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Sample records for cleave complex clustered

  1. In situ investigation of the mobility of small gold clusters on cleaved MgO surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metois, J. J.; Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1976-01-01

    The mobility of small clusters of gold (about 10 A in diameter) on electron-beam-cleaved MgO surfaces was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy under controlled vacuum and temperature conditions. During the first 10 min following a deposition at room temperature, over 10 per cent of the crystallites moved over short distances (about 20 A) discontinuously, with a velocity greater than 150 A/sec. Eighty per cent of the mobility events were characterized by the avoidance of proximity of other crystallites, and this was tentatively explained as the result of repulsive elastic forces between the interacting crystallites.

  2. A cationic gold complex cleaves BArF24.

    PubMed

    Weber, Simone G; Zahner, David; Rominger, Frank; Straub, Bernd F

    2012-11-28

    A sterically shielded cationic NHC gold complex IPr**Au-BArF(24) without solvent coordination has been prepared in situ in CH(2)Cl(2). The monovalent transition metal electrophile, a "soft proton", heterolytically activates the C-B bond of the weakly coordinating counterion tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate at room temperature. PMID:23073224

  3. Cleaved thioredoxin fusion protein enables the crystallization of poorly soluble ERα in complex with synthetic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Cura, Vincent; Gangloff, Monique; Eiler, Sylvia; Moras, Dino; Ruff, Marc

    2008-01-01

    A new crystallization strategy: the presence of cleaved thioredoxin fusion is critical for crystallization of the estrogen nuclear receptor ligand binding domain in complex with synthetic ligands. This novel technique should be regarded as an interesting alternative for crystallization of difficult proteins. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human oestrogen receptor α was produced in Escherichia coli as a cleavable thioredoxin (Trx) fusion in order to improve solubility. Crystallization trials with either cleaved and purified LBD or with the purified fusion protein both failed to produce crystals. In another attempt, Trx was not removed from the LBD after endoproteolytic cleavage and its presence promoted nucleation and subsequent crystal growth, which allowed the structure determination of two different LBD–ligand–coactivator peptide complexes at 2.3 Å resolution. This technique is likely to be applicable to other low-solubility proteins.

  4. Micro-ultrasonic cleaving of cell clusters by laser-generated focused ultrasound and its mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Lee, Taehwa; Guo, L. Jay

    2013-01-01

    Laser-generated focused ultrasound (LGFU) is a unique modality that can produce single-pulsed cavitation and strong local disturbances on a tight focal spot (<100 μm). We utilize LGFU as a non-contact, non-thermal, high-precision tool to fractionate and cleave cell clusters cultured on glass substrates. Fractionation processes are investigated in detail, which confirms distinct cell behaviors in the focal center and the periphery of LGFU spot. For better understanding of local disturbances under LGFU, we use a high-speed laser-flash shadowgraphy technique and then fully visualize instantaneous microscopic processes from the ultrasound wave focusing to the micro-bubble collapse. Based on these visual evidences, we discuss possible mechanisms responsible for the focal and peripheral disruptions, such as a liquid jet-induced wall shear stress and shock emissions due to bubble collapse. The ultrasonic micro-fractionation is readily available for in vitro cell patterning and harvesting. Moreover, it is significant as a preliminary step towards high-precision surgery applications in future. PMID:24010006

  5. Cleaved thioredoxin fusion protein enables the crystallization of poorly soluble ERα in complex with synthetic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Vincent; Gangloff, Monique; Eiler, Sylvia; Moras, Dino; Ruff, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human oestrogen receptor α was produced in Escherichia coli as a cleavable thioredoxin (Trx) fusion in order to improve solubility. Crystallization trials with either cleaved and purified LBD or with the purified fusion protein both failed to produce crystals. In another attempt, Trx was not removed from the LBD after endoproteolytic cleavage and its presence promoted nucleation and subsequent crystal growth, which allowed the structure determination of two different LBD–ligand–coactivator peptide complexes at 2.3 Å resolution. This technique is likely to be applicable to other low-solubility proteins. PMID:18097104

  6. Effective DNA binding and cleaving tendencies of malonic acid coupled transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Utthra, Ponnukalai Ponya; Kumaravel, Ganesan; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-11-01

    Eight transition metal complexes were designed to achieve maximum biological efficacy. They were characterized by elemental analysis and various other spectroscopic techniques. The monomeric complexes were found to espouse octahedral geometry and non-electrolytic nature. The DNA interaction propensity of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, cyclic voltammetry, and viscometric techniques revealed intercalation as the possible binding mode. Fascinatingly, the complexes were found to exhibit greater binding strength than that of the free ligands. A strong hypochromism and a slight red shift were exhibited by complex 5 among the other complexes. The intrinsic binding constant values of all the complexes compared to cisplatin reveal that they are excellent metallonucleases than that of cisplatin. The complexes were also shown to reveal displacement of the ethidium bromide, a strong intercalator using fluorescence titrations. Gel electrophoresis was used to divulge the competence of the complexes in cleaving the supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA. From the results, it is concluded that the complexes, especially 5, are excellent chemical nucleases in the presence of H2O2. Furthermore, the in vitro antimicrobial screening of the complexes exposes that these complexes are excellent antimicrobial agents. Overall the effect of coligands is evident from the results of all the investigations.

  7. Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry of Fe(II) and Fe(III) Quinonemonooxime Complexes and Their DNA Cleaving Activities

    PubMed Central

    Murugkar, Anupa; Deobagkar, Deepti

    1999-01-01

    Iron(II) and iron(III) complexes of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-o-benzoquinonemonooxime were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical studies. Their ability to cleave DNA has been investigated under aerobic conditions at room temperature and in the presence and absence of H2 O2. The plasmid DNA pBR322 was effectively cleaved by these complexes in a concentration dependant manner. PMID:18475885

  8. Nucleotide cleaving agents and method

    DOEpatents

    Que, Jr., Lawrence; Hanson, Richard S.; Schnaith, Leah M. T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a unique series of nucleotide cleaving agents and a method for cleaving a nucleotide sequence, whether single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA, using and a cationic metal complex having at least one polydentate ligand to cleave the nucleotide sequence phosphate backbone to yield a hydroxyl end and a phosphate end.

  9. A nickel complex cleaves uridine in folded RNA structures: application to E. coli tmRNA and related engineered molecules.

    PubMed

    Hickerson, R P; Watkins-Sims, C D; Burrows, C J; Atkins, J F; Gesteland, R F; Felden, B

    1998-06-12

    To gain more insight about Escherichia coli tmRNA structure, NiCR, a square planar macrocyclic nickel (II) complex, was used to probe guanine N7 exposure. On the basis of this additional structural information, a refined secondary structure of the molecule is proposed. In addition to its known specificity for guanine N7, we show here that the chemical probe can also cleave at specific uridine residues. In contrast to the alkaline-labile modification of guanine, the reactivity of NiCR at these uridine residues results in direct strand scission. To better characterize the uridine cleavage sites and assess the importance of the RNA structure for the reaction to occur, smaller RNA molecules derived from one pseudoknot (PK4) of E. coli tmRNA containing two uridine cleavage sites were engineered and probed. It is shown that this pseudoknot can fold by itself in solution and that the expected uridine residues are also cleaved by the nickel complex, suggesting that only a local sequence and/or structural context is required for cleavage. In E. coli tmRNA, the five uridine cleavage sites are located in double-stranded regions. These sites contain a G-U wobble base-pair and a downstream uridine which is cleaved. Using smaller RNAs derived from one stem of PK4, systematic changes in the proposed recognition motif indicate that the G-U pair is required for cleavage. Furthermore, there is no cleavage if the G-U pair is reversed. If the recognition motif is moved within the stem, the cleavage site moves accordingly. Additionally, if the recognition motif is changed such that the G-U pair is flanked by two uridine residues, the reactivity occurs only at the 3' uridine. Radical quenching studies have indicated that sulfate radical, as in the case of guanine oxidation, is involved in uridine oxidation. Although additional studies are required to better characterize the reaction, this paper reports a novel specificity for a chemical probe which may be useful for investigating

  10. Cluster algorithms and computational complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuenan

    Cluster algorithms for the 2D Ising model with a staggered field have been studied and a new cluster algorithm for path sampling has been worked out. The complexity properties of Bak-Seppen model and the Growing network model have been studied by using the Computational Complexity Theory. The dynamic critical behavior of the two-replica cluster algorithm is studied. Several versions of the algorithm are applied to the two-dimensional, square lattice Ising model with a staggered field. The dynamic exponent for the full algorithm is found to be less than 0.5. It is found that odd translations of one replica with respect to the other together with global flips are essential for obtaining a small value of the dynamic exponent. The path sampling problem for the 1D Ising model is studied using both a local algorithm and a novel cluster algorithm. The local algorithm is extremely inefficient at low temperature, where the integrated autocorrelation time is found to be proportional to the fourth power of correlation length. The dynamic exponent of the cluster algorithm is found to be zero and therefore proved to be much more efficient than the local algorithm. The parallel computational complexity of the Bak-Sneppen evolution model is studied. It is shown that Bak-Sneppen histories can be generated by a massively parallel computer in a time that is polylog in the length of the history, which means that the logical depth of producing a Bak-Sneppen history is exponentially less than the length of the history. The parallel dynamics for generating Bak-Sneppen histories is contrasted to standard Bak-Sneppen dynamics. The parallel computational complexity of the Growing Network model is studied. The growth of the network with linear kernels is shown to be not complex and an algorithm with polylog parallel running time is found. The growth of the network with gamma ≥ 2 super-linear kernels can be realized by a randomized parallel algorithm with polylog expected running time.

  11. Cleaving DNA with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Nir; Balkhi, Shameelah R.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1998-03-01

    A DNA structure is described that can cleave single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides in the presence of ionic copper. This ``deoxyribozyme'' can self-cleave or can operate as a bimolecular complex that simultaneously makes use of duplex and triplex interactions to bind and cleave separate DNA substrates. Bimolecular deoxyribozyme-mediated strand scission proceeds with a kobs of 0.2 min-1, whereas the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction could not be detected. The duplex and triplex recognition domains can be altered, making possible the targeted cleavage of single-stranded DNAs with different nucleotide sequences. Several small synthetic DNAs were made to function as simple ``restriction enzymes'' for the site-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA.

  12. Crystal structure and stability of gyrase–fluoroquinolone cleaved complexes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Benjamin H.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects one-third of the world’s population and in 2013 accounted for 1.5 million deaths. Fluoroquinolone antibacterials, which target DNA gyrase, are critical agents used to halt the progression from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to extensively resistant disease; however, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging and new ways to bypass resistance are required. To better explain known differences in fluoroquinolone action, the crystal structures of the WT Mtb DNA gyrase cleavage core and a fluoroquinolone-sensitized mutant were determined in complex with DNA and five fluoroquinolones. The structures, ranging from 2.4- to 2.6-Å resolution, show that the intrinsically low susceptibility of Mtb to fluoroquinolones correlates with a reduction in contacts to the water shell of an associated magnesium ion, which bridges fluoroquinolone–gyrase interactions. Surprisingly, the structural data revealed few differences in fluoroquinolone–enzyme contacts from drugs that have very different activities against Mtb. By contrast, a stability assay using purified components showed a clear relationship between ternary complex reversibility and inhibitory activities reported with cultured cells. Collectively, our data indicate that the stability of fluoroquinolone/DNA interactions is a major determinant of fluoroquinolone activity and that moieties that have been appended to the C7 position of different quinolone scaffolds do not take advantage of specific contacts that might be made with the enzyme. These concepts point to new approaches for developing quinolone-class compounds that have increased potency against Mtb and the ability to overcome resistance. PMID:26792525

  13. Crystal structure and stability of gyrase-fluoroquinolone cleaved complexes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Blower, Tim R; Williamson, Benjamin H; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M

    2016-02-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects one-third of the world's population and in 2013 accounted for 1.5 million deaths. Fluoroquinolone antibacterials, which target DNA gyrase, are critical agents used to halt the progression from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to extensively resistant disease; however, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging and new ways to bypass resistance are required. To better explain known differences in fluoroquinolone action, the crystal structures of the WT Mtb DNA gyrase cleavage core and a fluoroquinolone-sensitized mutant were determined in complex with DNA and five fluoroquinolones. The structures, ranging from 2.4- to 2.6-Å resolution, show that the intrinsically low susceptibility of Mtb to fluoroquinolones correlates with a reduction in contacts to the water shell of an associated magnesium ion, which bridges fluoroquinolone-gyrase interactions. Surprisingly, the structural data revealed few differences in fluoroquinolone-enzyme contacts from drugs that have very different activities against Mtb. By contrast, a stability assay using purified components showed a clear relationship between ternary complex reversibility and inhibitory activities reported with cultured cells. Collectively, our data indicate that the stability of fluoroquinolone/DNA interactions is a major determinant of fluoroquinolone activity and that moieties that have been appended to the C7 position of different quinolone scaffolds do not take advantage of specific contacts that might be made with the enzyme. These concepts point to new approaches for developing quinolone-class compounds that have increased potency against Mtb and the ability to overcome resistance. PMID:26792525

  14. A non-B-DNA structure at the Bcl-2 major breakpoint region is cleaved by the RAG complex.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Swanson, Patrick C; Wu, Xiantuo; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Lieber, Michael R

    2004-03-01

    The causes of spontaneous chromosomal translocations in somatic cells of biological organisms are largely unknown, although double-strand DNA breaks are required in all proposed mechanisms. The most common chromosomal abnormality in human cancer is the reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 14 and 18 (t(14;18)), which occurs in follicular lymphomas. The break at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus on chromosome 14 is an interruption of the normal V(D)J recombination process. But the breakage on chromosome 18, at the Bcl-2 gene, occurs within a confined 150-base-pair region (the major breakpoint region or Mbr) for reasons that have remained enigmatic. We have reproduced key features of the translocation process on an episome that propagates in human cells. The RAG complex--which is the normal enzyme for DNA cleavage at V, D or J segments--nicks the Bcl-2 Mbr in vitro and in vivo in a manner that reflects the pattern of the chromosomal translocations; however, the Mbr is not a V(D)J recombination signal. Rather the Bcl-2 Mbr assumes a non-B-form DNA structure within the chromosomes of human cells at 20-30% of alleles. Purified DNA assuming this structure contains stable regions of single-strandedness, which correspond well to the translocation regions in patients. Hence, a stable non-B-DNA structure in the human genome appears to be the basis for the fragility of the Bcl-2 Mbr, and the RAG complex is able to cleave this structure. PMID:14999286

  15. Poliovirus protease 3C (P3-7c) does not cleave P220 of the eucaryotic mRNA cap-binding protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K A; Edery, I; Hanecak, R; Wimmer, E; Sonenberg, N

    1985-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells by poliovirus results in proteolysis of the large subunit (P220) of the cap-binding protein complex. This is believed to cause the rapid shut-off of host protein synthesis during poliovirus infection. In this communication we examined the possible involvement of poliovirus proteins 3C (a proteinase) and 2C in cleavage of P220. Using antisera against these two viral polypeptides, we were unable to inhibit proteolysis of P220 in an in vitro assay. These results indicate that viral proteins 3C and 2C are not directly involved in cleaving P220 and hence do not cause shut-off of cellular protein synthesis. Images PMID:2991572

  16. CLUSTERED K+ CHANNEL COMPLEXES IN AXONS

    PubMed Central

    Rasband, Matthew N.

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels regulate diverse neuronal properties including action potential threshold, amplitude, and duration, frequency of firing, neurotransmitter release, and resting membrane potential. In axons, Kv channels are clustered at a variety of functionally important sites including axon initial segments, juxtaparanodes of myelinated axons, nodes of Ranvier, and cerebellar basket cell terminals. These channels are part of larger protein complexes that include cell adhesion molecules and scaffolding proteins. These interacting proteins play important roles in recruiting K+ channels to distinct axonal domains. Here, I review the composition, functions, and mechanism of localization of these K+ channel complexes in axons. PMID:20816921

  17. High Fat Diet Enhances β-Site Cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) via Promoting β-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1/Adaptor Protein 2/Clathrin Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Maesako, Masato; Uemura, Maiko; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Sasaki, Kazuki; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Noda, Yasuha; Ueda, Karin; Asada-Utsugi, Megumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Okawa, Katsuya; Ihara, Masafumi; Shimohama, Shun; Uemura, Kengo; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are risk factors of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported that a high fat diet (HFD) promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage by β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) without increasing BACE1 levels in APP transgenic mice. However, the detailed mechanism had remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that HFD promotes BACE1/Adaptor protein-2 (AP-2)/clathrin complex formation by increasing AP-2 levels in APP transgenic mice. In Swedish APP overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as well as in SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of AP-2 promoted the formation of BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, increasing the level of the soluble form of APP β (sAPPβ). On the other hand, mutant D495R BACE1, which inhibits formation of this trimeric complex, was shown to decrease the level of sAPPβ. Overexpression of AP-2 promoted the internalization of BACE1 from the cell surface, thus reducing the cell surface BACE1 level. As such, we concluded that HFD may induce the formation of the BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, which is followed by its transport of BACE1 from the cell surface to the intracellular compartments. These events might be associated with the enhancement of β-site cleavage of APP in APP transgenic mice. Here we present evidence that HFD, by regulation of subcellular trafficking of BACE1, promotes APP cleavage. PMID:26414661

  18. Detecting complex network modularity by dynamical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaletti, S.; Ivanchenko, M.; Latora, V.; Pluchino, A.; Rapisarda, A.

    2007-04-01

    Based on cluster desynchronization properties of phase oscillators, we introduce an efficient method for the detection and identification of modules in complex networks. The performance of the algorithm is tested on computer generated and real-world networks whose modular structure is already known or has been studied by means of other methods. The algorithm attains a high level of precision, especially when the modular units are very mixed and hardly detectable by the other methods, with a computational effort O(KN) on a generic graph with N nodes and K links.

  19. Calpain Cleaves Most Components in the Multiple Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complex and Affects Their Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hui-Yan; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Sun, Wei-Cheng; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-01

    Nine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and three scaffold proteins form a super multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) in the human cytoplasm. Domains that have been added progressively to MSC components during evolution are linked by unstructured flexible peptides, producing an elongated and multiarmed MSC structure that is easily attacked by proteases in vivo. A yeast two-hybrid screen for proteins interacting with LeuRS, a representative MSC member, identified calpain 2, a calcium-activated neutral cysteine protease. Calpain 2 and calpain 1 could partially hydrolyze most MSC components to generate specific fragments that resembled those reported previously. The cleavage sites of calpain in ArgRS, GlnRS, and p43 were precisely mapped. After cleavage, their N-terminal regions were removed. Sixty-three amino acid residues were removed from the N terminus of ArgRS to form ArgRSΔN63; GlnRS formed GlnRSΔN198, and p43 formed p43ΔN106. GlnRSΔN198 had a much weaker affinity for its substrates, tRNAGln and glutamine. p43ΔN106 was the same as the previously reported p43-derived apoptosis-released factor. The formation of p43ΔN106 by calpain depended on Ca2+ and could be specifically inhibited by calpeptin and by RNAi of the regulatory subunit of calpain in vivo. These results showed, for the first time, that calpain plays an essential role in dissociating the MSC and might regulate the canonical and non-canonical functions of certain components of the MSC. PMID:26324710

  20. Calpain Cleaves Most Components in the Multiple Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complex and Affects Their Functions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hui-Yan; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Sun, Wei-Cheng; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-10-23

    Nine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and three scaffold proteins form a super multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) in the human cytoplasm. Domains that have been added progressively to MSC components during evolution are linked by unstructured flexible peptides, producing an elongated and multiarmed MSC structure that is easily attacked by proteases in vivo. A yeast two-hybrid screen for proteins interacting with LeuRS, a representative MSC member, identified calpain 2, a calcium-activated neutral cysteine protease. Calpain 2 and calpain 1 could partially hydrolyze most MSC components to generate specific fragments that resembled those reported previously. The cleavage sites of calpain in ArgRS, GlnRS, and p43 were precisely mapped. After cleavage, their N-terminal regions were removed. Sixty-three amino acid residues were removed from the N terminus of ArgRS to form ArgRSΔN63; GlnRS formed GlnRSΔN198, and p43 formed p43ΔN106. GlnRSΔN198 had a much weaker affinity for its substrates, tRNA(Gln) and glutamine. p43ΔN106 was the same as the previously reported p43-derived apoptosis-released factor. The formation of p43ΔN106 by calpain depended on Ca(2+) and could be specifically inhibited by calpeptin and by RNAi of the regulatory subunit of calpain in vivo. These results showed, for the first time, that calpain plays an essential role in dissociating the MSC and might regulate the canonical and non-canonical functions of certain components of the MSC. PMID:26324710

  1. Adaptive and Unstructured Mesh Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, Jonathan R.; Sastry, Shankar P.; Levine, Joshua A.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new strategy for boundary conforming meshing that decouples the problem of building tetrahedra of proper size and shape from the problem of conforming to complex, non-manifold boundaries. This approach is motivated by the observation that while several methods exist for adaptive tetrahedral meshing, they typically have difficulty at geometric boundaries. The proposed strategy avoids this conflict by extracting the boundary conforming constraint into a secondary step. We first build a background mesh having a desired set of tetrahedral properties, and then use a generalized stenciling method to divide, or “cleave”, these elements to get a set of conforming tetrahedra, while limiting the impacts cleaving has on element quality. In developing this new framework, we make several technical contributions including a new method for building graded tetrahedral meshes as well as a generalization of the isosurface stuffing and lattice cleaving algorithms to unstructured background meshes. PMID:26137171

  2. X-RAY STAR CLUSTERS IN THE CARINA COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Povich, Matthew S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; King, Robert R.; Montmerle, Thierry; Preibisch, Thomas; Smith, Nathan; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wang Junfeng; Wolk, Scott; Zinnecker, Hans

    2011-05-01

    The distribution of young stars found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) is examined for clustering structure. X-ray surveys are advantageous for identifying young stellar populations compared to optical and infrared surveys in suffering less contamination from nebular emission and Galactic field stars. The analysis is based on smoothed maps of a spatially complete subsample of {approx}3000 brighter X-ray sources classified as Carina members and {approx}10,000 stars from the full CCCP sample. The principal known clusters are recovered, and some additional smaller groups are identified. No rich embedded clusters are present, although a number of sparse groups are found. The CCCP reveals considerable complexity in clustering properties. The Trumpler 14 and 15 clusters have rich stellar populations in unimodal, centrally concentrated structures several parsecs across. Non-spherical internal structure is seen, and large-scale low surface density distributions surround these rich clusters. Trumpler 16, in contrast, is comprised of several smaller clusters within a circular boundary. Collinder 228 is a third type of cluster which extends over tens of parsecs with many sparse compact groups likely arising from triggered star formation processes. A widely dispersed, but highly populous, distribution of X-ray stars across the {approx}50 pc CCCP mosaic supports a model of past generations of star formation in the region. Collinder 234, a group of massive stars without an associated cluster of pre-main-sequence stars, may be part of this dispersed population.

  3. X-ray Star Clusters in the Carina Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Povich, Matthew S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; King, Robert R.; Montmerle, Thierry; Preibisch, Thomas; Smith, Nathan; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wang, Junfeng; Wolk, Scott; Zinnecker, Hans

    2011-05-01

    The distribution of young stars found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) is examined for clustering structure. X-ray surveys are advantageous for identifying young stellar populations compared to optical and infrared surveys in suffering less contamination from nebular emission and Galactic field stars. The analysis is based on smoothed maps of a spatially complete subsample of ~3000 brighter X-ray sources classified as Carina members and ~10,000 stars from the full CCCP sample. The principal known clusters are recovered, and some additional smaller groups are identified. No rich embedded clusters are present, although a number of sparse groups are found. The CCCP reveals considerable complexity in clustering properties. The Trumpler 14 and 15 clusters have rich stellar populations in unimodal, centrally concentrated structures several parsecs across. Non-spherical internal structure is seen, and large-scale low surface density distributions surround these rich clusters. Trumpler 16, in contrast, is comprised of several smaller clusters within a circular boundary. Collinder 228 is a third type of cluster which extends over tens of parsecs with many sparse compact groups likely arising from triggered star formation processes. A widely dispersed, but highly populous, distribution of X-ray stars across the ~50 pc CCCP mosaic supports a model of past generations of star formation in the region. Collinder 234, a group of massive stars without an associated cluster of pre-main-sequence stars, may be part of this dispersed population.

  4. Symmetries, Cluster Synchronization, and Isolated Desynchronization in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Louis

    2015-03-01

    Many networks are observed to produce patterns of synchronized clusters, but it has been difficult to predict these clusters in general or understand the conditions for their formation. We show the intimate connection between network symmetry and cluster synchronization. We apply computational group theory to reveal the clusters and determine their stability. In complex networks the symmetries can number in the millions, billions, and more. The connection between symmetry and cluster synchronization is experimentally explored using an electro-optic network. We observe and explain a surprising and common phenomenon (isolated desynchronization) in which some clusters lose synchrony while leaving others connected to them synchronized. We show the isolated desynchronization is intimately related to the decomposition of the group of symmetries into subgroups. The results could guide the design of new power grid systems or lead to new understanding of the dynamical behavior of networks ranging from neural to social.

  5. Multiscale ensemble clustering for finding modules in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Youn; Hwang, Dong-Uk; Ko, Tae-Wook

    2012-02-01

    The identification of modules in complex networks is important for the understanding of systems. Here, we propose an ensemble clustering method incorporating node groupings in various sizes and the sequential removal of weak ties between nodes which are rarely grouped together. This method successfully detects modules in various networks, such as hierarchical random networks and the American college football network, with known modular structures. Some of the results are compared with those obtained by modularity optimization and K-means clustering.

  6. Water clusters in mixed ionic complexes with metal dipicolinate anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Babulal; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2013-02-01

    Formations of three different types of hydrogen-bonded water clusters in the interstices of mixed ionic complexes with metal dipicolinate anions are reported. In the complex [Co(phen)2(H2O)2][Zn(dpa)2]ṡ7H2O (1) (where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, dpa = dipicolinate), both the cation and anion is hydrophilic in nature, exhibits an unusual 2D infinite cyclic water decamers (H2O)10 stabilized by four identical zinc dipicolinato complex anions. Modulating the cationic unit to a hydrophobic environment by replacing the aqua ligand with 2,2'-bipyridine ligand the water cluster can be modified. The complex [Ni(phen)2ṡbpy][Co(dpa)2]ṡ8H2O (2) (where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) has unprecedented discrete hydrogen bonded hexadecameric (H2O)16 water clusters encapsulated between eight anionic units. A rare wavelike infinite water chain (H2O)n is observed in complex [Co(phen)3][Mn(dpa)2]ṡ12H2O (3), in this case the water chain fills the interstitial space created by packing of large hydrophilic anionic units and hydrophobic cationic units. The reported clusters are indefinitely stable in their respective complex at ambient temperature, but the water loss is irreversible when thermally decomposed.

  7. Mathematical modelling of complex contagion on clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'sullivan, David J.; O'Keeffe, Gary; Fennell, Peter; Gleeson, James

    2015-09-01

    The spreading of behavior, such as the adoption of a new innovation, is influenced bythe structure of social networks that interconnect the population. In the experiments of Centola (Science, 2010), adoption of new behavior was shown to spread further and faster across clustered-lattice networks than across corresponding random networks. This implies that the “complex contagion” effects of social reinforcement are important in such diffusion, in contrast to “simple” contagion models of disease-spread which predict that epidemics would grow more efficiently on random networks than on clustered networks. To accurately model complex contagion on clustered networks remains a challenge because the usual assumptions (e.g. of mean-field theory) regarding tree-like networks are invalidated by the presence of triangles in the network; the triangles are, however, crucial to the social reinforcement mechanism, which posits an increased probability of a person adopting behavior that has been adopted by two or more neighbors. In this paper we modify the analytical approach that was introduced by Hebert-Dufresne et al. (Phys. Rev. E, 2010), to study disease-spread on clustered networks. We show how the approximation method can be adapted to a complex contagion model, and confirm the accuracy of the method with numerical simulations. The analytical results of the model enable us to quantify the level of social reinforcement that is required to observe—as in Centola’s experiments—faster diffusion on clustered topologies than on random networks.

  8. Cleaved-edge-overgrowth nanogap electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luber, Sebastian M.; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Tornow, Marc

    2011-02-01

    We present a method to fabricate multiple metal nanogap electrodes of tailored width and distance in parallel, on the cleaved plane of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The three-dimensional patterned structures are obtained by a combination of molecular-beam-epitaxial regrowth on a crystal facet, using the cleaved-edge-overgrowth (CEO) method, and subsequent wet selective etching and metallization steps. SEM and AFM studies reveal smooth and co-planar electrodes of width and distance of the order of 10 nm. Preliminary electrical characterization indicates electrical gap insulation in the 100 MΩ range with kΩ lead resistance. We propose our methodology to realize multiple electrode geometries that would allow investigation of the electrical conductivity of complex nanoscale objects such as branched organic molecules.

  9. Deciphering the global organization of clustering in real complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Serrano, M. Ángeles; Beiró, Mariano G.; Alvarez-Hamelin, J. Ignacio; Boguñá, Marián

    2013-01-01

    We uncover the global organization of clustering in real complex networks. To this end, we ask whether triangles in real networks organize as in maximally random graphs with given degree and clustering distributions, or as in maximally ordered graph models where triangles are forced into modules. The answer comes by way of exploring m-core landscapes, where the m-core is defined, akin to the k-core, as the maximal subgraph with edges participating in at least m triangles. This property defines a set of nested subgraphs that, contrarily to k-cores, is able to distinguish between hierarchical and modular architectures. We find that the clustering organization in real networks is neither completely random nor ordered although, surprisingly, it is more random than modular. This supports the idea that the structure of real networks may in fact be the outcome of self-organized processes based on local optimization rules, in contrast to global optimization principles. PMID:23982757

  10. Stellar Clusters in the NGC 6334 Star-Forming Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Martin, Amanda L.; McNeill, Collin J.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2009-07-01

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, has not been well sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95% of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20,000-30,000 pre-main-sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with ~10 distinct star clusters. The heavily obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio H II regions. The lightly obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formation in the complex has proceeded over millions of years. A number of extraordinarily heavily absorbed X-ray sources are associated with the active regions of star formation.

  11. STELLAR CLUSTERS IN THE NGC 6334 STAR-FORMING COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Martin, Amanda L.; McNeill, Collin J.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2009-07-15

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, has not been well sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95% of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20,000-30,000 pre-main-sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with {approx}10 distinct star clusters. The heavily obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio H II regions. The lightly obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formation in the complex has proceeded over millions of years. A number of extraordinarily heavily absorbed X-ray sources are associated with the active regions of star formation.

  12. UV and VUV Ionization of Organic Molecules, Clusters, and Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marksteiner, Markus; Haslinger, Philipp; Sclafani, Michele; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2009-08-01

    The generation of organic particle beams is studied in combination with photoionization using UV radiation at 266 nm and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at 157 nm. Single-photon ionization with pulsed VUV light turns out to be sensitive enough to detect various large neutral biomolecular complexes ranging from metal-amino acid complexes to nucleotide clusters and aggregates of polypeptides. Different biomolecular clusters are shown to exhibit rather specific binding characteristics with regard to the various metals that are codesorbed in the source. We also find that the ion signal of gramicidin can be increased by a factor of 15 when the photon energy is increased from 4.66 to 7.9 eV.

  13. Cage Opening of a Carborane Ligand by Metal Cluster Complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Kiprotich, Joseph; Peryshkov, Dmitry V; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Os3 (CO)10 (NCMe)2 with closo-o-C2 B10 H10 has yielded two interconvertible isomers Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -4,5,9-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 a) and Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -3,4,8-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 b) formed by the loss of the two NCMe ligands and one CO ligand from the Os3 cluster. Two BH bonds of the o-C2 B10 H10 were activated in its addition to the osmium cluster. A second triosmium cluster was added to the 1 a/1 b mixture to yield the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)2 (μ3 -4,5,9-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H7 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)3 (2) that contains two triosmium triangles attached to the same carborane cage. When heated, 2 was transformed to the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)(μ3 -3,4,8-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H8 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H) (3) by a novel opening of the carborane cage with loss of H2 . PMID:26971388

  14. The globular cluster system of NGC 1316. III. Kinematic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richtler, T.; Hilker, M.; Kumar, B.; Bassino, L. P.; Gómez, M.; Dirsch, B.

    2014-09-01

    discernable out to 3' radius. The kinematic major axis of NGC 1316 is misaligned by about 10° with the photometric major axis, which might indicate a triaxial symmetry. A simple spherical model like that suggested by dynamical analyses of planetary nebulae also reproduces the velocity dispersions of the faint globular clusters. Conclusions: The central dark matter density of the present model resembles a giant elliptical galaxy. This contradicts population properties which indicate spiral galaxies as pre-merger components. Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) would provide a solution, but the kinematical complexity of NGC 1316 does not allow a really firm conclusion. However, NGC 1316 might anyway be a problem for a cold dark matter scenario, if the high dark matter density in the inner region is confirmed in future studies. Based on observations obtained with the VLT at ESO, Cerro Paranal, Chile under the programme 078.B-0856.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Knockout driven reactions in complex molecules and their clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatchell, Michael; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Energetic ions lose some of their kinetic energy when interacting with electrons or nuclei in matter. Here, we discuss combined experimental and theoretical studies on such impulse driven reactions in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fullerenes, and pure or mixed clusters of these molecules. These studies show that the nature of excitation is important for how complex molecular systems respond to ion/atom impact. Rutherford-like nuclear scattering processes may lead to prompt atom knockout and formation of highly reactive fragments, while heating of the molecular electron clouds in general lead to formation of more stable and less reactive fragments. In this topical review, we focus on recent studies of knockout driven reactions, and present new calculations of the angular dependent threshold (displacement) energies for such processes in PAHs. The so-formed fragments may efficiently form covalent bonds with neighboring molecules in clusters. These unique molecular growth processes may be important in astrophysical environments such as low velocity shock waves.

  16. Adaptive clustering algorithm for community detection in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhenqing; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Community structure is common in various real-world networks; methods or algorithms for detecting such communities in complex networks have attracted great attention in recent years. We introduced a different adaptive clustering algorithm capable of extracting modules from complex networks with considerable accuracy and robustness. In this approach, each node in a network acts as an autonomous agent demonstrating flocking behavior where vertices always travel toward their preferable neighboring groups. An optimal modular structure can emerge from a collection of these active nodes during a self-organization process where vertices constantly regroup. In addition, we show that our algorithm appears advantageous over other competing methods (e.g., the Newman-fast algorithm) through intensive evaluation. The applications in three real-world networks demonstrate the superiority of our algorithm to find communities that are parallel with the appropriate organization in reality. PMID:18999501

  17. Petaflop hydrokinetic simulations of complex flows on massive GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, M.; Bisson, M.; Fatica, M.; Melchionna, S.; Succi, S.

    2013-02-01

    We present recent extensions of the MUPHY computational framework for multi-scale simulation of complex bio-fluidic phenomena in real-life geometries. The new framework, which builds on concurrent advances of the computational modeling and parallelization techniques, is able to simulate suspensions with several hundreds of millions of finite-size bodies, interacting with each other and with the surrounding fluid, in geometries of realistic anatomic complexity. Blood flow through the human coronary arteries, at physiological hematocrit values, is simulated with a spatial resolution of 10 micrometers, comparable with the size of red blood cells. The simulation exhibits excellent parallel scalability on a cluster of 4000 M2050 Nvidia GPUs, with an aggregate performance close to 1 Petaflop/s.

  18. Radical AdoMet enzymes in complex metal cluster biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Duffus, Benjamin R; Hamilton, Trinity L; Shepard, Eric M; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2012-11-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) enzymes comprise a large superfamily of proteins that engage in a diverse series of biochemical transformations through generation of the highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate. Recent advances into the biosynthesis of unique iron-sulfur (FeS)-containing cofactors such as the H-cluster in [FeFe]-hydrogenase, the FeMo-co in nitrogenase, as well as the iron-guanylylpyridinol (FeGP) cofactor in [Fe]-hydrogenase have implicated new roles for radical AdoMet enzymes in the biosynthesis of complex inorganic cofactors. Radical AdoMet enzymes in conjunction with scaffold proteins engage in modifying ubiquitous FeS precursors into unique clusters, through novel amino acid decomposition and sulfur insertion reactions. The ability of radical AdoMet enzymes to modify common metal centers to unusual metal cofactors may provide important clues into the stepwise evolution of these and other complex bioinorganic catalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology. PMID:22269887

  19. Synthesis of supramolecular iron (III) complexes by cluster aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, Elisa Joy

    2000-12-01

    Biologically, iron is a ubiquitous and versatile metal, found in the active sites of proteins responsible for both oxygen and electron transport. Multinuclear iron-oxo proteins are either dinuclear, or contain many iron atoms; the [Fe2O] unit occurs in hemerythrin (Hr), ribonucleotide reductase, purple acid phosphatase (POP) and methane monooxygenase (MMO), whereas ferritin (Ft) can store up to 4500 iron atoms. Iron storage and transport are essential for protecting biological organisms from free iron, since free Fe(II) ions, will react with dioxygen to form destructive organic radicals, and free Fe(III) ions form insoluble iron hydroxide aggregates under physiological conditions. The tendency of iron to form molecular aggregates in systems containing water or alcohol, together with the fact that each iron atom possesses a large number of unpaired electrons (5 for high-spin FeIII) often results in products possessing large spin ground states (S). The current record-holder for iron is a Fe19 complex, with at least 33 unpaired electrons in the ground state (S = 33/2). Hence, iron is also important in the rapidly developing field of molecular magnetic materials. For these two reasons, the preparation of iron clusters with new topologies and properties has become a major goal of many synthetic inorganic groups, including our own. In this thesis work, synthetic and spectroscopic methods of inorganic coordination chemistry were used to achieve two different goals: firstly, to synthesize dinuclear iron complexes with the use of tetradentate ligands in order to study the magnetic interactions between the two metal centers; and secondly, to identify reactions and characterize the products whereby pre-formed iron oxide clusters undergo aggregation reactions to produce higher nuclearity products. The tetradentate ligands investigated were a bis-(beta-diketone) ligand L and a bis-bpy ligand L'. The reactions involving L and Fe(III) reagents produced complexes with a triple

  20. Unsaturated platinum-rhenium cluster complexes. Synthesis, structures and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Captain, Burjor; Smith, Mark D; Beddie, Chad; Hall, Michael B

    2007-05-01

    Two new compounds PtRe3(CO)12(PBut3)(micro-H)3, 9, and PtRe2(CO)9(PBut3)(micro-H)2, 10, were obtained from the reaction of Pt(PBut3)2 with Re3(CO)12(micro-H3), 8, at room temperature. Compound 9 contains a butterfly cluster of four metals formed by the insertion of the platinum atom from a Pt(PBut3) group into one of the hydride-bridged metal-metal bonds of 8. The three hydrido ligands are bridging ligands across each of three new Pt-Re bonds. Compound 10 contains a triangular PtRe2 cluster with two hydrido ligands; one bridges a Pt-Re bond, and the other bridges the Re-Re bond. The new compound Pt2Re2(CO)7(PBut3)2(micro-H)2, 11, was obtained from the reaction of 8 with Pt(PBut3)2 in hexane at reflux. Compound 11 was also obtained from 10 by reaction with an additional quantity of Pt(PBut3)2. Compound 11 contains a tetrahedral cluster of four metal atoms with two dynamically active hydrido ligands. A CO ligand on one of the two platinum atoms also exchanges between the two platinum atoms rapidly on the NMR time scale. Compound 11 is electronically unsaturated and was found to add hydrogen at room temperature to form the tetrahydrido cluster complex, Pt2Re2(CO)7(PBut3)2(micro-H)4, 12. Compound 12 has a structure similar to 11 but contains one triply bridging hydrido ligand, two edge bridging hydrido ligands, and one terminal hydrido ligand on one of the two platinum atoms. A kinetic isotope effect D/H of 1.5(1) was determined for the addition of H2 to 11. Hydrogen can be eliminated from 12 by heating to 97 degrees C or by the application of UV-vis irradiation at room temperature. Compound 12 adds CO at room temperature to yield the complex Pt2Re2(CO)8(PBut3)2(micro-H)4, 13, which contains a planar cluster of four metal atoms with a Pt-Pt bond and four edge bridging hydrido ligands. Compounds 11 and 12 react with Pt(PBut3)2 to yield the known five metal cluster complexes Pt3Re2(CO)6(PBut3)3(micro-H)2, 14, and Pt3Re2(CO)6(PBut3)3(micro-H)4, 15, respectively. Density

  1. Mono- and Dinuclear Macrocyclic Calcium Complexes as Platforms for Mixed-Metal Complexes and Clusters.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Emma A; Leeland, James W; Love, Jason B

    2016-01-19

    Mono- and dinuclear calcium complexes of the Schiff-base macrocycles H4L have been prepared and characterized spectroscopically and crystallographically. In the formation of Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)), Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), and Ca2(THF)4(L(2)), the ligand framework adopts a bowl-shaped conformation instead of the conventional wedge, Pacman-shaped structure as seen with the anthracenyl-hinged complex Ca2(py)5(L(3)). The mononuclear calcium complex Ca(THF)2(H2L(1)) reacts with various equivalents of LiN(SiMe3)2 to form calcium/alkali metal clusters and dinuclear transition metal complexes when reacted subsequently with transition metal salts. The dinuclear calcium complex Ca2(THF)2(μ-THF)(L(1)), when reacted with various equivalents of NaOH, is shown to act as a platform for the formation of calcium/alkali metal hydroxide clusters, displaying alternate wedged and bowl-shaped conformations. PMID:26709870

  2. Synthesis and characterization of reduced tungsten sulfide cluster complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiang.

    1991-06-27

    Reduction of tungsten(IV) chloride with metals was studied in order to find a high-yield and convenient preparation of {alpha}-tungsten (II) chloride. The reduction of tungsten(IV) chloride with iron metal proved to be the most convenient and reliable synthesis, with a good yield of 60%. The reactions between {alpha}-tungsten(II) chloride and sodium hydrosulfide were investigated. Complete substitution of sulfide for chloride in W{sub 6}Cl{sub 8}{sup 4+} was achieved in the presence of sodium n-butoxide in pyridine solution. Single crystals were grown at elevated temperature (200{degrees}C) in pyridine, and the structure of W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(py){sub 6} was determined by single crystal x-ray techniques. The triethylphosphine (PEt{sub 3}) and tetrahydrothiophene (THT) complexes of W{sub 6}S{sub 8} were established by ligand displacement of pyridine in W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(py){sub 6}. Structures for both W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(PEt{sub 3}){sub 6}. 1.44CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(THT){sub 6} were determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. These molecular complexes of the W{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster were also characterized by infrared spectroscopy. 86 refs., 19 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. ClusterViSu, a method for clustering of protein complexes by Voronoi tessellation in super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andronov, Leonid; Orlov, Igor; Lutz, Yves; Vonesch, Jean-Luc; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy (PALM, STORM etc.) provides a plethora of fluorescent signals in dense cellular environments which can be difficult to interpret. Here we describe ClusterViSu, a method for image reconstruction, visualization and quantification of labelled protein clusters, based on Voronoi tessellation of the individual fluorescence events. The general applicability of this clustering approach for the segmentation of super-resolution microscopy data, including for co-localization, is illustrated on a series of important biological objects such as chromatin complexes, RNA polymerase, nuclear pore complexes and microtubules. PMID:27068792

  4. FAINT FUZZY STAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 1023 AS REMNANTS OF MERGED STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bruens, R. C.; Kroupa, P.; Fellhauer, M. E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2009-09-10

    In the lenticular galaxy NGC 1023 a third population of globular clusters (GCs), called faint fuzzies (FFs), was discovered next to the blue and red GC populations by Larsen and Brodie. While these FFs have colors comparable to the red population, the new population is fainter, larger (R{sub eff}>7 pc) and, most importantly, shows clear signs of corotation with the galactic disk of NGC 1023. We present N-body simulations verifying the hypothesis that these disk-associated FFs are related to the young massive cluster complexes (CCs) observed by Bastian et al. in M51, who discovered a mass-radius relation for these CCs. Our models have an initial configuration based on the observations from M51 and are placed on various orbits in a galactic potential derived for NGC 1023. All computations end up with a stable object containing 10%-60% of the initial CC mass after an integration time of 5 Gyr. A conversion to visual magnitudes demonstrates that the resulting objects cover exactly the observed range for FFs. Moreover, the simulated objects show projected half-mass radii between 3.6 and 13.4 pc, in good agreement with the observed FF sizes. We conclude that objects like the young massive CCs in M51 are likely progenitors of the FFs observed in NGC 1023.

  5. Complexes and clusters of water relevant to atmospheric chemistry: H2O complexes with oxidants.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, Petr G; Ignatov, Stanislav K; Schrems, Otto

    2005-03-01

    Experimental observations and data from quantum chemical calculations on complexes between water molecules and small, oxygen-containing inorganic species that play an important role as oxidants in the atmosphere (O(1D), O(3P), O2(X3sigmag), O2(b1sigmag+), O3, HO, HOO, HOOO, and H2O2) are reviewed, with emphasis on their structure, hydrogen bonding, interaction energies, thermodynamic parameters, and infrared spectra. In recent years, weakly bound complexes containing water have increasingly attracted scientific attention. Water in all its phases is a major player in the absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation. Thus, complexes between water and other atmospheric species may have a perceivable influence on the radiative balance and contribute to the greenhouse effect, even though their concentrations are low. In addition, they can play an important role in the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere, particularly in the oxidation of trace gases. Apart from gas-phase complexes, the interactions of oxidants with ice surfaces have also received considerable advertency lately due to their importance in the chemistry of snow, ice clouds, and ice surfaces (e.g., ice shields in polar regions). In paleoclimate--respectively paleoenvironmental--studies, it is essential to understand the transfer processes from the atmosphere to the ice surface. Consequently, special attention is being paid here to the intercomparison of the properties of binary complexes and the complexes and clusters of more complicated compositions, including oxidants adsorbed on ice surfaces, where ice is considered a kind of large water cluster. Various facts concerning the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere (concentration profiles and possible influence on radical reactions in the atmosphere) are discussed. PMID:15799459

  6. On the complexity of some quadratic Euclidean 2-clustering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kel'manov, A. V.; Pyatkin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Some problems of partitioning a finite set of points of Euclidean space into two clusters are considered. In these problems, the following criteria are minimized: (1) the sum over both clusters of the sums of squared pairwise distances between the elements of the cluster and (2) the sum of the (multiplied by the cardinalities of the clusters) sums of squared distances from the elements of the cluster to its geometric center, where the geometric center (or centroid) of a cluster is defined as the mean value of the elements in that cluster. Additionally, another problem close to (2) is considered, where the desired center of one of the clusters is given as input, while the center of the other cluster is unknown (is the variable to be optimized) as in problem (2). Two variants of the problems are analyzed, in which the cardinalities of the clusters are (1) parts of the input or (2) optimization variables. It is proved that all the considered problems are strongly NP-hard and that, in general, there is no fully polynomial-time approximation scheme for them (unless P = NP).

  7. Cleaved thin-film probes for scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siahaan, T; Kurnosikov, O; Barcones, B; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-01-22

    We introduce an alternative type of probe for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Instead of using a needle-like tip made from a piece of metallic wire, a sharp-edged cleaved insulating substrate, which is initially covered by a thin conductive film, is used. The sharp tip is formed at the intersection of the two cleaved sides. Using this approach a variety of materials for STM probes can be used, and functionalization of STM probes is possible. The working principle of different probes made of metallic (Pt, Co, and CoB), indium-tin oxide, as well as Cu/Pt and Co/Pt multilayer films are demonstrated by STM imaging of clean Cu(001) and Cu(111) surfaces as well as the epitaxial Co clusters on Cu(111). PMID:26636763

  8. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  9. Complex dynamics of synergistic coinfections on realistically clustered networks

    PubMed Central

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Althouse, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of contact structure clustering on the dynamics of multiple diseases interacting through coinfection of a single individual, two problems typically studied independently. We highlight how clustering, which is well known to hinder propagation of diseases, can actually speed up epidemic propagation in the context of synergistic coinfections if the strength of the coupling matches that of the clustering. We also show that such dynamics lead to a first-order transition in endemic states, where small changes in transmissibility of the diseases can lead to explosive outbreaks and regions where these explosive outbreaks can only happen on clustered networks. We develop a mean-field model of coinfection of two diseases following susceptible-infectious-susceptible dynamics, which is allowed to interact on a general class of modular networks. We also introduce a criterion based on tertiary infections that yields precise analytical estimates of when clustering will lead to faster propagation than nonclustered networks. Our results carry importance for epidemiology, mathematical modeling, and the propagation of interacting phenomena in general. We make a call for more detailed epidemiological data of interacting coinfections. PMID:26195773

  10. Carbon-vacancy complexes as traps for self-interstitial clusters in Fe-C alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anento, N.; Serra, A.

    2013-09-01

    Self-interstitial loops in irradiated Fe-C alloys are formed by the growth of small self-interstitial atom clusters created directly in cascades. For these clusters to grow up to visible sizes they should be stopped by traps otherwise they would disappear in sinks due to their high one dimensional mobility. The well-known affinity of carbon with vacancies in α-Fe leads to the formation of carbon-vacancy (C-V) complexes that are potential candidates as traps for SIA loops. Applying molecular static simulations we have studied the interaction between the most abundant C-V complexes and SIA clusters using a metallic covalent interatomic model for the Fe-C system. The complexes studied, {Cn-Vm}, are C-V, C-V2 and C2-V. The maximum binding energies obtained for the interaction with a 1/2 <1 1 1> 61SIA cluster are 0.75 eV for the C-V, 1.4 eV for the C-V2 and 1.5 eV for C2-V. Finally, additional MD simulations were used to check the stability of the traps at high temperature. C-V} complexes have higher binding energies than single C atoms and their interaction depends strongly on their position relative to the SIA cluster. The vacancies of the complexes only recombine with the interstitials when they are at the edge of the cluster. The C-V2 complex located in the central region of the cluster has a binding energy of 1.4 eV which results in a good trap for the cluster. In this case the efficiency of a di-vacancy to stop the movement of the cluster is enhanced by the C atom that contributes to the binding energy and inhibits the vacancies to migrate to the cluster edge. C2-V extends to high temperatures the effectiveness of C-V2 as a trap at low temperatures. For this complex the higher interaction occurs at the periphery of the cluster when the vacancy recombination leaves two C atoms strongly tight with a binding energy up to 1.5 eV. Both linear and adjacent configurations are stable and should coexist. Since their binding energies with the cluster are comparable, the

  11. Intrafamilial cluster of pulmonary tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis of the African 1 clonal complex.

    PubMed

    Godreuil, S; Jeziorski, E; Bañuls, A L; Fraisse, T; Van de Perre, P; Boschiroli, M L

    2010-12-01

    A new clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis present at high frequency in cattle from west central African countries has been described as the African 1 (Af1) clonal complex. Here, the first intrafamilial cluster of human tuberculosis cases due to M. bovis Af1 clonal complex strains is reported. We discuss hypotheses regarding modes of transmission. PMID:20980573

  12. Reconstructing Histories of Complex Gene Clusters on a Phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa; Song, Giltae; Siepel, Adam

    Clusters of genes that have evolved by repeated segmental duplication present difficult challenges throughout genomic analysis, from sequence assembly to functional analysis. These clusters are one of the major sources of evolutionary innovation, and they are linked to multiple diseases, including HIV and a variety of cancers. Understanding their evolutionary histories is a key to the application of comparative genomics methods in these regions of the genome. We propose a probabilistic model of gene cluster evolution on a phylogeny, and an MCMC algorithm for reconstruction of duplication histories from genomic sequences in multiple species. Several projects are underway to obtain high quality BAC-based assemblies of duplicated clusters in multiple species, and we anticipate use of our methods in their analysis. Supplementary materials are located at http://compbio.fmph.uniba.sk/suppl/09recombcg/

  13. Dynamic Expression of DNA Complexation with Self-assembled Biomolecular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Bartolami, Eline; Bessin, Yannick; Gervais, Virginie; Dumy, Pascal; Ulrich, Sébastien

    2015-08-24

    We report herein the implementation of a dynamic covalent chemistry approach to the generation of multivalent clusters for DNA recognition. We show that biomolecular clusters can be expressed in situ by a programmed self-assembly process using chemoselective ligations. The cationic clusters are shown, by fluorescence displacement assay, gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry, to effectively complex DNA through multivalent interactions. The reversibility of the ligation was exploited to demonstrate that template effects occur, whereby DNA imposes component selection in order to favor the most active DNA-binding clusters. Furthermore, we show that a chemical effector can be used to trigger DNA release through component exchange reactions. PMID:26177835

  14. Biochemical analysis of hatchet self-cleaving ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Lünse, Christina E.; Harris, Kimberly A.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Hatchet RNAs are members of a novel self-cleaving ribozyme class that was recently discovered by using a bioinformatics search strategy. The consensus sequence and secondary structure of this class includes 13 highly conserved and numerous other modestly conserved nucleotides interspersed among bulges linking four base-paired substructures. A representative hatchet ribozyme from a metagenomic source requires divalent ions such as Mg2+ to promote RNA strand scission with a maximum rate constant of ∼4 min−1. As with all other small self-cleaving ribozymes discovered to date, hatchet ribozymes employ a general mechanism for catalysis involving the nucleophilic attack of a ribose 2′-oxygen atom on an adjacent phosphorus center. Kinetic characteristics of the reaction demonstrate that members of this ribozyme class have an essential requirement for divalent metal ions and that they might have a complex active site that employs multiple catalytic strategies to accelerate RNA cleavage by internal phosphoester transfer. PMID:26385510

  15. Crystal structure of a soluble cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Cupo, Albert; Sok, Devin; Stanfield, Robyn L; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Deller, Marc C; Klasse, Per-Johan; Burton, Dennis R; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-20

    HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) target cells is mediated by cleaved envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers that have been challenging to characterize structurally. Here, we describe the crystal structure at 4.7 angstroms of a soluble, cleaved Env trimer that is stabilized and antigenically near-native (termed the BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 trimer) in complex with a potent broadly neutralizing antibody, PGT122. The structure shows a prefusion state of gp41, the interaction between the component gp120 and gp41 subunits, and how a close association between the gp120 V1/V2/V3 loops stabilizes the trimer apex around the threefold axis. The complete epitope of PGT122 on the trimer involves gp120 V1, V3, and several surrounding glycans. This trimer structure advances our understanding of how Env functions and is presented to the immune system, and provides a blueprint for structure-based vaccine design. PMID:24179159

  16. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  17. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H cleaves RNA/RNA in arrested complexes: implications for the mechanism by which RNase H discriminates between RNA/RNA and RNA/DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Götte, M; Fackler, S; Hermann, T; Perola, E; Cellai, L; Gross, H J; Le Grice, S F; Heumann, H

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is primed by tRNA(Lys3), which forms an 18 base pair RNA homoduplex with its 3' terminus and the primer binding site (PBS) of the viral genome. Using an in vitro system mimicking initiation of minus strand DNA synthesis, we analyzed the mechanism by which HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) distinguishes between RNA/DNA and RNA/RNA (dsRNA). tRNA(Lys3) was hybridized to a PBS-containing RNA template and extended by addition of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). In the presence of all four dNTPs, initial cleavage of the RNA template occurred immediately downstream of the tRNA-DNA junction, reflecting RNase H specificity for RNA in a RNA/DNA hybrid. However, in the absence of DNA synthesis, or limiting this by chain termination, the PBS was cleaved at a constant distance of 18 nucleotides upstream of the nascent primer 3' terminus. The position of cleavage remained in register with the position of DNA synthesis arrest, indicating that hydrolysis of homoduplex RNA is spatialy co-ordinated with DNA synthesis. Kinetic studies comparing cleavage rates of an analogous DNA primer/PBS heteroduplex and the tRNA(Lys3)/PBS homoduplex showed that while the former is cleaved as rapidly as RT polymerizes, the latter proceeds 30-fold slower. Although the RNase H domain hydrolyzes dsRNA when RT is artificially arrested, specificity for RNA/DNA hybrids is maintained when DNA is actively synthesized, since residency of the RNase H domain at a single base position is not long enough to allow significant cleavage on dsRNA. Images PMID:7533725

  18. The multitude of iron-sulfur clusters in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Gnandt, Emmanuel; Dörner, Katerina; Strampraad, Marc F J; de Vries, Simon; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory complex I couples the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. Complex I contains one non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide and, depending on the species, up to ten iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters as cofactors. The reason for the presence of the multitude of Fe/S clusters in complex I remained enigmatic for a long time. The question was partly answered by investigations on the evolution of the complex revealing the stepwise construction of the electron transfer domain from several modules. Extension of the ancestral to the modern electron input domain was associated with the acquisition of several Fe/S-proteins. The X-ray structure of the complex showed that the NADH oxidation-site is connected with the quinone-reduction site by a chain of seven Fe/S-clusters. Fast enzyme kinetics revealed that this chain of Fe/S-clusters is used to regulate electron-tunneling rates within the complex. A possible function of the off-pathway cluster N1a is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26944855

  19. A HIERARCHY OF ANKYRIN/SPECTRIN COMPLEXES CLUSTERS SODIUM CHANNELS AT NODES OF RANVIER

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tammy Szu-Yu; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Chang, Kae-Jiun; Xu, Mingxuan; Cooper, Edward C.; Stankewich, Michael C.; Bennett, Vann; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The scaffolding protein ankyrinG is required for Na+ channel clustering at axon initial segments. It is also considered essential for Na+ channel clustering at nodes of Ranvier to facilitate fast and efficient action potential propagation. However, in contrast to these widely accepted roles, we show here that ankyrinG is dispensable for nodal Na+ channel clustering in vivo. Surprisingly, without ankyrinG, erythrocyte ankyrin (ankyrinR) and its binding partner βI spectrin substitute and rescue nodal Na+ channel clustering. In addition, channel clustering is also rescued after loss of nodal βIV spectrin by βI spectrin and ankyrinR. In mice lacking both ankyrinG and ankyrinR, Na+ channels fail to cluster at nodes. Thus, ankyrinR/βI spectrin protein complexes function as secondary reserve Na+ channel clustering machinery, and two independent ankyrin/spectrin protein complexes exist in myelinated axons to cluster Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:25362473

  20. Link-Prediction Enhanced Consensus Clustering for Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Matthew; Adar, Eytan; Cafarella, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Many real networks that are collected or inferred from data are incomplete due to missing edges. Missing edges can be inherent to the dataset (Facebook friend links will never be complete) or the result of sampling (one may only have access to a portion of the data). The consequence is that downstream analyses that “consume” the network will often yield less accurate results than if the edges were complete. Community detection algorithms, in particular, often suffer when critical intra-community edges are missing. We propose a novel consensus clustering algorithm to enhance community detection on incomplete networks. Our framework utilizes existing community detection algorithms that process networks imputed by our link prediction based sampling algorithm and merges their multiple partitions into a final consensus output. On average our method boosts performance of existing algorithms by 7% on artificial data and 17% on ego networks collected from Facebook. PMID:27203750

  1. Applying Clustering Techniques to Reduce Complexity in Automated Planning Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, Luke; Levine, John

    Automated Planning is a very active area of research within Artificial Intelligence. Broadly this discipline deals with the methods by which an agent can independently determine the action sequence required to successfully achieve a set of objectives. In this paper, we will present initial work outlining a new approach to planning based on Clustering techniques, in order to group states of the world together and use the fundamental structure of the world to lift out more abstract representations. We will show that this approach can limit the combinatorial explosion of a typical planning problem in a way that is much more intuitive and reusable than has previously been possible, and outline ways that this approach can be developed further.

  2. Clustering of complex shaped data sets via Kohonen maps and mathematical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Costa, Jose A.; de Andrade Netto, Marcio L.

    2001-03-01

    Clustering is the process of discovering groups within the data, based on similarities, with a minimal, if any, knowledge of their structure. The self-organizing (or Kohonen) map (SOM) is one of the best known neural network algorithms. It has been widely studied as a software tool for visualization of high-dimensional data. Important features include information compression while preserving topological and metric relationship of the primary data items. Although Kohonen maps had been applied for clustering data, usually the researcher sets the number of neurons equal to the expected number of clusters, or manually segments a two-dimensional map using some a-priori knowledge of the data. This paper proposes techniques for automatic partitioning and labeling SOM networks in clusters of neurons that may be used to represent the data clusters. Mathematical morphology operations, such as watershed, are performed on the U-matrix, which is a neuron-distance image. The direct application of watershed leads to an oversegmented image. It is used markers to identify significant clusters and homotopy modification to suppress the others. Markers are automatically found by performing a multilevel scan of connected regions of the U-matrix. Each cluster of neurons is a sub-graph that defines, in the input space, complex and non-parametric geometries which approximately describes the shape of the clusters. The process of map partitioning is extended recursively. Each cluster of neurons gives rise to a new map, which are trained with the subset of data that were classified to it. The algorithm produces dynamically a hierarchical tree of maps, which explains the cluster's structure in levels of granularity. The distributed and multiple prototypes cluster representation enables the discoveries of clusters even in the case when we have two or more non-separable pattern classes.

  3. Asparaginyl endopeptidase cleaves TDP-43 in brain.

    PubMed

    Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Gozal, Yair M; Duong, Duc M; Dammer, Eric B; Gearing, Marla; Ye, Keqiang; Lah, James J; Peng, Junmin; Levey, Allan I; Seyfried, Nicholas T

    2012-08-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a nuclear protein involved in RNA splicing and a major protein component in ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Under disease conditions, TDP-43 redistributes to the cytoplasm where it can be phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and proteolytically cleaved. Enzymes responsible for TDP-43 proteolytic processing in brain remain largely unreported. Using a MS approach, we identified two truncated TDP-43 peptides, terminating C-terminal to asparagines 291 (N291) and 306 (N306). The only documented mammalian enzyme capable of cleaving C-terminal to asparagine is asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP). TDP-43-immunoreactive fragments (~35 and 32 kDa) predicted to be generated by AEP cleavage at N291 and N306 were observed by Western blot analyses of postmortem frontotemporal lobar degeneration brain tissue and cultured human cells over-expressing TDP-43. Studies in vitro determined that AEP can directly cleave TDP-43 at seven sites, including N291 and N306. Western blots of brain homogenates isolated from AEP-null mice and wild-type littermate controls revealed that TDP-43 proteolytic fragments were substantially reduced in the absence of AEP in vivo. Taken together, we conclude that TDP-43 is cleaved by AEP in brain. Moreover, these data highlight the utility of combining proteomic strategies in vitro and in vivo to provide insight into TDP-43 biology that will fuel the design of more detailed models of disease pathogenesis. PMID:22718532

  4. Optimized catalytic DNA-cleaving ribozymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention discloses nucleic acid enzymes capable of cleaving nucleic acid molecules, including single-stranded DNA, in a site-specific manner under physiologic conditions, as well as compositions including same. The present invention also discloses methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions.

  5. Conditional pseudolikelihood methods for clustered ordinal, multinomial, or count outcomes with complex survey data.

    PubMed

    Brumback, Babette A; Cai, Zhuangyu; He, Zhulin; Zheng, Hao W; Dailey, Amy B

    2013-04-15

    In order to adjust individual-level covariate effects for confounding due to unmeasured neighborhood characteristics, we have recently developed conditional pseudolikelihood methods to estimate the parameters of a proportional odds model for clustered ordinal outcomes with complex survey data. The methods require sampling design joint probabilities for each within-neighborhood pair. In the present article, we develop a similar methodology for a baseline category logit model for clustered multinomial outcomes and for a loglinear model for clustered count outcomes. All of the estimators and asymptotic sampling distributions we present can be conveniently computed using standard logistic regression software for complex survey data, such as sas proc surveylogistic. We demonstrate validity of the methods theoretically and also empirically by using simulations. We apply the new method for clustered multinomial outcomes to data from the 2008 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey in order to investigate disparities in frequency of dental cleaning both unadjusted and adjusted for confounding by neighborhood. PMID:22976045

  6. Colorimetric recognition of different enzymology-concerning transition metals based on a hybrid cluster complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Hua; Yuan, Wen-Tao; Zheng, Hong; Xu, Jin-Gou

    2004-07-01

    A hybrid cluster complex, formed by chelating a chromogenic ligand to a [2Fe-2S] cluster, sensitively exhibited differential colorimetric responses towards Hg2+, Cd2+, Cr3+, Pb2, Sn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe3+ and Co2+ in water at physiological pH. Speciation of some of these metal elements, such as Cr(III) and Sn(IV), was also studied by UV/Vis absorption. PMID:15293390

  7. Diffuse radio emission in the complex merging galaxy cluster Abell2069

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabent, A.; Hoeft, M.; Pizzo, R. F.; Bonafede, A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Klein, U.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters with signs of a recent merger in many cases show extended diffuse radio features. This emission originates from relativistic electrons that suffer synchrotron losses due to the intracluster magnetic field. The mechanisms of particle acceleration and the properties of the magnetic field are still poorly understood. Aims: We search for diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. Here, we study the complex galaxy cluster Abell 2069, for which X-ray observations indicate a recent merger. Methods: We investigate the cluster's radio continuum emission by deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations at 346 MHz and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 322 MHz. Results: We find an extended diffuse radio feature roughly coinciding with the main component of the cluster. We classify this emission as a radio halo and estimate its lower limit flux density at 25 ± 9 mJy. Moreover, we find a second extended diffuse source located at the cluster's companion and estimate its flux density at 15 ± 2 mJy. We speculate that this is a small halo or a mini-halo. If true, this cluster is the first example of a double-halo in a single galaxy cluster.

  8. Cluster formation by allelomimesis in real-world complex adaptive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanico, Dranreb Earl; Monterola, Christopher; Saloma, Caesar

    2005-04-01

    Animal and human clusters are complex adaptive systems and many organize in cluster sizes s that obey the frequency distribution D(s)∝s-τ . The exponent τ describes the relative abundance of the cluster sizes in a given system. Data analyses reveal that real-world clusters exhibit a broad spectrum of τ values, 0.7 (tuna fish schools) ⩽τ⩽4.61 (T4 bacteriophage gene family sizes). Allelomimesis is proposed as an underlying mechanism for adaptation that explains the observed broad τ spectrum. Allelomimesis is the tendency of an individual to imitate the actions of others and two cluster systems have different τ values when their component agents display unequal degrees of allelomimetic tendencies. Cluster formation by allelomimesis is shown to be of three general types: namely, blind copying, information-use copying, and noncopying. Allelomimetic adaptation also reveals that the most stable cluster size is formed by three strongly allelomimetic individuals. Our finding is consistent with available field data taken from killer whales and marmots.

  9. Defect clustering in simple and complex oxides. Progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.B.; Ellis, D.E.; Mason, T.O.

    1992-10-01

    Vacancy:interstitial clusters in Fe{sub 1{minus}x}O were surveyed theoretically, and the 7:2 cluster is predicted to be the most stable, followed by 4:1. In Mn{sub 1{minus}x}O, the 2:1 cluster is predicted to be the most stable, followed by 6:2. The Co{sub 1{minus}x}O is still unresolved, although the 2:1 cluster should be the most stable. Work on complex oxides is also reported, including REAECuO (RE=rare earth, AE=alkaline earth), NdCeCuO, LaCuO-based cuprates, and doped sapphire.

