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Sample records for cleft palate surgery

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery ... to correct a physical defect caused by a cleft lip or cleft palate, which occur once in every ...

  2. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear infections, hearing loss, and problems with their teeth. Often, surgery can close the lip and palate. Cleft lip surgery is usually done before age 12 months, and cleft palate surgery is done ...

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Primary Palatal Surgery in Children with Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate with and without Lip

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seunghee; Koh, Kyung S.; Moon, Heewon; Jung, Seungeun; Oh, Tae Suk

    2015-01-01

    This study presents clinical outcomes of primary cleft palate surgery, including rate of oronasal fistula development, rate of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) requiring secondary surgery, and speech outcomes. We examined the effect of cleft type on the clinical outcomes. Retrospective analysis was performed using clinical records of all patients who received a primary palatoplasty at the Cleft Palate Clinic at Seoul Asan Medical Center, South Korea, between 2007 and 2012. The study included 292 patients with nonsyndromic overt cleft palatecleft lip). The results revealed that the rate of oronasal fistula was 7.9% and the incidence of VPI based on the rate of secondary palatal surgery was 19.2%. The results showed that 50.3% of all the patients had received speech therapy and 28.8% and 51.4% demonstrated significant hypernasality and articulatory deficits, respectively. The results of the rate of VPI and speech outcomes were significantly different in terms of cleft type. Except for the rate of oronasal fistula, patients with cleft palate generally exhibited better clinical outcomes compared to those with bilateral or unilateral cleft lip and palate. This study suggests that several factors, including cleft type, should be identified and comprehensively considered to establish an optimal treatment regimen for patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273593

  4. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  5. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    Cleft palate; Craniofacial defect ... way to the base of the nose. A cleft palate can be on 1 or both sides of ... nose, and palate confirms a cleft lip or cleft palate. Medical tests may be done to rule out ...

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate KidsHealth > For Kids > Cleft Lip ... to the back of your mouth. What's a Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate? The word cleft means a ...

  7. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Support Resources Books for Kids and Adults Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area FAQs for ... Conference: For Patients and Families Glossary of Terms Cleft lip and cleft palate comprise the most common birth ...

  8. Cleft palate - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cleft palate ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cleft palate : Cleft Palate Foundation -- www.cleftline.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/professionals/14332_1210.asp ...

  9. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly. They happen early during ... A baby can have a cleft lip, a cleft palate, or both. A cleft lip happens if the ...

  10. Cleft Palate Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a list of 2016 funded research projects. Cleft Palate Foundation 1504 East Franklin Street, Suite 102 Chapel ... to order bottles Order CPF publications © Copyright 2014 Cleft Palate Foundation. Website by Mixer Creative Follow us on ...

  11. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that affect the upper lip and the roof of the mouth. ... There are many causes of cleft lip and palate. Problems with genes ... viruses, or other toxins can all cause these birth defects. ...

  12. A protocol for safe anasthesia for cleft lip and palate surgery in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hodges, S C; Hodges, A M

    2000-05-01

    A project to perform surgical correction of cleft lips and palates was carried out in Uganda in 1998. Twenty centres were visited and 336 cleft lips and 41 cleft palates were repaired. The age of the patients ranged from 2 weeks to 60 years. Many of the centres visited were remote and lacked even the most basic equipment. Patients were anasthetised using ketamine, ether or halothane according to a protocol that we developed. There was no anasthetic mortality and only one case of significant morbidity. We report our experience and discuss recommendations regarding the provision of anasthesia in remote circumstances based on our outcome. An additional benefit of the project was that we provided training to local medical personnel in anasthesia and surgery for cleft lips and palates. PMID:10792134

  13. Spectral Analysis of Hypernasality in Cleft Palate Children: A Pre-Post Surgery Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Narra, Manjunath; Varghese, Sneha Mareen; Deepak, Dessai Teja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Change in resonance is the most commonly experienced speech problems in children diagnosed with cleft lip and palate. The degree of nasality during normal speech production is maintained by the changes in velopharyngeal port. These variations in speech signal are reported to be successfully captured using acoustical tools like spectral analysis. Aim The present study investigated to note voice low tone to high tone ratio (VLHR) values for phonation samples of individuals with cleft palate before and after surgery. Materials and Methods Thirty children with congenital cleft of palate within 8 to 15 years of age participated in the study. Three trials of sustained vowels (/a/,/i/ and /u/) were recorded at their comfortable pitch and loudness level in a noise free room using a hand held dynamic microphone. Praat software that utilized Hillenbrand algorithm was used to extract the VLHR values for samples recorded before and after recovery from the surgery. Results Statistical analysis revealed significant decrease in VLHR values after surgery in comparison to before the surgery. Analysis of Variance revealed statistical significant difference at 95% confidence level. Conclusion It is concluded that VLHR parameter could be used as an index to measure nasality and can be included in the routine tool assessment protocol. PMID:26894098

  14. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... refers to a cleft in the lip only accounting for 20 percent of all clefts. What causes ... permission. Oral Cavity Get Involved Professional Development Practice Management ENT Careers Marketplace Privacy Policy Terms of Use ...

  15. Clinical performance of cuffed versus uncuffed preformed endotracheal tube in pediatric patients undergoing cleft palate surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Mukhopadhyay, S; Bhattacharya, D; Bandyopadhyay, BK; Mukherjee, M; Ganguly, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncuffed endotracheal tubes are commonly used in children but due to several decade preferred in paediatric oral surgery. Due to lack of conclusive evidences in this regard, we have conducted this study to compare post-operative morbidity following use of cuffed and uncuffed endotracheal tubes in paediatric patients undergoing cleft lip-palate surgery. Methods: This randomised controlled trial was conducted on children aged 2 to 12 years.110 patients were allocated in two parallel groups using computer generated list of random numbers. Post operative extubation stridor, sore throat, time to first oral intake and regaining of normal voice were compared between two groups. Results: The incidence of sore throat was significantly more (P value > 0.005) in patients of uncuffed group compared to cuffed group. The time to first oral intake and time to regain normal voice were significantly earlier in cuffed group compared to the other. Conclusion: With standard care, preformed cuffed ET tube has shown reduced incidence of post operative sore throat. Cuffed group has earlier oral intake and normal voice regain compared to uncuffed group. PMID:27051374

  16. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  17. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus and pregnancy Microcephaly Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how to help reduce your risk ... of all races about the same. Can other birth defects happen along with oral clefts? Yes. There are ...

  18. An Opportunity for Diagonal Development in Global Surgery: Cleft Lip and Palate Care in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pratik B.; Hoyler, Marguerite; Maine, Rebecca; Hughes, Christopher D.; Hagander, Lars; Meara, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Global cleft surgery missions have provided much-needed care to millions of poor patients worldwide. Still, surgical capacity in low- and middle-income countries is generally inadequate. Through surgical missions, global cleft care has largely ascribed to a vertical model of healthcare delivery, which is disease specific, and tends to deliver services parallel to, but not necessarily within, the local healthcare system. The vertical model has been used to address infectious diseases as well as humanitarian emergencies. By contrast, a horizontal model for healthcare delivery tends to focus on long-term investments in public health infrastructure and human capital and has less often been implemented by humanitarian groups for a variety of reasons. As surgical care is an integral component of basic healthcare, the plastic surgery community must challenge itself to address the burden of specific disease entities, such as cleft lip and palate, in a way that sustainably expands and enriches global surgical care as a whole. In this paper, we describe a diagonal care delivery model, whereby cleft missions can enrich surgical capacity through integration into sustainable, local care delivery systems. Furthermore, we examine the applications of diagonal development to cleft care specifically and global surgical care more broadly. PMID:23316355

  19. Clefting of the Alveolus: Emphasizing the Distinction from Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Nicholas; Sidman, James; Block, William

    2016-05-01

    Oral clefting is one of the most common significant fetal abnormalities. Cleft lip and cleft palate have drastically different clinical ramifications and management from one another. A cleft of the alveolus (with or without cleft lip) can confuse the diagnostic picture and lead to a false assumption of cleft palate. The cleft alveolus should be viewed on the spectrum of cleft lip rather than be associated with cleft palate. This is made evident by understanding the embryological development of the midface and relevant terminology. Cleft alveolus carries significantly different clinical implications and treatment options than that of cleft palate. Accurately distinguishing cleft alveolus from cleft palate is crucial for appropriate discussions regarding the patient's care. PMID:26906186

  20. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  1. Molecular contribution to cleft palate production in cleft lip mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasunori; Taya, Yuji; Saito, Kan; Fujita, Kazuya; Aoba, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Taku

    2014-01-01

    Cleft palate following cleft lip may include a developmental disorder during palatogenesis. CL/Fr mice fetuses, which develop cleft lip and palate spontaneously, have less capability for in vivo cell proliferation in palatal mesenchyme compared with CL/Fr normal fetuses. In order to know the changes of signaling molecules contributing to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip, the mRNA expression profiles were compared in palatal shelves oriented vertically (before elevation) in CL/Fr fetuses with or without cleft lip. The changes in mRNA profile of cleft palate morphogenesis were presented in a microarray analysis, and genes were restricted to lists contributing to cleft palate development in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip. Four candidate genes (Ywhab, Nek2, Tacc1 and Frk) were linked in a gene network that associates with cell proliferation (cell cycle, MAPK, Wnt and Tgf beta pathways). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR highlighted the candidate genes that significantly changed in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip (Ywhab, Nek2 and Tacc1). The results of these molecular contributions will provide useful information for a better understanding of palatogenesis in cleft palate following cleft lip. Our data indicated the genetic contribution to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip. PMID:24206222

  2. Molecular contribution to cleft palate production in cleft lip mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yasunori; Taya, Yuji; Saito, Kan; Fujita, Kazuya; Aoba, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Taku

    2014-05-01

    Cleft palate following cleft lip may include a developmental disorder during palatogenesis. CL/Fr mice fetuses, which develop cleft lip and palate spontaneously, have less capability for in vivo cell proliferation in palatal mesenchyme compared with CL/Fr normal fetuses. In order to know the changes of signaling molecules contributing to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip, the mRNA expression profiles were compared in palatal shelves oriented vertically (before elevation) in CL/Fr fetuses with or without cleft lip. The changes in mRNA profile of cleft palate morphogenesis were presented in a microarray analysis, and genes were restricted to lists contributing to cleft palate development in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip. Four candidate genes (Ywhab, Nek2, Tacc1 and Frk) were linked in a gene network that associates with cell proliferation (cell cycle, MAPK, Wnt and Tgf beta pathways). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR highlighted the candidate genes that significantly changed in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip (Ywhab, Nek2 and Tacc1). The results of these molecular contributions will provide useful information for a better understanding of palatogenesis in cleft palate following cleft lip. Our data indicated the genetic contribution to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip. PMID:24206222

  3. The Management of Iatrogenic Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome Following Bimaxillary Surgery in a Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Gerbino, Giovanni; Gervasio, Fernando Carmine; Blythe, John; Bianchi, Francesca Antonella

    2016-07-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with a 6-year history of severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome followed a bimaxillary osteotomy procedure for a class III skeletal pattern. The patient was born with a unilateral cleft lip and palate and underwent primary lip and palate repair and later a pharyngeal flap for severe velopharyngeal insufficiency. Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome with conventional osteotomy, in cleft lip and palate patients, is a difficult problem. Distraction osteogenesis may provide a safer alternative. The authors describe and discuss the indications and the technical challenge of a multistage treatment protocol with distraction osteogenesis. PMID:27391499

  4. Do cleft lip and palate patients opt for secondary corrective surgery of upper lip and nose, frequently?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This prospective study was aimed at assessing cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients’ opinions and attitudes towards their upper lip and nose and the number of secondary corrective surgical interventions electively undertaken to upper lip and nose that were carried out during a 2 year follow-up period. Materials and methods During a 2 year follow-up period CLP outpatients were recruited for the study who attended follow-up examinations at a cleft lip and palate craniofacial center and received a recommendation for secondary corrective facial surgery. The participants filled in a questionnaire that included questions regarding the patients’ opinions and attitudes towards appearance of lip and nose and need for secondary corrective facial surgery. During an additional interval of 2 years the rate of patients who underwent secondary corrective surgery to lip and nose was documented. Results Out of 362 CLP patients 37 (mean age 13.6 ± 7.6 years) received a recommendation for secondary corrective surgery to upper lip and/or nose. 22 patients (mean age 12.6 ± 6.3 years) filled in the questionnaire (response rate of 62.1%). The satisfaction with the overall facial appearance following the first corrective operation was statistically significantly better than the satisfaction with the nose (p = .016). The satisfaction with facial symmetry (5.6 ± 2.0) did not differ statistically significantly from the overall satisfaction with the facial appearance (6.2 ± 1.8; p = .093). Significantly fewer patients (n = 9) opted for corrective surgery compared to the number of patients who got the recommendation to have secondary corrective surgery done (n = 22, p < .0005). Conclusions The findings of the present study may reflect a high overall patient satisfaction with the primary treatment outcome following surgery for CLP. Perceived patient need for secondary operation for the lip/nose may be as low as 5%. PMID:24321223

  5. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro. PMID:18650554

  6. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-02

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  7. Phonological Patterns Observed in Young Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broen, Patricia A.; And Others

    The study examined the speech production strategies used by 4 young children (30- to 32-months-old) with cleft palate and velopharyngeal inadequacy during the early stages of phonological learning. All the children had had primary palatal surgery and were producing primarily single word utterances with a few 2- and 3-word phrases. Analysis of each…

  8. Space Technology for Palate Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    University of Miami utilized NASA's spacecraft viewing technology to develop the optical profilometer provides more accurate measurements of cleft palate casts than has heretofore been possible, enabling better planning of corrective surgery. Lens like instrument electronically scans a palate cast precisely measuring its irregular contours by detecting minute differences in the intensity of a light beam reflected off the cast. Readings are computer processed and delivered to the surgeon by a teleprinter.

  9. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... from surgery, coping with speech problems, or improving self-esteem. Some teens join support groups or online forums where they can talk to ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Hearing Impairment Speech Problems ...

  10. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI.

  11. Computer-Assisted Orthognathic Surgery for Patients with Cleft Lip/Palate: From Traditional Planning to Three-Dimensional Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Lonic, Daniel; Pai, Betty Chien-Jung; Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Chortrakarnkij, Peerasak; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Background Although conventional two-dimensional (2D) methods for orthognathic surgery planning are still popular, the use of three-dimensional (3D) simulation is steadily increasing. In facial asymmetry cases such as in cleft lip/palate patients, the additional information can dramatically improve planning accuracy and outcome. The purpose of this study is to investigate which parameters are changed most frequently in transferring a traditional 2D plan to 3D simulation, and what planning parameters can be better adjusted by this method. Patients and Methods This prospective study enrolled 30 consecutive patients with cleft lip and/or cleft palate (mean age 18.6±2.9 years, range 15 to 32 years). All patients received two-jaw single-splint orthognathic surgery. 2D orthodontic surgery plans were transferred into a 3D setting. Severe bony collisions in the ramus area after 2D plan transfer were noted. The position of the maxillo-mandibular complex was evaluated and eventually adjusted. Position changes of roll, midline, pitch, yaw, genioplasty and their frequency within the patient group were recorded as an alternation of the initial 2D plan. Patients were divided in groups of no change from the original 2D plan and changes in one, two, three and four of the aforementioned parameters as well as subgroups of unilateral, bilateral cleft lip/palate and isolated cleft palate cases. Postoperative OQLQ scores were obtained for 20 patients who finished orthodontic treatment. Results 83.3% of 2D plans were modified, mostly concerning yaw (63.3%) and midline (36.7%) adjustments. Yaw adjustments had the highest mean values in total and in all subgroups. Severe bony collisions as a result of 2D planning were seen in 46.7% of patients. Possible asymmetry was regularly foreseen and corrected in the 3D simulation. Conclusion Based on our findings, 3D simulation renders important information for accurate planning in complex cleft lip/palate cases involving facial asymmetry that is

  12. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Zuhaib, Mohammed; Bonanthaya, Krishnamurthy; Parmar, Renu; Shetty, Pritham N.; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Context: Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM) is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1) To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (2) To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (3) To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Settings and Design: Prospective study. Subjects and Methods: A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results: Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, significant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. Conclusions: PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle closure in unilateral

  13. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  14. Cleft lip and palate repair

    MedlinePlus

    Orofacial cleft; Craniofacial birth defect repair; Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty ... A cleft lip is a birth defect: A cleft lip may be just a small notch in the lip. It may also be a complete split in the ...

  15. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and breathing, overbites/underbites, and appearance. Dental and Orthodontic Treatment Maintaining healthy teeth and preventing cavities is ... Kids with cleft lip and palate may begin orthodontic treatment as early as 6 years of age. ...

  16. Spectrographic measures of the speech of young children with cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Casal, C; Domínguez, C; Fernández, A; Sarget, R; Martínez-Celdrán, E; Sentís-Vilalta, J; Gay-Escoda, C

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-two consecutive children with repaired cleft lip and/or palate [isolated cleft lip (CL) 6, isolated cleft palate (CP) 7, unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) 7, and bilateral cleft lip and palate 2] with a mean age of 27 months underwent spectrographic measures of tape-recorded speech (DSP Sona-Graph digital unit). Controls were 22 age- and sex-matched noncleft children. Data analyzed included (1) the Spanish vocalic variables [a, i, u, e, o]: first formant, second formant, duration, and context; (2) obstruent variables [p, t, k]: burst, voice onset time, and duration, and (3) nasal variables [m]: first formant, second formant, and duration. Statistically significant differences were observed between the CL group and the control group in the first formant of [e] and in the increase of the frequency of the [t] burst. Comparison between UCLP and controls showed differences in the second formant of [a], in the first formant of [o], and in the second formant of [o]. These results suggest a small but significant influence of either the cleft lip or its repair on lip rounding for [o] and [u]. In addition, tongue position differences were most likely responsible for the differences seen with [a] and [e]. Spectrographic differences in the current patients did not contribute to meaningful differences in speech sound development. Individualized care (orthodontics, surgery, speech therapy) in children with cleft lip and/or palate attended at specialized craniofacial units contributes to normalization of speech development. PMID:12378036

  17. Lip Prints and Inheritance of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    CJ, Manasa Ravath; HC, Girish; Hegde, Ramesh B; JK, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Labial mucosa has elevations and depressions forming a pattern called ‘Lip Prints’. Parents of patients with cleft lip &/or palate are known to have a particular lip print pattern. Objectives: Analysis of lip prints and relationship between Cheiloscopy and inheritance of cleft lip &/or cleft palate. Methodology: The study included 100 subjects [study groupparents with children having cleft lip &/or cleft palate, 50 fathers and 50 mothers) and 50 subjects (control group-parents having children without cleft lip &/or cleft palate, 25 fathers and 25 mothers. The lip prints of the subjects were obtained using the cellophane method and analysed using Suzuki & Tsuchihashi classification of lip prints. The data was subjected to Chi- Square test, Fisher Exact test and Student t-test [two tailed, independent]. Results: A new whorl pattern was present in the study group. The groove count was higher in the fathers’ than in the mothers’ prints in the upper lip and vice versa in the lower lip. Conclusion: The new pattern was present in the study group in a significant number of cases. The groove count was significantly high in the study group. These two parameters can be of significant value to similar future studies. PMID:25177633

  18. Cleft-orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Posnick, Jeffrey C; Ricalde, Pat

    2004-04-01

    For the cleft patient presenting in adolescence with a jaw discrepancy and malocclusion, misinformation and limited available surgical and dental expertise often prevents a favorable facial reconstruction and dental rehabilitation. A major advantage of the modified Le Fort I osteotomy is its ability to simultaneously close cleft dental gap(s), resolve oronasal fistulas, manage skeletal defects, stabilize dentoalveolar segments, and correct jaw deformities. When a thoughtful staging of reconstruction is undertaken, individuals born with cleft lip and palate can reach adolescence after undergoing only a limited number of operations and interventions, without negative attention being drawn to their original malformation. PMID:15145672

  19. Investigations on the palatal rugae pattern in cleft patients. Part I: A morphological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kratzsch, H; Opitz, C

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of the palatal rugae zone (number of rugae, relief type, posterior limitation) were investigated on the maxillary casts of 44 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 28 patients with bilateral clefts by means of reflex microscopy, a three-dimensional, computer-assisted, touch-free measuring system for the metrical registration and analysis of the parameters directly on the maxillary casts for the segments of the 2 cleft groups. The features "number of palatal rugae" and "relief type" (primary rugae) were determined both before and after surgical repair of the cleft palate. Both segments in unilateral cleft lip and palate and both lateral segments in bilateral clefts most commonly had 4 to 5 palatal rugae. The number of rugae in cleft patients is thus in a range that other authors have reported for non-cleft individuals. Following palatal cleft repair, the rugae counts per segment decreased significantly in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate but the 3rd rugae was never lost after surgery. The relief type identified in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate was the same as in isolated cleft palates and did not differ from that in non-cleft subjects. The posterior limitation of the palatal rugae zone was determined both in a tooth-defined manner and as an absolute linear distance (at all time points). The most frequent tooth-defined posterior limitation of the rugae zone in unilateral and bilateral clefts was the second deciduous molar, which is also the position identified for non-cleft individuals. The linear distance from the tuberosity line to the rugae zone increased in all segments of unilateral and bilateral clefts during the interval up to palatal cleft repair, indicating sagittal maxillary development in the posterior area of the palate. Surgical repair of the cleft palate resulted in a significant shortening of the distance in both segments of the unilateral cleft, most likely due to the