  10. Complexities in complex posttraumatic stress disorder in inpatient women: evidence from cluster analysis of MCMI-III Personality Disorder Scales.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Huntoon, J; Evans, R B

    1999-12-01

    Herman's (1992a) clinical formulation of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) captures the extensive diagnostic comorbidity seen in patients with a history of repeated interpersonal trauma and severe psychiatric disorders. Yet the sheer breadth of symptoms and personality disturbance encompassed by complex PTSD limits its descriptive usefulness. This study employed cluster analysis of the MCMI-III (Millon, 1994) personality disorder scales to determine whether there is meaningful heterogeneity within a group of 227 severely traumatized women who were treated in a specialized inpatient program. The analysis distinguishes 5 clinically meaningful clusters, which we label alienated, withdrawn, aggressive, suffering, and adaptive. The study examined differences among these 5 personality disorder clusters on the MCMI-III clinical syndrome scales, as well as on the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993), Dissociative Experiences Scale (E. M. Bernstein & Putnam, 1986), Adult Attachment Scale (Collins & Read, 1990), and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (D.P. Bernstein, 1995). We present a classification-tree method for determining the cluster membership of new cases and discuss the implications of the findings for diagnostic assessment, treatment, and research. PMID:10689654

  11. Ant colony clustering with fitness perception and pheromone diffusion for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Junzhong; Song, Xiangjing; Liu, Chunnian; Zhang, Xiuzhen

    2013-08-01

    Community structure detection in complex networks has been intensively investigated in recent years. In this paper, we propose an adaptive approach based on ant colony clustering to discover communities in a complex network. The focus of the method is the clustering process of an ant colony in a virtual grid, where each ant represents a node in the complex network. During the ant colony search, the method uses a new fitness function to percept local environment and employs a pheromone diffusion model as a global information feedback mechanism to realize information exchange among ants. A significant advantage of our method is that the locations in the grid environment and the connections of the complex network structure are simultaneously taken into account in ants moving. Experimental results on computer-generated and real-world networks show the capability of our method to successfully detect community structures.

  12. Investigating the function of [2Fe–2S] cluster N1a, the off-pathway cluster in complex I, by manipulating its reduction potential

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, James A.; Morina, Klaudia; Bridges, Hannah R.; Friedrich, Thorsten; Hirst, Judy

    2013-01-01

    NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) couples NADH oxidation and quinone reduction to proton translocation across an energy-transducing membrane. All complexes I contain a flavin to oxidize NADH, seven iron–sulfur clusters to transfer electrons from the flavin to quinone and an eighth cluster (N1a) on the opposite side of the flavin. The role of cluster N1a is unknown, but Escherichia coli complex I has an unusually high-potential cluster N1a and its reduced flavin produces H2O2, not superoxide, suggesting that cluster N1a may affect reactive oxygen species production. In the present study, we combine protein film voltammetry with mutagenesis in overproduced N1a-binding subunits to identify two residues that switch N1a between its high- (E. coli, valine and asparagine) and low- (Bos taurus and Yarrowia lipolytica, proline and methionine) potential forms. The mutations were incorporated into E. coli complex I: cluster N1a could no longer be reduced by NADH, but H2O2 and superoxide production were unaffected. The reverse mutations (that increase the potential by ~0.16 V) were incorporated into Y. lipolytica complex I, but N1a was still not reduced by NADH. We conclude that cluster N1a does not affect reactive oxygen species production by the complex I flavin; it is probably required for enzyme assembly or stability. PMID:23980528

  13. Adult Speakers' Tongue-Palate Contact Patterns for Bilabial Stops within Complex Clusters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zharkova, Natalia; Schaeffler, Sonja; Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies using Electropalatography (EPG) have shown that individuals with speech disorders sometimes produce articulation errors that affect bilabial targets, but currently there is limited normative data available. In this study, EPG and acoustic data were recorded during complex word final sps clusters spoken by 20 normal adults. A total…

  14. COMPLEX DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN THE MERGING PLANCK ESZ CLUSTER A3411

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weeren, R. J.; Fogarty, K.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kraft, R. P.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Brueggen, M.; Lal, D. V.; Roettgering, H. J. A.

    2013-06-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) radio and Chandra X-ray observations of the merging galaxy cluster A3411. For the cluster, we find an overall temperature of 6.4{sup +0.6}{sub -1.0} keV and an X-ray luminosity of 2.8 {+-} 0.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} between 0.5 and 2.0 keV. The Chandra observation reveals the cluster to be undergoing a merger event. The VLA observations show the presence of large-scale diffuse emission in the central region of the cluster, which we classify as a 0.9 Mpc size radio halo. In addition, a complex region of diffuse, polarized emission is found in the southeastern outskirts of the cluster along the projected merger axis of the system. We classify this region of diffuse emission as a radio relic. The total extent of this radio relic is 1.9 Mpc. For the combined emission in the cluster region, we find a radio spectral index of -1.0 {+-} 0.1 between 74 MHz and 1.4 GHz. The morphology of the radio relic is peculiar, as the relic is broken up into five fragments. This suggests that the shock responsible for the relic has been broken up due to interaction with a large-scale galaxy filament connected to the cluster or other substructures in the intracluster medium. Alternatively, the complex morphology reflects the presence of electrons in fossil radio bubbles that are re-accelerated by a shock.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and DNA cleaving studies of new organocobaloxime derivatives.

    PubMed

    Erdem-Tuncmen, Mukadder; Karipcin, Fatma; Ozmen, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Dioxime ligand (H2L) was synthesized by condensation reaction between 4-biphenylchloroglyoxime and 4-chloroaniline. The metal complexes of the types, [Co(HL)2(i-Pr)Py], [CoL2(i-Pr)PyB2F4] and [CoL2(i-Pr)Py(Cu(phen))2](ClO4)2 [H2L = 4-(4-chlorophenylamino)biphenylglyoxime; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; i-Pr = isopropyl; Py = pyridine] were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and magnetic susceptibility, conductivity measurements. The results of elemental analyses, IR and NMR confirmed the stoichiometry of the complexes and the formation of ligand frameworks around the metal ions. The magnetic moment measurements of the complexes indicated that the complexes are diamagnetic (low-spin d6 octahedral) except trinuclear complex. Furthermore the interaction between the dioxime ligand and its complexes with DNA has also been investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis. The trinuclear Cu2Co complex with H2O2 as a cooxidant exhibited the strongest DNA cleaving activity. PMID:23841342

  16. Adaptive fuzzy leader clustering of complex data sets in pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Scott C.; Pemmaraju, Surya; Mitra, Sunanda

    1992-01-01

    A modular, unsupervised neural network architecture for clustering and classification of complex data sets is presented. The adaptive fuzzy leader clustering (AFLC) architecture is a hybrid neural-fuzzy system that learns on-line in a stable and efficient manner. The initial classification is performed in two stages: a simple competitive stage and a distance metric comparison stage. The cluster prototypes are then incrementally updated by relocating the centroid positions from fuzzy C-means system equations for the centroids and the membership values. The AFLC algorithm is applied to the Anderson Iris data and laser-luminescent fingerprint image data. It is concluded that the AFLC algorithm successfully classifies features extracted from real data, discrete or continuous.

  17. Complex nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl polyhedra and phosphate tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Ling, Jie; Qiu, Jie; Pressprich, Laura; Baranay, Melissa; Ward, Matthew; Burns, Peter C.

    2011-06-20

    Five cage clusters that self-assemble in alkaline aqueous solution have been isolated and characterized. Each is built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids with two or three equatorial edges occupied by peroxide, and three also contain phosphate tetrahedra. These clusters contain 30 uranyl polyhedra; 30 uranyl polyhedra and six pyrophosphate groups; 30 uranyl polyhedra, 12 pyrophosphate groups, and one phosphate tetrahedron; 42 uranyl polyhedra; and 40 uranyl polyhedra and three pyrophosphate groups. These clusters present complex topologies as well as a range of compositions, sizes, and charges. Two adopt fullerene topologies, and the others contain combinations of topological squares, pentagons, and hexagons. An analysis of possible topologies further indicates that higher-symmetry topologies are favored.

  18. Opening of Carborane Cages by Metal Cluster Complexes: The Reaction of a Thiolate-Substituted Carborane with Triosmium Carbonyl Cluster Complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Kiprotich, Joseph; Peryshkov, Dmitry V; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-08-15

    The reaction of Os3(CO)10(NCMe)2 with closo-o-(1-SCH3)C2B10H11 has yielded the complex Os3(CO)9[μ3-η(3)-C2B10H9(SCH3)](μ-H)2, 1, by the loss of the two NCMe ligands and one CO ligand from the Os3 cluster and the coordination of the sulfur atom and the activation of two B-H bonds with transfer of the hydrogen atoms to the cluster. Reaction of 1 with a second equivalent of Os3(CO)10(NCMe)2 yielded the complex Os3(CO)9(μ-H)[(μ3-η(3)-1,4,5-μ3-η(3)-6,10,11-C2B10H8S(CH3)]Os3(CO)9(μ-H)2, 2, that contains two triosmium triangles attached to the same carborane cage. The carborane cage was opened by cleavage of two B-C bonds and one B-B bond. The B-H group that was pulled out of the cage became a triply bridging group on one of the Os3 triangles but remains bonded to the cage by two B-B bonds. When heated to 150 °C, 2 was transformed into the complex Os3(CO)9(μ-H)[(μ3-η(3)-μ3-η(3)-C2B10H7S(CH3)]Os3(CO)9(μ-H), 3, by the loss of two hydrogen atoms and a rearrangement that led to further opening of the carborane cage. Reaction of 1 with a second equivalent of closo-o-(1-SCH3)C2B10H11 has yielded the complex Os3(CO)6)(μ3-η(3)-C2B10H9-R-SCH3) (μ3-η(3)-C2B10H10-S-SCH3)(μ-H)3, 4a, containing two carborane cages coordinated to one Os3 cluster. Compound 4a was isomerized to the compound Os3(CO)6(μ3-η(3)-C2B10H9-R-SCH3)(μ3-η(3)-C2B10H10-R-SCH3)(μ-H)3, 4b, by an inversion of stereochemistry at one of the sulfur atoms by heating to 174 °C. PMID:27487332

  19. Studying the Effect of a Composition of the Cluster Core in High-Radiopacity Cluster Complexes of Rhenium on Their Acute Toxicity In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Pozmogova, T N; Krasil'nikova, A A; Ivanov, A A; Shestopalov, M A; Gyrylova, S N; Shestopalova, L V; Shestopaloiv, A M; Shkurupy, V A

    2016-05-01

    An in vivo study was performed to evaluate the dependence of acute toxicity of high-radiopacity and luminescent octahedral cluster complexes of rhenium after intravenous injection on a composition of the cluster core. Changes in mouse body weight, water and food consumption, degree of intoxication, and morphological changes in the visceral organs were studied after intravenous injection of the following cluster complexes with various internal ligands (S, Se, or Te): Na4[{Re 6 Te 8 }(CN)6], Na4[{Re 6 Se 8 }(CN)6], and Na4[{Re 6 S 8 }(CN)6]. The Na4[{Re 6 S 8 } (CN)6] cluster complex was shown to be the safest for animals. PMID:27270936

  20. Complete characterization of the stability of cluster synchronization in complex dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Francesco; Pecora, Louis M; Hagerstrom, Aaron M; Murphy, Thomas E; Roy, Rajarshi

    2016-04-01

    Synchronization is an important and prevalent phenomenon in natural and engineered systems. In many dynamical networks, the coupling is balanced or adjusted to admit global synchronization, a condition called Laplacian coupling. Many networks exhibit incomplete synchronization, where two or more clusters of synchronization persist, and computational group theory has recently proved to be valuable in discovering these cluster states based on the topology of the network. In the important case of Laplacian coupling, additional synchronization patterns can exist that would not be predicted from the group theory analysis alone. Understanding how and when clusters form, merge, and persist is essential for understanding collective dynamics, synchronization, and failure mechanisms of complex networks such as electric power grids, distributed control networks, and autonomous swarming vehicles. We describe a method to find and analyze all of the possible cluster synchronization patterns in a Laplacian-coupled network, by applying methods of computational group theory to dynamically equivalent networks. We present a general technique to evaluate the stability of each of the dynamically valid cluster synchronization patterns. Our results are validated in an optoelectronic experiment on a five-node network that confirms the synchronization patterns predicted by the theory. PMID:27152349

  1. Complete characterization of the stability of cluster synchronization in complex dynamical networks

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Francesco; Pecora, Louis M.; Hagerstrom, Aaron M.; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization is an important and prevalent phenomenon in natural and engineered systems. In many dynamical networks, the coupling is balanced or adjusted to admit global synchronization, a condition called Laplacian coupling. Many networks exhibit incomplete synchronization, where two or more clusters of synchronization persist, and computational group theory has recently proved to be valuable in discovering these cluster states based on the topology of the network. In the important case of Laplacian coupling, additional synchronization patterns can exist that would not be predicted from the group theory analysis alone. Understanding how and when clusters form, merge, and persist is essential for understanding collective dynamics, synchronization, and failure mechanisms of complex networks such as electric power grids, distributed control networks, and autonomous swarming vehicles. We describe a method to find and analyze all of the possible cluster synchronization patterns in a Laplacian-coupled network, by applying methods of computational group theory to dynamically equivalent networks. We present a general technique to evaluate the stability of each of the dynamically valid cluster synchronization patterns. Our results are validated in an optoelectronic experiment on a five-node network that confirms the synchronization patterns predicted by the theory. PMID:27152349

  2. Clustering of protein families into functional subtypes using Relative Complexity Measure with reduced amino acid alphabets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analysis can be used to divide a protein family into subfamilies in the absence of experimental information. Most phylogenetic analysis methods utilize multiple alignment of sequences and are based on an evolutionary model. However, multiple alignment is not an automated procedure and requires human intervention to maintain alignment integrity and to produce phylogenies consistent with the functional splits in underlying sequences. To address this problem, we propose to use the alignment-free Relative Complexity Measure (RCM) combined with reduced amino acid alphabets to cluster protein families into functional subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with an alignment-based approach was also carried out to test the quality of the clustering. Results We demonstrate the robustness of RCM with reduced alphabets in clustering of protein sequences into families in a simulated dataset and seven well-characterized protein datasets. On protein datasets, crotonases, mandelate racemases, nucleotidyl cyclases and glycoside hydrolase family 2 were clustered into subfamilies with 100% accuracy whereas acyl transferase domains, haloacid dehalogenases, and vicinal oxygen chelates could be assigned to subfamilies with 97.2%, 96.9% and 92.2% accuracies, respectively. Conclusions The overall combination of methods in this paper is useful for clustering protein families into subtypes based on solely protein sequence information. The method is also flexible and computationally fast because it does not require multiple alignment of sequences. PMID:20718947

  3. A Transition Metal Complex (Venus Flytrap Cluster) for Radioimmunodetection and Radioimmunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Raymond J.; Beatty, Barbara G.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Varadarajan, Aravamuthan; Williams, Lawrence E.; Curtis, Frederick L.; Knobler, Carolyn B.; Beatty, J. David; Shiveley, John E.

    1991-04-01

    A novel transition metal complex, Venus flytrap cluster (VFC), is described for the preparation of radiolabeled antibodies. VFC contained 57Co, which was held tightly between the faces of two covalently bridged carborane ligands by cluster bonding of the metal with appropriate ligand orbitals. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody T84.66 was conjugated to 57Co-VFC with full retention of immunological activity. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen-producing tumors showed excellent tumor localization of 57Co-VFC-T84.66. The accumulation of radionuclide in normal liver was low and independent of dose, which may reflect the stability of the radionuclide complex. These results presage the use of VFC systems for binding transition metals that are clinically useful for radio-immunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy.

  4. A transition metal complex (Venus flytrap cluster) for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, R.J.; Curtis, F.L.; Shively, J.E. ); Beatty, B.G.; Williams, L.E.; Beatty, J.D. ); Hawthorne, M.F.; Varadarajan, A.; Knobler, C.B. )

    1991-04-15

    A novel transition metal complex, Venus flytrap cluster (VFC), is described for the preparation of radiolabeled antibodies. VFC contained {sup 57}Co, which was held tightly between the faces of two covalently bridged carborane ligands by cluster bonding of the metal with appropriate ligand orbitals. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody T84,66 was conjugated to {sup 57}Co-VFC with full retention of immunological activity. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen-producing tumors showed excellent tumor localization of {sup 57}Co-VFC-T84.66. The accumulation of radionuclide in normal liver was low and independent of dose, which may reflect the stability of the radionuclide complex. These results presage the use of VFC systems for binding transition metals that are clinically useful for radioimmunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy.

  5. Substrate recognition mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin-cleaving clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4') do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond. PMID:18511418

  6. Molecular orbital calculations of octahedral molybdenum cluster complexes with the DV-X{alpha} method

    SciTech Connect

    Imoto, Hideo; Saito, Taro; Adachi, Hirohiko

    1995-04-26

    Discrete variational-{Chi}{alpha} molecular orbital methods were applied to octahedral cluster complexes, [Mo{sub 6}X{sub 8}-(PH{sub 3}){sub 6}](X = S and Se). This structure is of interest due to its role in superconductivity of Chevrel plates. Level energies are discussed and factors contributing to their separations are categorized. Agreement with empirical XPS data is excellent.

  7. Detecting overlapping protein complexes by rough-fuzzy clustering in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  8. Detecting Overlapping Protein Complexes by Rough-Fuzzy Clustering in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  9. The G305 star-forming complex: the central star clusters Danks 1 and Danks 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; Clark, J. S.; Trombley, Christine; Figer, Donald F.; Najarro, Francisco; Crowther, Paul A.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Thompson, Mark; Urquhart, James S.; Hindson, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The G305 H II complex (G305.4+0.1) is one of the most massive star-forming structures yet identified within the Galaxy. It is host to many massive stars at all stages of formation and evolution, from embedded molecular cores to post-main-sequence stars. Here, we present a detailed near-infrared analysis of the two central star clusters Danks 1 and Danks 2, using Hubble Space Telescope+NICMOS imaging and Very Large Telescope+ISAAC spectroscopy. We find that the spectrophotometric distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance to the G305 complex, an average of all measurements giving a distance of 3.8 ± 0.6 kpc. From analysis of the stellar populations and the pre-main-sequence stars, we find that Danks 2 is the elder of the two clusters, with an age of 3+3- 1 Myr. Danks 1 is clearly younger with an age of 1.5+1.5- 0.5 Myr, and is dominated by three very luminous H-rich Wolf-Rayet stars which may have masses ≳100 M⊙. The two clusters have mass functions consistent with the Salpeter slope, and total cluster masses of 8000 ± 1500 and 3000 ± 800 M⊙ for Danks 1 and Danks 2, respectively. Danks 1 is significantly the more compact cluster of the two, and is one of the densest clusters in the Galaxy with log (ρ/M⊙ pc-3) = 5.5+0.5- 0.4. In addition to the clusters, there is a population of apparently isolated Wolf-Rayet stars within the molecular cloud's cavity. Our results suggest that the star-forming history of G305 began with the formation of Danks 2, and subsequently Danks 1, with the origin of the diffuse evolved population currently uncertain. Together, the massive stars at the centre of the G305 region appear to be clearing away what is left of the natal cloud, triggering a further generation of star formation at the cloud's periphery.

  10. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion.

    PubMed

    Zarkesh, Ryan A; Ichimura, Andrew S; Monson, Todd C; Tomson, Neil C; Anstey, Mitchell R

    2016-06-14

    The redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand was used to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events. PMID:26998892

  11. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  12. The Fas-FADD Death Domain Complex Structure Unravels Signalling by Receptor Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, F.; Stec, B; Pop, C; Dobaczewska, M; Lee, J; Monosov, E; Robinson, H; Salvesen, G; Schwarzenbacher, R; Riedl, S

    2009-01-01

    The death inducing signalling complex (DISC) formed by Fas receptor, FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) and caspase 8 is a pivotal trigger of apoptosis1, 2, 3. The Fas-FADD DISC represents a receptor platform, which once assembled initiates the induction of programmed cell death. A highly oligomeric network of homotypic protein interactions comprised of the death domains of Fas and FADD is at the centre of DISC formation4, 5. Thus, characterizing the mechanistic basis for the Fas-FADD interaction is crucial for understanding DISC signalling but has remained unclear largely because of a lack of structural data. We have successfully formed and isolated the human Fas-FADD death domain complex and report the 2.7 A crystal structure. The complex shows a tetrameric arrangement of four FADD death domains bound to four Fas death domains. We show that an opening of the Fas death domain exposes the FADD binding site and simultaneously generates a Fas-Fas bridge. The result is a regulatory Fas-FADD complex bridge governed by weak protein-protein interactions revealing a model where the complex itself functions as a mechanistic switch. This switch prevents accidental DISC assembly, yet allows for highly processive DISC formation and clustering upon a sufficient stimulus. In addition to depicting a previously unknown mode of death domain interactions, these results further uncover a mechanism for receptor signalling solely by oligomerization and clustering events.

  13. Endonuclease V cleaves at inosines in RNA.

    PubMed

    Vik, Erik Sebastian; Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Strøm Andersen, Pernille; Fladeby, Cathrine; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2013-01-01

    Endonuclease V orthologues are highly conserved proteins found in all kingdoms of life. While the prokaryotic enzymes are DNA repair proteins for removal of deaminated adenosine (inosine) from the genome, no clear role for the eukaryotic counterparts has hitherto been described. Here we report that human endonuclease V (ENDOV) and also Escherichia coli endonuclease V are highly active ribonucleases specific for inosine in RNA. Inosines are normal residues in certain RNAs introduced by specific deaminases. Adenosine-to-inosine editing is essential for proper function of these transcripts and defects are linked to various human disease. Here we show that human ENDOV cleaves an RNA substrate containing inosine in a position corresponding to a biologically important site for deamination in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABA(A) neurotransmitter. Further, human ENDOV specifically incises transfer RNAs with inosine in the wobble position. This previously unknown RNA incision activity may suggest a role for endonuclease V in normal RNA metabolism. PMID:23912683

  14. Endonuclease V cleaves at inosines in RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian Vik, Erik; Sameen Nawaz, Meh; Strøm Andersen, Pernille; Fladeby, Cathrine; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2013-01-01

    Endonuclease V orthologues are highly conserved proteins found in all kingdoms of life. While the prokaryotic enzymes are DNA repair proteins for removal of deaminated adenosine (inosine) from the genome, no clear role for the eukaryotic counterparts has hitherto been described. Here we report that human endonuclease V (ENDOV) and also Escherichia coli endonuclease V are highly active ribonucleases specific for inosine in RNA. Inosines are normal residues in certain RNAs introduced by specific deaminases. Adenosine-to-inosine editing is essential for proper function of these transcripts and defects are linked to various human disease. Here we show that human ENDOV cleaves an RNA substrate containing inosine in a position corresponding to a biologically important site for deamination in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABAA neurotransmitter. Further, human ENDOV specifically incises transfer RNAs with inosine in the wobble position. This previously unknown RNA incision activity may suggest a role for endonuclease V in normal RNA metabolism. PMID:23912683

  15. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  16. The impact of polyploidy on the evolution of a complex NB-LRR resistance gene cluster in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comparative genomics approach was used to investigate the evolution of a complex NB-LRR gene cluster found in soybean (Glycine max), common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and other legumes. In soybean, the cluster is associated with several disease resistance (R) genes of known function including Rpg1...

  17. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  18. Depth resolution improvement in secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis using metal cluster complex ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, M.; Kinno, T.; Koike, M.; Tanaka, H.; Takeno, S.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondou, K.; Teranishi, Y.; Nonaka, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kurokawa, A.; Ichimura, S.

    2006-07-31

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses were carried out using a metal cluster complex ion of Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 7}{sup +} as a primary ion beam. Depth resolution was evaluated as a function of primary ion species, energy, and incident angle. The depth resolution obtained using cluster ion bombardment was considerably better than that obtained by oxygen ion bombardment under the same experimental condition due to reduction of atomic mixing in the depth. The authors obtained a depth resolution of {approx}1 nm under 5 keV, 45 deg. condition. Depth resolution was degraded by ion-bombardment-induced surface roughness at 5 keV with higher incident angles.

  19. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  20. Amprenavir complexes with HIV-1 protease and its drug-resistant mutants altering hydrophobic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-10-22

    The structural and kinetic effects of amprenavir (APV), a clinical HIV protease (PR) inhibitor, were analyzed with wild-type enzyme and mutants with single substitutions of V32I, I50V, I54V, I54M, I84V and L90M that are common in drug resistance. Crystal structures of the APV complexes at resolutions of 1.02-1.85 {angstrom} reveal the structural changes due to the mutations. Substitution of the larger side chains in PR{sub V32I}, PR{sub I54M} and PR{sub L90M} resulted in the formation of new hydrophobic contacts with flap residues, residues 79 and 80, and Asp25, respectively. Mutation to smaller side chains eliminated hydrophobic interactions in the PR{sub I50V} and PR{sub I54V} structures. The PR{sub I84V}-APV complex had lost hydrophobic contacts with APV, the PR{sub V32I}-APV complex showed increased hydrophobic contacts within the hydrophobic cluster and the PR{sub I50V} complex had weaker polar and hydrophobic interactions with APV. The observed structural changes in PR{sub I84V}-APV, PR{sub V32I}-APV and PR{sub I50V}-APV were related to their reduced inhibition by APV of six-, 10- and 30-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type PR. The APV complexes were compared with the corresponding saquinavir complexes. The PR dimers had distinct rearrangements of the flaps and 80's loops that adapt to the different P1{prime} groups of the inhibitors, while maintaining contacts within the hydrophobic cluster. These small changes in the loops and weak internal interactions produce the different patterns of resistant mutations for the two drugs.

  1. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewa, Takehisa; Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu; Nango, Mamoru

    2013-06-01

    In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency.

  2. The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Stephanie J.; Lostchuck, Emily; Goult, Benjamin T.; Bouaouina, Mohamed; Fairchild, Michael J.; López-Ceballos, Pablo; Calderwood, David A.; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development. PMID:25393120

  3. Identifying driving gene clusters in complex diseases through critical transition theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Wang, Xujing; Hessner, Martin; Gao, Shouguo; Chen, Ye; Jia, Shuang

    A novel approach of looking at the human body using critical transition theory has yielded positive results: clusters of genes that act in tandem to drive complex disease progression. This cluster of genes can be thought of as the first part of a large genetic force that pushes the body from a curable, but sick, point to an incurable diseased point through a catastrophic bifurcation. The data analyzed is time course microarray blood assay data of 7 high risk individuals for Type 1 Diabetes who progressed into a clinical onset, with an additional larger study requested to be presented at the conference. The normalized data is 25,000 genes strong, which were narrowed down based on statistical metrics, and finally a machine learning algorithm using critical transition metrics found the driving network. This approach was created to be repeatable across multiple complex diseases with only progression time course data needed so that it would be applicable to identifying when an individual is at risk of developing a complex disease. Thusly, preventative measures can be enacted, and in the longer term, offers a possible solution to prevent all Type 1 Diabetes.

  4. Low temperature pathways to Chevrel phases via reduced molybdenum sulfide cluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, H.

    1993-03-01

    The initial cluster compound, Na(2y)Mo(6)S(8+y) py(sub x), was discovered by reacting Mo(6)Cl(12) with higher stoichiometries of sodium hydrosulfide and sodium butoxide in butanol/pyridine. This compound can subsequently undergo ligand exchange reactions to form a variety of cluster complexes. Single-crystal structure determinations are reported for the pyridine (py), piperidine (pip), and pyrrolidine (pyrr) complexes: triclinic Mo(6)S(8)(PY)(6) (center dot) 1.65py, cubic Mo(6)S(8)(py)(6) (center dot) 2py, Mo(6)S(8)(pip)(6) (center dot) 7pip, and Mo(6)S(8) (pyrr)(6) (center dot) 1pyrr. Delegation of the cluster complexes was explored. Direct heating under dynamic vacuum led to incomplete delegation. Reactions with tin and lead resulted in formation of corresponding Chevrel phase compounds along with MoS(2). Thermolysis reactions in the presence of flowing ammonia gas resulted in further delegation than was evidenced for reactions explored in vacuo. Solution reactions with strong acids were studied in an attempt to protonate the ligands and thus make them better leaving groups only limited success was achieved. A new preparative route was developed for ternary molybdenum sulfides. Cation exchange reactions with Na(2y)Mo(6)S(8+y)(MeOH)(x) were used to form the cobalt, tin, lead, and holmium compounds. Preliminary hydrodesulfurization studies on the sodium and cobalt compounds showed that they possess larger surface areas and thiophene conversion percentages than Chevrel phases, but a lower HDS rate.

  5. The young open cluster NGC 3293 and its relation to Car OB1 and the Carina Nebula complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. G.; Grieve, G. R.; Herbst, W.; Harris, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of visible evidence, NGC 3293 appears to be associated with a number of objects in the Carina Nebula complex. UBVRI photoelectric photometry and MK-spectral specifications are presented for a large number of stars in this cluster and its surroundings (Car OB1). Over 70 cluster members with spectral types earlier than B9 are identified. Star counts indicate that the expected number of members brighter than V = 18 is 297 plus or minus 9. The cluster appears to be situated just in front of a dense dust lane, which itself appears to be part of the dust complex emanating from the center of the Carina Nebula.

  6. Capillary Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Intact Monolayer-Protected Gold Clusters in Complex Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Black, David M; Bach, Stephan B H; Whetten, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    In some respects, large noble-metal clusters protected by thiolate ligands behave as giant molecules of definite composition and structure; however, their rigorous analysis continues to be quite challenging. Analysis of complex mixtures of intact monolayer-protected clusters (MPCs) by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) could provide quantitative identification of the various components present. This advance is critical for biomedical and toxicological research, as well as in fundamental studies that rely on the identification of selected compositions. This work expands upon the separate LC and MS results previously achieved, by interfacing the capillary liquid chromatograph directly to the electrospray source of the mass spectrometer, in order to provide an extremely sensitive, quantitative, and rapid means to characterize MPCs and their derivatives far beyond that of earlier reports. Here, we show that nonaqueous reversed-phase chromatography can be coupled to mass-spectrometry detection to resolve complex mixtures in minute (∼100 ng) samples of gold MPCs, of molecular masses up to ∼40 kDa, and with single-species sensitivity easily demonstrated for components on the level of sub-10 ng or picomole (1 pmol). PMID:27216373

  7. The Intrinsic Properties of the Stellar Clusters in the M82 Starburst Complex: Propagating Star Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, S.; Watson, Dan M.; Pipher, J. L.; Forrest, W. J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Smith, H. A.; Fischer, J.; Woodward, Charles E.

    1997-07-01

    Near-Infrared spectroscopy combined with high spatial resolution imaging have been used in this work to probe the central 500 pc of M82. Imaging observations in the 2.36 μm CO band head are added to our previously published near-infrared hydrogen recombination line imaging, near-infrared broadband imaging, and 3.29 μm dust feature imaging observations, in order to study the nature of the starburst stellar population. A starburst model is constructed and compared with the observations of the stellar clusters in the starburst complex. Our analysis implies that the typical age for the starburst clusters is 107 yr. In addition, our high spatial resolution observations indicate that there is an age dispersion within the starburst complex that is correlated with projected distance from the center of the galaxy. The inferred age dispersion is 6 × 106 yr. If the starburst in M82 is propagating outward from the center, this age dispersion corresponds to a velocity of propagation, originating in the center, of ~50 km s-1. Our quantitative analysis also reveals that a Salpeter initial mass function, extending from 0.1 to 100 M⊙, can fit the observed properties of M82 without using up more than 30% of the total dynamical mass in the starburst.

  8. Lipoprotein insertion into membranes of various complexity: lipid sorting, interfacial adsorption and protein clustering.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Nelli; Sperlich, Benjamin; Garivet, Guillaume; Waldmann, Herbert; Weise, Katrin; Winter, Roland

    2016-04-01

    In a combined chemical-biological and biophysical approach we explored the membrane partitioning of the lipidated signaling proteins N-Ras and K-Ras4B into membrane systems of different complexity, ranging from one-component lipid bilayers and anionic binary and ternary heterogeneous membrane systems even up to partitioning studies on protein-free and protein-containing giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). To yield a pictorial view of the localization process, imaging using confocal laser scanning and atomic force microscopy was performed. The results reveal pronounced isoform-specific differences regarding the lateral distribution and formation of protein-rich membrane domains. Line tension is one of the key parameters controlling not only the size and dynamic properties of segregated lipid domains but also the partitioning process of N-Ras that acts as a lineactant. The formation of N-Ras protein clusters is even recorded for almost vanishing hydrophobic mismatch. Conversely, for K-Ras4B, selective localization and clustering are electrostatically mediated by its polybasic farnesylated C-terminus. The formation of K-Ras4B clusters is also observed for the multi-component GPMV membrane, i.e., it seems to be a general phenomenon, largely independent of the details of the membrane composition, including the anionic charge density of lipid headgroups. Our data indicate that unspecific and entropy-driven membrane-mediated interactions play a major role in the partitioning behavior, thus relaxing the need for a multitude of fine-tuned interactions. Such a scenario seems also to be reasonable recalling the high dynamic nature of cellular membranes. Finally, we note that even relatively simple models of heterogeneous membranes are able to reproduce many of the properties of much more complex biological membranes. PMID:26960984

  9. STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES AND THE HOST GALAXY IN THREE H II GALAXIES: Mrk 36, UM 408, AND UM 461

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, P.; Telles, E.; Nigoche-Netro, A.

    2011-11-15

    We present a stellar population study of three H II galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high-resolution near-infrared J, H, and K{sub p} broadband and Br{gamma} narrowband images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine the relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low-luminosity H II galaxies is {approx}10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses {approx}>10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently and likely simultaneously over short timescales in their host galaxies, triggered by some internal mechanism. Finally, the fraction of the total cluster mass with respect to the low surface brightness (or host galaxy) mass, considering our complete range in ages, is less than 1%.

  10. Spatiotemporal Clustering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Genotypes in Florida: Genetic Diversity Segregated by Country of Birth

    PubMed Central

    Séraphin, Marie Nancy; Lauzardo, Michael; Morris, J. Glenn; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Although the MTBC is highly clonal, between-strain genetic diversity has been observed. In low TB incidence settings, immigration may facilitate the importation of MTBC strains with a potential to complicate TB control efforts. Methods We investigated the genetic diversity and spatiotemporal clustering of 2,510 MTBC strains isolated in Florida, United States, between 2009 and 2013 and genotyped using spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU-VNTR. We mapped the genetic diversity to the centroid of patient residential zip codes using a geographic information system (GIS). We assessed transmission dynamics and the influence of immigration on genotype clustering using space-time permutation models adjusted for foreign-born population density and county-level HIV risk and multinomial models stratified by country of birth and timing of immigration in SaTScan. Principal Findings Among the 2,510 strains, 1,245 were reported among foreign-born persons; including 408 recent immigrants (<5 years). Strain allelic diversity (h) ranged from low to medium in most locations and was most diverse in urban centers where foreign-born population density was also high. Overall, 21.5% of cases among U.S.-born persons and 4.6% among foreign-born persons clustered genotypically and spatiotemporally and involved strains of the Haarlem family. One Haarlem space-time cluster identified in the mostly rural northern region of Florida included US/Canada-born individuals incarcerated at the time of diagnosis; two clusters in the mostly urban southern region of Florida were composed predominantly of foreign-born persons. Both groups had HIV prevalence above twenty percent. Conclusions/Significance Almost five percent of TB cases reported in Florida during 2009–2013 were potentially due to recent transmission. Improvements to TB screening practices among the prison population and recent immigrants are

  11. Creation of cosmic structure in the complex galaxy cluster merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, J.; Coe, D.; Dupke, R.; Massey, R.; Zitrin, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Okabe, N.; Frye, B.; Braglia, F. G.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Rhodes, J.; Meneghetti, M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Krick, J.; Bregman, J. N.

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed strong-lensing, weak-lensing and X-ray analysis of Abell 2744 (z= 0.308), one of the most actively merging galaxy clusters known. It appears to have unleashed 'dark', 'ghost', 'bullet' and 'stripped' substructures, each ˜1014 M⊙. The phenomenology is complex and will present a challenge for numerical simulations to reproduce. With new, multiband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, we identify 34 strongly lensed images of 11 galaxies around the massive Southern 'core'. Combining this with weak-lensing data from HST, VLT and Subaru, we produce the most detailed mass map of this cluster to date. We also perform an independent analysis of archival Chandra X-ray imaging. Our analyses support a recent claim that the Southern core and Northwestern substructure are post-merger and exhibit morphology similar to the Bullet Cluster viewed from an angle. From the separation between X-ray emitting gas and lensing mass in the Southern core, we derive a new and independent constraint on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter particles σ/m < 3 ± 1 cm2 g-1. In the Northwestern substructure, the gas, dark matter and galaxy components have become separated by much larger distances. Most curiously, the 'ghost' clump (primarily gas) leads the 'dark' clump (primarily dark matter) by more than 150 kpc. We propose an enhanced 'ram-pressure slingshot' scenario which may have yielded this reversal of components with such a large separation, but needs further confirmation by follow-up observations and numerical simulations. A secondary merger involves a second 'bullet' clump in the North and an extremely 'stripped' clump to the West. The latter appears to exhibit the largest separation between dark matter and X-ray emitting baryons detected to date in our sky.

  12. Predicting Water Activity for Complex Wastes with Solvation Cluster Equilibria (SCE) - 12042

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, S.F.; Reynolds, J.G.; Johnston, C.T.

    2012-07-01

    Predicting an electrolyte mixture's water activity, i.e. the ratio of water vapor pressure over a solution with that of pure water, in principle reveals both boiling point and solubilities for that mixture. Better predictions of these properties helps support the ongoing missions to concentrate complex nuclear waste mixtures in order to conserve tank space and improved predictions of water activity will help. A new approach for predicting water activity, the solvation cluster equilibria (SCE) model, uses pure electrolyte water activities to predict water activity for a complex mixture of those electrolytes. An SCE function based on electrolyte hydration free energy and a standard Debye- Hueckel (DH) charge compression fits each pure electrolyte's water activity with three parameters. Given these pure electrolyte water activities, the SCE predicts any mixture water activity over a large range of concentration with an additional parameter for each mixture vector, the multinarity. In contrast to ionic strength, which scales with concentration, multinarity is related to the relative proportion of electrolytes in a mixture and can either increase or decrease the water activity prediction over a broad range of concentration for that mixture. The SCE model predicts water activity for complex electrolyte mixtures based on the water activities of pure electrolytes. Three parameter SCE functions fit the water activities of pure electrolytes and along with a single multinarity parameter for each mixture vector then predict the mixture water activity. Predictions of water activity can in principle predict solution electrolyte activity and this relationship will be explored in the future. Predicting electrolyte activities for complex mixtures provides a means of determining solubilities for each electrolyte. Although there are a number of reports [9, 10, 11] of water activity models for pure and binary mixtures of electrolytes, none of them compare measured versus calculated

  13. Communication: A reduced-space algorithm for the solution of the complex linear response equations used in coupled cluster damped response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Christiansen, Ove; Coriani, Sonia

    2013-12-01

    We present a reduced-space algorithm for solving the complex (damped) linear response equations required to compute the complex linear response function for the hierarchy of methods: coupled cluster singles, coupled cluster singles and iterative approximate doubles, and coupled cluster singles and doubles. The solver is the keystone element for the development of damped coupled cluster response methods for linear and nonlinear effects in resonant frequency regions.

  14. Ring opening of strained-ring heterocycles containing nitrogen by an osmium cluster complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.; Chen, Gong

    1992-11-01

    The osmium cluster complex Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}({mu}-NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2})({mu}-H) (1) was obtained in 34% yield from the reaction of Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(NCMe){sub 2} with azetidine. Complex 1 was characterized crystallographically and shown to contain a four-membered NCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2} ring bridging two of the metal atoms via the nitrogen atom. When heated to 125{degrees}C, 1 was transformed to the new complex Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}[{mu}-N=C(H)Et]({mu}-H) (2; 27% yield) by an opening of the four-membered ring and a hydrogen shift. Crystal data: for 1, space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 8.793 (2) A, b = 16.265 (2) A, c = 13.766 (4) A, {Beta} = 110.56 (1){degrees}, Z = 4, 1872 reflections, R = 0.039; for 2, space group P1, a = 92.73 (2){degrees}, {Beta} = 99.03 (2){degrees}, {gamma} = 81.52 (2){degrees}, Z = 6, 4862 reflections, R = 0.024. 16 refs. 2 figs.

  15. Clustering of time-evolving scaling dynamics in a complex signal.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Hamidreza; Chau, Tom; Kushki, Azadeh

    2016-07-01

    Complex time series are widespread in physics and physiology. Multifractal analysis provides a tool to study the scaling dynamics of such time series. However, the temporal evolution of scaling dynamics has been ignored by traditional tools such as the multifractal spectrum. We present scaling maps that add the time dimension to the study of scaling dynamics. This is particularly important in cases in which the dynamics of the underlying processes change in time or in applications that necessitate real-time detection of scaling dynamics. In addition, we present a methodology for automatic clustering of existing scaling regimes in a signal. We demonstrate the methodology on time-evolving correlated and uncorrelated noise and the output of a physiological control system (i.e., cardiac interbeat intervals) in healthy and pathological states. PMID:27575136

  16. Clustering of time-evolving scaling dynamics in a complex signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghir, Hamidreza; Chau, Tom; Kushki, Azadeh

    2016-07-01

    Complex time series are widespread in physics and physiology. Multifractal analysis provides a tool to study the scaling dynamics of such time series. However, the temporal evolution of scaling dynamics has been ignored by traditional tools such as the multifractal spectrum. We present scaling maps that add the time dimension to the study of scaling dynamics. This is particularly important in cases in which the dynamics of the underlying processes change in time or in applications that necessitate real-time detection of scaling dynamics. In addition, we present a methodology for automatic clustering of existing scaling regimes in a signal. We demonstrate the methodology on time-evolving correlated and uncorrelated noise and the output of a physiological control system (i.e., cardiac interbeat intervals) in healthy and pathological states.

  17. Atomically precise, coupled quantum dots fabricated by cleaved edge overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegscheider, W.; Schedelbeck, G.; Bichler, M.; Abstreiter, G.

    Recent progress in the fabrication of quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy along three directions in space is reviewed. The optical properties of different sample structures consisting of individual quantum dots, pairs of coupled dots as well as of linear arrays of dots are studied by microscopic photoluminescence spectroscopy. The high degree of control over shape, composition and position of the 7×7×7 nm3 size GaAs quantum dots, which form at the intesection of three orthogonal quantum wells, allows a detailed investigation of the influence of coupling between almost identical zero-dimensional objects. In contrast to the inhomogeneously broadened quantum well and quantum wire signals originating from the complex twofold cleaved edge overgrowth structure, the photoluminescence spetrum of an individual quantum dot exhibits a single sharp line (full width at half maximum <70μeV) almost free of background signal. Microscopic photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy directly reveals the discreteness of the energy levels of the zero-dimensional structures and justifies the denomination "artificial atoms" for the quantum dots. It is further demonstrated that an "artifical molecule", characterized by the existence of bonding and antibonding states can be assembled from two of such "artificial atoms". The coupling strength between the "artificial atoms" is adjusted by the "interatomic" distance and is reflected in the energetic separation of the bonding and antibonding levels and the linewidths of the corresponding interband transitions.

  18. CHIMERA: Top-down model for hierarchical, overlapping and directed cluster structures in directed and weighted complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, R.

    2016-11-01

    In many networks discovered in biology, medicine, neuroscience and other disciplines special properties like a certain degree distribution and hierarchical cluster structure (also called communities) can be observed as general organizing principles. Detecting the cluster structure of an unknown network promises to identify functional subdivisions, hierarchy and interactions on a mesoscale. It is not trivial choosing an appropriate detection algorithm because there are multiple network, cluster and algorithmic properties to be considered. Edges can be weighted and/or directed, clusters overlap or build a hierarchy in several ways. Algorithms differ not only in runtime, memory requirements but also in allowed network and cluster properties. They are based on a specific definition of what a cluster is, too. On the one hand, a comprehensive network creation model is needed to build a large variety of benchmark networks with different reasonable structures to compare algorithms. On the other hand, if a cluster structure is already known, it is desirable to separate effects of this structure from other network properties. This can be done with null model networks that mimic an observed cluster structure to improve statistics on other network features. A third important application is the general study of properties in networks with different cluster structures, possibly evolving over time. Currently there are good benchmark and creation models available. But what is left is a precise sandbox model to build hierarchical, overlapping and directed clusters for undirected or directed, binary or weighted complex random networks on basis of a sophisticated blueprint. This gap shall be closed by the model CHIMERA (Cluster Hierarchy Interconnection Model for Evaluation, Research and Analysis) which will be introduced and described here for the first time.

  19. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, W.

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S{sub 2} state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2} state with the g{approx}4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S{sub 2}-g4 state) was compared with that in the S{sub 2} state with multiline signal (S{sub 2}-MLS state) and the S{sub 1} state. The S{sub 2}-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S{sub 1} state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S{sub 1} to the S{sub 2}-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2}-g4 state is different from that in the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. In the S{sub 2}-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 {angstrom} and 2.85 {angstrom}. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S{sub 1} or S{sub 2}-MLS states. The third shell of the S{sub 2}-g4 state at about 3.3 {angstrom} also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S{sub 1} {yields} S{sub 2} transition.

  20. The CRISPR-associated DNA-cleaving enzyme Cpf1 also processes precursor CRISPR RNA.

    PubMed

    Fonfara, Ines; Richter, Hagen; Bratovič, Majda; Le Rhun, Anaïs; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-28

    CRISPR-Cas systems that provide defence against mobile genetic elements in bacteria and archaea have evolved a variety of mechanisms to target and cleave RNA or DNA. The well-studied types I, II and III utilize a set of distinct CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins for production of mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) and interference with invading nucleic acids. In types I and III, Cas6 or Cas5d cleaves precursor crRNA (pre-crRNA) and the mature crRNAs then guide a complex of Cas proteins (Cascade-Cas3, type I; Csm or Cmr, type III) to target and cleave invading DNA or RNA. In type II systems, RNase III cleaves pre-crRNA base-paired with trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) in the presence of Cas9 (refs 13, 14). The mature tracrRNA-crRNA duplex then guides Cas9 to cleave target DNA. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism in CRISPR-Cas immunity. We show that type V-A Cpf1 from Francisella novicida is a dual-nuclease that is specific to crRNA biogenesis and target DNA interference. Cpf1 cleaves pre-crRNA upstream of a hairpin structure formed within the CRISPR repeats and thereby generates intermediate crRNAs that are processed further, leading to mature crRNAs. After recognition of a 5'-YTN-3' protospacer adjacent motif on the non-target DNA strand and subsequent probing for an eight-nucleotide seed sequence, Cpf1, guided by the single mature repeat-spacer crRNA, introduces double-stranded breaks in the target DNA to generate a 5' overhang. The RNase and DNase activities of Cpf1 require sequence- and structure-specific binding to the hairpin of crRNA repeats. Cpf1 uses distinct active domains for both nuclease reactions and cleaves nucleic acids in the presence of magnesium or calcium. This study uncovers a new family of enzymes with specific dual endoribonuclease and endonuclease activities, and demonstrates that type V-A constitutes the most minimalistic of the CRISPR-Cas systems so far described. PMID:27096362

  1. A CEP215-HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K; Woods, C Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215-HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome-spindle pole interface by the CEP215-HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  2. Electrostatic complexation of polyelectrolyte and magnetic nanoparticles: from wild clustering to controllable magnetic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Minhao; Qu, Li; Fan, Jiangxia; Ren, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We present the electrostatic complexation between polyelectrolytes and charged nanoparticles. The nanoparticles in solution are γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) spheres with 8.3 nm diameter and anionic surface charges. The complexation was monitored using three different formulation pathways such as direct mixing, dilution, and dialysis. In the first process, the hybrids were obtained by mixing stock solutions of polymers and nanoparticles. A `destabilization state' with sharp and intense maximum aggregation was found at charges stoichiometry (isoelectric point). While on the two sides of the isoelectric point, `long-lived stable clusters state' (arrested states) were observed. Dilution and dialysis processes were based on controlled desalting kinetics according to methods developed in molecular biology. Under an external magnetic field ( B = 0.3 T), from dialysis at isoelectric point and at arrested states, cationic polyelectrolytes can `paste' these magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) together to yield irregular aggregates (size of 100 μm) and regular rod-like aggregates, respectively. These straight magnetic wires were fabricated with diameters around 200 nm and lengths comprised between 1 μm and 0.5 mm. The wires can have either positive or negative charges on their surface. After analyzing their orientational behavior under an external rotating field, we also showed that the wires made from different polyelectrolytes have the same magnetic property. The recipe used a wide range of polyelectrolytes thereby enhancing the versatility and applied potentialities of the method. This simple and general approach presents significant perspective for the fabrication of hybrid functional materials.

  3. The Raman and vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-containing complexes and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maxton, P.M.; Schaeffer, M.W.; Ohline, S.M.; Kim, W.; Venturo, V.A.; Felker, P.M. )

    1994-11-15

    Theoretical and experimental results pertaining to the excitation of intermolecular vibrations in the Raman and vibronic spectra of aromatic-containing, weakly bound complexes and clusters are reported. The theoretical analysis of intermolecular Raman activity is based on the assumption that the polarizability tensor of a weakly bound species is given by the sum of the polarizability tensors of its constituent monomers. The analysis shows that the van der Waals bending fundamentals in aromatic--rare gas complexes may be expected to be strongly Raman active. More generally, it predicts strong Raman activity for intermolecular vibrations that involve the libration or internal rotation of monomer moieties having appreciable permanent polarizability anisotropies. The vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-rare gas complexes is analyzed under the assumption that every vibronic band gains its strength from an aromatic-localized transition. It is found that intermolecular vibrational excitations can accompany aromatic-localized vibronic excitations by the usual Franck--Condon mechanism or by a mechanism dependent on the librational amplitude of the aromatic moiety during the course of the pertinent intermolecular vibration. The latter mechanism can impart appreciable intensity to bands that are forbidden by rigid-molecule symmetry selection rules. The applicability of such rules is therefore called into question. Finally, experimental spectra of intermolecular transitions, obtained by mass-selective, ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies, are reported for benzene--X (X=Ar, --Ar[sub 2], N[sub 2], HCl, CO[sub 2], and --fluorene), fluorobenzene--Ar and --Kr, aniline--Ar, and fluorene--Ar and --Ar[sub 2]. The results support the conclusions of the theoretical analyses and provide further evidence for the value of Raman methods in characterizing intermolecular vibrational level structures.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxies in the UMa cluster complex (Karachentsev+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.; Courtois, H. M.

    2015-04-01

    A nearby friable cloud in Ursa Majoris contains 270 galaxies with radial velocities 500complex. According to Makarov & Karachentsev (2011MNRAS.412.2498M, Cat. J/MNRAS/412/2498), most of the UMa galaxies belong to seven bound groups, which have the following median parameters: velocity dispersion of 58k/s, harmonic projected radius of 300kpc, virial mass of 2x1012M⊙ and virial mass-to-K-band luminosity ratio of 27M⊙/L⊙. Almost a half of the UMa cloud population are gas-rich dwarfs (Ir, Im, BCD) with active star formation seen in the GALEX UV-survey. The UMa groups reside within 15-19Mpc from us, being just at the same distance as the Virgo cluster. The total virial mass of the UMa groups is 4x1013M⊙, yielding the average density of dark matter in the UMa cloud to be Ωm=0.08, i.e. a factor of 3 lower than the cosmic average. This is despite the fact that the UMa cloud resides in a region of the Universe that is an apparent overdensity. A possible explanation for this is that most mass in the Universe lies in the empty space between clusters. Herewith, the mean distances and velocities of the UMa groups follow nearly undisturbed Hubble flow without a sign of the 'Z-wave' effect caused by infall towards a massive attractor. This constrains the total amount of dark matter between the UMa groups within the cloud volume. (1 data file).

  5. The human brm protein is cleaved during apoptosis: the role of cathepsin G.

    PubMed

    Biggs, J R; Yang, J; Gullberg, U; Muchardt, C; Yaniv, M; Kraft, A S

    2001-03-27

    The human brm (hbrm) protein (homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster brahma and Saccharomyces cervisiae SNF-2 proteins) is part of a polypeptide complex believed to regulate chromatin conformation. We have shown that the hbrm protein is cleaved in NB4 leukemic cells after induction of apoptosis by UV-irradiation, DNA damaging agents, or staurosporine. Because hbrm is found only in the nucleus, we have investigated the nature of the proteases that may regulate the degradation of this protein during apoptosis. In an in vitro assay, the hbrm protein could not be cleaved by caspase-3, -7, or -6, the "effector" caspases generally believed to carry out the cleavage of nuclear protein substrates. In contrast, we find that cathepsin G, a granule enzyme found in NB4 cells, cleaves hbrm in a pattern similar to that observed in vivo during apoptosis. In addition, a peptide inhibitor of cathepsin G blocks hbrm cleavage during apoptosis but does not block activation of caspases or cleavage of the nuclear protein polyADP ribose polymerase (PARP). Although localized in granules and in the Golgi complex in untreated cells, cathepsin G becomes diffusely distributed during apoptosis. Cleavage by cathepsin G removes a 20-kDa fragment containing a bromodomain from the carboxyl terminus of hbrm. This cleavage disrupts the association between hbrm and the nuclear matrix; the 160-kDa hbrm cleavage fragment is less tightly associated with the nuclear matrix than full-length hbrm. PMID:11259672

  6. Nucleophilic ring opening of bridging thietanes in open triosmium cluster complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.; Belinski, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    The complexes Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}({mu}{sub 3}-S)[{mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}] (1) and Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}({mu}{sub 3}-S)[{mu}-SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}] (2) were obtained from the reactions of Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}({mu}{sub 3}-S) with 3,3-dimethylthietane (DMT) and thietane, respectively, at -42 {degree}C in the presence of Me{sub 3}NO. Compound 1 was characterized by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and was found to contain a DMT group bridging two of the nonbonded metal atoms in the open cluster of three metal atoms by using both lone pairs of electrons on the sulfur atom. Compound 1 reacted with bis(triphenylphosphine)nitrogen(1+) chloride ([PPN]Cl) at 25 {degrees}C to yield the salt [PPN][Os{sub 3}-(CO){sub 9}({mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Cl)({mu}{sub 3}-S)] (3; 76%), in which the chloride ion was added to one of the methylene groups of the DMT ring in a process that caused the ring to open by cleavage of one of the carbon-sulfur bonds. A 4-chloro-3,3-dimethylpropanethiolate ligand bridges the open edge of the anionic triosmium cluster. Compound 3 was converted to the neutral complex Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}[{mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Cl]({mu}{sub 3}-S)({mu}-H) (4) by reaction with HCl at 25 {degrees}C. Compound 4 is structurally similar to 3, except that is contains a hydride ligand bridging one of the two metal-metal bonds. Compounds 1 and 2 react with HCl in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solvent to yield the neutral compounds 4 and Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}[{mu}-SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Cl]({mu}{sub 3}-S)({mu}-H) (5) in 89% and 90% yields, respectively, in one step. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Nucleophilic ring opening of bridging thietane ligands in trirhenium carbonyl cluster complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.; Cortopassi, J.E.; Falloon, S.B.

    1992-11-01

    The reactions of 3,3-dimethylthietane, SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2} (3,3-DMT), and thietane, SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}, with Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}[{mu}-SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}]({mu}-H){sub 3}, 2b. Compound 2a was characterized crystallographically and was found to consist of a trirhenium cluster with three bridging hydride ligands and a bridging thietane ligand coordinated through its sulfur atom. 2a and 2b react with halide ions by ring-opening additions to the 3,3-DMT ligand to yield the complex anions [Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}({mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}x)({mu}-h){sub 3}]{sup -} 3A-6A, X = F (71%), Cl(71%), Br(84%), I(87%) and [Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}({mu}-SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Cl)({mu}-H){sub 3}]{sup -}, 4b (67%). Similarly, addition of NMe{sub 3} to 2a and 2b yielded the ring-opened zwitterions Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}({mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NMe{sub 3})({mu}-H){sub 3}, 7 a crystographically. They are zwitterions positively charged at the nitrogen atoms and negatively charged on the trirhenium clusters. Complex 7b was also obtained in a 48% yield from the reaction of Re{sub 3}(C){sub 12}({mu}-H){sub 3} with Me{sub 3}NO in the presence of thietane, but the corresponding reaction using 3,3-DMT yielded only 2a and Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 11}(SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2})({mu}-H){sub 3}, 8. Attempts to obtain a ring-opening addition to 2a by reaction with PMe{sub 2}Ph yielded only Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(PMe{sub 2}PH){sub 2}({mu}-H){sub 3} by ligand substitution. Attempts to obtain ring opening addition to 8 by reaction with I{sup -} yielded only [Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 11}I({mu}-H){sub 3}]{sup -} by ligand substitution. 20 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. A widespread self-cleaving ribozyme class is revealed by bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Adam; Weinberg, Zasha; Chen, Andy G. Y.; Kim, Peter B.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2013-01-01

    Ribozymes are noncoding RNAs that promote chemical transformations with rate enhancements approaching those of protein enzymes. Although ribozymes are likely to have been abundant during the RNA world era, only ten classes are known to exist among contemporary organisms. We report the discovery and analysis of an additional self-cleaving ribozyme class, called twister, which is present in many species of bacteria and eukarya. Nearly 2700 twister ribozymes were identified that conform to a secondary structure consensus that is small yet complex, with three stems conjoined by internal and terminal loops. Two pseudoknots provide tertiary structure contacts that are critical for catalytic activity. The twister ribozyme motif provides another example of a natural RNA catalyst and calls attention to the potentially varied biological roles of this and other classes of widely distributed self-cleaving RNAs. PMID:24240507

  9. Non-traditional spectral clustering algorithms for the detection of community structure in complex networks: a comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoke; Gao, Lin

    2011-05-01

    The detection of community structure in complex networks is crucial since it provides insight into the substructures of the whole network. Spectral clustering algorithms that employ the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of an appropriate input matrix have been successfully applied in this field. Despite its empirical success in community detection, spectral clustering has been criticized for its inefficiency when dealing with large scale data sets. This is confirmed by the fact that the time complexity for spectral clustering is cubic with respect to the number of instances; even the memory efficient iterative eigensolvers, such as the power method, may converge slowly to the desired solutions. In efforts to improve the complexity and performance, many non-traditional spectral clustering algorithms have been proposed. Rather than using the real eigenvalues and eigenvectors as in the traditional methods, the non-traditional clusterings employ additional topological structure information characterized by the spectrum of a matrix associated with the network involved, such as the complex eigenvalues and their corresponding complex eigenvectors, eigenspaces and semi-supervised labels. However, to the best of our knowledge, no work has been devoted to comparison among these newly developed approaches. This is the main goal of this paper, through evaluating the effectiveness of these spectral algorithms against some benchmark networks. The experimental results demonstrate that the spectral algorithm based on the eigenspaces achieves the best performance but is the slowest algorithm; the semi-supervised spectral algorithm is the fastest but its performance largely depends on the prior knowledge; and the spectral method based on the complement network shows similar performance to the conventional ones.

  10. Carbonyl substitution chemistry of some trimetallic transition metal cluster complexes with polyfunctional ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Lindsay T.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Torabi, A. Asgar; White, Allan H.; Wild, S. Bruce

    2008-11-03

    The trimetallic clusters [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppm)], [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] and [RuCo{sub 2}(CO){sub 11}] react with a number of multifunctional secondary phosphine and tertiary arsine ligands to give products consequent on carbonyl substitution and, in the case of the secondary phosphines, PH activation. The reaction with the unresolved mixed P/S donor, 1-phenylphosphino-2-thio(ethane), HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PHPh ({double_bond}LH{sub 2}), gave two products under various conditions which have been characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic means. These two complexes [Ru{sub 3}({mu}dppm)(H)(CO){sub 7}(LH)] and [Ru{sub 3}({mu}-dppm)(H)(CO){sub 8}(LH)Ru{sub 3}({mu}-dppm)(CO){sub 9}], show the versatility of the ligand, with it chelating in the former and bridging two Ru{sub 3} units in the latter. The stereogenic centres in the molecules gave rise to complicated spectroscopic data which are consistent with the presence of diastereoisomers. In the case of [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] the reaction with LH{sub 2} gave a poor yield of a tetranuclear butterfly cluster, [Ru{sub 4}(CO){sub 10}(L){sub 2}], in which two of the ligands bridge opposite hinge wingtip bonds of the cluster. A related ligand, HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}AsMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe), reacted with [RuCo{sub 2}(CO){sub 11}] to give a low yield of the heterobimetallic Ru-Co adduct, [RuCo(CO){sub 6}(SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}AsMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe))], which appears to be the only one of its type so far structurally characterized. The secondary phosphine, HPMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}OMe)) and its oxide HP(O)Me(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}OMe)) also react with the cluster [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppm)] to give carbonyl substitution products, [Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 5}(dppm)({mu}{sub 2}-PMe(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe)){sub 4}], and [Ru{sub 3}H(CO){sub 7}(dppm)({mu}{sub 2},{eta}{sup 1}P({double_bond}O)Me(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}OMe))]. The former consists of an open Ru{sub 3} triangle with four

  11. Ca cofactor of the water-oxidation complex: Evidence for a Mn/Ca heteronuclear cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Cinco, Roehl M.; Robblee, John H.; Messinger, Johannes; Fernandez, Carmen; McFarlane, Karen L.; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Sauer, Ken; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2001-07-25

    Calcium and chloride are necessary cofactors for the proper function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II). Located in the thylakoid membranes of green plants, cyanobacteria and algae, PS II and the OEC catalyze the light-driven oxidation of water into dioxygen (released into the biosphere), protons and electrons for carbon fixation. The actual chemistry of water oxidation is performed by a cluster of four manganese atoms, along with the requisite cofactors Ca{sup 2+} and Cl{sup -}. While the Mn complex has been extensively studied by X-ray absorption techniques, comparatively less is known about the Ca{sup 2+} cofactor. The fewer number of studies on the Ca{sup 2+} cofactor have sometimes relied on substituting the native cofactor with strontium or other metals, and have stirred some debate about the structure of the binding site. past efforts using Mn EXAFS on Sr-substituted PSII are suggestive of a close link between the Mn cluster and Sr, within 3.5 {angstrom}. The most recent published study using Sr EXAFS on similar samples confirms this finding of a 3.5 {angstrom} distance between Mn and Sr. This finding was base3d on a second Fourier peak (R {approx} 3 {angstrom}) in the Sr EXAFS from functional samples, but is absent from inactive, hydroxylamine-treated PS II. This Fourier peak II was found to fit best to two Mn at 3.5 {angstrom} rather than lighter atoms (carbon). Nevertheless, other experiments have given contrary results. They wanted to extend the technique by using polarized Sr EXAFS on layered Sr-substituted samples, to provide important angle information. Polarized EXAFS involves collecting spectra for different incident angles ({theta}) between the membrane normal of the layered sample and the X-ray electric field vector. Dichroism in the EXAFS can occur, depending on how the particular absorber-backscatterer (A-B) vector is aligned with the electric field. Through analysis of the dichroism, they extract the average number

  12. X-ray observations of complex temperature structure in the cool-core cluster A85

    SciTech Connect

    Schenck, David E.; Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Sam

    2014-07-01

    X-ray observations were used to examine the complex temperature structure of A85, a cool-core galaxy cluster. Temperature features can provide evidence of merging events which shock heat the intracluster gas. Temperature maps were made from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. The combination of a new, long-exposure XMM observation and an improved temperature map binning technique produced the highest fidelity temperature maps of A85 to date. Hot regions were detected near the subclusters to the south and southwest in both the Chandra and XMM temperature maps. The presence of these structures implies A85 is not relaxed. The hot regions may indicate the presence of shocks. The Mach numbers were estimated to be ∼1.9 at the locations of the hot spots. Observational effects will tend to systematically reduce temperature jumps, so the measured Mach numbers are likely underestimated. Neither temperature map showed evidence for a shock in the vicinity of the presumed radio relic near the southwest subcluster. However, the presence of a weak shock cannot be ruled out. There was tension between the temperatures measured by the two instruments.

  13. Tribological coatings for complex mechanical elements produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of metal dichalcogenide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzoni, C.; Buttery, M.; Hampson, M. R.; Roberts, E. W.; Ducati, C.; Lenardi, C.; Cavaliere, F.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2015-07-01

    Fullerene-like MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of fluid and solid lubricants. Metal dichalcogenide films have a very low friction coefficient in vacuum, therefore they have mostly been used as solid lubricants in space and vacuum applications. Unfortunately, their use is significantly hampered by the fact that in the presence of humidity, oxygen and moisture, the low-friction properties of these materials rapidly degrade due to oxidation. The use of closed-cage MoS2 and WS2 nanoparticles may eliminate this problem, although the fabrication of lubricant thin films starting from dichalcogenide nanoparticles is, to date, a difficult task. Here we demonstrate the use of supersonic cluster beam deposition for the coating of complex mechanical elements (angular contact ball bearings) with nanostructured MoS2 and WS2 thin films. We report structural and tribological characterization of the coatings in view of the optimization of tribological performances for aerospace applications.

  14. Frontier Fields Clusters: Deep Chandra Observations of the Complex Merger MACS~J1149.6+2223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrean, G. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Dawson, W. A.; Golovich, N.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Murray, S. S.; Nulsen, P.; Roediger, E.; Zitrin, A.; Bulbul, E.; Kraft, R.; Goulding, A.; Umetsu, K.; Mroczkowski, T.; Bonafede, A.; Randall, S.; Sayers, J.; Churazov, E.; David, L.; Merten, J.; Donahue, M.; Mason, B.; Rosati, P.; Vikhlinin, A.; Ebeling, H.

    2016-03-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields cluster MACS J1149.6+2223 is one of the most complex merging clusters, believed to consist of four dark matter halos. We present results from deep (365 ks) Chandra observations of the cluster, which reveal the most distant cold front (z = 0.544) discovered to date. In the cluster outskirts, we also detect hints of a surface brightness edge that could be the bow shock preceding the cold front. The substructure analysis of the cluster identified several components with large relative radial velocities, thus indicating that at least some collisions occur almost along the line of sight. The inclination of the mergers with respect to the plane of the sky poses significant observational challenges at X-ray wavelengths. MACS J1149.6+2223 possibly hosts a steep-spectrum radio halo. If the steepness of the radio halo is confirmed, then the radio spectrum, combined with the relatively regular ICM morphology, could indicate that MACS J1149.6+2223 is an old merging cluster.

  15. Organizational and mutational analysis of a complete FR-008/candicidin gene cluster encoding a structurally related polyene complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Huang, Xi; Zhou, Xiufen; Bai, Linquan; He, Jing; Jeong, Ki Jun; Lee, Sang Yup; Deng, Zixin

    2003-11-01

    The complete gene cluster for biosynthesis of a polyene complex, FR-008, spans 137.2 kb of the genome of Streptomyces sp. FR-008 consisting of six genes for a modular PKS and 15 additional genes. The extensive similarity to the partially characterized candicidin gene cluster in Streptomyces griseus IMRU3570, especially for genes involved in mycosamine biosynthesis, prompted us to compare the compounds produced by Streptomyces sp. FR-008 and Streptomyces griseus IMRU3570, and we found that FR-008 and candicidin complex are identical. A model for biosynthesis of a set of four structurally related FR-008/candicidin compounds was proposed. Deletion of the putative regulatory genes abolished antibiotic production, while disruption of putative glycosyltransferase and GDP-ketosugar aminotransferase functionalities led to the productions of a set of nonmycosaminated aglycones and a novel polyene complex with attachment of altered sugar moiety, respectively. PMID:14652074

  16. The properties of clusters in the gas phase. IV - Complexes of H2O and HNOx clustering on NOx/-/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.; Keesee, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermodynamic quantities for the gas-phase clustering equilibria of NO2(-) and NO3(-) were determined with high-pressure mass spectrometry. A comparison of values of the free energy of hydration derived from the data shows good agreement with formerly reported values at 296 K. New data for larger NO2(-) and NO3(-) hydrates as well as NO2(-)(HNO2)n were obtained in this study. To aid in understanding the bonding and stability of the hydrates of nitrite and nitrate ions, CNDO/2 calculations were performed, and the results are discussed. A correlation between the aqueous-phase total hydration enthalpy of a single ion and its gas-phase hydration enthalpy was obtained. Atmospheric implications of the data are also briefly discussed.