  20. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Laub, Donald R

    2015-06-01

    International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients.The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated.Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries ("Plan B"), approaches 100%.The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries.Furthermore, the academic visiting professor ("Plan A": hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model ("Plan C": to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance.The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful. PMID:26080114

  1. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Laub, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients. The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated. Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries (“Plan B”), approaches 100%. The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries. Furthermore, the academic visiting professor (“Plan A”: hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model (“Plan C”: to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance. The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful. PMID:26080114

  2. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  3. INFLUENCE OF ISOLATED CLEFT PALATE AND PALATOPLASTY ON THE FACE

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Omar Gabriel; Rosa, Larissa Alves de Albuquerque; Lauris, Rita de Cássia M. Carvalho

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The literature has demonstrated that alterations in craniofacial morphology characterizing individuals with cleft palate are observed in both operated and unoperated patients. Objective This study evaluated the influence of isolated cleft palate and palatoplasty on the face, based on facial analysis. Material and methods Lateral facial photographs of the right side of 85 young adult patients with cleft palate were analyzed, of whom 50 were operated on and 35 had never received any previous surgical treatment. The nasolabial angle and zygomatic projection were used to define the maxillary position in the face. Mandibular positioning was classified as Pattern I, II and III. Results Patients were distributed into 54.12% as Pattern I, 32.94% Pattern II and 12.94% Pattern III. Distribution of facial patterns did not show statistically significant differences between groups (p>0.05). Although palatoplasty did not influence the facial pattern, the zygomatic projection was vulnerable to plastic surgeries. Twenty-eight percent of the patients in the operated group showed zygomatic deficiency, compared to only 8.5% in the unoperated group. Conclusions In patients with isolated cleft palate, palatoplasty may influence negatively the sagittal behavior of the maxilla, according to the zygomatic projection of the face, though without compromising the facial pattern. PMID:19089130

  4. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  5. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  6. [The adolescent with cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Chapados, C

    1998-02-01

    Research studies afford an in-depth look at the problems experienced by adolescents born with a cleft lip, a cleft palate or cleft lip and palate. If not addressed, their problems can multiply with each successive stage of development. An interdisciplinary team, where the adolescents themselves play an important role, is one of the best means of helping them come to terms with the consequences of the abnormality. The nurse should be a key member of the team. To help adolescents cope with their situation now and in the future, the author promotes a holistic and humanistic approach. Here, she sees nurses creating therapeutic alliances as educators. She recommends that nurses assert themselves more as professionals and as essential resources. Her doctoral thesis proposes a training model to this effect. PMID:9573899

  7. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  8. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Results: Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Conclusion: Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively. PMID:25954706

  9. Causal attributions of cleft lip and palate across cultures.

    PubMed

    Mednick, Lauren; Snyder, Julie; Schook, Carolyn; Blood, Emily A; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Weatherley-White, R C A

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To describe and compare the causal beliefs associated with cleft lips and/or palates across several different countries. Design : Cross-sectional survey. Setting : Operation Smile surgery screenings in six developing countries. Participants : Two hundred seventy-nine adult patients and parents of children with cleft lips and/or palates in Kenya, Russia, Cambodia, India, Egypt, and Peru. Interventions : In person interviews were conducted with interpreters. Main Outcome Measure : As part of a larger study, a semistructured questionnaire was created to explore cleft perceptions, belief systems that affect these perceptions, and social reactions to individuals with clefts. Results : Causal attributions were grouped by category (environment, self-blame, supernatural, chance, unknown, or other) and type of locus of control (external, internal, or unknown). Results indicate significant difference by country for both causal attribution category (P < .001) and type (P < .001). This difference was maintained in multivariate analyses, which controlled for differences by demographic variables between countries. Conclusions : This study provides evidence that causal attributions for clefts are influenced by culture. As harmful beliefs about cause may continue to impact affected individuals and their families even after a repair, it is insufficient to provide surgical care alone. Care of the entire person must include attempts to change misinformed cultural beliefs through educating the broader community. PMID:23030676

  10. Rehabilitation of Cleft Palate: Parents and Professionals, A Unifying Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannbacker, Mary; Schneiderman, Carl

    1977-01-01

    Described are commonalities and differences between parents of children with cleft palate and rehabilitation professionals, and offered are suggestions to increase communication and joint effectiveness. (DB)

  11. Epidemiologic Research on Malformations Associated with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroshi; Iida, Koichi; Maeda, Tomoki; Takahashi, Mizuho; Fukushima, Naoki; Goshi, Terufumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate malformations associated with cleft lip and cleft palate, we conducted surveys at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and other non-NICU facilities and to determine whether there are differences among facilities. The regional survey investigated NICU facilities located in Oita Prefecture, including 92 patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) or cleft palate (CP) that occurred between 2004 and 2013, and the national survey investigated oral surgery, plastic surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology facilities located in Japan, including 16,452 patients with cleft lip (CL), CLP, or CP that occurred since 2000. The incidence per 10,000 births was 4.2, 6.2, and 2.8 for CL, CLP, and CP, respectively, according to the national survey, and 6.3 and 2.9 for CLP and CP, respectively according to the regional survey. These results indicated comparable incidences between the two surveys. In contrast, when the survey results on malformations associated with CLP and CP according to the ICD-10 classification were compared between the national survey conducted at oral surgery or plastic surgery facilities and the regional survey conducted at NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was 19.8% vs. 41.3% for any types of associated malformation, 6.8% vs. 21.7% for congenital heart disease, and 0.5% vs. 16.3% for chromosomal abnormalities. These results indicated that the incidences of all of these associated malformations were significantly greater in the survey conducted at NICU facilities and similar to the findings from international epidemiological surveys. When comparing the survey conducted at obstetrics facilities vs. NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was similar results as above. The incidence of CLP and CP was not different between surveys conducted at NICU facilities vs. non-NICU facilities; however, when conducting surveys on associated malformations, it is possible to obtain accurate epidemiological data by

  12. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  13. A Model Humanitarian Cleft Mission: 312 Cleft Surgeries in 7 Days

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nauman Ahmad; Ishaq, Irfan; Ganatra, Muhammad Ashraf; Mahmood, Farrakh; Kashif, Muhammad; Alam, Iftikhar; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Lo, Lun-Jou; Laub, Donald Rudolph

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are many countries in the world where patients with cleft lip and palate cannot get access to specialized cleft care units. Cleft missions play an important role in providing surgical care to the areas of the world with limited resources. This article presents a model of cleft missions that can be adopted in many countries where expertise is available but resources are limited. Through proper utilization of local human resource, this type of mission can be a cost-effective and robust way of treating patients with cleft in countries with approximately 52% of the world’s population. Methods: We present a case series of patients of one of our cleft missions carried out in Khairpur, Pakistan, in March 2014 over a period of 7 days. Specific details concerning the organization of mission, gathering of patients, preparation for surgery, and carrying out surgical procedures in a safe and swift manner are presented. Results: A total of 312 patients were operated on in 7 days. There were 145 patients with cleft lip and 167 patients with cleft palate. There were 187 male and 125 female patients with mean age of 7 years. Contemporary operative techniques were utilized to repair different types of cleft lip and palate. Of 167 patients, only 16 developed fistula. Conclusion: A locoregional cleft team can be more effective to care for the patients with cleft in countries where surgical and other expertise can be utilized by proper organization of cleft missions on a national level. PMID:25878924

  14. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  15. A Glance at Methods for Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolinejad, Sima; Ebrahimzadeh Bidskan, Alireza; Ashraf, Hami; Hamidi Alamdari, Daryoush

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cleft palate is the second most common birth defect and is considered as a challenge for pediatric plastic surgeons. There is still a general lack of a standard protocol and patients often require multiple surgical interventions during their lifetime along with disappointing results. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed search was undertaken using search terms including 'cleft palate repair', 'palatal cleft closure', 'cleft palate + stem cells', 'cleft palate + plasma rich platelet', 'cleft palate + scaffold', 'palatal tissue engineering', and 'bone tissue engineering'. The found articles were included if they defined a therapeutic strategy and/or assessed a new technique. Results: We reported a summary of the key-points concerning cleft palate development, the genes involving this defect, current therapeutic strategies, recently novel aspects, and future advances in treatments for easy and fast understanding of the concepts, rather than a systematic review. In addition, the results were integrated with our recent experience. Conclusions: Tissue engineering may open a new window in cleft palate reconstruction. Stem cells and growth factors play key roles in this field. PMID:25593724

  16. Abnormal Patterns of Tongue-Palate Contact in the Speech of Individuals with Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with cleft palate, even those with adequate velopharyngeal function, are at high risk for disordered lingual articulation. This article attempts to summarize current knowledge of abnormal tongue-palate contact patterns derived from electropalatographic (EPG) data in speakers with cleft palate. These data, which have been reported in 23…

  17. Introduction of "Papazian Pusher: " A Modified-Design Knot Pusher for Surgical Repair of Cleft Palates.

    PubMed

    Papazian, Nazareth J; Chahine, Fadl; Atiyeh, Bishara; Deeba, Samer; Zgheib, Elias; Abu-Sittah, Ghassan

    2015-09-01

    Tying sutures is an integral aspect of any surgery and reliable instruments are essential for hassle-free procedures including craniofacial surgeries. Knot pushers have been widely known for their application in various laparoscopic, arthroscopic, and anal surgeries. The literature reveals numerous articles pertaining to knot pushers, as well as improvements on existing designs. Nevertheless, no application of knot pushers in the surgical repair of cleft palates has been described. We describe a new knot pusher "Papazian Pusher" (PP) finely designed for application in oral surgeries in general and repair of cleft palates in particular. The instrument was used satisfactorily in repair of cleft palate surgeries and no complications were encountered. The PP was found, overall, to be easy to use, and helps in performing faster, stronger, smooth, and secure knots. PMID:26355980

  18. COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR THE CHILD WITH A CLEFT PALATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BENSEN, JACK F.; WHITE, FRAZER D.

    A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO CHILDREN WITH CLEFT PALATES IS DESCRIBED. THE SOUTH FLORIDA CLEFT PALATE CLINIC, REPRESENTING NINE PROFESSIONAL SPECIALTIES, MEETS WEEKLY TO SEE SIX OR SEVEN CASES. SPEECH PERFORMANCE IS RECORDED ON SIX DIAGNOSTIC, DATA COLLECTING FORMS WHICH PROVIDE A BASIS FOR RECORDING CLINICAL JUDGMENTS. PROGNOSIS AND…

  19. Single-Word Intelligibility in Speakers with Repaired Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara; Chau, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Many speakers with repaired cleft palate have reduced intelligibility, but there are limitations with current procedures for assessing intelligibility. The aim of this study was to construct a single-word intelligibility test for speakers with cleft palate. The test used a multiple-choice identification format, and was based on phonetic contrasts…

  20. Early Speech Production of Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, Theresa; Broen, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    The study comparing word-initial target phonemes and phoneme production of five toddlers with cleft palate and five normal toddlers found that the cleft palate children tended to target more words with word-initial nasals, approximants, and vowels and fewer words with word-initial stops, fricatives, and affricates than normal children. (Author/DB)

  1. Midface fracture in an unoperated adult patient with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Sanyog; Baliga, Shridhar; Kotrashetti, Sharadaindu Mahadevappa; Pillai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    In western countries, it is hard to find an unoperated cleft palate due to better healthcare services and awareness. Here, we present an unoperated adult case of cleft palate that had midfacial fractures following a road traffic accident. The patient's cleft lip was repaired when he was 2 years old but the palate was not operated because of poor follow-up. We would like to share the difficulties encountered in diagnosis and treatment planning for this rare kind of trauma case. After routine investigations, a palatal acrylic splint was constructed for fixation and an acceptable degree of function and aesthetics was achieved postoperatively. PMID:25150231

  2. Use of rotation flap in repair of cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Isik, Daghan; Durucu, Cengiz; Isik, Yasemin; Atik, Bekir; Kocak, Omer Faruk; Karatas, Erkan; Bekerecioglu, Mehmet

    2011-07-01

    Although cleft palate anomaly is frequent, the criterion standards in surgical treatment have not been determined yet. There are a few techniques described for cleft palate repair owing to the limited tissue in the palatal mucosa, the rigid structure of the palatal mucosa, and the limited vascularity of the hard palate. In this study, a novel cleft palate repair technique based on separating the soft palate from the hard palate as a musculomucosal flap and using it as a rotation flap has been described. The operation is evaluated individually for each anomaly because variations occur in the surgical technique according to the extension of the cleft toward the teeth in the palate. This operation was performed on a total of 28 patients (17 girls and 11 boys) aged between 1.5 and 16 years and presented to our clinic. Patients were assessed for speech analysis outcomes, tympanogram values, hearing functions, magnitude of palatal lengthening during the operation, and rate of fistulae. Statistically significant differences in values of the speech analysis and the audiometric assessment were determined between before and 6 months after surgery. Complete recovery of otitis was observed 1 month after surgery without another treatment in 9 (42.8%) of 21 patients who were detected to have serous otitis media preoperatively. Tension-free closure, lower risk of fistula, good restoration of velopharyngeal functions, ability to be performed on all types of cleft palate, ability to provide a good intraoperative exposure, and being a single stage seem to be the most important advantages of this technique. PMID:21772216

  3. Prevalence of Associated Anomalies in Cleft Lip and/or Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi Fakhim, Shahin; Shahidi, Nikzad; Lotfi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Orofacial clefts are among the most common congenital anomalies. Patients presenting with orofacial clefts often require surgery or other complex procedures. A cleft lip or palate can be a single anomaly or a part of multiple congenital anomalies. The reported prevalence of cleft disease and associated anomalies varies widely across the literature, and is dependent on the diagnostic procedure used. In this study we determined the prevalence of associated anomalies in patients with a cleft lip and/or palate, with a specific focus on cardiac anomalies. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 526 patients with a cleft lip and /or palate admitted to the children’s referral hospital between 2006 and 2011 were evaluated. All associated anomalies were detected and recorded. Patient information collected included age, gender, type and side of cleft, craniofacial anomalies and presence of other anomalies, including cardiac anomalies. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: Of the 526 patients enrolled in the study, 58% (305) were male and 42% (221) were female. In total, 75% of patients (396) were aged between 4 and 8 years and 25% (130) were aged less than 4 years. The most common cleft type in our study was bilateral cleft palate. The most commonly associated anomaly among cleft patients, in 12% of cleft patients, was a cardiac anomaly. The most common cardiac anomaly was atrial septal defect (ASD). Conclusion: The prevalence of associated anomalies among orofacial cleft patients is high. The most common associated anomaly is cardiac anomaly, with ASD being the most common cardiac anomaly. There are no significant relationships between type of cleft and associated cardiac anomalies. PMID:27280100

  4. Postoperative Speech Outcomes and Complications in Submucous Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Seo; Nam, Su Bong; Kang, Kyung Dong; Sung, Ji Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The postoperative speech outcomes of submucous cleft palate (SMCP) surgery are known to be poorer than those of other types of cleft palate. We attempted to objectively characterize the postoperative complications and speech outcomes of the surgical treatment of SMCP through a comparison with the outcomes of incomplete cleft palate (ICP). Methods This study included 53 SMCP patients and 285 ICP patients who underwent surgical repair from 1998 to 2015. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was 3.9±1.9 years for the SMCP patients and 1.3±0.9 years for the ICP patients. A retrospective analysis was performed of the complications, the frequency of subsequent surgical correction for velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), and speech outcomes. Results In both the SMCP and ICP patients, no cases of respiratory difficulty, bleeding, or wound disruption were noted. Delayed wound healing and fistula occurred in 18.9% and 5.7% of the SMCP patients and in 14% and 3.2% of the ICP patients, respectively. However, no statistically significant difference in either delayed wound healing or fistula occurrence was observed between the two groups. The rate of surgical correction for VPD in the SMCP group was higher than in the ICP group. In the subset of 26 SMCP patients and 62 ICP patients who underwent speech evaluation, the median speech score value was 58.8 in the SMCP group and 66 in the ICP group, which was a statistically significant difference. Conclusions SMCP and ICP were found to have similar complication rates, but SMCP had significantly worse speech outcomes. PMID:27218023

  5. Cleft Palate Habilitation; Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Cleft Palate Habilitation (5th, Syracuse University, New York, May 11-12, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencione, Ruth M., Ed.

    With emphasis on the growing interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of cleft palate, Ruth M. Lencione introduces the subject covering incidence, causes, and classification. Richard B. Stark discusses surgery of the primary pharyngeal flap and E. Harris Nober presents a review of the literature on hearing problems. Aubrey L. Ruess examined…

  6. Facial clefting and oroauditory pathway manifestations in ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cole, Patrick; Hatef, Daniel A; Kaufman, Yoav; Magruder, Amy; Bree, Alanna; Friedman, Ellen; Sindwani, Raj; Hollier, Larry H

    2009-09-01

    Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) Syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by ectodermal dysplasia, along with other malformations such as cleft lip and palate, and various secondary issues such as chronic sinusitis, otitis media, and conductive hearing loss (CHL). The International Research Symposium for AEC Syndrome convened at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Patients with a suspected diagnosis of AEC syndrome attended, and members of the dental, dermatology, plastic surgery, otolaryngology, and audiology services examined each patient. Eighteen patients with a diagnosis of AEC were evaluated. Mean age was 7.5 years (range: 4 months-30 years). Fourteen of the 15 subjects tested (93.33%) demonstrated CHL, with seven showing moderate to severe hearing deficits (41-90 dB). Nine of 13 respondents reported hoarseness or voice problems; 8 were noted to display this on examination. Fourteen of 16 subjects reported speech was below average for age; 8 were in speech therapy. All 18 subjects reported a history of otitis externa or otitis media. Eleven of the subjects (61.11%) required myringotomy and pressure equalizing (PE) tubes. All patients demonstrated cleft palate defects. Of these, 16 (94.11%) presented with clefting of the soft palate, and 10 (58.82%) showed hard palate defects. Three subjects (16.67%) were noted to have submucous clefts. Our experience leads us to propose that while the oroauditory problems in those with AEC syndrome is likely multifactorial, many issues may stem from palatal clefting. Despite this, some abnormalities persist following surgical cleft closure, which indicates other complicating factors are also involved. PMID:19697430

  7. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  8. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  9. Studies with WNT Genes and Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Renato; Letra, Ariadne; Kim, Ana H.; Kuchler, Erika C.; Day, Alicia; Tannure, Patricia N.; da Motta, Luise Gomes; Paiva, Katiucia Batista; Granjeiro, Jose M.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Clefts of the lip and/or palate (cleft lip/palate) are notable for their complex etiology. The WNT pathway regulates multiple developmental processes including craniofacial development and may play a role in cleft lip/palate and other defects of craniofacial development such as tooth agenesis. Variations in WNT genes have been recently associated with cleft lip/palate in humans. In addition, two WNT genes, Wnt3 and Wnt9B, are located in the clf1 cleft locus in mice. Methods We investigated 13 SNPs located in WNT3A, WNT5A, WNT8A, WNT11, WNT3 and WNT9B genes, for association with cleft lip/palate subphenotypes in 500 cleft cases and 500 unrelated controls. Genotyping of selected polymorphisms was carried out using Taqman assays. PLINK 1.06 software was used to test for differences in allele frequencies of each polymorphism between affected and unaffected individuals. Haplotype analysis was also performed. Results Individuals carrying variant alleles in WNT3 presented an increased risk for cleft lip/palate (P=0.0003; OR=1.61 95% C.I: 1.29 -2.02) in the population studied. Conclusion Our results continue to support a role for WNT genes in the pathogenesis of cleft lip/palate. Although much remains to be learned about the function of individual WNT genes during craniofacial development, additional studies should focus in the identification of potentially functional variants in these genes as contributors to human clefting. PMID:20890934

  10. Evolution of my philosophy in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Brusati, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    At the end of 50-year-long clinical activity, the evolution of my approach to the treatment of unilateral cleft of the lip and palate is discussed. I had several teachers in this field (Rusconi, Reherman, Perko, Delaire, Talmant, Sommerlad and others) and I introduced in my approach what I considered to be improvements from all of them. My current protocol is related to the anatomy of the cleft: for wide clefts a two-stage protocol is applied (1° step: soft palate and lip and nose repair; 2° step: hard palate repair with gingivoalveoloplasty); for narrow cleft (less than 1 cm at the posterior border of hard palate) an "all in one" protocol is performed with or without gingivoalveoloplasty (in accordance to the presence or absence of contact between the stumps at alveolar level). The most important details regarding surgery of the lip and palate are discussed. Robust data collection on speech and skeletal growth is still needed to determine whether the "all in one" approach can be validated as the treatment of choice for unilateral complete lip and palate cleft in selected cases. PMID:27318751

  11. Communication disorders in individuals with cleft lip and palate: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Roopa; Savitha, V. H.; Subramaniyan, B.