  17. Ring opening and carbonylation of 3,3-dimethylthietane ligands in ruthenium carbonyl cluster complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.; Belinski, J.A.; Yamamoto, J.H.

    1992-10-01

    When heated to 97{degrees}C, the complex Ru{sub 4}(CO){sub 12}[{mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}]2 (1) was transformed into two new hexaruthenium cluster complexes, Ru{sub 6}(CO){sub 13}({mu}{sub 3}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 4} (2) and Ru{sub 6}(CO){sub 12}({mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2})({mu}{sub 3}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 3}[{mu}{sub 3}-SCH{sub 2}C(Me)(CH{sub 2})CH{sub 2}] ({mu}-H) (3), that contain four and five ring-opened 3,3-dimethylthietane (3,3-DMT) ligands, respectively. In compound 3 one of the ring-opened DMT ligands has also undergone a CH activation on one of the methyl groups. Compound 2 reacts with additional 3,3-DMT at 97{degrees}C to form 3 in 18% yield. When treated with CO at 95{degrees}C (500 psi), compound 2 yielded 4,4-dimethylthiobutyrolactone and Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}. It was also found that the complex Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 11-}(SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C{double_bond}O) (4) yields 4,4-dimethylthiobutyrolactone when treated with CO at 120{degrees}C (1200 psi). Crystal data for 2: space group P2{sub 1}/n, {alpha} = 22.652 (7) A, {beta} = 11.712 (2) A, c = 19.965 (6) A, {Beta} = 115.75 (2){degrees} Z = 4, 3665 reflections, R = 0.021. Crystal data for 3: space group P2{sub 1}/c, {alpha} = 17.332 (8) A, {Beta} = 14.668 (9) A, c = 19.823 (9) A, {Beta} = 91.27 (4){degrees}, Z = 4, 1875 reflections, R = 0.050. 13 refs., 2 figs., 13 refs.

  18. The Ether-Cleaving Methyltransferase System of the Strict Anaerobe Acetobacterium dehalogenans: Analysis and Expression of the Encoding Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Schilhabel, Anke; Studenik, Sandra; Vödisch, Martin; Kreher, Sandra; Schlott, Bernhard; Pierik, Antonio Y.; Diekert, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic O-demethylases are inducible multicomponent enzymes which mediate the cleavage of the ether bond of phenyl methyl ethers and the transfer of the methyl group to tetrahydrofolate. The genes of all components (methyltransferases I and II, CP, and activating enzyme [AE]) of the vanillate- and veratrol-O-demethylases of Acetobacterium dehalogenans were sequenced and analyzed. In A. dehalogenans, the genes for methyltransferase I, CP, and methyltransferase II of both O-demethylases are clustered. The single-copy gene for AE is not included in the O-demethylase gene clusters. It was found that AE grouped with COG3894 proteins, the function of which was unknown so far. Genes encoding COG3894 proteins with 20 to 41% amino acid sequence identity with AE are present in numerous genomes of anaerobic microorganisms. Inspection of the domain structure and genetic context of these orthologs predicts that these are also reductive activases for corrinoid enzymes (RACEs), such as carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl coenzyme A synthases or anaerobic methyltransferases. The genes encoding the O-demethylase components were heterologously expressed with a C-terminal Strep-tag in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins methyltransferase I, CP, and AE were characterized. Gel shift experiments showed that the AE comigrated with the CP. The formation of other protein complexes with the O-demethylase components was not observed under the conditions used. The results point to a strong interaction of the AE with the CP. This is the first report on the functional heterologous expression of acetogenic phenyl methyl ether-cleaving O-demethylases. PMID:19011025

  19. Assessment of the CCSD and CCSD(T) Coupled-Cluster Methods in Calculating Heats of Formation for Zn Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Michael N.; Yang, Yue; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2009-08-01

    Heats of formation were calculated using coupled-cluster methods for a series of zinc complexes. The calculated values were evaluated against previously conducted computational studies using density functional methods as well as experimental values. Heats of formation for nine neutral ZnXn complexes [X = -Zn, -H, -O, -F2, -S, -Cl, -Cl2, -CH3, (-CH3)2] were determined at the CCSD and CCSD(T) levels using the 6-31G** and TZVP basis sets as well as the LANL2DZ-6-31G** (LACVP**) and LANL2DZ-TZVP hybrid basis sets. The CCSD(T)/6-31G** level of theory was found to predict the heat of formation for the nonalkyl Zn complexes most accurately. The alkyl Zn species were problematic in that none of the methods that were tested accurately predicted the heat of formation for these complexes. In instances where experimental geometric parameters were available, these were most accurately predicted by the CCSD/6-31G** level of theory; going to CCSD(T) did not improve agreement with the experimental values. Coupled-cluster methods did not offer a systemic improvement over DFT calculations for a given functional/basis set combination. With the exceptions of ZnH and ZnF2, there are multiple density functionals that outperform coupled-cluster calculations with the 6-31G** basis set.

  20. Analysis of the Tribolium homeotic complex: insights into mechanisms constraining insect Hox clusters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The remarkable conservation of Hox clusters is an accepted but little understood principle of biology. Some organizational constraints have been identified for vertebrate Hox clusters, but most of these are thought to be recent innovations that may not apply to other organisms. Ironically, many mode...

  1. Probing the Dragonfish star-forming complex: the ionizing population of the young massive cluster Mercer 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Borissova, J.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Hanson, M. M.; Trombley, C.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Garcia, M.; Kurtev, R.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Smith, L. C.; Lucas, P. W.; Herrero, A.

    2016-05-01

    It has recently been claimed that the nebula, Dragonfish, is powered by a superluminous but elusive OB association. However, systematic searches in near-infrared photometric surveys have found many other cluster candidates in this region of the sky. Among these, the first confirmed young massive cluster was Mercer 30, where Wolf-Rayet stars were found.We perform a new characterization of Mercer 30 with unprecedented accuracy, combining NICMOS/HST and VVV photometric data with multi-epoch ISAAC/VLT H- and K-band spectra. Stellar parameters for most of spectroscopically observed cluster members are found through precise non-LTE atmosphere modeling with the CMFGEN code. Our spectrophotometric study for this cluster yields a new, revised distance of d = (12.4 ± 1.7) kpc and a total of QHMc30 ≈ 6.70 × 1050 s-1 Lyman ionizing photons. A cluster age of (4.0 ± 0.8) Myr is found through isochrone fitting, and a total mass of (1.6 ± 0.6) × 104M⊙ is estimated, thanks to our extensive knowledge of the post-main-sequence population. As a consequence, membership of Mercer 30 to the Dragonfish star-forming complex is confirmed, allowing us to use this cluster as a probe for the whole complex, which turns out to be extremely large (~400 pc across) and located at the outer edge of the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (~11 kpc from the Galactic center). The Dragonfish complex hosts 19 young clusters or cluster candidates (including Mercer 30 and a new candidate presented in this work) and an estimated minimum of nine field Wolf-Rayet stars. All these contributions account for, at least 73% of the ionization of the Dragonfish nebula and leaves little or no room for the alleged superluminous OB association; alternative explanations are discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs IDs 179.B-2002, 081.D-0471, 083.D-0765, 087.D-0957, and 089.D-0989.

  2. Probing the Dragonfish star-forming complex: the ionizing population of the young massive cluster Mercer 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Borissova, J.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Hanson, M. M.; Trombley, C.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Garcia, M.; Kurtev, R.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Smith, L. C.; Lucas, P. W.; Herrero, A.

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been claimed that the nebula, Dragonfish, is powered by a superluminous but elusive OB association. However, systematic searches in near-infrared photometric surveys have found many other cluster candidates in this region of the sky. Among these, the first confirmed young massive cluster was Mercer 30, where Wolf-Rayet stars were found.We perform a new characterization of Mercer 30 with unprecedented accuracy, combining NICMOS/HST and VVV photometric data with multi-epoch ISAAC/VLT H- and K-band spectra. Stellar parameters for most of spectroscopically observed cluster members are found through precise non-LTE atmosphere modeling with the CMFGEN code. Our spectrophotometric study for this cluster yields a new, revised distance of d = (12.4 ± 1.7) kpc and a total of QHMc30 ≈ 6.70 × 1050 s-1 Lyman ionizing photons. A cluster age of (4.0 ± 0.8) Myr is found through isochrone fitting, and a total mass of (1.6 ± 0.6) × 104M⊙ is estimated, thanks to our extensive knowledge of the post-main-sequence population. As a consequence, membership of Mercer 30 to the Dragonfish star-forming complex is confirmed, allowing us to use this cluster as a probe for the whole complex, which turns out to be extremely large (~400 pc across) and located at the outer edge of the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (~11 kpc from the Galactic center). The Dragonfish complex hosts 19 young clusters or cluster candidates (including Mercer 30 and a new candidate presented in this work) and an estimated minimum of nine field Wolf-Rayet stars. All these contributions account for, at least 73% of the ionization of the Dragonfish nebula and leaves little or no room for the alleged superluminous OB association; alternative explanations are discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs IDs 179.B-2002, 081.D-0471, 083.D-0765, 087.D-0957, and 089.D-0989.

  3. Cluster synchronization of complex networks via event-triggered strategy under stochastic sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Aihua; Cao, Jinde; Hu, Manfeng; Guo, Liuxiao

    2015-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the issue of mean square cluster synchronization of non-identical nodes connected by a directed network. Suppose that the nodes possess nonlinear dynamics and split into several clusters, then an event-triggered control scheme is proposed for synchronization based on the information from stochastic sampling. Meanwhile, an equilibrium is considered to be the synchronization state or the virtual leader for each cluster, which can apply pinning control to the following nodes. Assume that a spanning tree exists in the subgraph consisting of the nodes belonging to the same cluster and the corresponding virtual leader, and the instants for updating controllers are determined by the given event-triggered strategy, then some sufficient conditions for cluster synchronization are presented according to the Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality technique. Finally, a specific numerical example is shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  4. RNA-Cleaving DNA Enzymes with Altered Regio- or Enantioselectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    In vitro evolution methods were used to obtain DNA enzymes that cleave either a 2',5' - phosphodiester following a wibonucleotide or a 3',5' -phosphodiester following an L-ribonucleotide. Both enzymes can operate in an intermolecular reaction format with multiple turnover. The DNA enzyme that cleaves a 2',5' -phosphodiester exhibits a k(sub cat) of approx. 0.01/ min and catalytic efficiency, k(sub cat)/k(sub m) of approx. 10(exp 5)/ M min. The enzyme that cleaves an L-ribonudeotide is about 10-fold slower and has a catalytic efficiency of approx. 4 x 10(exp 5)/ M min. Both enzymes require a divalent metal cation for their activity and have optimal catalytic rate at pH 7-8 and 35-50 C. In a comparison of each enzyme s activity with either its corresponding substrate that contains an unnatural ribonudeotide or a substrate that instead contains a standard ribonucleotide, the 2',5' -phosphodiester-deaving DNA enzyme exhibited a regioselectivity of 6000- fold, while the L-ribonucleotide-cleaving DNA enzyme exhibited an enantioselectivity of 50-fold. These molecules demonstrate how in vitro evolution can be used to obtain regio- and enantioselective catalysts that exhibit specificities for nonnatural analogues of biological compounds.

  5. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  6. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets.

    PubMed

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results. PMID:25974531

  7. The Complexities of Implementing Cluster Supply Chain - Case Study of JCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiao; Zhang, Jibiao; Wang, Yang

    As a new type of management pattern, "cluster supply chain" (CSC) can help SMEs to face the global challenges through all kinds of collaboration. However, a major challenge in implementing CSC is the gap between theory and practice in the field. In an effort to provide a better understanding of this emerging phenomenon, this paper presents the implementation process of CSC in the context of JingCheng Mechanical & Electrical Holding co., ltd.(JCH) as a case study. The cast study of JCH suggests that the key problems in the practice of cluster supply chain: How do small firms use cluster supply chain? Only after we clarify the problem, the actual construction and operation of cluster supply chain does show successful results as it should be.

  8. Scaling, cluster dynamics and complex oscillations in a multispecies Lattice Lotka-Volterra Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabunin, A. V.; Efimov, A.; Tsekouras, G. A.; Provata, A.

    2005-03-01

    The cluster formation in the cyclic (4+1)-Lattice Lotka-Volterra Model is studied by Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on a square lattice support. At the Mean Field level this model demonstrates conservative four-dimensional oscillations which, depending on the parameters, can be chaotic or quasi-periodic. When the system is realized on a square lattice substrate the various species organize in domains (clusters) with fractal boundaries and this is consistent with dissipative dynamics. For small lattice sizes, the entire lattice oscillates in phase and the size distribution of the clusters follows a pure power law distribution. When the system size is large many independently oscillating regions are formed and as a result the cluster size distribution in addition to the power law, acquires a exponential decay dependence. This combination of power law and exponential decay of distributions and correlations is indicative, in this case, of mixing and superposition of regions oscillating asynchronously.

  9. The complex stellar populations in the background of open clusters in the third Galactic quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Seleznev, Anton F.; Baume, Gustavo; Turner, David. G.

    2016-02-01

    Multicolour photometry of the stellar populations in five fields in the third Galactic quadrant centred on the clusters NGC 2215, NGC 2354, Haffner 22, Ruprecht 11, and ESO489 SC01 is interpreted in terms of a warped and flared Galactic disc, without resort to an external entity such as the popular Monoceros or Canis Major overdensities. Except for NGC 2215, the clusters are poorly or unstudied previously. The data generate basic parameters for each cluster, including the distribution of stars along the line of sight. We use star counts and photometric analysis, without recourse to Galactic-model-based predictions or interpretations, and confirms earlier results for NGC 2215 and NGC 2354. ESO489 SC01 is not a real cluster, while Haffner 22 is an overlooked cluster aged ˜2.5 Gyr. Conclusions for Ruprecht 11 are preliminary, evidence for a cluster being marginal. Fields surrounding the clusters show signatures of young and intermediate-age stellar populations. The young population background to NGC 2354 and Ruprecht 11 lies ˜8-9 kpc from the Sun and ˜1 kpc below the formal Galactic plane, tracing a portion of the Norma-Cygnus arm, challenging Galactic models that adopt a sharp cut-off of the disc 12-14 kpc from the Galactic Centre. The old population is metal-poor with an age of ˜2-3 Gyr, resembling star clusters like Tombaugh 2 or NGC 2158. It has a large colour spread and is difficult to locate precisely. Young and old populations follow a pattern that depends critically on the vertical location of the thin and/or thick disc, and whether or not a particular line of sight intersects one, both, or none.

  10. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    methods with all-electron Douglas-Kroll relativistic methods. We have the capabilities for computing full CI extrapolations including spin-orbit effects and several one-electron properties and electron density maps including spin-orbit effects. We are continuously collaborating with several experimental groups around the country and at National Labs to carry out computational studies on the DOE-BES funded projects. The past work in the last 3 years was primarily motivated and driven by the concurrent or recent experimental studies on these systems. We were thus significantly benefited by coordinating our computational efforts with experimental studies. The interaction between theory and experiment has resulted in some unique and exciting opportunities. For example, for the very first time ever, the upper spin-orbit component of a heavy trimer such as Au{sub 3} was experimentally observed as a result of our accurate computational study on the upper electronic states of gold trimer. Likewise for the first time AuH{sub 2} could be observed and interpreted clearly due to our computed potential energy surfaces that revealed the existence of a large barrier to convert the isolated AuH{sub 2} back to Au and H{sub 2}. We have also worked on yet to be observed systems and have made predictions for future experiments. We have computed the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal carbides transition metal clusters and compared our electronic states to the anion photodetachment spectra of Lai Sheng Wang. Prof Mike Morse and coworkers(funded also by DOE-BES) and Prof Stimle and coworkers(also funded by DOE-BES) are working on the spectroscopic properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides. Our predictions on the excited states of transition metal clusters such as Hf{sub 3}, Nb{sub 2}{sup +} etc., have been confirmed experimentally by Prof. Lombardi and coworkers using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have also been studying larger complexes critical to the

  11. RNA-activated DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR-Cas effector complex.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Michael A; Kuo, Fang-Ting; Bailey, Scott

    2016-02-15

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) system is an RNA-guided immune system that protects prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. This system represents an inheritable and adaptable immune system that is mediated by multisubunit effector complexes. In the Type III-B system, the Cmr effector complex has been found to cleave ssRNA in vitro. However, in vivo, it has been implicated in transcription-dependent DNA targeting. We show here that the Cmr complex from Thermotoga maritima can cleave an ssRNA target that is complementary to the CRISPR RNA. We also show that binding of a complementary ssRNA target activates an ssDNA-specific nuclease activity in the histidine-aspartate (HD) domain of the Cmr2 subunit of the complex. These data suggest a mechanism for transcription-coupled DNA targeting by the Cmr complex and provide a unifying mechanism for all Type III systems. PMID:26848046

  12. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R.; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 MI compounds often disproportionate into M0 and MIII. Here, however, we show that the reaction of the MI salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [GaI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− (RF=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3]2+•{[Al(ORF)4]−}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a GaII compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [GaIII{(bipy)3}•]2+ radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [InI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6]3+, [In3(bipy)5]3+ and [In4(bipy)6]4+ metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In−In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3]3+{[Al(ORF)4]−}3 and [M4]4+{[Al(ORF)4]−}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  13. X-ray spectroscopy of the Mn4Ca cluster in the water-oxidation complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Kenneth; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    The water-oxidation complex of Photosystem II (PS II) contains a heteronuclear cluster of 4 Mn atoms and a Ca atom. Ligands to the metal cluster involve bridging O atoms, and O and N atoms from amino acid side-chains of the D1 polypeptide of PS II, with likely additional contributions from water and CP43. Although moderate resolution X-ray diffraction-based structures of PS II have been reported recently, and the location of the Mn4Ca cluster has been identified, the structures are not resolved at the atomic level. X-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provide independent and potentially highly accurate sources of structural and oxidation-state information. When combined with polarized X-ray studies of oriented membranes or single-crystals of PS II, a more detailed picture of the cluster and its disposition in PS II is obtained. PMID:15977060

  14. The Human Iron–Sulfur Assembly Complex Catalyzes the Synthesis of [2Fe-2S] Clusters on ISCU2 That Can Be Transferred to Acceptor Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; McCormick, Sean P.; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters are essential protein cofactors for most life forms. In human mitochondria, the core Fe–S biosynthetic enzymatic complex (called SDUF) consists of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) protein components. Few mechanistic details about how this complex synthesizes Fe–S clusters and how these clusters are delivered to targets are known. Here circular dichroism and Mössbauer spectroscopies were used to reveal details of the Fe–S cluster assembly reaction on the SDUF complex. SDUF reactions generated [2Fe-2S] cluster intermediates that readily converted to stable [2Fe-2S] clusters bound to uncomplexed ISCU2. Similar reactions that included the apo Fe–S acceptor protein human ferredoxin (FDX1) resulted in formation of [2Fe-2S]-ISCU2 rather than [2Fe-2S]-FDX1. Subsequent addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) induced transfer of the cluster from ISCU2 to FDX1, suggesting that [2Fe-2S]-ISCU2 is an intermediate. Reactions that initially included DTT rapidly generated [2Fe-2S]-FDX1 and bypassed formation of [2Fe-2S]-ISCU2. In the absence of apo-FDX1, incubation of [2Fe-2S]-ISCU2 with DTT generated [4Fe-4S]-ISCU2 species. Together, these results conflict with a recent report of stable [4Fe-4S] cluster formation on the SDUF complex. Rather, they support a model in which SDUF builds transient [2Fe-2S] cluster intermediates that generate clusters on sulfur-containing molecules, including uncomplexed ISCU2. Additional small molecule or protein factors are required for the transfer of these clusters to Fe–S acceptor proteins or the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters. PMID:26016389

  15. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  16. High-throughput sequencing and graph-based cluster analysis facilitate microsatellite development from a highly complex genome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abhijeet B; Schielzeth, Holger; Albersmeier, Andreas; Kalinowski, Joern; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent advances in high-throughput sequencing, difficulties are often encountered when developing microsatellites for species with large and complex genomes. This probably reflects the close association in many species of microsatellites with cryptic repetitive elements. We therefore developed a novel approach for isolating polymorphic microsatellites from the club-legged grasshopper (Gomphocerus sibiricus), an emerging quantitative genetic and behavioral model system. Whole genome shotgun Illumina MiSeq sequencing was used to generate over three million 300 bp paired-end reads, of which 67.75% were grouped into 40,548 clusters within RepeatExplorer. Annotations of the top 468 clusters, which represent 60.5% of the reads, revealed homology to satellite DNA and a variety of transposable elements. Evaluating 96 primer pairs in eight wild-caught individuals, we found that primers mined from singleton reads were six times more likely to amplify a single polymorphic microsatellite locus than primers mined from clusters. Our study provides experimental evidence in support of the notion that microsatellites associated with repetitive elements are less likely to successfully amplify. It also reveals how advances in high-throughput sequencing and graph-based repetitive DNA analysis can be leveraged to isolate polymorphic microsatellites from complex genomes. PMID:27547349

  17. Experiments in clustered neuronal networks: A paradigm for complex modular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, Sara; Soriano, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    Uncovering the interplay activity-connectivity is one of the major challenges in neuroscience. To deepen in the understanding of how a neuronal circuit shapes network dynamics, neuronal cultures have emerged as remarkable systems given their accessibility and easy manipulation. An attractive configuration of these in vitro systems consists in an ensemble of interconnected clusters of neurons. Using calcium fluorescence imaging to monitor spontaneous activity in these clustered neuronal networks, we were able to draw functional maps and reveal their topological features. We also observed that these networks exhibit a hierarchical modular dynamics, in which clusters fire in small groups that shape characteristic communities in the network. The structure and stability of these communities is sensitive to chemical or physical action, and therefore their analysis may serve as a proxy for network health. Indeed, the combination of all these approaches is helping to develop models to quantify damage upon network degradation, with promising applications for the study of neurological disorders in vitro.

  18. Dengue Virus Impairs Mitochondrial Fusion by Cleaving Mitofusins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chia-Yi; Liang, Jian-Jong; Li, Jin-Kun; Lee, Yi-Ling; Chang, Bi-Lan; Su, Chan-I; Huang, Wei-Jheng; Lai, Michael M. C.; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic subcellular organelles participating in many signaling pathways such as antiviral innate immunity and cell death cascades. Here we found that mitochondrial fusion was impaired in dengue virus (DENV) infected cells. Two mitofusins (MFN1 and MFN2), which mediate mitochondrial fusion and participate in the proper function of mitochondria, were cleaved by DENV protease NS2B3. By knockdown and overexpression approaches, these two MFNs showed diverse functions in DENV infection. MFN1 was required for efficient antiviral retinoic acid-inducible gene I–like receptor signaling to suppress DENV replication, while MFN2 participated in maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) to attenuate DENV-induced cell death. Cleaving MFN1 and MFN2 by DENV protease suppressed mitochondrial fusion and deteriorated DENV-induced cytopathic effects through subverting interferon production and facilitating MMP disruption. Thus, MFNs participate in host defense against DENV infection by promoting the antiviral response and cell survival, and DENV regulates mitochondrial morphology by cleaving MFNs to manipulate the outcome of infection. PMID:26717518

  19. Three complexes of Cu(I) cluster with flexible and rigid ligands: Synthesis, characterization and photoluminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shu; Liu, Li-Juan; Ma, Wang-Yang; Zhou, Wei-Xia; Li, Jun; Zhang, Feng-Xing

    2015-05-15

    Three new Cu(I) cluster complexes, viz. [(Cu{sub 4}I{sub 4})(Cu{sub 2}I{sub 2})(dimb){sub 3}]{sub n} (1; dimb=1,4-diimidazol-1-ylbutane), [(Cu{sub 3}I{sub 2})(dimb)(dmtz)]{sub n} (2; dmtz=3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazole), and [Cu{sub 6}(mbt){sub 6}] (3; mbt=2-mercaptobenzothiazole), have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. In 1, a Cu{sub 4}I{sub 4} cubane core as a 4-connecting node, connects the neighboring nodes either through single dimb or μ{sub 2}-[(Cu{sub 2}I{sub 2})(dimb){sub 2}] linkers, affording an undulated 2D (4,4) net. Parallel interpenetration occurs between the adjacent nets and thus the overall 2D→3D network is formed. Complex 2 is constructed by 2D (4,4) topological plane grid layers of AB stacking. The core, a distorted triangular bipyramidal Cu{sub 3}I{sub 2} cluster, is acted as a 4-connecting node and connected with dimb and μ{sub 3}-dmtz to form the layer. Complex 3 contains a (Cu{sub 6}S{sub 6}) core in discrete paddle-wheel molecule, which serves as a 4-connecting node to link equivalent ones via π···π interaction, forming 2D (4,4) layers. Solid-state luminescence properties and thermogravimetric analyses of 1, 2 and 3 were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Complexes based on Cu(I) clusters possess two-fold 2D→3D parallel interpenetrating (1), triple emissions (2) and near-infrared emission (3). - Highlights: • Complex 1 represents two-fold 2D→3D parallel interpenetrating framework. • Complex 2 shows triple emissions. • Complex 3 displays a quite intense near-infrared (NIR) emission. • These complexes have good thermal stability.

  20. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Cinco, Roehl M.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Robblee, John H.; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-08-02

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared subsequent to Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 angstroms, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is {approx}; 3.5 angstroms distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  1. Multilevel Hierarchical Kernel Spectral Clustering for Real-Life Large Scale Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Raghvendra; Langone, Rocco; Suykens, Johan A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Kernel spectral clustering corresponds to a weighted kernel principal component analysis problem in a constrained optimization framework. The primal formulation leads to an eigen-decomposition of a centered Laplacian matrix at the dual level. The dual formulation allows to build a model on a representative subgraph of the large scale network in the training phase and the model parameters are estimated in the validation stage. The KSC model has a powerful out-of-sample extension property which allows cluster affiliation for the unseen nodes of the big data network. In this paper we exploit the structure of the projections in the eigenspace during the validation stage to automatically determine a set of increasing distance thresholds. We use these distance thresholds in the test phase to obtain multiple levels of hierarchy for the large scale network. The hierarchical structure in the network is determined in a bottom-up fashion. We empirically showcase that real-world networks have multilevel hierarchical organization which cannot be detected efficiently by several state-of-the-art large scale hierarchical community detection techniques like the Louvain, OSLOM and Infomap methods. We show that a major advantage of our proposed approach is the ability to locate good quality clusters at both the finer and coarser levels of hierarchy using internal cluster quality metrics on 7 real-life networks. PMID:24949877

  2. Multilevel hierarchical kernel spectral clustering for real-life large scale complex networks.

    PubMed

    Mall, Raghvendra; Langone, Rocco; Suykens, Johan A K

    2014-01-01

    Kernel spectral clustering corresponds to a weighted kernel principal component analysis problem in a constrained optimization framework. The primal formulation leads to an eigen-decomposition of a centered Laplacian matrix at the dual level. The dual formulation allows to build a model on a representative subgraph of the large scale network in the training phase and the model parameters are estimated in the validation stage. The KSC model has a powerful out-of-sample extension property which allows cluster affiliation for the unseen nodes of the big data network. In this paper we exploit the structure of the projections in the eigenspace during the validation stage to automatically determine a set of increasing distance thresholds. We use these distance thresholds in the test phase to obtain multiple levels of hierarchy for the large scale network. The hierarchical structure in the network is determined in a bottom-up fashion. We empirically showcase that real-world networks have multilevel hierarchical organization which cannot be detected efficiently by several state-of-the-art large scale hierarchical community detection techniques like the Louvain, OSLOM and Infomap methods. We show that a major advantage of our proposed approach is the ability to locate good quality clusters at both the finer and coarser levels of hierarchy using internal cluster quality metrics on 7 real-life networks. PMID:24949877

  3. Cleaving the n,n triple bond: the transformation of dinitrogen to ammonia by nitrogenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chung; Ribbe, Markus W; Hu, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a natural process that converts atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to bioavailable ammonia (NH3). This reaction not only plays a key role in supplying bio-accessible nitrogen to all life forms on Earth, but also embodies the powerful chemistry of cleaving the inert N,N triple bond under ambient conditions. The group of enzymes that carry out this reaction are called nitrogenases and typically consist of two redox active protein components, each containing metal cluster(s) that are crucial for catalysis. In the past decade, a number of crystal structures, including several at high resolutions, have been solved. However, the catalytic mechanism of nitrogenase, namely, how the N,N triple bond is cleaved by this enzyme under ambient conditions, has remained elusive. Nevertheless, recent biochemical and spectroscopic studies have led to a better understanding of the potential intermediates of N2 reduction by the molybdenum (Mo)-nitrogenase. In addition, it has been demonstrated that carbon monoxide (CO), which was thought to be an inhibitor of N2 reduction, could also be reduced by the vanadium (V)-nitrogenase to small alkanes and alkenes. This chapter will begin with an introduction to biological nitrogen fixation and Mo-nitrogenase, continue with a discussion of the catalytic mechanism of N2 reduction by Mo-nitrogenase, and conclude with a survey of the current knowledge of N2- and CO-reduction by V-nitrogenase and how V-nitrogenase compares to its Mo-counterpart in these catalytic activities. PMID:25416394

  4. COMPLEX SCATTERED RADIATION FIELDS AND MULTIPLE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE PROTOSTELLAR CLUSTER IN NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsuya; Hough, James H.; Werner, Michael W.; Teixeira, Paula S.

    2011-11-01

    Near-infrared imaging polarimetry in the J, H, and K{sub s} bands has been carried out for the protostellar cluster region around NGC 2264 IRS 2 in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud. Various infrared reflection nebula clusters (IRNCs) associated with NGC 2264 IRS 2 and the IRAS 12 S1 core, as well as local infrared reflection nebulae (IRNe), were detected. The illuminating sources of the IRNe were identified with known or new near- and mid-infrared sources. In addition, 314 point-like sources were detected in all three bands and their aperture polarimetry was studied. Using a color-color diagram, reddened field stars and diskless pre-main-sequence stars were selected to trace the magnetic field (MF) structure of the molecular cloud. The mean polarization position angle of the point-like sources is 81 Degree-Sign {+-} 29 Degree-Sign in the cluster core, and 58 Degree-Sign {+-} 24 Degree-Sign in the perimeter of the cluster core, which is interpreted as the projected direction on the sky of the MF in the observed region of the cloud. The Chandrasekhar-Fermi method gives a rough estimate of the MF strength to be about 100 {mu}G. A comparison with recent numerical simulations of the cluster formation implies that the cloud dynamics is controlled by the relatively strong MF. The local MF direction is well associated with that of CO outflow for IRAS 12 S1 and consistent with that inferred from submillimeter polarimetry. In contrast, the local MF direction runs roughly perpendicular to the Galactic MF direction.

  5. The paracaspase MALT1 cleaves the LUBAC subunit HOIL1 during antigen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Douanne, Tiphaine; Gavard, Julie; Bidère, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Antigen-receptor-mediated activation of lymphocytes relies on a signalosome comprising CARMA1 (also known as CARD11), BCL10 and MALT1 (the CBM complex). The CBM activates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcription factors by recruiting the 'linear ubiquitin assembly complex' (LUBAC), and unleashes MALT1 paracaspase activity. Although MALT1 enzyme shapes NF-κB signaling, lymphocyte activation and contributes to lymphoma growth, the identity of its substrates continues to be elucidated. Here, we report that the LUBAC subunit HOIL1 (also known as RBCK1) is cleaved by MALT1 following antigen receptor engagement. HOIL1 is also constitutively processed in the 'activated B-cell-like' (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which exhibits aberrant MALT1 activity. We further show that the overexpression of MALT1-insensitive HOIL1 mitigates T-cell-receptor-mediated NF-κB activation and subsequent cytokine production in lymphocytes. Thus, our results unveil HOIL1 as a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation cleaved by MALT1. This cleavage could therefore constitute an appealing therapeutic target for modulating immune responses. PMID:27006117

  6. Three complexes of Cu(I) cluster with flexible and rigid ligands: Synthesis, characterization and photoluminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shu; Liu, Li-Juan; Ma, Wang-Yang; Zhou, Wei-Xia; Li, Jun; Zhang, Feng-Xing

    2015-05-01

    Three new Cu(I) cluster complexes, viz. [(Cu4I4)(Cu2I2)(dimb)3]n (1; dimb=1,4-diimidazol-1-ylbutane), [(Cu3I2)(dimb)(dmtz)]n (2; dmtz=3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazole), and [Cu6(mbt)6] (3; mbt=2-mercaptobenzothiazole), have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. In 1, a Cu4I4 cubane core as a 4-connecting node, connects the neighboring nodes either through single dimb or μ2-[(Cu2I2)(dimb)2] linkers, affording an undulated 2D (4,4) net. Parallel interpenetration occurs between the adjacent nets and thus the overall 2D→3D network is formed. Complex 2 is constructed by 2D (4,4) topological plane grid layers of AB stacking. The core, a distorted triangular bipyramidal Cu3I2 cluster, is acted as a 4-connecting node and connected with dimb and μ3-dmtz to form the layer. Complex 3 contains a (Cu6S6) core in discrete paddle-wheel molecule, which serves as a 4-connecting node to link equivalent ones via π···π interaction, forming 2D (4,4) layers. Solid-state luminescence properties and thermogravimetric analyses of 1, 2 and 3 were investigated.

  7. {sup 35}Mn ESE-ENDOR of a mixed valence Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex: Comparison with the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.W.; Sturgeon, B.E.; Ball, J.A.; Lorigan, G.A.; Chan, M.K.; Britt, R.D.; Klein, M.P. |; Armstrong, W.H.

    1995-11-29

    Analysis of {sup 55}Mn electron spin echo-electron nuclear double resonance (ESE-ENDOR) spectra obtained on a dinuclear mixed valence Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex [di-{mu}-oxotetrakis(2, 2`-bipyridine)dimanganese(III,IV)] (1) reveals the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupolar parameters for the spin I=5/2 {sup 55}Mn nucleus of both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) ions. The {sup 55}Mn ESE-ENDOR data obtained on the g = 2 Mn multiline EPR signal of the S{sub 2} state of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex demonstrate that this EPR signal cannot arise from a dinuclear Mn(III)-Mn(IV) center. The ENDOR spectra are consistent with a tetranuclear Mn cluster origin for the photosystem II multiline EPR signal. 75 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Spectroscopic Evidence for the Two C-H-Cleaving Intermediates of Aspergillus nidulans Isopenicillin N Synthase.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Yisong; Chang, Wei-Chen; Barr, Eric W; Xing, Gang; St Clair, Jennifer; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank; Bollinger, J Martin; Krebs, Carsten

    2016-07-20

    The enzyme isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) installs the β-lactam and thiazolidine rings of the penicillin core into the linear tripeptide l-δ-aminoadipoyl-l-Cys-d-Val (ACV) on the pathways to a number of important antibacterial drugs. A classic set of enzymological and crystallographic studies by Baldwin and co-workers established that this overall four-electron oxidation occurs by a sequence of two oxidative cyclizations, with the β-lactam ring being installed first and the thiazolidine ring second. Each phase requires cleavage of an aliphatic C-H bond of the substrate: the pro-S-CCys,β-H bond for closure of the β-lactam ring, and the CVal,β-H bond for installation of the thiazolidine ring. IPNS uses a mononuclear non-heme-iron(II) cofactor and dioxygen as cosubstrate to cleave these C-H bonds and direct the ring closures. Despite the intense scrutiny to which the enzyme has been subjected, the identities of the oxidized iron intermediates that cleave the C-H bonds have been addressed only computationally; no experimental insight into their geometric or electronic structures has been reported. In this work, we have employed a combination of transient-state-kinetic and spectroscopic methods, together with the specifically deuterium-labeled substrates, A[d2-C]V and AC[d8-V], to identify both C-H-cleaving intermediates. The results show that they are high-spin Fe(III)-superoxo and high-spin Fe(IV)-oxo complexes, respectively, in agreement with published mechanistic proposals derived computationally from Baldwin's founding work. PMID:27193226

  9. Quantitative Z-Contrast Imaging of Supported Metal Complexes and Clusters - A Gateway to Understanding Catalysis on the Atomic Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, Nigel D.; Aydin, C.; Lu, Jing; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Ortalan, V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2013-09-01

    Z-contrast imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to observe and quantify the sizes, shapes, and compositions of the metal frames in supported mono-, bi-, and multimetallic metal clusters and can even detect the metal atoms in single-metal-atom complexes, as well as providing direct structural information characterizing the metal-support interface. Herein, we assess the major experimental challenges associated with obtaining atomic resolution Z-contrast images of the materials that are highly beam-sensitive, that is, the clusters readily migrate and sinter on support surfaces, and the support itself can drastically change in structure if the experiment is not properly controlled. Calibrated and quantified Z-contrast images are used in conjunction with exsitu analytical measurements and larger-scale characterization methods such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to generate an atomic-scale understanding of supported catalysts and their function. Examples of the application of these methods include the characterization of a wide range of sizes and compositions of supported clusters, primarily those incorporating Ir, Os, and Au, on highly crystalline supports (zeolites and MgO).

  10. Light-harvesting Complexes (LHCs) Cluster Spontaneously in Membrane Environment Leading to Shortening of Their Excited State Lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Natali, Alberto; Gruber, J Michael; Dietzel, Lars; Stuart, Marc C A; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta

    2016-08-01

    The light reactions of photosynthesis, which include light-harvesting and charge separation, take place in the amphiphilic environment of the thylakoid membrane. The light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the main responsible for light absorption in plants and green algae and is involved in photoprotective mechanisms that regulate the amount of excited states in the membrane. The dual function of LHCII has been extensively studied in detergent micelles, but recent results have indicated that the properties of this complex differ in a lipid environment. In this work we checked these suggestions by studying LHCII in liposomes. By combining bulk and single molecule measurements, we monitored the fluorescence characteristics of liposomes containing single complexes up to densely packed proteoliposomes. We show that the natural lipid environment per se does not alter the properties of LHCII, which for single complexes remain very similar to that in detergent. However, we show that LHCII has the strong tendency to cluster in the membrane and that protein interactions and the extent of crowding modulate the lifetimes of the excited state in the membrane. Finally, the presence of LHCII monomers at low concentrations of complexes per liposome is discussed. PMID:27252376

  11. Surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping

    2008-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2 crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography alone cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

  12. Optical fiber alignment using cleaved-edge diffracted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Louis C.; Bergeron, Patrick; Duguay, Michel A.; Ouellette, Francois; Tetu, Michel

    1993-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for aligning optical fibers prior to fusion splicing. The technique relies on the fact that well-cleaved fiber ends have extremely sharp edges. By making the narrow pencil of light emerging from one fiber scan laterally over the entrance face of a second fiber, and by monitoring the light diffracted past its sharp edges, we can locate precisely the geometric center of the output fiber. With this technique, we have aligned fiber cores with a mean lateral offset of 0.81 micrometers , the major part of this offset caused by the eccentricity of the core relative to the cladding's circular perimeter.

  13. Evolutionary origins of the placental expression of Chromosome 19 cluster galectins and their complex dysregulation in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Xu, Yi; Erez, Offer; Xu, Zhonghui; Bhatti, Gaurav; Leavitt, Ron; Chung, Tzu Hung; El-Azzamy, Haidy; LaJeunesse, Christopher; Wang, Bing; Balogh, Andrea; Szalai, Gabor; Land, Susan; Dong, Zhong; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Krispin, Manuel; Kim, Chong Jai; Tarca, Adi L.; Papp, Zoltan; Bohn, Hans

    2014-01-01

    . Conclusions These findings reveal the evolutionary origins of the placental expression of Chr19 cluster galectins. The complex dysregulation of these genes in preeclampsia may alter immune tolerance mechanisms at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:25266889

  14. Toward accurate molecular identification of species in complex environmental samples: testing the performance of sequence filtering and clustering methods

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jullien M; Brown, Emily A; Chain, Frédéric J J; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-01-01

    Metabarcoding has the potential to become a rapid, sensitive, and effective approach for identifying species in complex environmental samples. Accurate molecular identification of species depends on the ability to generate operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that correspond to biological species. Due to the sometimes enormous estimates of biodiversity using this method, there is a great need to test the efficacy of data analysis methods used to derive OTUs. Here, we evaluate the performance of various methods for clustering length variable 18S amplicons from complex samples into OTUs using a mock community and a natural community of zooplankton species. We compare analytic procedures consisting of a combination of (1) stringent and relaxed data filtering, (2) singleton sequences included and removed, (3) three commonly used clustering algorithms (mothur, UCLUST, and UPARSE), and (4) three methods of treating alignment gaps when calculating sequence divergence. Depending on the combination of methods used, the number of OTUs varied by nearly two orders of magnitude for the mock community (60–5068 OTUs) and three orders of magnitude for the natural community (22–22191 OTUs). The use of relaxed filtering and the inclusion of singletons greatly inflated OTU numbers without increasing the ability to recover species. Our results also suggest that the method used to treat gaps when calculating sequence divergence can have a great impact on the number of OTUs. Our findings are particularly relevant to studies that cover taxonomically diverse species and employ markers such as rRNA genes in which length variation is extensive. PMID:26078860

  15. UV Insights into the Complex Populations of M87 Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, A.; Renzini, A.; Anderson, J.; Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Soto, M.; Brown, T. M.; Milone, A. P.; Sohn, S. T.; Sweigart, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    We have imaged with Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS the central 2\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 7× 2\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 7 region of the giant elliptical galaxy M87, using the ultraviolet filter F275W. In combination with archival ACS/WFC data taken through the F606W and F814W filters, covering the same field, we have constructed integrated-light UV-optical colors and magnitudes for 1460 objects, most of which are believed to be globular clusters (GCs) belonging to M87. The purpose was to ascertain whether the multiple-populations syndrome, ubiquitous among Galactic GCs, also exists among the M87 family of clusters. To achieve this goal, we sought those GCs with exceptionally blue UV-to-optical colors because helium-enriched sub-populations produce a horizontal-branch morphology that is well populated at high effective temperature. For comparison, integrated, synthetic UV-optical and purely optical colors and magnitudes have been constructed for 45 Galactic GCs, starting from individual-star photometry obtained with the same instruments and the same filters. We identify a small group of M87 clusters exhibiting a radial UV-optical color gradient, representing our best candidate GCs hosting multiple populations with extreme helium content. We also find that the central spatial distribution of the bluer GCs is flattened in a direction parallel to the jet, while the distribution of redder GCs is more spherical. We release to the astronomical community our photometric catalog in F275W, F606W, and F814W bands and the high-quality image stacks in the same bands. Based on proprietary and archival observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  16. Cathepsin X Cleaves Profilin 1 C-Terminal Tyr139 and Influences Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Pečar Fonović, Urša; Kos, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin X, a cysteine carboxypeptidase, is upregulated in several types of cancer. Its molecular target in tumor cells is profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor and regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cathepsin X cleaves off the C-terminal Tyr139 of profilin 1, affecting binding of poly-L-proline ligands and, consequently, tumor cell migration and invasion. Profilin 1 with mutations at the C-terminus, transiently expressed in prostate cancer cells PC-3, showed that Tyr139 is important for proper function of profilin 1 as a tumor suppressor. Cleaving off Tyr139 prevents the binding of clathrin, a poly-L-proline ligand involved in endocytosis. More profilin 1—clathrin complexes were present in PC-3 cells when cathepsin X was inhibited by its specific inhibitor AMS36 or silenced by siRNA. As a consequence, the endocytosis of FITC-labeled dextran and transferrin conjugate was significantly increased. These results constitute the first report of the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in tumor cells through proteolytic processing of profilin 1. PMID:26325675

  17. Cleaving for growth: threonine aspartase 1-a protease relevant for development and disease.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Roland H; Hahlbrock, Angelina; Knauer, Shirley K; Wünsch, Désirée

    2016-03-01

    From the beginning of life, proteases are key to organismal development comprising morphogenesis, cellular differentiation, and cell growth. Regulated proteolytic activity is essential for the orchestration of multiple developmental pathways, and defects in protease activity can account for multiple disease patterns. The highly conserved protease threonine aspartase 1 is a member of such developmental proteases and critically involved in the regulation of complex processes, including segmental identity, head morphogenesis, spermatogenesis, and proliferation. Additionally, threonine aspartase 1 is overexpressed in numerous liquid as well as in solid malignancies. Although threonine aspartase 1 is able to cleave the master regulator mixed lineage leukemia protein as well as other regulatory proteins in humans, our knowledge of its detailed pathobiological function and the underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to development and disease is still incomplete. Moreover, neither effective genetic nor chemical inhibitors for this enzyme are available so far precluding the detailed dissection of the pathobiological functions of threonine aspartase 1. Here, we review the current knowledge of the structure-function relationship of threonine aspartase 1 and its mechanistic impact on substrate-mediated coordination of the cell cycle and development. We discuss threonine aspartase 1-mediated effects on cellular transformation and conclude by presenting a short overview of recent interference strategies.-Stauber, R. H., Hahlbrock, A., Knauer, S. K., Wünsch, D. Cleaving for growth: threonine aspartase 1-a protease relevant for development and disease. PMID:26578689

  18. Complex Stellar System ESO65SC03: Open Cluster or Remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gireesh C.; Joshi, Y. C.; Joshi, S.; Chowdhury, S.; Tyagi, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    We present a complete spatial and dynamical study of the poorly populated stellar system ESO65SC03. The radial distribution of the system gives a core and cluster radii of 1.10±0.63 and 5.36±0.24 arcmin, respectively. The SNDP does not show any clear enhancement of the surface stellar number density between the stars of the system and the field regions. We derive the optimum isochrone solution for a particular grid size in the CMD using the statistical cleaning procedure. Using the statistically cleaned CMDs, we find the distance modulus, (m - M)0, and reddening, E(B - V), of the system to be 11.8±0.2 and 0.45 mag, respectively. The mean proper motion of this system is - 5.37±0.81 mas yr-1 and 0.31±0.40 in RA and DEC directions, respectively. The mean proper motion of this system is found to be almost similar to the field region. The mass function for the brighter stars is found to be too high for the system to be an open cluster. These combined results place constraints on whether stellar system ESO65SC03 is a POCR or an Asterism. Our understanding is that the ESO65SC03 is in a stage of POCR by losing their main-sequence stars in the dynamic evolution processes.

  19. Cleaving yeast and Escherichia coli genomes at a single site

    SciTech Connect

    Koob, M.; Szybalski, W. )

    1990-10-12

    The 15-megabase pair Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the 4.7-megabase pair Escherichia coli genomes were completely cleaved at a single predetermined site by means of the Achilles' heel cleavage (AC) procedure. The symmetric lac operator (lacO{sub s}) was introduced into the circular Escherichia coli genome and into one of the 16 yeast chromosomes. Intact chromosomes from the resulting strains were prepared in agarose microbeads and methylated with Hha I (5{prime}-GCGC) methyltransferase (M{center dot}Hha I) in the presence of lac repressor (LacI). All Hae II sites ({prime}-{sub G}{sup A}GCGC{sub C}{sup T}) with the exception of the one in lacO{sub s}, which was protected by LacI, were modified and thus no longer recognized by Hae II. After inactivation of M{center dot}Hha I and LacI, Hae II was used to completely cleave the chromosomes specifically at the inserted lacO{sub s}. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using the AC approach to efficiently extend the specificity of naturally occurring restriction enzymes and create new tools for the mapping and precise molecular dissection of multimegabase genomes.

  20. The nature of the air-cleaved mica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Hugo K.; Thomson, Neil H.

    2016-06-01

    The accepted image of muscovite mica is that of an inert and atomically smooth surface, easily prepared by cleavage in an ambient atmosphere. Consequently, mica is extensively used a model substrate in many fundamental studies of surface phenomena and as a substrate for AFM imaging of biomolecules. In this review we present evidence from the literature that the above picture is not quite correct. The mica used in experimental work is almost invariably cleaved in laboratory air, where a reaction between the mica surface, atmospheric CO2 and water occurs immediately after cleavage. The evidence suggests very strongly that as a result the mica surface becomes covered by up to one formula unit of K2CO3 per nm2, which is mobile under humid conditions, and crystallises under drier conditions. The properties of mica in air or water vapour cannot be fully understood without reference to the surface K2CO3, and many studies of the structure of adsorbed water on mica surfaces may need to be revisited. With this new insight, however, the air-cleaved mica should provide exciting opportunities to study phenomena such as two-dimensional ion diffusion, electrolyte effects on surface conductivity, and two-dimensional crystal nucleation.

  1. Biochemical analysis of pistol self-cleaving ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kimberly A.; Lünse, Christina E.; Li, Sanshu; Brewer, Kenneth I.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Pistol RNAs are members of a distinct class of self-cleaving ribozymes that was recently discovered by using a bioinformatics search strategy. Several hundred pistol ribozymes share a consensus sequence including 10 highly conserved nucleotides and many other modestly conserved nucleotides associated with specific secondary structure features, including three base-paired stems and a pseudoknot. A representative pistol ribozyme from the bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus was found to promote RNA strand scission with a rate constant of ∼10 min−1 under physiological Mg2+ and pH conditions. The reaction proceeds via the nucleophilic attack of a 2′-oxygen atom on the adjacent phosphorus center, and thus adheres to the same general catalytic mechanism of internal phosphoester transfer as found with all other classes of natural self-cleaving ribozymes discovered to date. Analyses of the kinetic characteristics and the metal ion requirements of the cleavage reaction reveal that members of this ribozyme class likely use several catalytic strategies to promote the rapid cleavage of RNA. PMID:26385507

  2. Biochemical analysis of pistol self-cleaving ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kimberly A; Lünse, Christina E; Li, Sanshu; Brewer, Kenneth I; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-11-01

    Pistol RNAs are members of a distinct class of self-cleaving ribozymes that was recently discovered by using a bioinformatics search strategy. Several hundred pistol ribozymes share a consensus sequence including 10 highly conserved nucleotides and many other modestly conserved nucleotides associated with specific secondary structure features, including three base-paired stems and a pseudoknot. A representative pistol ribozyme from the bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus was found to promote RNA strand scission with a rate constant of ∼10 min(-1) under physiological Mg(2+) and pH conditions. The reaction proceeds via the nucleophilic attack of a 2'-oxygen atom on the adjacent phosphorus center, and thus adheres to the same general catalytic mechanism of internal phosphoester transfer as found with all other classes of natural self-cleaving ribozymes discovered to date. Analyses of the kinetic characteristics and the metal ion requirements of the cleavage reaction reveal that members of this ribozyme class likely use several catalytic strategies to promote the rapid cleavage of RNA. PMID:26385507

  3. Crystal structure of cleaved vaspin (serpinA12).

    PubMed

    Pippel, Jan; Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Ulbricht, David; Daberger, Jan; Schultz, Stephan; Heiker, John T; Sträter, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The adipokine vaspin (serpinA12) is mainly expressed in white adipose tissue and exhibits various beneficial effects on obesity-related processes. Kallikrein 7 is the only known target protease of vaspin and is inhibited by the classical serpin inhibitory mechanism involving a cleavage of the reactive center loop between P1 (M378) and P1' (E379). Here, we present the X-ray structure of vaspin, cleaved between M378 and E379. We provide a comprehensive analysis of differences between the uncleaved and cleaved forms in the shutter, breach, and hinge regions with relation to common molecular features underlying the serpin inhibitory mode. Furthermore, we point out differences towards other serpins and provide novel data underlining the remarkable stability of vaspin. We speculate that the previously reported FKGx1Wx2x3 motif in the breach region may play a decisive role in determining the reactive center loop configuration in the native vaspin state and might contribute to the high thermostability of vaspin. Thus, this structure may provide a basis for future mutational studies. PMID:26529565

  4. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  5. Cluster analysis in soft x-ray spectromicroscopy : finding the patterns in complex specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Lerotic, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Gillow, J. B.; Wirick, S.; Vogt, S.; Maser, J.; Experimental Facilities Division; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook; BNL

    2005-06-01

    Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy provides spectral data on the chemical speciation of light elements at sub-100 nanometer spatial resolution. If all chemical species in a specimen are known and separately characterized, existing approaches can be used to measure the concentration of each component at each pixel. In other situations such as in biology or environmental science, this approach may not be possible. We have previously described the use of principle component analysis (PCA) to orthogonalize and noise-filter spectromicroscopy data, and cluster analysis (CA) to classify the analyzed data and obtain thickness maps of representative spectra. We describe here an extension of that work employing an angle distance measure; this measure provides better classification based on spectral signatures alone in specimens with significant thickness variations. The method is illustrated using simulated data, and also to examine sporulation in the bacterium Clostridium sp.

  6. Communication: Relativistic Fock-space coupled cluster study of small building blocks of larger uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tecmer, Paweł Visscher, Lucas; Severo Pereira Gomes, André; Knecht, Stefan

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the electronic structure of the [UO{sub 2}]{sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2} {sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 3} {sup +}, NUO, [NUO]{sup +}, [NUO]{sup 2} {sup +}, [NUN]{sup −}, NUN, and [NUN]{sup +} molecules with the intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster method. The accuracy of mean-field approaches based on the eXact-2-Component Hamiltonian to incorporate spin–orbit coupling and Gaunt interactions are compared to results obtained with the Dirac–Coulomb Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we assess the reliability of calculations employing approximate density functionals in describing electronic spectra and quantities useful in rationalizing Uranium (VI) species reactivity (hardness, electronegativity, and electrophilicity)

  7. Synthesis of self-assembled large area films of complex hierarchical PZT clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap Chaudhary, Raghvendra; Saxena, Sumit; Kmar, Amit; Bharadwaj, Rajesh; Shukla, Shobha

    2016-02-01

    The ability to bridge nano-micro interface for applications in functional miniaturized devices is of fundamental interest. We have synthesized novel large area films of complex hierarchical micro-flower morphologies of piezo-ceramics using hydrothermal reactions. The overall size of the samples produced is ∼cm2. The growth morphologies are found to be dependent on concentration and pressure inside the reaction chamber. This can be used to deterministically grow these complex multi-scaled microstructures over a large area. These results outline a strategy for growth of omni-directional microstructures by utilizing self assembly processes.

  8. Iridium Complexes and Clusters in Dealuminated Zeolite HY: Distribution between Crystalline and Impurity Amorphous Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Xu, Pinghong; Hwang, Son-Jong; Lu, Jing; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-07-08

    Dealuminated zeolite HY was used to support Ir(CO)2 complexes formed from Ir(CO)2(C5H7O2). Infrared and X-ray absorption spectra and atomic-resolution electron microscopy images identify these complexes, and the images and 27Al NMR spectra identify impurity amorphous regions in the zeolite where the iridium is more susceptible to aggregation than in the crystalline regions. The results indicate a significant stability limitation of metal in amorphous impurity regions of zeolites.

  9. Cell-penetration by Co(III)cyclen-based peptide-cleaving catalysts selective for pathogenic proteins of amyloidoses.

    PubMed

    Chei, Woo Suk; Lee, Joo-Won; Kim, Jae Bum; Suh, Junghun

    2010-07-15

    Derivatives of the Co(III) complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen) with various organic pendants have been reported as target-selective peptide-cleaving catalysts, which can be exploited as catalytic drugs. In order to provide a firm basis for the catalytic drugs based on Co(III)cyclen, the ability of the Co(III)cyclen-containing peptide-cleaving catalysts to penetrate animal cells such as mouse fibroblast NIH-3T 3 or human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells is demonstrated in the present study. Since the catalysts destroy pathogenic proteins for amyloidoses, results of the present study are expected to initiate extensive efforts to obtain therapeutically safe catalytic drugs for amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, mad cow disease, and so on. PMID:20542701

  10. Characterization of Toxin Complex Gene Clusters and Insect Toxicity of Bacteria Representing Four Subgroups of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Lorena I; Henkels, Marcella D; Shaffer, Brenda T; Walker, Francesca L; Davis, Edward W; Stockwell, Virginia O; Bruck, Denny; Taylor, Barbara J; Loper, Joyce E

    2016-01-01

    Ten strains representing four lineages of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group (P. chlororaphis, P. corrugata, P. koreensis, and P. fluorescens subgroups) were evaluated for toxicity to the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta and the common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains within the P. chlororaphis subgroup exhibited both oral and injectable toxicity to the lepidopteran M. sexta. All three strains have the gene cluster encoding the FitD insect toxin and a ΔfitD mutant of P. protegens strain Pf-5 exhibited diminished oral toxicity compared to the wildtype strain. Only one of the three strains, P. protegens Pf-5, exhibited substantial levels of oral toxicity against the dipteran D. melanogaster. Three strains in the P. fluorescens subgroup, which lack fitD, consistently showed significant levels of injectable toxicity against M. sexta. In contrast, the oral toxicity of these strains against D. melanogaster was variable between experiments, with only one strain, Pseudomonas sp. BG33R, causing significant levels of mortality in repeated experiments. Toxin complex (Tc) gene clusters, which encode insecticidal properties in Photorhabdus luminescens, were identified in the genomes of seven of the ten strains evaluated in this study. Within those seven genomes, six types of Tc gene clusters were identified, distinguished by gene content, organization and genomic location, but no correlation was observed between the presence of Tc genes and insect toxicity of the evaluated strains. Our results demonstrate that members of the P. fluorescens group have the capacity to kill insects by both FitD-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:27580176

  11. A critical look at the merger scenario to explain multiple populations and rotation in iron-complex globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavagnin, Elena; Mapelli, Michela; Lake, George

    2016-09-01

    Merging has been proposed to explain multiple populations in globular clusters (GCs) where there is a spread in iron abundance (hereafter, iron-complex GCs). By means of N-body simulations, we investigate if merging is consistent with the observations of subpopulations and rotation in iron-complex GCs. The key parameters are the initial mass and density ratios of the progenitors. When densities are similar, the more massive progenitor dominates the central part of the merger remnant and the less massive progenitor forms an extended rotating population. The low-mass progenitor can become the majority population in the central regions of the merger remnant only if its initial density is higher by roughly the mass ratio. To match the radial distribution of multiple populations in two iron-complex GCs (ω Cen and NGC 1851), the less massive progenitor needs to be four times as dense as the larger one. Our merger remnants show solid-body rotation in the inner parts, becoming differential in the outer parts. Rotation velocity V and ellipticity ɛ are in agreement with models for oblate rotators with isotropic dispersion. We discuss several kinematic signatures of a merger with a denser lower mass progenitor that can be tested with future observations.

  12. Photo-induced transformation process at gold clusters-semiconductor interface: Implications for the complexity of gold clusters-based photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siqi; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The recent thrust in utilizing atomically precise organic ligands protected gold clusters (Au clusters) as photosensitizer coupled with semiconductors for nano-catalysts has led to the claims of improved efficiency in photocatalysis. Nonetheless, the influence of photo-stability of organic ligands protected-Au clusters at the Au/semiconductor interface on the photocatalytic properties remains rather elusive. Taking Au clusters–TiO2 composites as a prototype, we for the first time demonstrate the photo-induced transformation of small molecular-like Au clusters to larger metallic Au nanoparticles under different illumination conditions, which leads to the diverse photocatalytic reaction mechanism. This transformation process undergoes a diffusion/aggregation mechanism accompanied with the onslaught of Au clusters by active oxygen species and holes resulting from photo-excited TiO2 and Au clusters. However, such Au clusters aggregation can be efficiently inhibited by tuning reaction conditions. This work would trigger rational structural design and fine condition control of organic ligands protected-metal clusters-semiconductor composites for diverse photocatalytic applications with long-term photo-stability. PMID:26947754

  13. Photo-induced transformation process at gold clusters-semiconductor interface: Implications for the complexity of gold clusters-based photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2016-03-01

    The recent thrust in utilizing atomically precise organic ligands protected gold clusters (Au clusters) as photosensitizer coupled with semiconductors for nano-catalysts has led to the claims of improved efficiency in photocatalysis. Nonetheless, the influence of photo-stability of organic ligands protected-Au clusters at the Au/semiconductor interface on the photocatalytic properties remains rather elusive. Taking Au clusters–TiO2 composites as a prototype, we for the first time demonstrate the photo-induced transformation of small molecular-like Au clusters to larger metallic Au nanoparticles under different illumination conditions, which leads to the diverse photocatalytic reaction mechanism. This transformation process undergoes a diffusion/aggregation mechanism accompanied with the onslaught of Au clusters by active oxygen species and holes resulting from photo-excited TiO2 and Au clusters. However, such Au clusters aggregation can be efficiently inhibited by tuning reaction conditions. This work would trigger rational structural design and fine condition control of organic ligands protected-metal clusters-semiconductor composites for diverse photocatalytic applications with long-term photo-stability.

  14. Quick detection of QRS complexes and R-waves using a wavelet transform and K-means clustering.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Han, Junze; Wang, Kuanquan

    2015-01-01

    Based on the idea of telemedicine, 24-hour uninterrupted monitoring on electrocardiograms (ECG) has started to be implemented. To create an intelligent ECG monitoring system, an efficient and quick detection algorithm for the characteristic waveforms is needed. This paper aims to give a quick and effective method for detecting QRS-complexes and R-waves in ECGs. The real ECG signal from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database is used for the performance evaluation. The method proposed combined a wavelet transform and the K-means clustering algorithm. A wavelet transform is adopted in the data analysis and preprocessing. Then, based on the slope information of the filtered data, a segmented K-means clustering method is adopted to detect the QRS region. Detection of the R-peak is based on comparing the local amplitudes in each QRS region, which is different from other approaches, and the time cost of R-wave detection is reduced. Of the tested 8 records (total 18201 beats) from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database, an average R-peak detection sensitivity of 99.72 and a positive predictive value of 99.80% are gained; the average time consumed detecting a 30-min original signal is 5.78s, which is competitive with other methods. PMID:26405862

  15. Chemistry and Biology of Self-Cleaving Ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Randi M; Polanco, Julio A; Lupták, Andrej

    2015-11-01

    Self-cleaving ribozymes were discovered 30 years ago, but their biological distribution and catalytic mechanisms are only beginning to be defined. Each ribozyme family is defined by a distinct structure, with unique active sites accelerating the same transesterification reaction across the families. Biochemical studies show that general acid-base catalysis is the most common mechanism of self-cleavage, but metal ions and metabolites can be used as cofactors. Ribozymes have been discovered in highly diverse genomic contexts throughout nature, from viroids to vertebrates. Their biological roles include self-scission during rolling-circle replication of RNA genomes, co-transcriptional processing of retrotransposons, and metabolite-dependent gene expression regulation in bacteria. Other examples, including highly conserved mammalian ribozymes, suggest that many new biological roles are yet to be discovered. PMID:26481500

  16. Ring-Cleaving Dioxygenases with a Cupin Fold

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ring-cleaving dioxygenases catalyze key reactions in the aerobic microbial degradation of aromatic compounds. Many pathways converge to catecholic intermediates, which are subject to ortho or meta cleavage by intradiol or extradiol dioxygenases, respectively. However, a number of degradation pathways proceed via noncatecholic hydroxy-substituted aromatic carboxylic acids like gentisate, salicylate, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate, or aminohydroxybenzoates. The ring-cleaving dioxygenases active toward these compounds belong to the cupin superfamily, which is characterized by a six-stranded β-barrel fold and conserved amino acid motifs that provide the 3His or 2- or 3His-1Glu ligand environment of a divalent metal ion. Most cupin-type ring cleavage dioxygenases use an FeII center for catalysis, and the proposed mechanism is very similar to that of the canonical (type I) extradiol dioxygenases. The metal ion is presumed to act as an electron conduit for single electron transfer from the metal-bound substrate anion to O2, resulting in activation of both substrates to radical species. The family of cupin-type dioxygenases also involves quercetinase (flavonol 2,4-dioxygenase), which opens up two C-C bonds of the heterocyclic ring of quercetin, a wide-spread plant flavonol. Remarkably, bacterial quercetinases are capable of using different divalent metal ions for catalysis, suggesting that the redox properties of the metal are relatively unimportant for the catalytic reaction. The major role of the active-site metal ion could be to correctly position the substrate and to stabilize transition states and intermediates rather than to mediate electron transfer. The tentative hypothesis that quercetinase catalysis involves direct electron transfer from metal-bound flavonolate to O2 is supported by model chemistry. PMID:22287012

  17. Theoretical prediction of new Kubas four centre H2 complexes involving dimolybdate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simandiras, Emmanuel D.; Liakos, Dimitrios G.

    2013-09-01

    A new type of Kubas nonclassical molecular hydrogen complex involving two metallic centers is predicted by extensive DFT calculations, using five accurate functionals. The interaction consists of a four centre bond involving two metal atoms and the H2 molecule, the latter retaining a significant part of its molecular nature. [Mo2Cl8(μ-H2)]2- and [Mo2(CO)8(μ-H2)] are two examples that are found to be stable.

  18. Two hybrid compounds constructed from Ni-tris(imidazolyl) complexes and Keggin clusters: Syntheses, structures and electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuanfang; Sun, Xiaojun; Ma, Huiyuan; Pang, Haijun; Li, Shaobin; Zhao, Chunyan

    2016-07-01

    By introducing different polyoxotungstates into the Ni-tib (tib = 1, 3, 5-tris (1-imidazolyl)benzene) system, two new polyoxometalate-based inorganic-organic hybrids with distinct architectures, [Ni(Htib)4][PW12O40]2 (1) and [Nitib]2(H2O)4](GeW12O40)·2H2O (2) have been synthesized under the same hydrothermal conditions. Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and characterized by infrared spectra (IR), elemental analyses, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and thermogravimetic (TG) analyses. Structural analyses show that compound 1 is a dimer, in which two neighboring mono-connected [PW12O40]3- (PW12) clusters are linked together by a [Ni(Htib)4] complex cation. In contrast to compound 1, compound 2 presents a 2D grid layer formed by bi-connected [GeW12O40]4- (GeW12) clusters and [Ni2(H2O)4(tib)2] complex cations, and the adjacent layers are further linked together by the hydrogen bondings to form a highly opened 3D framework. The distinct structural features of two hybrids suggest that the charge of the Keggin anions should play a key role in the process of assembly. Additionally, the electrochemical properties of compounds 1 and 2 have been investigated, and the results indicated that 1 and 2 have good electrocatalytic activities towards reduction of nitrite and oxidation of ascorbic acid.

  19. Two hybrid compounds constructed from Ni-tris(imidazolyl) complexes and Keggin clusters: Syntheses, structures and electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuanfang; Sun, Xiaojun; Ma, Huiyuan; Pang, Haijun; Li, Shaobin; Zhao, Chunyan

    2016-07-01

    By introducing different polyoxotungstates into the Ni-tib (tib = 1, 3, 5-tris (1-imidazolyl)benzene) system, two new polyoxometalate-based inorganic-organic hybrids with distinct architectures, [Ni(Htib)4][PW12O40]2 (1) and [Nitib]2(H2O)4](GeW12O40)·2H2O (2) have been synthesized under the same hydrothermal conditions. Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and characterized by infrared spectra (IR), elemental analyses, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and thermogravimetic (TG) analyses. Structural analyses show that compound 1 is a dimer, in which two neighboring mono-connected [PW12O40]3- (PW12) clusters are linked together by a [Ni(Htib)4] complex cation. In contrast to compound 1, compound 2 presents a 2D grid layer formed by bi-connected [GeW12O40]4- (GeW12) clusters and [Ni2(H2O)4(tib)2] complex cations, and the adjacent layers are further linked together by the hydrogen bondings to form a highly opened 3D framework. The distinct structural features of two hybrids suggest that the charge of the Keggin anions should play a key role in the process of assembly. Additionally, the electrochemical properties of compounds 1 and 2 have been investigated, and the results indicated that 1 and 2 have good electrocatalytic activities towards reduction of nitrite and oxidation of ascorbic acid.

  20. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in cluster-forming clumps of the Aquila Rift complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe; Maury, Anaëlle

    2015-08-01

    One of the main goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (André et al. 2010) is to elucidate the physicalmechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores in molecular clouds. In theAquila cloud complex imaged with Herschel/SPIRE-PACS between 70-500 μm, we have recently identifieda complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them are gravitationally-bound prestellar cores, likelyforming stars in the future. We also detected 58 protostellar cores (Könyves et al. 2010 and 2015, subm.- see http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr/archives). This region is dominated by two (proto)clusters which arecurrently active sites of clustered star formation (SF): the filamentary Serpens South cloud and the W40HII region. The latter is powered by massive young stars, and a 2nd-generation SF can be witnessed inthe surroundings (Maury et al. 2011).Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in Aquila and suggest aclose connection between them and the formation process of prestellar cores, where both structures arehighly concentrated around the protoclusters. About 10-20% of the gas mass is in the form of filamentsbelow Av~7, while ~50-75% of the dense gas mass above Av~7-10 is in filamentary structures.Furthermore, ~90% of our prestellar cores are located above a background column density correspondingto Av~7, and ~75% of them lie within the densest filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unitlength >16 M⊙/pc. Indeed, a strong correlation is found between the spatial distribution of prestellar coresand the densest filaments.Comparing the statistics of cores and filaments with the number of young stellar objects found by Spitzerin the same complex, we also infer a typical timescale ~1 Myr for the formation and evolution of bothprestellar cores and filaments.In summary, our Herschel findings in Aquila support a filamentary paradigm for the early stages of SF,where the cores result from the gravitational fragmentation

  1. Dissection of Two Complex Clusters of Resistance Genes in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; McHale, Leah K; Kozik, Alex; Reyes-Chin Wo, Sebastian; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    Of the over 50 phenotypic resistance genes mapped in lettuce, 25 colocalize to three major resistance clusters (MRC) on chromosomes 1, 2, and 4. Similarly, the majority of candidate resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR) proteins genetically colocalize with phenotypic resistance loci. MRC1 and MRC4 span over 66 and 63 Mb containing 84 and 21 NLR-encoding genes, respectively, as well as 765 and 627 genes that are not related to NLR genes. Forward and reverse genetic approaches were applied to dissect MRC1 and MRC4. Transgenic lines exhibiting silencing were selected using silencing of β-glucuronidase as a reporter. Silencing of two of five NLR-encoding gene families resulted in abrogation of nine of 14 tested resistance phenotypes mapping to these two regions. At MRC1, members of the coiled coil-NLR-encoding RGC1 gene family were implicated in host and nonhost resistance through requirement for Dm5/8- and Dm45-mediated resistance to downy mildew caused by Bremia lactucae as well as the hypersensitive response to effectors AvrB, AvrRpm1, and AvrRpt2 of the nonpathogen Pseudomonas syringae. At MRC4, RGC12 family members, which encode toll interleukin receptor-NLR proteins, were implicated in Dm4-, Dm7-, Dm11-, and Dm44-mediated resistance to B. lactucae. Lesions were identified in the sequence of a candidate gene within dm7 loss-of-resistance mutant lines, confirming that RGC12G confers Dm7. PMID:25650829

  2. The formation of complex acetylcholine receptor clusters requires MuSK kinase activity and structural information from the MuSK extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Sania; Herbst, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Efficient synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) requires the topological maturation of the postsynaptic apparatus from an oval acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-rich plaque into a complex pretzel-shaped array of branches. However, compared to NMJ formation very little is known about the mechanisms that regulate NMJ maturation. Recently the process of in vivo transformation from plaque into pretzel has been reproduced in vitro by culturing myotubes aneurally on laminin-coated substrate. It was proposed that the formation of complex AChR clusters is regulated by a MuSK-dependent muscle intrinsic program. To elucidate the structure–function role of MuSK in the aneural maturation of AChR pretzels, we used muscle cell lines expressing MuSK mutant and chimeric proteins. Here we report, that besides its role during agrin-induced AChR clustering, MuSK kinase activity is also necessary for substrate-dependent cluster formation. Constitutive-active MuSK induces larger AChR clusters, a faster cluster maturation on laminin and increases the anchorage of AChRs to the cytoskeleton compared to MuSK wild-type. In addition, we find that the juxtamembrane region of MuSK, which has previously been shown to regulate agrin-induced AChR clustering, is unable to induce complex AChR clusters on laminin substrate. Most interestingly, MuSK kinase activity is not sufficient for laminin-dependent AChR cluster formation since the MuSK ectodomain is also required suggesting a so far undiscovered instructive role for the extracellular domain of MuSK. PMID:22210232

  3. Mutations in LYRM4, encoding iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis factor ISD11, cause deficiency of multiple respiratory chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sze Chern; Friemel, Martin; Marum, Justine E.; Tucker, Elena J.; Bruno, Damien L.; Riley, Lisa G.; Christodoulou, John; Kirk, Edwin P.; Boneh, Avihu; DeGennaro, Christine M.; Springer, Michael; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Rouault, Tracey A.; Leimkühler, Silke; Thorburn, David R.; Compton, Alison G.

    2013-01-01

    Iron–sulfur clusters (ISCs) are important prosthetic groups that define the functions of many proteins. Proteins with ISCs (called iron–sulfur or Fe–S proteins) are present in mitochondria, the cytosol, the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus. They participate in various biological pathways including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the citric acid cycle, iron homeostasis, heme biosynthesis and DNA repair. Here, we report a homozygous mutation in LYRM4 in two patients with combined OXPHOS deficiency. LYRM4 encodes the ISD11 protein, which forms a complex with, and stabilizes, the sulfur donor NFS1. The homozygous mutation (c.203G>T, p.R68L) was identified via massively parallel sequencing of >1000 mitochondrial genes (MitoExome sequencing) in a patient with deficiency of complexes I, II and III in muscle and liver. These three complexes contain ISCs. Sanger sequencing identified the same mutation in his similarly affected cousin, who had a more severe phenotype and died while a neonate. Complex IV was also deficient in her skeletal muscle. Several other Fe–S proteins were also affected in both patients, including the aconitases and ferrochelatase. Mutant ISD11 only partially complemented for an ISD11 deletion in yeast. Our in vitro studies showed that the l-cysteine desulfurase activity of NFS1 was barely present when co-expressed with mutant ISD11. Our findings are consistent with a defect in the early step of ISC assembly affecting a broad variety of Fe–S proteins. The differences in biochemical and clinical features between the two patients may relate to limited availability of cysteine in the newborn period and suggest a potential approach to therapy. PMID:23814038

  4. Mixed-Valent Heptairon Complex with a Ground-State Spin Value of S=12/2 Constructed from a Triiron Cluster Ligand.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara; Ito

    2000-01-01

    The anionic triiron(III) cluster ligand [Fe(III)(3)(µ(3)-O)(bpca)(2)Cl(4)(EtO)(2)](-) (1; Hbpca=bis(2-pyridylcarbonyl)amine) was prepared as a building block for constructing larger metal assemblies. This "metal cluster complex ligand" was used in the synthesis of the mixed-valent heptairon complex [Fe(II)(1)(2)(EtOH)(2)], which has a ground-state spin value of S=12/2. PMID:10649385

  5. piRNA clusters and open chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are major structural components of eukaryotic genomes; however, mobilization of TEs generally has negative effects on the host genome. To counteract this threat, host cells have evolved genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that keep TEs silenced. One such mechanism involves the Piwi-piRNA complex, which represses TEs in animal gonads either by cleaving TE transcripts in the cytoplasm or by directing specific chromatin modifications at TE loci in the nucleus. Most Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are derived from genomic piRNA clusters. There has been remarkable progress in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying piRNA biogenesis. However, little is known about how a specific locus in the genome is converted into a piRNA-producing site. In this review, we will discuss a possible link between chromatin boundaries and piRNA cluster formation. PMID:25126116

  6. The resistance of electron-transport chain Fe-S clusters to oxidative damage during the reaction of peroxynitrite with mitochondrial complex II and rat-heart pericardium.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Linda L; Martinez-Bosch, Sandra; Manzano, Elisenda Lopez; Winnica, Daniel E; Epperly, Michael W; Peterson, Jim

    2009-05-01

    The effects of peroxynitrite and nitric oxide on the iron-sulfur clusters in complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) isolated from bovine heart have been studied primarily by EPR spectroscopy and no measurable damage to the constitutive 2Fe-2S, 3Fe-4S, or 4Fe-4S clusters was observed. The enzyme can be repeatedly oxidized with a slight excess of peroxynitrite and then quantitatively re-reduced with succinate. When added in large excess, peroxynitrite reacted with at least one tyrosine in each subunit of complex II to form 3-nitrotyrosines, but activity was barely compromised. Examination of rat-heart pericardium subjected to conditions leading to peroxynitrite production showed a small inhibition of complex II (16%) and a greater inhibition of aconitase (77%). In addition, experiments performed with excesses of sodium citrate and sodium succinate on rat-heart pericardium indicated that the "g approximately 2.01" EPR signal observed immediately following the beginning of conditions modeling oxidative/nitrosative stress, could be a consequence of both reversible oxidation of the constitutive 3Fe-4S cluster in complex II and degradation of the 4Fe-4S cluster in aconitase. However, the net signal envelope, which becomes apparent in less than 1min following the start of oxidative/nitrosative conditions, is dominated by the component arising from complex II. Taking into account the findings of a previous study concerning complexes I and III (L.L. Pearce, A.J. Kanai, M.W. Epperly, J. Peterson, Nitrosative stress results in irreversible inhibition of purified mitochondrial complexes I and III without modification of cofactors, Nitric Oxide 13 (2005) 254-263) it is now apparent that, with the exception of the cofactor in aconitase, mammalian (mitochondrial) iron-sulfur clusters are surprisingly resistant to degradation stemming from oxidative/nitrosative stress. PMID:19118636

  7. Synaptonemal complex extension from clustered telomeres mediates full-length chromosome pairing in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Youbin; Miller, Danny E.; Ross, Eric J.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro; Hawley, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    In the 1920s, József Gelei proposed that chromosome pairing in flatworms resulted from the formation of a telomere bouquet followed by the extension of synapsis from telomeres at the base of the bouquet, thus facilitating homolog pairing in a processive manner. A modern interpretation of Gelei’s model postulates that the synaptonemal complex (SC) is nucleated close to the telomeres and then extends progressively along the full length of chromosome arms. We used the easily visible meiotic chromosomes, a well-characterized genome, and RNAi in the sexual biotype of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea to test that hypothesis. By identifying and characterizing S. mediterranea homologs of genes encoding synaptonemal complex protein 1 (SYCP1), the topoisomerase-like protein SPO11, and RAD51, a key player in homologous recombination, we confirmed that SC formation begins near the telomeres and progresses along chromosome arms during zygotene. Although distal regions pair at the time of bouquet formation, pairing of a unique interstitial locus is not observed until the formation of full-length SC at pachytene. Moreover, neither full extension of the SC nor homologous pairing is dependent on the formation of double-strand breaks. These findings validate Gelei’s speculation that full-length pairing of homologous chromosomes is mediated by the extension of the SC formed near the telomeres. S. mediterranea thus becomes the first organism described (to our knowledge) that forms a canonical telomere bouquet but does not require double-strand breaks for synapsis between homologous chromosomes. However, the initiation of SC formation at the base of the telomere bouquet, which then is followed by full-length homologous pairing in planarian spermatocytes, is not observed in other species and may not be conserved. PMID:25404302

  8. Synthesis and structure of electron rich ruthenium polyhydride complexes and clusters containing AlCp* and GaCp*.

    PubMed

    Cadenbach, Thomas; Bollermann, Timo; Gemel, Christian; Fischer, Roland A

    2009-01-14

    The reactions of the ruthenium hydride complexes [{Ru(COD)(H)(NH2NMe2)3}{BArF}] (BArF=B{C6H3(CF3)2}4), [{Cp*Ru}2(micro-H)4] and [{Cp*Ru}3(micro-H)3(micro3-H)2] with GaCp* and AlCp* are investigated. The reaction of [{Ru(COD)(H)(NH2NMe2)3}{BArF}] with GaCp* leads to substitution of the hydrazine ligands by GaCp* and the formation of [{Ru(COD)(H)(GaCp*)3}{BArF}] (), while the reactions of [{Cp*Ru}2(micro-H)4] and [{Cp*Ru}3(micro-H)3(micro3-H)2] with ECp* (E=Al, Ga) results in the formation of the polyhydride clusters [{Cp*Ru(micro-H)(H)(micro-ECp*)}2] (, E=Ga; , E=Al) and [{Cp*Ru}3(micro-H)5(micro3-ECp*)] (, E=Al; , E=Ga). All Ru complexes react upon coordination of the group 13 ligand without loss of H2 or reductive elimination of Cp*H and without insertion into the Ru-H bonds; some of the products, however, showing Ru-H-E bridging motifs. All compounds were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:19089014

  9. Association between GABAA Receptor Subunit Gene Cluster and Zolpidem-Induced Complex Sleep Behaviors in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Lin, Hung-Hsun; Cheng, Kuang-hung; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate and elucidate the role of GABAA receptor subunits, specifically the 2 genetic markers at the GABAA α1 and GABAA α6 receptors, in zolpidem-induced complex sleep behaviors (CSBs). Design: Genetic association study. Setting: Kaohsiung Medical University-affiliated hospitals, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Patients: 30 zolpidem-induced CSB subjects and 37 controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The χ2 test demonstrated an association between the A15G variant at the GABAA α1 receptor subunit gene and zolpidem-induced CSBs (P = 0.007). The adjusted odds ratio of the GABAA α1 receptor subunit genotype for the risk of zolpidem-induced CSBs was approximately 10 (OR = 9.99, 95% CI = 1.82, 74.87; P = 0.013). Conclusions: The finding reveals that the A15G variant at the GABAA α1 receptor subunit gene confers a high risk of zolpidem-induced CSBs and may be considered in clinical services. Citation: Tsai JH; Yang P; Lin HH; Cheng Kh; Yang YH; Wu MT; Chen CC. Association between GABAA receptor subunit gene cluster and zolpidem-induced complex sleep behaviors in Han Chinese. SLEEP 2013;36(2):197–202. PMID:23372267

  10. Explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations for the benzenium ion (C6H7(+)) and its complexes with Ne and Ar.

    PubMed

    Botschwina, Peter; Oswald, Rainer

    2011-11-24

    Explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory at the CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a, b) level (Adler, T. B.; Knizia, G.; Werner, H.-J. J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 127, 221106) has been employed in a study of the benzenium ion (C6H7(+)) and its complexes with a neon or an argon atom. The ground-state rotational constants of C6H7(+) are predicted to be A0 = 5445 MHz, B0 = 5313 MHz, and C0 = 2731 MHz. Anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers of this cation were obtained by combination of harmonic CCSD(T*)-F12a values with anharmonic contributions calculated by double-hybrid density functional theory at the B2PLYP-D level. For the complexes of C6H7(+) with Ne or Ar, the lowest energy minimum is of π-bonded structure. The corresponding dissociation energies D0 are estimated to be 160 and 550 cm(-1), respectively. There is no indication of H-bonds to the aromatic or aliphatic hydrogen atoms. Instead, three nonequivalent local energy minima were found for nuclear configurations where the rare-gas atom lies in the ring-plane and approximatly points to the center of one of the six CC bonds. PMID:21981720

  11. A CEP215–HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Pavithra L.; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R.; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215–HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome–spindle pole interface by the CEP215–HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  12. Structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features observed in the STM will be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites) and the presence of contaminants

  13. Clustering of OB-fold domains of the partner protease complexed with trimeric stomatin from Thermococcales.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Hiramoto, Kana; Forterre, Patrick; Matsui, Ikuo

    2013-07-01

    The C-terminal soluble domain of stomatin operon partner protein (STOPP) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii has an oligonucleotide binding-fold (OB-fold). STOPP lacks the conserved surface residues necessary for binding to DNA/RNA. A tryptophan (W) residue is conserved instead at the molecular surface. Solvent-accessible W residues are often found at interfaces of protein-protein complexes, which suggested the possibility of self-assembling of STOPP. Protein-protein interactions among the C-terminal soluble domains of STOPP PH1510 (1510-C) were then analyzed by chemical linking and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) methods. These results suggest that the soluble domains of STOPP could assemble into homo-oligomers. Since hexameric subcomplex I from archaeal proteasome consists of coiled-coil segments and OB-fold domains, molecular modeling of 1510-C was performed using hexameric subcomplex I as a template. Although 1510-C is a comparatively small polypeptide consisting of approximately 60 residues, numerous salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were observed in the predicted hexamer of 1510-C, suggesting the stability of the homo-oligomeric structure. This oligomeric property of STOPP may be favorable for triplicate proteolysis of the trimer of prokaryotic stomatin. PMID:23587725

  14. Star formation in the filament of S254-S258 OB complex: a cluster in the process of being created

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, M. R.; Ojha, D. K.; Jose, J.; Zavagno, A.; Takahashi, S.; Neichel, B.; Kim, J. S.; Chauhan, N.; Pandey, A. K.; Zinchenko, I.; Tamura, M.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared dark clouds are ideal laboratories for studying the initial processes of high-mass star and star-cluster formation. We investigated the star formation activity of an unexplored filamentary dark cloud (size ~5.7 pc × 1.9 pc), which itself is part of a large filament (~20 pc) located in the S254-S258 OB complex at a distance of 2.5 kpc. Using Multi-band Imaging Photometer (MIPS) Spitzer 24 μm data, we uncovered 49 sources with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5. We identified 45 sources as candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) of Class I, flat-spectrum, and Class II natures. Additional 17 candidate YSOs (9 Class I and 8 Class II) are also identified using JHK and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry. We find that the protostar-to-Class II sources ratio (~2) and the protostar fraction (~70%) of the region are high. Comparison of the protostar fraction to other young clusters suggests that the star formation in the dark cloud possibly started only 1 Myr ago. Combining the near-infrared photometry of the YSO candidates with the theoretical evolutionary models, we infer that most of the candidate YSOs formed in the dark cloud are low-mass (<2 M⊙). We examine the spatial distribution of the YSOs and find that majority of them are linearly aligned along the highest column density line (N(H2)~1 × 1022 cm-2) of the dark cloud along its long axis at the mean nearest-neighbour separation of ~0.2 pc. Using the observed properties of the YSOs, physical conditions of the cloud and a simple cylindrical model, we explore the possible star formation process of this filamentary dark cloud and suggest that gravitational fragmentation within the filament should have played a dominant role in the formation of the YSOs. From the total mass of the YSOs, the gaseous mass associated with the dark cloud, and the surrounding environment, we infer that the region is presently forming stars at an efficiency of ~3% and a rate ~30 M⊙ Myr-1, and it may emerge

  15. Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different aromatic carboxylates: Assembly, structures, electrochemical and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Ju-Wen; Lu, Qi-Lin

    2013-02-15

    Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole (atrz) and three types of aromatic carboxylates, [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(DNBA){sub 6}] (1), [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(1,3-BDC){sub 3}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(SIP){sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (3) (HDNBA=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid and NaH{sub 2}SIP=sodium 5-sulfoisophthalate), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Complex 1 displays a single-molecular Cu{sup II}{sub 4} cluster structure, which is further connected by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions to form a 2D supramolecular layer. In 2, there also exist tetranuclear Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters, which are linked by the 1,3-BDC anions to give a 3D NaCl-type framework. In 3, the Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters are connected by the carboxyl and sulfo groups of SIP anions to generate 3D (4,8)-connected framework with a (4{sup 10}{center_dot}6{sup 14}{center_dot}8{sup 4})(4{sup 5}{center_dot}6){sub 2} topology. The atrz ligand conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters and the carboxylates with different non-carboxyl substituent show important effects on the final structures of the title complexes. The electrochemical and magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes based on different carboxylates have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The carboxylate anions play a key role in the formation of three different structures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes have been obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atrz conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carboxylates show important effect on the structures of

  16. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces.

    PubMed

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-02-01

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress-displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements. PMID:24356124

  17. Far-field radiation from a cleaved cylindrical dielectric waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C.

    1996-07-09

    Angular spread in the far-field radiation pattern of a cleaved dielectric waveguide is determined from the modal structure at the surface of the waveguide using the Smythe vector integral formulation. Essential features: First, a mode exists in the fiber that has no wavelength cutoff--the so-called HE{sub 11} mode. This mode arises when non-azimuthal angular dependence of the incoming radiation is present. Second, the energy flow from this hybrid mode fills the fiber face and is not annularly shaped as opposed to the symmetric TE and TM modes. Third, the HE{sub 11} mode is not polarization dependent in contrast to the TE and TM modes. Fourth, for small differences in the refractive indices between the core and cladding regions, only the HE{sub 11} mode will be supported until the next modes appear around 3.33{lambda}. At this point, three new modes can propagate and the model structure of the radiation becomes more complicated. Fifth, the far-field radiation pattern will have negligibly small angular dependence in the phases of the vector fields when only the lowest mode is present; the amplitude has an overall angular dependent form factor. Furthermore, when other modes are present (above 3.33{lambda}), the phase of the vector fields will acquire an angular dependence.

  18. Signal peptide peptidase functions in ERAD to cleave the unfolded protein response regulator XBP1u.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-yi; Malchus, Nicole S; Hehn, Beate; Stelzer, Walter; Avci, Dönem; Langosch, Dieter; Lemberg, Marius K

    2014-11-01

    Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes intramembrane proteolysis of signal peptides at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but has also been suggested to play a role in ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we show that SPP forms a complex with the ERAD factor Derlin1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRC8 to cleave the unfolded protein response (UPR) regulator XBP1u. Cleavage occurs within a so far unrecognized type II transmembrane domain, which renders XBP1u as an SPP substrate through specific sequence features. Additionally, Derlin1 acts in the complex as a substrate receptor by recognizing the luminal tail of XBP1u. Remarkably, this interaction of Derlin1 with XBP1u obviates the need for ectodomain shedding prior to SPP cleavage, commonly required for intramembrane cuts. Furthermore, we show that XBP1u inhibits the UPR transcription factor XBP1s by targeting it toward proteasomal degradation. Thus, we identify an ERAD complex that controls the abundance of XBP1u and thereby tunes signaling through the UPR. PMID:25239945

  19. Signal peptide peptidase functions in ERAD to cleave the unfolded protein response regulator XBP1u

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-yi; Malchus, Nicole S; Hehn, Beate; Stelzer, Walter; Avci, Dönem; Langosch, Dieter; Lemberg, Marius K

    2014-01-01

    Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes intramembrane proteolysis of signal peptides at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but has also been suggested to play a role in ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we show that SPP forms a complex with the ERAD factor Derlin1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRC8 to cleave the unfolded protein response (UPR) regulator XBP1u. Cleavage occurs within a so far unrecognized type II transmembrane domain, which renders XBP1u as an SPP substrate through specific sequence features. Additionally, Derlin1 acts in the complex as a substrate receptor by recognizing the luminal tail of XBP1u. Remarkably, this interaction of Derlin1 with XBP1u obviates the need for ectodomain shedding prior to SPP cleavage, commonly required for intramembrane cuts. Furthermore, we show that XBP1u inhibits the UPR transcription factor XBP1s by targeting it toward proteasomal degradation. Thus, we identify an ERAD complex that controls the abundance of XBP1u and thereby tunes signaling through the UPR. PMID:25239945

  20. Organometallic Complex Formed by an Unconventional Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dong, Min; Horitani, Masaki; Dzikovski, Boris; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Krebs, Carsten; Freed, Jack H; Hoffman, Brian M; Lin, Hening

    2016-08-10

    Pyrococcus horikoshii Dph2 (PhDph2) is an unusual radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme involved in the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis. It catalyzes the reaction by cleaving SAM to generate a 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl (ACP) radical. To probe the reaction mechanism, we synthesized a SAM analogue (SAMCA), in which the ACP group of SAM is replaced with a 3-carboxyallyl group. SAMCA is cleaved by PhDph2, yielding a paramagnetic (S = 1/2) species, which is assigned to a complex formed between the reaction product, α-sulfinyl-3-butenoic acid, and the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measurements with (13)C and (2)H isotopically labeled SAMCA support a π-complex between the C═C double bond of α-sulfinyl-3-butenoic acid and the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. This is the first example of a radical SAM-related [4Fe-4S](+) cluster forming an organometallic complex with an alkene, shedding additional light on the mechanism of PhDph2 and expanding our current notions for the reactivity of [4Fe-4S] clusters in radical SAM enzymes. PMID:27465315

  1. Detecting hidden spatial and spatio-temporal structures in glasses and complex physical systems by multiresolution network clustering.

    PubMed

    Ronhovde, P; Chakrabarty, S; Hu, D; Sahu, M; Sahu, K K; Kelton, K F; Mauro, N A; Nussinov, Z

    2011-09-01

    We elaborate on a general method that we recently introduced for characterizing the "natural" structures in complex physical systems via multi-scale network analysis. The method is based on "community detection" wherein interacting particles are partitioned into an "ideal gas" of optimally decoupled groups of particles. Specifically, we construct a set of network representations ("replicas") of the physical system based on interatomic potentials and apply a multiscale clustering ("multiresolution community detection") analysis using information-based correlations among the replicas. Replicas may i) be different representations of an identical static system, ii) embody dynamics by considering replicas to be time separated snapshots of the system (with a tunable time separation), or iii) encode general correlations when different replicas correspond to different representations of the entire history of the system as it evolves in space-time. Inputs for our method are the inter-particle potentials or experimentally measured two (or higher order) particle correlations. We apply our method to computer simulations of a binary Kob-Andersen Lennard-Jones system in a mixture ratio of A(80)B(20) , a ternary model system with components "A", "B", and "C" in ratios of A(88)B(7)C(5) (as in Al(88)Y(7)Fe(5) , and to atomic coordinates in a Zr(80)Pt(20) system as gleaned by reverse Monte Carlo analysis of experimentally determined structure factors. We identify the dominant structures (disjoint or overlapping) and general length scales by analyzing extrema of the information theory measures. We speculate on possible links between i) physical transitions or crossovers and ii) changes in structures found by this method as well as phase transitions associated with the computational complexity of the community detection problem. We also briefly consider continuum approaches and discuss rigidity and the shear penetration depth in amorphous systems; this latter length scale increases as

  2. Theoretical differential Raman scattering cross-sections of totally-symmetric vibrational modes of free pyridine and pyridine-metal cluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. Y.; Hayashi, M.; Lin, S. H.; Tian, Z. Q.

    2004-01-01

    The differential Raman scattering cross-sections of totally-symmetric vibrational modes for pyridine and pyridine-metal clusters have been calculated by using ab initio and density functional methods. The results are compared with experimental data and a good agreement is obtained. In particular, we can theoretically reproduce the significant changes in the relative Raman intensities of the ν12 mode in pyridine-metal cluster complexes. We focus on two mechanisms for these Raman intensities changes: (1) the chemical interaction between the pyridine and the metal clusters; and (2) the charge transfer mechanism. For the pyridine-silver cluster complexes, we find that due to the weak bonding, the chemical interaction does not influence the relative intensities of the Raman peaks of the ν1 and ν12 modes. However, in the case where the copper or the gold clusters are attached to pyridine, the intensity of the band of the ν12 mode is weakened significantly. We also find that the charge transfer mechanism increases the asymmetry of the bands of the ν1 and ν12 modes on all three metals.

  3. Methane activation by cobalt cluster cations, Con+ (n=2-16): Reaction mechanisms and thermochemistry of cluster-CHx (x=0-3) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citir, Murat; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-02-01

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Con+ (n =2-16) with CD4 are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-10 eV. The main products are hydride formation, ConD+, dehydrogenation to form ConCD2+, and double dehydrogenation yielding ConC+. These primary products decompose to form secondary and higher order products, ConCD+, Con-1D+, Con-1C+, Con-1CD+, and Con-1CD2+ at higher energies. Adduct formation of ConCD4+ is also observed for the largest cluster cations, n ≥10. In general, the efficiencies of the single and double dehydrogenation processes increase with cluster size, although the hexamer cation shows a reduced reactivity compared to its neighbors. All reactions exhibit thresholds, and cross sections for the various primary and secondary reactions are analyzed to yield reaction thresholds from which bond energies for cobalt cluster cations to D, C, CD, CD2, and CD3 are determined. The relative magnitudes of these bond energies are consistent with simple bond order considerations. Bond energies for larger clusters rapidly reach relatively constant values, which are used to estimate the chemisorption energies of the C, CD, CD2, and CD3 molecular fragments to cobalt surfaces.

  4. Functional characterization of diverse ring-hydroxylating oxygenases and induction of complex aromatic catabolic gene clusters in Sphingobium sp. PNB

    PubMed Central

    Khara, Pratick; Roy, Madhumita; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Ghosal, Debajyoti; Dutta, Tapan K.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. PNB, like other sphingomonads, has multiple ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (RHO) genes. Three different fosmid clones have been sequenced to identify the putative genes responsible for the degradation of various aromatics in this bacterial strain. Comparison of the map of the catabolic genes with that of different sphingomonads revealed a similar arrangement of gene clusters that harbors seven sets of RHO terminal components and a sole set of electron transport (ET) proteins. The presence of distinctly conserved amino acid residues in ferredoxin and in silico molecular docking analyses of ferredoxin with the well characterized terminal oxygenase components indicated the structural uniqueness of the ET component in sphingomonads. The predicted substrate specificities, derived from the phylogenetic relationship of each of the RHOs, were examined based on transformation of putative substrates and their structural homologs by the recombinant strains expressing each of the oxygenases and the sole set of available ET proteins. The RHO AhdA1bA2b was functionally characterized for the first time and was found to be capable of transforming ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, cumene, p-cymene and biphenyl, in addition to a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Overexpression of aromatic catabolic genes in strain PNB, revealed by real-time PCR analyses, is a way forward to understand the complex regulation of degradative genes in sphingomonads. PMID:24918041

  5. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:6432847

  6. Pectate lyase C from Bacillus subtilis: a novel endo-cleaving enzyme with activity on highly methylated pectin.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Margarita; Diaz, Pilar; Pastor, Francisco I Javier

    2006-03-01

    The gene yvpA from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. It encoded a pectate lyase of 221 amino acids that was denominated PelC. The heterologously expressed enzyme was purified by His-tag affinity chromatography and characterized. PelC depolymerized polygalacturonate and pectins of methyl esterification degree from 22 % to 89 %, exhibiting maximum activity on 22 % esterified citrus pectin. It showed an absolute Ca2+ requirement and the optimum temperature and pH were 65 degrees C and pH 10, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence of PelC showed 53 % identity to pectate lyase PelA from Paenibacillus barcinonensis, which was also characterized. Similarly to PelC, purified PelA showed activity on polygalacturonate and pectins with a high degree of methyl esterification. The two enzymes cleaved pectic polymers to a mixture of oligogalacturonates, indicating an endo mode of action. Analysis of activity on trigalacturonate showed that PelC cleaved it to galacturonic acid and unsaturated digalacturonate, whereas PelA did not show activity on this substrate. PelC and PelA showed high homology to a few recently identified pectate lyases of family 3 and form with them a cluster of small-sized pectate lyases from non-pathogenic micro-organisms. PMID:16514142

  7. Experimental and Metabolic Modeling Evidence for a Folate-Cleaving Side-Activity of Ketopantoate Hydroxymethyltransferase (PanB)

    PubMed Central

    Thiaville, Jennifer J.; Frelin, Océane; García-Salinas, Carolina; Harrison, Katherine; Hasnain, Ghulam; Horenstein, Nicole A.; Díaz de la Garza, Rocio I.; Henry, Christopher S.; Hanson, Andrew D.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydrofolate (THF) and its one-carbon derivatives, collectively termed folates, are essential cofactors, but are inherently unstable. While it is clear that chemical oxidation can cleave folates or damage their pterin precursors, very little is known about enzymatic damage to these molecules or about whether the folate biosynthesis pathway responds adaptively to damage to its end-products. The presence of a duplication of the gene encoding the folate biosynthesis enzyme 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (FolK) in many sequenced bacterial genomes combined with a strong chromosomal clustering of the folK gene with panB, encoding the 5,10-methylene-THF-dependent enzyme ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase, led us to infer that PanB has a side activity that cleaves 5,10-methylene-THF, yielding a pterin product that is recycled by FolK. Genetic and metabolic analyses of Escherichia coli strains showed that overexpression of PanB leads to accumulation of the likely folate cleavage product 6-hydroxymethylpterin and other pterins in cells and medium, and—unexpectedly—to a 46% increase in total folate content. In silico modeling of the folate biosynthesis pathway showed that these observations are consistent with the in vivo cleavage of 5,10-methylene-THF by a side-activity of PanB, with FolK-mediated recycling of the pterin cleavage product, and with regulation of folate biosynthesis by folates or their damage products. PMID:27065985

  8. Complex trend of magnetic order in Fe clusters on 4d transition-metal surfaces. I. Experimental evidence and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessi, V.; Otte, F.; Krotzky, S.; Tieg, C.; Wasniowska, M.; Ferriani, P.; Heinze, S.; Honolka, J.; Kern, K.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate the occurrence of compensated spin configurations in Fe clusters and monolayers on Ru(0001) and Rh(111) by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments, first-principles calculations, and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results reveal complex intracluster exchange interactions which depend strongly on the substrate 4d-band filling, the cluster geometry, as well as lateral and vertical structural relaxations. The importance of substrate 4d-band filling manifests itself also in small nearest-neighbor exchange interactions in Fe dimers and in a nearly inverted trend of the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida coupling constants for Fe adatoms on the Ru and Rh surface.

  9. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Dingra, Nin N.; Naik, Sunil G.; Lees, Nicolas S.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela J.; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in S. cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in E. coli. We have shown that co-expression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV-visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, Mössbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast. PMID:19715344

  10. Crystal Structures of the Iron-Sulfur Cluster-Dependent Quinolinate Synthase in Complex with Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate, Iminoaspartate Analogues, and Quinolinate.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Michael K; Ealick, Steven E

    2016-08-01

    The quinolinate synthase of prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, NadA, contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster with unknown function. We report crystal structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii NadA in complex with dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), iminoaspartate analogues, and quinolinate. DHAP adopts a nearly planar conformation and chelates the [4Fe-4S] cluster via its keto and hydroxyl groups. The active site architecture suggests that the cluster acts as a Lewis acid in enediolate formation, like zinc in class II aldolases. The DHAP and putative iminoaspartate structures suggest a model for a condensed intermediate. The ensemble of structures suggests a two-state system, which may be exploited in early steps. PMID:27404889

  11. Biological actions of cleaved atrial natriuretic factor (ANF101-105/106-126) in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Charles, C J; Espiner, E A; Yandle, T G; Cameron, V A; Richards, A M

    1991-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) cleaved between Cys105 and Phe106 is the primary metabolite of ANF and circulates in human plasma. Because the role of this metabolite in vivo and its possible interaction with intact ANF are unclear, we studied the biologic effects of a 2-h infusion of rat cleaved ANF101-105/106-126 (15 pmol/kg/min) or vehicle alone in six normal sheep. Infusions of cleaved ANF increased venous plasma levels of cleaved ANF from less than 5 to 260 pmol/L and induced a progressive and significant increase in plasma cyclic GMP (p = 0.025) without significantly affecting plasma ANF levels. These changes were associated with a small (nonsignificant) decrease in arterial pressure and a significant increase in heart rate (HR) and sympathetic nervous activity and were followed by activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) axis after infusions were terminated. Unlike ANF itself, cleaved ANF was not natriuretic and did not reduce plasma volume or right atrial pressure. Calculated metabolic clearance rate (MCR) (1.47 +/- 0.4 L/min) and disappearance rate of cleaved ANF from plasma (4.8 +/- 0.37 min) were similar to values reported previously for intact ANF in sheep. These studies show that cleaved ANF stimulates guanylate cyclase and alters hemodynamics and the RAA system in vivo. PMID:1711601

  12. A structure-based analysis of the vibrational spectra of nitrosyl ligands in transition-metal coordination complexes and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Cruz, Carlos; Sheppard, Norman

    2011-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of nitrogen monoxide or nitric oxide (NO) bonded to one or to several transition-metal (M) atom(s) in coordination and cluster compounds are analyzed in relation to the various types of such structures identified by diffraction methods. These structures are classified in: (a) terminal (linear and bent) nitrosyls, [M(σ-NO)] or [M(NO)]; (b) twofold nitrosyl bridges, [M 2(μ 2-NO)]; (c) threefold nitrosyl bridges, [M 3(μ 3-NO)]; (d) σ/π-dihaptonitrosyls or " side-on" nitrosyls; and (e) isonitrosyls (oxygen-bonded nitrosyls). Typical ranges for the values of internuclear N-O and M-N bond-distances and M-N-O bond-angles for linear nitrosyls are: 1.14-1.20 Å/1.60-1.90 Å/180-160° and for bent nitrosyls are 1.16-1.22 Å/1.80-2.00 Å/140-110°. The [M 2(μ 2-NO)] bridges have been divided into those that contain one or several metal-metal bonds and those without a formal metal/metal bond (M⋯M). Typical ranges for the M-M, N-O, M-N bond distances and M-N-M bond angles for the normal twofold NO bridges are: 2.30-3.00 Å/1.18-1.22 Å/1.80-2.00 Å/90-70°, whereas for the analogous ranges of the long twofold NO bridges these are 3.10-3.40 Å/1.20-1.24 Å/1.90-2.10 Å/130-110°. In both situations the N-O vector is approximately at right angle to the M-M (or M⋯M) vector within the experimental error; i.e. the NO group is symmetrical bonded to the two metal atoms. In contrast the threefold NO bridges can be symmetrically or unsymmetrically bonded to an M 3-plane of a cluster compound. Characteristic values for the N-O and M-N bond-distances of these NO bridges are: 1.24-1.28 Å/1.80-1.90 Å, respectively. As few dihaptonitrosyl and isonitrosyl complexes are known, the structural features of these are discussed on an individual basis. The very extensive vibrational spectroscopy literature considered gives emphasis to the data from linearly bonded NO ligands in stable closed-shell metal complexes; i.e. those which are consistent with the

  13. A structure-based analysis of the vibrational spectra of nitrosyl ligands in transition-metal coordination complexes and clusters.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Carlos; Sheppard, Norman

    2011-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of nitrogen monoxide or nitric oxide (NO) bonded to one or to several transition-metal (M) atom(s) in coordination and cluster compounds are analyzed in relation to the various types of such structures identified by diffraction methods. These structures are classified in: (a) terminal (linear and bent) nitrosyls, [M(σ-NO)] or [M(NO)]; (b) twofold nitrosyl bridges, [M2(μ2-NO)]; (c) threefold nitrosyl bridges, [M3(μ3-NO)]; (d) σ/π-dihaptonitrosyls or "side-on" nitrosyls; and (e) isonitrosyls (oxygen-bonded nitrosyls). Typical ranges for the values of internuclear N-O and M-N bond-distances and M-N-O bond-angles for linear nitrosyls are: 1.14-1.20 Å/1.60-1.90 Å/180-160° and for bent nitrosyls are 1.16-1.22 Å/1.80-2.00 Å/140-110°. The [M2(μ2-NO)] bridges have been divided into those that contain one or several metal-metal bonds and those without a formal metal/metal bond (M⋯M). Typical ranges for the M-M, N-O, M-N bond distances and M-N-M bond angles for the normal twofold NO bridges are: 2.30-3.00 Å/1.18-1.22 Å/1.80-2.00 Å/90-70°, whereas for the analogous ranges of the long twofold NO bridges these are 3.10-3.40 Å/1.20-1.24 Å/1.90-2.10 Å/130-110°. In both situations the N-O vector is approximately at right angle to the M-M (or M⋯M) vector within the experimental error; i.e. the NO group is symmetrical bonded to the two metal atoms. In contrast the threefold NO bridges can be symmetrically or unsymmetrically bonded to an M3-plane of a cluster compound. Characteristic values for the N-O and M-N bond-distances of these NO bridges are: 1.24-1.28 Å/1.80-1.90 Å, respectively. As few dihaptonitrosyl and isonitrosyl complexes are known, the structural features of these are discussed on an individual basis. The very extensive vibrational spectroscopy literature considered gives emphasis to the data from linearly bonded NO ligands in stable closed-shell metal complexes; i.e. those which are consistent with the

  14. Exome sequencing identifies NFS1 deficiency in a novel Fe-S cluster disease, infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Sali M K; Wang, Jian; Robinson, John F; Lahiry, Piya; Siu, Victoria M; Prasad, Chitra; Kronick, Jonathan B; Ramsay, David A; Rupar, C Anthony; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are a class of highly conserved and ubiquitous prosthetic groups with unique chemical properties that allow the proteins that contain them, Fe-S proteins, to assist in various key biochemical pathways. Mutations in Fe-S proteins often disrupt Fe-S cluster assembly leading to a spectrum of severe disorders such as Friedreich's ataxia or iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme (ISCU) myopathy. Herein, we describe infantile mitochondrial complex II/III deficiency, a novel autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease characterized by lactic acidemia, hypotonia, respiratory chain complex II and III deficiency, multisystem organ failure and abnormal mitochondria. Through autozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, in silico analyses, population studies and functional tests, we identified c.215G>A, p.Arg72Gln in NFS1 as the likely causative mutation. We describe the first disease in man likely caused by deficiency in NFS1, a cysteine desulfurase that is implicated in respiratory chain function and iron maintenance by initiating Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Our results further demonstrate the importance of sufficient NFS1 expression in human physiology. PMID:24498631

  15. Friedreich's Ataxia Variants I154F and W155R Diminish Frataxin-Based Activation of the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi-Lin; Bridwell-Rabb, Jennifer; Barondeau, David P

    2011-11-07

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that has been linked to defects in the protein frataxin (Fxn). Most FRDA patients have a GAA expansion in the first intron of their Fxn gene that decreases protein expression. Some FRDA patients have a GAA expansion on one allele and a missense mutation on the other allele. Few functional details are known for the ~15 different missense mutations identified in FRDA patients. Here in vitro evidence is presented that indicates the FRDA I154F and W155R variants bind more weakly to the complex of Nfs1, Isd11, and Isu2 and thereby are defective in forming the four-component SDUF complex that constitutes the core of the Fe-S cluster assembly machine. The binding affinities follow the trend Fxn ~ I154F > W155F > W155A ~ W155R. The Fxn variants also have diminished ability to function as part of the SDUF complex to stimulate the cysteine desulfurase reaction and facilitate Fe-S cluster assembly. Four crystal structures, including the first for a FRDA variant, reveal specific rearrangements associated with the loss of function and lead to a model for Fxn-based activation of the Fe-S cluster assembly complex. Importantly, the weaker binding and lower activity for FRDA variants correlate with the severity of disease progression. Together, these results suggest that Fxn facilitates sulfur transfer from Nfs1 to Isu2 and that these in vitro assays are sensitive and appropriate for deciphering functional defects and mechanistic details for human Fe-S cluster biosynthesis.

  16. RNase MRP Cleaves Pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA Maturation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V.; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNASer-Met. To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met, suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry–based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute “Domain 1” in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP. PMID:25401760

  17. An ion-gating multinanochannel system based on a copper-responsive self-cleaving DNAzyme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Zhou, Di; Meng, Zheyi; Zhai, Jin

    2016-08-21

    We developed an ion-gating nanochannel composite system by immobilizing a Cu(2+)-responsive self-cleaving DNAzyme into PET conical multinanochannels, which could control the ion transport by regulating the surface charge density of the channels. PMID:27443504

  18. Type II restriction endonucleases cleave single-stranded DNAs in general.

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Wakuda, H; Husimi, Y; Tanaka, T

    1985-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases (13 out of 18 species used for the test) were certified to cleave single-stranded(ss)DNA. Such enzymes as AvaII, HaeII, DdeI, AluI, Sau3AI, AccII,TthHB8I and HapII were newly reported to cleave ssDNA. A model to account for the cleavage of ssDNA by restriction enzymes was proposed with supportive data. The essential part of the model was that restriction enzymes preferentially cleave transiently formed secondary structures (called canonical structures) in ssDNA composed of two recognition sequences with two fold rotational symmetry. This means that a restriction enzyme can cleave ssDNAs in general so far as the DNAs have the sequences of restriction sites for the enzyme, and that the rate of cleavage depends on the stabilities of canonical structures. Images PMID:2994012

  19. Improved fabrication of HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors by machine-cleaving

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, A.; Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Vandenberg, L.; Yellon, W.B.; Alkire, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The perfection of machine-cleaved sections from HgI/sub 2/ bulk crystals was examined. The perfection of the machine-cleaved sections as established by gamma diffraction rocking curves was found to be much better than the perfection of hand-cleaved sections or as grown thin platelets, reaching a perfection similar to that of the wire-sawn sections of HgI/sub 2/. A correlation between the perfection and the thickness of the machine-cleaved section was also found, i.e., the thicker the cleaved-section the more perfect it is. The reproducibility of the fabrication was significantly improved by using machine cleaving in the process of fabrication. Large single crystals of HgI/sub 2/ weighing 20 to 200 g, can be grown from the vapor phase using the TOM Technique. In order to fabricate nuclear radiation detectors from these single crystals, thin sections of about 0.4 to 0.8 mm thickness have to be prepared. Up till now, the state-of-the-art of fabricating HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors involved two methods to get thin sections from the large single crystals: (1) hand-cleaving using a razor-blade and (2) solution wire sawing. The chemical wire sawing method involves a loss of about 50% of the crystal volume and is usually followed by a chemical polishing process which involves a significant loss of volume of the original volume. This procedure is complicated and wasteful. The traditional fabrication method, i.e., hand-cleaving followed by rapid nonselective chemical etching, is simpler and less wasteful.

  20. Stop-cleaved InGaAsP laser monolithically integrated with a monitoring detector

    SciTech Connect

    Antreasyan, A.; Chen, C.Y.; Napholtz, S.G.; Wilt, D.P.

    1985-11-01

    We report the monolithic fabrication of a stop-cleaved laser with a monitoring detector. Stop-cleaved, double channel planar buried heterostructure lasers with threshold currents of 57 mA have been obtained emitting at 1.3-..mu..m wavelength. For the monitoring detector on the same substrate we have estimated a quantum efficiency of 31% from the measured responsivity of 14.4 ..mu..A/mW and the theoretical diffraction coupling efficiency.

  1. Etching of deep grooves for the precise positioning of cleaves in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.E.; Hemenway, B.R.; Wilt, D.P.

    1985-03-01

    Photoelectrochemical etching of InP is used to etch deep (80 ..mu..m), narrow (20 ..mu..m) grooves. The grooves are used to precisely position cleaves in semiconductor lasers and to demonstrate the first wafer processing of long/short cleaved-coupled-cavity (C/sup 3/) lasers. Large numbers of low threshold C/sup 3/ lasers wth very similar cavity lengths were obtained.

  2. DNA affinity cleaving analysis of homeodomain-DNA interaction: identification of homeodomain consensus sites in genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Z; Ebright, Y W; Iler, N; Pendergrast, P S; Echelard, Y; McMahon, A P; Ebright, R H; Abate, C

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated the DNA-cleaving moiety o-phenanthroline-copper at amino acid 10 of the Msx-1 homeodomain, and we have analyzed site-specific DNA cleavage by the resulting Msx-1 derivative. We show that amino acid 10 of the Msx-1 homeodomain is close to the 5' end of the consensus DNA site 5'-(C/G)TAATTG-3' in the Msx-1-DNA complex. Our results indicate that the orientation of the Msx-1 homeodomain relative to DNA is analogous to the orientation of the engrailed and Antennapedia homeodomains. We show further that DNA affinity cleaving permits identification of consensus DNA sites for Msx-1 in kilobase DNA substrates. The specificity of the approach enabled us to identify an Msx-1 consensus DNA site within the transcriptional control region of the developmental regulatory gene Wnt-1. We propose that incorporation of o-phenanthroline-copper at amino acid 10 of a homeodomain may provide a generalizable strategy to determine the orientation of a homeodomain relative to DNA and to identify homeodomain consensus DNA sites in genomic DNA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7904065

  3. MIB–MIP is a mycoplasma system that captures and cleaves immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Arfi, Yonathan; Minder, Laetitia; Di Primo, Carmelo; Le Roy, Aline; Ebel, Christine; Coquet, Laurent; Claverol, Stephane; Vashee, Sanjay; Jores, Joerg; Blanchard, Alain; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are “minimal” bacteria able to infect humans, wildlife, and a large number of economically important livestock species. Mycoplasma infections include a spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from simple fever to fulminant inflammatory diseases with high mortality rates. These infections are mostly chronic, suggesting that mycoplasmas have developed means to evade the host immune response. Here we present and functionally characterize a two-protein system from Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies capri that is involved in the capture and cleavage of IgG. The first component, Mycoplasma Ig binding protein (MIB), is an 83-kDa protein that is able to tightly bind to the Fv region of a wide range of IgG. The second component, Mycoplasma Ig protease (MIP), is a 97-kDa serine protease that is able to cleave off the VH domain of IgG. We demonstrate that MIB is necessary for the proteolytic activity of MIP. Cleavage of IgG requires a sequential interaction of the different partners of the system: first MIB captures the IgG, and then MIP is recruited to the MIB–IgG complex, enabling protease activity. MIB and MIP are encoded by two genes organized in tandem, with homologs found in the majority of pathogenic mycoplasmas and often in multiple copies. Phylogenetic studies suggest that genes encoding the MIB–MIP system are specific to mycoplasmas and have been disseminated by horizontal gene transfer. These results highlight an original and complex system targeting the host immunoglobulins, playing a potentially key role in the immunity evasion by mycoplasmas. PMID:27114507

  4. MIB-MIP is a mycoplasma system that captures and cleaves immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Arfi, Yonathan; Minder, Laetitia; Di Primo, Carmelo; Le Roy, Aline; Ebel, Christine; Coquet, Laurent; Claverol, Stephane; Vashee, Sanjay; Jores, Joerg; Blanchard, Alain; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2016-05-10

    Mycoplasmas are "minimal" bacteria able to infect humans, wildlife, and a large number of economically important livestock species. Mycoplasma infections include a spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from simple fever to fulminant inflammatory diseases with high mortality rates. These infections are mostly chronic, suggesting that mycoplasmas have developed means to evade the host immune response. Here we present and functionally characterize a two-protein system from Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies capri that is involved in the capture and cleavage of IgG. The first component, Mycoplasma Ig binding protein (MIB), is an 83-kDa protein that is able to tightly bind to the Fv region of a wide range of IgG. The second component, Mycoplasma Ig protease (MIP), is a 97-kDa serine protease that is able to cleave off the VH domain of IgG. We demonstrate that MIB is necessary for the proteolytic activity of MIP. Cleavage of IgG requires a sequential interaction of the different partners of the system: first MIB captures the IgG, and then MIP is recruited to the MIB-IgG complex, enabling protease activity. MIB and MIP are encoded by two genes organized in tandem, with homologs found in the majority of pathogenic mycoplasmas and often in multiple copies. Phylogenetic studies suggest that genes encoding the MIB-MIP system are specific to mycoplasmas and have been disseminated by horizontal gene transfer. These results highlight an original and complex system targeting the host immunoglobulins, playing a potentially key role in the immunity evasion by mycoplasmas. PMID:27114507

  5. A possible evolutionary origin for the Mn4 cluster of the photosynthetic water oxidation complex from natural MnO2 precipitates in the early ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-04-30

    The photosynthetic water oxidation complex consists of a cluster of 4 Mn atoms bridged by O atoms, associated with Ca2+ and Cl- and incorporated into protein. The structure is similar in higher plants and algae, as well as in cyanobacteria of more ancient lineage, dating back more than 2.5 Ga on Earth. It has been proposed that the proto-enzyme derived from a component of a natural early marine manganese precipitate that contained a CaMn4O9 cluster. A variety of MnO2 minerals is found in nature. Three major classes are spinels, sheet-like layered structures and 3-dimensional networks that contain parallel tunnels. These relatively open structures readily incorporate cations (Na+, Li+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, H+ and even Mn2+) and water. The minerals have different ratios of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) octahedrally coordinated to oxygens. Using X-ray spectroscopy we compare the chemical structures of Mn in the minerals with what is known about the arrangement in the water-oxidation complex to define the parameters of a structural model for the photosynthetic catalytic site. This comparison provides for the structural model a set of candidate Mn4 clusters -- some previously proposed and considered and others entirely novel.

  6. Mixed-metal chloro sulfido cluster complex of molybdenum and platinum, (Mo sub 3 Pt sub 2 S sub 4 Cl sub 4 (PEt sub 3 ) sub 6 )

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Taro; Tsuboi, Toshio; Kajitani, Yoshimichi; Yamagata, Tsuneaki; Imoto, Hideo )

    1991-09-04

    In the authors recent publication, syntheses of mixed-metal chloro sulfido and chloro selenido complexes of molybdenum and nickel were reported. They were prepared by the reaction of (Mo{sub 3}X{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}(PEt{sub 3}){sub 3}(MeOH){sub 2}) (X = S, Se){sup 2} with Ni(cod){sub 2} (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene). In the present study, another excellent building block compound, Pt(cot){sub 2}, was reacted with the same trinuclear molybdenum complex, and the mixed-metal cluster complex (Mo{sub 3}Pt{sub 2}S{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}(PEt{sub 3}){sub 6}) (1) with an unexpected structure was obtained.

  7. Matrilysin-1 (MMP7) cleaves galectin-3 and inhibits wound healing in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Puthenedam, Manjula; Wu, Feng; Shetye, Alysha; Michaels, Alex; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kwon, John H

    2010-01-01

    Background Galectin-3 is an animal lectin that has been implicated in wound healing and is decreased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) also known as matrilysin-1, a protease shown to cleave extracellular matrix proteins, is highly expressed in IBD tissues, especially at the leading edge of gastrointestinal ulcers. The ability of MMP7 to cleave galectin-3 and influence wound healing has not been reported previously. Aim To determine whether MMP7 cleaves galectin-3 and modulates wound healing in intestinal epithelial cells. Methods The cleaved fragments of galectin-3 were identified by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. Western blotting was used to detect the cleaved galectin-3 products in a colonic epithelial cell line (T84 cells). Cell migration was studied by in vitro scratch method. Results We demonstrate for the first time that MMP7 cleaves galectin-3 in vitro, resulting in three cleaved fragments (20.2 kDa, 18.9 kDa and 15.5 kDa). Exogenous treatment of T84 cells with recombinant MMP7 resulted in the appearance of secreted galectin-3 cleavage fragments in the supernatant. MMP7 inhibited cell migration and resulted in wound retraction and the addition of MMP7 to galectin-3 abrogated the wound healing and cell migration induced by galectin-3. Conclusions We have demonstrated that galectin-3 is a substrate for MMP7. Cleavage of galectin-3 may be one mechanism by which MMP7 inhibits wound healing. This study has significance in understanding delayed wound healing in chronic intestinal diseases like intestinal ulcers and IBD where MMP7 protein expression is elevated with a decreased galectin-3 protein expression. PMID:20812334

  8. Malfunctioning of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces Oxidative Stress via an Iron-Dependent Mechanism, Causing Dysfunction in Respiratory Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Mauricio; Pérez-Gallardo, Rocío V.; Sánchez, Luis A.; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Meza Carmen, Victor; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Lara-Romero, Javier; Jiménez-Sandoval, Sergio; Rodríguez, Francisco; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S.; Campos-García, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis and recycling of iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters play important roles in the iron homeostasis mechanisms involved in mitochondrial function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Fe–S clusters are assembled into apoproteins by the iron–sulfur cluster machinery (ISC). The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ISC gene deletion and consequent iron release under oxidative stress conditions on mitochondrial functionality in S. cerevisiae. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused by H2O2, menadione, or ethanol, was associated with a loss of iron homeostasis and exacerbated by ISC system dysfunction. ISC mutants showed increased free Fe2+ content, exacerbated by ROS-inducers, causing an increase in ROS, which was decreased by the addition of an iron chelator. Our study suggests that the increment in free Fe2+ associated with ROS generation may have originated from mitochondria, probably Fe–S cluster proteins, under both normal and oxidative stress conditions, suggesting that Fe–S cluster anabolism is affected. Raman spectroscopy analysis and immunoblotting indicated that in mitochondria from SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants, the content of [Fe–S] centers was decreased, as was formation of Rieske protein-dependent supercomplex III2IV2, but this was not observed in the iron-deficient ATX1 and MRS4 mutants. In addition, the activity of complexes II and IV from the electron transport chain (ETC) was impaired or totally abolished in SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants. These results confirm that the ISC system plays important roles in iron homeostasis, ROS stress, and in assembly of supercomplexes III2IV2 and III2IV1, thus affecting the functionality of the respiratory chain. PMID:25356756

  9. Complex-to-Predict Generational Shift between Nested and Clustered Organization of Individual Prey Networks in Digger Wasps

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Yolanda; Polidori, Carlo; Tormos, José; Baños-Picón, Laura; Asís, Josep Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Although diet has traditionally been considered to be a property of the species or populations as a whole, there is nowadays extensive knowledge that individual specialization is widespread among animal populations. Nevertheless, the factors determining the shape of interactions within food webs remain largely undiscovered, especially in predatory insects. We used an aggregation of the digger wasp Bembix merceti to 1) analyse patterns of individual prey use across three flying seasons in a network–based context; and 2) test the effect of four potential factors that might explain network topologies (wasp mass, nest spatial distribution, simultaneous nest-provisioning, prey availability). Inter-individual diet variation was found in all three years, under different predator-prey network topologies: Individuals arranged in dietary clusters and displayed a checkerboard pattern in 2009, but showed nestedness in 2008 and 2010. Network topologies were not fully explained by the tested factors. Larger females consumed a higher proportion of the total number of prey species captured by the population as a whole, in such a way that nested patterns may arise from mass-dependent prey spectrum width. Conversely, individuals with similar body mass didn’t form clusters. Nested patterns seemed to be associated with a greater availability of the main prey species (a proxy for reduced intra-specific competition). Thus, according with theory, clusters seemed to appear when competition increased. On the other hand, the nests of the individuals belonging to a given cluster were not more closely located, and neither did individuals within a cluster provision their nests simultaneously. Thus, a female-female copying behaviour during foraging was unlikely. In conclusion, wasp populations can maintain a considerable individual variation across years under different food web organizations. The tested factors only partially accounted for the shift in network properties, and new analyses

  10. Spindle-to-cortex communication in cleaving, polyspermic Xenopus eggs

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christine M.; Groen, Aaron C.; Nguyen, Phuong A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindles specify cleavage planes in early embryos by communicating their position and orientation to the cell cortex using microtubule asters that grow out from the spindle poles during anaphase. Chromatin also plays a poorly understood role. Polyspermic fertilization provides a natural experiment in which aster pairs from the same spindle (sister asters) have chromatin between them, whereas asters pairs from different spindles (nonsisters) do not. In frogs, only sister aster pairs induce furrows. We found that only sister asters recruited two conserved furrow-inducing signaling complexes, chromosome passenger complex (CPC) and Centralspindlin, to a plane between them. This explains why only sister pairs induce furrows. We then investigated factors that influenced CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles in intact eggs and a cytokinesis extract system. We found that microtubule stabilization, optimal starting distance between asters, and proximity to chromatin all favored CPC recruitment. We propose a model in which proximity to chromatin biases initial CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles between asters from the same spindle. Next a positive feedback between CPC recruitment and microtubule stabilization promotes lateral growth of a plane of CPC-positive microtubule bundles out to the cortex to position the furrow. PMID:26310438

  11. Spindle-to-cortex communication in cleaving, polyspermic Xenopus eggs.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Groen, Aaron C; Nguyen, Phuong A; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2015-10-15

    Mitotic spindles specify cleavage planes in early embryos by communicating their position and orientation to the cell cortex using microtubule asters that grow out from the spindle poles during anaphase. Chromatin also plays a poorly understood role. Polyspermic fertilization provides a natural experiment in which aster pairs from the same spindle (sister asters) have chromatin between them, whereas asters pairs from different spindles (nonsisters) do not. In frogs, only sister aster pairs induce furrows. We found that only sister asters recruited two conserved furrow-inducing signaling complexes, chromosome passenger complex (CPC) and Centralspindlin, to a plane between them. This explains why only sister pairs induce furrows. We then investigated factors that influenced CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles in intact eggs and a cytokinesis extract system. We found that microtubule stabilization, optimal starting distance between asters, and proximity to chromatin all favored CPC recruitment. We propose a model in which proximity to chromatin biases initial CPC recruitment to microtubule bundles between asters from the same spindle. Next a positive feedback between CPC recruitment and microtubule stabilization promotes lateral growth of a plane of CPC-positive microtubule bundles out to the cortex to position the furrow. PMID:26310438

  12. Interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 Proteins of Cytosolic Fe-S Cluster Assembly Reveals a Stable Complex Formation in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Shadab; Dikhit, Manas Ranjan; Singh, Krishn Pratap; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Zaidi, Amir; Sahoo, Ganesh Chandra; Roy, Awadh Kishore; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Das, Pradeep; Ali, Vahab

    2014-01-01

    Iron-Sulfur (Fe-S) proteins are involved in many biological functions such as electron transport, photosynthesis, regulation of gene expression and enzymatic activities. Biosynthesis and transfer of Fe-S clusters depend on Fe-S clusters assembly processes such as ISC, SUF, NIF, and CIA systems. Unlike other eukaryotes which possess ISC and CIA systems, amitochondriate Entamoeba histolytica has retained NIF & CIA systems for Fe-S cluster assembly in the cytosol. In the present study, we have elucidated interaction between two proteins of E. histolytica CIA system, Cytosolic Fe-S cluster deficient 1 (Cfd1) protein and Nucleotide binding protein 35 (Nbp35). In-silico analysis showed that structural regions ranging from amino acid residues (P33-K35, G131-V135 and I147-E151) of Nbp35 and (G5-V6, M34-D39 and G46-A52) of Cfd1 are involved in the formation of protein-protein complex. Furthermore, Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations study suggested that hydrophobic forces surpass over hydrophilic forces between Nbp35 and Cfd1 and Van-der-Waal interaction plays crucial role in the formation of stable complex. Both proteins were separately cloned, expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by affinity column chromatography. Physical interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 proteins was confirmed in vitro by co-purification of recombinant Nbp35 with thrombin digested Cfd1 and in vivo by pull down assay and immunoprecipitation. The insilico, in vitro as well as in vivo results prove a stable interaction between these two proteins, supporting the possibility of its involvement in Fe-S cluster transfer to target apo-proteins through CIA machinery in E. histolytica. Our study indicates that initial synthesis of a Fe-S precursor in mitochondria is not necessary for the formation of Cfd1-Nbp35 complex. Thus, Cfd1 and Nbp35 with the help of cytosolic NifS and NifU proteins can participate in the maturation of non-mitosomal Fe-S proteins without any

  13. High-Resolution Mn EXAFS of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex inPhotosystem II: Structural Implications for the Mn4Ca Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Glatzel, Pieter; Lewis, Azul; Sauer,Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal

    2005-09-06

    The biological generation of oxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II) is one of natures most important reactions. The recent X-ray crystal structures, while limited by resolutions of 3.2 to 3.5 A, have located the electron density associated with the Mn4Ca complex within the multi-protein PS II complex. Detailed structures critically depend on input from spectroscopic techniques such as EXAFS and EPR/ENDOR, as the XRD resolution does not allow for accurate determination of the position of Mn/Ca or the bridging and terminal ligand atoms. The number and distances of Mn-Mn/Ca/ligand interactions determined from EXAFS provide important constraints for the structure of the Mn cluster. Here we present data from a high-resolution EXAFS method using a novel multi-crystal monochromator that show three short Mn-Mn distances between 2.7 and 2.8 A and hence the presence of three di-mu-oxobridged units in the Mn4Ca cluster. This result imposes clear limitations on the proposed structures based on spectroscopic and diffraction data and provides input for refining such structures.

  14. Oxide- and zeolite-supported molecular metal complexes and clusters: physical characterization and determination of structure, bonding, and metal oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Fierro-Gonzalez, Juan C; Kuba, Stefan; Hao, Yalin; Gates, Bruce C

    2006-07-13

    This article is a review of the physical characterization of well-defined site-isolated molecular metal complexes and metal clusters supported on metal oxides and zeolites. These surface species are of interest primarily as catalysts; as a consequence of their relatively uniform structures, they can be characterized much more precisely than traditional supported catalysts. The properties discussed in this review include metal nuclearity, oxidation state, and ligand environment, as well as metal-support interactions. These properties are determined by complementary techniques, including transmission electron microscopy; X-ray absorption, infrared, Raman, and NMR spectroscopies; and density functional theory. The strengths and limitations of these techniques are assessed in the context of results characterizing samples that have been investigated thoroughly and with multiple techniques. The depth of understanding of well-defined metal complexes and metal clusters on supports is approaching that attainable for molecular analogues in solution. The results provide a foundation for understanding the more complex materials that are typical of industrial catalysts. PMID:16821852

  15. Synthesis, structures, and fluorescence properties of two d-d heterometallic cluster-based complexes constructed by N-(phosphonomethyl) iminodiacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sa-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Two novel d-d heterometallic cluster-based complexes constructed by N-(Phosphonomethyl)imino-diacetic acid (H4PMIDA) multifunctional ligand, [Cu2Zn2(PMIDA)2(H2O)3]·3H2O(1), [ZnNi14(PMIDA)6(H2O)18]·(NO3)6·15H2O(2), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal analyses, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex 1 is one-dimensional heteronuclear molecular chain, which is further extends into a 3D supramolecular network through very extensive Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The compound 2 is a rare novel zero-dimensional heteronuclear molecular cluster, which is further extends into a 3D supramolecular network through very extensive Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the solid-state fluorescence properties of the two complexes have also been investigated at room temperature.

  16. Microbially cleaved immunoglobulins are sensed by the innate immune receptor LILRA2.

    PubMed

    Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Saito, Fumiji; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Shida, Kyoko; Arase, Noriko; Oikawa, Keita; Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Chibana, Hiroji; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kubori, Tomoko; Nagai, Hiroki; Nakamaru, Yuji; Katayama, Ichiro; Colonna, Marco; Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Microbial proteases degrade a variety of host proteins(1-3). However, it has remained largely unknown why microorganisms have evolved to acquire such proteases and how the host responds to microbially degraded products. Here, we have found that immunoglobulins disrupted by microbial pathogens are specifically detected by leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A2 (LILRA2), an orphan activating receptor expressed on human myeloid cells. Proteases from Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Legionella pneumophila, Streptococcus pneumonia and Candida albicans cleaved the N-terminus of immunoglobulins. Identification of the immunoglobulin-cleaving protease from L. pneumophila revealed that the protease is conserved across some bacteria including Vibrio spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microbially cleaved immunoglobulins but not normal immunoglobulins stimulated human neutrophils via LILRA2. In addition, stimulation of primary monocytes via LILRA2 inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila. When mice were infected with L. pneumophila, immunoglobulins were cleaved and recognized by LILRA2. More importantly, cleaved immunoglobulins were detected in patients with bacterial infections and stimulated LILRA2-expressing cells. Our findings demonstrate that LILRA2 is a type of innate immune receptor in the host immune system that detects immunoglobulin abnormalities caused by microbial pathogens. PMID:27572839

  17. Furrow microtubules and localized exocytosis in cleaving Xenopus laevis embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilchik, Michael V.; Bedrick, Steven D.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Ray, Kimberly

    2003-01-01

    In dividing Xenopus eggs, furrowing is accompanied by expansion of a new domain of plasma membrane in the cleavage plane. The source of the new membrane is known to include a store of oogenetically produced exocytotic vesicles, but the site where their exocytosis occurs has not been described. Previous work revealed a V-shaped array of microtubule bundles at the base of advancing furrows. Cold shock or exposure to nocodazole halted expansion of the new membrane domain, which suggests that these microtubules are involved in the localized exocytosis. In the present report, scanning electron microscopy revealed collections of pits or craters, up to approximately 1.5 micro m in diameter. These pits are evidently fusion pores at sites of recent exocytosis, clustered in the immediate vicinity of the deepening furrow base and therefore near the furrow microtubules. Confocal microscopy near the furrow base of live embryos labeled with the membrane dye FM1-43 captured time-lapse sequences of individual exocytotic events in which irregular patches of approximately 20 micro m(2) of unlabeled membrane abruptly displaced pre-existing FM1-43-labeled surface. In some cases, stable fusion pores, approximately 2 micro m in diameter, were seen at the surface for up to several minutes before suddenly delivering patches of unlabeled membrane. To test whether the presence of furrow microtubule bundles near the surface plays a role in directing or concentrating this localized exocytosis, membrane expansion was examined in embryos exposed to D(2)O to induce formation of microtubule monasters randomly under the surface. D(2)O treatment resulted in a rapid, uniform expansion of the egg surface via random, ectopic exocytosis of vesicles. This D(2)O-induced membrane expansion was completely blocked with nocodazole, indicating that the ectopic exocytosis was microtubule-dependent. Results indicate that exocytotic vesicles are present throughout the egg subcortex, and that the presence of

  18. Enzyme-triggered and self-cleaving fragrant alcohol precursors.

    PubMed

    Flachsmann, Felix; Gautschi, Markus; Bachmann, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    The high volatility and water solubility of many natural perfumery alcohols leads to their rapid loss in fabric-care and personal-care applications. A dramatically enhanced substantivity is achieved by the use of fragrance precursors as controlled-release systems. In the first part of this article, we present multi-odorant precursors, in which the enzymatic cleavage of esters or carbonates of fragrant alcohols triggers subsequent steps leading to the release of fragrant ketones, lactones, and additional fragrant alcohols. In the second part, a study on oligocarbonates of fragrant alcohols is presented. Therein, the outstanding enzyme-independent performance of gluconolactone oligocarbonate 27 for the long-lasting release of (Z)-hex-3-en-1-ol is highlighted. We show that these polyfunctional compounds undergo complex rearrangements and intramolecular substitution reactions which lead to the observed release kinetics. PMID:18618399

  19. Identifying structural building blocks in CuO 6 clusters: CuO 2 complexes vs CuO 3 ozonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouillon, Y.; Massobrio, C.