    2009-01-01

    The need for an interdisciplinary approach in the comprehensive management of individuals with cleft lip and palate is well recognized. This article provides an introduction to communication disorders in individuals with cleft lip and palate for members of cleft care teams. The speech pathologist is involved in identifying those infants who are at risk for communication disorders and also for initiating early intervention to prevent or mitigate communication disorders caused by the cleft. Even with early cleft repair, some children exhibit ‘cleft palate speech’ characterized by atypical consonant productions, abnormal nasal resonance, abnormal nasal airflow, altered laryngeal voice quality, and nasal or facial grimaces. These manifestations are evaluated to identify those that (a) are developmental, (b) can be corrected through speech therapy alone, and, (c) those that may require both surgery and speech therapy. Speech is evaluated perceptually using several types of stimuli. It is important to identify compensatory and obligatory errors in articulation. When velopharyngeal dysfunction is suspected, the assessment should include at least one direct measure such as nasoendoscopy or videofluoroscopy. This provides information about the adequacy of the velopharyngeal valve for speech production, and is useful for planning further management of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The basic principle of speech therapy in cleft lip and palate is to establish the correct placement of the articulators and appropriate air flow. Appropriate feedback is important during therapy for establishing the correct patterns of speech. PMID:19884669

  12. Reconstruction of Congenital Nose, Cleft Primary Palate, and Lip Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fiani, Nadine; Verstraete, Frank J M; Arzi, Boaz

    2016-07-01

    Clefts of the primary palate in the dog are uncommon, and their repair can be challenging. The aims of this article are to provide information regarding pathogenesis and convey practical information for the repair of these defects. PMID:26965528

  13. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  14. A review of cleft lip and palate management: Experience of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Osunde, Otasowie Daniel; Akpasa, Izegboya Olohitae

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip (CL) and palate (CLP) management is multidisciplinary. A cleft team was formed in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital to address the health needs of cleft patients in the centre. Aim: This paper aims at documenting the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) management protocol for orofacial clefts and also to review our experience with CLP surgeries performed at AKTH since our partnering with Smile Train. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all the cleft patients surgically treated from January 2006 to December 2014 under Smile Train sponsorship was undertaken. A descriptive narrative of the cleft team protocol was also given. Results: One hundred and fifty-five patients (80 males, 75 females) had surgical repairs of either the lip or palate. CL patients were 83 (53.55%), while CLP patients were 45 (29.03%) and isolated cleft palate patients were 27 (17.42%). Conclusion: The inclusion of various specialities in the cleft team is highly desirable. Poverty level amongst our patients frequently limits our management to surgical treatment sponsored by the Smile Train, despite the presence of other residual problems. PMID:26712291

  15. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  16. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  17. Bilateral optic disc pit with maculopathy in a patient with cleft lip and cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Anisha; Gupta, Rajat; Gupta, Anika; Raina, Usha K; Ghosh, Basudeb

    2015-01-01

    Optic disc pit (ODP) is small, gray-white, oval depression found at the optic nerve head. It is a congenital defect that occurs due to imperfect closure of superior edge of the embryonic fissure. Cleft lip and palate are also congenital midline abnormalities occurring due to defect in the fusion of frontonasal prominence, maxillary prominence and mandibular prominence. There is only one case report describing the occurrence of ODP in a young patient with cleft lip and palate who also had basal encephalocele. We describe a 52-year-old patient with congenital cleft lip and palate with bilateral ODP with maculopathy but without any other midline abnormality. PMID:26044478

  18. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Masih, Shaila; Chacko, Reena Annie; Thomas, Abi M; Singh, Namita; Thomas, Rodny; Abraham, Deena

    2014-01-01

    A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient's weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury. PMID:25231044

  19. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  20. Treatment of cleft lip and palate during the Revolutionary war: bicentennial reflections.

    PubMed

    Rogers, B O

    1976-10-01

    Cleft palate surgery was not performed either in Europe or in America during the time of America's Revolutionary War. Cleft lip surgery was performed by the pinning and figure-of-eight thread method of closure in keeping with current European teachings on the subjects. This surgery was frequently performed by itinerant mendicants, charlatans, and also by the more legitimate members of the surgical community living in the 13 states at the time of the Revolution. A brief review of the surgical methods employed form the major portion of the article. PMID:786505

  1. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements. PMID:26701347

  2. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Reema Sharma; Bora, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia, and facial clefting along with some associated features. Presence of all the three major features in a single individual is extremely rare. We report a case of 4 year 11 months old child with EEC syndrome having ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and cleft palate and ectrodactyly with some associated features. Clinical features, diagnosis and role of a dentist in the multidisciplinary treatment approach have been elaborated in this case report. PMID:25231046

  3. FOXE1 association with both isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and isolated cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Lina M.; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Busch, Tamara D.; Machida, Junichiro; Johnson, Marla K.; Brauer, David; Krahn, Katherine; Daack-Hirsch, Sandy; L'Heureux, Jamie; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Rivera, Dora; López, Ana Maria; Moreno, Manuel A.; Hing, Anne; Lammer, Edward J.; Jones, Marilyn; Christensen, Kaare; Lie, Rolv T.; Jugessur, Astanand; Wilcox, Allen J.; Chines, Peter; Pugh, Elizabeth; Doheny, Kim; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22–q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we undertook an iterative and complementary fine mapping strategy using family-based CL/P samples from Colombia, USA and the Philippines. Candidate genes within 9q22–q33 were sequenced, revealing 32 new variants. Concurrently, 397 SNPs spanning the 9q22–q33 2-LOD-unit interval were tested for association. Significant SNP and haplotype association signals (P = 1.45E − 08) narrowed the interval to a 200 kb region containing: FOXE1, C9ORF156 and HEMGN. Association results were replicated in CL/P families of European descent and when all populations were combined the two most associated SNPs, rs3758249 (P = 5.01E − 13) and rs4460498 (P = 6.51E − 12), were located inside a 70 kb high linkage disequilibrium block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5′ and 3′ of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated, indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically distinct. Foxe1 expression was found in the epithelium undergoing fusion between the medial nasal and maxillary processes. Mutation screens of FOXE1 identified two family-specific missense mutations at highly conserved amino acids. These data indicate that FOXE1 is a major gene for CL/P and provides new insights for improved counseling and genetic interaction studies. PMID:19779022

  4. Common Dental Anomalies in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    HAQUE, Sanjida; ALAM, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common orofacial congenital malformation in live births. CLP can occur individually or in combination with other congenital deformities. Affected patients experience a number of dental, aesthetic, speech, hearing, and psychological complications and have a higher incidence of severe dental conditions. The purpose of this study is to characterise the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with CLP patients based on a literature survey. Methods: By literature survey, this study characterises the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with cleft lip and palate patients. Results: Common dental anomalies associated with CLP are supernumerary tooth, congenitally missing tooth, delayed tooth development, morphological anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentition, delayed eruption of permanent maxillary incisors, microdontia, and abnormal tooth number. Conclusion: The incidence of certain dental anomalies is strongly correlated with Cleft lip and palate, a finding that is consistent with previous studies. PMID:26023296

  5. Early Orthopedic Retraction of the Premaxilla in Bilateral Complete Cleft Lip and Palate: An Innovative Approach to a Difficult Problem.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Rizwan; Flood, Tim; Robinson, Stephen; Al-Gholmy, Mohammed

    2016-05-01

    Bilateral cleft lip and palate occurs in 9.2% of cleft patients. Many approaches have been adopted to manage the protrusive premaxillary segment in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Some advocate the use of intraoral appliances, occasionally combined with invasive surgery, which often requires revision at a later date. The authors describe the case of a 3-year-old child born with bilateral cleft lip and palate presenting with a protuberant premaxilla and an overjet greater than 25 mm. Prompt intervention was warranted in this case due to the potential for traumatic compromise to the dentition of the premaxillary segment and a distinct lack of social integration reported by the parents. The patient was managed with a novel, innovative approach using orthodontic traction and minimally invasive surgery. The literature has been reviewed and the patient's subsequent physiological and psychosocial development has been monitored. He has since undergone successful alveolar bone grafting. PMID:25647517

  6. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    PubMed

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins. PMID:780004

  7. Cleft lip and palate in a Brazilian subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Cuozzo, Fernanda Dornelles Martins; Espinosa, Mariano Martínez; da Silva, Katia Tavares Serafim; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fabio; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2013-01-01

    Background: This work aimed to access the profile of cleft lip and palate patients of a sub-population in Mid-West Brazil. Materials & Methods: Research was carried out through a cross-sectional study at the Craniofacial Rehabilitation Center of the University General Hospital of the University of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Variables related to oral cleft type, gender, race, age and presence or absence of associated congenital anomalies or syndromes were analyzed. Results: 313 patients treated at the institution from 2004 to 2007 were recruited. There were 54% male and 46% female patients with the mean age of 11.4 years. Cleft lip and palate was the most prevalent alteration in 49.6% of cases. Caucasians were the most affected in 54.6% of cases. 6.4% of patients had other anomalies or syndromes associated with cleft. Conclusion: More comprehensive surveys should be conducted in order to supply the lack of data on the occurrence and determinants of oral clefts in this region. How to cite this article:Cuozzo FD, Espinosa MM, Serafim da Silva KT, Martins de Barros YB, Bandeca MC, Aranha AM, Borges AH, Volpato LE. Cleft lip and palate in a Brazilian subpopulation. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(4):15-20. PMID:24155614

  8. TCDD disrupts posterior palatogenesis and causes cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomohiro; Hirata, Azumi; Sasabe, Eri; Yoshimura, Tomohide; Ohno, Seiji; Kitamura, Naoya; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Dioxins (e.g. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD) cause cleft palate at a high rate. A post-fusional split may contribute to the pathogenesis, and tissue fragility may be a concern. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of TCDD on the palatal epithelium, bone and muscle, which contribute to tissue integrity. ICR mice (10-12 weeks old) were used. TCDD was administered on E12.5 at 40 mg/kg. Immunohistochemical staining for AhR, ER-α, laminin, collagen IV, osteopontin, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were performed. Furthermore, western blot analysis for osteopontin, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were performed to evaluate protein expression in the palatal tissue. Immunohistologically, there was little difference in the collagen IV and laminin localization in the palatal epithelium between control versus TCDD-treated mice. Runx2 and osteopontin immunoreactivity decreased in the TCDD-treated palatal bone, and MyoD and desmin decreased in the TCDD-treated palatal muscle. AhR and ER-α immunoreactivity were localized to the normal palatal bone, but ER-α was diminished in the TCDD-treated palate. On western blot analysis, Runx2, MyoD, and desmin were all downregulated in the TCDD-treated palate. TCDD may suppress palatal osteogenesis and myogenesis via AhR, and cause cleft palates via a post-fusional split mechanism, in addition to a failure of palatal fusion. PMID:23602632

  9. Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers from Congenital Cleft Palates and Normal Palates of Spanish Goats

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Michael C.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey; Kuzon, William M.; Panter, Kip E.; Buchman, Steven R.; Faulkner, John A.; Yu, Deborah; Cederna, Paul S.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Analysis of the composition of muscle fibers constituent to a cleft palate could provide significant insight into the cause of velopharyngeal inadequacy. The authors hypothesized that levator veli palatini muscle dysfunction inherent to cleft palates could affect the timing and outcome of cleft palate repair. Methods Single, permeabilized muscle fibers from levator veli palatini muscles of three normal (n = 19 fibers) and three chemically induced congenital cleft palates (n = 21 fibers) of 14-month-old goats were isolated, and contractile properties were evaluated. The maximum isometric force and rate constants of tension redevelopment (ktr) were measured, and the specific force and normalized power were calculated for each fiber. Results The ktr measures indicate that cleft fibers are predominantly fast-fatigable; normal fibers are slow fatigue-resistant: after a 10-minute isometric contraction, fibers from cleft palates had a loss of force 16 percent greater than that from normal palates (p = 0.0001). The cross-sectional areas of the fibers from cleft palates (2750 ± 209 μm2) were greater (p = 0.05) than those from normal palates (2226 ± 143 μm2). Specific forces did not differ between the two groups. Maximum normalized power of fibers from cleft palates (11.05 ± 1.82 W/l) was greater (p = 0.0001) than fibers from normal palates (1.60 ± 0.12 W/l). Conclusions There are clear physiologic differences in single muscle fibers from cleft palates and normal palates: cleft palate fibers are physiologically fast, have greater fatigability, and have greater power production. Detection of functional and/or fiber type differences in muscles of cleft palates may provide preoperative identification of a patient's susceptibility to velopharyngeal inadequacy and permit early surgical intervention to correct this clinical condition. PMID:17440342

  10. Speech Analyses of Four Children with Repaired Cleft Palates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Gene R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Spontaneous speech samples were collected from four three-year olds with surgically repaired cleft palates. Analyses showed that subjects were similar to one another with respect to their phonetic inventories but differed considerably in the frequency and types of phonological processes used. (Author/JDD)

  11. Prevention of Communication Problems Associated with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannbacker, Mary

    1988-01-01

    The paper reviews principles of preventative intervention and their application to communication problems associated with cleft palate. Ten specific suggestions (such as continuing professional education, identification of adenoidal atrophy, and prompt referral for secondary management) and activities are described. (Author/DB)

  12. Observations on Hearing Levels of Preschool Cleft-Palate Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert J.; Philips, Betty Jane

    1971-01-01

    Pure-tone audiometry performed monthly on nine preschool cleft palate children showed the incidence of hearing loss ranging from 25 to 71 percent from month to month, with all children experiencing a significant hearing loss at some time. (Author/KW)

  13. Helping the Child with a Cleft Palate in Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Michael J.; Pentz, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    Guidelines for teachers of a student with a cleft palate include understand the physical problem; know what kind of speech problem to expect; be alert to the possibility of language-based learning difficulties; watch for signs of hearing loss; be alert to socialization problems; help the student make up work; and avoid self-fulfilling prophecies.…

  14. A Study of Cleft Palate Speakers with Marginal Velopharyngeal Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, M. A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The study examined a previously hypothesized model for a subgroup of cleft palate speakers with marginal velopharyngeal competence during speech. Evaluation of 52 5- and 6-year-olds with appropriate lateral X-ray results indicated that most met fewer than three of the other five criteria required by the model. (Author/DB)

  15. Cleft Palate Repair Using a Double Opposing Z-Plasty.

    PubMed

    Moores, Craig; Shah, Ajul; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2016-07-01

    Cleft palate is a common congenital defect with several described surgical repairs. The most successful treatment modality remains a controversy. The goals of repair focus on achievement of normal speech and optimizing velopharyngeal function while minimizing both fistula formation and facial growth restriction. In this video, the authors demonstrate use of the double opposing Z-plasty technique in the repair of a Veau II type cleft palate. The video demonstrates the marking, incisions, dissection, and repair of the cleft. It also examines the use of von Langenbeck-type relaxing incisions and demonstrates a specific approach to the repair of this particular cleft. The authors believe that the Furlow double opposing Z-plasty with the von Langenbeck relaxing incision can provide the best postoperative outcome by combining the benefits of each individual operation. The Z-plasty technique works to correct the aberrant muscle of the soft palate while increasing the length of the palate. The authors believe that this results in better velopharyngeal function. PMID:27315321

  16. Prosthodontic treatment of the edentulous adult cleft palate patient.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Leanne M

    2003-03-01

    Clefts of the upper lip and plate are relatively common, yet dental treatment of these patients is still very poor and many grow up suffering dental neglect. Dental practitioners should become involved in the treatment team as dental needs are present from birth to death. Adult cleft patients often need tooth replacement with obturation of any residual clefts. They are best treated with tooth-supported removable appliances including partial and complete overdentures, thus preservation of their natural dentition is desirable. Edentulous cleft palate patients present with restorative difficulties due to their compromised maxillary arches as well as the presence of scar tissue in their palates and lips. An outline of these complications and guidelines for their treatment is illustrated in the form of three case reports from members of one family all presenting with varying cleft lip and palate defects. This article highlights the need for dental students to be exposed to dentally compromised patients so that they will feel confident enough to treat them in private practice. PMID:12800267

  17. [Cleft rhinoplasty, from primary to secondary surgery].

    PubMed

    Talmant, Jean-Claude; Talmant, Jean-Christian

    2014-12-01

    Despite fifty years of statistics, congresses, publications, the cleft nose remains an enigma to the great majority of cleft specialists. Most of the published papers give recipes to camouflage the cleft deformity, very few are concerned by the functional anatomy and its relation with facial growth. The complexity of the matter, the results frequently disappointing, the lack of awareness of the necessity of early nasal breathing, and the academic condemnation of any imperfect attempt to correct the nose at the time of the first operation have led to resignation. For the last forty years, we have been involved in a careful and obstinate research about the early correction of the cleft nose deformity. We wish to present our conclusions in this chapter with at least 17 years of follow-up. They are as following: in cleft patients the nasal cartilages are only deformed. We can achieve sub periosteal and sub perichondrial dissections by 6 months of age without being harmful for facial and nasal growth. Repositioning accurately the nasal structures is enough if we are able to control the healing process and prevent endonasal wound contraction. We have not to do any compromise and favor one function with regard to the others, nasal ventilation being the most important for a good facial growth. In a word, nasal pediatric surgery is necessary at the time of the first operation from 6 months of age and should be carried on with a double demand, aesthetic and functional. To achieve this goal, we must have a sound knowledge of the cleft nose deformity, of the adequate surgical techniques and of the logic chronology to reach the best result. The nose repair cannot be limited to the nasal cartilages. The whole nasal structure is concerned especially its bony framework, the width of which at the level of the piriform orifice and the nasal floor depends on the outcomes of any surgical step that it would relate to the lip, palate or alveolar closure. Interaction of all these factors

  18. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  19. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  20. A bibliometric analysis of the 50 most cited papers in cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Nicola A; Joyce, Cormac W

    2015-02-01

    Citation analysis is an established bibliometric method which catalogues papers according to the number of times they have been referenced. It is believed that the total number of citations an article receives reflects its importance among its peers. Never before has a bibliometric analysis been performed in the area of Cleft Lip and Palate. Our citation analysis creates a comprehensive list of the 50 most influential papers in this field. Journals specializing in Cleft Palate, Craniofacial, Plastic Surgery, Maxillofacial Surgery, Aesthetics and Radiology were searched to establish which articles most enriched the specialty over the past 70 years. The results show an interesting collection of papers which reveal developing trends in surgical techniques. These landmark papers mould and influence management and decision-making today. PMID:25196126

  1. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S.; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P < 0.05. Results: The study showed different categories of clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Conclusion: Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely. PMID:27195223

  2. Perioperative respiratory complications in cleft lip and palate repairs: An audit of 1000 cases under ‘Smile Train Project’

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Kalpana R; Patil, Mohan R; Shirke, Abasaheb M; Jadhav, Shivaji B

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Anaesthesia for cleft surgery in children is associated with a variety of airway related problems. This study aims to review the frequency of associated anomalies and other conditions as well as perioperative respiratory complications during the cleft lip/palate repair surgeries. Methods: An audit of 1000 cleft surgeries in children enrolled under “Smile Train” is presented. Following informed consent, general anaesthesia was induced with endotracheal (ET) intubation using halothane in O2 and/or intravenous thiopentone 5 mg/kg or propofol 1.5 mg/kg, suxamethonium 1.5 mg/kg or rocuronium 0.8 mg/kg and maintained with halothane/isoflurane 0.4-1% in 50% N2O in O2 with rocuronium. The observational data regarding the occurrence of perioperative complications in 1000 cleft surgeries are mentioned as mean (standard deviation), number and percentage as appropriate. ‘Two sample t-test between percentage’ is applied for significance. Results: The frequency of isolated cleft lip was 263 (36.4%), cleft palate 183 (25.3%) and combined defect 277 (38.3%) of the operated cases. Other congenital anomalies were present in 21 (2.8%) of the children. The intraoperative airway complications occurred in 13 (2.4%) of cleft lip and 40 (8.7%) of cleft palate repairs (P < 0.05). Post-operative respiratory complications were observed in 9 (1.7%) and 34 (7.4%) patients of cleft lip and palate repairs respectively (P < 0.05). Mortality occurred post-operatively in 2 (0.2%) of cleft repairs (n = 1000). Conclusion: Cleft deformities in children when associated with other congenital anomalies or respiratory problems pre-dispose them to difficult airway and pulmonary complications. Frequency of perioperative respiratory complications were significantly higher with cleft palate repair than with cleft lip repair. Anaesthetic expertise, optimum monitoring facility and specialised post-operative care is necessary to decrease the morbidity. PMID:24403615

  3. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  4. Ten-Year Cleft Surgery in Nepal: Achievements and Lessons Learned for Better Cleft Care Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Hans-Dieter; Koch, Heribert; Koller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate surgery abroad is devoid of global consensus regarding standards of therapy, follow-up, and outcome. Cleft surgery in Nepal during a 10-year sustained program provided the opportunity to inform on the need for such standards. Methods: Medical records were evaluated from the cleft clinic at Sushma Koirala Memorial Hospital, Sankhu, Kathmandu, Nepal, from 1997 to 2007. Four groups were identified for analysis: total cohort, total surgical cohort (TSC), primary program patients (PPP; patients had not been operated on before), and nonprimary program patients (non-PPP; patients operated on elsewhere before). Patient demographics, diagnostic, primary and secondary surgery (corrective surgery), and follow-up were evaluated. Results: One thousand forty-five patients were eligible for surgery. Three hundred twenty-three of 1,045 patients (30.9%) did not seek treatment, although scheduled for surgery. One thousand two hundred one procedures were performed in 722 patients [TSC; 845 PPP (70.4%); 356 non-PPP (29.64%)]. Corrective procedures were performed in 257 of 1,201 [3.5% (30 of 845 procedures in 509 patients) PPP vs 63.7% (227 of 356 procedures in 213 patients) non-PPP]. One hundred six lips were completely reoperated on (1 PPP vs 105 non-PPP), and 42 palates underwent a total revision (5 PPP vs 37 non-PPP). The surgical outcome of the TSC group in terms of complication rate was similar to the one in developed countries. Conclusions: The high rate of corrective surgery reveals the need for global regulatory mechanisms and the need for nongovernmental organizations to introduce strategies for delivering sustained cleft care until achieving full rehabilitation. The World Health Organization should establish standards for cleft care delivered in less developed countries. PMID:27579235

  5. Definition of Critical Periods for Hedgehog Pathway Antagonist-Induced Holoprosencephaly, Cleft Lip, and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Galen W.; Melberg, Cal G.; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Parins, Kia F.; Kietzman, Henry W.; Everson, Joshua L.; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J.; Lipinski, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO). Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD) 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in “non-syndromic” orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug. PMID:25793997