    2002-04-01

    Structural minima of neutral and negatively charged CuO 6 clusters have been investigated within density functional theory and a plane-wave approach. Among the lower energy structures, three isomers made of CuO 2 complexes and two isomers featuring a double ozonide Cu(O 3) unit lie within a few hundredths of eV. Isomers containing CuOOO chains are higher in energy. Formation of Cu(O 3) units is accompanied by hybridization between O 2p- and Cu 3d-like states. We highlight analogies and differences between our results and the structural identification proposed in the framework of photoelectron spectroscopy experiments.

  20. Crystal Structure of Human Arginase l Complexed with Thiosemicarbazide Reveals an Unusual Thiocarbonly u-Sulfide Ligand in the Binuclear Manganese Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo,L.; Pique, M.; Christianson, D.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human arginase I-thiosemicarbazide complex reveals an unusual thiocarbonyl {mu}-sulfide ligand in the binuclear manganese cluster. The CS moiety of thiosemicarbazide bridges Mn2+A and Mn2+B with coordination distances of 2.6 and 2.4 Angstroms, respectively. Otherwise, the binding of thiosemicarbazide to human arginase I does not cause any significant structural changes in the active site. The crystal structure of the unliganded enzyme reveals a hydrogen-bonded water molecule that could support proton transfer between a {mu}-water molecule and H141 to regenerate the nucleophilic {mu}-hydroxide ion in the final step of catalysis.

  1. [Is it reality that the endonuclease that cleaves pre-mRNA on polyadenylation has not been discovered?].

    PubMed

    Zarudnaia, M I; Govorun, D N

    2001-01-01

    Specific cleavage of transcript by a complex of multisubunit proteins is the first stage of polyadenylation of eukaryotic pre-mRNAs. The main participant of this reaction--endonuclease--is not discovered yet. However it is known that proteins CPSF-30 (mammalian) and Yth 1p (yeast) are homologues of the drosofila protein clipper (CLP), which displays endoribonucleolytic activity. In the N-terminal region all three proteins contain five copies of CCCH zinc finger motif that are associated with nucleolytic activity in the case of CLP. Literature data on the three above-mentioned proteins has been analysed. The results of these works do not contradict the hypothesis that exactly CPSF-30 and its homologues are the actual nucleases that cleave pre-mRNA in the process of polyadenylation. PMID:12035497

  2. The Caspase-8 Homolog Dredd Cleaves Imd and Relish but Is Not Inhibited by p35*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan-Hee; Paik, Donggi; Rus, Florentina; Silverman, Neal

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila, the Imd pathway is activated by diaminopimelic acid-type peptidoglycan and triggers the humoral innate immune response, including the robust induction of antimicrobial peptide gene expression. Imd and Relish, two essential components of this pathway, are both endoproteolytically cleaved upon immune stimulation. Genetic analyses have shown that these cleavage events are dependent on the caspase-8 like Dredd, suggesting that Imd and Relish are direct substrates of Dredd. Among the seven Drosophila caspases, we find that Dredd uniquely promotes Imd and Relish processing, and purified recombinant Dredd cleaves Imd and Relish in vitro. In addition, interdomain cleavage of Dredd is not required for Imd or Relish processing and is not observed during immune stimulation. Baculovirus p35, a suicide substrate of executioner caspases, is not cleaved by purified Dredd in vitro. Consistent with this biochemistry but contrary to earlier reports, p35 does not interfere with Imd signaling in S2* cells or in vivo. PMID:24891502

  3. High-throughput assay and engineering of self-cleaving ribozymes by sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Shungo; Nomura, Yoko; Miu, Anh; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Self-cleaving ribozymes are found in all domains of life and are believed to play important roles in biology. Additionally, self-cleaving ribozymes have been the subject of extensive engineering efforts for applications in synthetic biology. These studies often involve laborious assays of multiple individual variants that are either designed rationally or discovered through selection or screening. However, these assays provide only a limited view of the large sequence space relevant to the ribozyme function. Here, we report a strategy that allows quantitative characterization of greater than 1000 ribozyme variants in a single experiment. We generated a library of predefined ribozyme variants that were converted to DNA and analyzed by high-throughput sequencing. By counting the number of cleaved and uncleaved reads of every variant in the library, we obtained a complete activity profile of the ribozyme pool which was used to both analyze and engineer allosteric ribozymes. PMID:25829176

  4. New classes of self-cleaving ribozymes revealed by comparative genomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Zasha; Kim, Peter B; Chen, Tony H; Li, Sanshu; Harris, Kimberly A; Lünse, Christina E; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-08-01

    Enzymes made of RNA catalyze reactions that are essential for protein synthesis and RNA processing. However, such natural ribozymes are exceedingly rare, as evidenced by the fact that the discovery rate for new classes has dropped to one per decade from about one per year during the 1980s. Indeed, only 11 distinct ribozyme classes have been experimentally validated to date. Recently, we recognized that self-cleaving ribozymes frequently associate with certain types of genes from bacteria. Herein we exploited this association to identify divergent architectures for two previously known ribozyme classes and to discover additional noncoding RNA motifs that are self-cleaving RNA candidates. We identified three new self-cleaving classes, which we named twister sister, pistol and hatchet, from this collection, suggesting that even more ribozymes remain hidden in modern cells. PMID:26167874

  5. New classes of self-cleaving ribozymes revealed by comparative genomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Zasha; Kim, Peter B.; Chen, Tony H.; Li, Sanshu; Harris, Kimberly A.; Lünse, Christina E.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes made of RNA catalyze reactions that are essential for protein synthesis and RNA processing. However, such natural ribozymes are exceedingly rare, as evident by the fact that the discovery rate for new classes has dropped to one per decade from about one per year during the 1980s. Indeed, only 11 distinct ribozyme classes have been experimentally validated to date. Recently, we recognized that self-cleaving ribozymes frequently associate with certain types of genes from bacteria. Herein this synteny was exploited to identify divergent architectures for two previously known ribozyme classes and to discover additional noncoding RNA motifs that are self-cleaving RNA candidates. Three new self-cleaving classes, named twister sister, pistol and hatchet, have been identified from this collection, suggesting that even more ribozymes remain hidden in modern cells. PMID:26167874

  6. Synthetic Tuning of Redox, Spectroscopic, and Photophysical Properties of {Mo6I8}(4+) Core Cluster Complexes by Terminal Carboxylate Ligands.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Maxim A; Brylev, Konstantin A; Abramov, Pavel A; Sakuda, Eri; Akagi, Soichiro; Ito, Akitaka; Kitamura, Noboru; Sokolov, Maxim N

    2016-09-01

    The reactions between the tetra-n-butylammonium salt of [{Mo6I8}I6](2-) and silver carboxylates RCOOAg (R = CH3 (1), C(CH3)3 (2), α-C4H3O (3), C6H5 (4), α-C10H7 (5), or C2F5 (6)) in CH2Cl2 afforded new carboxylate complexes [{Mo6I8}(RCOO)6](2-). The complexes were characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction and elemental analysis, cyclic/differential pulse voltammetry, and IR, NMR, and UV-visible spectroscopies. The emission properties of the complexes 1-6, and those of the earlier reported complexes with R = CF3 (7) and n-C3F7 (8), were studied both in acetonitrile solution and in the solid state. In deaerated CH3CN at 298 K, all of the complexes 1-8 exhibit intense and long-lived emission with the quantum yield and lifetime being 0.48-0.73 and 283-359 μs, respectively. The oxidation (Eox)/reduction (Ered) potentials of the complexes correlate linearly with the pKa value of the terminal carboxylate ligands L = RCOO (pKa(L)). Reflecting the pKa(L) dependences of Eox/Ered, the emission energy (νem) of the complexes was also shown to correlate with pKa(L). The present study successfully demonstrates synthetic tuning of the redox, spectroscopic, and photophysical characteristics of a {Mo6I8}(4+)-based cluster complex with pKa(L). PMID:27505303

  7. Deficient activity of von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease in chronic relapsing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Furlan, M; Robles, R; Solenthaler, M; Wassmer, M; Sandoz, P; Lämmle, B

    1997-05-01

    In patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), excessive intravascular platelet aggregation has been associated with appearance in plasma of unusually large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers. These extremely adhesive vWF multimers may arise due to deficiency of a "depolymerase" cleaving vWF to smaller molecular forms, either by reducing the interdimeric disulfide bridges or by proteolytic degradation. We studied the activity of a recently described vWF-cleaving protease in four patients with chronic relapsing TTP. Diluted plasma samples of TTP patients were incubated with purified normal human vWF in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor, at low ionic strength, and in the presence of urea and barium ions. The extent of vWF degradation was assayed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose gels and immunoblotting. Four patients, that included two brothers, with chronic relapsing TTP displayed either substantially reduced levels or a complete absence of vWF-cleaving protease activity. In none of these patient plasmas was an inhibitor of or an antibody against the vWF-cleaving protease established. Our data suggest that the unusually large vWF multimers found in TTP patients may be caused by deficient vWF-cleaving protease activity. Deficiency of this protease may be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and seems to predispose to chronic relapsing TTP. The assay of the vWF-cleaving protease activity may be used as a sensitive diagnostic tool for identification of subjects with a latent TTP tendency. PMID:9129011

  8. Low-threshold, high quantum efficiency stop-cleaved InGaAsP semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Antreasyan, A.; Chen, C.Y.; Napholtz, S.G.; Wilt, D.P.

    1985-08-15

    InGaAsP double-channel--planar-buried-heterostructure lasers with stop-cleaved mirrors emitting at 1.3 ..mu..m have been fabricated. Threshold currents as low as 18 mA and differential quantum efficiencies as high as 39% have been obtained. Furthermore, we have achieved a yield greater than 50% in obtaining good quality facets utilizing the stop-cleaving technique. Our result represents one of the lowest threshold currents obtained so far at 1.3-..mu..m wavelength among the structures designed for monolithic optoelectronic integration.

  9. Monolithically integrated external feedback InGaAsP lasers using stop-cleaving technique

    SciTech Connect

    Antreasyan, A.; Chen, C.Y.; Napholtz, S.G.; Wilt, D.P.; Ostermayer, F.W.

    1986-02-15

    We have developed a monolithically integrated external feedback laser utilizing a pair of stop-cleaved double channel planar buried heterostructure lasers emitting at 1.3 ..mu..m. The external feedback is provided by the stop cleaved facet of the second cavity. A sidemode rejection ratio of 200 : 1 has been obtained with a laser having a 250-..mu..m cavity length and an external resonator length of 200 ..mu..m. Since both lasers are fabricated in a self-aligned structure, this device may prove to be a powerful scheme for injection locking to reduce dynamic linewidth.

  10. Cleaved-coupled-cavity lasers with large cavity length ratios for enhanced stability

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.E.; Bjorkholm, J.E.; Burrus, C.A.; Coldren, L.A.; Hemenway, B.R.; Wilt, D.P.

    1984-05-01

    The fabrication and operation of the first cleaved-coupled-cavity (C/sup 3/) semiconductor lasers with large cavity length ratios are described. The internal cleaved facet is precisely positioned by photochemically etching a groove through most of the wafer. Single longitudinal mode operation is obtained over a temperature range of 21 /sup 0/C and over a current range of threshold to greater than four times threshold. Sidemode suppression of 100:1 was measured when the laser was modulated at 350 MHz with an extinction ratio greater than 10:1. These results are experimentally and theoretically compared to approximately equal length C/sup 3/ lasers.

  11. Effect of the Keggin anions on assembly of Cu{sup I}-bis(tetrazole) thioether complexes containing multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiuli; Gao Qiang; Tian Aixiang; Hu Hailiang; Liu Guocheng

    2012-03-15

    In order to investigate the effect of polyoxometalate (POM) on the assembly of transition metal-bis(tetrazole) thioether complexes, three new complexes based on different Keggin anions and multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster [Cu{sup I}{sub 12}(bmtr){sub 9}(HSiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}){sub 4}] (1), [Cu{sup I}{sub 3}(bmtr){sub 3}(PM{sub 12}O{sub 40})] (M=W for 2; Mo for 3) (bmtr=1,3-bis(1-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,3,4-tetrazole)propane), have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by routine physical methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In compound 1, two kinds of nanometer-scale tetranuclear subunits linked by [SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-} polyanions assemble a (3, 4)-connected three-dimensional (3D) self-penetrating framework. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural, exhibiting a 1D chain with [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-}/[PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-} polyanions and trinuclear clusters arranging alternately. The distinct structural differences between these POM-based Cu{sup I}-bmtr complexes of 1 and 2/3 maybe rest on the contrast of Keggin-type polyoxometalate with different central heteroatoms, which have been discussed in detail. In addition, the electrochemical properties of the title complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new complexes based on different Keggin anions and multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The Keggin polyanions with different central heteroatoms play a key role. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The flexible bis(tetrazole)-based thioether ligand with some advantages have been used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Keggin anions with different central heteroatoms has been discussed in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrochemical behaviors and electrocatalysis property have been investigated.

  12. Organotin-oxido cluster-based multiferrocenyl complexes obtained by hydrolysis of ferrocenyl-functionalized organotin chlorides.

    PubMed

    You, Zhiliang; Möckel, Robert; Bergunde, Jakob; Dehnen, Stefanie

    2014-10-13

    Three organotin-oxido clusters were formed by hydrolysis of ferrocenyl-functionalized organotin chloride precursors in the presence of NaEPh (E=S, Se). [R(Fc) SnCl3 ⋅HCl] (C; R(Fc) = CMe2 CH2 C(Me)=N-N=C(Me)Fc) and [SnCl6 ](2-) formed {(R(Fc) SnCl2 )3 [Sn(OH)6 ]}[SnCl3 ] (3 a) and {(R(Fc) SnCl2 )3 [Sn(OH)6 ]}[PhSeO3 ] (3 b), bearing an unprecedented [Sn4 O6 ] unit, in a one-pot synthesis or stepwise through [(R(Fc) SnCl2 )2 Se] (1) plus [(R(Fc) SnCl2 )SePh] (2). A one-pot reaction starting out from FcSnCl3 gave [(FcSn)9 (OH)6 O8 Cl5 ] (4), which represents the largest Fc-decorated Sn/O cluster reported to date. PMID:25164865

  13. Titanium oxo-clusters derivatized from the Ti10O12(cat)8(py)8 complex: structural investigation and spectroscopic studies of light absorption.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Clément; Chaumont, Alain; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Mobian, Pierre; Henry, Marc

    2016-06-01

    A series of deep-red colored nano-sized titanium oxo-clusters bearing catecholato ligands is reported. These architectures are produced via post-synthetic modification of the Ti10O12(cat)8(py)8 (cat = catecholato, py = pyridine) complex through quantitative substitution of labile pyridine ligands by three substituted pyridines (pico, 4-Phpy and pyrald). The crystal structure analysis reveals a common Ti10O12(cat)8 backbone for the three isolated molecular architectures. Partial charge analysis indicates two types of titanium atoms within these complexes with one resembling titanium(iv) found in TiO2. These complexes strongly absorb visible light in solution (λmax = 411 nm, ε = 10 800 for Ti10O12(cat)8(py)8 in CHCl3) and in the solid-state. The band gaps estimated from the reflectance spectra are between 1.85 eV and 1.97 eV. The present work also details the HOMO and LUMO representations obtained via DFT calculation for Ti10O12(cat)8(py)8 and a virtual Ti10O12(cat)8 complex as well as the DOS (density of states) plots calculated for those structures. This computational study highlights an impact of the pyridine ligand on the DOS plots. PMID:27142485

  14. A structural snapshot of CYP2B4 in complex with paroxetine provides insights into ligand binding and clusters of conformational states.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish B; Kufareva, Irina; Pascual, Jaime; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C David; Halpert, James R

    2013-07-01

    An X-ray crystal structure of CYP2B4 in complex with the drug paroxetine [(3S,4R)-3-[(2H-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yloxy)methyl]-4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperidine] was solved at 2.14 Å resolution. The structure revealed a conformation intermediate to that of the recently solved complex with amlodipine and that of the more compact complex with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole in terms of the placement of the F-G cassette. Moreover, comparison of the new structure with 15 previously solved structures of CYP2B4 revealed some new insights into the determinants of active-site size and shape. The 2B4-paroxetine structure is nearly superimposable on a previously solved closed structure in a ligand-free state. Despite the overall conformational similarity among multiple closed structures, the active-site cavity volume of the paroxetine complex is enlarged. Further analysis of the accessible space and binding pocket near the heme reveals a new subchamber that resulted from the movement of secondary structural elements and rearrangements of active-site side chains. Overall, the results from the comparison of all 16 structures of CYP2B4 demonstrate a cluster of protein conformations that were observed in the presence or absence of various ligands. PMID:23633618

  15. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  16. Density functional study of hydrazine adsorption and its Nsbnd N bond cleaving on Fe(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathurrahman, Fadjar; Kasai, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    We report density-functional-theory-based calculations of hydrazine adsorption and its Nsbnd N bond cleaving on clean Fe(110) surface. It is found that hydrazine may adopt several adsorption configurations among which the most energetically stable is the bridging configuration. Adsorption on short bridge site generally has larger adsorption energies than those on long bridge site. Nsbnd N bond cleaving is an exothermic process with reaction energies of 1.90 and 1.67 eV on long and short bridge site, respectively. Nudged elastic band method is used to estimate the activation energies of Nsbnd N bond cleaving. Our results indicate that Nsbnd N bond cleaving on long bridge site has lower activation energy (0.27 eV) compared to that of short bridge site (0.36 eV). By examining the molecular orbitals of the initial state it is found that this difference stems from stronger bond between the two NH2 fragments adsorbed on short bridge site as compared to long bridge.

  17. Cleaving of TOPAS and PMMA microstructured polymer optical fibers: Core-shift and statistical quality optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, A.; Nielsen, K.; Rasmussen, H. K.; Bang, O.

    2012-04-01

    We fabricated an electronically controlled polymer optical fiber cleaver, which uses a razor-blade guillotine and provides independent control of fiber temperature, blade temperature, and cleaving speed. To determine the optimum cleaving conditions of microstructured polymer optical fibers (mPOFs) with hexagonal hole structures we developed a program for cleaving quality optimization, which reads in a microscope image of the fiber end-facet and determines the core-shift and the statistics of the hole diameter, hole-to-hole pitch, hole ellipticity, and direction of major ellipse axis. For 125 μm in diameter mPOFs of the standard polymer PMMA we found the optimum temperatures to be 77.5 °C for both blade and fiber. For 280 μm in diameter mPOFs of the humidity insensitive polymer TOPAS® (grade 8007) the optimum temperature was 40° for both blade and fiber. A 100 μm thick flat-edge blade was found to minimize the core-shift by the cleaving to only 298 nm or 5% of the pitch for the PMMA mPOF at the optimal temperature.

  18. In vitro selection of RNA-cleaving DNAzymes for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Feng, Qian; Chang, Dingran; Tram, Kha; Li, Yingfu

    2016-08-15

    DNAzymes refer to single-stranded DNA molecules with catalytic activity and can be isolated from synthetic random-sequence DNA pools using the technique of in vitro selection. DNAzymes that cleave RNA, known as "RNA-cleaving DNAzymes", represent one of the best-studied classes of DNAzymes and have been widely used for the development of biosensors and bioassays for various analytes. We have been interested in developing RNA-cleaving DNAzymes as bacterial sensors and these DNAzymes are engineered to perform three linked functions: recognition of a bacterial biomarker, RNA cleavage, and fluorescence generation. These fluorogenic DNAzymes emit fluorescence automatically in the presence of a bacterium of interest and can be used to set up a simple "mix-and-read" assay to detect this bacterium. In this article, we will discuss this DNAzyme system and present a proven strategy for isolating highly specific bacteria-responding DNAzyme probes from random-sequence DNA pools. We will also provide an in vitro selection protocol successfully used to derive RNA-cleaving fluorogenic DNAzyme probes that are capable of recognizing a targeted strain of Clostridium difficile. PMID:27017912

  19. CleavPredict: A Platform for Reasoning about Matrix Metalloproteinases Proteolytic Events

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sonu; Ratnikov, Boris I.; Kazanov, Marat D.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Cieplak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    CleavPredict (http://cleavpredict.sanfordburnham.org) is a Web server for substrate cleavage prediction for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). It is intended as a computational platform aiding the scientific community in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict offers in silico prediction of cleavage sites specific for 11 human MMPs. The prediction method employs the MMP specific position weight matrices (PWMs) derived from statistical analysis of high-throughput phage display experimental results. To augment the substrate cleavage prediction process, CleavPredict provides information about the structural features of potential cleavage sites that influence proteolysis. These include: secondary structure, disordered regions, transmembrane domains, and solvent accessibility. The server also provides information about subcellular location, co-localization, and co-expression of proteinase and potential substrates, along with experimentally determined positions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and posttranslational modification (PTM) sites in substrates. All this information will provide the user with perspectives in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict is freely accessible, and there is no login required. PMID:25996941

  20. CleavPredict: A Platform for Reasoning about Matrix Metalloproteinases Proteolytic Events.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sonu; Ratnikov, Boris I; Kazanov, Marat D; Smith, Jeffrey W; Cieplak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    CleavPredict (http://cleavpredict.sanfordburnham.org) is a Web server for substrate cleavage prediction for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). It is intended as a computational platform aiding the scientific community in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict offers in silico prediction of cleavage sites specific for 11 human MMPs. The prediction method employs the MMP specific position weight matrices (PWMs) derived from statistical analysis of high-throughput phage display experimental results. To augment the substrate cleavage prediction process, CleavPredict provides information about the structural features of potential cleavage sites that influence proteolysis. These include: secondary structure, disordered regions, transmembrane domains, and solvent accessibility. The server also provides information about subcellular location, co-localization, and co-expression of proteinase and potential substrates, along with experimentally determined positions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and posttranslational modification (PTM) sites in substrates. All this information will provide the user with perspectives in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict is freely accessible, and there is no login required. PMID:25996941

  1. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  2. Localization of two post-proline cleaving peptidases in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activit...

  3. Edge-bridging and face-capping coordination of alkenyl ligands in triruthenium carbonyl cluster complexes derived from hydrazines: synthetic, structural, theoretical, and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; del Río, Ignacio; Fernández-Colinas, José M; García-Granda, Santiago; Martínez-Méndez, Lorena; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique

    2004-12-01

    The reactions of the triruthenium cluster complex [Ru3(mu-H)(mu3-eta2-HNNMe2)(CO)9] (1; H2NNMe2=1,1-dimethylhydrazine) with alkynes (PhC triple bond CPh, HC triple bond CH, MeO2CC triple bond CCO2Me, PhC triple bond CH, MeO2CC triple bond CH, HOMe2CC triple bond CH, 2-pyC triple bond CH) give trinuclear complexes containing edge-bridging and/or face-capping alkenyl ligands. Whereas the edge-bridged products are closed triangular species (three Ru-Ru bonds), the face-capped products are open derivatives (two Ru-Ru bonds). For terminal alkynes, products containing gem (RCCH2) and/or trans (RHCCH) alkenyl ligands have been identified in both edge-bridging and face-capping positions, except for the complex [Ru3(mu3-eta2-HNNMe2)(mu3-eta3-HCCH-2-py)(mu-CO)(CO)7], which has the two alkenyl H atoms in a cis arrangement. Under comparable reaction conditions (1:1 molar ratio, THF at reflux, time required for the consumption of complex 1), some reactions give a single product, but most give mixtures of isomers (not all the possible ones), which were separated. To determine the effect of the hydrazido ligand, the reactions of [Ru3(mu-H)(mu3-eta2-MeNNHMe)(CO)9] (2; HMeNNHMe=1,2-dimethylhydrazine) with PhC triple bond CPh, PhC triple bond CH, and HC triple bond CH were also studied. For edge-bridged alkenyl complexes, the Ru--Ru edge that is spanned by the alkenyl ligand depends on the position of the methyl groups on the hydrazido ligand. For face-capped alkenyl complexes, the relative orientation of the hydrazido and alkenyl ligands also depends on the position of the methyl groups on the hydrazido ligand. A kinetic analysis of the reaction of 1 with PhC[triple chemical bond]CPh revealed that the reaction follows an associative mechanism, which implies that incorporation of the alkyne in the cluster is rate-limiting and precedes the release of a CO ligand. X-ray diffraction, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and calculations of minimum-energy structures by DFT methods were used to

  4. Complexation of the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide and related molecules with zinc compounds including zinc oxide clusters (Zn4O4).

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana; Wong, Ming Wah

    2008-01-01

    Zinc chemicals are used as activators in the vulcanization of organic polymers with sulfur to produce elastic rubbers. In this work, the reactions of Zn(2+), ZnMe(2), Zn(OMe)(2), Zn(OOCMe)(2), and the heterocubane cluster Zn(4)O(4) with the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) and with the related radicals and anions Me(2)NCS(2)(*), Me(2)NCS(3)(*), Me(2)NCS(2)(-), and Me(2)NCS(3)(-) have been studied by quantum chemical methods at the MP2/6-31+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G* level of theory. More than 35 zinc complexes have been structurally characterized and the energies of formation from their components calculated for the first time. The binding energy of TMTD as a bidendate ligand increases in the order ZnMe(2)complexes with the radicals Me(2)NCS(2)(*) and Me(2)NCS(3)(*). Dissociation of the TMTD molecule at the S-S bond on reaction with the Zn(4)O(4) cluster is predicted to be strongly exothermic, in sharp contrast to the endothermic S-S bond dissociation of the free molecule. The same holds for tetramethylthiuram trisulfide (TMTT). Surprisingly, the resulting complexes contain Zn-S as well as S-O bonds. The Zn(4)O(4) nanocluster serves here as a model for bulk zinc oxide used as an activator in rubber vulcanization by sulfur. The further uptake of sulfur atoms by the various complexes from S(8) or TMTD with formation of species derived from the radical Me(2)NCS(3)(*) or the trithiocarbamate anion Me(2)NCS(3)(-) is endothermic for mono- and dinuclear zinc dithiocarbamate (dtc) complexes such as [Zn(dtc)(2)] and [Zn(2)(dtc)(4)], but exothermic in the case of polynuclear zinc oxide species containing bridging ligands as in [Zn(4)O(4)(mu-S(2)CNMe(2))] and [Zn(4)O(4)(mu-dtc)]. Therefore, zinc oxide as a polynuclear species is predicted to promote the formation of trisulfido complexes, which are generally assumed to serve as catalysts for the transfer of

  5. Comparison of flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers as treatment sources for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Timothy M. Foster, Thomas H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: For interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) of bulky tumors, careful treatment planning is required in order to ensure that a therapeutic dose is delivered to the tumor, while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissue. In clinical contexts, iPDT has typically been performed with either flat cleaved or cylindrical diffusing optical fibers as light sources. Here, the authors directly compare these two source geometries in terms of the number of fibers and duration of treatment required to deliver a prescribed light dose to a tumor volume. Methods: Treatment planning software for iPDT was developed based on graphics processing unit enhanced Monte Carlo simulations. This software was used to optimize the number of fibers, total energy delivered by each fiber, and the position of individual fibers in order to deliver a target light dose (D{sub 90}) to 90% of the tumor volume. Treatment plans were developed using both flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers, based on tissue volumes derived from CT data from a head and neck cancer patient. Plans were created for four cases: fixed energy per fiber, fixed number of fibers, and in cases where both or neither of these factors were fixed. Results: When the number of source fibers was fixed at eight, treatment plans based on flat cleaved fibers required each to deliver 7180–8080 J in order to deposit 90 J/cm{sup 2} in 90% of the tumor volume. For diffusers, each fiber was required to deliver 2270–2350 J (333–1178 J/cm) in order to achieve this same result. For the case of fibers delivering a fixed 900 J, 13 diffusers or 19 flat cleaved fibers at a spacing of 1 cm were required to deliver the desired dose. With energy per fiber fixed at 2400 J and the number of fibers fixed at eight, diffuser fibers delivered the desired dose to 93% of the tumor volume, while flat cleaved fibers delivered this dose to 79%. With both energy and number of fibers allowed to vary, six diffusers delivering 3485–3600 J

  6. Studies of a Ring-Cleaving Dioxygenase Illuminate the Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haizhong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Snieckus, Victor; Ly, Lan H.; Converse, Paul J.; Jacobs, William R.; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of TB, possesses a cholesterol catabolic pathway implicated in pathogenesis. This pathway includes an iron-dependent extradiol dioxygenase, HsaC, that cleaves catechols. Immuno-compromised mice infected with a ΔhsaC mutant of M. tuberculosis H37Rv survived 50% longer than mice infected with the wild-type strain. In guinea pigs, the mutant disseminated more slowly to the spleen, persisted less successfully in the lung, and caused little pathology. These data establish that, while cholesterol metabolism by M. tuberculosis appears to be most important during the chronic stage of infection, it begins much earlier and may contribute to the pathogen's dissemination within the host. Purified HsaC efficiently cleaved the catecholic cholesterol metabolite, DHSA (3,4-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione; kcat/Km = 14.4±0.5 µM−1 s−1), and was inactivated by a halogenated substrate analogue (partition coefficient<50). Remarkably, cholesterol caused loss of viability in the ΔhsaC mutant, consistent with catechol toxicity. Structures of HsaC:DHSA binary complexes at 2.1 Å revealed two catechol-binding modes: bidentate binding to the active site iron, as has been reported in similar enzymes, and, unexpectedly, monodentate binding. The position of the bicyclo-alkanone moiety of DHSA was very similar in the two binding modes, suggesting that this interaction is a determinant in the initial substrate-binding event. These data provide insights into the binding of catechols by extradiol dioxygenases and facilitate inhibitor design. PMID:19300498

  7. Influenza A penetrates host mucus by cleaving sialic acids with neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus (IAV) neuraminidase (NA) cleaves sialic acids (Sias) from glycans. Inhibiting NA with oseltamivir suppresses both viral infection, and viral release from cultured human airway epithelial cells. The role of NA in viral exit is well established: it releases budding virions by cleaving Sias from glycoconjugates on infected cells and progeny virions. The role of NA in viral entry remains unclear. Host respiratory epithelia secrete a mucus layer rich in heavily sialylated glycoproteins; these could inhibit viral entry by mimicking sialylated receptors on the cell surface. It has been suggested that NA allows influenza to penetrate the mucus by cleaving these sialylated decoys, but the exact mechanism is not yet established. Methods We tested IAV interaction with secreted mucus using frozen human trachea/bronchus tissue sections, and bead-bound purified human salivary mucins (HSM) and purified porcine submaxillary mucins (PSM). The protective effect of mucus was analyzed using MDCK cells coated with purified HSM and PSM with known Sia content. Oseltamivir was used to inhibit NA activity, and the fluorescent reporter substrate, 4MU-Neu5Ac, was used to quantify NA activity. Results IAV binds to the secreted mucus layer of frozen human trachea/bronchus tissues in a Sia dependent manner. HSM inhibition of IAV infection is Sia dose-dependent, but PSM cannot inhibit infection of underlying cells. HSM competitively inhibits NA cleavage of 4MU-Neu5Ac, reporter substrate. Human IAV effectively cleaves Sias from HSM but not from PSM, and binds to HSM but not to PSM. Conclusion IAV interacts with human mucus on frozen tissue sections and mucus-coated beads. Inhibition of IAV infection by sialylated human mucus is dose-dependent, and enhanced when NA is inhibited with oseltamivir. Thus NA cleaves sialylated decoys during initial stages of infection. Understanding IAV interactions with host mucins is a promising new avenue for drug development. PMID

  8. Astacin Proteases Cleave Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) to Generate Dentin Phosphoprotein (Dpp)

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C; Richardson, Amelia S; Yamakoshi, Fumiko; Yamakoshi, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) is critical for proper dentin biomineralization because genetic defects in DSPP cause dentin dysplasia type II and dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III. Dspp is processed by proteases into smaller subunits; the initial cleavage releases dentin phosphoprotein (Dpp). We incubated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides containing the amino acid context of the Dpp cleavage site (YEFDGKSMQGDDPN, designated Dspp-FRET) or a mutant version of that context (YEFDGKSIEGDDPN, designated mutDspp-FRET) with BMP-1, MEP1A, MEP1B, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, MT3-MMP, Klk4, MMP-20, plasmin, or porcine Dpp and characterized the peptide cleavage products. Only BMP-1, MEP1A, and MEP1B cleaved Dspp-FRET at the G–D peptide bond that releases Dpp from Dspp in vivo. We isolated Dspp proteoglycan from dentin power and incubated it with the three enzymes that cleaved Dspp-FRET at the G–D bond. In each case, the released Dpp domain was isolated, and its N-terminus was characterized by Edman degradation. BMP-1 and MEP1A both cleaved native Dspp at the correct site to generate Dpp, making both these enzymes prime candidates for the protease that cleaves Dspp in vivo. MEP1B was able to degrade Dpp when the Dpp was at sufficiently high concentration to deplete free calcium ion concentration. Immunohistochemistry of developing porcine molars demonstrated that astacins are expressed by odontoblasts, a result that is consistent with RT-PCR analyses. We conclude that during odontogenesis, astacins in the predentin matrix cleave Dspp before the DDPN sequence at the N-terminus of Dpp to release Dpp from the parent Dspp protein. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20687161

  9. The use of phosphonates for constructing 3d-4f clusters at high oxidation states: synthesis and characterization of two unusual heterometallic CeMn complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Yuan, Da-Qiang; Ma, Cheng-Bing; Yuan, Ming-Jian; Hu, Ming-Qiang; Li, Na; Chen, Hui; Chen, Chang-Neng; Liu, Qiu-Tian

    2010-08-21

    The use of phosphonic acids in the synthesis of mixed-metal CeMn complexes has led to the formation of two phosphonate complexes with unusual topologies: [Ce(2)Mn(6)O(6)(OH)(5)(t-BuPO(3))(6)(O(2)CMe)(3)] x 53 H(2)O (1 x 53 H(2)O) and [Ce(22)Mn(12)O(34)(MePO(3))(12)(O(2)CMe)(33)(OMe)(6)(NO(3))(H(2)O)(12)](n) (2). The two mixed-metal CeMn complexes were both prepared from a reaction system containing Mn(O(2)CMe)(2) and (NH(4))(2)[Ce(NO(3))(6)] with similar procedures except for using different phosphonic acids (tert-butylphosphonic acid and methylphosphonic acid, respectively) as coligands. Both complexes possess rare topology of triangular type, with compound 1 being a 0D discrete cluster, whereas, compound 2 is a 1D polymer. The octanuclear core of complex 1 is composed of three symmetry equivalent distorted cubanes {Ce(IV)(2)Mn(IV)(2)O(2)(OH)(2)} sharing a trigonal-bipyramidal unit {Ce(IV)(2)(OH)(3)} in the centre. Compound 2 is a one-dimensional chain polymer of identical Ce(22)Mn(12)O(34) units linked together by NO(3)(-) and MeCO(2)(-) groups, while the Ce(22)Mn(12)O(34) unit is constituted by two centrosymmetric Ce(9)(IV)Ce(2)(III)Mn(IV)(6)O(17) subunits, which features three identical distorted cubanes {Ce(IV)(2)Mn(IV)(2)O(4)} connecting to a central trigonal-bipyramidal unit {Ce(IV)(3)O(2)}, and two additional Ce(III) ions capping the top and bottom of the central trigonal bipyramid by six MePO(3)(2-) ligands. Complexes 1 and 2 are the first high-nuclearity Mn/Ln aggregates reported to date using phosphonates as ligands. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that compound 1 displays dominant ferromagnetic interactions between the adjacent metal ions with the best fit parameters for the exchanges are J(1) = 6.186 cm(-1), J(2) = 4.172 cm(-1), and with a result of S = 9 ground state confirmed by the M versus HT(-1) data, which indicates the spins of all the six Mn(IV) ions in the cluster are parallel to each other. In contrast, the data for 2 reveals

  10. σ-Aromatic cyclic M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) clusters and their complexation with dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole, furan, noble gases and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2016-04-28

    The σ-aromaticity of M3(+) (M = Cu, Ag, Au) is analyzed and compared with that of Li3(+) and a prototype σ-aromatic system, H3(+). Ligands (L) like dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene, pyridine, isoxazole and furan are employed to stabilize these monocationic M3(+) clusters. They all bind M3(+) with favorable interaction energy. Dimethyl imidazol-2-ylidene forms the strongest bond with M3(+) followed by pyridine, isoxazole and furan. Electrostatic contribution is considerably more than that of orbital contribution in these M-L bonds. The orbital interaction arises from both L → M σ donation and L ← M back donation. M3(+) clusters also bind noble gas atoms and carbon monoxide effectively. In general, among the studied systems Au3(+) binds a given L most strongly followed by Cu3(+) and Ag3(+). Computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and its different extensions like the NICS-rate and NICS in-plane component vs. NICS out-of-plane component shows that the σ-aromaticity in L bound M3(+) increases compared to that of bare clusters. The aromaticity in pyridine, isoxazole and furan bound Au3(+) complexes is quite comparable with that in the recently synthesized Zn3(C5(CH3)5)3(+). The energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital also increases upon binding with L. The blue-shift and red-shift in the C-O stretching frequency of M3(CO)3(+) and M3(OC)3(+), respectively, are analyzed through reverse polarization of the σ- and π-orbitals of CO as well as the relative amount of OC → M σ donation and M → CO π back donation. The electron density analysis is also performed to gain further insight into the nature of interaction. PMID:26624276

  11. Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions for autoionizing excited states: Theory, implementation, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Zuev, Dmitry; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.

    2013-03-28

    Theory and implementation of complex-scaled variant of equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for excitation energies with single and double substitutions (EOM-EE-CCSD) is presented. The complex-scaling formalism extends the EOM-EE-CCSD model to resonance states, i.e., excited states that are metastable with respect to electron ejection. The method is applied to Feshbach resonances in atomic systems (He, H{sup -}, and Be). The dependence of the results on one-electron basis set is quantified and analyzed. Energy decomposition and wave function analysis reveal that the origin of the dependence is in electron correlation, which is essential for the lifetime of Feshbach resonances. It is found that one-electron basis should be sufficiently flexible to describe radial and angular electron correlation in a balanced fashion and at different values of the scaling parameter, {theta}. Standard basis sets that are optimized for not-complex-scaled calculations ({theta} = 0) are not sufficiently flexible to describe the {theta}-dependence of the wave functions even when heavily augmented by additional sets.

  12. Influence of Single Skimmer Versus Dual Funnel Transfer on the Appearance of ESI-Generated LiCl Cluster/ß-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Ina D; Drewello, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Singly and doubly charged adducts of LiCl with β-cyclodextrin (βCD) of the type (βCD)(LiCl)(n)Li(+) and (βCD)2(LiCl)(p)Li2(2+) were studied using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Insight into their structural composition was gained by analysis of their collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra. The conditions the ions experience in the transfer region interfacing the ESI source and the mass analyzer were found to have a marked influence on the nature of the detected ions. In one instrument incorporating a single skimmer, individually attached LiCl ion pairs were observed, whereas the dual funnel ion guides of the second instrument allow the detection of previously unknown labile inclusion complexes of (LiCl)n clusters in βCD. PMID:25895893

  13. Influence of Single Skimmer Versus Dual Funnel Transfer on the Appearance of ESI-Generated LiCl Cluster/ß-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, Ina D.; Drewello, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Singly and doubly charged adducts of LiCl with β-cyclodextrin (βCD) of the type (βCD)(LiCl)nLi+ and (βCD)2(LiCl)pLi2 2+ were studied using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Insight into their structural composition was gained by analysis of their collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra. The conditions the ions experience in the transfer region interfacing the ESI source and the mass analyzer were found to have a marked influence on the nature of the detected ions. In one instrument incorporating a single skimmer, individually attached LiCl ion pairs were observed, whereas the dual funnel ion guides of the second instrument allow the detection of previously unknown labile inclusion complexes of (LiCl)n clusters in βCD.

  14. A new algorithm for essential proteins identification based on the integration of protein complex co-expression information and edge clustering coefficient.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiawei; Wu, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Essential proteins provide valuable information for the development of biology and medical research from the system level. The accuracy of topological centrality only based methods is deeply affected by noise in the network. Therefore, exploring efficient methods for identifying essential proteins would be of great value. Using biological features to identify essential proteins is efficient in reducing the noise in PPI network. In this paper, based on the consideration that essential proteins evolve slowly and play a central role within a network, a new algorithm, named CED, is proposed. CED mainly employs gene expression level, protein complex information and edge clustering coefficient to predict essential proteins. The performance of CED is validated based on the yeast Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network obtained from DIP database and BioGRID database. The prediction accuracy of CED outperforms other seven algorithms when applied to the two databases. PMID:26510286

  15. Complex absorbing potential based equation-of-motion coupled cluster method for the potential energy curve of CO{sub 2}{sup −} anion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2014-10-28

    The equation-of-motion coupled cluster method employing the complex absorbing potential has been used to investigate the low energy electron scattering by CO{sub 2}. We have studied the potential energy curve for the {sup 2}Π{sub u} resonance states of CO{sub 2}{sup −} upon bending as well as symmetric and asymmetric stretching of the molecule. Specifically, we have stretched the C−O bond length from 1.1 Å to 1.5 Å and the bending angles are changed between 180° and 132°. Upon bending, the low energy {sup 2}Π{sub u} resonance state is split into two components, i.e., {sup 2}A{sub 1}, {sup 2}B{sub 1} due to the Renner-Teller effect, which behave differently as the molecule is bent.

  16. Crystal structure of human arginase I complexed with thiosemicarbazide reveals an unusual thiocarbonyl μ-sulfide ligand in the binuclear manganese cluster

    PubMed Central

    Di Costanzo, Luigi; Pique, Michael E.; Christianson, David W.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human arginase I-thiosemicarbazide complex reveals an unusual thiocarbonyl μ-sulfide ligand in the binuclear manganese cluster. The C=S moiety of thiosemicarbazide bridges Mn2+A and Mn2+B with coordination distances of 2.6 Å and 2.4 Å, respectively. Otherwise, the binding of thiosemicarbazide to human arginase I does not cause any significant structural changes in the active site. The crystal structure of the unliganded enzyme reveals a hydrogen bonded water molecule that could support proton transfer between a μ-water molecule and H141 to regenerate the nucleophilic μ-hydroxide ion in the final step of catalysis. PMID:17469833

  17. First principles calculations in iron: structure and mobility of defect clusters and defect complexes for kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chu Chun; Willaime, F.

    2008-04-01

    Predictive simulations of the defect population evolution in materials under or after irradiation can be performed in a multi-scale approach, where the atomistic properties of defects are determined by electronic structure calculations based on the Density Functional Theory and used as input for kinetic simulations covering macroscopic time and length scales. Recent advances obtained in iron are presented. The determination of the 3D migration of self-interstitial atoms instead of a fast one-dimensional glide induced an overall revision of the widely accepted picture of radiation damage predicted by previously existing empirical potentials. A coupled ab initio and mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation provided strong evidence to clarify controversial interpretations of electrical resistivity recovery experiments concerning the mobility of vacancies, self-interstitial atoms, and their clusters. The results on the dissolution and migration properties of helium in α-Fe were used to parameterize Rate Theory models and new inter-atomic potentials, which improved the understanding of fusion reactor materials behavior. Finally, the effects of carbon, present in all steels as the principal hardening element, are also shown. To cite this article: C.C. Fu, F. Willaime, C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  18. MMPs are less efficient than ADAMTS5 in cleaving aggrecan core protein.

    PubMed

    Durigova, Michaela; Nagase, Hideaki; Mort, John S; Roughley, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    Aggrecan degradation in articular cartilage occurs predominantly through proteolysis and has been attributed to the action of members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) families. Both families of enzymes cleave aggrecan at specific sites within the aggrecan core protein. One cleavage site within the interglobular domain (IGD), between Glu(373-374)Ala and five additional sites in the chondroitin sulfate-2 (CS-2) region of aggrecan were characterized as "aggrecanase" (ADAMTS) cleavage sites, while cleavage between Ser(341-342)Phe within the IGD of bovine aggrecan is attributed to MMP action. The objective of this study was to assess the cleavage efficiency of MMPs relative to ADAMTS and their contribution to aggrecan proteolysis in vitro. The analysis of aggrecan IGD degradation in bovine articular cartilage explants treated with catabolic cytokines over a 19-day period showed that MMP-mediated degradation of aggrecan within the IGD can only be observed following day 12 of culture. This delay is associated with the lack of activation of proMMPs during the first 12 days of culture. Analysis of MMP1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13 and ADAMTS5 efficiencies at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD and CS-2 region in vitro was carried out by the digestion of bovine aggrecan with the various enzymes and Western blot analysis using aggrecan anti-G1 and anti-G3 antibodies. Of these MMPs, MMP12 was the most efficient at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD. In addition to cleavage in the IGD, MMP, 3, 7, 8 and 12 were also able to degrade the aggrecan CS-2 region. MMP3 and MMP12 were able to degrade aggrecan at the very C-terminus of the CS-2 region, cleaving the Glu(2047-2048)Ala bond which was previously shown to be cleaved by ADAMTS5. However, in comparison to ADAMTS5, MMP3 was about 100 times and 10 times less efficient at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD and CS-2 regions, respectively. Collectively, our results

  19. High-nuclearity ruthenium carbonyl cluster complexes derived from 2-amino-6-methylpyridine: synthesis of nonanuclear derivatives containing mu4- and mu5-oxo ligands.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; del Río, Ignacio; García-Alvarez, Pablo; Miguel, Daniel

    2006-07-24

    Nonanuclear cluster complexes [Ru9(mu3-H)2(mu-H)(mu5-O)(mu4-ampy)(mu3-Hampy)(CO)21] (4) (H2ampy = 2-amino-6-methylpyridine), [Ru9(mu5-O)2(mu4-ampy)(mu3-Hampy)2(mu-CO)(CO)20] (5), [Ru9(mu5-O)2(mu4-ampy)(mu3-Hampy)2(mu-CO)2(CO)19] (6), and [Ru9(mu4-O)(mu5-O)(mu4-ampy)(mu3-Hampy)(mu-Hampy)(mu-CO)(CO)19] (7), together with the known hexanuclear [Ru6(mu3-H)2(mu5-ampy)(mu-CO)2(CO)14] (2) and the novel pentanuclear [Ru5(mu4-ampy)(2)(mu-CO)(CO)12] (3) complexes, are products of the thermolysis of [Ru3(mu-H)(mu3-Hampy)(CO)9] (1) in decane at 150 degrees C. Two different and very unusual quadruply bridging coordination modes have been observed for the ampy ligand. Compounds 4-7 also feature one (4) or two (5-7) bridging oxo ligands. With the exception of one of the oxo ligands of 7, which is in a distorted tetrahedral environment, the remaining oxo ligands of 4-7 are surrounded by five metal atoms. In carbonyl metal clusters, quadruply bridging oxo ligands are very unusual, whereas quintuply bridging oxo ligands are unprecedented. By using 18O-labeled water, we have unambiguously established that these oxo ligands arise from water. PMID:16842009

  20. FT-IR spectroscopic characterization of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from Escherichia coli: oxidation of FeS cluster N2 is coupled with the protonation of an aspartate or glutamate side chain.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, P; Scheide, D; Bungert, S; Mäntele, W; Friedrich, T

    2000-09-01

    The proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, also called complex I, is the first energy-transducing complex of many respiratory chains. It couples the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. One FMN and up to nine iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters participate in the redox reaction. So far, complex I has been described mainly by means of EPR- and UV-vis spectroscopy. Here, we report for the first time an infrared spectroscopic characterization of complex I. Electrochemically induced FT-IR difference spectra of complex I from Escherichia coli and of the NADH dehydrogenase fragment of this complex were obtained for critical potential steps. The spectral contributions of the FMN in both preparations were derived from a comparison using model compounds and turned out to be unexpectedly small. Furthermore, the FT-IR difference spectra reveal that the redox transitions of the FMN and of the FeS clusters induce strong reorganizations of the polypeptide backbone. Additional signals in the spectra of complex I reflect contributions induced by the redox transition of the high-potential FeS cluster N2 which is not present in the NADH dehydrogenase fragment. Part of these signals are attributed to the reorganization of protonated/deprotonated Asp or Glu side chains. On the basis of these data we discuss the role of N2 for proton translocation of complex I. PMID:10978175

  1. A novel octanuclear vanadium(V) oxide cluster complex having an unprecedented neutral V8O20 core functionalized with 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Shintaro; Taya, Nobuto; Ishii, Youichi

    2014-03-17

    A novel octanuclear vanadium(V) oxide cluster complex, [V8O20(4,4'-(t)Bubpy)4] (1), was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis to reveal that 1 has an unprecedented neutral V8O20 core. An unexpected interconversion between 1 and the methoxo(oxo)vanadium(V) cluster complex, [V4O8(OMe)4(4,4'-(t)Bubpy)2] (2), was observed upon changes in the solvent systems. PMID:24559114

  2. Friction imprint effect in mechanically cleaved BaTiO3 (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Christian J.; Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2014-09-01

    Adsorption, chemisorption, and reconstruction at the surfaces of ferroelectric materials can all contribute toward the pinning of ferroelectric polarization, which is called the electrical imprint effect. Here, we show that the opposite is also true: freshly cleaved, atomically flat surfaces of (001) oriented BaTiO3 exhibit a persistent change in surface chemistry that is driven by ferroelectric polarization. This surface modification is explored using lateral force microscopy (LFM), while the ferroelectric polarization is probed using piezoresponse force microscopy. We find that immediately after cleaving BaTiO3, LFM reveals friction contrast between ferroelectric domains. We also find that this surface modification remains after the ferroelectric domain distribution is modified, resulting in an imprint of the original ferroelectric domain distribution on the sample surface. This friction imprint effect has implications for surface patterning as well as ferroelectric device operation and failure.

  3. Density functional study of hydrazine N-N bond cleaving on 3d metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathurrahman, Fadjar; Kasai, Hideaki

    2015-11-01

    Theoretical calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D2) has been performed to investigate hydrazine adsorption and N-N bond cleaving on closed packed surfaces of 3d metals: Fe(110), Co(0001), Ni(111), Cu(111), and Zn(0001). The activation energies of N-N bond cleaving of hydrazine on each surface are estimated using climbing-image nudged elastic band (CINEB) method. The results showed that the activation energies for this process have increasing trend from Fe(110) to Zn(0001). By examining the electronic structure of the adsorbed hydrazine, it is found that this trend is related to occupation of derived 6σ* orbitals. It is also found that approximate linear relationship between reaction energy and activation energy (the Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relationship) holds for those surfaces.

  4. Scribe-cleave-passivate (SCP) slim edge technology for silicon sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, V.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Ely, S.; Wright, J. G.; Christophersen, M.; Phlips, B. F.; Pellegrini, G.; Grinstein, S.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Klingenberg, R.; Wittig, T.; Macchiolo, A.; Weigell, P.; Creanza, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Eklund, L.; Maneuski, D.; Stewart, G.; Casse, G.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S.; Kramberger, G.

    2013-12-01

    We are pursuing scribe-cleave-passivate (SCP) technology of making “slim edge” sensors. Such sensors have only a minimal amount of inactive peripheral region, which benefits construction of large-area tracker and imaging systems. Key application steps of this method are surface scribing, cleaving, and passivation of the resulting sidewall. We are working on developing both the technology and physical understanding of the processed devices performance. In this paper we begin by reviewing the manufacturing options of SCP technology. Then we show new results regarding the technology automation and device physics performance. The latter includes charge collection efficiency near the edge and radiation hardness study. We also report on the status of devices processed at the request of the RD50 collaborators.

  5. Friction imprint effect in mechanically cleaved BaTiO{sub 3} (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Christian J.; Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2014-09-28

    Adsorption, chemisorption, and reconstruction at the surfaces of ferroelectric materials can all contribute toward the pinning of ferroelectric polarization, which is called the electrical imprint effect. Here, we show that the opposite is also true: freshly cleaved, atomically flat surfaces of (001) oriented BaTiO{sub 3} exhibit a persistent change in surface chemistry that is driven by ferroelectric polarization. This surface modification is explored using lateral force microscopy (LFM), while the ferroelectric polarization is probed using piezoresponse force microscopy. We find that immediately after cleaving BaTiO{sub 3}, LFM reveals friction contrast between ferroelectric domains. We also find that this surface modification remains after the ferroelectric domain distribution is modified, resulting in an imprint of the original ferroelectric domain distribution on the sample surface. This friction imprint effect has implications for surface patterning as well as ferroelectric device operation and failure.

  6. The Streptococcal Cysteine Protease SpeB Is Not a Natural Immunoglobulin-Cleaving Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Helena; Vindebro, Reine

    2013-01-01

    The human bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes has developed a broad variety of virulence mechanisms to evade the actions of the host immune defense. One of the best-characterized factors is the streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB, an important multifunctional protease that contributes to group A streptococcal pathogenesis in vivo. Among many suggested activities, SpeB has been described to degrade various human plasma proteins, including immunoglobulins (Igs). In this study, we show that SpeB has no Ig-cleaving activity under physiological conditions and that only Igs in a reduced state, i.e., semimonomeric molecules, are cleaved and degraded by SpeB. Since reducing conditions outside eukaryotic cells have to be considered nonphysiological and IgG in a reduced state lacks biological effector functions, we conclude that SpeB does not contribute to S. pyogenes virulence through the proteolytic degradation of Igs. PMID:23569114

  7. Trichosanthin, a potent HIV-1 inhibitor, can cleave supercoiled DNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Li, M X; Yeung, H W; Pan, L P; Chan, S I

    1991-01-01

    Trichosanthin, an abortifacient, immunosuppressive and anti-tumor protein purified from the traditional Chinese herb medicine Tian Hua Fen, is a potent inhibitor against HIV-1 replication. Under normal enzymatic digestion conditions, trichosanthin cleaves the supercoiled double-stranded DNA to produce nicked circular and linear DNA. Trichosanthin has no effect on linear double-stranded DNA. Neither does it convert relaxed circular duplex DNA into a supercoiled form in the presence of ATP. Thus trichosanthin is not a DNA gyrase. However, trichosanthin can cleave the relaxed circular DNA into a linear form, indicating that both the circular as well as the supercoiled forms are essential for trichosanthin recognition. In addition, trichosanthin contains one calcium metal ion per protein molecule, which presumably is related to its endonucleolytic activity. Images PMID:1659689

  8. The Host Targeting motif in exported Plasmodium proteins is cleaved in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Andrew R.; Speicher, Kaye D.; Tamez, Pamela A.; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Speicher, David W.; Haldar, Kasturi

    2010-01-01

    During the blood stage of its lifecycle, the malaria parasite resides and replicates inside a membrane vacuole within its host cell, the human erythrocyte. The parasite exports many proteins across the vacuole membrane and into the host cell cytoplasm. Most exported proteins are characterized by the presence of a Host Targeting (HT) motif, also referred to as a Plasmodium Export Element (PEXEL), which corresponds to the consensus sequence RxLxE/D/Q. During export the HT motif is cleaved by an unknown protease. Here, we generate parasite lines expressing HT motif containing proteins that are localized to different compartments within the parasite or host cell. We find that the HT motif in a protein that is retained in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum, is cleaved and N-acetylated as efficiently as a protein that is exported. This shows that cleavage of the HT motif occurs early in the secretory pathway, in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:20117149

  9. Histidine 103 in Fra2 Is an Iron-Sulfur Cluster Ligand in the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3 Complex and Is Required for in Vivo Iron Signaling in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Dingra, Nin N.; Keller, Greg; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela J.; Winge, Dennis R.; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2011-01-01

    The BolA homologue Fra2 and the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins Grx3 and Grx4 together play a key role in regulating iron homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic studies indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 regulate activity of the iron-responsive transcription factors Aft1 and Aft2 in response to mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. We have previously shown that Fra2 and Grx3/4 form a [2Fe-2S]2+-bridged heterodimeric complex with iron ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. To further characterize this unusual Fe-S-binding complex, site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify specific residues in Fra2 that influence Fe-S cluster binding and regulation of Aft1 activity in vivo. Here, we present spectroscopic evidence that His-103 in Fra2 is an Fe-S cluster ligand in the Fra2-Grx3 complex. Replacement of this residue does not abolish Fe-S cluster binding, but it does lead to a change in cluster coordination and destabilization of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. In vivo genetic studies further confirm that Fra2 His-103 is critical for control of Aft1 activity in response to the cellular iron status. Using CD spectroscopy, we find that ∼1 mol eq of apo-Fra2 binds tightly to the [2Fe-2S] Grx3 homodimer to form the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3 heterodimer, suggesting a mechanism for formation of the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3 heterodimer in vivo. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the histidine coordination and stability of the [2Fe-2S] cluster in the Fra2-Grx3 complex are essential for iron regulation in yeast. PMID:20978135

  10. A level set simulation for ordering of quantum dots via cleaved-edge overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, X. B.; Uccelli, E.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Ratsch, C.

    2009-07-01

    Cleaved-edge overgrowth (CEO) is a promising technique to obtain ordered arrays of quantum dots, where the size and position of the dots can be controlled very well. We present level set simulations for CEO. Our simulations illustrate how the quality of the CEO technique depends on the potential energy surface (PES) for adatom diffusion, and thus suggest how variations of the PES can potentially improve the uniformity of quantum dot arrays.

  11. RecA-dependent programmable endonuclease Ref cleaves DNA in two distinct steps

    PubMed Central

    Ronayne, Erin A.; Cox, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage P1 recombination enhancement function (Ref) protein is a RecA-dependent programmable endonuclease. Ref targets displacement loops formed when an oligonucleotide is bound by a RecA filament and invades homologous double-stranded DNA sequences. Mechanistic details of this reaction have been explored, revealing that (i) Ref is nickase, cleaving the two target strands of a displacement loop sequentially, (ii) the two strands are cleaved in a prescribed order, with the paired strand cut first and (iii) the two cleavage events have different requirements. Cutting the paired strand is rapid, does not require RecA-mediated ATP hydrolysis and is promoted even by Ref active site variant H153A. The displaced strand is cleaved much more slowly, requires RecA-mediated ATP hydrolysis and does not occur with Ref H153A. The two cleavage events are also affected differently by solution conditions. We postulate that the second cleavage (displaced strand) is limited by some activity of RecA protein. PMID:24371286

  12. Meprin A impairs epithelial barrier function, enhances monocyte migration, and cleaves the tight junction protein occludin

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jialing; Yura, Renee E.; Matters, Gail L.; Bradley, S. Gaylen; Shi, Pan; Tian, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases are highly expressed at the luminal interface of the intestine and kidney and in certain leukocytes. Meprins cleave a variety of substrates in vitro, including extracellular matrix proteins, adherens junction proteins, and cytokines, and have been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases. The linkage between results in vitro and pathogenesis, however, has not been elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether meprins are determinative factors in disrupting the barrier function of the epithelium. Active meprin A or meprin B applied to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers increased permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran and disrupted immunostaining of the tight junction protein occludin but not claudin-4. Meprin A, but not meprin B, cleaved occludin in MDCK monolayers. Experiments with recombinant occludin demonstrated that meprin A cleaves the protein between Gly100 and Ser101 on the first extracellular loop. In vivo experiments demonstrated that meprin A infused into the mouse bladder increased the epithelium permeability to sodium fluorescein. Furthermore, monocytes from meprin knockout mice on a C57BL/6 background were less able to migrate through an MDCK monolayer than monocytes from their wild-type counterparts. These results demonstrate the capability of meprin A to disrupt epithelial barriers and implicate occludin as one of the important targets of meprin A that may modulate inflammation. PMID:23804454

  13. A review of immune amplification via ligand clustering by self-assembled liquid-crystalline DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ernest Y; Lee, Calvin K; Schmidt, Nathan W; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard C L

    2016-06-01

    We examine how the interferon production of plasmacytoid dendritic cells is amplified by the self-assembly of liquid-crystalline antimicrobial peptide/DNA complexes. These specialized dendritic cells are important for host defense because they quickly release large quantities of type I interferons in response to infection. However, their aberrant activation is also correlated with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and lupus. In this review, we will describe how polyelectrolyte self-assembly and the statistical mechanics of multivalent interactions contribute to this process. In a more general compass, we provide an interesting conceptual corrective to the common notion in molecular biology of a dichotomy between specific interactions and non-specific interactions, and show examples where one can construct exquisitely specific interactions using non-specific interactions. PMID:26956527

  14. Fibronectin fragments and the cleaving enzyme ADAM-8 in the degenerative human intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Nancy; Markova, Dessislava Z.; Adams, Sherrill L.; Scanzello, Carla; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; Gerard, David; Shi, Peng; Anderson, D. Greg; Zack, Marc; An, Howard S.; Chen, Di; Zhang, Yejia

    2014-01-01

    Study Design The presence fibronectin fragments (FN-fs) and the cleaving enzyme, A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein (ADAM)-8 were examined in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue in vitro. Objective To investigate the presence and pathophysiological concentration of FN-fs and their cleaving enzyme, ADAM-8, in the human IVD tissue. Summary of Background Data The 29kDa FN-f has been shown to result in extracellular matrix loss in rabbit IVDs. However, the concentration of this biologically active fragment in the degenerative human IVD tissue has previously not been determined. Further, it is critical to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for FN cleavage in the IVD. Methods Human degenerative IVD tissues were removed during spinal surgery. A normal appearing young adult and an infant human cadaveric sample were obtained as controls. Soluble proteins were extracted, and analyzed by Western blotting utilizing antibodies specific for the human FN neoepitope VRAA271. A purified 29 kDa FN-f was used to allow estimation of the concentration of FN-fs in the tissues. ADAM-8, a FN-cleaving enzyme, was analyzed by Western blotting and immunostaining. Results All adult IVD tissues contain many FN-f species, but these species were absent from the infant disc tissue. Moderately degenerative discs contained the highest amount of FN-fs; the concentration was estimated to be in the nanomolar range per gram of tissue. ADAM-8, known to cleave FN resulting in the VRAA271 neoepitope, was present in the human disc. ADAM-8 primarily localized in the pericellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue, as determined by immunostaining. Conclusion This is the first report that N-terminal FN-fs are consistently present in IVD tissues from adult subjects. The pathophysiological concentration of these fragments is estimated to be at nanomolar range per gram of IVD tissue. Further, ADAM-8, known to cleave FN, is present at the pericellular matrix of disc cells

  15. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease Regulates Its Interferon Antagonism by Cleaving NEMO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Shi, Yanling; Zhang, Huan; Gao, Li; Peng, Guiqing; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Kui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an enteropathogenic coronavirus causing lethal watery diarrhea in piglets. Since 2010, a PEDV variant has spread rapidly in China, and it emerged in the United States in 2013, posing significant economic and public health concerns. The ability to circumvent the interferon (IFN) antiviral response, as suggested for PEDV, promotes viral survival and regulates pathogenesis of PEDV infections, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we show that PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease, nsp5, is an IFN antagonist that proteolytically cleaves the nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO), an essential adaptor bridging interferon-regulatory factor and NF-κB activation. NEMO is cleaved at glutamine 231 (Q231) by PEDV, and this cleavage impaired the ability of NEMO to activate downstream IFN production and to act as a signaling adaptor of the RIG-I/MDA5 pathway. Mutations specifically disrupting the cysteine protease activity of PEDV nsp5 abrogated NEMO cleavage and the inhibition of IFN induction. Structural analysis suggests that several key residues outside the catalytic sites of PEDV nsp5 probably impact NEMO cleavage by modulating potential interactions of nsp5 with their substrates. These data show that PEDV nsp5 disrupts type I IFN signaling by cleaving NEMO. Previously, we and others demonstrated that NEMO is also cleaved by 3C or 3C-like proteinases of picornavirus and artertivirus. Thus, NEMO probably represents a prime target for 3C or 3C-like proteinases of different viruses. IMPORTANCE The continued emergence and reemergence of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) underscore the importance of studying how this virus manipulates the immune responses of its hosts. During coevolution with its hosts, PEDV has acquired mechanisms to subvert host innate immune responses for its survival advantage. At least two proteins encoded by PEDV have been identified as interferon (IFN

  16. Electronic Structure of the Mn[subscript 4]Ca Cluster in the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II Studied by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-11-12

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra simultaneously. The second energy dimension separates the pre-edge (1s to 3d) transitions from the main K-edge (1s to 4p), and thus more precise analysis is possible. The 1s2p RIXS final state electron configuration along the energy transfer axis is identical to conventional L-edge absorption spectroscopy and the RIXS spectra are therefore sensitive to the metal spin state. We have collected data from PS II samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states are small compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms. The RIXS spectra of S{sub 0} and S{sub 3

  17. The paracaspase MALT1 cleaves HOIL1 reducing linear ubiquitination by LUBAC to dampen lymphocyte NF-κB signalling

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theo; Fung, Shan-Yu; Renner, Florian; Blank, Michael A.; Dufour, Antoine; Kang, Sohyeong; Bolger-Munro, Madison; Scurll, Joshua M.; Priatel, John J.; Schweigler, Patrick; Melkko, Samu; Gold, Michael R.; Viner, Rosa I.; Régnier, Catherine H.; Turvey, Stuart E.; Overall, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen receptor signalling activates the canonical NF-κB pathway via the CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 (CBM) signalosome involving key, yet ill-defined roles for linear ubiquitination. The paracaspase MALT1 cleaves and removes negative checkpoint proteins, amplifying lymphocyte responses in NF-κB activation and in B-cell lymphoma subtypes. To identify new human MALT1 substrates, we compare B cells from the only known living MALT1mut/mut patient with healthy MALT1+/mut family members using 10-plex Tandem Mass Tag TAILS N-terminal peptide proteomics. We identify HOIL1 of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex as a novel MALT1 substrate. We show linear ubiquitination at B-cell receptor microclusters and signalosomes. Late in the NF-κB activation cycle HOIL1 cleavage transiently reduces linear ubiquitination, including of NEMO and RIP1, dampening NF-κB activation and preventing reactivation. By regulating linear ubiquitination, MALT1 is both a positive and negative pleiotropic regulator of the human canonical NF-κB pathway—first promoting activation via the CBM—then triggering HOIL1-dependent negative-feedback termination, preventing reactivation. PMID:26525107

  18. Monolithic integration of InGaAsP/InP semiconductor lasers using the stop-cleaving technique

    SciTech Connect

    Antreasyan, A.; Napholtz, S.G.; Wilt, D.P.; Garbinski, P.A.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper the authors describe the stop-cleaving technique for locally cleaving the mirrors of semiconductor lasers without cleaving the entire substrate, and its applications. The technique is suitable for batch processing with a good yield and, therefore, can be applied to preparing optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEIC's). InGaAsP/InP double-channel-planar-buried-heterostructure lasers emitting at 1.3 ..mu..m are fabricated utilizing this technique with threshold currents as low as 20 mA and differential quantum efficiencies as high as 60 percent (two facets). The implementation of this technique for preparing a monolithically integrated pair of lasers is also demonstrated. The integrated dual-laser configuration is utilized to obtain a monolithically integrated laser-detector pair by operating one of the lasers under reserve bias, and to enhance longitudinal mode discrimination by utilizing the optical feedback from the self-aligned stop-cleaved facet of the second cavity.