  6. Caregiver responses to early cleft palate care: A mixed method approach

    PubMed Central

    Sischo, Lacey; Clouston, Sean; Phillips, Ceib; Broder, Hillary L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study sought to understand caregivers’ (CGs’) responses to early cleft lip/palate care for their infants. Method A prospective, mixed methods multicenter longitudinal study was conducted among CGs (N=118) seeking treatment for their infants’ cleft lip and palate or cleft lip only at one of six cleft treatment centers in the United States. Participants were in one of two treatment groups: traditional care only or nasoalveolar molding (NAM) plus traditional care. The CGs completed semi-structured interviews and standardized questionnaires assessing psychosocial well-being and family impact at three time points: the beginning of treatment (~1 month of age), pre-lip surgery (~3–5 months of age), and post-palate surgery (~12–13 months of age). Multi-level modeling was used to longitudinally assess CGs’ psychosocial outcomes. Results While the first year was demanding for all CGs, NAM onset and the child’s lip surgery were particularly stressful times. CGs used optimism, problem-solving behavior, and social support to cope with this stress. Qualitatively, CGs’ ability to balance cleft treatment demands with their psychosocial resources and coping strategies influenced family adaptation. Qualitative and quantitative results indicated CGs of NAM-treated infants experienced more rapid declines in anxiety and depressive symptoms and better coping skills over time than CGs whose infants had traditional care. Conclusion CGs of NAM-treated infants experienced more positive psychosocial outcomes than CGs whose infants had traditional care. Results from the mixed model support the Family Adjustment and Adaptation Response Model as used in pediatric chronic condition research. PMID:26280177

  7. Otologic and Audiologic Outcomes With the Furlow and von Langenbeck With Intravelar Veloplasty Palatoplasties in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Patrick J.; Jorge, José C.; Feniman, Mariza R.; Piazentin-Penna, Sílvia H.A.; Dutka-Souza, Jeniffer C.R.; Seagle, M. Brent; Williams, William N.; Nackashi, John A.; Boggs, Steve; Graciano, Maria I.G.; Souza, Telma V.; Neto, José S.M.; Garla, Luis A.; Silva, Marcos L.N.; Marques, Ilza L.; Borgo, Hilton C.; Martinelli, Ângela P.M.C.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Pimentel, Maria C.M.; Zimmermann, Maria C.; Bento-Gonçalves, Cristina G.A.; Kemker, F. Joseph; McGorray, Susan P.; Pegoraro-Krook, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cleft palate increases the risk of chronic middle ear disease and hearing loss. The goal of this report was to determine which of two palate surgeries and which timing of palate surgery were associated with better otologic and audiologic outcomes in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate at 5 to 6 years of age. Design Subjects were randomly assigned to the von Langenbeck with intravelar veloplasty or Furlow palate repair, to palate surgery at 9 to 12 months or 15 to 18 months of age, and to the Spina or Millard lip repair. Setting Centralized, tertiary care craniofacial treatment center. Patients A total of 673 infants with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Interventions Palate and lip were repaired using established techniques. Serial otoscopic and audiometric evaluations were performed. Main Outcome Measures Hearing and otoscopic findings at 5 to 6 years old. Results There were 370 children available for analysis. Hearing and need for tympanostomy tube placement did not differ by palatoplasty, age at palatoplasty, cheiloplasty, or surgeon. Risk of developing cholesteatoma or perforation was higher with Millard cheiloplasty (odds ratio = 5.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.44 to 18.11, p = .012). Type and age at palatoplasty were not significantly associated with either the rate of developing these sequelae or the rate of achieving bilaterally normal hearing and ear examinations. Conclusions Type of palatoplasty did not influence otologic and audiologic outcomes in 5- to 6-year-olds with unilateral cleft lip and palate. The potential influence of lip repair on otologic outcomes warrants further investigation. PMID:20536371

  8. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...

  9. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  10. Genetic and environmental factors in human cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common craniofacial birth defect and its etiology has been the focus of many reports in the literature. It is well accepted that both genetics and environment play a role in the condition, however we still have not been able to translate what have been learned into clinical applications. This paper provides an interpretation of the latest research findings in humans and a perspective for where the field is going. The latest effort in gene identification and the associations between isolated cleft lip and palate and the loci harboring IRF6 (1q32) and 8q24.21 are highlighted, as well as the latest insight from more sophisticated phenotypical characterization and the inclusion of covariables related to the environment in the analysis of genetic variation. PMID:22759667

  11. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with non syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Material and Methods Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Results Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, p<0.0001), bilateral complete CLP (p=0.0002) and bilateral incomplete CLP (p< 0.0001) were more affected by tooth agenesis than individuals with other cleft types. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most affected teeth (p<0.0001). Conclusions The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P. Key words:Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without palate, dental anomaly, tooth agenesis, microdontia. PMID:26615505

  12. Presurgical nasoalveolar molding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul J.; Kharkar, Viraj R.; Kamath, Shamika

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients have an esthetic and functional compromise of the middle third of the face and nasal structures. To improve the esthetic result of lip repair, the concept of presurgical nasoalveolar molding (PNAM) was brought into conception. PNAM is an easy and passive method of bringing the alveolus and lips together by redirecting the forces of natural growth. This case report documents a 2-year follow-up of PNAM in UCLP. PMID:26681868

  13. Mid-face osteotomy in the adolescent cleft palate patient.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, B

    1977-10-01

    Retrognathia or retrusion of the maxilla and mid-face is present in about one-third of treated cleft palate patients. Surgical repositioning of either the dental segments, or the entire mid-face into a forward position, can greatly enhance appearance and at the same time provide for a more functional occlusion. Some surgical aspects of this work are presented together with an evaluation of soft tissue change. PMID:277152

  14. [Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome, report of a case with variable expressivity].

    PubMed

    Meza Escobar, Luis Enrique; Isaza, Carolina; Pachajoa, Harry

    2012-10-01

    The ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate syndrome is a rare entity associated with mutations in the genes that express the protein p63. We present a case of a patient with right foot ectrodactyly associated with cleft lip and palate, without other evident anomalies. The patient has a positive familiar history for cleft lift and palate and mortality during the perinatal period. The management of each case must be specific and multidisciplinary. PMID:23070194

  15. Receptor-dependent mechanisms of glucocorticoid and dioxin-induced cleft palate

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    Glucocorticoids (triamcinolone) and dioxins (TCDD) are highly specific teratogens in the mouse, in that cleft palate is the major malformation observed. Glucocorticoids and TCDD both readily cross the yolk sac and placenta and appear in the developing secondary palate. Structure-activity relationships for glucocorticoid- and TCDD-induced cleft palate suggest a receptor involvement. Receptors for glucocorticoids and TCDD are present in the palate and their levels in various mouse strains are highly correlated with their sensitivity to cleft palate induction. Receptors for glucocorticoids appear to be more prevalent in the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas those for TCDD are probably located in the palatal epithelial cells. Glucocorticoids exert their teratogenic effect on the palate by inhibiting the growth of the palatal mesenchymal cells whereas TCDD alters the terminal cell differentiation of the media palatal epithelial cells. 71 references.

  16. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning. PMID:26923345

  17. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning. PMID:26923345

  18. The developmental characteristics of mastoid pneumatisation in cleft palate children: the genetic influence.

    PubMed

    Srzentić, Mladen; Handzić, Jadranka; Trotić, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Physiologic and developmental role of mastoid pneumatisation in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) is still controversial. For measuring mastoid pneumatisation and examine developmental characteristics, we used children with orofacial malformation of high risk for long term negative pressure in the middle ear and are expected to have lower rate of size and growth of pneumatisation. Mastoid were measured on Schuller's mastoid X-ray pictures planimetrically in study group of 146 children with bilateral (BCLP), unilateral (UCLP) and isolated (ICP) cleft palate, and control group of non-cleft 52 children, both groups with confirmed otitis media with effusion and no previous otological surgery. The lowest pneumatisation found in BCLE, BCLP and UCLP showed no growth of mastoid with age and lower mastoid size than OME controls. ICP is the only cleft type with growth of mastoid with aging. OME patients has the highest size of mastoid and growth rate with aging. PMID:23213949

  19. Longitudinal treatment of cleft lip and palate in developing countries: dentistry as part of a multidisciplinary endeavor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cameron C Y; Jagtap, Rasika R; Deshpande, Gaurav S

    2014-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate affects roughly 1 in 600 children and predisposes patients to a lifetime of functional and esthetic discrepancies. Disparities in access as well as quality of care exist worldwide, with many children in developing countries unable to receive treatment. In the late 20th century, humanitarian medical missions emerged as a means of delivering surgical expertise to patients in resource-limited settings. These early missions took on a patient-centered approach focused solely on cleft repair, with little emphasis on treating the dental abnormalities that arose after the initial surgery. However, modern cleft care is characterized by a multidisciplinary, team-based approach with significant dental involvement. Recent cleft lip and palate endeavors have shifted from a mission-based approach to a developmental approach facilitating growth of an independent care center. This strategy focuses on creating an institution with expanded access to dental services, thus facilitating the long-term treatment inherent in modern cleft care. One clinic in a developing country that has experienced successful transitioning from a mission site to an independent craniofacial clinic is Operation Smile's Cleft Comprehensive Care Clinic in Guwahati, India. This article will summarize the rationale and planning of the clinic, underscore the team-based approach required in longitudinal treatment of cleft lip and palate, and demonstrate how treatment methodology may differ in resource-limited settings by outlining the therapeutic considerations of each provider in the Guwahati Clinic. PMID:25162552

  20. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  1. Cleft lip and palate in Madagascar 1998-2007.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarison, Richard Aurélien; Rakotoarivony, Andrianony Emmanuel; Rabesandratana, Norotiana; Razafindrabe, John Bam; Andriambololona, Raoelina; Andriambololo-Nivo, Rabetrano; Feki, Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    Our aim was to find out the prevalence of oral clefts in Madagascar, to compare it with elsewhere in the world, and to give the possible cause of the particular rate in the Vakinankaratra region where Antsirabe is situated. Data were collected from birth registers from 1998 to 2007 in the 10 most important hospitals of the 6 former provinces and of Antsirabe. A total of 150,973 consecutive live births were recorded in the 6 provinces, and 175,981 including those from Antsirabe. The general birth prevalence of oral clefts was 0.48‰ (about 1/2100, n=150,973) which was made up of 0.23‰, 0.12‰, and 0.11‰ for cleft lip and palate, isolated cleft lip, and isolated cleft palate, respectively. Prevalence was greater on the Central Highlands than in the coastal regions. Higher prevalence rates were found among girls than boys (64.4% compared with 35.6%, p<0.01). Of the clefts, 65.5% were unilateral, and left-sided ones were most common (77.8%). If the results obtained in Antsirabe are also considered, birth prevalence of oral clefts was 0.92‰ (about 1/1100, n=175,981) if Antsirabe is included, and 0.41-0.50‰ in the 6 former provinces; rates of associated, or syndromic, forms, or both, were 21.9% in the 6 provinces and 26.1% in Antsirabe. Overall, the prevalence of oral clefts in Madagascar does not differ from that in the rest of the world, except for the sex difference. There was a high prevalence of oral clefts in general and associated or syndromic forms, or both, in the Vakinankaratra region. There may be a link between these results and background high doses of ionising radiation in some areas because of the presence of former uranium mines. Further research is needed to obtain more precise data. PMID:21764188

  2. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  3. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Burg, Madeleine L; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  4. Velopharyngeal Insufficiency Rates After Delayed Cleft Palate Repair: Lessons Learned From Internationally Adopted Patients.

    PubMed

    Follmar, Keith E; Yuan, Nance; Pendleton, Courtney S; Dorafshar, Amir H; Kolk, Craig Vander; Redett, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Most surgeons recommend cleft palate repair between 6 and 12 months of age. Internationally adopted patients often undergo delayed repair due to social circumstances. There are few outcomes studies on this population. We conducted a 13-year retrospective review of all patients undergoing primary cleft palate repair at a single tertiary-care academic medical center between 1993 and 2006. The primary outcome was velopharyngeal insufficiency, defined as the recommendation for corrective surgery after multiple formal speech assessments. Two hundred one patients (102 males and 99 females) were identified. One hundred eighty-three repairs were performed before 18 months of age (standard repair group). Eighteen repairs were performed after 18 months of age (delayed repair group), with international adoption being a circumstance in 16 cases. The delayed and standard repair groups were similar with regard to sex, presence of craniofacial syndrome, Veau class, cleft size and laterality, type of repair, and operating surgeon. Mean follow-up was 9.3 years, with minimum follow-up of 5.0 years. Six (33%) of 18 patients in the delayed repair group developed velopharyngeal insufficiency compared to 23 (13%) of 183 in the standard repair group (P = 0.03 by Fisher exact test). These data demonstrate that internationally adopted patients undergoing delayed palate repair suffer especially poor speech outcomes. Physiologic differences in patients undergoing late repair, as well as social factors including adaptation to a new language and culture, may be factors. Early repair should be performed when possible. PMID:25046662

  5. Submucous cleft palate: outcomes after primary repair with repositioning of the levator muscle in 51 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Smyth, A G

    2016-06-01

    I report the incidence of hypernasal resonance, nasal emission, and fistula after intravelar surgery with retropositioning of the levator muscle by a single surgeon in a consecutive series of 51 patients who presented with symptomatic submucous cleft palate. Intravelar veloplasty with repositioning of the levator muscle was highly effective in that 37/51 patients (73%) achieved either normal or mild and inconsistent resonance (p<0.0001), and 39 (77%) normal or mild and inconsistent nasal emissions (p<0.0001). The fistula rate was 6% (n=3). Both the clinical grade of submucous cleft palate and the presence of a syndrome correlated directly with changes in hypernasality, whereas the age of the patient and the degree of hypernasality at presentation did not. Non-syndromic patients with clinical grade III and II submucous cleft palates responded well to intravelar surgery with repositioning of the levator muscle, and routine preoperative videofluoroscopy is not recommended. I recommend intravelar surgery with repositioning of the levator muscle routinely for all non-syndromic patients who present with grade III or II submucous cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency. PMID:26992275

  6. Optimization of dental status improves long-term outcome after alveolar bone grafting in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Fatima; Skoog, Valdemar; Reiser, Eicka; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Objective : To evaluate the importance of dental status for long-term outcome after alveolar bone grafting in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Design : Retrospective longitudinal study. Setting : Cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Patients : A total of 67 consecutive patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. Interventions : Secondary alveolar bone grafting, prior to the eruption of the permanent canine, was performed at the average age of 10.0 years (range, 8.5 to 12.0 years). Main Outcome Measures : Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the modified Bergland index at 1 and 10 years after surgery. Results : Of the patients, 97% had modified Bergland index grade I and the remaining 3% had modified Bergland index grade II at 1 year after surgery. At 10 years' follow-up, 43% showed modified Bergland index grade I; 55%, modified Bergland index grade II; and 2% (one patient), modified Bergland index grade III. The degree of dental anomalies in the cleft area, such as enamel hypoplasia, incisor rotation, incisor inclination, canine inclination, and oral hygiene registered preoperatively, all correlated negatively to the modified Bergland index at 10 years after surgery. Enamel hypoplasia (ρ = 0.70195, P < .0001), followed by canine inclination (ρ = 0.55429, P < .0001), showed the strongest correlation to reduced bone height in the cleft area. Conclusions : In patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, excellent results from secondary alveolar bone grafting in terms of bone height in the alveolar cleft tend to decrease with time. This seems to be correlated with factors that might to some extent be treated preoperatively through adequate planning and execution of the orthodontic treatment. PMID:24568558

  7. Closure of huge palatal fistula in an adult patient with isolated cleft palate: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-02-01

    Closure of huge palatal fistula surrounded by fully erupted permanent dentition in the adult patients with cleft is a challenge. Posteriorly based buccinator myomucosal flap is a neurovascular pedicled flap, with inherent nature of thin thickness, saliva secretion, and axial pattern blood supply. Vicinity of donor site to the palate and low donor-site morbidity are the other advantages. It is an ideal choice in such situation. In this article, the details of surgical technique and the effectiveness of this method are presented. PMID:25750845

  8. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  9. Effects of Listening Instructions and Severity of Cleft Palate Speech on Listeners. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shames, George H.; And Others

    Mothers of cleft and noncleft palate children (C- and non C-mothers) listened to a reading by a cleft palate child of a passage containing specified combinations of nasality and intelligibility. Groups were either uninstructed or instructed to listed to the content or the manner of speech; they assessed the nasality and intelligibility of the…

  10. Vocal Development of 9-Month-Old Babies with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Kathy L.; Hardin-Jones, Mary; Schulte, Julie; Halter, Kelli Ann

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the prelinguistic vocal development of 30 9- month-old babies with unrepaired cleft palate and age-matched peers (N=15). Fewer of the babies with cleft palate had reached the canonical babbling stage (57 percent versus 93 percent) and had smaller consonant inventories. However, syllable types and length and number of…

  11. Perception of Place of Articulation by Children with Cleft Palate and Posterior Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Francis, Alexander L.; Ching, Christine K-Y.

    2003-01-01

    A study examined if 10 children (ages 4-12) with repaired cleft palate who demonstrate posterior placement of alveolar targets differed from 10 children with cleft palate without such error patterns, and from 10 controls in the perception of alveolar targets. Children with posterior placement appeared unable to distinguish alveolar targets.…

  12. EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD. B D Abbott, A R Buckalew, and K E Leffler. RTD, NHEERL, ORD,US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is teratogenic in C57BL/6J mice, producing cleft palate (CP) after exposure...

  13. The Interrelationships between Ratings of Speech and Facial Acceptability in Persons with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinko, Garnet R.; Hedrick, Dona L.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty untrained young adult observers rated the speech and facial acceptablity of 20 speakers with cleft palate. The observers were reliable in rating both speech and facial acceptability. Judgments of facial acceptability were generally more positive, suggesting that speech is generally judged more negatively in speakers with cleft palate.…

  14. Psychosocial Aspects of Cleft Lip and Palate: Implications for Parental Education. Research Report 138.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalland, Mirjam

    This study focused on the psychosocial aspects of cleft lip and/or palate on maternal emotional reactions and the family, with emphasis on the effect on the maternal-infant bond. Interviews were conducted with 40 mothers of 1-year-old infants with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate. The interviews were analyzed using the phenomenological…

  15. A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harvey R.; Ferrand, Carole T.

    1987-01-01

    Respirometric quotients (RQ), the ratio of oral air volume expended to total volume expended, were obtained from the productions of oral and nasal airflow of 10 speakers with cleft palate, with and without their prosthetic appliances, and 10 normal speakers. Cleft palate speakers without their appliances exhibited the lowest RQ values. (Author/DB)

  16. Acquisition of Linguistic and Cognitive Skills by Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broen, Patricia A.; Devers, Monica C.; Doyle, Shirley S.; Prouty, Jo McCauley; Moller, Karlind T.

    1998-01-01

    This study compared cognitive and linguistic development of young children with (N=28) and without (N=29) cleft palate. Children with cleft palate, although well within the normal range, performed significantly below the control group on cognitive and linguistic tests. Cognitive differences were linguistic in nature and were related to hearing…

  17. Current Controversies in Diagnosis and Management of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ysunza, Pablo Antonio; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Pamplona, Maria Carmen; Calderon, Juan F.; Shaheen, Kenneth; Chaiyasate, Konkgrit; Rontal, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most controversial topics concerning cleft palate is the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Objective. This paper reviews current genetic aspects of cleft palate, imaging diagnosis of VPI, the planning of operations for restoring velopharyngeal function during speech, and strategies for speech pathology treatment of articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate. Materials and Methods. An updated review of the scientific literature concerning genetic aspects of cleft palate was carried out. Current strategies for assessing and treating articulation disorders associated with cleft palate were analyzed. Imaging procedures for assessing velopharyngeal closure during speech were reviewed, including a recent method for performing intraoperative videonasopharyngoscopy. Results. Conclusions from the analysis of genetic aspects of syndromic and nonsyndromic cleft palate and their use in its diagnosis and management are presented. Strategies for classifying and treating articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate are presented. Preliminary results of the use of multiplanar videofluoroscopy as an outpatient procedure and intraoperative endoscopy for the planning of operations which aimed to correct VPI are presented. Conclusion. This paper presents current aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients with cleft palate and VPI including 3 main aspects: genetics and genomics, speech pathology and imaging diagnosis, and surgical management. PMID:26273595

  18. Cleft Palate induced by Sulfur Mustard in mice fetus

    PubMed Central

    Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad; Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shekouhi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent which was widely used in the World War I and more recently during Gulf war in the early 1980s'. SM is a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic and carcinogenic effects; but only few studies have been published on its teratogenicity. Since SM has been widely used as a chemical weapon by the Iraqi regime against the Iranian soldiers as well as the civilian population particularly pregnant women in the border area; therefore, the investigation of SM adverse effects on cleft malformations which is one of the most frequent congenital anomalies is considered in this study. An experimental work has been carried out in embryopathy in mouse with intraperitoneal injection of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg SM at different periods of gestation. Cleft lip and palate were examined by stereomicroscopy. Current data demonstrate that exposure with SM on the 11th day of gestation can increase the incidence of cleft defects in comparison with control group (P<0.001). These results also show that SM treatment in GD 11 and 13 can lead to more anomalies compared with GD 14 (P<0.001). They also show that the teratogenic effects of SM are restrictively under the influence of the threshold dose and time of gestation. The present results suggest that exposure to sufficient doses of SM on critical days of gestation may increase the risk of congenital cleft malformations. PMID:24551757

  19. How various surgical protocols of the unilateral cleft lip and palate influence the facial growth and possible orthodontic problems? Which is the best timing of lip, palate and alveolus repair? literature review.

    PubMed

    Farronato, Giampietro; Kairyte, Laima; Giannini, Lucia; Galbiati, Guido; Maspero, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Cleft lip palate is congenital growth disease with unknown etiology, probably linked to both genetically and external causes. The aim of this work consists in presenting the effects of these diseases on cranio facial growth and the surgical protocols described in literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The literature review articles conducted by Medline ranged from 1998 to 2011 have been selected. The key words of the research were "cleft lip palate", "cleft lip palate facial growth", "cleft lip palate surgery". The inclusion criteria were articles that analyzed surgical protocols and the growth of unilateral lip and palate clefts, the timing repair of lip, palate and alveolus. We excluded case reports, studies without control group in the sample and the other types of publication as thesis or conference presentation. 60 articles had the selection criteria of the research. RESULTS. The cleft lip and palate is one of the most common birth defects that needs long rehabilitation between birth and adulthood. Several authors have presented surgical protocols and timing. The effects of these diseases on cranio facial growth and the importance of the early intervention have been described. CONCLUSIONS. The review describes the main surgical protocols and treatment strategies of the unilateral lip and palate clefts. The review discusses how surgery effects the midfacial skeletal growth. Studies agree that the palate repair is the main cause of the maxilla growth disturbances. About the timing of palate repair in the unilateral clefts it can be concluded that most studies found no difference between one or two stages palate repair techniques for the midfacial growth. Also from the research, studies agree that delayed hard palate repair has more positive effects on maxillary growth than that of early hard palate repair. Nevertheless good results, delayed hard palate repair technique is abandoned by many hospital centres because of worse speech outcome. The best

  20. The Impact of Early Intervention on Speech and Lexical Development for Toddlers with Cleft Palate: A Retrospective Look at Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin-Jones, Mary; Chapman, Kathy L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the impact of early intervention on speech and lexical measures for toddlers with cleft palate. Method: Speech measures of ten 27-month-old toddlers with cleft palate who had been referred for therapy at 17 months of age were compared to those of 10 toddlers with cleft palate who had…

  1. Description of a clinical technique for tooth extraction in the cleft lip and palate area.

    PubMed

    Dalben, G S; Gomide, M R; Costa, B; Neves, L T

    2001-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate are relatively common congenital malformations, which may require specialist paedodontic treatment. In this article, the case of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral complete cleft lip and palate is presented. He attended the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies (HRAC) for routine examination, during which the presence of pre-canine supernumeraries bilaterally in the cleft area was seen. The extraction of these dental elements was justified by extensive carious lesions and because they represented a potential problem during secondary palatoplasty. The precautions needed in tooth extraction in patients with cleft lip and palate are described, together with illustrations of the clinical procedure. PMID:11310139

  2. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. OBJECTIVES: To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. METHODS: A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. RESULTS: On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. CONCLUSIONS: The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory

  3. Study of relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure in cleft palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Meng, Tian; Zheng, Guang-ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to analyze the relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure (VPC) in cleft palate patients. METHODS: Chi-square test was used to compare the postoperative velopharyngeal closure rate. Logistic regression model was used to analyze independent variables associated with velopharyngeal closure. RESULTS: Difference of postoperative VPC rate in different cleft types, operative ages and surgical techniques was significant (P=0.000). Results of logistic regression analysis suggested that when operative age was beyond deciduous dentition stage, or cleft palate type was complete, or just had undergone a simple palatoplasty without levator veli palatini retropositioning, patients would suffer a higher velopharyngeal insufficiency rate after primary palatal repair. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft type, operative age and surgical technique were the contributing factors influencing VPC rate after primary palatal repair of cleft palate patients. PMID:22279464

  4. Cleft characteristics and treatment outcomes in hemifacial microsomia compared to non-syndromic cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Dentino, K M; Valstar, A; Padwa, B L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and cleft lip/palate (CL/P), and to compare them to a historic cohort of patients with non-syndromic CL/P treated at the same centre. A retrospective review of patients with HFM and CL/P was performed; the main outcome measures assessed were cleft type/side, surgical outcome, midfacial retrusion, and speech. Twenty-six patients (13 male, 13 female; mean age 22.7±14.9, range 1-52 years) with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL±P) were identified: three with cleft lip (12%), two with cleft lip and alveolus and an intact secondary palate (8%), and 21 with cleft lip and palate (CLP) (81%; 15 unilateral and six bilateral). Four patients (19%) had a palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Twelve of 22 patients aged >5 years (55%) had midfacial retrusion and two (9%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Fisher's exact test demonstrated a higher frequency of complete labial clefting (P=0.004), CLP (P=0.009), midfacial retrusion (P=0.0009), and postoperative palatal fistula (P=0.03) in HFM compared to non-syndromic CL±P. There was no difference in VPI prevalence. This study revealed that patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe forms of orofacial clefting than patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe midfacial retrusion and a higher palatal fistula rate compared to patients with non-syndromic CL±P. PMID:26775633

  5. Postoperative complications from primary repair of cleft lip and palate in a semi-urban Nigerian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adesina, Oluwafemi Adewale; Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Idon, Paul Ikhodaro

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper seeks to investigate the incidence of short-term postoperative complications in children and adult patients undergoing primary surgery of cleft lip and palate. Patients and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients consisting of children (below 12 years) and adult (12 years and above) who were operated for both cleft lip and palate within a 2-year period at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital were reviewed postoperatively at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year intervals, respectively. The complications encountered within the periods of the review were recorded. Results: One hundred and twenty surgeries were performed on 115 patients (85 children 30 Adults). A total of 43 complications (31 in children and 12 in adults) were recorded over the study period. Eighteen (41.9%) of these complications were noticed in unilateral cleft lip repair, while 12 (27.9%) and 13 (30.2%) complications were observed in bilateral cleft lip and cleft palate surgeries, respectively. A higher complication rate (72.0%) was recorded in children compared with adults. Major complications (13.9%) were, however, observed more in adults than children. Conclusion: Although every surgeon attempts to prevent complications during surgery, they may still occur. The high complication rate observed in our study may be due to a small sample size. General complications observed among children are due to cross infection during a hospital stay, contributing immensely to the higher rate of complications in children. Moreover, this may be reduced by short hospital stay following surgery. We also advocate early contact with children with cleft, and early surgical intervention in other to prevent some of the major complications encountered in adult patients. PMID:27397954

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate Associated with Other Malformations in a Neotropical Primate (Saimiri ustus)

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Beatriz; Lopes, Claudia AA; Moura, Marina; Nogueira, Denise M; Gonçalves, Miguel AB; Fasano, Daniele M; Andrade, Marcia CR; Nascimento, Laine WF; Marinho, Antonio M

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) has been documented in several species of nonhuman primates, which in general are susceptible at similar doses and stages of gestation to the same teratogens as humans. Cleft lip can be unilateral or bilateral, isolated, syndromic, familial, or genetic. Here we report the first case of syndromic cleft lip and palate in a male bare-eared squirrel monkey (Saimiri ustus). Associated with the orofacial clefts, the monkey manifested absence of bones, malformation of vertebrae L3, only 4 fingers in each hand, and shortening of tendons leading to inflection of the hands and fingers. Previous reports describing cleft lip and palate in other squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in other breeding units have suggested consanguineous mating as a possible cause. Although the etiology in the case we present is unknown, we discuss factors associated with orofacial clefts in humans and various nonhuman primates. PMID:20587169

  7. Constitutively active mutation of ACVR1 in oral epithelium causes submucous cleft palate in mice.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kazuo; Mishina, Yuji; Komatsu, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-15

    Cleft palate is among the most common human birth defects. Submucous cleft palate (SMCP) is a subgroup of cleft palate, which may be as common as overt cleft palate. Despite the high frequency of SMCP in humans, only recently have several animal models of SMCP begun to provide insight into the mechanisms by which SMCP develops. In this study, we show that enhanced BMP signaling through constitutively active ACVR1 in palatal epithelium causes submucous cleft palate in mice. In these mutant mice, the fusion of both palatal mesenchyme in hard palate, and muscles in soft palate were hampered by epithelial tissue. During palatal fusion, enhanced SMAD-dependent BMP signaling impaired cell death and altered cell proliferation rate in medial edge epithelium (MEE), and resulted in MEE persistence. At the molecular level, downregulation of ΔNp63, which is crucial for normal palatal fusion, in MEE cells was impaired, leading to a reduction in caspase-3 activation. Our study provides a new insight into the etiology of SMCP caused by augmented BMP signaling. PMID:26116174

  8. Developing a visual rating chart for the esthetic outcome of unilateral cleft lip and palate repair

    PubMed Central

    Adeola, A. Olusanya; Oladimeji, A. Akadiri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aesthetic impairment is a major concern for the cleft lip/palate patient. Thus, auditing of postsurgical esthetic outcome needs to be further explored as till date no universally accepted protocol exists. The study objective was to propose a new visual rating chart (VRC) for the aesthetic outcome of cleft lip and palate (CLP) surgery. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective review of 200 repaired clefts, the common esthetic deficiencies were identified, categorized and ranked in the order of severity. A chart of the illustrative diagram with textual description of the defects was produced and used as a basis for rating outcome by two groups of raters (familiar raters and recruited raters). Intra- and inter-raters reliability was estimated using Cohen's kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Comparison between mean group coefficient was achieved with Kendall's correlation coefficient of concordance. Results: The intra- and inter-rater reliability for familiar raters was found to be strong with kappa values range of 0.80–0.87 (P < 0.001). Similarly, inter-raters’ reliability by recruited judges was very strong using ICC at both single (0.768) and average measures (0.982). Conclusion: The VRC is a reliable tool for assessing the esthetic outcome of CLP repairs. PMID:26389035

  9. The Facial Growth Pattern and the Amount of Palatal Bone Deficiency Relative to Cleft Size Should Be Considered in Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to determine the best surgical/orthodontic treatment plan for the complete bilateral and unilateral cleft lip and palate patient to achieve all treatment goals of facial aesthetics, speech, dental function, and psychosocial development. Methods: Review of 40 years of serial complete bilateral cleft lip and palate and complete unilateral cleft lip and palate dental casts and photographs from birth to adolescence, with serial cephs starting at 4 years. This was part of a multicenter international 3-dimensional palatal growth study of serial dental casts of patients who developed good speech, occlusion, and facial growth. Results: Nasoalveolar molding and gingivoperiosteoplasty were introduced without proven longitudinal benefits. The procedure bodily retruded the premaxilla, which “telescoped” backward causing synostosis at the premaxillary vomerine suture. The resulting midfacial recessiveness with an anterior dental crossbite can only be corrected by midfacial protraction or a Le Fort I surgery. Conclusions: Staged orthodontic/surgical treatment limiting premaxillary retraction forces to lip adhesion or forces that cause only premaxillary ventroflexion produce the best results. The palatal cleft should be closed between 18 and 24 months when the ratio of the cleft to the palatal size medial to the alveolar ridge is at least 10%. The protruding premaxilla should only be ventroflexed but never bodily retruded. The facial growth pattern and degree of palatal bone deficiency are the main items to be considered in treatment planning. PMID:27579230

  10. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  11. Association of BMP4 polymorphisms with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and isolated cleft palate in Latvian and Lithuanian populations.

    PubMed

    Kempa, Inga; Ambrozaitytė, Laima; Stavusis, Janis; Akota, Ilze; Barkane, Biruta; Krumina, Astrida; Matulevičienė, Aušra; Utkus, Algirdas; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lace, Baiba

    2014-01-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP and CL, respectively) and isolated cleft palate (CP) represent one of the most common human birth defects, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 300-2500 depending on the population. Formation of non-syndromic CL/CLP and CP arises from the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the BMP4 gene (encoding bone morphogenetic protein 4) and non-syndromic CL/CLP and CP in order to clarify the role of this gene in the aetiology of the malformation in Latvian and Lithuanian populations. We genotyped three markers of the BMP4 gene (rs17563, rs2071047 and rs1957860) in order to perform single marker and haplotype association analyses for Latvian and Lithuanian non-syndromic CL/CLP and CP patients and controls. Transmission disequilibrium test was also conducted for Latvian and Lithuanian proband-parent trios. The case-control analysis revealed that SNP rs2071047 allele A was associated with a decreased risk of CL/CLP in the Latvian population, which was confirmed by the haplotype analysis. A modest association was detected between SNP rs1957860 and CP in the Lithuanian population, where allele C was associated with a decreased risk of this cleft phenotype, corroborating haplotype analysis data. Our findings support a role of the BMP4 gene in the aetiology of non-syndromic CL/CLP and CP in the studied populations. PMID:25471993

  12. Craniofacial pattern of parents of children having cleft lip and/or cleft palate anomaly.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, R; Sidhu, S S; Kharbanda, O P

    1994-01-01

    The craniofacial patterns of 38 sets of parents who had children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate anomalies (experimental group) were compared with the 24 sets of parents of healthy (noncleft) children (control group). Using a computerized program, 248 cephalograms (124 lateral and 124 frontal) were digitized and analyzed. The parents in the experimental group exhibited a distinct craniofacial morphology, including a significant decrease in upper anterior facial height (N-Ans) and total anterior face height (V-Gn). Anterior nasal spine (Ans) and maxillary alveolar process (A) were positioned more anteriorly and superiorly in the experimental group, which contributed to a significant increase in the length of the palate (Ans-Pns) and an anterosuperior rotation of the palatal plane. The cranial base angle in the experimental group was significantly obtuse and the articular angle was smaller than that of the controls. The counterclockwise rotation of the mandible was mitigated by a significant increase in the gonial angle. Parents in the experimental group also tended to have faces which were smaller in both transverse and vertical dimensions. PMID:8010522

  13. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goat Palates

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Michael C.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey; Panter, Kip E.; McClellan, W. Thomas; Caterson, Stefanie A.; Buchman, Steven R.; Faulkner, John A.; Yu, Deborah; Cederna, Paul S.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Inherent differences in the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle of cleft palates before palatoplasty may play a role in persistent postrepair velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Contractile properties of LVP muscle fibers were analyzed from young (2-month) normal (YNP), young congenitally cleft (YCP) and again on the same YCP subjects 6 months after palatoplasty, mature repaired palate (MRP). The cross-sectional area and rate of force development (ktr) were measured. Specific force (sF0) and normalized power (nPmax) were calculated. Using ktr to determine fiber type composition, YNP was 44% type 1 and 56% type 2, while YCP was 100% type 2. Two MRP subjects shifted to 100% type 1; 1 demonstrated increased resistance to fatigue. No differences in sF0 were observed. nPmax increased with presence of type 2 fibers. The persistent state of type 2 fibers following palatoplasty leads to increased fatigue in the LVP of MRP subjects and may cause VPI symptoms. PMID:18216514

  14. Maternal and child locus of control and field-dependence in cleft palate children.

    PubMed

    Brantley, H T; Clifford, E

    1979-04-01

    The cleft palate experience includes events which are beyond the control of cleft palate children and their mothers. To investigate whether the experiences relate to other maternal and child variables, 44 cleft palate children, 9--18 years of age, and their mothers were compared to 61 control children and their mothers. Maternal variables included locus of control and perceived reactions to the child's birth. Child variables included locus of control, field dependence, parental perceptions, and teacher ratings. Mothers of children with cleft palates indicated a significantly greater negative impact at their children's births but did not indicate greater externality. Children with clefts were significantly more external in control, were more field-dependent, perceived parental reactions as more negative, and had more negative academic ratings. Mothers who were more external in locus of control had children who were more field-dependent and had more external control. PMID:284868

  15. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a child with cleft lip and/or palate, nutrition is the first priority as for any other child. These children have specific physical limitations. To fulfill their nutritional requirement, these children need modifications in order to thrive and grow. Failure to adjust to these needs could place the children into a potential life-threatening situation. One of the immediate problems to be addressed in a newborn with cleft lip/palate is difficulty in feeding. Nasal regurgitation and choking are common because of inability of the palate to separate the nasal and oral cavities. The case presented here discusses the management of feeding problem in the infant with cleft lip/palate. How to cite this article: Goswami M, Jangra B, Bhushan U. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/ Palate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):143-145. PMID:27365936

  16. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/Palate.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Mridula; Jangra, Babita; Bhushan, Urvashi

    2016-01-01

    In a child with cleft lip and/or palate, nutrition is the first priority as for any other child. These children have specific physical limitations. To fulfill their nutritional requirement, these children need modifications in order to thrive and grow. Failure to adjust to these needs could place the children into a potential life-threatening situation. One of the immediate problems to be addressed in a newborn with cleft lip/palate is difficulty in feeding. Nasal regurgitation and choking are common because of inability of the palate to separate the nasal and oral cavities. The case presented here discusses the management of feeding problem in the infant with cleft lip/palate. How to cite this article: Goswami M, Jangra B, Bhushan U. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/ Palate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):143-145. PMID:27365936

  17. Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: New BCL3 information

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, C.; Hecht, J.T.; Gasser, D.

    1996-09-01

    We did not previously provide LOD scores for linkage assuming heterogeneity, as suggested by Ott for the linkage analysis of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and BCL3, ApoC2, and D19S178 in the paper by Stein et al. The results from analysis using the HOMOG program, allowing for heterogeneity under the reduced penetrance model, gave a maximum LOD score of 1.85 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.03 for D19S178, and 1.72 for multipoint analysis in the interval. For the affecteds-only model, the values are 1.96 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.01 for D19S178, and 1.44 for the multipoint analysis. 8 refs.

  18. Global variation in cleft palate repairs: an analysis of 352,191 primary cleft repairs in low- to higher-middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Hodges, Andrew M; Van Lierde, Kristiane M; Swan, Marc C

    2014-09-01

    Objectives : Resources for repair of cleft lip and palate may be lacking in low- and middle-income countries. The Smile Train is a registered charity that supports cleft repair in resource-poor settings. In the global health care challenge, it has been suggested that many babies born with cleft palates are not repaired. This study aims to determine whether any variation exists in the proportion of cleft lip and cleft palate repairs undertaken in low- and middle-income countries. Methods : Data were obtained from the Smile Train database of 352,191 consecutive cleft operations performed between 2008 and 2011 in low- to higher-middle-income countries. The ratio of cleft lip to palate repair was analyzed as a function of geographic region and by country income (gross national income). Results : A significant correlation exists between both the income of a country and its geographical region to the ratio of lip and palate repair procedures undertaken. Higher-income countries had a higher ratio of cleft palate repairs. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa have the lowest proportion of cleft palate repairs. Conclusion : This study emphasizes that many babies born with cleft palates in resource-poor regions do not have their palates repaired. This finding may be explained by an increased neonatal mortality in cleft palate babies. Furthermore, fewer isolated palatal clefts may present to an appropriate health care facility or there may be a reluctance to treat cleft palate due to concerns regarding higher perioperative risks or the lack of available surgical and anesthetic expertise. PMID:24102511

  19. Analysis for speech and esthetics in sixty consecutive patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Shiraganvi, Mahantesh S; Kumar, N; Desai, A; Kiran, TUR; Gopalkrishnan, K

    2012-01-01

    Background A double-blind retrospective study was carried out at our oral and maxillofacial surgery department to assess speech and esthetics of primary cheiloplasty in patients operated for unilateral complete cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Materials and Methods Total sample size was 60. All were operated for unilateral complete cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Age range was between 1 and 21 years. Results of surgeries performed by two surgeons were assessed. The speech of all these patients was judged by a single speech therapist who was unaware of the operating surgeon. All patients were assessed for articulatory errors, namely, omission, distortion, substitution, addition and intelligibility. Sixty-eight words in local language (Kannada) were selected by the speech pathologist. All patients were subdivided into three age groups: ≤5 years, 6-10 years and ≥11 years. The cheiloplasty was assessed using VLS (V: vermilion, L: lip, S: scar) scale for vermilion, lip and scar patterns. Results and Conclusion Patients undergoing palatoplasty in ≤1 year showed good articulation between the age of 5 and 10 years. Articulation and intelligibility was maximum in patients ≥11 years. Patients at this age try various compensatory mechanisms to overcome communication disabilities. Based on the VLS scale, scarring was the least in all patients. Vermilion and lip patterns showed satisfactory results in most of the patients. PMID:25756010

  20. Evaluating aesthetics of the nasolabial region in children with cleft lip and palate: professional analysis and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common deformities of the craniofacial region, and treatment of this deformity is essential for social reintegration. One of the major goals of surgery and treatment of craniofacial deformities is to improve the aesthetic appearance of the face, and thereby improve the patient’s social acceptability. Here, we present a critical review of the criteria for aesthetic evaluation of the nasolabial region in cleft patients by assessing publications with the highest level of evidence, including professional evaluation, and patient satisfaction. The findings indicate treatment of this condition represents a major challenge for multidisciplinary team care. PMID:23152672

  1. Single-layer Closure with Tongue Flap for Palatal Fistula in Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alsalman, Abdulla K.; Alwabari, Mufeed Saeed; Almugarrab, Fatimah Jawad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tongue flap is a good option to close a complicated palatal fistula in cleft patients. Most surgeons advocate a double-layer closure to decrease the recurrence rates. In this study, we have reported our experience with a modified single-layer closure with tongue flap in cleft patients. Method: All cases done by a single surgeon using this modified technique in a period of 10 years were retrospectively reviewed. A thorough description of this technique is also provided in the study. Results: Only 5 cases were operated on using this technique. The success rate of all these cases was 100%, with no recurrence of fistula and few complications. Conclusions: This technique provides a way to avoid nasal layer closure in cases where nasal layer is difficult or impossible to close. It also limits the need for a second flap for nasal layer closure.