  19. Comprehensive Antigenic Map of a Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Derking, Ronald; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Cupo, Albert; Torres, Jonathan L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; van Montfort, Thijs; de Taeye, Steven W.; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Klasse, Per-Johan; Ward, Andrew B.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2015-01-01

    The trimeric envelope (Env) spike is the focus of vaccine design efforts aimed at generating broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to protect against HIV-1 infection. Three recent developments have facilitated a thorough investigation of the antigenic structure of the Env trimer: 1) the isolation of many bNAbs against multiple different epitopes; 2) the generation of a soluble trimer mimic, BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140, that expresses most bNAb epitopes; 3) facile binding assays involving the oriented immobilization of tagged trimers. Using these tools, we generated an antigenic map of the trimer by antibody cross-competition. Our analysis delineates three well-defined epitope clusters (CD4 binding site, quaternary V1V2 and Asn332-centered oligomannose patch) and new epitopes at the gp120-gp41 interface. It also identifies the relationships among these clusters. In addition to epitope overlap, we defined three more ways in which antibodies can cross-compete: steric competition from binding to proximal but non-overlapping epitopes (e.g., PGT151 inhibition of 8ANC195 binding); allosteric inhibition (e.g., PGT145 inhibition of 1NC9, 8ANC195, PGT151 and CD4 binding); and competition by reorientation of glycans (e.g., PGT135 inhibition of CD4bs bNAbs, and CD4bs bNAb inhibition of 8ANC195). We further demonstrate that bNAb binding can be complex, often affecting several other areas of the trimer surface beyond the epitope. This extensive analysis of the antigenic structure and the epitope interrelationships of the Env trimer should aid in design of both bNAb-based therapies and vaccines intended to induce bNAbs. PMID:25807248

  20. Employment of 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime as a new route to high nuclearity metal clusters: Mn6 and Mn8 complexes.

    PubMed

    Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Luisi, Brian S; Moulton, Brian; Christou, George

    2008-02-01

    The employment of the anion of 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime (dapdoH2) as a pentadentate chelate in transition metal cluster chemistry is reported. The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetochemical characterization are described for [Mn6O2(OMe)2(dapdo)2(dapdoH)4](ClO4)2 (1), [Mn6O2(OMe)2(dapdo)2(dapdoH)4][Ca(NO3)4] (2), and [Mn8O4(OH)4(OMe)2(N3)2(dapdo)2(dapdoH)2(H2O)2] (3). The reaction of [Mn3O(O2CMe)6(py)3](ClO4) with 3 equiv of dapdoH2 (with or without 2 equiv of NEt3) in MeOH gave 1. The same cation, but with a [Ca(NO3)4]2- anion, was found in complex 2, which was obtained from the reaction in MeOH between Mn(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, and dapdoH2 in the presence of NEt3. In contrast, addition of NaN3 to several reactions comprising MnCl2, dapdoH2, and NEt3 in MeOH gave the octanuclear complex 3. Complexes 1-3 all possess rare topologies and are mixed-valence: 2MnII, 4MnIII for 1 and 2, and 2MnII, 6MnIII for 3. The core of the cation of 1 and 2 consists of two edge-sharing Mn4 tetrahedra at the center of each of which is a micro4-O2- ion. Peripheral ligation is provided by two micro-OMe-, four micro-dapdoH-, and two micro3-dapdo2- groups. The core of 3 consists of two [MnIIMnIII3(micro3-O)2]7+ "butterfly" units linked together by one of the micro3-O2- ions, which thus becomes micro4. Peripheral ligation is provided by four micro-OMe-, two micro-OH-, two micro-dapdoH-, and two micro4-dapdo2- groups. Variable-temperature, solid-state dc and ac magnetization studies were carried out on complexes 1-3 in the 5.0-300 K range; the data for 1 and 2 are identical. Fitting of the obtained magnetization versus field (H) and temperature (T) data by matrix diagonalization and including only axial anisotropy (zero-field splitting, D) established that 1 possesses an S=5 ground state with D=-0.24 cm(-1). For 3, low-lying excited states precluded obtaining a good fit from the magnetization data, and the ground state was instead determined from the ac data, which indicated an S=1

  1. Effectiveness of a complex intervention in reducing the prevalence of smoking among adolescents: study design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The likelihood of an adolescent taking up smoking may be influenced by his or her society, school and family. Thus, changes in the immediate environment may alter a young person’s perception of smoking. Methods/Design The proposed multi-center, cluster-randomized controlled trial will be stratified by the baseline prevalence of smoking in schools. Municipalities with fewer than 100,000 inhabitants will be randomly assigned to a control or intervention group. One secondary school will be randomly selected from each municipality. These schools will be randomized to two groups: the students of one will receive any existing educational course regarding smoking, while those of the other school will receive a four-year, class-based curriculum intervention (22 classroom lessons) aimed at reinforcing a smoke-free school policy and encouraging smoking cessation in parents, pupils, and teachers. The intervention will also include annual meetings with parents and efforts to empower adolescents to change the smoking-related attitudes and behaviors in their homes, classrooms and communities. We will enroll children aged 12-13 years as they enter secondary school during two consecutive school years (to obtain sufficient enrolled subjects). We will follow them for five years, until two years after they leave secondary school. All external evaluators and analysts will be blinded to school allocation. The aim of this study is to analyze the effectiveness of a complex intervention in reducing the prevalence of smoking in the third year of compulsory secondary education (ESO) and two years after secondary school, when the participants are 14-15 and 17-18 years old, respectively. Discussion Most interventions aimed at preventing smoking among adolescents yield little to no positive long-term effects. This clinical trial will analyze the effectiveness of a complex intervention aimed at reducing the incidence and prevalence of smoking in this vulnerable age group. Trial

  2. Cell-cell interactions determine the dorsoventral axis in embryos of an equally cleaving opisthobranch mollusc.

    PubMed

    Boring, L

    1989-11-01

    Dorsoventral polarity in molluscan embryos can arise by two distinct mechanisms, where the mechanism employed is strongly correlated with the cleavage pattern of the early embryo. In species with unequal cleavage, the dorsal lineage, or "D quadrant", is determined in a cell-autonomous manner by the inheritance of cytoplasmic determinants. However, in gastropod molluscs with equal cleavage, cell-cell interactions are required to specify the fate of the dorsal blastomere. During the fifth cleavage interval in equally cleaving embryos, one of the vegetal macromeres makes exclusive contacts with the animal micromeres, and this macromere will give rise to the mesodermal precursor cell at the next division, thereby identifying the dorsal quadrant. This study examines D-quadrant determination in an equally cleaving species from a group of previously uninvestigated gastropods, the subclass Opisthobranchia. Blastomere ablation experiments were performed on embryos of Haminoea callidegenita to (i) determine the developmental potential of macromeres before and after fifth cleavage, and (ii) examine the role of micromere-macromere interactions in the establishment of bilateral symmetry. The results suggest that the macromeres are developmentally equivalent prior to fifth cleavage, but become nonequivalent soon afterward. The dorsoventral axis corresponds to the displacement of the micromeres over one macromere early in the fifth cleavage interval. This unusual cellular topology is hypothesized to result from constraints imposed on micromere-macromere interactions in an embryo that develops from a large egg and forms a stereoblastula (no cleavage cavity). Ablation of the entire first quarter of micromeres results in embryos which remain radially symmetrical in the vegetal hemisphere, indicating that micromere-macromere interactions are required for the elaboration of bilateral symmetry properties. Therefore, inductive interactions between cells may represent a general strategy

  3. Activation of the Kexin from Schizosaccharomyces pombe Requires Internal Cleavage of Its Initially Cleaved Prosequence

    PubMed Central

    Powner, Dale; Davey, John

    1998-01-01

    Members of the kexin family of processing enzymes are responsible for the cleavage of many proproteins during their transport through the secretory pathway. The enzymes themselves are made as inactive precursors, and we investigated the activation process by studying the maturation of Krp1, a kexin from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using a cell-free translation-translocation system prepared from Xenopus eggs, we found that Krp1 is made as a preproprotein that loses the presequence during translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum. The prosequence is also rapidly cleaved in a reaction that is autocatalytic and probably intramolecular and is inhibited by disruption of the P domain. Prosequence cleavage normally occurs at Arg-Tyr-Lys-Arg102↓ (primary cleavage site) but can occur at Lys-Arg82 (internal cleavage site) and/or Trp-Arg99 when the basic residues are removed from the primary site. Cleavage of the prosequence is necessary but not sufficient for activation, and Krp1 is initially unable to process substrates presented in trans. Full activation is achieved after further incubation in the extract and is coincident with the addition of O-linked sugars. O glycosylation is not, however, essential for activity, and the crucial event appears to be cleavage of the initially cleaved prosequence at the internal site. Our results are consistent with a model in which the cleaved prosequence remains noncovalently associated with the catalytic domain and acts as an autoinhibitor of the enzyme. Inhibition is then relieved by a second (internal) cleavage of the inhibitory prosequence. Further support for this model is provided by our finding that overexpression of a Krp1 prosequence lacking a cleavable internal site dramatically reduced the growth rate of otherwise wild-type S. pombe cells, an effect that was not seen after overexpression of the normal, internally cleavable, prosequence or prosequences that lack the Lys-Arg102 residues. PMID:9418887

  4. Pharmacokinetics of an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody conjugated to a bifunctional transition metal carborane complex (venus flytrap cluster) in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Beatty, B G; Paxton, R J; Hawthorne, M F; Williams, L E; Rickard-Dickson, K J; Do, T; Shively, J E; Beatty, J D

    1993-08-01

    An anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody, T84.66, has been conjugated to a metallocarborane complex (Venus flytrap cluster, VFC) containing 57Co. This radioimmunoconjugate, 57Co-VFC-T84.66, retained > 90% immunoreactivity, was stable in serum (7 days) and demonstrated good localization in LS174T tumor xenografts. Pharmacokinetics of 57Co-VFC-T84.66 in tumor-bearing mice were compared to T84.66 Mab conjugated with either DTPA or its benzylisothiocyanate derivative (BzDTPA) labeled with 111In. Whole-body half-life for VFC-T84.66 was less (t1/2 = 62 hr) than that for either DTPA-T84.66 (t1/2 = 157 hr) or BzDTPA-T84.66 (t1/2 = 167 hr). Blood clearance was similar for all three radioimmunoconjugates (t1/2 = 22 hr). Hepatic uptake of the radiolabel was rapid and remained constant for 7 days for both DTPA radioimmunoconjugates (DTPA radioimmunoconjugate = 13.7 +/- 1.5 %ID/g; BzDTPA radioimmunoconjugate = 10.4 +/- 1.7%ID/g). For VFC, however, liver radioactivity decreased from 19.1 +/- 0.6%ID/g at 1 hr to 0.9 +/- 0.1 %ID/g 7 days postinjection, suggesting a possible role for VFC radioimmunoconjugate in the imaging and therapy of liver metastases. PMID:8326387

  5. Human Lin28 Forms a High-Affinity 1:1 Complex with the 106~363 Cluster miRNA miR-363.

    PubMed

    Peters, Daniel T; Fung, Herman K H; Levdikov, Vladimir M; Irmscher, Tobias; Warrander, Fiona C; Greive, Sandra J; Kovalevskiy, Oleg; Isaacs, Harry V; Coles, Mark; Antson, Alfred A

    2016-09-13

    Lin28A is a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression that interacts with and negatively regulates the biogenesis of let-7 family miRNAs. Recent data suggested that Lin28A also binds the putative tumor suppressor miR-363, a member of the 106~363 cluster of miRNAs. Affinity for this miRNA and the stoichiometry of the protein-RNA complex are unknown. Characterization of human Lin28's interaction with RNA has been complicated by difficulties in producing stable RNA-free protein. We have engineered a maltose binding protein fusion with Lin28, which binds let-7 miRNA with a Kd of 54.1 ± 4.2 nM, in agreement with previous data on a murine homologue. We show that human Lin28A binds miR-363 with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with a similar, if not higher, affinity (Kd = 16.6 ± 1.9 nM). Further analysis suggests that the interaction of the N-terminal cold shock domain of Lin28A with RNA is salt-dependent, supporting a model in which the cold shock domain allows the protein to sample RNA substrates through transient electrostatic interactions. PMID:27559824

  6. Cleaved iron oxide nanoparticles as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Lan; Chae, Min Kyung; Jang, Eun Ju; Lee, Chulhyun

    2013-03-25

    Iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents are reported to effectively improve magnetic resonance imaging of tissues and cells. In this work, cleaved iron oxide nanoparticles (CIONPs) were generated from hydrophobic FeO nanoparticles (HIONPs) by coating their surfaces with PEG-phospholipids, oxidizing them under water, and slowly removing the residual FeO phase in phthalate buffer. The synthesized CIONPs showed good r2 values of up to 258 s(-1)  mM(-1). Thus, the CIONPs can be employed as vectors for drug delivery due to their unique structure with an empty inner space, which enables their use in a wide range of applications. PMID:23345158

  7. Proteolytic Processing of Neuregulin 1 Type III by Three Intramembrane-cleaving Proteases.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Daniel; Voss, Matthias; Brankatschk, Ben; Giudici, Camilla; Hampel, Heike; Schwenk, Benjamin; Edbauer, Dieter; Fukumori, Akio; Steiner, Harald; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Rossner, Moritz J; Fluhrer, Regina; Willem, Michael; Haass, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Numerous membrane-bound proteins undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis is initiated by shedding, and the remaining stubs are further processed by intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs). Neuregulin 1 type III (NRG1 type III) is a major physiological substrate of β-secretase (β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)). BACE1-mediated cleavage is required to allow signaling of NRG1 type III. Because of the hairpin nature of NRG1 type III, two membrane-bound stubs with a type 1 and a type 2 orientation are generated by proteolytic processing. We demonstrate that these stubs are substrates for three I-CLiPs. The type 1-oriented stub is further cleaved by γ-secretase at an ϵ-like site five amino acids N-terminal to the C-terminal membrane anchor and at a γ-like site in the middle of the transmembrane domain. The ϵ-cleavage site is only one amino acid N-terminal to a Val/Leu substitution associated with schizophrenia. The mutation reduces generation of the NRG1 type III β-peptide as well as reverses signaling. Moreover, it affects the cleavage precision of γ-secretase at the γ-site similar to certain Alzheimer disease-associated mutations within the amyloid precursor protein. The type 2-oriented membrane-retained stub of NRG1 type III is further processed by signal peptide peptidase-like proteases SPPL2a and SPPL2b. Expression of catalytically inactive aspartate mutations as well as treatment with 2,2'-(2-oxo-1,3-propanediyl)bis[(phenylmethoxy)carbonyl]-l-leucyl-l-leucinamide ketone inhibits formation of N-terminal intracellular domains and the corresponding secreted C-peptide. Thus, NRG1 type III is the first protein substrate that is not only cleaved by multiple sheddases but is also processed by three different I-CLiPs. PMID:26574544

  8. Nuclei growth kinetics during the nucleation of gold on UHV-cleaved mica substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of crystalline sizes during nucleation of gold on mica surfaces cleaved in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) reveal the presence of symmetric, sharply peaked distributions which flatten and broaden with increasing nucleation time. When the number density of nuclei increases, the growth rate is suppressed. The time taken to reach a given size increases with increasing temperature when the nuclei are growing as isolated particles. When the nuclei are spaced so far that their diffusion fields overlap, then the time taken to reach a given size decreases with increasing temperature.

  9. Laser-damage processes in cleaved and polished CaF{sub 2} at 248nm

    SciTech Connect

    Reichling, M.; Gogoll, S.; Stenzel, S.

    1996-12-31

    Single-shot irradiation of single crystal CaF{sub 2} with 248nm/14ns laser light results in various degrees of degradation and damage depending on the applied laser fluence. Phenomena range from subtle, non-topographic surface modification only detectable by secondary electrons of scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) over cracking along crystallographic directions to the ablation of crystalline material. Significant differences are found for cleaved and polished surfaces. Findings from SEM investigations, in-situ photoacoustic mirage measurements and visual inspection of irradiated samples form a comprehensive picture of the stages of laser-induced damage.

  10. Hepatitis A Virus 3C Protease Cleaves NEMO To Impair Induction of Beta Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Wei, Dahai; Zhang, Huan; Luo, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-01-01

    NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) is a bridging adaptor indispensable for viral activation of interferon (IFN) antiviral response. Herein, we show that hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C protease (3Cpro) cleaves NEMO at the Q304 residue, negating its signaling adaptor function and abrogating viral induction of IFN-β synthesis via the retinoic acid-inducible gene I/melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (RIG-I/MDA5) and Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) pathways. NEMO cleavage and IFN antagonism, however, were lost upon ablation of the catalytic activity of 3Cpro. These data describe a novel immune evasion mechanism of HAV. PMID:24920812

  11. 1Surface structure of cleaved (001) USB2 single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2crystals cleave on the (00 I) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most ofthe density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography only cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

  12. Study of the effects of polishing, etching, cleaving, and water leaching on the UV laser damage of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiyama, J.; Genin, F.Y.; Salleo, A.; Thomas, I.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Sheehan, L.M.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Camp, D.W.

    1997-12-23

    A damage morphology study was performed with a 355 nm Nd:YAG laser on synthetic UV-grade fused silica to determine the effects of post- polish chemical etching on laser-induced damage, compare damage morphologies of cleaved and polished surfaces, and understand the effects of the hydrolyzed surface layer and waste-crack interactions. The samples were polished , then chemically etched in buffered HF solution to remove 45,90,135, and 180 nm of surface material. Another set of samples was cleaved and soaked in boiling distilled water for 1 second and 1 hour. All the samples were irradiated at damaging fluencies and characterized by Normarski optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Damage was initiated as micro-pits on both input and output surfaces of the polished fused silica sample. At higher fluencies, the micro-pits generated cracks on the surface. Laser damage of the polished surface showed significant trace contamination levels within a 50 nm surface layer. Micro-pit formation also appeared after irradiating cleaved fused silica surfaces at damaging fluences. Linear damage tracks corresponding cleaving tracks were often observed on cleaved surfaces. Soaking cleaved samples in water produced wide laser damage tracks.

  13. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  14. Specialization of the DNA-Cleaving Activity of a Group I Ribozyme Through In Vitro Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Joyce; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    In an earlier study, an in vitro evolution procedure was applied to a large population of variants of the Tetrahymena group 1 ribozyme to obtain individuals with a 10(exp 5)-fold improved ability to cleave a target single-stranded DNA substrate under simulated physiological conditions. The evolved ribozymes also showed a twofold improvement, compared to the wild-type, in their ability to cleave a single-stranded RNA substrate. Here, we report continuation of the in vitro evolution process using a new selection strategy to achieve both enhanced DNA and diminished RNA-cleavage activity. Our strategy combines a positive selection for DNA cleavage with a negative selection against RNA binding. After 36 "generations" of in vitro evolution, the evolved population showed an approx. 100-fold increase in the ratio of DNA to RNA-cleavage activity. Site-directed mutagenesis experiment confirmed the selective advantage of two covarying mutations within the catalytic core of ribozyme that are largely responsible for this modified behavior. The population of ribozymes has now undergone a total of 63 successive generations of evolution, resulting in an average 28 mutations relative to the wild-type that are responsible for the altered phenotype.

  15. Evolving optical second-harmonic anisotropy at the cleaved Bi2Se3 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yong; Green, Avery; Diebold, Alain

    Bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) is a centrosymmetric topological insulator with conducting surface states. The surface states have been studied by various electrical and optical techniques in air, but ambience effects and surface aging have not been adequately addressed. Optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) is a suitable probe for the Bi2Se3 surface because SHG arises from symmetry breaking at the surface and thus should detect surface states preferentially over bulk states. However, a strong time dependence of SHG is often observed, hampering the detection and investigation of the surface states. Here we find a new phenomenon in which the major and minor intensity lobes of a measured rotational-anisotropy SHG pattern from a cleaved Bi2Se3 (111) surface can significantly change with time and eventually switch their amplitudes. This switching provides a means for tracking the progress of surface oxidation inside a quintuple layer of Bi2Se3. We also perform pump-probe SHG experiments, comparatively on freshly cleaved and oxidized Bi2Se3 surfaces, to study charge dynamics at the oxide/Bi2Se3 interface and to detect spin polarization of photoexcited surface states in the Bi2Se3 topological insulator. This work was supported by the SRC NRI Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration (INDEX).

  16. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo. PMID:27443638

  17. Sam68 is cleaved by caspases under apoptotic cell death induced by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Choi, Moo Hyun; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Pyo, Suhkneung; Yang, Kwang Hee

    2015-03-01

    The RNA-binding protein Sam68, a mitotic substrate of tyrosine kinases, has been reported to participate in the cell cycle, apoptosis, and signaling. In particular, overexpression of Sam68 protein is known to suppress cell growth and cell cycle progression in NIH3T3 cells. Although Sam68 is involved in many cellular activities, the function of Sam68, especially in response to apoptotic stimulation, is not well understood. In this study, we found that Sam68 protein is cleaved in immune cells undergoing apoptosis induced by γ-radiation. Moreover, we found that Sam68 cleavage was induced by apoptotic stimuli containing γ-radiation in a caspase-dependent manner. In particular, we showed that activated casepase-3, 7, 8 and 9 can directly cleave Sam68 protein through in vitro protease cleavage assay. Finally, we found that the knockdown of Sam68 attenuated γ-radiation-induced cell death and growth suppression. Conclusively, the cleavage of Sam68 is a new indicator for the cell damaging effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:25666188

  18. Quantum Hall effect at a tunably sharp cleaved-edge potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Grayson, M.; Steinke, L.; Uccelli, E.; Koblmueller, G.; Bichler, M.; Abstreiter, G.; Schmult, S.; Dietsche, W.

    2010-03-01

    We study magnetotransport in the quantum Hall (QH) regime of a two-dimensional electron system with an epitaxially overgrown sharp cleaved-edge. A thick insulating barrier is overgrown at the cleaved-edge followed by a doped layer, serving as a side gate which can control depletion or accumulation at the sharp edge, hence can convert a sharp edge into a soft edge by changing the gate bias. This geometry leads to a tunable edge potential with either the standard incompressible strips in the ``soft edge'' limit, or thin or vanishing incompressible strips in the ``sharp edge'' limit. DC magnetotransport measurements show evidence of a longitudinal resistance minimum whose width depends on the current direction. This experimental result is consistent with recent theory on the role of edge potentials in defining the QH in small samples [1]. Size effect and gate bias dependence are studied. We also report an unexplained magnetic field hysteresis at the high field side of filling factors ν=1, 2, 3, 4 in the limit of negative side-gate bias.[4pt] [1] A. Siddiki, Euro. Phys. Lett. 87, 17008(2009)

  19. Precision UV laser scribing for cleaving mirror facets of GaN-based laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, O.; Kang, J.-H.; Spevak, M.; Zeimer, U.; Einfeldt, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser scribing with a nanosecond-pulsed UV laser operating at 355 nm was used to create precise perforation for die separation of GaN-based laser diodes. Machining depth of single- and multiple-pass scribing was investigated. For pulse energies between 1 and 45 µJ at a pulse repetition frequency of 20 kHz and single scan at 100 mm/min, scribe depths from 15 to 180 µm were obtained. Processing parameters were adjusted to minimize the formation of microcracks due to laser-induced local heating. By using the laser skip-and-scribe technique, the propagation of the cleavage plane could be controlled, irregular breaking could be minimized, and die yield could be improved. Smooth mirror facets with low density of terraces were formed by cleaving. In the vicinity of the laser-treated zone, no detrimental effects on the crystal quality of the multi-quantum wells could be detected by cathodoluminescence. The electro-optical characteristics of broad-area laser diodes fabricated by the laser-assisted process were similar to the ones fabricated using the conventional diamond-tip edge-scribing technique that suffers from low die yield. Our results demonstrate that nanosecond-pulsed UV laser scribing followed by cleaving is a powerful technique for the formation of mirror facets of GaN-based laser diodes.

  20. Study of surface recombination on cleaved and passivated edges of Si detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Vaitkus, J. V.; Fadeyev, V.; Ely, S.; Galloway, Z.; F-W Sadrozinski, H.; Christophersen, M.; Phlips, B. F.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S.

    2016-03-01

    The effectiveness of the passivation of a cleaved boundary of large area strip detectors has been studied by using Al2O3 formed by atomic layer deposition technology for p-Si structures and Si x N y grown on n-Si by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The parameters of bulk and surface recombinations have been examined in a contactless mode implemented through analysis of the microwave-probed photoconductivity transients. Rather efficient and reproducible passivation, revealed through the reduction of surface recombination velocities from ˜2 × 104 to 5 × 103 cm s-1 for n-Si and from ˜2 × 104 to 3 × 102 cm s-1 for p-Si samples, has been obtained. The existence of trapping centres together with recombination defects has been revealed at the cleaved interface within the passivating layer. It has been revealed that the impact of surface recombination is negligible when bulk radiation defects are dominant in samples irradiated with fluences >1014 neq cm-2.

  1. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo. PMID:27443638

  2. High-nuclearity homometallic iron and nickel clusters: Fe22 and Ni24 complexes from the use of N-methyldiethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Foguet-Albiol, Dolos; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2005-09-14

    The use of N-methyldiethanolamine (mdaH2) in reactions with Fe(III) and Ni(II) sources has led to Fe22 and Ni24 products; the clusters are the highest and second-highest, respectively, homometallic clusters for these metals to date, and possess S = 0 and S = 6 ground states, respectively. PMID:16113722

  3. Thrombin-cleaved Fragments of Osteopontin Are Overexpressed in Malignant Glial Tumors and Provide a Molecular Niche with Survival Advantage*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yasuto; Shao, Zhifei; Sharif, Shadi; Du, Xiao-Yan; Myles, Timothy; Merchant, Milton; Harsh, Griffith; Glantz, Michael; Recht, Lawrence; Morser, John; Leung, Lawrence L. K.

    2013-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN), which is highly expressed in malignant glioblastoma (GBM), possesses inflammatory activity modulated by proteolytic cleavage by thrombin and plasma carboxypeptidase B2 (CPB2) at a highly conserved cleavage site. Full-length OPN (OPN-FL) was elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from all cancer patients compared with noncancer patients. However, thrombin-cleaved OPN (OPN-R) and thrombin/CPB2-double-cleaved OPN (OPN-L) levels were markedly increased in GBM and non-GBM gliomas compared with systemic cancer and noncancer patients. Cleaved OPN constituted ∼23 and ∼31% of the total OPN in the GBM and non-GBM CSF samples, respectively. OPN-R was also elevated in GBM tissues. Thrombin-antithrombin levels were highly correlated with cleaved OPN, but not OPN-FL, suggesting that the cleaved OPN fragments resulted from increased thrombin and CPB2 in this extracellular compartment. Levels of VEGF and CCL4 were increased in CSF of GBM and correlated with the levels of cleaved OPN. GBM cell lines were more adherent to OPN-R and OPN-L than OPN-FL. Adhesion to OPN altered gene expression, in particular genes involved with cellular processes, cell cycle regulation, death, and inflammation. OPN and its cleaved forms promoted motility of U-87 MG cells and conferred resistance to apoptosis. Although functional mutation of the RGD motif in OPN largely abolished these functions, OPNRAA-R regained significant cell binding and signaling function, suggesting that the SVVYGLR motif in OPN-R may substitute for the RGD motif if the latter becomes inaccessible. OPN cleavage contributes to GBM development by allowing more cells to bind in niches where they acquire anti-apoptotic properties. PMID:23204518

  4. Complexes of type C6H7+.L (L = N2 and CO2) studied by explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botschwina, Peter; Oswald, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    Complexes of the benzenium ion (C_6 H_7^ +) with N2 or CO2 have been studied by explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory at the CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a, b) level [T. B. Adler et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007), 10.1063/1.2817618] and the double-hybrid density functional B2PLYP-D [T. Schwabe and S. Grimme, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9, 3397 (2007), 10.1039/b704725h]. Improved harmonic vibrational wavenumbers for C_6 H_7^ + have been obtained by CCSD(T*)-F12a calculations with the VTZ-F12 basis set. Combining them with previous B2PLYP-D anharmonic contributions we arrive at anharmonic wavenumbers which are in excellent agreement with recent experimental data from p-H2 matrix isolation IR spectroscopy [M. Bahou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154304 (2012), 10.1063/1.3703502]. The energetically most favourable conformer of C_6 H_7^ +.N2 shows a π-bonded structure similar to C_6 H_7^ +.Rg (Rg = Ne, Ar) [P. Botschwina and R. Oswald, J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 13664 (2011), 10.1021/jp207905t] with De ≈ 870 cm-1. For C_6 H_7^ +.CO2, a slightly lower energy is calculated for a conformer with the CO2 ligand lying in the ring-plane of the C_6 H_7^ + moiety (De ≈ 1508 cm-1). It may be discriminated from other conformers through a strong band predicted at 1218 cm-1, red-shifted by 21 cm-1 from the corresponding band of free C_6 H_7^ +.

  5. Complexes of type C6H7(+)·L (L = N2 and CO2) studied by explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Botschwina, Peter; Oswald, Rainer

    2012-05-28

    Complexes of the benzenium ion (C(6)H(7)(+)) with N(2) or CO(2) have been studied by explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory at the CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a, b) level [T. B. Adler et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007)] and the double-hybrid density functional B2PLYP-D [T. Schwabe and S. Grimme, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9, 3397 (2007)]. Improved harmonic vibrational wavenumbers for C(6)H(7)(+) have been obtained by CCSD(T∗)-F12a calculations with the VTZ-F12 basis set. Combining them with previous B2PLYP-D anharmonic contributions we arrive at anharmonic wavenumbers which are in excellent agreement with recent experimental data from p-H(2) matrix isolation IR spectroscopy [M. Bahou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154304 (2012)]. The energetically most favourable conformer of C(6)H(7)(+)·N(2) shows a π-bonded structure similar to C(6)H(7)(+)·Rg (Rg = Ne, Ar) [P. Botschwina and R. Oswald, J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 13664 (2011)] with D(e) ≈ 870 cm(-1). For C(6)H(7)(+)·CO(2), a slightly lower energy is calculated for a conformer with the CO(2) ligand lying in the ring-plane of the C(6)H(7)(+) moiety (D(e) ≈ 1508 cm(-1)). It may be discriminated from other conformers through a strong band predicted at 1218 cm(-1), red-shifted by 21 cm(-1) from the corresponding band of free C(6)H(7)(+). PMID:22667554

  6. Architecture of the Yeast Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery: THE SUB-COMPLEX FORMED BY THE IRON DONOR, Yfh1 PROTEIN, AND THE SCAFFOLD, Isu1 PROTEIN.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, Wasantha; Gakh, Oleksandr; Galeano, Belinda K; Smith, Douglas Y; Söderberg, Christopher A G; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-05-01

    The biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters is a vital process involving the delivery of elemental iron and sulfur to scaffold proteins via molecular interactions that are still poorly defined. We reconstituted a stable, functional complex consisting of the iron donor, Yfh1 (yeast frataxin homologue 1), and the Fe-S cluster scaffold, Isu1, with 1:1 stoichiometry, [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction of this complex at a resolution of ∼17 Å. In addition, via chemical cross-linking, limited proteolysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified protein-protein interaction surfaces within the complex. The data together reveal that [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 is a roughly cubic macromolecule consisting of one symmetric Isu1 trimer binding on top of one symmetric Yfh1 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Furthermore, molecular modeling suggests that two subunits of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1, may bind symmetrically on top of two adjacent Isu1 trimers in a manner that creates two putative [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly centers. In each center, conserved amino acids known to be involved in sulfur and iron donation by Nfs1 and Yfh1, respectively, are in close proximity to the Fe-S cluster-coordinating residues of Isu1. We suggest that this architecture is suitable to ensure concerted and protected transfer of potentially toxic iron and sulfur atoms to Isu1 during Fe-S cluster assembly. PMID:26941001

  7. The food choice at work study: effectiveness of complex workplace dietary interventions on dietary behaviours and diet-related disease risk - study protocol for a clustered controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary behaviour interventions have the potential to reduce diet-related disease. Ample opportunity exists to implement these interventions in the workplace. The overall aim is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of complex dietary interventions focused on environmental dietary modification alone or in combination with nutrition education in large manufacturing workplace settings. Methods/design A clustered controlled trial involving four large multinational manufacturing workplaces in Cork will be conducted. The complex intervention design has been developed using the Medical Research Council’s framework and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines and will be reported using the TREND statement for the transparent reporting of evaluations with non-randomized designs. It will draw on a soft paternalistic “nudge” theoretical perspective. Nutrition education will include three elements: group presentations, individual nutrition consultations and detailed nutrition information. Environmental dietary modification will consist of five elements: (a) restriction of fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt, (b) increase in fibre, fruit and vegetables, (c) price discounts for whole fresh fruit, (d) strategic positioning of healthier alternatives and (e) portion size control. No intervention will be offered in workplace A (control). Workplace B will receive nutrition education. Workplace C will receive nutrition education and environmental dietary modification. Workplace D will receive environmental dietary modification alone. A total of 448 participants aged 18 to 64 years will be selected randomly. All permanent, full-time employees, purchasing at least one main meal in the workplace daily, will be eligible. Changes in dietary behaviours, nutrition knowledge, health status with measurements obtained at baseline and at intervals of 3 to 4 months, 7 to 9 months and 13 to 16 months will be recorded. A process

  8. Increasing chlamydia screening tests in general practice: a modified Zelen prospective Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial evaluating a complex intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Hogan, Angela H; Ricketts, Ellie J; Wallace, Louise; Oliver, Isabel; Campbell, Rona; Kalwij, Sebastian; O'Connell, Elaine; Charlett, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if a structured complex intervention increases opportunistic chlamydia screening testing of patients aged 15–24 years attending English general practitioner (GP) practices. Methods A prospective, Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial with a modified Zelen design involving 160 practices in South West England in 2010. The intervention was based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). It comprised of practice-based education with up to two additional contacts to increase the importance of screening to GP staff and their confidence to offer tests through skill development (including videos). Practical resources (targets, posters, invitation cards, computer reminders, newsletters including feedback) aimed to actively influence social cognitions of staff, increasing their testing intention. Results Data from 76 intervention and 81 control practices were analysed. In intervention practices, chlamydia screening test rates were 2.43/100 15–24-year-olds registered preintervention, 4.34 during intervention and 3.46 postintervention; controls testing rates were 2.61/100 registered patients prior intervention, 3.0 during intervention and 2.82 postintervention. During the intervention period, testing in intervention practices was 1.76 times as great (CI 1.24 to 2.48) as controls; this persisted for 9 months postintervention (1.57 times as great, CI 1.27 to 2.30). Chlamydia infections detected increased in intervention practices from 2.1/1000 registered 15–24-year-olds prior intervention to 2.5 during the intervention compared with 2.0 and 2.3/1000 in controls (Estimated Rate Ratio intervention versus controls 1.4 (CI 1.01 to 1.93). Conclusions This complex intervention doubled chlamydia screening tests in fully engaged practices. The modified Zelen design gave realistic measures of practice full engagement (63%) and efficacy of this educational intervention in general practice; it should be used more often. Trial registration The trial was

  9. Effectiveness of a primary care based complex intervention to promote self-management in patients presenting psychiatric symptoms: study protocol of a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety, Depression and Somatoform (ADSom) disorders are highly prevalent in primary care. Managing these disorders is time-consuming and requires strong commitment on behalf of the General Practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, the management of these patients is restricted by the high patient turnover rates in primary care practices, especially in the German health care system. In order to address this problem, we implement a complex, low-threshold intervention by an Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) using a mixture of case management and counseling techniques to promote self-management in these patients. Here we present the protocol of the “Self-Management Support for Anxiety, Depression and Somatoform Disorders in Primary Care” (SMADS)-Study. Methods/Design The study is designed as a cluster-randomized controlled trial, comparing an intervention and a control group of 10 primary care practices in each case. We will compare the effectiveness of the intervention applied by an APN with usual GP-care. A total of 340 participants will be enrolled in the study, 170 in either arm. We use the Patient Health Questionnaire-German version (PHQ-D) as a screening tool for psychiatric symptoms, including patients with a score above 5 on any of the three symptom scales. The primary outcome is self-efficacy, measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE), here used as a proxy for self-management. As secondary outcomes we include the PHQ-D symptom load and questionnaires regarding coping with illness and health related quality of life. Outcome assessments will be applied 8 weeks and 12 months after the baseline assessment. Discussion The SMADS-study evaluates a complex, low threshold intervention for ambulatory patients presenting ADSom-symptoms, empowering them to better manage their condition, as well as improving their motivation to engage in self-help and health-seeking behaviour. The benefit of the intervention will be substantiated, when patients can enhance

  10. A Cluster of Four Homologous Small RNAs Modulates C1 Metabolism and the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides under Various Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Billenkamp, Fabian; Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, regulatory RNAs play an important role in the regulation and balancing of many cellular processes and stress responses. Among these regulatory RNAs, trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) are of particular interest since one sRNA can lead to the regulation of multiple target mRNAs. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, several sRNAs are induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the functional characterization of four homologous sRNAs that are cotranscribed with the gene for the conserved hypothetical protein RSP_6037, a genetic arrangement described for only a few sRNAs until now. Each of the four sRNAs is characterized by two stem-loops that carry CCUCCUCCC motifs in their loops. They are induced under oxidative stress, as well as by various other stress conditions, and were therefore renamed here sRNAs CcsR1 to CcsR4 (CcsR1–4) for conserved CCUCCUCCC motif stress-induced RNAs 1 to 4. Increased CcsR1–4 expression decreases the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism or encoding components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex either directly by binding to their target mRNAs or indirectly. One of the CcsR1–4 target mRNAs encodes the transcriptional regulator FlhR, an activator of glutathione-dependent methanol/formaldehyde metabolism. Downregulation of this glutathione-dependent pathway increases the pool of glutathione, which helps to counteract oxidative stress. The FlhR-dependent downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces a primary target of reactive oxygen species and reduces aerobic electron transport, a main source of reactive oxygen species. Our findings reveal a previously unknown strategy used by bacteria to counteract oxidative stress. IMPORTANCE Phototrophic organisms have to cope with photo-oxidative stress due to the function of chlorophylls as photosensitizers for the formation of singlet oxygen. Our study assigns an important role in photo-oxidative stress resistance to a

  11. Rhenium Complexes and Clusters Supported on c-Al2O3: Effects of Rhenium Oxidation State and Rhenium Cluster Size on Catalytic Activity for n-butane Hydrogenolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo Lapidus, R.; Gates, B

    2009-01-01

    Supported metals prepared from H{sub 3}Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were treated under conditions that led to various rhenium structures on the support and were tested as catalysts for n-butane conversion in the presence of H{sub 2} in a flow reactor at 533 K and 1 atm. After use, two samples were characterized by X-ray absorption edge positions of approximately 5.6 eV (relative to rhenium metal), indicating that the rhenium was cationic and essentially in the same average oxidation state in each. But the Re-Re coordination numbers found by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (2.2 and 5.1) show that the clusters in the two samples were significantly different in average nuclearity despite their indistinguishable rhenium oxidation states. Spectra of a third sample after catalysis indicate approximately Re{sub 3} clusters, on average, and an edge position of 4.5 eV. Thus, two samples contained clusters approximated as Re{sub 3} (on the basis of the Re-Re coordination number), on average, with different average rhenium oxidation states. The data allow resolution of the effects of rhenium oxidation state and cluster size, both of which affect the catalytic activity; larger clusters and a greater degree of reduction lead to increased activity.

  12. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE DISCOVERY OF A z = 3.9 MULTIPLY IMAGED GALAXY BEHIND THE COMPLEX CLUSTER LENS WARPS J1415.1+36 AT z = 1.026

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Barbary, K.; Goldhaber, G.; Hennawi, J. F.; Morokuma, T.; Aldering, G.; Faccioli, L.; Amanullah, R.; Brodwin, M.; Connolly, N. V.; Dawson, K. S.; Doi, M.; Ihara, Y.; Fadeyev, V.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gladders, M. D.; Jee, M. J.; Kowalski, M.; Konishi, K.

    2009-12-10

    We report the discovery of a multiply lensed Lyalpha emitter at z = 3.90 behind the massive cluster WARPS J1415.1+3612 at z = 1.026. Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope using the Advanced Camera for Surveys reveal a complex lensing system that produces a prominent, highly magnified arc and a triplet of smaller arcs grouped tightly around a spectroscopically confirmed cluster member. Spectroscopic observations using the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph on Subaru confirm strong Lyalpha emission in the source galaxy and provide the redshifts for more than 21 cluster members with a velocity dispersion of 807 +- 185 km s{sup -1}. Assuming a singular isothermal sphere profile, the mass within the Einstein ring (7.13 +- 0.''38) corresponds to a central velocity dispersion of 686{sup +15} {sub -19} km s{sup -1} for the cluster, consistent with the value estimated from cluster member redshifts. Our mass profile estimate from combining strong lensing and dynamical analyses is in good agreement with both X-ray and weak lensing results.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum cysteine protease falcipain-2 cleaves erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins at late stages of parasite development.

    PubMed

    Hanspal, Manjit; Dua, Meenakshi; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Chishti, Athar H; Mizuno, Akiko

    2002-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-derived cysteine protease falcipain-2 cleaves host erythrocyte hemoglobin at acidic pH and specific components of the membrane skeleton at neutral pH. Analysis of stage-specific expression of these 2 proteolytic activities of falcipain-2 shows that hemoglobin-hydrolyzing activity is maximum in early trophozoites and declines rapidly at late stages, whereas the membrane skeletal protein hydrolyzing activity is markedly increased at the late trophozoite and schizont stages. Among the erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins, ankyrin and protein 4.1 are cleaved by native and recombinant falcipain-2 near their C-termini. To identify the precise peptide sequence at the hydrolysis site of protein 4.1, we used a recombinant construct of protein 4.1 as substrate followed by MALDI-MS analysis of the cleaved product. We show that falcipain-2-mediated cleavage of protein 4.1 occurs immediately after lysine 437, which lies within a region of the spectrin-actin-binding domain critical for erythrocyte membrane stability. A 16-mer peptide containing the cleavage site completely inhibited the enzyme activity and blocked falcipain-2-induced fragmentation of erythrocyte ghosts. Based on these results, we propose that falcipain-2 cleaves hemoglobin in the acidic food vacuole at the early trophozoite stage, whereas it cleaves specific components of the red cell skeleton at the late trophozoite and schizont stages. It is the proteolysis of skeletal proteins that causes membrane instability, which, in turn, facilitates parasite release in vivo. PMID:12130521

  14. Immunoexpression of cleaved caspase-3 shows lower apoptotic area indices in lip carcinomas than in intraoral cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEITE, Ana Flávia Schueler de Assumpção; BERNARDO, Vagner Gonçalves; BUEXM, Luisa Aguirre; da FONSECA, Eliene Carvalho; da SILVA, Licínio Esmeraldo; BARROSO, Danielle Resende Camisasca; LOURENÇO, Simone de Queiroz Chaves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study aimed to evaluate apoptosis by assessing cleaved caspase-3 immunoexpression in hyperplastic, potentially malignant disorder (PMD), and malignant tumors in intraoral and lower lip sites. Material and Methods A retrospective study using paraffin blocks with tissues from patients with inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (IFH), actinic cheilitis, oral leukoplakia, lower lip and intraoral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was performed. The tissues were evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis with anti-cleaved caspase-3 antibody. Apoptotic area index was then correlated with lesion type. Results From 120 lesions assessed, 55 (46%) were cleaved caspase-3-positive. The SCC samples (n=40) had the highest apoptotic area indices (n=35; 87.5%). Significant differences were detected between SCCs and PMDs (p=0.0003), as well as SCCs and IFHs (p=0.001), regarding caspase-3 immunopositivity. Carcinomas of the lower lip had lower apoptotic area indices than intraoral cancer (p=0.0015). Conclusions Cleaved caspase-3 immunoexpression showed differences in oral SCCs and PMDs and demonstrated a distinct role of apoptosis in carcinogenesis of intraoral and lower lip cancer. In future, the expression of cleaved caspase-3 with other target molecules in oral cancer may be helpful in delineating the prognosis and treatment of these tumors. PMID:27556207

  15. Cyclostomes Lack Clustered Protocadherins.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Vydianathan; Yu, Wei-Ping; Pillai, Nisha E; Lian, Michelle M; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2016-02-01

    The brain, comprising billions of neurons and intricate neural networks, is arguably the most complex organ in vertebrates. The diversity of individual neurons is fundamental to the neuronal network complexity and the overall function of the vertebrate brain. In jawed vertebrates, clustered protocadherins provide the molecular basis for this neuronal diversity, through stochastic and combinatorial expression of their various isoforms in individual neurons. Based on analyses of transcriptomes from the Japanese lamprey brain and sea lamprey embryos, genome assemblies of the two lampreys, and brain expressed sequence tags of the inshore hagfish, we show that extant jawless vertebrates (cyclostomes) lack the clustered protocadherins. Our findings indicate that the clustered protocadherins originated from a nonclustered protocadherin in the jawed vertebrate ancestor, after the two rounds of whole-genome duplication. In the absence of clustered protocadherins, cyclostomes might have evolved novel molecules or mechanisms for generating neuronal diversity which remains to be discovered. PMID:26545918

  16. A two-electron shell game: Intermediates of the extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Extradiol catechol ring-cleaving dioxygenases function by binding both the organic substrate and O2 at a divalent metal center in the active site. They have proven to be a particularly versatile group of enzymes with which to study the O2 activation process. Here, recent studies of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) are summarized with the objective of showing how Nature can utilize the enzyme structure and the properties of the metal and the substrate to select among many possible chemical paths to achieve both specificity and efficiency. Possible intermediates in the mechanism have been trapped by swapping active site metals, introducing active site amino acid substituted variants, and using substrates with different electron donating capacities. While each of these intermediates could form part of a viable reaction pathway, kinetic measurements significantly limit the likely candidates. Structural, kinetic, spectroscopic and computational analysis of the various intermediates shed light on how catalytic efficiency can be achieved. PMID:24615282

  17. A recombinant RNA bacteriophage system to identify functionally important nucleotides in a self-cleaving ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA bacteriophages like Qbeta and MS2 are well known for their high mutation rate, short infection cycle and strong selection against foreign inserts. The hammerhead ribozyme (HHRz) is a small self-cleaving RNA molecule whose active residues have previously been identified by mutational analysis of each individual base. Here the functionally important bases of HHRz were determined in a single screening experiment by inserting the HHRz into the genome of MS2. Findings The minimal HHRz of satellite Tobacco ringspot virus was cloned into the genome of RNA bacteriophage MS2. Sequence analysis of the surviving phages revealed that the majority had acquired single base-substitutions that apparently inactivated the HHRz. The positions of these substitutions exactly matched that of the previously determined core residues of the HHRz. Conclusions Natural selection against a ribozyme in the genome of MS2 can be used to quickly identify nucleotides required for self-cleavage. PMID:24946926

  18. Hole Transport and Spin Effects in Cleaved-Edge-Overgrowth Quantum Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulpizio, Joseph; Quay, Charis; de Picciotto, Rafi; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2009-03-01

    Transport measurements on ballistic GaAs electron wires have revealed a rich set of phenomena associated with one-dimensional (1D) quantum systems. Studies of transport in hole systems are a natural extension of these experiments due to the enhanced effective mass, g-factor, and spin-orbit coupling of holes over their electron counterparts. However, only recently has the creation of ballistic hole wire devices been possible due to breakthroughs in molecular beam epitaxy using the cleaved-edge-overgrowth (CEO) technique. We present measurements of hole transport in CEO GaAs quantum wires in magnetic field in a dilution refrigerator. Based on a simple model, we extract the g-factor for different field orientations, and also discuss evidence for observing spin-orbit coupling in a 1D system.

  19. An Efficient Lanthanide-Dependent DNAzyme Cleaving 2'-5'-Linked RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-05-17

    RNA can form two types of linkage. In addition to the predominant 3'-5' linkage, 2'-5'-linked RNA is also important in biology, medicine, and prebiotic studies. Here, in vitro selection was used to isolate a DNAzyme that specifically cleaves 2'-5' RNA by using Ce(3+) as the metal cofactor, but leaves the 3'-5' counterpart intact. This Ce5 DNAzyme requires trivalent light lanthanide ions and shows a rate of 0.16 min(-1) in the presence of 10 μm Ce(3+) ; the activity decreases with heavier lanthanide ions. This is the fastest DNAzyme reported for this reaction, and it might enable applications in chemical biology. As a proof-of-concept, using this DNAzyme, the reactions between phosphorothioate-modified RNA and strongly thiophilic metals (Hg(2+) and Tl(3+) ) were studied as a function of pH. PMID:26957420

  20. Crystal growth of Bi2Te3 and noble cleaved (0001) surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Golyashov, V. A.; Kokh, K. A.; Korolkov, I. V.; Kozhukhov, A. S.; Kruchinin, V. N.; Loshkarev, I. D.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Romanyuk, K. N.; Tereshchenko, O. E.

    2016-04-01

    A high quality Bi2Te3 crystal has been grown by Bridgman method with the use of rotating heat field. The phase purity and bulk structural quality of the crystal have been verified by XRD analysis and rocking curve observation. The atomically smooth Bi2Te3(0001) surface with an excellent crystallographic quality is formed by cleavage in the air. The chemical and microstructural properties of the surface have been evaluated with RHEED, AFM, STM, SE and XPS. The Bi2Te3(0001) cleaved surface is formed by atomically smooth terraces with the height of the elemental step of ~1.04±0.1 nm, as estimated by AFM. There is no surface oxidation process detected over a month keeping in the air at normal conditions, as shown by comparative core level photoelectron spectroscopy.

  1. A two-electron-shell game: intermediates of the extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Andrew J; Lipscomb, John D; Que, Lawrence

    2014-06-01

    Extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases function by binding both the organic substrate and O2 at a divalent metal center in the active site. They have proven to be a particularly versatile group of enzymes with which to study the O2 activation process. Here, recent studies of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase are summarized, showing how nature can utilize the enzyme structure and the properties of the metal and the substrate to select among many possible chemical paths to achieve both specificity and efficiency. Possible intermediates in the mechanism have been trapped by swapping active-site metals, introducing active-site amino acid substituted variants, and using substrates with different electron-donating capacities. Although each of these intermediates could form part of a viable reaction pathway, kinetic measurements significantly limit the likely candidates. Structural, kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational analyses of the various intermediates shed light on how catalytic efficiency can be achieved. PMID:24615282

  2. Ethenolysis: A Green Catalytic Tool to Cleave Carbon-Carbon Double Bonds.

    PubMed

    Bidange, Johan; Fischmeister, Cédric; Bruneau, Christian

    2016-08-22

    Remarkable innovations have been made in the field of olefin metathesis due to the design and preparation of new catalysts. Ethenolysis, which is cross-metathesis with ethylene, represents one catalytic transformation that has been used with the purpose of cleaving internal carbon-carbon double bonds. The objectives were either the ring opening of cyclic olefins to produce dienes or the shortening of unsaturated hydrocarbon chains to degrade polymers or generate valuable shorter terminal olefins in a controlled manner. This Review summarizes several aspects of this reaction: the catalysts, their degradation in the presence of ethylene, some parameters driving their productivity, the side reactions, and the applications of ethenolysis in organic synthesis and in potential industrial applications. PMID:27359344

  3. Chromogranin A Is Preferentially Cleaved into Proangiogenic Peptides in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Mimma; Gasparri, Anna Maria; Colombo, Barbara; Curnis, Flavio; Girlanda, Stefania; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Calcinotto, Arianna; Sacchi, Angelina; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Ferrarini, Marina; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Bellone, Matteo; Tonon, Giovanni; Ciceri, Fabio; Marcatti, Magda; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Corti, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis has been postulated to be critical for the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, a neoplastic disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). Cleavage of the N- and C-terminal regions of circulating chromogranin A (CgA, CHGA), classically an antiangiogenic protein, can activate latent antiangiogenic and proangiogenic sites, respectively. In this study, we investigated the distribution of CgA-derived polypeptides in multiple myeloma patients and the subsequent implications for disease progression. We show that the ratio of pro/antiangiogenic forms of CgA is altered in multiple myeloma patients compared with healthy subjects and that this ratio is higher in BM plasma compared with peripheral plasma, suggesting enhanced local cleavage of the CgA C-terminal region. Enhanced cleavage correlated with increased VEGF and FGF2 BM plasma levels and BM microvascular density. Using the Vk*MYC mouse model of multiple myeloma, we further demonstrate that exogenously administered CgA was cleaved in favor of the proangiogenic form and was associated with increased microvessel density. Mechanistic studies revealed that multiple myeloma and proliferating endothelial cells can promote CgA C-terminal cleavage by activating the plasminogen activator/plasmin system. Moreover, cleaved and full-length forms could also counter balance the pro/antiangiogenic activity of each other in in vitro angiogenesis assays. These findings suggest that the CgA-angiogenic switch is activated in the BM of multiple myeloma patients and prompt further investigation of this CgA imbalance as a prognostic or therapeutic target. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1781-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26869462

  4. Synthesis, photochemical properties and DNA binding studies of dna cleaving agents based on chiral dipyridine dihydrodioxins salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamaev, Alexei

    Control of chemical reactions becomes especially challenging when chemical processes have to work within the complexity of biological environments. This is one of the reasons why the ability to design "caged" molecules with structure, reactivity, and biological activity that can be activated externally by light continues to draw significant attention, from both the practical and fundamental points of view. Possible applications of such molecules include design of molecular machines and switches, logic gate mimics, optical sensors, drug delivery systems, etc. Since "caged" molecules are of particular use for processes that occur in biochemical systems and in the environment, interesting light-sensitive systems, anti-cancer drugs, have been developed recently to control DNA cleavage. Caged molecules may interact with or bind with DNA and can be classified by their mechanism of action. Each of these classes of molecules has a different structure and interacts with DNA in a different way, but some molecules can combine several functionalities. The preponderance of caged molecules, anti-cancer drugs, capable of DNA cleavage or their metabolites incorporate Electron Transfer (ET) functionalities, which play important roles in physiological responses. These main groups include quinones (or phenolic precursors), metal complexes, aromatic nitro compounds (or reduced derivatives), and conjugated imines (or iminium species). Redox cycling with oxygen can occur giving rise to Oxidation Stress (OS) through generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) which can contribute to drug efficacy or can lead to undesirable toxicity. In some cases, ET results in interference with normal electron transport chains. In this work a series of caged molecules-chiral Pyrene Dihydridioxins (PDHD)-DNA chiral DNA intecalators and PDHD-metal complexes bearing masked o-quinone functionality activated through intramolecular ET were synthesized. The o-quinone release and intramolecular ET can be easily

  5. RasGAP Shields Akt from Deactivating Phosphatases in Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling but Loses This Ability Once Cleaved by Caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Widmann, Christian; Browaeys-Poly, Edith

    2015-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are involved in proliferative and differentiation physiological responses. Deregulation of FGFR-mediated signaling involving the Ras/PI3K/Akt and the Ras/Raf/ERK MAPK pathways is causally involved in the development of several cancers. The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module is a stress sensor switch. Under mild stress conditions, RasGAP is cleaved by caspase-3 at position 455. The resulting N-terminal fragment, called fragment N, stimulates anti-death signaling. When caspase-3 activity further increases, fragment N is cleaved at position 157. This generates a fragment, called N2, that no longer protects cells. Here, we investigated in Xenopus oocytes the impact of RasGAP and its fragments on FGF1-mediated signaling during G2/M cell cycle transition. RasGAP used its N-terminal Src homology 2 domain to bind FGFR once stimulated by FGF1, and this was necessary for the recruitment of Akt to the FGFR complex. Fragment N, which did not associate with the FGFR complex, favored FGF1-induced ERK stimulation, leading to accelerated G2/M transition. In contrast, fragment N2 bound the FGFR, and this inhibited mTORC2-dependent Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and ERK2 phosphorylation but not phosphorylation of Akt on Thr-308. This also blocked cell cycle progression. Inhibition of Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and entry into G2/M was relieved by PHLPP phosphatase inhibition. Hence, full-length RasGAP favors Akt activity by shielding it from deactivating phosphatases. This shielding was abrogated by fragment N2. These results highlight the role played by RasGAP in FGFR signaling and how graded stress intensities, by generating different RasGAP fragments, can positively or negatively impact this signaling. PMID:26109071

  6. The mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone Ssq1 facilitates Fe/S cluster transfer from Isu1 to Grx5 by complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Uzarska, Marta A.; Dutkiewicz, Rafal; Freibert, Sven-Andreas; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone Ssq1 plays a dedicated role in the maturation of iron–sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, an essential process of mitochondria. Similar to its bacterial orthologue HscA, Ssq1 binds to the scaffold protein Isu1, thereby facilitating dissociation of the newly synthesized Fe/S cluster on Isu1 and its transfer to target apoproteins. Here we use in vivo and in vitro approaches to show that Ssq1 also interacts with the monothiol glutaredoxin 5 (Grx5) at a binding site different from that of Isu1. Grx5 binding does not stimulate the ATPase activity of Ssq1 and is most pronounced for the ADP-bound form of Ssq1, which interacts with Isu1 most tightly. The vicinity of Isu1 and Grx5 on the Hsp70 chaperone facilitates rapid Fe/S cluster transfer from Isu1 to Grx5. Grx5 and its bound Fe/S cluster are required for maturation of all cellular Fe/S proteins, regardless of the type of bound Fe/S cofactor and subcellular localization. Hence Grx5 functions as a late-acting component of the core Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery linking the Fe/S cluster synthesis reaction on Isu1 with late assembly steps involving Fe/S cluster targeting to dedicated apoproteins. PMID:23615440

  7. Update on scribe-cleave-passivate (SCP) slim edge technology for silicon sensors: Automated processing and radiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, V.; Ely, S.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Christophersen, M.; Phlips, B. F.; Pellegrini, G.; Rafi, J. M.; Quirion, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Casse, G.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S.; Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Vaitkus, J. V.

    2014-11-01

    We pursue scribe-cleave-passivate (SCP) technology for making "slim edge" sensors. The goal is to reduce the inactive region at the periphery of the devices while maintaining their performance. In this paper we report on two aspects of the current efforts. The first one involves fabrication options for mass production. We describe the automated cleaving tests and a simplified version of SCP post-processing of n-type devices. Another aspect is the radiation resistance of the passivation. We report on the radiation tests of n- and p-type devices with protons and neutrons.

  8. Observation of a Metastable Periodic Structure for the (001) Surface of KTaO{sub 3} after Cleaving In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jaime A.; Akhadov, E. A.; Baker, Jeff; Boatner, L. A.; Bonart, D.; Flaherty, F. A.; Fritsch, J.; Safron, S. A.; Schro''der, U.; Skofronick, J. G.

    2001-05-21

    Helium atom diffraction experiments carried out under ultrahigh vacuum conditions on a freshly cleaved (001) surface of KTaO{sub 3} reveal metastable features which decay over a period of several hours. The initial He diffraction pattern contains large scattering intensity satellite peaks very close to the specular reflection beam. As time from cleaving elapses, the satellite intensities diminish virtually to zero while the specular intensity increases, and the diffraction pattern evolves into one consistent with the (1x1) bulk termination surface. The data are compared with model calculations for scattering from a series of terraces at two heights with a distribution of terrace lengths [Surf.Sci. 384, 15 (1997)].

  9. Caught in the act: the crystal structure of cleaved cathepsin L bound to the active site of Cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Piotr; Turk, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Cathepsin L is a ubiquitously expressed papain-like cysteine protease involved in the endosomal degradation of proteins and has numerous roles in physiological and pathological processes, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer. Insight into the specificity of cathepsin L is important for elucidating its physiological roles and drug discovery. To study interactions with synthetic ligands, we prepared a presumably inactive mutant and crystallized it. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure determined at 1.4 Å revealed that the cathepsin L molecule is cleaved, with the cleaved region trapped in the active site cleft of the neighboring molecule. Hence, the catalytic mutant demonstrated low levels of catalytic activity. PMID:26992470

  10. Stormy weather in galaxy clusters

    PubMed

    Burns

    1998-04-17

    Recent x-ray, optical, and radio observations coupled with particle and gas dynamics numerical simulations reveal an unexpectedly complex environment within clusters of galaxies, driven by ongoing accretion of matter from large-scale supercluster filaments. Mergers between clusters and continuous infall of dark matter and baryons from the cluster periphery produce long-lived "stormy weather" within the gaseous cluster atmosphere-shocks, turbulence, and winds of more than 1000 kilometers per second. This weather may be responsible for shaping a rich variety of extended radio sources, which in turn act as "barometers" and "anemometers" of cluster weather. PMID:9545210

  11. Application of Balanced Scorecard in the Evaluation of a Complex Health System Intervention: 12 Months Post Intervention Findings from the BHOMA Intervention: A Cluster Randomised Trial in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Mutale, Wilbroad; Stringer, Jeffrey; Chintu, Namwinga; Chilengi, Roma; Mwanamwenge, Margaret Tembo; Kasese, Nkatya; Balabanova, Dina; Spicer, Neil; Lewis, James; Ayles, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In many low income countries, the delivery of quality health services is hampered by health system-wide barriers which are often interlinked, however empirical evidence on how to assess the level and scope of these barriers is scarce. A balanced scorecard is a tool that allows for wider analysis of domains that are deemed important in achieving the overall vision of the health system. We present the quantitative results of the 12 months follow-up study applying the balanced scorecard approach in the BHOMA intervention with the aim of demonstrating the utility of the balanced scorecard in evaluating multiple building blocks in a trial setting. Methods The BHOMA is a cluster randomised trial that aims to strengthen the health system in three rural districts in Zambia. The intervention aims to improve clinical care quality by implementing practical tools that establish clear clinical care standards through intensive clinic implementations. This paper reports the findings of the follow-up health facility survey that was conducted after 12 months of intervention implementation. Comparisons were made between those facilities in the intervention and control sites. STATA version 12 was used for analysis. Results The study found significant mean differences between intervention(I) and control (C) sites in the following domains: Training domain (Mean I:C; 87.5.vs 61.1, mean difference 23.3, p = 0.031), adult clinical observation domain (mean I:C; 73.3 vs.58.0, mean difference 10.9, p = 0.02 ) and health information domain (mean I:C; 63.6 vs.56.1, mean difference 6.8, p = 0.01. There was no gender differences in adult service satisfaction. Governance and motivation scores did not differ between control and intervention sites. Conclusion This study demonstrates the utility of the balanced scorecard in assessing multiple elements of the health system. Using system wide approaches and triangulating data collection methods seems to be key to successful

  12. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  13. Genesis of a Cerium Oxide-Supported Gold Catalyst for CO Oxidation: Transformation of Mononuclear Gold Complexes into Clusters as Characterized by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Guerrero, V.; Lobo-Lapidus, R; Gates, B

    2009-01-01

    CeO{sub 2}-supported mononuclear gold species synthesized from Au(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(acac) catalyzed CO oxidation at 353 K, with a turnover frequency of 6.5 x 10{sup -3} molecules of CO (Au atom s){sup -1} at CO and O{sub 2} partial pressures of 1.0 and 0.5 kPa, respectively. As the catalyst functioned in a flow reactor, the activity increased markedly so that within about 10 h the conversion of CO had increased from about 1% to almost 100%. Activated catalyst samples were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and found to incorporate clusters of gold, which increased in size, undergoing reduction, with increasing time of operation. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrum of the catalyst used for the longest period was indistinguishable from that characterizing gold foil. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data characterizing the catalyst after the longest period of operation indicated the presence of clusters of approximately 30 Au atoms each, on average. The evidence that the catalytic activity increased as the clusters grew is contrasted with earlier reports pointing to increasing activity of supported gold clusters as they were made smallerin a cluster size range largely exceeding ours.

  14. Methane activation by cobalt cluster cations, Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=2-16): Reaction mechanisms and thermochemistry of cluster-CH{sub x} (x=0-3) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Citir, Murat; Liu Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-02-07

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=2-16) with CD{sub 4} are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-10 eV. The main products are hydride formation, Co{sub n}D{sup +}, dehydrogenation to form Co{sub n}CD{sub 2}{sup +}, and double dehydrogenation yielding Co{sub n}C{sup +}. These primary products decompose to form secondary and higher order products, Co{sub n}CD{sup +}, Co{sub n-1}D{sup +}, Co{sub n-1}C{sup +}, Co{sub n-1}CD{sup +}, and Co{sub n-1}CD{sub 2}{sup +} at higher energies. Adduct formation of Co{sub n}CD{sub 4}{sup +} is also observed for the largest cluster cations, n{>=}10. In general, the efficiencies of the single and double dehydrogenation processes increase with cluster size, although the hexamer cation shows a reduced reactivity compared to its neighbors. All reactions exhibit thresholds, and cross sections for the various primary and secondary reactions are analyzed to yield reaction thresholds from which bond energies for cobalt cluster cations to D, C, CD, CD{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} are determined. The relative magnitudes of these bond energies are consistent with simple bond order considerations. Bond energies for larger clusters rapidly reach relatively constant values, which are used to estimate the chemisorption energies of the C, CD, CD{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} molecular fragments to cobalt surfaces.