  2. A new approach to repairing cleft palate and acquired palatal defects with distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D-Z; Chen, G; Liao, Y-M; Liu, S-G; Gao, Z-W; Hu, J; Li, J-H; Liao, C-H

    2006-08-01

    Cleft palate (CP) is one of the most common human congenital deformities, and acquired palate defects after trauma or tumour resection are also common. In this study, distraction osteogenesis (DO) for CP and other palatal bone defects was evaluated. Twenty cats were assigned randomly to 3 groups of (1) 15, (2) 3 and (3) 2 cats. In groups 1 and 2, a rectangular ostectomy, in the posterior of the palatal bone shelf, was performed in the sagittal axis to establish the CP defect model. At the same time, a pure titanium intraoral distractor was fixed to molar teeth with brackets and to the palatal bone shelf across the defect with titanium miniscrews bilaterally. Four weeks later, a secondary transport disc (TD) osteotomy was performed, and gradual DO treatment started at 0.4mm twice a day, after 6 days of latency. DO was performed until the TD reached the opposite margin over the gap in 5-6 days. Three cats each of group 1 were killed at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after completion of DO. In group 2, the bone and soft-tissue defects were untreated until death 6 weeks later. Group 3 cats (control) were killed after 6 weeks. The TD successfully recombined with the opposite palatal bone stump, and proportional expansion of the overlay mucoperiosteal flap was achieved. Intramembranous bone formation was revealed: parallel collagen bundles gradually deposited on new bone trabeculae while the proliferative osteoblasts produced bone matrix. The bone defect was finally reconstructed by de novo osteogenesis. The control group was observed to have no spontaneous repairing. These results suggest that the CP defect was reconstructed by osteogenesis in situ, and the soft tissues expanded simultaneously to achieve functional correction. The intraoral distractor provided both effective distraction and stability. PMID:16690250

  3. Malonylcarnitine in Newborns with Non-syndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Hozyasz, Kamil Konrad; Oltarzewski, Mariusz; Dudkiewicz, Zofia

    2010-01-01

    Aim Malonyl-CoA is regarded as a key signaling molecule in mammalian cells. It is converted to acetyl-CoA, and to a lesser extent, to malonyl acid and malonylcarnitine (C3DC). Availability of carnitine has been reported to be essential for the developing fetus. The objectives of the present study were to analyze associations of malonylcarnitine, acetylcarnitine (C2), and free carnitine (C0) in subjects with orofacial clefts. Methodology We performed a retrospective analysis of carnitine concentration obtained from a newborn screening program carried out in our institution. Concentrations of whole blood malonylcarnitine, acetylcarnitine, and free carnitine were measured using tandem mass spectrometry. The study group consisted of 51 children with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate. In total, 106 healthy children without congenital anomalies served as controls. Cut-off points were established using likelihood ratio values. Results The mean concentration of malonylcarnitine in the cleft group was lower than that of the control group, 0.048 μmol·L−1 vs. 0.058 μmol·L−1, respectively (P=0.009). In patients with orofacial cleft, low malonylcarnitine levels (≤0.047 μmol·L−1) were 1.7 times more predominant than in healthy individuals (P=0.03). The mean concentration of acetylcarnitine was also lower in affected newborns in comparison to controls, 33.8 μmol·L−1 vs. 37.8 μmol·L−1, respectively (P=0.026). After analysis of acetylcarnitine and free carnitine concentrations, the likelihood ratio test did not indicate valuable cut-off points. Conclusion The study provides initial data indicating a potential association between decreased malonylcarnitine and abnormal palatogenesis. PMID:21125791

  4. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-03-01

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not. PMID:25394591

  5. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-01-01

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not. PMID:25394591

  6. Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, and Cleft Lip-Palate Syndrome; Its Association with Conductive Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss associated with the ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip palate syndrome was reported in one sporadic case and in a pedigree with four cases in three generations. (GW)

  7. Effect of cleft lip palate repair on craniofacial growth

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Zuber Ahamed; Shivalinga, BM; Ravi, S; Munawwar, Syeda Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare craniofacial growth among operated and unoperated unilateral cleft lip and palate non-syndromic subjects. Materials and Methods: A sample of 180 subjects of Indian origin was selected. Of them, 90 were operated, and 90 were unoperated complete unilateral cleft lip and palate individuals. The subjects were divided into three age groups of 3–5, 8–10, and 20–25 years comprised of 30 patients in each group. The following measurements were evaluated: Angle and length of the cranial base; maxillary spatial positioning and length; mandibular spatial positioning; morphology and length; maxillomandibular relationship. Comparative analysis of the means between the groups was performed with Student's t-test at the significance levels of 5%. The ANOVA test has been performed to test the effect of time. Results: No significant differences were observed between the measurements that represented the angle and length of the cranial base of unoperated and the operated patients (P>0.05). There was statistically significant decrease (P˂0.05) in the maxillary length (Co-A; 69.00 mm in 3–5 years, 68.33 mm in 8–10 years, and 67.17 mm in 20–25 years age group), and SNA angle (74.83° in 3–5 years, 74.17 ° in 8–10 years and 73.17 ° in 20–25 years age group) in operated group. No significant difference noticed on cephalometric values of the mandible, except Ar-Go-Me angle (P˂0.05), which showed vertical growth pattern in unoperated patients (132.50 ° in 3–5 years, 132.00 ° I 8–10 years and 138.33 ° in 20–25 years age group). Conclusion: Lip and palate repair has a significant influence on the maxilla and resulting in retarded growth of maxilla, which causes midface deficiency beyond acceptable sagittal limits. The Gonial angle showed vertical growth pattern in unoperated patients, but the cranial base angle and length of unoperated and the operated patients were similar. PMID:26229945

  8. GFA Taq I polymorphism and cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) risk

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijia; Ma, Lian

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) Taq I polymorphism has been indicated to be correlated with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) susceptibility, but study results are still debatable. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted. We conducted a comprehensive search of Embase, Ovid, Web of Science, the Cochrane database, PubMed, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM-disc, 1979-2014), the database of National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1979-2014) and the full paper database of Chinese Science and Technology of Chongqing (VIP, 1989-2014) to identify suitable studies. There were 18 studies suitable for this meta-analysis, involving a total of 3135 cases and 3575 controls. Significantly increased CL/P risk was observed (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.17-1.89; P = 0.001). In subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, there was evidence in the Caucasian population for an association between this polymorphism and CL/P risk (OR = 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was found between this his polymorphism and CL/P risk in African and Hispanic populations. According to a specific CL/P type, increased clip lip and palate risk and clip palate risk were found (OR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.10-1.73; P = 0.005; OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.01-1.66; P = 0.042). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis found that the TGFA Taq I polymorphism may be associated with CL/P susceptibility. PMID:26064247

  9. Citation Characteristics of Research Articles under the Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University.

    PubMed

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit; Thanapaisal, Sukhumal

    2015-08-01

    Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University, has cooperated with the Medical Association of Thailand in publishing the special five issues of JMT (Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand) during the years 2010-2014 in order to promote research activities and working network of related fields in cleft lip-cleft palate and craniofacial deformities. This study aimed to examine the features of 106 research articles in terms of authors and disciplines, and analyze the citations considering sources, country and years after publication. The scope of study also included citations in the form of journal, which was presented as journal ranking compared with impact factors and Bradford's Law on journal citation. The results of study will be useful in developing multidisciplinary research activities of the center and especially assist in the acquisition of academic journals for essential sources of reference. PMID:26742377

  10. Postoperative evaluation of the folded pharyngeal flap operation for cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimasu, Hidemi; Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Negishi, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Velopharyngeal function is very important for patients with cleft palate to acquire good speech. For patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency, prosthetic speech appliances and speech therapy are applied first, and then pharyngeal flap surgery to improve velopharyngeal function is performed in our hospital. The folded pharyngeal flap operation was first reported by Isshiki and Morimoto in 1975. We usually use a modification of the original method. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to introduce our method of the folded pharyngeal flap operation and report the results. Materials and Methods: The folded pharyngeal flap operation was performed for 110 patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency from 1982 to 2010. Of these, the 97 whose postoperative speech function was evaluated are reported. The cases included 61 males and 36 females, ranging in age from 7 to 50 years. The time from surgery to speech assessment ranged from 5 months to 6 years. In order to evaluate preoperative velopharyngeal function, assessment of speech by a trained speech pathologist, nasopharyngoscopy, and cephalometric radiography with contrast media were performed before surgery, and then the appropriate surgery was selected and performed. Postoperative velopharyngeal function was assessed by a trained speech pathologist. Results: Of the 97 patients who underwent the folded pharyngeal flap operation, 85 (87.6%) showed velopharyngeal competence, 8 (8.2%) showed marginal velopharyngeal incompetence, and only 2 (2.1%) showed velopharyngeal incompetence; in 2 cases (2.1%), hyponasality was present. Approximately 95% of patients showed improved velopharyngeal function. Conclusions: The folded pharyngeal flap operation based on appropriate preoperative assessment has been shown to be an effective method for the treatment of cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency. PMID:26389036

  11. Verbal Competence in Narrative Retelling in 5-Year-Olds with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Lohmander, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research regarding expressive language performance in children born with cleft palate is sparse. The relationship between articulation/phonology and expressive language skills also needs to be further explored. Aims: To investigate verbal competence in narrative retelling in 5-year-old children born with unilateral cleft lip and palate…

  12. Membrane Assisted Palatal Fistula Closure in a Cleft Palate Patient: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Siva Prasad; Reddy, G Venkateshwara; Sree, P Karuna; Reddy, K Sravan Kumar; Reddy, P Amarnath

    2016-03-01

    Palatal fistula following cleft palate repair, is one of the considerable complications and remains a challenging problem to the surgeons. The reported recurrence rate of the fistula is between 33% to 37%. Due to fibrosis and poor vascularity of adjacent tissues, high recurrence rates are typical. Closure of palatal fistulas can be achieved by different surgical techniques like local, regional and distant flaps, local turnover flaps, pedicled flaps from oral mucosa, buccal fat pad flaps, inter-positional cartilage grafts can be utilized for management of small fistulas. For larger fistualas, tongue flaps, temporalis muscle flaps, musculomucosal flaps, nasal septal flaps and free flaps can be used. These procedures are often cumbersome and leave a raw nasal or oral surface, which may increase the incidence of postoperative problems or some flaps can be bulky and may require a second-stage procedure. Different synthetic materials such as alloderm, Poly-D and L-Lactic Acid or "PdLLA" and collagen membrane are used in multilayer repair represented by the nasal mucosa, the inter-positional graft and oral mucosa. These interpositional grafts provide a scaffold for in growth of tissues, revascularization and mucosal epithelialization. We present a case of closure of an oronasal fistula, using resorbable collagen membrane in three layered repair to avoid recurrence. PMID:27135018

  13. Membrane Assisted Palatal Fistula Closure in a Cleft Palate Patient: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, G. Siva Prasad; Reddy, G. Venkateshwara; Reddy, K. Sravan Kumar; Reddy, P. Amarnath

    2016-01-01

    Palatal fistula following cleft palate repair, is one of the considerable complications and remains a challenging problem to the surgeons. The reported recurrence rate of the fistula is between 33% to 37%. Due to fibrosis and poor vascularity of adjacent tissues, high recurrence rates are typical. Closure of palatal fistulas can be achieved by different surgical techniques like local, regional and distant flaps, local turnover flaps, pedicled flaps from oral mucosa, buccal fat pad flaps, inter-positional cartilage grafts can be utilized for management of small fistulas. For larger fistualas, tongue flaps, temporalis muscle flaps, musculomucosal flaps, nasal septal flaps and free flaps can be used. These procedures are often cumbersome and leave a raw nasal or oral surface, which may increase the incidence of postoperative problems or some flaps can be bulky and may require a second-stage procedure. Different synthetic materials such as alloderm, Poly-D and L-Lactic Acid or “PdLLA” and collagen membrane are used in multilayer repair represented by the nasal mucosa, the inter-positional graft and oral mucosa. These interpositional grafts provide a scaffold for in growth of tissues, revascularization and mucosal epithelialization. We present a case of closure of an oronasal fistula, using resorbable collagen membrane in three layered repair to avoid recurrence. PMID:27135018

  14. The etiology of cleft palate formation in BMP7-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, Thaleia; Kozlova, Anastasiia; Alexiou, Maria; Blumer, Susanne; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Katsaros, Christos; Chiquet, Matthias; Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Graf, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Palatogenesis is a complex process implying growth, elevation and fusion of the two lateral palatal shelves during embryogenesis. This process is tightly controlled by genetic and mechanistic cues that also coordinate the growth of other orofacial structures. Failure at any of these steps can result in cleft palate, which is a frequent craniofacial malformation in humans. To understand the etiology of cleft palate linked to the BMP signaling pathway, we studied palatogenesis in Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. Bmp7 expression was found in several orofacial structures including the edges of the palatal shelves prior and during their fusion. Bmp7 deletion resulted in a general alteration of oral cavity morphology, unpaired palatal shelf elevation, delayed shelf approximation, and subsequent lack of fusion. Cell proliferation and expression of specific genes involved in palatogenesis were not altered in Bmp7-deficient embryos. Conditional ablation of Bmp7 with Keratin14-Cre or Wnt1-Cre revealed that neither epithelial nor neural crest-specific loss of Bmp7 alone could recapitulate the cleft palate phenotype. Palatal shelves from mutant embryos were able to fuse when cultured in vitro as isolated shelves in proximity, but not when cultured as whole upper jaw explants. Thus, deformations in the oral cavity of Bmp7-deficient embryos such as the shorter and wider mandible were not solely responsible for cleft palate formation. These findings indicate a requirement for Bmp7 for the coordination of both developmental and mechanistic aspects of palatogenesis. PMID:23516636

  15. MECHANISMS OF TCDD-INDUCTION OF CLEFT PALATE: INSIGHTS FROM IN VIVO AND IN VITRO APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    TCDD induced cleft palate (CP) in C57BL6N embryos by altering proliferation and differentiation of palatal medial epithelial cells. hese effects correlated with altered expression of the growth factors, TGF-a,EGF. TGF-B1 and TGF-B2, and the EGF receptor. ynergistic interactions b...

  16. A Demonstration Project of Speech Training for the Preschool Cleft Palate Child. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert J.

    To ascertain the efficacy of a program of language and speech stimulation for the preschool cleft palate child, a research and demonstration project was conducted using 137 subjects (ages 18 to 72 months) with defects involving the soft palate. Their language and speech skills were matched with those of a noncleft peer group revealing that the…

  17. The Etiology of Cleft Palate Formation in BMP7-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouskoura, Thaleia; Kozlova, Anastasiia; Alexiou, Maria; Blumer, Susanne; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Katsaros, Christos; Chiquet, Matthias; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Graf, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Palatogenesis is a complex process implying growth, elevation and fusion of the two lateral palatal shelves during embryogenesis. This process is tightly controlled by genetic and mechanistic cues that also coordinate the growth of other orofacial structures. Failure at any of these steps can result in cleft palate, which is a frequent craniofacial malformation in humans. To understand the etiology of cleft palate linked to the BMP signaling pathway, we studied palatogenesis in Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. Bmp7 expression was found in several orofacial structures including the edges of the palatal shelves prior and during their fusion. Bmp7 deletion resulted in a general alteration of oral cavity morphology, unpaired palatal shelf elevation, delayed shelf approximation, and subsequent lack of fusion. Cell proliferation and expression of specific genes involved in palatogenesis were not altered in Bmp7-deficient embryos. Conditional ablation of Bmp7 with Keratin14-Cre or Wnt1-Cre revealed that neither epithelial nor neural crest-specific loss of Bmp7 alone could recapitulate the cleft palate phenotype. Palatal shelves from mutant embryos were able to fuse when cultured in vitro as isolated shelves in proximity, but not when cultured as whole upper jaw explants. Thus, deformations in the oral cavity of Bmp7-deficient embryos such as the shorter and wider mandible were not solely responsible for cleft palate formation. These findings indicate a requirement for Bmp7 for the coordination of both developmental and mechanistic aspects of palatogenesis. PMID:23516636

  18. Effect of cleft palate repair on the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenitally-clefted goat palates.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite cleft palate repair, velopharyngeal competence is not achieved in ~ 15% of patients, often necessitating secondary surgical correction. Velopharyngeal competence postrepair may require the conversion of levator veli palatini muscle fibers from injury-susceptible type 2 fibers to injury-resi...

  19. Occlusal Disorders among Patients with Total Clefts of Lip, Alveolar Bone, and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska-Stolarz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Clefts are common birth defects. They are accompanied by various malformations, including disturbances in facial look as well as skeletal disorders that include malocclusions, most frequently crossbites and class III anomalies. The aim of the study was to present the commonest malocclusions in patients with total cleft of the lip, alveolar bone and palate (n = 154) and compare the results to the healthy on-cleft patients (n = 151). Normal occlusion, characteristic for I angle class, was observed in 50% of the control group and 30% of the examined. In the examined patients with clefts, most frequently crossbite and open bite on the cleft side was observed. In patients with clefts, only 2 out of 154 patients presented isolated dental anomalies. In healthy individuals the commonest occlusal disorder was distal occlusion and dental anomalies. The commonest malocclusions among patients with clefts are crossbites and class III malocclusions. PMID:24982898

  20. CLEFT PALATE IN HIV-EXPOSED NEWBORNS OF MOTHERS ON HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    James, Ayotunde; Oluwatosin, Babatunde; Njideka, Georgina; Babafemi; Benjamin, Onyekwere George; Olufemi, David; Leo, Robert; Folorunso, Isaac; Phylis; Olusina, Olusegun

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cleft lip/palate, though rare, is the commonest head and neck congenital malformation. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis but the role of in-utero exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is still being investigated. This short communication reports the occurrence of cleft palate in three newborns exposed in-utero to HIV and HAART. Material and methods This is a case series of HIV-exposed newborns observed to have cleft palate among a larger cohort of HIV-exposed and unexposed newborns in a study evaluating the effect of HIV infection and HAART on newborn hearing. The Risk Ratio (RR) was calculated to detect a potential association between in-utero exposure to Efavirenz containing ART and cleft palate. Results Three HIV-exposed newborns with cleft palate were identified during hearing screening performed on 126 HIV-exposed and 121 HIV unexposed newborns. Two had exposure to tenofovir+lamivudine+efavirenz (TDF+3TC+EFV) while the third had exposure to zidovudine+lamivudine+nevirapine (ZDV+3TC+NVP) during the first trimester. There was no statistically significant association between presence of cleft palate and exposure to an EFV containing HAART regimen (p=0.07, RR=10.95 [0.94-126.84]). Conclusions This communication highlights the possible aetiologic role of HAART in cleft palate, the need for further prospective follow-up studies and establishment of antiretroviral pregnancy, birth and neonatal registries. PMID:25653715

  1. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Shanghai, China: Evidence for an autosomal major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Marazita, M.L. ); Hu, Dan-Ning; Liu, You-E. ); Spence, A. ); Melnick, M. )

    1992-09-01

    Orientals are at higher risk for cleft lip with our without cleft palate (CL[+-] P) than Caucasians or blacks. The authors collected demographic and family data to study factors contributing to the etiology of CL[+-]P in Shanghai. The birth incidence of nonsyndromic CL[+-]P (SHanghai 1980-87) was 1.11/1,000, with a male/female ratio of 1.42. Almost 2,000 nonsyndromic CL[+-]P probands were ascertained from individuals operated on during the years 1956-83 at surgical hospitals in Shanghai. Detailed family histories and medical examinations were obtained for the probands and all available family members. Genetic analysis of the probands' families were performed under the mixed model with major locus (ML) and multifactorial (MFT) components. The hypothesis of no familial transmission and of MFT alone could be rejected. Of the ML models, the autosomal recessive was significantly most likely and was assumed for testing three complex hypothesis: (1) ML and sporadics; (2) ML and MFT; (3) ML, MFT, and sporadics. None of the complex models were more likely than the ML alone model. In conclusion, the best-fitting, most parsimonious model for CL[+-]P in Shanghai was that of an autosomal recessive major locus. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Postoperative analgesia for cleft lip and palate repair in children

    PubMed Central

    Reena; Bandyopadhyay, Kasturi Hussain; Paul, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Acute pain such as postoperative pain during infancy was ignored approximately three decades ago due to biases and misconceptions regarding the maturity of the infant's developing nervous system, their inability to verbally report pain, and their perceived inability to remember pain. More recently, these misconceptions are rarely acknowledged due to enhanced understanding of the developmental neurobiology of infant pain pathways and supraspinal processing. Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common congenital abnormalities requiring surgical treatment in children and is associated with intense postoperative pain. The pain management gets further complicated due to association with postsurgical difficult airway and other congenital anomalies. Orofacial blocks like infraorbital, external nasal, greater/lesser palatine, and nasopalatine nerve blocks have been successively used either alone or in combinations to reduce the postoperative pain. Since in pediatric population, regional anesthesia is essentially performed under general anesthesia, association of these two techniques has dramatically cut down the risks of both procedures particularly those associated with the use of opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Definitive guidelines for postoperative pain management in these patients have not yet been developed. Incorporation of multimodal approach as an institutional protocol can help minimize the confusion around this topic. PMID:27006533

  3. Strategies for treating compensatory articulation in patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Pamplona, Maria; Ysunza, Antonio; Morales, Santiago

    2014-03-01

    Patients with cleft palate frequently show compensatory articulation (CA). CA requires a prolonged period of speech intervention. Some scaffolding strategies can be useful for correcting placement and manner of articulation in these cases. The purpose of this paper was to study whether the use of specific strategies of speech pathology can be more effective if applied according to the level of severity of CA. Ninety patients with CA were studied in two groups. One group was treated using strategies specific for their level of severity of articulation, whereas in the other group all strategies were used indistinctively. The degree of severity of CA was compared at the end of the speech intervention. After the speech therapy intervention, the group of patients in which the strategies were used selectively, showed a significantly greater decrease in the severity of CA, as compared with the patients in whom all the strategies were used indistinctively. An assessment of the severity of CA can be useful for selecting the strategies, which can be more effective for correcting the compensatory errors. PMID:24711749

  4. Social motivation in individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Ellen; Koscik, Timothy R; Conrad, Amy L; Moser, David; Nopoulos, Peg

    2013-01-01

    Social isolation is common among individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate (ICLP), but the available data on why this may be are mixed. We present a novel theory relating to reduced social motivation in ICLP, called the social abulia hypothesis. Based on this hypothesis, we predicted that reduced social motivation would lead to reduced responsiveness to negative social feedback, both in terms of explicit responses and non-controlled, psychophysiological responses. Twenty males with ICLP and 20 normal comparison males (NC group) between 13 and 25 years old participated in the study. Social motivation was examined by measuring participants’ response to negative social feedback (social exclusion). Additionally, psychophysiological reactivity to positive and negative social stimuli was measured. In order to rule out other potential contributors to social isolation, we tested basic social perception, emotion recognition, and social anxiety. In line with the social abulia hypothesis, we show that negative social feedback had less of an effect on males with ICLP relative to healthy male peers, which was evident in explicit responses, and non-controlled, psychophysiological responses to negative social feedback. Our results could not be attributed to problems in social perception, a lack of understanding facial expressions, or increased social anxiety, as groups did not differ on these constructs. This study suggests that current views on social isolation in ICLP may need to be reconsidered to include the possibility that isolation in this population may be the direct result of reduced social motivation. PMID:23634967

  5. Social motivation in individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Ellen; Koscik, Timothy R; Conrad, Amy L; Moser, David J; Nopoulos, Peg

    2013-01-01

    Social isolation is common among individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate (ICLP), but the available data on why this may be are mixed. We present a novel theory relating to reduced social motivation in ICLP, called the social abulia hypothesis. Based on this hypothesis, we predicted that reduced social motivation would lead to reduced responsiveness to negative social feedback, in terms of both explicit responses and noncontrolled, psychophysiological responses. Twenty males with ICLP and 20 normal comparison males between 13 and 25 years old participated in the study. Social motivation was examined by measuring participants' response to negative social feedback (social exclusion). Additionally, psychophysiological reactivity to positive and negative social stimuli was measured. In order to rule out other potential contributors to social isolation, we tested basic social perception, emotion recognition, and social anxiety. In line with the social abulia hypothesis, we show that negative social feedback had less of an effect on males with ICLP than on healthy male peers, which was evident in explicit responses and noncontrolled, psychophysiological responses to negative social feedback. Our results could not be attributed to problems in social perception, a lack of understanding facial expressions, or increased social anxiety, as groups did not differ on these constructs. This study suggests that current views on social isolation in ICLP may need to be reconsidered to include the possibility that isolation in this population may be the direct result of reduced social motivation. PMID:23634967

  6. Nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate: No evidence of linkage to HLA or factor 13A

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, J.T.; Yaping Wang; Connor, B.; Daiger, S.P. ); Blanton, S.H. Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville )

    1993-06-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) is a common craniofacial anomaly, the etiology of which is not known. Population studies have shown that a large proportion of cases occur sporadically. Recently, segregation analyses applied to CLP families have demonstrated that an autosomal dominant/codominant gene(s) may cause clefting in cases. Associations of autosomal dominant CLP and nonsyndromic cleft palate (CP) with HLA and F13A genes on chromosome 6p have been suggested previously. Linkage to these two areas on chromosome 6p were tested in 12 autosomal dominant families with CLP. With a LOD score of [minus]2 or less for exclusion, no evidence of linkage was found to four chromosome 6p markers. Multipoint analysis showed no evidence of a clefting locus in this region spanning 54 cM on chromosome 6p in these CLP families. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Parent-Reported Family Functioning Among Children With Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Crerand, Canice E.; Rosenberg, Janine; Magee, Leanne; Stein, Margot B.; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Broder, Hillary L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine family functioning related to sociodemographic and clinical characteristics in youth with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). Design Cross-sectional, multisite investigation. Setting Six U.S. cleft centers. Patients/Participants A diverse sample of 1200 children with CL/P and their parents. Main Outcome Measure Parents completed the Family Environment Scale (FES), which assesses three domains of family functioning: cohesion (or closeness), expressiveness (open expression of feelings), and conflict. Demographic and clinical characteristics were also assessed including race, ethnicity, type of insurance, and surgical recommendations. Results The FES scores for families seeking team evaluations for their youth with CL/P (mean age = 11.6 years) fall within the average range compared with normative samples. Families receiving surgical recommendations for their youth also had FES scores in the average range, yet families of children recommended for functional surgery reported greater cohesion, expressiveness, and less conflict compared with those recommended for aesthetic surgery (P < .05). For cohesion and expressiveness, significant main effects for race (P = .012, P < .0001, respectively) and ethnicity (P =.004, P < .0001, respectively) were found but not for their interaction. No significant differences were found on the conflict domain. Families with private insurance reported significantly greater cohesion (P < .001) and expressiveness (P < .001) than did families with public insurance. Conclusions Family functioning across domains was in the average range. However, observed differences by race, ethnicity, type of insurance, and surgical recommendation may warrant consideration in clinical management for patients and families. PMID:25405543

  8. Identification of a novel heterozygous truncation mutation in exon 1 of ARHGAP29 in an Indian subject with nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Deepak; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in exon 1 of ARHGAP29, a RhoA specific GTPase have been identified in North American and Filipino subjects with nonsyndromic cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Since the genetic status of ARHGAP29 in Indian subjects with nonsyndromic oral clefts is not known, we designed the present study to investigate the occurrence of the above mutations in them. Materials and Methods: Total genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood of 60 subjects with nonsyndromic cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and equal number of control healthy subjects were amplified with primers flanking exon 1 of ARHGAP29 gene and subjected to direct sequencing. Results: Sequencing analysis identified a nonsense mutation in exon 1 of ARHGAP29 that caused substitution of lysine to stop codon at codon position 32 in a subject with nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate. The mutation, however, occurred in heterozygous condition. None of the other subjects carried mutation in this region. Conclusion: The study has thus identified a rare but novel truncation mutation in ARHGAP29 gene for the first time in nonsyndromic oral clefts. PMID:25512736

  9. Perpendicular serial maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; Sándor, George K.; Harila, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate patients often have a retruded maxilla with a severely narrowed deficient maxillary arch. This report aims to describe the management of severe maxillary retrusion and constriction in cleft lip and palate patients using distraction osteogenesis applied in serial sequence in two directions perpendicular to each other. Materials and Methods: Two adult male cleft lip and palate patients were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two stages. In the first stage, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with a tooth-borne device was performed to significantly expand the maxillary arch in the transverse dimension. After the teeth were orthodontically aligned, the horizontal distraction of the maxilla was made by two internal maxillary distraction devices. Results: In the first patient, the maxilla was initially widened by 11 mm and then distracted forward by 20 mm. Despite the breakage of the shaft of one of the two distractors at the end of distraction, a satisfactory occlusion was found at the time of distractor device removal. The maxillary position has remained stable through 8 years of follow-up. In the second patient, the palate was widened by 14 mm and the maxilla was distracted forward by 22 mm. The maxillary position has remained stable through 3 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Sequential serial distraction of maxilla in two planes perpendicular to each other is a safe and stable approach for the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients with severe transverse and anteroposterior discrepancies. PMID:26981462

  10. Histone acetylation is involved in TCDD‑induced cleft palate formation in fetal mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xingang; Qiu, Lin; Pu, Yalan; Liu, Cuiping; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Chen; Pu, Wei; Fu, Yuexian

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present was to evaluate the effects of DNA methylation and histone acetylation on 2,3,7,8‑tetrachlorodibenzo‑p‑dioxin (TCDD)‑induced cleft palate in fetal mice. Pregnant mice (n=10) were randomly divided into two groups: i) TCDD group, mice were treated with 28 µg/kg TCDD on gestation day (GD) 10 by oral gavage; ii) control group, mice were treated with an equal volume of corn oil. On GD 16.5, the fetal mice were evaluated for the presence of a cleft palate. An additional 36 pregnant mice were divided into the control and TCDD groups, and palate samples were collected on GD 13.5, GD 14.5 and GD 15.5, respectively. Transforming growth factor‑β3 (TGF‑β3) mRNA expression, TGF‑β3 promoter methylation, histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity and histone H3 (H3) acetylation in the palates were evaluated in the two groups. The incidence of a cleft palate in the TCDD group was 93.55%, and no cases of cleft palate were identified in the control group. On GD 13.5 and GD 14.5, TGF‑β3 mRNA expression, HAT activity and acetylated H3 levels were significantly increased in the TCDD group compared with the control. Methylated bands were not observed in the TCDD or control groups. In conclusion, at the critical period of palate fusion (GD 13.5‑14.5), TCDD significantly increased TGF‑β3 gene expression, HAT activity and H3 acetylation. Therefore, histone acetylation may be involved in TCDD‑induced cleft palate formation in fetal mice. PMID:27279340

  11. Histone acetylation is involved in TCDD-induced cleft palate formation in fetal mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xingang; Qiu, Lin; Pu, Yalan; Liu, Cuiping; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Chen; Pu, Wei; Fu, Yuexian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present was to evaluate the effects of DNA methylation and histone acetylation on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlo-rodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced cleft palate in fetal mice. Pregnant mice (n=10) were randomly divided into two groups: i) TCDD group, mice were treated with 28 µg/kg TCDD on gestation day (GD) 10 by oral gavage; ii) control group, mice were treated with an equal volume of corn oil. On GD 16.5, the fetal mice were evaluated for the presence of a cleft palate. An additional 36 pregnant mice were divided into the control and TCDD groups, and palate samples were collected on GD 13.5, GD 14.5 and GD 15.5, respectively. Transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) mRNA expression, TGF-β3 promoter methylation, histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity and histone H3 (H3) acetylation in the palates were evaluated in the two groups. The incidence of a cleft palate in the TCDD group was 93.55%, and no cases of cleft palate were identified in the control group. On GD 13.5 and GD 14.5, TGF-β3 mRNA expression, HAT activity and acetylated H3 levels were significantly increased in the TCDD group compared with the control. Methylated bands were not observed in the TCDD or control groups. In conclusion, at the critical period of palate fusion (GD 13.5–14.5), TCDD significantly increased TGF-β3 gene expression, HAT activity and H3 acetylation. Therefore, histone acetylation may be involved in TCDD-induced cleft palate formation in fetal mice. PMID:27279340

  12. Contraction-induced injury to single permeabilized muscle fibers from normal and congenitally-clefted goat palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine (LVP) muscle. It was determined that muscle fiber type, size, and sensitivity to contraction-induced injury was different between cleft palate ind...

  13. [Prevention of cleft lip and palate. Reducing risk of recurrence--a 25-year clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Schubert, Johannes; Krost, Birgit

    2006-09-01

    From 1980 to 2005, 71 female patients having non-syndromic cleft lip and palate (CLP) or cleft palate (CP) themselves or in their family and desiring to have children underwent 88 times a cleft prevention protocol with high doses of Vitamin B Complex and Actovegin twice a week. The data about the outcome of the pregnancy were prospectively collected. Empiric data of the recurrence risks from the literature depending on the cleft type were used as comparative group. In 80 cases, a healthy child was born. In two cases microsymptoms of unilateral lip notches were observed. The observed risks with prophylaxis were 2.9% (only microsymptoms!) and 0% comparing with 4.9% and 2.4% respectively in the controls. The relative risk as reference value between expected and observed risk was 0.6 (microsymptoms) for CLP and 0 for CP. PMID:16944083

  14. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant

    PubMed Central

    Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle. PMID:27190971

  15. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Vinuta Siddayya; Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-04-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle. PMID:27190971

  16. Morphofunctional changes of orofacial muscles in patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate.

    PubMed

    Proff, Peter; Weingärtner, Jens; Koppe, Thomas; Fanghänel, Jochen; Mack, Florian; Gedrange, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    The facial musculature is part of a biocybernetic feedback system within the stomatognathic system, the continuity of which is disturbed by clefts of the lip, jaw, and palate (cheilognathopalatoschisis). This results in topographic, fine-structural and functional alterations of the facial musculature. In two heads with unilateral clefts and two heads with bilateral clefts, the facial musculature was dissected and the M. orbicularis oris macroscopically and topographically examined. We found changes in the attachment of the M. orbicularis oris. The modiolus, which is coresponsible for the proper topographic relation of the M. obicularis oris to the other facial muscles, was unchanged. Further, we examined the vascular system of the muscle, which likewise adapts to the altered situation. Lip/jaw/palatal clefts result in anatomically functional and fine-structural alterations of the M. orbicularis oris, while the rest of the facial musculature remains unchanged. PMID:17419554

  17. Nasopharyngeal Development in Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wermker, Kai; Jung, Susanne; Joos, Ulrich; Kleinheinz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this paper was to evaluate cephalometrically the nasopharyngeal development of patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. Influencing factors were evaluated and cleft to noncleft subjects were compared to each other. Material and Methods. The lateral cephalograms of 66 patients with complete cleft lip and palate were measured and compared retrospectively to the cephalograms of 123 healthy probands. Measurements were derived from a standardized analysis of 56 landmarks. Results. We observed significant differences between cleft and control group: the cleft patients showed amaxillary retroposition and a reduced maxillary length; the inclination of the maxilla was significantly more posterior and cranial; the anterior nasopharyngeal height was reduced; the nasopharyngeal growth followed a vertical tendency with reduced sagittal dimensions concerning hard and soft tissue. The velum length was reduced. In the cleft group, an accumulation of mandibular retrognathia and an anterior position of the hyoid were observed. Skeletal configuration and type of growth were predominantly vertical. Conclusions. Our data provides a fundamental radiological analysis of the nasopharyngeal development in cleft patients. It confirms the lateral cephalogram as a basic diagnostic device in the analysis of nasopharyngeal and skeletal growth in cleft patients. PMID:22523495

  18. A comprehensive review of the genetic basis of cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Sarvraj Singh; Kohli, Virinder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) are birth defects that affect the upper lip and the roof of the mouth. CLP has a multifactorial etiology, comprising both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the recent data on the etiology of cleft lip and palate. We conducted a search of the MEDLINE database (Entrez PubMed) from January 1986 to December 2010 using the key words: ‘cleft lip,’ ‘cleft palate,’ ‘etiology,’ and ‘genetics.’ The etiology of CLP seems complex, with genetics playing a major role. Several genes causing syndromic CLP have been discovered. Three of them—T-box transcription factor-22 (TBX22), poliovirus receptor-like-1 (PVRL1), and interferon regulatory factor-6 (IRF6)—are responsible for causing X-linked cleft palate, cleft lip/palate–ectodermal dysplasia syndrome, and Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes, respectively; they are also implicated in nonsyndromic CLP. The nature and functions of these genes vary widely, illustrating the high vulnerability within the craniofacial developmental pathways. The etiological complexity of nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate is also exemplified by the large number of candidate genes and loci. To conclude, although the etiology of nonsyndromic CLP is still largely unknown, mutations in candidate genes have been identified in a small proportion of cases. Determining the relative risk of CLP on the basis of genetic background and environmental influence (including smoking, alcohol use, and dietary factors) will be useful for genetic counseling and the development of future preventive measures. PMID:22438645

  19. Stability after Cleft Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis or Conventional Orthognathic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Svenstrup, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Klit; Küseler, Annelise; Jensen, John; Nørholt, Sven Erik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To compare stability of maxillary advancements in patients with cleft lip and palate following distraction osteogenesis or orthognathic surgery. Material and Methods Inclusion criteria: 1) cleft lip and palate, 2) advancement > 8 mm. Eleven patients comprised the distraction osteogenesis group (DOG). Seven patients comprised the orthognathic treatment group (CONVG). Skeletal and soft tissue points were traced on lateral cephalograms: T1 (preoperatively), T2 (after surgery), T3 (follow-up). Group differences were analyzed using Students t-test. Results At T1-T2, advancement of 6.98 mm (P = 0.002) was observed in DOG. Horizontal overjet increased 11.62 mm (P = 0.001). A point-nasion-B point (ANB) angle increased 8.82° (P = 0.001). Aesthetic plane to upper lip was reduced 5.44 mm (P = 0.017) and the naso-labial angle increased 16.6° (P = 0.001). Vertical overbite (VOB) increased 2.27 mm (P = 0.021). In T2-T3, no significant changes were observed in DOG. In T1-T2, horizontal overjet increased 8.45 mm (P = 0.02). The ANB angle, 9.33° (P = 0.009) in CONVG. At T2-T3, VOB increased, 2.35 mm (P = 0.046), and the ANB angle reduced, 3.83° (P = 0.003). In T2-T3, no parameters changed in CONVG. At follow-up (T3), VOB increased in CONVG compared with DOG, (P = 0.01). Vertical position of A point differed between the groups (P = 0.04). No significant intergroup differences between soft tissue parameters occurred. Conclusions Distraction osteogenesis resulted in a stable position of the maxilla and movement upwards in vertical plane, however in case of orthognathic treatment sagittal relapse and a continued postoperatively downward movement was registered. PMID:26229581

  20. Neonatal Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis Reduces Cleft Palate Width and Lengthens Soft Palate, Influencing Palatoplasty in Patients With Pierre Robin Sequence.

    PubMed

    Collares, Marcus V M; Duarte, Daniele W; Sobral, Davi S; Portinho, Ciro P; Faller, Gustavo J; Fraga, Mariana M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) on cleft dimensions and on early palatoplasty outcomes in patients with Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). In a prospective cohort study that enrolled 24 nonsyndromic patients with PRS, 12 submitted to the MDO group and 12 patients not treated (non-MDO group), the authors compared patients for cleft palate dimensions through 7 morphometric measurements at the moment of palatoplasty and for early palatoplasty outcomes. At palatoplasty, the MDO group presented a significant shorter distance between the posterior nasal spines (PNS-PNS, P < 0.001) and between uvular bases (UB-UB, P < 0.001), representing a reduction in cleft palate width. They also had significant soft palate lengthening represented by a larger distance between UB and retromolar space (UB-RM, P < 0.001) and UB and PNS (UB-PNS, P = 0.014). Their UB moved away from the posterior wall of the nasopharynx (UB-NPH, P < 0.001). The MDO group had a length of operative time significantly shorter (P < 0.001) and no early palatoplasty complications compared with the non-MDO group. In conclusion, MDO acted as an orthopedic procedure that reduced cleft palate width and elongated the soft palate in patients with PRS. These modifications enabled a reduction of around 11% in the length of operative time of palatoplasty (P < 0.001). PMID:27315309

  1. Phenotypic discordance in a family with monozygotic twins and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Wyszynski, D.F. |; Lewanda, A.F. |; Beaty, T.H.

    1996-12-30

    Despite considerable research, the cause of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is still an enigma. Case-control and cohort studies have searched for environmental factors that might influence the development of this common malformation, such as maternal cigarette smoking, periconceptional supplementation of folic acid and multivitamins, agricultural chemical use, and place of residence, among others. However, these studies are subject to numerous biases, and their results have often been contradictory and inconclusive. 41 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Bilateral cleft lip and palate, hypertelorism with agenesis of corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S M

    2016-01-01

    Agenesis of corpus callosum (ACC) can have various development abnormalities spectrum. These include delay in milestones to complex neuropsychiatric manifestations. Following case report highlights the case of a young infant presenting with associated features including bilateral cleft lip and palate and hypertelorism. The kid was refused treatment at several centers owing to the central nervous system abnormality. This case reports highlight the ACC as a comorbid diagnosis in cleft lip and palate patient with hypertelorism perhaps owing to ignorance and fear of this apparently innocuous congenital malformation. PMID:27054869

  3. CLEFT LIP, ALVEOLUS AND PALATE IN AFRICAN NATIVES: AN UPDATE ON DEMOGRAPHICS AND MANAGEMENT OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Akintububo, O.B.; Ojo, E.O.; Kokong, DD; Adamu, S.A.; Nnadozie, U.U; Yunusa-Kaltungo, Z; Jalo, I; Dauda, A.M

    2015-01-01

    Background Development of craniofacial structures is a complex process and disruption of any of the numerous steps can lead to development of oro-facial clefts. This is a surgically amenable anomaly as from early life that has had conflicting pattern of demographics reported by various researchers globally. There are several factors that are critical to the surgical outcome. Objective Study the demographics and the management outcome of cleft lip, alveolus and palate and highlight factors responsible for improved care in recent time. Design Descriptive cohort study. Setting Tertiary health institution Method All consecutive patients managed for cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) over 7years and 10months were studied. Outcome Cleft lip, alveolus and palate repair was performed on 149 patients, January 1, 2001– December 31, 2008 with an incidence of 2.1/1000 live births. From this, 27 patients, averaging 4.5 patients per year were operated for the first 6 1/3 years while the remaining 122(81.9%) the next 1 1/2 years, averaging 81.6 patients yearly. Their ages ranged from 3 months – 60 years with 77 (51.7%) males and 72 (48.3.0%) females. Cleft lip was the main presentation in 108(72.5%) of which 72(66.7%) were left sided. Bilateral cleft lip were14 (9.4%). Five (3.4%) patients had associated anomalies out of which 3(60.0%) had CLAP while 2(40.0%) isolated cleft lip or palate. The technique for cleft lip repair was Millard’s and Noordhoof’s while palatal cleft was the two-flap palatoplasty with intravelar veloplasty. Success was recorded in 142(95.3%) with complication observed in 7(4.7%) patients. Conclusion The rarity of cleft lip, alveolus and/or palate in the African native documented previously may no longer be tenable as observe in this study. Management outcome has improved owing to the collaboration with SmileTrain, USA, along with multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26709327

  4. Dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and palate in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this paper was to describe the prevalence and type of dental anomalies in the primary and permanent dentition in children with a cleft condition at Princess Margaret Hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Materials and Methods: The details of 162 current dental patients extracted from the main dental database through their year of birth for the period 1998–2001 were selected consecutively. Dental records and X-rays were examined by one examiner (WN) and verified by a second examiner (RB) to determine dental development. The mean age of the subjects was 10.8 years with equal numbers of males and females. Subjects were further divided into cleft type; unilateral cleft lip (UCL) and palate, bilateral cleft lip (BCL) and palate, UCL, BCL, and cleft palate. Results: One hundred sixty-two subjects were grouped into 21 categories of anomaly or abnormality. Prevalence rates for the categories were calculated for the overall group and for gender and cleft type. Conclusion: Overall, 94% of patients were found to have at least one dental anomaly, with fifty-six (34%) patients having more than one anomaly or abnormality. PMID:27095907

  5. Selection bias in genetic-epidemiological studies of cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, K.; Holm, N.V.; Kock, K. ); Olsen, J. ); Fogh-Anderson, P.