  15. Two EPR-detectable [4Fe-4S] clusters, N2a and N2b, are bound to the NuoI (TYKY) subunit of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Chevallet, Mireille; Dupuis, Alain; Issartel, Jean-Paul; Lunardi, Joël; van Belzen, Ronald; Albracht, Simon P J

    2003-03-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases (Complex I) contain a subunit, TYKY in the bovine enzyme and NuoI in the enzyme from Rhodobacter capsulatus, which is assumed to bind two [4Fe-4S] clusters because it contains two sets of conserved cysteine motifs similar to those found in the 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins. It was recently shown that the TYKY subunit is not an ordinary 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin, but has a unique amino acid sequence, which is only found in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases and certain membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases expected to be involved in redox-linked proton translocation [FEBS Lett. 485 (2000) 1]. We have generated a set of R. capsulatus mutants in which five out of the eight conserved cysteine residues in NuoI were replaced by other amino acids. The resulting mutants fell into three categories with virtually no, intermediate or quite normal Complex I activities. EPR-spectroscopic analysis of the membranes of the C67S and C106S mutants, two mutants belonging to the second and third group, respectively, showed a specific 50% decrease of the EPR signal attributed to cluster N2. It is concluded that the NuoI (TYKY) subunit binds two clusters N2, called N2a and N2b, which exhibit very similar spectral features when analyzed by X-band EPR spectroscopy. PMID:12615348

  16. Conserved cryptic recombination signals in Vκ gene segments are cleaved in small pre-B cells

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Anne E; Kuraoka, Masayuki; Davila, Marco; Kelsoe, Garnett; Cowell, Lindsay G

    2009-01-01

    Background The cleavage of recombination signals (RS) at the boundaries of immunoglobulin V, D, and J gene segments initiates the somatic generation of the antigen receptor genes expressed by B lymphocytes. RS contain a conserved heptamer and nonamer motif separated by non-conserved spacers of 12 or 23 nucleotides. Under physiologic conditions, V(D)J recombination follows the "12/23 rule" to assemble functional antigen-receptor genes, i.e., cleavage and recombination occur only between RS with dissimilar spacer types. Functional, cryptic RS (cRS) have been identified in VH gene segments; these VH cRS were hypothesized to facilitate self-tolerance by mediating VH → VHDJH replacements. At the Igκ locus, however, secondary, de novo rearrangements can delete autoreactive VκJκ joins. Thus, under the hypothesis that V-embedded cRS are conserved to facilitate self-tolerance by mediating V-replacement rearrangements, there would be little selection for Vκ cRS. Recent studies have demonstrated that VH cRS cleavage is only modestly more efficient than V(D)J recombination in violation of the 12/23 rule and first occurs in pro-B cells unable to interact with exogenous antigens. These results are inconsistent with a model of cRS cleavage during autoreactivity-induced VH gene replacement. Results To test the hypothesis that cRS are absent from Vκ gene segments, a corollary of the hypothesis that the need for tolerizing VH replacements is responsible for the selection pressure to maintain VH cRS, we searched for cRS in mouse Vκ gene segments using a statistical model of RS. Scans of 135 mouse Vκ gene segments revealed highly conserved cRS that were shown to be cleaved in the 103/BCL2 cell line and mouse bone marrow B cells. Analogous to results for VH cRS, we find that Vκ cRS are conserved at multiple locations in Vκ gene segments and are cleaved in pre-B cells. Conclusion Our results, together with those for VH cRS, support a model of cRS cleavage in which cleavage is

  17. Cleaving the Halqeh-ye-nur diamonds: a dynamic fracture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Colin; Martineau, Philip M.; Khan, Rizwan U. A.; Field, John E.; Fisher, David; Davies, Nick M.; Samartseva, Julia V.; Putterman, Seth J.; Hird, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    The degree of surface roughness and clarity with which a surface in a brittle material can be formed via fracture is known to be related to the speed of the propagating crack. Cracks traversing a brittle material at low speed produce very smooth surfaces, while those propagating faster create less reflective and rough surfaces (Buehler MJ, Gao H. 2006 Nature 439, 307–310 (doi:10.1038/nature04408)). The elastic wave speeds (cl≈18 000 m s−1, cs≈11 750 m s−1) in diamond are fast (Willmott GR, Field JE. 2006 Phil. Mag. 86, 4305–4318 (doi:10.1080/14786430500482336)) and present a particular problem in creating smooth surfaces during the cleaving of diamond—a routine operation in the fashioning of diamonds for gemstone purposes—as the waves are reflected from the boundaries of the material and can add a tensile component to the propagating crack tip causing the well-known cleavage steps observed on diamond surfaces (Field JE. 1971 Contemp. Phys. 12, 1–31 (doi:10.1080/00107517108205103); Field JE. 1979 Properties of diamond, 1st edn, Academic Press; Wilks EM. 1958 Phil. Mag. 3, 1074–1080 (doi:10.1080/14786435808237036)). Here we report an analysis of two diamonds, having large dimensions and high aspect ratio, which from a gemological analysis are shown to have been cleaved from the same 200 carat specimen. A methodology for their manufacture is calculated by an analysis of a model problem. This takes into account the effect of multiple reflections from the sample boundaries. It is suggested that the lapidary had an intuitive guide to how to apply the cleavage force in order to control the crack speed. In particular, it is shown that it is likely that this technique caused the fracture to propagate at a lower speed. The sacrifice of a large diamond with the intention of creating thin plates, rather than a faceted gemstone, demonstrates how symbolism and beliefs associated with gemstones have changed over the centuries (Harlow GE. 1998 The

  18. Porphyromonas gingivalis Type IX Secretion Substrates Are Cleaved and Modified by a Sortase-Like Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dina; Seers, Christine A.; Mitchell, Helen A.; Chen, Yu-Yen; Glew, Michelle D.; Dashper, Stuart G.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The type IX secretion system (T9SS) of Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes proteins possessing a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) to the cell surface. The C-terminal signal is essential for these proteins to translocate across the outer membrane via the T9SS. On the surface the CTD of these proteins is cleaved prior to extensive glycosylation. It is believed that the modification on these CTD proteins is anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS), which enables the attachment of CTD proteins to the cell surface. However, the exact site of modification and the mechanism of attachment of CTD proteins to the cell surface are unknown. In this study we characterized two wbaP (PG1964) mutants that did not synthesise A-LPS and accumulated CTD proteins in the clarified culture fluid (CCF). The CTDs of the CTD proteins in the CCF were cleaved suggesting normal secretion, however, the CTD proteins were not glycosylated. Mass spectrometric analysis of CTD proteins purified from the CCF of the wbaP mutants revealed the presence of various peptide/amino acid modifications from the growth medium at the C-terminus of the mature CTD proteins. This suggested that modification occurs at the C-terminus of T9SS substrates in the wild type P. gingivalis. This was confirmed by analysis of CTD proteins from wild type, where a 648 Da linker was identified to be attached at the C-terminus of mature CTD proteins. Importantly, treatment with proteinase K released the 648 Da linker from the CTD proteins demonstrating a peptide bond between the C-terminus and the modification. Together, this is suggestive of a mechanism similar to sortase A for the cleavage and modification/attachment of CTD proteins in P. gingivalis. PG0026 has been recognized as the CTD signal peptidase and is now proposed to be the sortase-like protein in P. gingivalis. To our knowledge, this is the first biochemical evidence suggesting a sortase-like mechanism in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26340749

  19. Determination of surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features associated with vacancies were observed in the STM win be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites

  20. Cleaving the Halqeh-ye-nur diamonds: a dynamic fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Colin; Martineau, Philip M; Khan, Rizwan U A; Field, John E; Fisher, David; Davies, Nick M; Samartseva, Julia V; Putterman, Seth J; Hird, Jonathan R

    2015-03-28

    The degree of surface roughness and clarity with which a surface in a brittle material can be formed via fracture is known to be related to the speed of the propagating crack. Cracks traversing a brittle material at low speed produce very smooth surfaces, while those propagating faster create less reflective and rough surfaces (Buehler MJ, Gao H. 2006 Nature 439, 307-310 (doi:10.1038/nature04408)). The elastic wave speeds (c(l)≈18 000 m s(-1), c(s)≈11 750 m s(-1)) in diamond are fast (Willmott GR, Field JE. 2006 Phil. Mag. 86, 4305-4318 (doi:10.1080/14786430500482336)) and present a particular problem in creating smooth surfaces during the cleaving of diamond-a routine operation in the fashioning of diamonds for gemstone purposes--as the waves are reflected from the boundaries of the material and can add a tensile component to the propagating crack tip causing the well-known cleavage steps observed on diamond surfaces (Field JE. 1971 Contemp. Phys. 12, 1-31 (doi:10.1080/00107517108205103); Field JE. 1979 Properties of diamond, 1st edn, Academic Press; Wilks EM. 1958 Phil. Mag. 3, 1074-1080 (doi:10.1080/14786435808237036)). Here we report an analysis of two diamonds, having large dimensions and high aspect ratio, which from a gemological analysis are shown to have been cleaved from the same 200 carat specimen. A methodology for their manufacture is calculated by an analysis of a model problem. This takes into account the effect of multiple reflections from the sample boundaries. It is suggested that the lapidary had an intuitive guide to how to apply the cleavage force in order to control the crack speed. In particular, it is shown that it is likely that this technique caused the fracture to propagate at a lower speed. The sacrifice of a large diamond with the intention of creating thin plates, rather than a faceted gemstone, demonstrates how symbolism and beliefs associated with gemstones have changed over the centuries (Harlow GE. 1998 The nature

  1. A family of octahedral rhenium cluster complexes [Re6Q8(H2O)n(OH)6-n]n-4 (Q=S, Se; n=0-6): structural and pH-dependent spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Brylev, Konstantin A; Mironov, Yuri V; Yarovoi, Spartak S; Naumov, Nikolai G; Fedorov, Vladimir E; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kitamura, Noboru; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Yamada, Konatsu; Ishizaka, Shoji; Sasaki, Yoichi

    2007-09-01

    The conversions of hexahydroxo rhenium cluster complexes [Re6Q8(OH)6]4- (Q=S, Se) in aqueous solutions in a wide pH range were investigated by chemical methods and spectroscopic measurements. Dependences of the spectroscopic and excited-state properties of the solutions on pH have been studied in detail. It has been found that a pH decrease of aqueous solutions of the potassium salts K4[Re6Q8(OH)6].8H2O (Q=S, Se) results in the formation of aquahydroxo and hexaaqua cluster complexes with the general formula [Re6Q8(H2O)n(OH)6-n]n-4 that could be considered as a result of the protonation of the terminal OH- ligands in the hexahydroxo complexes. The compounds K2[Re6S8(H2O)2(OH)4].2H2O (1), [Re6S8(H2O)4(OH)2].12H2O (2), [Re6S8(H2O)6][Re6S6Br8].10H2O (3), and [Re6Se8(H2O)4(OH)2] (4) have been isolated and characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction and elemental analyses and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In crystal structures of the aquahydroxo complexes, the cluster units are connected to each other by an extensive system of very strong hydrogen bonds between terminal ligands. PMID:17676730

  2. Design and kinetic analysis of hammerhead ribozyme and DNAzyme that specifically cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Woo-Hyung; Choi, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jae Hyun; Yeo, Woon-Seok; Oh, Sangtaek; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2008-09-12

    In order to develop the oligonucleotides to abolish an expression of TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA, which is a genetic aberration that causes the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), hammerhead ribozymes and deoxyoligoribozymes that can specifically cleave TEL-AML1 fusion RNA were designed. Constructs of the deoxyribozyme with an asymmetric substrate binding arm (Dz26) and the hammerhead ribozyme with a 4 nt-bulged substrate binding arm in the stem III (buRz28) were able to cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA specifically at sites close to the junction in vitro, without cleaving the normal TEL and AML1 RNA. Single-turnover kinetic analysis under enzyme-excess condition revealed that the buRz28 is superior to the Dz26 in terms of substrate binding and RNA-cleavage. In conjunction with current progress in a gene-delivery technology, the designed oligonucleotides that specifically cleave the TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA are hoped to be applicable for the treatment of ALL in vivo.

  3. "Self-cleaving" 2A peptide from porcine teschovirus-1 mediates cleavage of dual fluorescent proteins in transgenic Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinming; Liu, Xianyong; Tao, Geru; Qin, Mei; Yin, Guangwen; Suo, Jingxia; Suo, Xun

    2016-01-01

    The "self-cleaving" 2A sequence of picornavirus, which mediates ribosome-skipping events, enables the generation of two or more separate peptide products from one mRNA containing one or more "self-cleaving" 2A sequences. In this study, we introduced a single 2A sequence of porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) linked to two fluorescent protein genes, the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) gene and the red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene, in a single cassette into transgenic Eimeria tenella (EtER). As expected, we obtained two separated protein molecules rather than a fused protein, although the two molecules were translated from the same mRNA carrying a single "self-cleaving" 2A sequence. Importantly, RFP led by a secretion signal was secreted into parasitophorous vacuoles, while EYFP localized mainly to the nucleus of EtER. Our results demonstrate that the "self-cleaving" 2A sequence actively mediated cleavage of polyproteins in the apicomplexan parasite E. tenella. PMID:27352927

  4. Polyglycine hydrolases: fungal b-lactamase-like endoproteases that cleave polyglycine regions within plant class IV chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyglycine hydrolases are secreted fungal proteases that cleave glycine-glycine peptide bonds in the inter-domain linker region of specific plant defense chitinases. Previously, we reported the catalytic activity of polyglycine hydrolases from the phytopathogens Epicoccum sorghi (Es-cmp) and Cochli...

  5. Complement activation by ligand-driven juxtaposition of discrete pattern recognition complexes.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Kjaer, Troels R; Kidmose, Rune T; Jensen, Lisbeth; Hansen, Annette G; Tekin, Mustafa; Jensenius, Jens C; Andersen, Gregers R; Thiel, Steffen

    2014-09-16

    Defining mechanisms governing translation of molecular binding events into immune activation is central to understanding immune function. In the lectin pathway of complement, the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins complexed with the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-2 cleave C4 and C2 to generate C3 convertase. MASP-1 was recently found to be the exclusive activator of MASP-2 under physiological conditions, yet the predominant oligomeric forms of MBL carry only a single MASP homodimer. This prompted us to investigate whether activation of MASP-2 by MASP-1 occurs through PRM-driven juxtaposition on ligand surfaces. We demonstrate that intercomplex activation occurs between discrete PRM/MASP complexes. PRM ligand binding does not directly escort the transition of MASP from zymogen to active enzyme in the PRM/MASP complex; rather, clustering of PRM/MASP complexes directly causes activation. Our results support a clustering-based mechanism of activation, fundamentally different from the conformational model suggested for the classical pathway of complement. PMID:25197071

  6. Complement activation by ligand-driven juxtaposition of discrete pattern recognition complexes

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Kjaer, Troels R.; Kidmose, Rune T.; Jensen, Lisbeth; Hansen, Annette G.; Tekin, Mustafa; Jensenius, Jens C.; Andersen, Gregers R.; Thiel, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Defining mechanisms governing translation of molecular binding events into immune activation is central to understanding immune function. In the lectin pathway of complement, the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins complexed with the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-2 cleave C4 and C2 to generate C3 convertase. MASP-1 was recently found to be the exclusive activator of MASP-2 under physiological conditions, yet the predominant oligomeric forms of MBL carry only a single MASP homodimer. This prompted us to investigate whether activation of MASP-2 by MASP-1 occurs through PRM-driven juxtaposition on ligand surfaces. We demonstrate that intercomplex activation occurs between discrete PRM/MASP complexes. PRM ligand binding does not directly escort the transition of MASP from zymogen to active enzyme in the PRM/MASP complex; rather, clustering of PRM/MASP complexes directly causes activation. Our results support a clustering-based mechanism of activation, fundamentally different from the conformational model suggested for the classical pathway of complement. PMID:25197071

  7. Initial use of dioximate ligands in 3d/4f cluster chemistry: synthesis, structure, and magnetic studies of an unusual [Gd(III)2Mn(IV)O]8+ complex.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Stamatatos, Theocharis C; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2009-01-19

    An unusual [Mn(IV)Gd(III)(2)(mu(3)-O(2-))](8+) triangular complex has been prepared from the initial use of 2,6-diacetylpyridine dioxime (dapdoH(2)) in 3d/4f cluster chemistry. The complex has an S = (13)/(2) ground state, with exchange parameters J = +0.49 cm(-1) and J' = -0.12 cm(-1) [H = -2J(S(i) x S(j)) convention] for the Gd(III)...Mn(IV) and Gd(III)...Gd(III) interactions, respectively. The origin of this ground state has been rationalized by consideration of the spin frustration occurring within the complex as a function of the relative magnitude of the competing interactions. PMID:19072591

  8. NMR analysis of cleaved Escherichia coli thioredoxin (1-73/74-108) and its P76A variant: cis/trans peptide isomerization.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W. F.; Tung, C. S.; Wang, H.; Tasayco, M. L.

    2000-01-01

    Inspection of high resolution three-dimensional (3D) structures from the protein database reveals an increasing number of cis-Xaa-Pro and cis-Xaa-Yaa peptide bonds. However, we are still far from being able to predict whether these bonds will remain cis upon single-site substitution of Pro or Yaa and/or cleavage of a peptide bond close to it in the sequence. We have chosen oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (Trx), a member of the Trx superfamily with a single alpha/beta domain and cis P76 to determine the effect of single-site substitution and/or cleavage on this isomer. Standard two-dimensional (2D) NMR analysis were performed on cleaved Trx (1-73/74-108) and its P76A variant. Analysis of the NOE connectivities indicates remarkable similarity between the secondary and supersecondary structure of the noncovalent complexes and Trx. Analysis of the 2D version of the HCCH-TOCSY and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC and 13C-filtered HMQC-NOESY spectra of cleaved Trx with uniformly 13C-labeled 175 and P76 shows surprising conservation of both cis P76 and packing of 175 against W31. A similar NMR analysis of its P76A variant provides no evidence for cis A76 and shows only subtle local changes in both the packing of 175 and the interstrand connectivities between its most protected hydrophobic strands (beta2 and beta4). Indeed, a molecular simulation model for the trans P76A variant of Trx shows only subtle local changes around the substitution site. In conclusion, cleavage of R73 is insufficient to provoke cis/trans isomerization of P76, but cleavage and single-site substitution (P76A) favors the trans isomer. PMID:10739243

  9. Dynamic Bayesian clustering.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Anna; Menon, Vilas; Heard, Nicholas A

    2013-10-01

    Clusters of time series data may change location and memberships over time; in gene expression data, this occurs as groups of genes or samples respond differently to stimuli or experimental conditions at different times. In order to uncover this underlying temporal structure, we consider dynamic clusters with time-dependent parameters which split and merge over time, enabling cluster memberships to change. These interesting time-dependent structures are useful in understanding the development of organisms or complex organs, and could not be identified using traditional clustering methods. In cell cycle data, these time-dependent structure may provide links between genes and stages of the cell cycle, whilst in developmental data sets they may highlight key developmental transitions. PMID:24131050

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  11. Development of an efficiently cleaved, bioactive, highly pure FLAG-tagged recombinant human Mullerian Inhibiting Substance

    PubMed Central

    Papakostas, Thanos D.; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Nicolaou, Fotini; Thanos, Aristomenis; Trichonas, George; Koufomichali, Xanthi; Anago, Kosisochukwu; Donahoe, Patricia K.; Teixeira, Jose; MacLaughlin, David T.; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a member of the TGF-β family, causes regression of the Mullerian duct in male embryos, after binding to Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Receptor II (MISRII). It has also been extensively demonstrated that it can inhibit proliferation of various cancer cell lines such as ovarian, prostate, and breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. Hence, the availability of a recombinant, epitope tagged, bioactive MIS is important for the selection of patients for treatment and for probing novel molecular targets for MIS in various tissues. To this end, we have expressed a recombinant, internally FLAG-tagged form of hMIS with the tag (DYKDDDDK) immediately after the cleavage site (427–428) of MIS at the C-terminus with a modified dibasic cleavage motif sequence. We show that this construct results in a highly pure, endogenously processed (cleaved) FLAG MIS, that causes complete regression of the Mullerian Duct in an organ culture assay. In addition, purified FLAG MIS was able to bind and affinity purify both transfected and endogenous MIS type II receptor. The availability of this fully functional, epitope tagged form of MIS should facilitate scale-up for preclinical and clinical use and should also be used for the study of MIS binding proteins and for tracking in pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:19755162

  12. Myelin Basic Protein Cleaves Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 and Improves Regeneration After Injury.

    PubMed

    Lutz, David; Kataria, Hardeep; Kleene, Ralf; Loers, Gabriele; Chaudhary, Harshita; Guseva, Daria; Wu, Bin; Jakovcevski, Igor; Schachner, Melitta

    2016-07-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a serine protease that cleaves neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and generates a transmembrane L1 fragment which facilitates L1-dependent functions in vitro, such as neurite outgrowth, neuronal cell migration and survival, myelination by Schwann cells as well as Schwann cell proliferation, migration, and process formation. Ablation and blocking of MBP or disruption of its proteolytic activity by mutation of a proteolytically active serine residue abolish L1-dependent cellular responses. In utero injection of adeno-associated virus encoding proteolytically active MBP into MBP-deficient shiverer mice normalizes differentiation, myelination, and synaptogenesis in the developing postnatal spinal cord, in contrast to proteolytically inactive MBP. Application of active MBP to the injured wild-type spinal cord and femoral nerve augments levels of a transmembrane L1 fragment, promotes remyelination, and improves functional recovery after injury. Application of MBP antibody impairs recovery. Virus-mediated expression of active MBP in the lesion site after spinal cord injury results in improved functional recovery, whereas injection of virus encoding proteolytically inactive MBP fails to do so. The present study provides evidence for a novel L1-mediated function of MBP in the developing spinal cord and in the injured adult mammalian nervous system that leads to enhanced recovery after acute trauma. PMID:26081148

  13. Drosophila insulin degrading enzyme and rat skeletal muscle insulin protease cleave insulin at similar sites

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, W.C.; Garcia, J.V.; Liepnieks, J.J.; Hamel, F.G.; Hermodson, M.A.; Frank, B.H.; Rosner, M.R. )

    1989-03-21

    Insulin degradation is an integral part of the cellular action of insulin. Recent evidence suggests that the enzyme insulin protease is involved in the degradation of insulin in mammalian tissues. Drosophila, which has insulin-like hormones and insulin receptor homologues, also expresses an insulin degrading enzyme with properties that are very similar to those of mammalian insulin protease. In the present study, the insulin cleavage products generated by the Drosophila insulin degrading enzyme were identified and compared with the products generated by the mammalian insulin protease. Both purified enzymes were incubated with porcine insulin specifically labeled with {sup 125}I on either the A19 or B26 position, and the degradation products were analyzed by HPLC before and after sulfitolysis. Isolation and sequencing of the cleavage products indicated that both enzymes cleave the A chain of intact insulin at identical sites between residues A13 and A14 and A14 and A15. These results demonstrate that all the insulin cleavage sites generated by the Drosopohila insulin degrading enzyme are shared in common with the mammalian insulin protease. These data support the hypothesis that there is evolutionary conservation of the insulin degrading enzyme and further suggest that this enzyme plays an important role in cellular function.

  14. Substrate-Induced Conformational Changes Occur in All Cleaved Forms of Caspase-6

    SciTech Connect

    S Vaidya; E Velazquez-Delgado; G Abbruzzese; J Hardy

    2011-12-31

    Caspase-6 is an apoptotic cysteine protease that also governs disease progression in Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases. Caspase-6 is of great interest as a target for treatment of these neurodegenerative diseases; however, the molecular basis of caspase-6 function and regulation remains poorly understood. In the recently reported structure of caspase-6, the 60's and 130's helices at the base of the substrate-binding groove extend upward, in a conformation entirely different from that of any other caspase. Presently, the central question about caspase-6 structure and function is whether the extended conformation is the catalytically competent conformation or whether the extended helices must undergo a large conformational rearrangement in order to bind substrate. We have generated a series of caspase-6 cleavage variants, including a novel constitutively two-chain form, and determined crystal structures of caspase-6 with and without the intersubunit linker. This series allows evaluation of the role of the prodomain and intersubunit linker on caspase-6 structure and function before and after substrate binding. Caspase-6 is inherently more stable than closely related caspases. Cleaved caspase-6 with both the prodomain and the linker present is the most stable, indicating that these two regions act in concert to increase stability, but maintain the extended conformation in the unliganded state. Moreover, these data suggest that caspase-6 undergoes a significant conformational change upon substrate binding, adopting a structure that is more like canonical caspases.

  15. Nuclear localization of the caspase-3-cleaved form of p73 in anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alsafadi, Samar; Tourpin, Sophie; Bessoltane, Nadia; Salomé-Desnoulez, Sophie; Vassal, Gilles; André, Fabrice; Ahomadegbe, Jean-Charles

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor p73 is a homologue of p53 that can be expressed as pro- or anti-apoptotic isoforms. Unlike p53, p73 is rarely mutated or lost in cancers and it is found to replace defective p53 inducing apoptosis. Here, we investigated the p73 involvement in anoikis, a type of apoptosis caused by inadequate cell-matrix interactions. Breast cancer cell lines with different p53 status were treated with doxorubicin (DOX) or docetaxel (DOC) and cells detached from the extracellular matrix were analyzed. We demonstrate for the first time that DOX-induced cell detachment is associated with p73 cleavage and caspase activation, independently of the p53 status. However, we did not detect p73 cleavage or caspase activation in detached cells under DOC treatment. Overexpressing the apoptotic isoform of p73 led to cell detachment associated with p73 cleavage and caspase activation. Interestingly, p73 cleaved forms localize to the nucleus during the late phase of cell death indicating an increase in the transcriptional activity. Our study suggests that the cleavage of p73 on specific sites may release its pro-apoptotic function and contribute to cell death. PMID:26575022

  16. Subcutaneously Administered Self-Cleaving Hydrogel-Octreotide Conjugates Provide Very Long-Acting Octreotide.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eric L; Henise, Jeff; Reid, Ralph; Ashley, Gary W; Santi, Daniel V

    2016-07-20

    We developed a long-acting drug-delivery system that supports subcutaneous administration of the peptidic somatostatin agonist octreotide-a blockbuster drug used to treat acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumors. The current once-a-month polymer-encapsulated octreotide, Sandostatin LAR, requires a painful intragluteal injection through a large needle by a health-care professional. To overcome such shortcomings, Tetra-PEG hydrogel microspheres were covalently attached to the α-amine of d-Phe(1) or the ε-amine of Lys(5) of octreotide by a self-cleaving β-eliminative linker; upon subcutaneous injection in the rat using a small-bore needle, octreotide was slowly released. The released drug from the ε-octreotide conjugate showed a remarkably long serum half-life that exceeded two months. The α-octreotide conjugate had a half-life of ∼2 weeks, and showed an excellent correlation of in vitro and in vivo drug release. Pharmacokinetic models indicate these microspheres should support once-weekly to once-monthly self-administered subcutaneous dosing in humans. The hydrogel-octreotide conjugate shows the favorable pharmacokinetics of Sandostatin LAR without its drawbacks. PMID:27253622

  17. The mitochondrial intramembrane protease PARL cleaves human Pink1 to regulate Pink1 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Cathrin; Lorenz, Holger; Weihofen, Andreas; Selkoe, Dennis J; Lemberg, Marius K

    2011-06-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis is a conserved mechanism that regulates a variety of cellular processes ranging from transcription control to signaling. In mitochondria, the inner membrane rhomboid protease PARL has been implicated in the control of life span and apoptosis by a so far uncharacterized mechanism. Here, we show that PARL cleaves human Pink1, which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, within its conserved membrane anchor. Mature Pink1 is then free to be released into the cytosol or the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Upon depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the canonical import of Pink1 and PARL-catalyzed processing is blocked, leading to accumulation of the Pink1 precursor. As targeting of this precursor to the outer mitochondrial membrane has been shown to trigger mitophagy, we suggest that the PARL-catalyzed removal of the Pink1 signal sequence in the canonical import pathway acts as a cellular checkpoint for mitochondrial integrity. Furthermore, we show that two Parkinson's disease-causing mutations decrease the processing of Pink1 by PARL, with attendant implications for pathogenesis. PMID:21426348

  18. Emerging role of the interleukin-8 cleaving enzyme SpyCEP in clinical Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Claire E; Kurupati, Prathiba; Jones, Michael D; Edwards, Robert J; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2009-08-15

    Neutrophil chemoattractant interleukin (IL)-8 is cleaved and inactivated by the Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope protease SpyCEP. A range of clinical S. pyogenes strains of differing emm type demonstrated SpyCEP activity, although transcription of the SpyCEP gene cepA differed 1000-fold between isolates. Disruption of the 2-component regulatory system covR/S in pharyngeal isolates increased cepA transcription 100-fold; this finding is consistent with endogenous CovR/S-mediated repression of cepA being responsible for low SpyCEP expression in some S. pyogenes strains associated with pharyngitis. Among patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection, disease severity and outcome were associated with the SpyCEP activity of the isolate. Lethal invasive isolate H292 (emm81) expressed more cepA than did other tested isolates. This strain carried a unique covR mutation that impaired binding to the cepA promoter. CovR/S sequence comparison in other clinical isolates revealed community-wide dissemination of covS mutations but not covR mutations. The results highlight a potential hazard and underline the importance of continuing molecular epidemiological surveillance for community-wide dissemination of CovR/S mutant hyperinvasive strains. PMID:19591574

  19. Substrate-induced conformational changes occur in all cleaved forms of caspase-6

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Sravanti; Velázquez-Delgado, Elih M.; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2010-01-01

    Caspase-6 is an apoptotic cysteine protease that also governs disease progression in Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s Diseases. Caspase-6 is of great interest as a target for treatment of these neurodegenerative diseases, however the molecular basis of caspase-6 function and regulation remains poorly understood. In the recently reported structure of caspase-6, the 60’s and 130’s helices at the base of the substrate-binding groove extend upward, in a conformation entirely different from that of any other caspase. Presently, the central question about caspase-6 structure and function is whether the extended conformation is the catalytically competent conformation or whether the extended helices must undergo a large conformational rearrangement in order to bind substrate. We have generated a series of caspase-6 cleavage variants including a novel constitutively two-chain form and determined crystal structures of caspase-6 with and without the intersubunit linker. This series allows evaluation of the role of the prodomain and intersubunit linker on caspase-6 structure and function before and after substrate binding. Caspase-6 is inherently more stable than closely related caspases. Cleaved caspase-6 with both the prodomain and linker present is the most stable indicating that these two regions act in concert to increase stability, but maintain the extended conformation in the unliganded state. Most importantly, these data suggest that caspase-6 undergoes a significant conformational change upon substrate binding, adopting a structure that is more like canonical caspases. PMID:21111746

  20. In vitro evolution of distinct self-cleaving ribozymes in diverse environments

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Milena; Fliss, Palmer S.; Ditzler, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evolution experiments have long been used to evaluate the roles of RNA in both modern and ancient biology, and as a tool for biotechnology applications. The conditions under which these experiments have been conducted, however, do not reflect the range of cellular environments in modern biology or our understanding of chemical environments on the early earth, when the atmosphere and oceans were largely anoxic and soluble Fe2+ was abundant. To test the impact of environmental factors relevant to RNA's potential role in the earliest forms of life, we evolved populations of self-cleaving ribozymes in an anoxic atmosphere with varying pH in the presence of either Fe2+ or Mg2+. Populations evolved under these different conditions are dominated by different sequences and secondary structures, demonstrating global differences in the underlying fitness landscapes. Comparisons between evolutionary outcomes and catalytic activities also indicate that Mg2+ can readily take the place of Fe2+ in supporting the catalysis of RNA cleavage at neutral pH, but not at lower pH. These results highlight the importance of considering the specific environments in which functional biopolymers evolve when evaluating their potential roles in the origin of life, extant biology, or biotechnology. PMID:26130717

  1. In vitro evolution of distinct self-cleaving ribozymes in diverse environments.

    PubMed

    Popović, Milena; Fliss, Palmer S; Ditzler, Mark A

    2015-08-18

    In vitro evolution experiments have long been used to evaluate the roles of RNA in both modern and ancient biology, and as a tool for biotechnology applications. The conditions under which these experiments have been conducted, however, do not reflect the range of cellular environments in modern biology or our understanding of chemical environments on the early earth, when the atmosphere and oceans were largely anoxic and soluble Fe(2+) was abundant. To test the impact of environmental factors relevant to RNA's potential role in the earliest forms of life, we evolved populations of self-cleaving ribozymes in an anoxic atmosphere with varying pH in the presence of either Fe(2+) or Mg(2+). Populations evolved under these different conditions are dominated by different sequences and secondary structures, demonstrating global differences in the underlying fitness landscapes. Comparisons between evolutionary outcomes and catalytic activities also indicate that Mg(2+) can readily take the place of Fe(2+) in supporting the catalysis of RNA cleavage at neutral pH, but not at lower pH. These results highlight the importance of considering the specific environments in which functional biopolymers evolve when evaluating their potential roles in the origin of life, extant biology, or biotechnology. PMID:26130717

  2. A C4-oxidizing Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Cleaving Both Cellulose and Cello-oligosaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Trine; Westereng, Bjørge; Aachmann, Finn L.; Agger, Jane W.; Kracher, Daniel; Kittl, Roman; Ludwig, Roland; Haltrich, Dietmar; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Horn, Svein J.

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable resource that significantly can substitute fossil resources for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Efficient saccharification of this biomass to fermentable sugars will be a key technology in future biorefineries. Traditionally, saccharification was thought to be accomplished by mixtures of hydrolytic enzymes. However, recently it has been shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to this process by catalyzing oxidative cleavage of insoluble polysaccharides utilizing a mechanism involving molecular oxygen and an electron donor. These enzymes thus represent novel tools for the saccharification of plant biomass. Most characterized LPMOs, including all reported bacterial LPMOs, form aldonic acids, i.e., products oxidized in the C1 position of the terminal sugar. Oxidation at other positions has been observed, and there has been some debate concerning the nature of this position (C4 or C6). In this study, we have characterized an LPMO from Neurospora crassa (NcLPMO9C; also known as NCU02916 and NcGH61–3). Remarkably, and in contrast to all previously characterized LPMOs, which are active only on polysaccharides, NcLPMO9C is able to cleave soluble cello-oligosaccharides as short as a tetramer, a property that allowed detailed product analysis. Using mass spectrometry and NMR, we show that the cello-oligosaccharide products released by this enzyme contain a C4 gemdiol/keto group at the nonreducing end. PMID:24324265

  3. A C4-oxidizing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase cleaving both cellulose and cello-oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Trine; Westereng, Bjørge; Aachmann, Finn L; Agger, Jane W; Kracher, Daniel; Kittl, Roman; Ludwig, Roland; Haltrich, Dietmar; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Horn, Svein J

    2014-01-31

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable resource that significantly can substitute fossil resources for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Efficient saccharification of this biomass to fermentable sugars will be a key technology in future biorefineries. Traditionally, saccharification was thought to be accomplished by mixtures of hydrolytic enzymes. However, recently it has been shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to this process by catalyzing oxidative cleavage of insoluble polysaccharides utilizing a mechanism involving molecular oxygen and an electron donor. These enzymes thus represent novel tools for the saccharification of plant biomass. Most characterized LPMOs, including all reported bacterial LPMOs, form aldonic acids, i.e., products oxidized in the C1 position of the terminal sugar. Oxidation at other positions has been observed, and there has been some debate concerning the nature of this position (C4 or C6). In this study, we have characterized an LPMO from Neurospora crassa (NcLPMO9C; also known as NCU02916 and NcGH61-3). Remarkably, and in contrast to all previously characterized LPMOs, which are active only on polysaccharides, NcLPMO9C is able to cleave soluble cello-oligosaccharides as short as a tetramer, a property that allowed detailed product analysis. Using mass spectrometry and NMR, we show that the cello-oligosaccharide products released by this enzyme contain a C4 gemdiol/keto group at the nonreducing end. PMID:24324265

  4. Delta-secretase cleaves amyloid precursor protein and regulates the pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Song, Mingke; Liu, Xia; Su Kang, Seong; Duong, Duc M.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Cao, Xuebing; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E.; Ping Yu, Shan; Jia, Jianping; Levey, Allan I.; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    The age-dependent deposition of amyloid-β peptides, derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite age being the greatest risk factor for AD, the molecular mechanisms linking ageing to APP processing are unknown. Here we show that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a pH-controlled cysteine proteinase, is activated during ageing and mediates APP proteolytic processing. AEP cleaves APP at N373 and N585 residues, selectively influencing the amyloidogenic fragmentation of APP. AEP is activated in normal mice in an age-dependent manner, and is strongly activated in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model and human AD brains. Deletion of AEP from 5XFAD or APP/PS1 mice decreases senile plaque formation, ameliorates synapse loss, elevates long-term potentiation and protects memory. Blockade of APP cleavage by AEP in mice alleviates pathological and behavioural deficits. Thus, AEP acts as a δ-secretase, contributing to the age-dependent pathogenic mechanisms in AD. PMID:26549211

  5. Cleaved high-molecular-weight kininogen inhibits neointima formation following vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jan-Marcus; Reich, Fabian; Dutzmann, Jochen; Weisheit, Simona; Teske, Rebecca; Gündüz, Dursun; Bauersachs, Johann; Preissner, Klaus T; Sedding, Daniel G

    2015-08-31

    Cleaved high-molecular-weight kininogen (HKa) or its peptide domain 5 (D5) alone exert anti-adhesive properties in vitro related to impeding integrin-mediated cellular interactions. However, the anti-adhesive effects of HKa in vivo remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the effects of HKa on leukocyte recruitment and neointima formation following wire-induced injury of the femoral artery in C57BL/6 mice. Local application of HKa significantly reduced the accumulation of monocytes and also reduced neointimal lesion size 14 days after injury. Moreover, C57BL/6 mice transplanted with bone marrow from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) showed a significantly reduced accumulation of eGFP+-cells at the arterial injury site and decreased neointimal lesion size after local application of HKa or the polypeptide D5 alone. A differentiation of accumulating eGFP+-cells into highly specific smooth muscle cells (SMC) was not detected in any group. In contrast, application of HKa significantly reduced the proliferation of locally derived neointimal cells. In vitro, HKa and D5 potently inhibited the adhesion of SMC to vitronectin, thus impairing their proliferation, migration, and survival rates. In conclusion, application of HKa or D5 decreases the inflammatory response to vascular injury and exerts direct effects on SMC by impeding the binding of integrins to extracellular matrix components. Therefore, HKa and D5 may hold promise as novel therapeutic substances to prevent neointima formation. PMID:26063414

  6. Topographic and electronic structure of cleaved SrTiO{sub 3}(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaputra, Wattaka Skowronski, Marek; Feenstra, Randall M.

    2015-05-15

    The topographic and electronic structure of cleaved SrTiO{sub 3}(001) surfaces were studied, employing samples that either had or had not been coated with Ti on their outer surfaces prior to fracture. In both cases, SrO- and TiO{sub 2}-terminated terraces were present on the cleavage surface, enabling in situ studies on either termination. However, the samples coated with Ti prior to fracture were found to yield a rougher morphology on TiO{sub 2}-terminated terraces as well as a higher density of oxygen vacancies during an annealing (outgassing) step following the coating. The higher density of oxygen vacancies in the bulk of the Ti-coated samples also provides higher conductivity, which, in turn, improves a sensitivity of the spectroscopy and reduces the effect of tip-induced band bending. Nonetheless, similar spectral features, unique to each termination, were observed for samples both with and without the Ti coating. Notably, with moderate-temperature annealing following fracture, a strong discrete peak in the conductance spectra, arising from oxygen vacancies, was observed on the SrO-terminated terraces. This peak appears at slightly different voltages for coated and uncoated samples, signifying a possible effect of tip-induced band bending.

  7. [Stable expression and characterization of the von Willebrand factor cleaving protease].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenni; Dong, Ningzheng; Zhang, Jingyu; Su, Jian; Wang, Anyou; Ruan, Changgeng

    2010-02-01

    This study was to acquire recombinant protein of von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (ADAMTS13, a disintegrin and metalloprotease with a thromboSpondin type 1 motifs 13), for further studies on its biological function in thrombosis and hemostasis. We transfected the Hela cells with the plasmid pSecTag-ADAMTS13 by lipofectamine. A positive cell cloning was selected by hygromycin-B. The recombinant protein was purified with Ni-NTA agarose column by gradient imidazole. The purity and immune activity of purified products were identified with SDS-PAGE and Western blotting respectively. We also measured the enzymatic activity of recombinant protein (rADAMTS13) by GST-His two-site ELISA assay. The results showed that we successfully constructed Hela cells ADAMTS2-4 which expressed high level of rADAMTS13. We received about 5.8 mg recombinant protein in culture supernantants per liter purified with Ni-NTA column. The protein formed a main lane at the position of 190 kDa with SDS-PAGE and reacted with polyclonal antibody against ADAMTS13 by Western blotting. The amount of rADAMTS13 activity was 6.4 U/mL, according to the normal plasma defined as 1 U/mL. In conclusion, rADAMTS13 protein had high purity, immune activity and good enzymatic activity, which could establish the experimental foundation for further research on biological function and mechanism of this unique metalloprotease. PMID:20432945

  8. In Silico Prediction of Mutant HIV-1 Proteases Cleaving a Target Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan H.; Willemoës, Martin; Winther, Jakob R.; De Vico, Luca

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 protease represents an appealing system for directed enzyme re-design, since it has various different endogenous targets, a relatively simple structure and it is well studied. Recently Chaudhury and Gray (Structure (2009) 17: 1636–1648) published a computational algorithm to discern the specificity determining residues of HIV-1 protease. In this paper we present two computational tools aimed at re-designing HIV-1 protease, derived from the algorithm of Chaudhuri and Gray. First, we present an energy-only based methodology to discriminate cleavable and non cleavable peptides for HIV-1 proteases, both wild type and mutant. Secondly, we show an algorithm we developed to predict mutant HIV-1 proteases capable of cleaving a new target substrate peptide, different from the natural targets of HIV-1 protease. The obtained in silico mutant enzymes were analyzed in terms of cleavability and specificity towards the target peptide using the energy-only methodology. We found two mutant proteases as best candidates for specificity and cleavability towards the target sequence. PMID:24796579

  9. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study.

    PubMed

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga; Fastbom, J; Benedikz, E

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP (beta-sAPP) in brain tissue sections from the frontal, temporal and occipital lobe. Strong granular beta-sAPP staining was found throughout the gray matter of all three areas, while white matter staining was considerably weaker. beta-sAPP was found to be localized in astrocytes and in axons. We found the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques and cerebral blood vessels. The results presented here show altered beta-sAPP staining in the AD brain, suggestive of abnormal processing and transport of APP. PMID:15090268

  10. Delta-secretase cleaves amyloid precursor protein and regulates the pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhentao; Song, Mingke; Liu, Xia; Su Kang, Seong; Duong, Duc M; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Cao, Xuebing; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E; Ping Yu, Shan; Jia, Jianping; Levey, Allan I; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    The age-dependent deposition of amyloid-β peptides, derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite age being the greatest risk factor for AD, the molecular mechanisms linking ageing to APP processing are unknown. Here we show that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a pH-controlled cysteine proteinase, is activated during ageing and mediates APP proteolytic processing. AEP cleaves APP at N373 and N585 residues, selectively influencing the amyloidogenic fragmentation of APP. AEP is activated in normal mice in an age-dependent manner, and is strongly activated in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model and human AD brains. Deletion of AEP from 5XFAD or APP/PS1 mice decreases senile plaque formation, ameliorates synapse loss, elevates long-term potentiation and protects memory. Blockade of APP cleavage by AEP in mice alleviates pathological and behavioural deficits. Thus, AEP acts as a δ-secretase, contributing to the age-dependent pathogenic mechanisms in AD. PMID:26549211

  11. Ribozyme cleaves rex/tax mRNA and inhibits bovine leukemia virus expression.

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, G H; McElwain, T F; Birkebak, T A; Palmer, G H

    1993-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) encodes at least two regulatory proteins, Rex and Tax. Tax, the transactivating protein, stimulates the long terminal repeat to promote viral transcription and may be involved in tumorigenesis. Rex is involved in the transition from early expression of regulatory proteins to later expression of viral structural proteins. We have targeted ribozymes against the mRNA encoding Rex and Tax. The ribozymes consist of the hammer-head catalytic motif flanked by antisense sequences that hybridize with the complementary rex/tax mRNA. To evaluate cleavage in a cell-free system, we transcribed portions of rex/tax mRNA and incubated them with synthetic RNA ribozymes. A ribozyme was identified that cleaves > 80% of the target RNA. Synthetic DNA encoding this ribozyme was cloned into the expression vector pRc/RSV and transfected into BLV-infected bat lung cells. Intracellular cleavage of rex/tax mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR. In cells expressing the ribozyme, viral expression was markedly inhibited. Expression of the BLV core protein p24 was inhibited by 61%, and reverse transcriptase activity in supernatant was inhibited by 92%. Ribozyme inhibition of BLV expression suggests that cattle expressing these sequences may be able to control BLV replication. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7504287

  12. Ferredoxin, in conjunction with NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP reductase, transfers electrons to the IscS/IscU complex to promote iron-sulfur cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Yan, Robert; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Pastore, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    Fe-S cluster biogenesis is an essential pathway coordinated by a network of protein-protein interactions whose functions include desulfurase activity, substrate delivery, electron transfer and product transfer. In an effort to understand the intricacies of the pathway, we have developed an in vitro assay to follow the ferredoxin role in electron transfer during Fe-S cluster assembly. Previously, assays have relied upon the non-physiological reducing agents dithionite and dithiothreitol to assess function. We have addressed this shortcoming by using electron transfer between NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP-reductase to reduce ferredoxin. Our results show that this trio of electron transfer partners are sufficient to sustain the reaction in in vitro studies, albeit with a rate slower compared with DTT-mediated cluster assembly. We also show that, despite overlapping with the CyaY protein in binding to IscS, Fdx does not interfere with the inhibitory activity of this protein. We suggest explanations for these observations which have important consequences for understanding the mechanism of cluster formation. Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25688831

  13. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey Aleksandrovich Varganov

    2005-12-17

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  14. Five water-soluble zwitterionic copper(II)-carboxylate polymers: role of dipyridyl coligands in enhancing the DNA-binding, cleaving and anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Shui-Ping; Li, Huan-Huan; Zhao, Hai-Qing; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Jin-Xiang; Chen, Wen-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Five water-soluble zwitterionic copper-carboxylate polymers were prepared from the reaction of N-carboxymethyl-(3,5-dicarboxyl)pyridinium bromide (H3CmdcpBr) with Cu(NO3)2 in the presence of NaOH by modulating the temperature, solvent and ancillary dipyridyl ligands. These complexes include a 1D ladder-shaped polymer {[Cu3(Cmdcp)2(OH)2(H2O)2]·H2O}n () formed in H2O at room temperature, and a 2D network polymer {[Cu(Cmdcp) (H2O)2]·2H2O}n () isolated in H2O at 135 °C. At 100 °C in H2O/DMF, the same reaction in the presence of an additional 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) gave a 2D zwitterionic complex {[Cu(Cmdcp)(bipy)]·3H2O}n () together with a 1D double-stranded polymer {[Cu(Cmdcp)(H2O)2]·H2O}n () as a minor product. The replacement of bipy with phenanthroline (phen) afforded a 1D zigzag polymer chain {[Cu(Cmdcp)(phen)(H2O)]2·9H2O}5 (). All these complexes were characterized by IR, elemental analyses and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Agarose gel electrophoresis (GE) and ethidium bromide (EB) displacement experiments indicated that complex exhibited the highest pBR322 DNA cleaving ability with the catalytic efficiency (kmax/KM) of 14.80 h(-1) mM(-1) and the highest binding affinity toward calf-thymus DNA. The MTT assay indicated that complex showed significant inhibitory activity toward the proliferation of several tumor cells. Its IC50 value was at micromolar level and lower than those of cisplatin and complexes , especially toward resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell A549. PMID:26131732

  15. Embedded Clusters in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    Stellar clusters are born embedded within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and during their formation and early evolution are often only visible at infrared wavelengths, being heavily obscured by dust. Over the past 15 years advances in infrared detection capabilities have enabled the first systematic studies of embedded clusters in galactic molecular clouds. In this article we review the current state of empirical knowledge concerning these extremely young protocluster systems. From a survey of the literature we compile the first extensive catalog of galactic embedded clusters. We use the catalog to construct the mass function and estimate the birthrate for embedded clusters within 2 kpc of the sun. We find that the embedded cluster birthrate exceeds that of visible open clusters by an order of magnitude or more indicating a high infant mortality rate for protocluster systems. Less than 4-7% of embedded clusters survive emergence from molecular clouds to become bound clusters of Pleiades age. The vast majority (90%) of stars that form in embedded clusters form in rich clusters of 100 or more members with masses in excess of 50 M⊙. Moreover, observations of nearby cloud complexes indicate that embedded clusters account for a significant (70-90%) fraction of all stars formed in GMCs. We review the role of embedded clusters in investigating the nature of the initial mass function (IMF) that, in one nearby example, has been measured over the entire range of stellar and substellar mass, from OB stars to substellar objects near the deuterium burning limit. We also review the role embedded clusters play in the investigation of circumstellar disk evolution and the important constraints they provide for understanding the origin of planetary systems. Finally, we discuss current ideas concerning the origin and dynamical evolution of embedded clusters and the implications for the formation of bound open clusters.

  16. The cleaved cytoplasmic tail of polycystin-1 regulates Src-dependent STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jeffrey J; Song, Xuewen; Wang, Xiaofang; Rinschen, Markus M; Doerr, Nicholas; LaRiviere, Wells B; Schermer, Bernhard; Pei, York P; Torres, Vicente E; Weimbs, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC1) mutations result in proliferative renal cyst growth and progression to renal failure in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The transcription factor STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) was shown to be activated in cyst-lining cells in ADPKD and PKD mouse models and may drive renal cyst growth, but the mechanisms leading to persistent STAT3 activation are unknown. A proteolytic fragment of PC1 corresponding to the cytoplasmic tail, PC1-p30, is overexpressed in ADPKD. Here, we show that PC1-p30 interacts with the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src, resulting in Src-dependent activation of STAT3 by tyrosine phosphorylation. The PC1-p30-mediated activation of Src/STAT3 was independent of JAK family kinases and insensitive to the STAT3 inhibitor suppressor of cytokine signaling 3. Signaling by the EGF receptor (EGFR) or cAMP amplified the activation of Src/STAT3 by PC1-p30. Expression of PC1-p30 changed the cellular response to cAMP signaling. In the absence of PC1-p30, cAMP dampened EGFR- or IL-6-dependent activation of STAT3; in the presence of PC1-p30, cAMP amplified Src-dependent activation of STAT3. In the polycystic kidney (PCK) rat model, activation of STAT3 in renal cystic cells depended on vasopressin receptor 2 (V2R) signaling, which increased cAMP levels. Genetic inhibition of vasopressin expression or treatment with a pharmacologic V2R inhibitor strongly suppressed STAT3 activation and reduced renal cyst growth. These results suggest that PC1, via its cleaved cytoplasmic tail, integrates signaling inputs from EGFR and cAMP, resulting in Src-dependent activation of STAT3 and a proliferative response. PMID:24578126

  17. Anaerobic biodegradation of ether compounds by ether bond-cleaving bacteria and methanogenic consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    Ether compounds are manufactured for use in nonionic detergents, plastics, pesticides and other products and occur as toxic organic compounds, the most famous being tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. Ether compounds were considered recalcitrant to anaerobic biodegradation due to the lack of an appropriate oxidant for ether bond-cleavage in reducing environments. Many of these compounds reside in anaerobic environments or are exposed to anaerobic waste treatment processes. Thus, it is of interest to identify: (i) whether ether compounds are anaerobically biodegradable, (ii) the anaerobic microorganisms able to degrade these compounds, and (iii) the mechanism(s) of anaerobic ether bond-cleavage. The ether bonds of polyethylene glycol (PEG; HO-(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-O-){sub n}H), phenyl ether ((C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}O), and dibenzo-p-dioxin ((C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}O{sub 2}) were shown to be degraded in methanogenic consortia enriched with these compounds and polyethoxylate (nonionic) surfactants as substrates. Two anaerobic microorganisms which used PEGs as sole substrates were isolated and characterized. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain DG2 degraded the monomer ethylene glycol and oligomers up to tetraethylene glycol (HO-(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-O-){sub 4}H) in length. Bacteroides sp. strain PG1 degraded diethylene glycol and all other polymer lengths of PEG. PEGs were degraded by Bacteroides sp. strain PG1 via an external depolymerization which was either a hydrolytic or a reductive cleavage of the ether bond. The ether bond of diaryl ethers was apparently cleaved by a reductive mechanism which produced benzene and phenol as products from phenyl ether degradation and benzene and, by indirect analysis, catechol from dibenzo-dioxin.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  19. Cell-specific and developmental expression of lectican-cleaving proteases in mouse hippocampus and neocortex.

    PubMed

    Levy, C; Brooks, J M; Chen, J; Su, J; Fox, M A

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that a specialized extracellular matrix exists in the mammalian brain and that this glycoprotein-rich matrix contributes to many aspects of brain development and function. The most prominent supramolecular assemblies of these extracellular matrix glycoproteins are perineuronal nets, specialized lattice-like structures that surround the cell bodies and proximal neurites of select classes of interneurons. Perineuronal nets are composed of lecticans, a family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that includes aggrecan, brevican, neurocan, and versican. These lattice-like structures emerge late in postnatal brain development, coinciding with the ending of critical periods of brain development. Despite our knowledge of the presence of lecticans in perineuronal nets and their importance in regulating synaptic plasticity, we know little about the development or distribution of the extracellular proteases that are responsible for their cleavage and turnover. A subset of a large family of extracellular proteases (called a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs [ADAMTS]) is responsible for endogenously cleaving lecticans. We therefore explored the expression pattern of two aggrecan-degrading ADAMTS family members, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4, in the hippocampus and neocortex. Here, we show that both lectican-degrading metalloproteases are present in these brain regions and that each exhibits a distinct temporal and spatial expression pattern. Adamts15 mRNA is expressed exclusively by parvalbumin-expressing interneurons during synaptogenesis, whereas Adamts4 mRNA is exclusively generated by telencephalic oligodendrocytes during myelination. Thus, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4 not only exhibit unique cellular expression patterns but their developmental upregulation by these cell types coincides with critical aspects of neural development. PMID:25349050

  20. Granzyme B Cleaves Decorin, Biglycan and Soluble Betaglycan, Releasing Active Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Wendy A.; Shackleford, Marlo; Vanden Hoek, Amanda; Zhao, Hongyan; Hackett, Tillie L.; Knight, Darryl A.; Granville, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Granzyme B (GrB) is a pro-apoptotic serine protease that contributes to immune-mediated target cell apoptosis. However, during inflammation, GrB accumulates in the extracellular space, retains its activity, and is capable of cleaving extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic extracellular role for GrB in cardiovascular disease, yet the pathophysiological consequences of extracellular GrB activity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify proteoglycan (PG) substrates of GrB and examine the ability of GrB to release PG-sequestered TGF-β1 into the extracellular milieu. Methods/Results Three extracellular GrB PG substrates were identified; decorin, biglycan and betaglycan. As all of these PGs sequester active TGF-β1, cytokine release assays were conducted to establish if GrB-mediated PG cleavage induced TGF-β1 release. Our data confirmed that GrB liberated TGF-β1 from all three substrates as well as from endogenous ECM and this process was inhibited by the GrB inhibitor 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. The released TGF-β1 retained its activity as indicated by the induction of SMAD-3 phosphorylation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells. Conclusion In addition to contributing to ECM degradation and the loss of tissue structural integrity in vivo, increased extracellular GrB activity is also capable of inducing the release of active TGF-β1 from PGs. PMID:22479366

  1. Rational design of self-cleaving pre-tRNA-ribonuclease P RNA conjugates.

    PubMed

    Frank, D N; Harris, M E; Pace, N R

    1994-09-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNaseP) generates the mature 5' end of tRNAs by removing 5'leader sequences from pre-tRNAs. In vitro, the RNA subunit is sufficient to catalyze this reaction and is therefore a ribozyme. The kinetic analysis of RNase P-mediated catalysis is complicated because product release is normally rate-limiting. Furthermore, the intermolecular nature of the cleavage reaction precludes many applications of in vitro selection schemes to the analysis of RNaseP. To examine and manipulate the RNase P function more effectively, we designed a pair of ribozymes in which the RNase P RNA is covalently linked to a pre-tRNA substrate. To facilitate intramolecular cleavage, pre-tRNA molecules were tethered to circulatory permuted RNaseP RNA molecules at nucleotides implicated in substrate binding. These "active-site-tethered" pre-tRNA-RNaseP RNA conjugates undergo accurate and efficient self-cleavage in vitro, with first-order reaction rates equivalent to the rate of the chemical step of the native RNase P reaction. Unlike most ribozymes, RNase P recognizes its substrate through tertiary RNA-RNA interactions, rather than through extensive Watson-Crick base-pairing. However, the development of the active-site-tethered conjugates has led us to create a sequence-specific endonuclease, termed Endo.P. In the Endo.P configuration, the 3'half of the pre-tRNA acceptor stem binds exogenous RNA substrates via Watson-Crick base-pairing; the bound substrate is subsequently cleaved at the predicted site. The demonstration of sequence-specific cleavage by Endo.P expands the potential of RNase P and its derivatives as reagents in gene therapy. PMID:8075082

  2. Fine mapping of 28S rRNA sites specifically cleaved in cells undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Houge, G; Robaye, B; Eikhom, T S; Golstein, J; Mellgren, G; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Døskeland, S O

    1995-01-01

    Bona fide apoptosis in rat and human leukemia cells, rat thymocytes, and bovine endothelial cells was accompanied by limited and specific cleavage of polysome-associated and monosome-associated 28S rRNA, with 18S rRNA being spared. Specific 28S rRNA cleavage was observed in all instances of apoptotic death accompanied by internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, with cleavage of 28S rRNA and of DNA being linked temporally. This indicates that 28S rRNA fragmentation may be as general a feature of apoptosis as internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and that concerted specific cleavage of intra- and extranuclear polynucleotides occurs in apoptosis. Apoptosis-associated cleavage sites were mapped to the 28S rRNA divergent domains D2, D6 (endothelial cells), and D8. The D2 cuts occurred in hairpin loop junctions considered to be buried in the intact ribosome, suggesting that this rRNA region becomes a target for RNase attack in apoptotic cells. D8 was cleaved in two exposed UU(U) sequences in bulge loops. Treatment with agents causing necrotic cell death or aging of cell lysates failed to produce any detectable limited D2 cleavage but did produce a more generalized cleavage in the D8 region. Of potential functional interest was the finding that the primary cuts in D2 exactly flanked a 0.3-kb hypervariable subdomain (D2c), allowing excision of the latter. The implication of hypervariable rRNA domains in apoptosis represents the first association of any functional process with these enigmatic parts of the ribosomes. PMID:7891700

  3. Cell-specific and developmental expression of lectican-cleaving proteases in mouse hippocampus and neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Levy, C.; Brooks, J.M.; Chen, J.; Su, J.; Fox, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that a specialized extracellular matrix exists in the mammalian brain, and this glycoprotein-rich matrix contributes to many aspects of brain development and function. The most prominent supramolecular assembly of these ECM glycoproteins are perineuronal nets, specialized lattice-like structures that surround the cell bodies and proximal neurites of select classes of interneurons. Perineuronal nets are composed of lecticans – a family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans [CSPGs] that includes aggrecan, brevican, neurocan, and versican. The presence of these lattice-like structures emerge late in postnatal brain development and coincides with the ending of critical periods of brain development. Despite our knowledge of the presence of lecticans in perineuronal nets and their importance in regulating synaptic plasticity, we know little about the development or distribution of extracellular proteases that are responsible for their cleavage and turnover. A subset of the large “A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs” (ADAMTS) family of extracellular proteases is responsible for endogenously cleaving lecticans. We therefore explored the expression pattern of 2 aggrecan-degrading ADAMTS family members, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4, in hippocampus and neocortex. Here, we show that both lectican-degrading metalloproteases are present in these brain regions and each exhibits a distinct temporal and spatial expression pattern. Adamts15 mRNA is expressed exclusively by Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons during synaptogenesis, whereas, Adamts4 mRNA is exclusively generated by telencephalic oligodendrocytes during myelination. Thus, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4 not only exhibit unique cellular expression patterns but their developmental upregulation by these cell types coincides with critical aspects of neural development. PMID:25349050

  4. Characterization of the Self-Cleaving Effector Protein NopE1 of Bradyrhizobium japonicum ▿

    PubMed Central

    Schirrmeister, Jana; Friedrich, Lars; Wenzel, Mandy; Hoppe, Markus; Wolf, Christine; Göttfert, Michael; Zehner, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    NopE1 is a type III-secreted protein of the symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum which is expressed in nodules. In vitro it exhibits self-cleavage in a duplicated domain of unknown function (DUF1521) but only in the presence of calcium. Here we show that either domain is self-sufficient for cleavage. An exchange of the aspartic acid residue at the cleavage site with asparagine prevented cleavage; however, cleavage was still observed with glutamic acid at the same position, indicating that a negative charge at the cleavage site is sufficient. Close to each cleavage site, an EF-hand-like motif is present. A replacement of one of the conserved aspartic acid residues with alanine prevented cleavage at the neighboring site. Except for EDTA, none of several protease inhibitors blocked cleavage, suggesting that a known protease-like mechanism is not involved in the reaction. In line with this, the reaction takes place within a broad pH and temperature range. Interestingly, magnesium, manganese, and several other divalent cations did not induce cleavage, indicating a highly specific calcium-binding site. Based on results obtained by blue-native gel electrophoresis, it is likely that the uncleaved protein forms a dimer and that the fragments of the cleaved protein oligomerize. A database search reveals that the DUF1521 domain is present in proteins encoded by Burkholderia phytofirmans PsNJ (a plant growth-promoting betaproteobacterium) and Vibrio coralliilyticus ATCC BAA450 (a pathogenic gammaproteobacterium). Obviously, this domain is more widespread in proteobacteria, and it might contribute to the interaction with hosts. PMID:21642459

  5. The pseudorabies virus vhs protein cleaves RNA containing an IRES sequence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fen; Tsai, Pei-Yun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Lin, Fong-Yuan; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2016-03-01

    The virion host shutoff protein (vhs), encoded by the gene UL41, has RNase activity and is the key regulator of the early host shutoff response induced by type 1 herpes simplex virus. Despite low amino acid similarity, the vhs protein of the swine herpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PrV), also exhibits RNase activity. However, the mechanism underlying the action of vhs remains undefined. Here, we report that the RNA degradation profile of PrV vhs is similar, but not identical, to that of type 1 herpes simplex virus vhs. Notably, the presence of a cap structure enhances both the degradation rate and the preferential targeting of the vhs protein towards the 3'-end of the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Furthermore, type 1 herpes simplex virus vhs produces a simple degradation pattern, but PrV vhs gives rise to multiple intermediates. The results of northern blotting using probes recognizing various regions of the RNA substrate found that PrV vhs also cleaves downstream of the IRES region and this vhs protein overall shows 5' to 3' RNase activity. Moreover, addition of the translation initiation factors eIF4H and eIF4B significantly increased the RNase activity of recombinant PrV vhs against capped RNA. Nonetheless, these proteins did not fully reconstitute the IRES-directed targeting pattern observed for vhs translated in a rabbit reticular lysate system. The interaction between PrV vhs and eIF4H/eIF4B implies that the translation initiation machinery within the cell is able to stimulate the nuclease activity of PrV vhs. However, this process remains inefficient in terms of the IRES-targeting pattern. PMID:26744129

  6. T cell recognition of the posttranslationally cleaved intersubunit region of influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Rajnavölgyi, E; Nagy, Z; Kurucz, I; Gogolák, P; Tóth, G K; Váradi, G; Penke, B; Tigyi, Z; Hollósi, M; Gergely, J

    1994-12-01

    The influenza virus hemagglutinin is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain, but upon maturation it will posttranslationally be modified by a host cell related trypsin-like enzyme. The enzymatic cleavage attacks the so-called intersubunit region of the molecule giving rise to covalently linked HA1 and HA2 subunits. An I-Ed-restricted T cell epitope was identified in the highly conserved intact intersubunit region of the influenza virus hemagglutinin. T cell recognition of a 25-mer synthetic peptide comprising the intact intersubunit region does not require further processing and the elimination of the intervening Arg residue coupling the fusion peptide to the C-terminal segment of HA1 does not abolish the T cell activating capacity. The fine specificity pattern of a T cell hybridoma similar to that of the polyclonal T cell response demonstrates that a single T cell receptor is able to recognize peptides of different sizes representing not only the uncleaved but also the cleaved form of this hemagglutinin region. Based on specificity studies the epitope was localized to the C-terminal 11 amino acids of the HA1 subunit. The cross-reactivity of peptide-primed T cells with influenza virus infected antigen-presenting cells shows that fragments comprising the identified epitope of the intersubunit region can be generated as a result of natural processing of the hemagglutinin molecule. As antigen-presenting cells are lacking the enzyme which is responsible for the posttranslational modification of newly synthesized hemagglutinin molecules, the role of immature viral proteins in immune recognition is discussed. PMID:7823966

  7. Crystal structures of alkylperoxo and anhydride intermediates in an intradiol ring-cleaving dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Knoot, Cory J.; Purpero, Vincent M.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intradiol aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenases use an active site, nonheme Fe3+ to activate O2 and catecholic substrates for reaction. The inability of Fe3+ to directly bind O2 presents a mechanistic conundrum. The reaction mechanism of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase is investigated here using the alternative substrate 4-fluorocatechol. This substrate is found to slow the reaction at several steps throughout the mechanistic cycle, allowing the intermediates to be detected in solution studies. When the reaction was initiated in an enzyme crystal, it was found to halt at one of two intermediates depending on the pH of the surrounding solution. The X-ray crystal structure of the intermediate at pH 6.5 revealed the key alkylperoxo-Fe3+ species, and the anhydride-Fe3+ intermediate was found for a crystal reacted at pH 8.5. Intermediates of these types have not been structurally characterized for intradiol dioxygenases, and they validate four decades of spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational studies. In contrast to our similar in crystallo crystallographic studies of an Fe2+-containing extradiol dioxygenase, no evidence for a superoxo or peroxo intermediate preceding the alkylperoxo was found. This observation and the lack of spectroscopic evidence for an Fe2+ intermediate that could bind O2 are consistent with concerted formation of the alkylperoxo followed by Criegee rearrangement to yield the anhydride and ultimately ring-opened product. Structural comparison of the alkylperoxo intermediates from the intra- and extradiol dioxygenases provides a rationale for site specificity of ring cleavage. PMID:25548185

  8. Furin-cleaved Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 (PCSK9) Is Active and Modulates Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor and Serum Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lipari, Michael T.; Li, Wei; Moran, Paul; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Sai, Tao; Lai, Joyce; Lin, S. Jack; Kolumam, Ganesh; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Arnott, David; Wang, Jianyong; Peterson, Andrew S.; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) regulates plasma LDL cholesterol levels by regulating the degradation of LDL receptors. Another proprotein convertase, furin, cleaves PCSK9 at Arg218-Gln219 in the surface-exposed “218 loop.” This cleaved form circulates in blood along with the intact form, albeit at lower concentrations. To gain a better understanding of how cleavage affects PCSK9 function, we produced recombinant furin-cleaved PCSK9 using antibody Ab-3D5, which binds the intact but not the cleaved 218 loop. Using Ab-3D5, we also produced highly purified hepsin-cleaved PCSK9. Hepsin cleaves PCSK9 at Arg218-Gln219 more efficiently than furin but also cleaves at Arg215-Phe216. Further analysis by size exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry indicated that furin and hepsin produced an internal cleavage in the 218 loop without the loss of the N-terminal segment (Ser153–Arg218), which remained attached to the catalytic domain. Both furin- and hepsin-cleaved PCSK9 bound to LDL receptor with only 2-fold reduced affinity compared with intact PCSK9. Moreover, they reduced LDL receptor levels in HepG2 cells and in mouse liver with only moderately lower activity than intact PCSK9, consistent with the binding data. Single injection into mice of furin-cleaved PCSK9 resulted in significantly increased serum cholesterol levels, approaching the increase by intact PCSK9. These findings indicate that circulating furin-cleaved PCSK9 is able to regulate LDL receptor and serum cholesterol levels, although somewhat less efficiently than intact PCSK9. Therapeutic anti-PCSK9 approaches that neutralize both forms should be the most effective in preserving LDL receptors and in lowering plasma LDL cholesterol. PMID:23135270

  9. Temperature-controlled formation of olygomeric and polymeric compounds based on [Re4Te4(CN)12]4- cluster anions and Tm3+/1,10-phen complex cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Yulia M.; Gayfulin, Yakov M.; Samsonenko, Denis G.; Piryazev, Dmitry A.; Mironov, Yuri V.

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembly reaction of [Re4Te4(CN)12]4- tetrahedral rhenium chalcocyanide cluster anions, Tm3+ cations and 1,10-phenanthroline in an H2O/EtOH medium was investigated at different temperatures. Slow mixing of reagent solutions at the room temperature lead to formation of cluster compound (1) containing unique trimeric anionic fragment [{Tm(phen) (H2O)4}{Tm(phen)2(H2O)3}{Tm(phen)2(H2O)2}{Re4Te4(CN)12}3]3- (A1, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline). Oligomeric anion A1 shows an unusual U-shaped structure build from three cluster anions and three {Tm(phen)n(H2O)m}3+ (n = 1, 2; m = 2-4) complex cations linked to each other by sbnd Ctbnd Nsbnd Tmsbnd Ntbnd Csbnd covalent bonds and two couples of short OH…N hydrogen bonds. At the elevated (80-100 °C) temperatures the initial reaction products were dissolved, however, further increase of temperature up to 150 °C resulted in formation of layered (2D) coordination polymer K[{Tm(phen) (H2O)3}{Re4Te4(CN)12}]·0.5H2O (2). In addition to the experimental and X-Ray structural analysis data, thermal decomposition of compounds is also discussed.

  10. Oxidative group transfer to a trimanganese complex to form Mn6(μ6-E) (E = O, N) clusters featuring interstitial oxide and nitride functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Fout, Alison R.; Zhao, Qinliang; Xiao, Dianne J.

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing a hexadentate ligand platform, a trinuclear manganese complex of the type (HL)Mn3(thf)3 was synthesized and characterized ([HL]6− = [MeC(CH2N(C6H4-o-NH))3]6−). The pale orange, formally divalent trimanganese complex rapidly reacts with O-atom transfer reagents to afford the μ6-oxo complex (HL)2Mn6(μ6-O)(NCMe)4, where two trinuclear subunits bind the central O-atom and the (HL) ligands cooperatively bind both trinuclear subunits. The trimanganese complex (HL)Mn3(thf)3 rapidly consumes inorganic azide ([N3]NBu4) to afford a dianionic hexanuclear nitride complex [(HL)2Mn6(μ6-N)](NBu4)2, which subsequently can be oxidized with elemental iodine to (HL)2Mn6(μ6-N)(NCMe)4. EPR and alkylation of the interstitial light atom substituent were used to distinguish the nitride from the oxo complex. The oxo and oxidized nitride complexes gives rise to well-defined Mn(II) and Mn(III) sites, determined by bond-valence summation, while the dianionic nitride shows a more symmetric complex, giving rise to indistinguishable ion oxidation states based on crystal structure bond metrics. PMID:21942370

  11. Comparative analysis of the substrate preferences of two post-proline cleaving endopeptidases, prolyl oligopeptidase and fibroblast activation protein α

    PubMed Central

    Jambunathan, Kalyani; Watson, Douglas S.; Endsley, Aaron N.; Kodukula, Krishna; Galande, Amit K.

    2012-01-01

    Post-proline cleaving peptidases are promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases, psychiatric conditions, metabolic disorders, and many cancers. Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP; E.C. 3.4.21.26) and fibroblast activation protein α (FAP; E.C. 3.4.24.B28) are two post-proline cleaving endopeptidases with very similar substrate specificities. Both enzymes are implicated in numerous human diseases, but their study is impeded by the lack of specific substrate probes. We interrogated a combinatorial library of proteolytic substrates and identified novel and selective substrates of POP and FAP. These new sequences will be useful as probes for fundamental biochemical study, scaffolds for inhibitor design, and triggers for controlled drug delivery. PMID:22750443

  12. Study of stress distribution in a cleaved Si shallow trench isolation structure using confocal micro-Raman system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Tetsuya; Poborchii, Vladimir; Kanayama, Toshihiko

    2010-06-01

    We measured local stress distributions in a cleaved Si shallow trench isolation (STI) structure. We used a high-spatial-resolution confocal UV micro-Raman system with an excitation wavelength of 364 nm. The polarization dependence of Raman spectra enabled us to quantitatively estimate the stress direction and intensity on the (1¯10) cross-section. We observed stress relaxation due to the cleavage resulted in an abrupt change in the intensity and polarity of stress around the cross-sectional surface. Finite element method simulations reproduced well the measurement results and confirmed that this change was due to out-of-plane elastic deformation of the cleaved surface. This accurate comparison of the measurement data and the simulation is based on the feature that the UV Raman measurement selectively detects the surface regions, making this method particularly useful in stress distribution analyses.

  13. Non-enzymic nature of the pyridine haemochrome-cleaving activity of mammalian tissue extracts (`haem α-methyl oxygenase')

    PubMed Central

    Colleran, Emer; Carra, P. Ó

    1970-01-01

    1. The pyridine haemochrome-cleaving activity of extracts from mammalian liver and other tissues is shown conclusively to be entirely non-enzymic in nature and attributable to coupled oxidation with ascorbate. 2. Reduced glutathione probably contributes to the activity indirectly by continuously regenerating the ascorbate to the reduced form. 3. The cleavage shows no specificity for the α-methine bridge of pyridine haemochrome. 4. Results are presented suggesting some probable reasons for the erroneous characterization of the activity as an α-methine-specific haem-cleaving enzyme (`haem α-methenyl oxygenase') by Nakajima and co-workers (e.g. Nakajima, Takemura, Nakajima & Yamaoka, 1963; Nakajima & Gray, 1967). PMID:5492854

  14. MmoSTI restriction endonuclease, isolated from Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, cleaving 5'-|CCNGG-3' sequences.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Marta A; Zebrowska, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-02-01

    A type II restriction endonuclease, MmoSTI, from the pathogenic bacterium Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, has been detected and biochemically characterized, as a potential etiological differentiation factor. The described REase recognizes interrupted palindromes, i.e., 5'-CCNGG-3' sequences and cleaves DNA leaving 5-nucleotide (nt) long, single-stranded (ss), 5'-cohesive ends, which was determined by three complementary methods: (i) cleavage of custom and standard DNA substrates, (ii) run-off sequencing of cleavage products, and (iii) shotgun cloning and sequencing of bacteriophage lambda (λ) DNA digested with MmoSTI. MmoSTI, the first 5'-CCNGG-3' REase characterized from M. morganii, is a neoschizomer of ScrFI, which cleaves DNA leaving 1-nt long, ss, 5'-cohesive ends. It is a high-frequency cutter and can be isolated from easily cultured bacteria, thus it can potentially serve as a tool for DNA manipulations. PMID:26280518

  15. Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

  16. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2](n) Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron-Sulfur Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna K; Hahn, Anselm W; Albers, Antonia; Schiewer, Christine E; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Lima, Frederico A; Meyer, Franc; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-05-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2](n) model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron-sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:27097289

  17. Systolic architecture for heirarchical clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    Several hierarchical clustering methods (including single-linkage complete-linkage, centroid, and absolute overlap methods) are reviewed. The absolute overlap clustering method is selected for the design of systolic architecture mainly due to its simplicity. Two versions of systolic architectures for the absolute overlap hierarchical clustering algorithm are proposed: one-dimensional version that leads to the development of a two dimensional version which fully takes advantage of the underlying data structure of the problems. The two dimensional systolic architecture can achieve a time complexity of O(m + n) in comparison with the conventional computer implementation of a time complexity of O(m/sup 2*/n).

  18. Substrate-Triggered Formation and Remarkable Stability of the C-H-Cleaving Chloroferryl Intermediate in the Aliphatic Halogenase, SyrB2†

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Megan L.; Krest, Courtney M.; Barr, Eric W.; Vaillancourt, Frédéric H.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Green, Michael T.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2009-01-01

    Aliphatic halogenases activate O2, cleave α-ketoglutarate (αKG) to CO2 and succinate, and form haloferryl [X-Fe(IV)=O; X = Cl, Br] complexes that cleave aliphatic C-H bonds to install halogens during the biosynthesis of natural products by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). For the related αKG-dependent dioxygenases, it has been shown that reaction of the Fe(II) cofactor with O2 to form the C-H-cleaving ferryl complex is “triggered” by binding of the target substrate. In this study, we have tested for and defined structural determinants of substrate triggering (ST) in the halogenase, SyrB2, from the syringomycin E biosynthetic NRPS of Pseudomonas syringae B301D. As for other halogen ases, the substrate of SyrB2 is complex, consisting of l-Thr tethered via thioester linkage to a covalently bound phosphopantetheine (PPant) cofactor of a carrier protein, SyrB1. Without an appended amino acid, SyrB1 does not trigger formation of the chloroferryl intermediate state in SyrB2, even in the presence of free l-Thr or its analogues, but SyrB1 charged either by l-Thr or by any of several non-native amino acids does trigger the reaction by as much as 8,000-fold (for l-Thr-S-SyrB1). Triggering efficacy is sensitive to the structures of both the amino acid and the carrier protein, being diminished by 5–20-fold when the native l-Thr is replaced by another amino acid and by ∼ 40-fold when SyrB1 is replaced by a heterologous carrier protein, CytC2. The directing effect of the carrier protein and consequent tolerance for profound modifications to the target amino acid allow the chloroferryl state to be formed in the presence of substrates that perturb the ratio of its two putative coordination isomers, lack the target C-H bond (l-Ala-S-SyrB1), or contain a C-H bond of enhanced strength (l-cyclopropylglycyl-S-SyrB1). For the latter two cases, the SyrB2 chloroferryl state so formed exhibits unprecedented stability (t1/2 = 30 – 110 min at 0 °C), can be trapped in

  19. A Complex of Cas Proteins 5, 6, and 7 Is Required for the Biogenesis and Stability of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-derived RNAs (crRNAs) in Haloferax volcanii*

    PubMed Central

    Brendel, Jutta; Stoll, Britta; Lange, Sita J.; Sharma, Kundan; Lenz, Christof; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Richter, Hagen; Nickel, Lisa; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Randau, Lennart; Allers, Thorsten; Urlaub, Henning; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR-Cas) system is a prokaryotic defense mechanism against foreign genetic elements. A plethora of CRISPR-Cas versions exist, with more than 40 different Cas protein families and several different molecular approaches to fight the invading DNA. One of the key players in the system is the CRISPR-derived RNA (crRNA), which directs the invader-degrading Cas protein complex to the invader. The CRISPR-Cas types I and III use the Cas6 protein to generate mature crRNAs. Here, we show that the Cas6 protein is necessary for crRNA production but that additional Cas proteins that form a CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense (Cascade)-like complex are needed for crRNA stability in the CRISPR-Cas type I-B system in Haloferax volcanii in vivo. Deletion of the cas6 gene results in the loss of mature crRNAs and interference. However, cells that have the complete cas gene cluster (cas1–8b) removed and are transformed with the cas6 gene are not able to produce and stably maintain mature crRNAs. crRNA production and stability is rescued only if cas5, -6, and -7 are present. Mutational analysis of the cas6 gene reveals three amino acids (His-41, Gly-256, and Gly-258) that are essential for pre-crRNA cleavage, whereas the mutation of two amino acids (Ser-115 and Ser-224) leads to an increase of crRNA amounts. This is the first systematic in vivo analysis of Cas6 protein variants. In addition, we show that the H. volcanii I-B system contains a Cascade-like complex with a Cas7, Cas5, and Cas6 core that protects the crRNA. PMID:24459147

  20. On the accuracy of explicitly correlated methods to generate potential energy surfaces for scattering calculations and clustering: application to the HCl-He complex.

    PubMed

    Ajili, Yosra; Hammami, Kamel; Jaidane, Nejm Eddine; Lanza, Mathieu; Kalugina, Yulia N; Lique, François; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2013-07-01

    We closely compare the accuracy of multidimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) generated by the recently developed explicitly correlated coupled cluster (CCSD(T)-F12) methods in connection with the cc-pVXZ-F12 (X = D, T) and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets and those deduced using the well-established orbital-based coupled cluster techniques employing correlation consistent atomic basis sets (aug-cc-pVXZ, X = T, Q, 5) and extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. This work is performed on the benchmark rare gas-hydrogen halide interaction (HCl-He) system. These PESs are then incorporated into quantum close-coupling scattering dynamical calculations in order to check the impact of the accuracy of the PES on the scattering calculations. For this system, we deduced inelastic collisional data including (de-)excitation collisional and pressure broadening cross sections. Our work shows that the CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVTZ PES describes correctly the repulsive wall, the van der Waals minimum and long range internuclear distances whereas cc-pVXZ-F12 (X = D,T) basis sets are not diffuse enough for that purposes. Interestingly, the collision cross sections deduced from the CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVTZ PES are in excellent agreement with those obtained with CCSD(T)/CBS methodology. The position of the resonances and the general shape of these cross sections almost coincide. Since the cost of the electronic structure computations is reduced by several orders of magnitude when using CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVTZ compared to CCSD(T)/CBS methodology, this approach can be recommended as an alternative for generation of PESs of molecular clusters and for the interpretation of accurate scattering experiments as well as for a wide production of collisional data to be included in astrophysical and atmospherical models. PMID:23443908

  1. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  2. Endonuclease IV cleaves apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in single-stranded DNA and its application for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Juan; Wu, Shuang; Cen, Yao; Chen, Ting-Ting; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2016-07-21

    Endonuclease IV (Endo IV), as a DNA repairing enzyme, plays a crucial role in repairing damaged DNA comprising abasic sites to maintain genomic integrity. The cleaving capability of Endo IV to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was demonstrated. It was found that Endo IV has considerably high cleaving activity to AP sites in ssDNA compared with that in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The unique feature of Endo IV in cleaving AP sites in ssDNA was further applied to construct a novel dual signal amplified sensing system for highly sensitive enzyme and protein detection by a combination of exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided cyclic amplification reaction and a rolling circle replication (RCR) technique, which showed a good sensing performance with a detection limit of 0.008 U mL(-1) for Endo IV and 2.5 pM for streptavidin. In addition, the developed method had considerably high specificity for Endo IV and streptavidin over other potential interferences. The developed strategy indeed provides a novel platform for protein and enzyme assays and may find a broad spectrum of applications in bioanalysis, disease diagnosis, and drug development. PMID:27186607

  3. alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin is the human plasma inhibitor of macrophage ectoenzymes that cleave pro-macrophage stimulating protein.

    PubMed

    Skeel, A; Leonard, E J

    2001-06-15

    Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP) is secreted as 78-kDa single chain pro-MSP, which is converted to biologically active, disulfide-linked alphabeta chain MSP by cleavage at Arg(483)-Val(484). Murine resident peritoneal macrophages have two cell surface proteolytic activities that cleave pro-MSP. One is a pro-MSP convertase, which cleaves pro-MSP to active MSP; the other degrades pro-MSP. The degrading protease is inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor or by low concentrations of blood plasma, which allows the convertase to cleave pro-MSP to MSP. Using pro-MSP cleavage as the assay, we purified the inhibitor from human plasma. The bulk of the plasma protein was removed by salting out and by isoelectric precipitation of albumin. Highly purified inhibitor was then obtained in three steps: dye-ligand binding and elution, ion exchange chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography gel filtration. After SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transfer to a polyvinylidene membrane, N-terminal sequencing of the product identified it as alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin. The mean concentration of alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin in human plasma is 7 micrometer. At this concentration, alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin inhibits both macrophage enzymes. A concentration of 0.4 micrometer, which is in the expected concentration range in extracellular fluid, preferentially inhibits the degrading enzyme, which allows for cleavage to active MSP by the pro-MSP convertase. PMID:11274154

  4. An Ultrasensitive Light-up Cu(2+) Biosensor Using a New DNAzyme Cleaving a Phosphorothioate-Modified Substrate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Liu, Juewen

    2016-03-15

    Cu(2+) is a very important metal ion in biology, environmental science, and industry. Developing biosensors for Cu(2+) is a key topic in analytical chemistry. DNAzyme-based sensors are highly attractive for their excellent sensitivity, stability, and programmability. In the past decade, a few Cu(2+) biosensors were reported using DNAzymes with DNA cleavage or DNA ligation activity. However, they require unstable ascorbate or imidazole activation. So far, no RNA-cleaving DNAzymes specific for Cu(2+) are known. In this work, a phosphorothioate (PS) RNA-containing library was used for in vitro selection, and a few new Cu(2+)-specific RNA-cleaving DNAzymes were isolated. Among them, a DNAzyme named PSCu10 was studied further. It has only eight nucleotides in the enzyme loop with a cleavage rate of 0.1 min(-1) in the presence of 1 μM Cu(2+) at pH 6.0 (its optimal pH). Between the two diastereomers of the PS RNA chiral center, the R(p) isomer is 37 times more active than the S(p) one. Among the other divalent metal ions, only Hg(2+) can cleave the substrate due to its extremely high thiophilicity. A catalytic beacon sensor was designed with a detection limit of 1.6 nM Cu(2+) and extremely high selectivity. PSCu10 is specific for Cu(2+), and it has no cleavage in the presence of ascorbate, which reduces Cu(2+) to Cu(+). PMID:26857405

  5. First principle-based AKMC modelling of the formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters in a neutron irradiated complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngayam-Happy, R.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-09-01

    The formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters under neutron irradiation have been modelled in a complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of RPV steels, by means of first principle-based atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results obtained reproduce most features observed in available experimental studies, highlighting the very good agreement between both series. According to simulation, solute-rich clusters form and develop via an induced segregation mechanism on either the vacancy or interstitial clusters, and these point defect clusters are efficiently generated only in cascade debris and not Frenkel pair flux. The results have revealed the existence of two distinct populations of clusters with different characteristic features. Solute-rich clusters in the first group are bound essentially to interstitial clusters and they are enriched in Mn mostly, but also Ni to a lesser extent. Over the low dose regime, their density increases in the alloy as a result of the accumulation of highly stable interstitial clusters. In the second group, the solute-rich clusters are merged with vacancy clusters, and they contain mostly Cu and Si, but also substantial amount of Mn and Ni. The formation of a sub-population of pure solute clusters has been observed, which results from annihilation of the low stable vacancy clusters on sinks. The results indicate finally that the Mn content in clusters is up to 50%, Cu, Si, and Ni sharing the other half in more or less equivalent amounts. This composition has not demonstrated any noticeable modification with increasing dose over irradiation.

  6. High resolution structure of cleaved Serpin 42 Da from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila melanogaster Serpin 42 Da gene (previously Serpin 4) encodes a serine protease inhibitor that is capable of remarkable functional diversity through the alternative splicing of four different reactive centre loop exons. Eight protein isoforms of Serpin 42 Da have been identified to date, targeting the protease inhibitor to both different proteases and cellular locations. Biochemical and genetic studies suggest that Serpin 42 Da inhibits target proteases through the classical serpin ‘suicide’ inhibition mechanism, however the crystal structure of a representative Serpin 42 Da isoform remains to be determined. Results We report two high-resolution crystal structures of Serpin 42 Da representing the A/B isoforms in the cleaved conformation, belonging to two different space-groups and diffracting to 1.7 Å and 1.8 Å. Structural analysis reveals the archetypal serpin fold, with the major elements of secondary structure displaying significant homology to the vertebrate serpin, neuroserpin. Key residues known to have central roles in the serpin inhibitory mechanism are conserved in both the hinge and shutter regions of Serpin 42 Da. Furthermore, these structures identify important conserved interactions that appear to be of crucial importance in allowing the Serpin 42 Da fold to act as a versatile template for multiple reactive centre loops that have different sequences and protease specificities. Conclusions In combination with previous biochemical and genetic studies, these structures confirm for the first time that the Serpin 42 Da isoforms are typical inhibitory serpin family members with the conserved serpin fold and inhibitory mechanism. Additionally, these data reveal the remarkable structural plasticity of serpins, whereby the basic fold is harnessed as a template for inhibition of a large spectrum of proteases by reactive centre loop exon ‘switching’. This is the first structure of a Drosophila serpin reported to date

  7. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  8. Respiratory chain complex I is essential for sexual development in neurospora and binding of iron sulfur clusters are required for enzyme assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, M; Videira, A

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned and disrupted in vivo, by repeat-induced point mutations, the nuclear gene coding for an iron sulfur subunit of complex I from Neurospora crassa, homologue of the mammalian TYKY protein. Analysis of the obtained mutant nuo21.3c revealed that complex I fails to assemble. The peripheral arm of the enzyme is disrupted while its membrane arm accumulates. Furthermore, mutated 21.3c-kD proteins, in which selected cysteine residues were substituted with alanines or serines, were expressed in mutant nuo21. 3c. The phenotypes of these strains regarding the formation of complex I are similar to that of the original mutant, indicating that binding of iron sulfur centers to protein subunits is a prerequisite for complex I assembly. Homozygous crosses of nuo21.3c strain, and of other complex I mutants, are unable to complete sexual development. The crosses are blocked at an early developmental stage, before fusion of the nuclei of opposite mating types. This phenotype can be rescued only by transformation with the intact gene. Our results suggest that this might be due to the compromised capacity of complex I-defective strains in energy production. PMID:11014810

  9. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  10. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  11. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  12. A novel anagostic C sbnd H⋯Cu interaction and clustered water molecules in copper(II)-pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Alper Tolga; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2011-04-01

    In this study, a new mononuclear Cu(II)-pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate complex with N,N-diethylethylenediamine (deen), [Cu(pydc)(deen)(H 2O)]·2H 2O ( 1) (pydc = pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylic acid or isocinchomeronic acid), has been synthesized. Elemental, thermal analysis and IR spectroscopic study have been performed to characterize the complex. The molecular structure of the complex has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In 1, the Cu(II) ion is coordinated by pyridine nitrogen and carboxylate oxygen atoms from pydc. The square pyramidal geometry around Cu(II) is completed by two N atoms from deen and aqua ligands. One of the interesting structural features of 1 is the presence of obvious C sbnd H⋯M anagostic interactions between the Cu(II) ion and the H atom of ethyl group.

  13. Detecting alternative graph clusterings.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Supreet; Kumara, Soundar; Yao, Tao

    2012-07-01

    The problem of graph clustering or community detection has enjoyed a lot of attention in complex networks literature. A quality function, modularity, quantifies the strength of clustering and on maximization yields sensible partitions. However, in most real world networks, there are an exponentially large number of near-optimal partitions with some being very different from each other. Therefore, picking an optimal clustering among the alternatives does not provide complete information about network topology. To tackle this problem, we propose a graph perturbation scheme which can be used to identify an ensemble of near-optimal and diverse clusterings. We establish analytical properties of modularity function under the perturbation which ensures diversity. Our approach is algorithm independent and therefore can leverage any of the existing modularity maximizing algorithms. We numerically show that our methodology can systematically identify very different partitions on several existing data sets. The knowledge of diverse partitions sheds more light into the topological organization and helps gain a more complete understanding of the underlying complex network. PMID:23005495

  14. Detecting alternative graph clusterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandala, Supreet; Kumara, Soundar; Yao, Tao

    2012-07-01

    The problem of graph clustering or community detection has enjoyed a lot of attention in complex networks literature. A quality function, modularity, quantifies the strength of clustering and on maximization yields sensible partitions. However, in most real world networks, there are an exponentially large number of near-optimal partitions with some being very different from each other. Therefore, picking an optimal clustering among the alternatives does not provide complete information about network topology. To tackle this problem, we propose a graph perturbation scheme which can be used to identify an ensemble of near-optimal and diverse clusterings. We establish analytical properties of modularity function under the perturbation which ensures diversity. Our approach is algorithm independent and therefore can leverage any of the existing modularity maximizing algorithms. We numerically show that our methodology can systematically identify very different partitions on several existing data sets. The knowledge of diverse partitions sheds more light into the topological organization and helps gain a more complete understanding of the underlying complex network.

  15. ROTATING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.; Zocchi, A.

    2013-07-20

    Internal rotation is thought to play a major role in the dynamics of some globular clusters. However, in only a few cases has internal rotation been studied by the quantitative application of realistic and physically justified global models. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of the photometry and three-dimensional kinematics of {omega} Cen, 47 Tuc, and M15, by means of a recently introduced family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating models. The three clusters, characterized by different relaxation conditions, show evidence of differential rotation and deviations from sphericity. The combination of line-of-sight velocities and proper motions allows us to determine their internal dynamics, predict their morphology, and estimate their dynamical distance. The well-relaxed cluster 47 Tuc is interpreted very well by our model; internal rotation is found to explain the observed morphology. For M15, we provide a global model in good agreement with the data, including the central behavior of the rotation profile and the shape of the ellipticity profile. For the partially relaxed cluster {omega} Cen, the selected model reproduces the complex three-dimensional kinematics; in particular, the observed anisotropy profile, characterized by a transition from isotropy to weakly radial anisotropy and then to tangential anisotropy in the outer parts. The discrepancy found for the steep central gradient in the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile and for the ellipticity profile is ascribed to the condition of only partial relaxation of this cluster and the interplay between rotation and radial anisotropy.

  16. Combining an amyloid-beta (Aβ) cleaving enzyme inhibitor with a γ-secretase modulator results in an additive reduction of Aβ production.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Kia; Eketjäll, Susanna; Georgievska, Biljana; Tunblad, Karin; Eliason, Kristina; Olsson, Fredrik; Radesäter, Ann-Cathrin; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Arvidsson, Per I; von Berg, Stefan; Fälting, Johanna; Cowburn, Richard F; Dabrowski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in amyloid plaques. Aβ peptides are produced by sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein by the β amyloid cleaving enzyme (BACE) and the γ-secretase (γ-sec) complex. Pharmacological treatments that decrease brain levels of in particular the toxic Aβ42 peptide are thought to be promising approaches for AD disease modification. Potent and selective BACE1 inhibitors as well as γ-sec modulators (GSMs) have been designed. Pharmacological intervention of secretase function is not without risks of either on- or off-target adverse effects. One way of improving the therapeutic window could be to combine treatment on multiple targets, using smaller individual doses and thereby minimizing adverse effect liability. We show that combined treatment of primary cortical neurons with a BACE1 inhibitor and a GSM gives an additive effect on Aβ42 level change compared with the individual treatments. We extend this finding to C57BL/6 mice, where the combined treatment results in reduction of brain Aβ42 levels reflecting the sum of the individual treatment efficacies. These results show that pharmacological targeting of two amyloid precursor protein processing steps is feasible without negatively interfering with the mechanism of action on individual targets. We conclude that targeting Aβ production by combining a BACE inhibitor and a GSM could be a viable approach for therapeutic intervention in AD modification. PMID:25303711

  17. Active-site-directed inactivators of the Zn2+-containing D-alanyl-D-alanine-cleaving carboxypeptidase of Streptomyces albus G.

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, P; Dideberg, O; Jamoulle, J C; Frère, J M; Ghuysen, J M; Dive, G; Lamotte-Brasseur, J

    1984-01-01

    Several types of active-site-directed inactivators (inhibitors) of the Zn2+-containing D-alanyl-D-alanine-cleaving carboxypeptidase were tested. (i) Among the heavy-atom-containing compounds examined, K2Pt(C2O4)2 inactivates the enzyme with a second-order rate constant of about 6 X 10(-2)M-1 X S-1 and has only one binding site located close to the Zn2+ cofactor within the enzyme active site. (ii) Several compounds possessing both a C-terminal carboxylate function and, at the other end of the molecule, a thiol, hydroxamate or carboxylate function were also examined. 3-Mercaptopropionate (racemic) and 3-mercaptoisobutyrate (L-isomer) inhibit the enzyme competitively with a Ki value of 5 X 10 X 10(-9)M. (iii) Classical beta-lactam compounds have a very weak inhibitory potency. Depending on the structure of the compounds, enzyme inhibition may be competitive (and binding occurs to the active site) or non-competitive (and binding causes disruption of the protein crystal lattice). (iv) 6-beta-Iodopenicillanate inactivates the enzyme in a complex way. At high beta-lactam concentrations, the pseudo-first-order rate constant of enzyme inactivation has a limit value of 7 X 10(-4)S-1 X 6-beta-Iodopenicillanate binds to the active site just in front of the Zn2+ cofactor and superimposes histidine-190, suggesting that permanent enzyme inactivation is by reaction with this latter residue. PMID:6743245

  18. Local density of states measurements via STM and TS on clean fresh cleaved HOPG and Gold thin films on HOPG under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morean, Casey; Marijczuk, Roman; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has many applications in physics and engineering thus understanding affiliated physical and chemical phenomena is important. This also makes HOPG an important and interesting system to study. This is an investigation of surfaces of HOPG and Au thin films (ranging about 20nm) via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Tunneling Spectroscopy (TS) with a Pt-Ir tip equipped Nanosurf Naio STM. In this investigation, clean fresh cleaved HOPG substrates were used. Surfaces of HOPG and Au sputter deposited at different film thicknesses were imaged via constant current mode to assess the surface consistency and roughness. Consistent atomic resolution images were obtained. The systems were then investigated via TS by applied tip voltage (V) vs. tunneling current (I) curves. These spectroscopic data were then used to assess the local density of states (LDOS) and the surface variation of LDOS. The discussion will attempt to assess the surface electronic environment of these systems in relation to the Au deposition and variation of Au thicknesses on HOPG. Since measurements were carried out in ambient conditions this adds to the complexity which will also be discussed. Lock Haven University Nanotechnology Program.

  19. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  20. The SMART CLUSTER METHOD - adaptive earthquake cluster analysis and declustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake declustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity with usual applications comprising of probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs) and earthquake prediction methods. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation. Various methods have been developed to address this issue from other researchers. These have differing ranges of complexity ranging from rather simple statistical window methods to complex epidemic models. This study introduces the smart cluster method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal identification. Hereby, an adaptive search algorithm for data point clusters is adopted. It uses the earthquake density in the spatio-temporal neighbourhood of each event to adjust the search properties. The identified clusters are subsequently analysed to determine directional anisotropy, focussing on a strong correlation along the rupture plane and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010/2011 Darfield-Christchurch events, an adaptive classification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures which may have been grouped into an individual cluster using near-field searches, support vector machines and temporal splitting. The steering parameters of the search behaviour are linked to local earthquake properties like magnitude of completeness, earthquake density and Gutenberg-Richter parameters. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It is tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. As a result of the cluster identification process, each event in

  1. Symmetry Based Automatic Evolution of Clusters: A New Approach to Data Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Vijendra, Singh; Laxman, Sahoo

    2015-01-01

    We present a multiobjective genetic clustering approach, in which data points are assigned to clusters based on new line symmetry distance. The proposed algorithm is called multiobjective line symmetry based genetic clustering (MOLGC). Two objective functions, first the Davies-Bouldin (DB) index and second the line symmetry distance based objective functions, are used. The proposed algorithm evolves near-optimal clustering solutions using multiple clustering criteria, without a priori knowledge of the actual number of clusters. The multiple randomized K dimensional (Kd) trees based nearest neighbor search is used to reduce the complexity of finding the closest symmetric points. Experimental results based on several artificial and real data sets show that proposed clustering algorithm can obtain optimal clustering solutions in terms of different cluster quality measures in comparison to existing SBKM and MOCK clustering algorithms. PMID:26339233

  2. Self-Assembled Multimetallic/Peptide Complexes: Structures and Unimolecular Reactions of [Mn (GlyGly-H)2n-1 ](+) and Mn+1 (GlyGly-H2n ](2+) Clusters in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Maryam B; Jami-Alahmadi, Yasaman; Fridgen, Travis D

    2015-10-26

    The unimolecular chemistry and structures of self-assembled complexes containing multiple alkaline-earth-metal dications and deprotonated GlyGly ligands are investigated. Singly and doubly charged ions [Mn (GlyGly-H)n-1 ](+) (n=2-4), [Mn+1 (GlyGly-H)2n ](2+) (n=2,4,6), and [M(GlyGly-H)GlyGly](+) were observed. The losses of 132 Da (GlyGly) and 57 Da (determined to be aminoketene) were the major dissociation pathways for singly charged ions. Doubly charged Mg(2+) clusters mainly lost GlyGly, whereas those containing Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) also underwent charge separation. Except for charge separation, no loss of metal cations was observed. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra were the most consistent with the computed IR spectra for the lowest energy structures, in which deprotonation occurs at the carboxyl acid groups and all amide and carboxylate oxygen atoms are complexed to the metal cations. The N-H stretch band, observed at 3350 cm(-1) , is indicative of hydrogen bonding between the amine nitrogen atoms and the amide hydrogen atom. This study represents the first into large self-assembled multimetallic complexes bound by peptide ligands. PMID:26279054

  3. First solid-state NMR analysis of uniformly ¹³C-enriched major light-harvesting complexes from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and identification of protein and cofactor spin clusters.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Anjali; Morosinotto, Tomas; Reus, Michael; Holzwarth, Alfred R; Bassi, Roberto; de Groot, Huub J M

    2011-04-01

    The light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the main component of the antenna system of plants and green algae and plays a major role in the capture of sun light for photosynthesis. The LHCII complexes have also been proposed to play a key role in the optimization of photosynthetic efficiency through the process of state 1-state 2 transitions and are involved in down-regulation of photosynthesis under excess light by energy dissipation through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). We present here the first solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR data of the major light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a eukaryotic green alga. We are able to identify nuclear spin clusters of the protein and of its associated chlorophyll pigments in ¹³C-¹³C dipolar homonuclear correlation spectra on a uniformly ¹³C-labeled sample. In particular, we were able to resolve several chlorophyll 13¹ carbon resonances that are sensitive to hydrogen bonding to the 13¹-keto carbonyl group. The data show that ¹³C NMR signals of the pigments and protein sites are well resolved, thus paving the way to study possible structural reorganization processes involved in light-harvesting regulation through MAS solid-state NMR. PMID:21276419

  4. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  5. On the guiding principles for lucid understanding of the damage-free S1 structure of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Suga, Michihiro; Akita, Fusamichi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2015-05-01

    Several key concepts and geometrical rules for the Mn-Mn and Mn-O distances of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) by previous and present theoretical calculations were examined for a clear understanding of the damage-free S1 structure revealed by X-ray free electron laser (XFEL). A simple equation to estimate the Mna-Mnb distance in relation to the Mna-O(5) distance was derived taking into consideration the Jahn-Teller (JT) effects for Mn centers, indicating that the XFEL structure is regarded as a slightly right-elongated quasi-central structure in contradiction to a right-opened structure proposed by the EXAFS measurements.

  6. H-D exchange in metal carbene complexes: Structure of cluster (μ-H)(μ-OCD3)Os3(CO)9{:C(CD3)NC2H8O}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savkov, Boris; Maksakov, Vladimir; Kuratieva, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray and spectroscopic data for the new complex (μ-H)(μ-OCH3)Os3(CO)9{:C(CD3)NC2H8O} (2) obtained in the reaction of the (μ-H)(μ-Cl)Os3(CO)9{:C(CH3)NC2H8O} (1) with NaOCD3 in CD3OD solution are reported. It is shown that cluster 1 has the property of CH-acidity inherent of Fisher type carbenes. This had demonstrated using hydrogen deuterium exchange reaction in the presence of a strong base. Bridging chlorine to metoxide ligand substitution takes place during the reaction. The molecular structure of 2 is compared with known analogues.

  7. Large-scale QM/MM calculations of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II: Comparisons with EXAFS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale QM/MM calculations including hydrogen-bonding networks in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) were performed to elucidate the geometric structures of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the key catalytic states (Si (i = 0-3)). The optimized Mn-Mn, Ca-Mn and Mn-O distances by the large-scale QM/MM starting from the high-resolution XRD structure were consistent with those of the EXAFS experiments in the dark stable S1 state by the Berkeley and Berlin groups. The optimized geometrical parameters for other Si (i = 0, 2, 3) states were also consistent with those of EXAFS, indicating the importance of the large-scale QM/MM calculations for the PSII-OEC.

  8. Streptococcal SpeB Cleaved PAR-1 Suppresses ERK Phosphorylation and Blunts Thrombin-Induced Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Ender, Miriam; Andreoni, Federica; Zinkernagel, Annelies Sophie; Schuepbach, Reto Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background The family of 4 related protease-activated receptors (PAR-1, 2, 3 & 4) expressed by mammalian cells allow to sense for and react to extracellular proteolytic activity. Since major human bacterial pathogens secret a wide array of protease(-s) we investigated whether they interfere with human PAR function. Methodology/Principal Findings Supernatants from cultures of major human bacterial pathogens were assayed for the presence of protease(-s) capable to cleave overexpressed human PAR-1, 2, 3 and 4 reporter constructs. Group A streptococcus (GAS) was found to secret a PAR-1-cleaving protease. Experiments involving genetical and pharmacological gain and loss of function identified streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B SpeB as the protease responsible. On the host’s side analysis of overexpressed PAR-1 carrying alanine substitutions and deletions showed the amino acid residue leucine44 on PAR-1’s extracellular N-terminus to be the only cleavage site. Complementary studies on endogenously expressed PAR-1 using PAR-1 blocking antibodies further supported our conclusion. Through PAR-1 cleavage SpeB efficiently blunted thrombin-induced induction of the ERK-pathway in endothelial cells and prevented platelets aggregation in response to thrombin. Conclusions/Significance Our results identify a novel function of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB. By cleaving human PAR-1 at the N-terminal amino acid residue leucine44 SpeB rendered endothelial cells unresponsive to thrombin and prevented human platelets from thrombin-induced aggregation. These results suggest that by blunting PAR-1 signaling, SpeB modulates various innate host responses directed against invasive GAS potentially helping the invasive bacteria to escape. This may allow to tailor additional treatments in the future since upon invasion of the blood stream endothelial cells as well as platelets and mononuclear cells respond to PAR-1 agonists aiming to prevent further bacterial dissemination. PMID

  9. A geological explanation for intraplate earthquake clustering complexity: The zeolite-bearing fault/fracture networks in the Adamello Massif (Southern Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, E. D.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Imber, J.; Bistacchi, A.; Di Toro, G.

    2014-09-01

    Interconnected networks of faults and veins filled with hydrothermal minerals such as zeolite are widespread in many orogenic terrains. These fractures commonly form at relatively low temperatures (e.g. <200 °C) late in the tectonic history and represent significant phases of fluid flow and mineralisation during exhumation. Zeolite-bearing fractures spatially associated with the Gole Larghe Fault Zone in the Southern Italian Alps are preserved along an interconnected network of variably orientated pre-existing structures. They show evidence of repeated episodes of hydraulic tensile fracturing and small magnitude (total offsets <5 m) shear displacements. We use geological observations and Coulomb stress modelling to propose that repeated seismogenic rupturing of larger offset faults led to local stress transfer and reactivation of widely distributed smaller pre-existing structures in the wall rocks. The differing orientations of the pre-existing features within what is assumed to have been a single regional stress field led to the simultaneous development of reverse, strike-slip and extensional faults. The kinematic diversity and cyclic nature of the hydraulically-assisted deformation suggest that the mineralised fracture systems represent a geological manifestation of intraplate micro-earthquake clusters associated with fluid migration episodes in the upper crust. Our observations highlight the role of crustal fluids and structural reactivation during earthquakes.

  10. Communication: Surface stability and topological surface states of cleaved Bi2Se3: First-principles studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y N

    2015-10-21

    Through systematic first principles calculations within the nonlocal van der Waals functional, we investigated the structure stability and topological surface state properties of various surface cleaves in the topological insulator Bi2Se3 Our results reveal that under Bi-rich conditions, the Bi bilayer-covered surface and the Se-terminated surface with a Bi bilayer under the first quintuple layer are even more stable than the generic Bi2Se3. The surface state bands are changed by different surface terminations, causing the formation of new Dirac states. We may distinguish various surfaces by using scanning tunneling microscopy experimentally. PMID:26493890

  11. Surface barrier heights and changes induced by ferrocene group addition on Ge and Si surfaces cleaved in electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, S.; Haneman, D.

    1980-12-01

    Ge and Si single crystals were cleaved inside electrolytes of ferrocene in tetrabutyl ammonium perchlorate and ethanol. and the stable surface barrier heights measured from photocurrent-potential plots. When hydroxymethylferrocene (HMF) was added, the Ge barrier height reduced from 0.19 to 0.14eV, but Si was unchanged at 0.68 eV. The results are interpreted as due to inability of HMF to dislodge ferrocene from the Si surfaces, but ability to replace it on Ge surfaces; the packing density of the molecules is concluded to be lower than for ferrocene.

  12. Assembly of juxtaparanodes in myelinating DRG culture: Differential clustering of the Kv1/Caspr2 complex and scaffolding protein 4.1B.

    PubMed

    Hivert, Bruno; Pinatel, Delphine; Labasque, Marilyne; Tricaud, Nicolas; Goutebroze, Laurence; Faivre-Sarrailh, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    The precise distribution of ion channels at the nodes of Ranvier is essential for the efficient propagation of action potentials along myelinated axons. The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.1/1.2 are clustered at the juxtaparanodes in association with the cell adhesion molecules, Caspr2 and TAG-1 and the scaffolding protein 4.1B. In the present study, we set up myelinating cultures of DRG neurons and Schwann cells to look through the formation of juxtaparanodes in vitro. We showed that the Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels were first enriched at paranodes before being restricted to distal paranodes and juxtaparanodes. In addition, the Kv1 channels displayed an asymmetric expression enriched at the distal juxtaparanodes. Caspr2 was strongly co-localized with Kv1.2 whereas the scaffolding protein 4.1B was preferentially recruited at paranodes while being present at juxtaparanodes too. Kv1.2/Caspr2 but not 4.1B, also transiently accumulated within the nodal region both in myelinated cultures and developing sciatic nerves. Studying cultures and sciatic nerves from 4.1B KO mice, we further showed that 4.1B is required for the proper targeting of Caspr2 early during myelination. Moreover, using adenoviral-mediated expression of Caspr-GFP and photobleaching experiments, we analyzed the stability of paranodal junctions and showed that the lateral stability of paranodal Caspr was not altered in 4.1B KO mice indicating that 4.1B is not required for the assembly and stability of the paranodal junctions. Thus, developing an adapted culture paradigm, we provide new insights into the dynamic and differential distribution of Kv1 channels and associated proteins during myelination. GLIA 2016;64:840-852. PMID:26840208

  13. How often are interventions in cluster-randomised controlled trials of complex interventions in general practices effective and reasons for potential shortcomings? Protocol and results of a feasibility project for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Siebenhofer, Andrea; Erckenbrecht, Stefanie; Pregartner, Gudrun; Berghold, Andrea; Muth, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most studies conducted at general practices investigate complex interventions and increasingly use cluster-randomised controlled trail (c-RCT) designs to do so. Our primary objective is to evaluate how frequently complex interventions are shown to be more, equally or less effective than routine care in c-RCTs with a superior design. The secondary aim is to discover whether the quality of a c-RCT determines the likelihood of the complex intervention being effective. Methods and analysis All c-RCTs of any design that have a patient-relevant primary outcome and with a duration of at least 1 year will be included. The search will be performed in three electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR)). The screening process, data collection, quality assessment and statistical data analyses (if suitably similar and of adequate quality) will be performed in accordance with requirements of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. A feasibility project was carried out that was restricted to a search in MEDLINE and the CCTR for c-RCTs published in 1 of the 8 journals that are most relevant to general practice. The process from trial selection to data collection, assessment and results presentation was piloted. Of the 512 abstracts identified during the feasibility search, 21 studies examined complex interventions in a general practice setting. Extrapolating the preliminary search to include all relevant c-RCTs in three databases, about 5000 abstracts and 150 primary studies are expected to be identified in the main study. 14 studies included in the feasibility project (67%) did not show a positive effect on a primary patient-relevant end point. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not being sought for this review. Findings will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journals that frequently publish articles on the results of c-RCTs and through presentations at international conferences. Trial

  14. SVM clustering

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Merat, Sam

    2007-01-01

    Background Support Vector Machines (SVMs) provide a powerful method for classification (supervised learning). Use of SVMs for clustering (unsupervised learning) is now being considered in a number of different ways. Results An SVM-based clustering algorithm is introduced that clusters data with no a priori knowledge of input classes. The algorithm initializes by first running a binary SVM classifier against a data set with each vector in the set randomly labelled, this is repeated until an initial convergence occurs. Once this initialization step is complete, the SVM confidence parameters for classification on each of the training instances can be accessed. The lowest confidence data (e.g., the worst of the mislabelled data) then has its' labels switched to the other class label. The SVM is then re-run on the data set (with partly re-labelled data) and is guaranteed to converge in this situation since it converged previously, and now it has fewer data points to carry with mislabelling penalties. This approach appears to limit exposure to the local minima traps that can occur with other approaches. Thus, the algorithm then improves on its weakly convergent result by SVM re-training after each re-labeling on the worst of the misclassified vectors – i.e., those feature vectors with confidence factor values beyond some threshold. The repetition of the above process improves the accuracy, here a measure of separability, until there are no misclassifications. Variations on this type of clustering approach are shown. Conclusion Non-parametric SVM-based clustering methods may allow for much improved performance over parametric approaches, particularly if they can be designed to inherit the strengths of their supervised SVM counterparts. PMID:18047717

  15. A Robust Open Framework Formed by Decavanadate Clusters and Copper(II) Complexes of Macrocyclic Polyamines: Permanent Microporosity and Catalytic Oxidation of Cycloalkanes.

    PubMed

    Martín-Caballero, Jagoba; San José Wéry, Ana; Reinoso, Santiago; Artetxe, Beñat; San Felices, Leire; El Bakkali, Bouchra; Trautwein, Guido; Alcañiz-Monge, Juan; Vilas, José Luis; Gutiérrez-Zorrilla, Juan M

    2016-05-16

    The first decavanadate-based microporous hybrid, namely, [Cu(cyclam)][{Cu(cyclam)}2(V10O28)]·10H2O (1, cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) was prepared by reaction of (VO3)(-) anions and {Cu(cyclam)}(2+) complexes in NaCl (aq) at pH 4.6-4.7 and characterized by elemental analyses, thermogravimetry, and X-ray diffraction (powder, single-crystal) techniques. Compound 1 exhibits a POMOF-like supramolecular open-framework built of covalent decavanadate/metalorganic layers with square-like voids, the stacking of which is aided by interlamellar cementing complexes and generates water-filled channels with approximate cross sections of 10.4 × 8.8 Å(2). The framework is robust enough to remain virtually unaltered upon thermal evacuation of all water molecules of hydration, as demonstrated through single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies on the anhydrous phase 1a. This permanent microporosity renders interesting functionality to 1, such as selective adsorption of CO2 over N2 and remarkable activity as heterogeneous catalyst toward the H2O2-based oxidation of the highly-stable, tricyclic alkane adamantane. PMID:27111578

  16. The PIN domain endonuclease Utp24 cleaves pre-ribosomal RNA at two coupled sites in yeast and humans.

    PubMed

    Wells, Graeme R; Weichmann, Franziska; Colvin, David; Sloan, Katherine E; Kudla, Grzegorz; Tollervey, David; Watkins, Nicholas J; Schneider, Claudia

    2016-06-20

    During ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation, cleavages at defined sites separate the mature rRNAs from spacer regions, but the identities of several enzymes required for 18S rRNA release remain unknown. PilT N-terminus (PIN) domain proteins are frequently endonucleases and the PIN domain protein Utp24 is essential for early cleavages at three pre-rRNA sites in yeast (A0, A1 and A2) and humans (A0, 1 and 2a). In yeast, A1 is cleaved prior to A2 and both cleavages require base-pairing by the U3 snoRNA to the central pseudoknot elements of the 18S rRNA. We found that yeast Utp24 UV-crosslinked in vivo to U3 and the pseudoknot, placing Utp24 close to cleavage at site A1. Yeast and human Utp24 proteins exhibited in vitro endonuclease activity on an RNA substrate containing yeast site A2. Moreover, an intact PIN domain in human UTP24 was required for accurate cleavages at sites 1 and 2a in vivo, whereas mutation of another potential site 2a endonuclease, RCL1, did not affect 18S production. We propose that Utp24 cleaves sites A1/1 and A2/2a in yeast and human cells. PMID:27034467

  17. 2A self-cleaving peptide-based multi-gene expression system in the silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuancheng; Wang, Feng; Wang, Riyuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental and applied studies of silkworms have entered the functional genomics era. Here, we report a multi-gene expression system (MGES) based on 2A self-cleaving peptide (2A), which regulates the simultaneous expression and cleavage of multiple gene targets in the silk gland of transgenic silkworms. First, a glycine-serine-glycine spacer (GSG) was found to significantly improve the cleavage efficiency of 2A. Then, the cleavage efficiency of six types of 2As with GSG was analyzed. The shortest porcine teschovirus-1 2A (P2A-GSG) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency in all insect cell lines that we tested. Next, P2A-GSG successfully cleaved the artificial human serum albumin (66 kDa) linked with human acidic fibroblast growth factor (20.2 kDa) fusion genes and vitellogenin receptor fragment (196 kD) of silkworm linked with EGFP fusion genes, importantly, vitellogenin receptor protein was secreted to the outside of cells. Furthermore, P2A-GSG successfully mediated the simultaneous expression and cleavage of a DsRed and EGFP fusion gene in silk glands and caused secretion into the cocoon of transgenic silkworms using our sericin1 expression system. We predicted that the MGES would be an efficient tool for gene function research and innovative research on various functional silk materials in medicine, cosmetics, and other biomedical areas. PMID:26537835

  18. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  19. A continuous kinetic assay for RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes, exploiting ethidium bromide as an extrinsic fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Davide; Peracchi, Alessio

    2002-10-15

    We describe a rapid and inexpensive method to monitor the kinetics of small RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes, based on the exogenous fluorophore ethidium bromide. Ethidium binds preferentially to double-stranded nucleic acids, and its fluorescence emission increases dramatically upon intercalation. Thus, ethidium can be used in single-turnover experiments to measure both annealing of the deoxyribozyme to its substrate and release of the products. Under conditions in which dissociation of the product is fast compared with cleavage, the apparent rate of product release reflects the cleavage step. The method was developed for characterizing the so-called 8-17 catalytic DNA, but its general applicability in the deoxyribozyme field was verified using the 10-23 RNA-cleaving construct. Catalysis by both deoxyribozymes was not inhibited in the presence of substoichiometric amounts of ethidium, and the rates obtained through the ethidium assay were virtually identical to the rates determined using radiolabeled substrates. In contrast, the assay cannot be applied to the large, structured ribozymes, and its use to study the kinetics of the small hammerhead ribozyme was hampered by the presence on the catalyst of at least one high-affinity ethidium binding site. PMID:12384614

  20. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules L1 and CHL1 Are Cleaved by BACE1 Protease in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lujia; Barão, Soraia; Laga, Mathias; Bockstael, Katrijn; Borgers, Marianne; Gijsen, Harry; Annaert, Wim; Moechars, Diederik; Mercken, Marc; Gevaer, Kris; De Strooper, Bart

    2012-01-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme BACE1 is a prime drug target for Alzheimer disease. However, the function and the physiological substrates of BACE1 remain largely unknown. In this work, we took a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze the secretome of primary neurons after acute BACE1 inhibition, and we identified several novel substrate candidates for BACE1. Many of these molecules are involved in neuronal network formation in the developing nervous system. We selected the adhesion molecules L1 and CHL1, which are crucial for axonal guidance and maintenance of neural circuits, for further validation as BACE1 substrates. Using both genetic BACE1 knock-out and acute pharmacological BACE1 inhibition in mice and cell cultures, we show that L1 and CHL1 are cleaved by BACE1 under physiological conditions. The BACE1 cleavage sites at the membrane-proximal regions of L1 (between Tyr1086 and Glu1087) and CHL1 (between Gln1061 and Asp1062) were determined by mass spectrometry. This work provides molecular insights into the function and the pathways in which BACE1 is involved, and it will help to predict or interpret possible side effects of BACE1 inhibitor drugs in current clinical trials. PMID:22692213

  1. The PIN domain endonuclease Utp24 cleaves pre-ribosomal RNA at two coupled sites in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Graeme R.; Weichmann, Franziska; Colvin, David; Sloan, Katherine E.; Kudla, Grzegorz; Tollervey, David; Watkins, Nicholas J.; Schneider, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    During ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation, cleavages at defined sites separate the mature rRNAs from spacer regions, but the identities of several enzymes required for 18S rRNA release remain unknown. PilT N-terminus (PIN) domain proteins are frequently endonucleases and the PIN domain protein Utp24 is essential for early cleavages at three pre-rRNA sites in yeast (A0, A1 and A2) and humans (A0, 1 and 2a). In yeast, A1 is cleaved prior to A2 and both cleavages require base-pairing by the U3 snoRNA to the central pseudoknot elements of the 18S rRNA. We found that yeast Utp24 UV-crosslinked in vivo to U3 and the pseudoknot, placing Utp24 close to cleavage at site A1. Yeast and human Utp24 proteins exhibited in vitro endonuclease activity on an RNA substrate containing yeast site A2. Moreover, an intact PIN domain in human UTP24 was required for accurate cleavages at sites 1 and 2a in vivo, whereas mutation of another potential site 2a endonuclease, RCL1, did not affect 18S production. We propose that Utp24 cleaves sites A1/1 and A2/2a in yeast and human cells. PMID:27034467

  2. Tetanus toxin blocks the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles clustered at synapses but not of synaptic vesicles in isolated axons.

    PubMed

    Verderio, C; Coco, S; Bacci, A; Rossetto, O; De Camilli, P; Montecucco, C; Matteoli, M

    1999-08-15

    Recycling synaptic vesicles are already present in isolated axons of developing neurons (Matteoli et al., Zakharenko et al., 1999). This vesicle recycling is distinct from the vesicular traffic implicated in axon outgrowth. Formation of synaptic contacts coincides with a clustering of synaptic vesicles at the contact site and with a downregulation of their basal rate of exo-endocytosis (Kraszewski et al, 1995; Coco et al., 1998) We report here that tetanus toxin-mediated cleavage of synaptobrevin/vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP2), previously shown not to affect axon outgrowth, also does not inhibit synaptic vesicle exocytosis in isolated axons, despite its potent blocking effect on their exocytosis at synapses. This differential effect of tetanus toxin could be seen even on different branches of a same neuron. In contrast, botulinum toxins A and E [which cleave synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa. (SNAP-25)] and F (which cleaves synaptobrevin/VAMP1 and 2) blocked synaptic vesicle exocytosis both in isolated axons and at synapses, strongly suggesting that this process is dependent on "classical" synaptic SNAP receptor (SNARE) complexes both before and after synaptogenesis. A tetanus toxin-resistant form of synaptic vesicle recycling, which proceeds in the absence of external stimuli and is sensitive to botulinum toxin F, E, and A, persists at mature synapses. These data suggest the involvement of a tetanus toxin-resistant, but botulinum F-sensitive, isoform of synaptobrevin/VAMP in synaptic vesicle exocytosis before synapse formation and the partial persistence of this form of exocytosis at mature synaptic contacts. PMID:10436029

  3. Active matter clusters at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development and flocks of birds. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit whose movement depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed clusters which exert forces but no active torques, encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds and clusters with active torques, they show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times, becoming trapped at the interface and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection of the low velocity clusters. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  4. On the equilibrium structures of the complexes H2C3H+ · Ar and c-C3H3(+) · Ar: results of explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Botschwina, Peter; Oswald, Rainer

    2011-01-28

    Explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory at the CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a, b) level [T. B. Adler et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007)] has been employed in a study of the potential energy surfaces for the complexes H(2)C(3)H(+) · Ar and c-C(3)H(3)(+) · Ar. For the former complex, a pronounced minimum with C(s) symmetry was found (D(e) ≈ 780 cm(-1)), well below the local "H-bound" minimum with C(2v) symmetry (D(e) ≈ 585 cm(-1)). The absorption at 3238 cm(-1) found in the recent infrared photodissociation spectra [A. M. Ricks et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 051101 (2010)] is, thus, interpreted as an essentially free acetylenic CH stretching vibration of the propargyl cation. A global minimum of C(s) symmetry was also obtained for c-C(3)H(3)(+) (D(e) ≈ 580 cm(-1)), but the energy difference with respect to the local C(2v) minimum is only 54 cm(-1). PMID:21280723

  5. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  6. Thermal and electrochemically assisted Pd-Cl bond cleavage in the d9-d9 Pd2dppm2Cl2 complex by Pd3 dppm3COn+ clusters (n = 2, 1, 0).

    PubMed

    Cugnet, Cyril; Mugnier, Yves; Dal Molin, Sophie; Brevet, David; Lucas, Dominique; Harvey, Pierre D

    2007-04-16

    A new aspect of reactivity of the cluster [Pd3(dppm)3(micro3-CO)]n+, ([Pd3]n+, n = 2, 1, 0) with the low-valent metal-metal-bonded Pd2(dppm)2Cl2 dimer (Pd2Cl2) was observed using electrochemical techniques. The direct reaction between [Pd3]2+ and Pd2Cl2 in THF at room temperature leads to the known [Pd3(dppm)3(micro3-CO)(Cl)]+ ([Pd3(Cl)]+) adduct and the monocationic species Pd2(dppm)2Cl+ (very likely as Pd2(dppm)2(Cl)(THF)+, [Pd2Cl]+) as unambiguously demonstrated by UV-vis and 31P NMR spectroscopy. In this case, [Pd3]2+ acts as a strong Lewis acid toward the labile Cl- ion, which weakly dissociates from Pd2Cl2 (i.e., dissociative mechanism). Host-guest interactions between [Pd3]2+ and Pd2Cl2 seem unlikely on the basis of computer modeling because of the strong screening of the Pd-Cl fragment by the Ph-dppm groups in Pd2Cl2. The electrogenerated clusters [Pd3]+ and [Pd3]0 also react with Pd2Cl2 to unexpectedly form the same oxidized adduct, [Pd3(Cl)]+, despite the known very low affinity of [Pd3]+ and [Pd3]0 toward Cl- ions. The reduced biproduct in this case is the highly reactive zerovalent species "Pd2(dppm)2" or "Pd(dppm)" as demonstrated by quenching with CDCl3 (forming the well-known complex Pd(dppm)Cl2) or in presence of dppm (forming the known Pd2(dppm)3 d10-d10 dimer). To bring these halide-electron exchange reactions to completion for [Pd3]+ and [Pd3]0, 0.5 and 1.0 equiv of Pd2Cl2 are necessary, respectively, accounting perfectly for the number of exchanged electrons. The presence of a partial dissociation of Pd2Cl2 into the Cl- ion and the monocation [Pd2Cl]+, which is easier to reduce than Pd2Cl2, is suggested to explain the overall electrochemical results. It is possible to regulate the nature of the species formed from Pd2Cl2 by changing the state of charge of the title cluster. PMID:17371010

  7. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Results Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3') while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC). Conclusions The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations) were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate) or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt). Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this enzyme has no practical

  8. Cell- and Protein-Directed Glycosylation of Native Cleaved HIV-1 Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Laura K.; Harvey, David J.; Bonomelli, Camille

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gp120/gp41 HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is highly glycosylated, with up to 50% of its mass consisting of N-linked glycans. This dense carbohydrate coat has emerged as a promising vaccine target, with its glycans acting as epitopes for a number of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). Characterizing the glycan structures present on native HIV-1 Env is thus a critical goal for the design of Env immunogens. In this study, we used a complementary, multistep approach involving ion mobility mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography to comprehensively characterize the glycan structures present on HIV-1 gp120 produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The capacity of different expression systems, including pseudoviral particles and recombinant cell surface trimers, to reproduce native-like glycosylation was then assessed. A population of oligomannose glycans on gp120 was reproduced across all expression systems, supporting this as an intrinsic property of Env that can be targeted for vaccine design. In contrast, Env produced in HEK 293T cells failed to accurately reproduce the highly processed complex-type glycan structures observed on PBMC-derived gp120, and in particular the precise linkage of sialic acid residues that cap these glycans. Finally, we show that unlike for gp120, the glycans decorating gp41 are mostly complex-type sugars, consistent with the glycan specificity of bnAbs that target this region. These findings provide insights into the glycosylation of native and recombinant HIV-1 Env and can be used to inform strategies for immunogen design and preparation. IMPORTANCE Development of an HIV vaccine is desperately needed to control new infections, and elicitation of HIV bnAbs will likely be an important component of an effective vaccine. Increasingly, HIV bnAbs are being identified that bind to the N-linked glycans coating the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, highlighting them as

  9. Cleave and capture chemistry illustrated through bimetallic-induced fragmentation of tetrahydrofuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, Robert E.; Blair, Victoria L.; Clegg, William; Kennedy, Alan R.; Klett, Jan; Russo, Luca

    2010-07-01

    The cleavage of ethers is commonly encountered in organometallic chemistry, although rarely studied in the context of new, emerging bimetallic reagents. Recently, it was reported that a bimetallic sodium-zinc base can deprotonate cyclic tetrahydrofuran under mild conditions without opening its heterocyclic (OC4) ring. In marked contrast to this synergic sedation, herein we show that switching to the more reactive sodium-magnesium or sodium-manganese bases promotes cleavage of at least six bonds in tetrahydrofuran, but uniquely the ring fragments are captured in separate crystalline complexes. Oxide fragments occupy guest positions in bimetallic, inverse crown ethers and C4 fragments ultimately appear in bimetallated butadiene molecules. These results demonstrate the special synergic reactivity that can be executed by bimetallic reagents, which include the ability to capture and control, and thereby study, reactive fragments from sensitive substrates.

  10. Cleave and capture chemistry illustrated through bimetallic-induced fragmentation of tetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Robert E; Blair, Victoria L; Clegg, William; Kennedy, Alan R; Klett, Jan; Russo, Luca

    2010-07-01

    The cleavage of ethers is commonly encountered in organometallic chemistry, although rarely studied in the context of new, emerging bimetallic reagents. Recently, it was reported that a bimetallic sodium-zinc base can deprotonate cyclic tetrahydrofuran under mild conditions without opening its heterocyclic (OC(4)) ring. In marked contrast to this synergic sedation, herein we show that switching to the more reactive sodium-magnesium or sodium-manganese bases promotes cleavage of at least six bonds in tetrahydrofuran, but uniquely the ring fragments are captured in separate crystalline complexes. Oxide fragments occupy guest positions in bimetallic, inverse crown ethers and C(4) fragments ultimately appear in bimetallated butadiene molecules. These results demonstrate the special synergic reactivity that can be executed by bimetallic reagents, which include the ability to capture and control, and thereby study, reactive fragments from sensitive substrates. PMID:20571579

  11. Cryo-EM structure of a native, fully glycosylated, cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Ward, Andrew B

    2016-03-01

    The envelope glycoprotein trimer (Env) on the surface of HIV-1 recognizes CD4(+) T cells and mediates viral entry. During this process, Env undergoes substantial conformational rearrangements, making it difficult to study in its native state. Soluble stabilized trimers have provided valuable insights into the Env structure, but they lack the hydrophobic membrane proximal external region (MPER, an important target of broadly neutralizing antibodies), the transmembrane domain, and the cytoplasmic tail. Here we present (i) a cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a clade B virus Env, which lacks only the cytoplasmic tail and is stabilized by the broadly neutralizing antibody PGT151, at a resolution of 4.2 angstroms and (ii) a reconstruction of this form of Env in complex with PGT151 and MPER-targeting antibody 10E8 at a resolution of 8.8 angstroms. These structures provide new insights into the wild-type Env structure. PMID:26941313

  12. [Autism Spectrum Disorder and DSM-5: Spectrum or Cluster?].

    PubMed

    Kienle, Xaver; Freiberger, Verena; Greulich, Heide; Blank, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Within the new DSM-5, the currently differentiated subgroups of "Autistic Disorder" (299.0), "Asperger's Disorder" (299.80) and "Pervasive Developmental Disorder" (299.80) are replaced by the more general "Autism Spectrum Disorder". With regard to a patient-oriented and expedient advising therapy planning, however, the issue of an empirically reproducible and clinically feasible differentiation into subgroups must still be raised. Based on two Autism-rating-scales (ASDS and FSK), an exploratory two-step cluster analysis was conducted with N=103 children (age: 5-18) seen in our social-pediatric health care centre to examine potentially autistic symptoms. In the two-cluster solution of both rating scales, mainly the problems in social communication grouped the children into a cluster "with communication problems" (51 % and 41 %), and a cluster "without communication problems". Within the three-cluster solution of the ASDS, sensory hypersensitivity, cleaving to routines and social-communicative problems generated an "autistic" subgroup (22%). The children of the second cluster ("communication problems", 35%) were only described by social-communicative problems, and the third group did not show any problems (38%). In the three-cluster solution of the FSK, the "autistic cluster" of the two-cluster solution differentiated in a subgroup with mainly social-communicative problems (cluster 1) and a second subgroup described by restrictive, repetitive behavior. The different cluster solutions will be discussed with a view to the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, for following studies a further specification of some of the ASDS and FSK items could be helpful. PMID:26289149

  13. Recombinant fragilysin isoforms cause E-cadherin cleavage of intact cells and do not cleave isolated E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kharlampieva, Daria; Manuvera, Valentin; Podgorny, Oleg; Grafskaia, Ekaterina; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Pobeguts, Olga; Altukhov, Ilya; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2015-01-01

    The fragilysin (BFT) is a protein secreted by enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis strains. BFT contains zinc-binding motif which was found in the metzincins family of metalloproteinases. In this study, we generated three known recombinant isoforms of BFT using Escherichia coli, tested their activity and examined whether E-cadherin is a substrate for BFTs. BFT treatment of HT-29 cells induced endogenous E-cadherin cleavage, and this BFT activity requires the native structure of zinc-binding motif. At the same time recombinant BFTs did not cleave recombinant E-cadherin or E-cadherin in isolated cell fractions. It indicates that E-cadherin may be not direct substrate for BFT. We also detected and identified proteins released into the cultural medium after HT-29 cells treatment with BFT. The role of these proteins in pathogenesis and cell response to BFT remains to be determined. PMID:25998017

  14. Surface stability and atomic-step-edge kinetics on a cleaved-edge-overgrown (110) GaAs surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.

    2007-04-10

    We investigate the evolution of surface smoothness and atomic step-edge patterns on 6-nm (110) GaAs surfaces grown by cleaved-edge overgrowth with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and subsequent in situ annealing at elevated substrate temperatures ranging from 590 to 650 deg. C. As the annealing temperature was increased, island structures of {mu}m scale formed on the annealed surfaces decreased in size and almost disappeared at 630 deg. C while pit structures and underlying monolayer terraces increased in size, which indicate that the surface migration of atoms are enhanced and flatten the (110) surface during annealing. At higher annealing temperatures above 630 deg. C, new triangular-shaped pit structures appeared on the surface, which disturbs atomic-scale smoothing of the (110) surfaces.

  15. Topological constraints of structural elements in regulation of catalytic activity in HDV-like self-cleaving ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Chiu-Ho T.; Nguyen, Dang; Myszka, Marie; Lupták, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Self-cleaving ribozymes fold into intricate structures, which orient active site groups into catalytically competent conformations. Most ribozyme families have distinct catalytic cores stabilized by tertiary interactions between domains peripheral to those cores. We show that large hepatitis delta virus (HDV)-like ribozymes are activated by peripheral domains that bring two helical segments, P1 and P2, into proximity – a “pinch” that results in rate acceleration by almost three orders of magnitude. Kinetic analysis of ribozymes with systematically altered length and stability of the peripheral domain revealed that about one third of its free energy of formation is used to lower an activation energy barrier, likely related to a rate-limiting conformational change leading to the pre-catalytic state. These findings provide a quantitative view of enzyme regulation by peripheral domains and may shed light on the energetics of allosteric regulation. PMID:27302490

  16. Tracking quintuple layer oxidation on cleaved B i2S e3 by optical second-harmonic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yong Q.; Green, Avery J.; Diebold, Alain C.

    2016-06-01

    We find that the major and minor intensity lobes of a measured rotational-anisotropy pattern of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) from a cleaved B i2S e3 (111) surface can gradually change with time and eventually switch their relative amplitudes. This switching provides a means for tracking the progress of surface oxidation inside a quintuple layer of B i2S e3 . At different stages of oxidation, we perform pump-probe SHG experiments to study charge dynamics at the oxide/B i2S e3 interface and to detect spin polarization of photoexcited surface states in the B i2S e3 topological insulator.

  17. Structure