    1992-09-01

    The possible impact of selection bias in genetic and epidemiological studies of cleft lip and palate was studied, using three nationwide ascertainment sources and an autopsy study in a 10% sample of the Danish population. A total of 670 cases were identified. Two national record systems, when used together, were found suitable for ascertaining facial cleft in live births. More than 95% ascertainment was obtained by means of surgical files for cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) without associated malformations/syndromes. However, surgical files could be a poor source for studying isolated cleft palate (CP) (only a 60% and biased ascertainment), and they cannot be used to study the prevalence of associated malformations or syndromes in facial cleft cases. The male:female ratio was 0.88 in surgically treated cases of CP and was 1.5 in nonoperated CP cases, making the overall sex ratio for CP 1.1 (95% confidence limits 0.86-1.4) The sex ratio for CP without associated malformation was 1.1 (95% confidence limits 0.84-1.6). One of the major test criteria in CP multifactorial threshold models (higher CP liability among male CP relatives) must be reconsidered, if other investigations confirm that a CP sex-ratio reversal to male predominance occurs when high ascertainment is achieved. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Exclusion of linkage between cleft lip with or without cleft palate and markers on chromosomes 4 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, S.H.; Malcolm, S.; Winter, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without associate cleft palate (CLP) is a common craniofacial defect, occurring in {approximately}1/1,000 live births. While the defect generally occurs sporadically, multiplex families have been reported. Segregation analyses have demonstrated that, in some families, CLP is inherited as an autosomal dominant/codominant disorder with low penetrance. Several clefting loci have been proposed on multiple chromosomes, including 6p24, 4q, and 19q13.1. Association studies and linkage studies suggested a locus that mapped to 6p24. We were unable to confirm this in a linkage study of 12 multigenerational families. A subsequent linkage study by Carinci et al., however, found evidence for linkage to this region in 14 of 21 clefting families. Additionally, Davies et al. studied the chromosomes of three individuals with cleft lip and palate, all of whom had a rearrangement involving 6p24. Their investigation supported a locus at 6p24. Carinci et al. reported that the most likely position for a clefting locus was at D6S89, which is centromeric to EDN1. This is in contrast to the findings of Davies et al., who suggested a placement telomeric to EDN1. F13A, which had been implicated in the initial association studies, is telomeric to EDN1. Thus, the region between F13A and D6S89 encompasses the regions proposed by both Davies et al. and Carinci et al. A second clefting locus, at 4q, was proposed by Beiraghi et al., who studied a single multigenerational family by linkage analysis. Their data suggested a locus near D4S175 and D4S192. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Presurgical nasoalveolar molding orthopedic treatment improves the outcome of primary cheiloplasty of unilateral complete cleft lip and palate, as assessed by naris morphology and cleft gap.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroyoshi; Togashi, Shinji; Karube, Rei; Yanagawa, Toru; Nakane, Shizuo; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Ishibashi, Naomi; Shinya, Yoshiko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Yamagata, Kenji; Onizawa, Kojiro; Adachi, Koji; Sekido, Mitsuru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of presurgical nasoalveolar molding (NAM) with an orthopedic appliance and compared them with a passive orthopedic method (Hotz plate, HP), focusing on the naris morphology and width of the alveolar and palate cleft gap. The subjects were 28 unilateral complete cleft lip and palate patients treated with primary cheiloplasty at Tsukuba University Hospital from 2004 to 2011. Thirteen patients were treated preoperatively with NAM (NAM group), and 15 with HP (HP group). The surgical outcome was assessed according to left-right naris symmetry, as measured by the area ratio, perimeter ratio, aspect a/u ratio (aspect ratio of the affected side/aspect ratio of the unaffected side), and Hausdorff distance. In addition, the alveolar and palate cleft width was measured at the times of orthopedic plate setting and primary cheiloplasty. The aspect ratio was significantly smaller in the NAM group than in the HP group before the operation. In both groups, the aspect ratio, perimeter ratio, and Hausdorff distance were significantly smaller after the operation than before. The width of the alveolar and palate cleft gap was significantly narrowed in the NAM group, and the cleft gap at the initiation of NAM correlated significantly with the Hausdorff distance after cheiloplasty. We found that NAM improved the form of the naris after primary cheiloplasty and decreased the palate cleft gap more effectively than HP and that the width of the palate cleft gap was correlated with the surgical outcome of the naris. PMID:23147280

  8. Dual embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors: clinical implications in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Rosar, Julia Petruccelli; Sathler, Renata; Ozawa, Terumi Okada

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are craniofacial anomalies highly prevalent in the overall population. In oral clefts involving the alveolar ridge, variations of number, shape, size and position are observed in maxillary lateral incisors. The objective of this manuscript is to elucidate the embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors in order to understand the etiology of these variations. Contextualization: The hypothesis that orofacial clefts would split maxillary lateral incisor buds has been previously reported. However, recent studies showed that maxillary lateral incisors have dual embryonic origin, being partially formed by both the medial nasal process and the maxillary process. In other words, the mesial half of the lateral incisor seems to come from the medial nasal process while the distal half of the lateral incisor originates from the maxillary process. In cleft patients, these processes do not fuse, which results in different numerical and positional patterns for lateral incisors relating to the alveolar cleft. In addition to these considerations, this study proposes a nomenclature for maxillary lateral incisors in patients with cleft lip and palate, based on embryology and lateral incisors position in relation to the alveolar cleft. Conclusion: Embryological knowledge on the dual origin of maxillary lateral incisors and the use of a proper nomenclature for their numerical and positional variations renders appropriate communication among professionals and treatment planning easier, in addition to standardizing research analysis. PMID:26560830

  9. The Anterior Double-Tilt Precision Attachment Case for Cleft Palate Patients and Accident Victims. Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Passively retained precision attachment removable partial dentures have been used successfully since the 1920s. Adult cleft palate patients and accident victims often have endured a lifetime of wearing awkward appliances to replace the missing structures that never formed intraorally or were lost in a traumatic accident. These patients tend to be poor candidates for dental implants, even with repeated grafting surgeries. The anterior double-tilt precision attachment case is a great treatment option for adults to restore the missing dental structures. Anterior precision partial dentures are stable appliances in the mouth that are worn 24 hours a day and only removed for hygiene. They can be custom designed for maximum esthetics. They do not require denture paste, and they extend minimally onto the palate. As a result, they do not interfere with musculature, tongue movements, speech and taste. Cleft palate patients and accident victims with poor or non-existent edentulous ridges will have difficulty retaining a denture, so preservation of the existing dentition is essential for comfort and function. Because these prostheses do not apply destructive forces to the abutment teeth, they can last decades with minimal maintenance. PMID:26939155

  10. Identification of susceptibility genes in non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate using whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Peng; Xu, Li-Fang; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhou, Ji-Long; Pan, Chen; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Wu, Qin-Rong; Li, Yi-Qun; Xia, Yu-Juan; Peng, Xiu; Zhang, Mei-Rong; Yu, Hong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is among the most common congenital malformations. The etiology of NSCL/P remains poorly characterized owing to its complex genetic heterogeneity. The objective of this study was to identify genetic variants that increase susceptibility to NSCL/P. Material and Methods Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed in 8 fetuses with NSCL/P in China. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using commercially available software. Variants detected by WES were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results By filtering out synonymous variants in exons, we identified average 8575 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs). We subsequently compared the SNVs against public databases including NCBI dbSNP build 135 and 1000 Genomes Project and obtained an average of 203 SNVs. Total 12 reported candidate genes were verified by Sanger sequencing. Sanger sequencing also confirmed 16 novel SNVs shared by two or more samples. Conclusions We have found and confirmed 16 susceptibility genes responsible for NSCL/P, which may play important role in the etiology of NSCL/P. The susceptibility genes identified in this study will not only be useful in revealing the etiology of NSCL/P but also in diagnosis and treatment of the patients with NSCL/P. Key words:Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate, whole-exome sequencing, sanger sequencing, susceptibility gene, single nucleotide variants (SNVs). PMID:26449438

  11. Further evidence of a relationship between the retinoic acid receptor alpha locus and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL [+-] P)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, D.; Field, L. ); Ray, A. ); Marazita, M. )

    1993-11-01

    Chenevix-Trench et al. (1992) reported a significant difference between nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL [+-] P) cases and unrelated controls in the frequency of alleles at the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) PstI RFLP located at 17q21.1. They also observed borderline significant (P = .055) differences between allele frequencies in subjects with cleft lip and palate (CL + P) compared with those with cleft lip only (CL). Retinoic acid (RA) is a known teratogen capable of producing cleft palate in rodents (Abbott and Birnbaum 1990). Chenevix-Tench et al. (1992) hypothesized that variation in susceptibility to the effects of RA in humans may result from alterations at the RARA locus. We have investigated association and linkage between CL [+-] P and a microsatellite marker (D17S579) located at 17q21 (Hall et al. 1992), selected for its proximity to RARA, in 14 extended multiplex families from rural West Bengal, India.

  12. Evaluation of speech errors in Putonghua speakers with cleft palate: a critical review of methodology issues.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenghui; Whitehill, Tara L

    2014-04-01

    Speech errors associated with cleft palate are well established for English and several other Indo-European languages. Few articles describing the speech of Putonghua (standard Mandarin Chinese) speakers with cleft palate have been published in English language journals. Although methodological guidelines have been published for the perceptual speech evaluation of individuals with cleft palate, there has been no critical review of methodological issues in studies of Putonghua speakers with cleft palate. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant studies published over the past 30 years in Chinese language journals. Only studies incorporating perceptual analysis of speech were included. Thirty-seven articles which met inclusion criteria were analyzed and coded on a number of methodological variables. Reliability was established by having all variables recoded for all studies. This critical review identified many methodological issues. These design flaws make it difficult to draw reliable conclusions about characteristic speech errors in this group of speakers. Specific recommendations are made to improve the reliability and validity of future studies, as well to facilitate cross-center comparisons. PMID:24093158

  13. Association of syndactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip and palate: report of two sibs from Turkey.

    PubMed Central

    Oğur, G; Yüksel, M

    1988-01-01

    Two Turkish sibs, products of a second cousin marriage, with tetramelic syndactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip and palate, renal anomalies, and mental retardation are reported. Similarities between these two brothers and previously reported cases and their mode of transmission are discussed. Images PMID:2832607

  14. Educational Programming: A Seminar for Young Adults with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imhoff, Michael; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The social service staff of the H. K. Cooper Clinic (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) conducted a seminar for young adults with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) and their families. The seminar was designed to respond to questions and concerns regarding the impact of CL/P on employment, social relations, and genetics. (SB)

  15. Long-Term Speech Results of Cleft Palate Speakers with Marginal Velopharyngeal Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Mary A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study of the longitudinal speech performance of 48 cleft palate speakers with marginal velopharyngeal competence, from age 6 to adolescence, found that the adolescent subjects' velopharyngeal status could be predicted based on 2 variables at age 6: the severity ratings of articulation defectiveness and nasality. (Author/JDD)

  16. Phonological Proficiency of Two Cleft Palate Toddlers with School-Age Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Joan I.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the speech-sound production at ages two-three, five, and seven of two children with repaired bilateral cleft lip and palate. Results indicated individual differences in that one S's emerging phonological system was more characteristic of developmental delay while the other was more characteristic of structural…

  17. Role of Visual Feedback Treatment for Defective /s/ Sounds in Patients with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michi, Ken-ichi; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Six patients with cleft palate were provided treatment using either visual feedback for tongue placement and frication or no visual feedback. Results indicated the feedback was especially useful in the treatment of defective /s/ sounds in the patients who exhibited abnormal posterior tongue posturing during dental or alveolar sounds. (Author/DB)

  18. A Procedure for the Computerized Analysis of Cleft Palate Speech Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimons, David A.; Jones, David L.; Barton, Belinda; North, Kathryn N.

    2012-01-01

    The phonetic symbols used by speech-language pathologists to transcribe speech contain underlying hexadecimal values used by computers to correctly display and process transcription data. This study aimed to develop a procedure to utilise these values as the basis for subsequent computerized analysis of cleft palate speech. A computer keyboard…

  19. Speech Analysis of Bengali Speaking Children with Repaired Cleft Lip & Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakrabarty, Madhushree; Kumar, Suman; Chatterjee, Indranil; Maheshwari, Neha

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims at analyzing speech samples of four Bengali speaking children with repaired cleft palates with a view to differentiate between the misarticulations arising out of a deficit in linguistic skills and structural or motoric limitations. Spontaneous speech samples were collected and subjected to a number of linguistic analyses…

  20. Speech Production Time and Judgments of Disordered Nasalization in Speakers with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated effect of production time on the perception of disordered nasalization in 20 children (ages 6-18) with cleft palate. Ten judges used direct magnitude estimates to rate severity of disordered nasalization. Results indicated that reducing the production time did not change perceptible nasalization. (Author/DB)

  1. Compensatory Articulatory Behaviours in Adolescents with Cleft Palate: Comparing the Perceptual and Instrumental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Sara

    2004-01-01

    A combination of perceptual and electropalatographic (EPG) analysis is used to investigate speech production in three adolescent speakers with a history of cleft palate. All the subjects still sound markedly atypical. Their speech output is analysed in three conditions: diadochokinetic tasks; single word production; connected speech. Comparison of…

  2. Bilingual Children with Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate: Language and Memory Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Selena Ee-Li; Purcell, Alison Anne; Ballard, Kirrie Jane; Liow, Susan Jane Rickard; Ramos, Sara Da Silva; Heard, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Research shows that monolingual children with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) have a higher incidence of cognitive-linguistic deficits, but it is not clear whether bilingual preschool children with CLP are especially vulnerable because they need to acquire 2 languages. We tested the hypothesis that bilingual children with CLP score lower…

  3. Issues in Perceptual Speech Analysis in Cleft Palate and Related Disorders: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, Debbie

    2005-01-01

    Perceptual speech assessment is central to the evaluation of speech outcomes associated with cleft palate and velopharyngeal dysfunction. However, the complexity of this process is perhaps sometimes underestimated. To draw together the many different strands in the complex process of perceptual speech assessment and analysis, and make…

  4. Effect of Maxillary Osteotomy on Speech in Cleft Lip and Palate: Perceptual Outcomes of Velopharyngeal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Valerie J.; Sell, Debbie; Tuomainen, Jyrki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Abnormal facial growth is a well-known sequelae of cleft lip and palate (CLP) resulting in maxillary retrusion and a class III malocclusion. In 10-50% of cases, surgical correction involving advancement of the maxilla typically by osteotomy methods is required and normally undertaken in adolescence when facial growth is complete.…

  5. Cognitive Patterns and Learning Disabilities in Cleft Palate Children with Verbal Deficits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Lynn C.

    1980-01-01

    The study examined patterns of cognitive ability in 57 cleft lip and palate children (ages 7 to 9) with verbal deficit, but without general intellectual retardation to evaluate whether the verbal disability displayed by these children was related primarily to a specific verbal expression deficit or a more general symbolic mediation problem.…

  6. Holoprosencephaly, bilateral cleft lip and palate and ectrodactyly: another case and follow up.

    PubMed

    König, Rainer; Beeg, Thomas; Tariverdian, Gholamali; Scheffer, Hans; Bitter, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    We describe a male patient with lobar holoprosencephaly, ectrodactyly, and cleft lip/palate, a syndrome which has been seen previously in only six patients. In addition, our patient developed hypernatraemia, which has been described in three patients before. PMID:14564207

  7. Interhypothalamic Adhesion in a 9-Month-Old Male with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Angel, Jacqueline D. S.

    2013-01-01

    A 9-month-old male infant with multiple congenital anomalies including cleft lip and palate was referred to us for a brain MR to exclude additional intracranial abnormalities. Imaging revealed an interhypothalamic adhesion, which we present as a possible forme fruste of holoprosencephaly. PMID:24368961

  8. Is there an optimal resting velopharyngeal gap in operated cleft palate patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yellinedi, Rajesh; Damalacheruvu, Mukunda Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Context: Videofluoroscopy in operated cleft palate patients. Aims: To determine the existence of an optimal resting velopharyngeal (VP) gap in operated cleft palate patients Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis of lateral view videofluoroscopy of operated cleft palate patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 117 cases of operated cleft palate underwent videofluoroscopy between 2006 and 2011. The lateral view of videofluoroscopy was utilised in the study. A retrospective analysis of the lateral view of videofluoroscopy of these 117 patients was performed to analyse the resting VP gap and its relationship to VP closure. Statistical analysis used: None. Results: Of the 117 cases, 35 had a resting gap of less than 6 mm, 34 had a resting gap between 6 and 10 mm and 48 patients had a resting gap of more than 10 mm. Conclusions: The conclusive finding was that almost all the patients with a resting gap of <6 mm (group C) achieved radiological closure of the velopharynx with speech; thus, they had the least chance of VP insufficiency (VPI). Those patients with a resting gap of >10 mm (group A) did not achieve VP closure on phonation, thus having full-blown VPI. Therefore, it can be concluded that the ideal resting VP gap is approximately 6 mm so as to get the maximal chance of VP closure and thus prevent VPI. PMID:23960311

  9. An innovative technique to restore velopharyngeal incompetency for a patient with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manawar; Dhanasekar, B; Aparna, I N; Naim, Hina

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of cleft lip and palate patients often demand well-coordinated work of medical and dental specialists. In spite of surgical and orthodontic therapy, prosthetic rehabilitation is always necessary because of partial anadontia, maxillary hypoplasia and velopharyngeal dysfuction. The aim of the prosthetic treatment is to improve aesthetics, function and speech of the patients; however, factors like underdeveloped and collapsed maxillary arch, retrognathic maxilla and reduced alveolar ridge height make the treatment challenging. This clinical report describes an interdisciplinary approach for the management of cleft lip and palate patient associated with mutilated dentition. The prosthetic phase began along with orthodontic treatment to achieve sufficient space distribution, which was restored with fixed dental prosthesis to stabilise the achieved status of occlusion. Palatal lift prosthesis was fabricated to restore the velopharyngeal incompetency with an innovative technique using 'standard orthodontic expansion screw' to eliminate hypernasality, decrease intelligibility of speech and to aid in deglutition. PMID:23821635

  10. Esthetic, Functional, and Everyday Life Assessment of Individuals with Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    PubMed Central

    Papamanou, Despina A.; Karamolegkou, Marina; Dorotheou, Domna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the level of satisfaction of individuals with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) and their parents concerning the esthetic and functional treatment outcomes, the impact of the cleft on everyday life, and potential associations with treatment outcome satisfaction. Subjects and Methods. The sample consisted of 33 patients (7 CP, 20 unilateral CLP, and 6 bilateral CLP; median age: 17.1, range: 9.0–33.1 years) and 30 parents, who responded to a questionnaire in an interview-guided session. All participants received their orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics in the University of Athens. Results. Patients and their parents were quite satisfied with esthetics and function. Patients with UCLP primarily were concerned about nose esthetics (BCLP about lip esthetics and CP about speech). Increased satisfaction was associated with decreased influence of the cleft in everyday life (0.35 < rho < 0.64, P < 0.05). Parents reported significant influence of the cleft on family life, while patients did not. Conclusions. Despite the limited sample size of subgroups, the main concerns of patients with different cleft types and the importance of satisfying lip, nose, and speech outcomes for an undisturbed everyday life were quite evident. Thus, the need for targeted treatment strategies is highlighted for individuals with cleft lip and/or palate. PMID:26064918

  11. Addressing the challenges of cleft lip and palate research in India

    PubMed Central

    Mossey, Peter; Little, Julian

    2009-01-01

    The Indian sub-continent remains one of the most populous areas of the world with an estimated population of 1.1 billion in India alone. This yields an estimated 24.5 million births per year and the birth prevalence of clefts is somewhere between 27,000 and 33,000 clefts per year. Inequalities exist, both in access to and quality of cleft care with distinct differences in urban versus rural access and over the years the accumulation of unrepaired clefts of the lip and palate make this a significant health care problem in India. In recent years the situation has been significantly improved through the intervention of Non Governmental Organisations such as SmileTrain and Transforming Faces Worldwide participating in primary surgical repair programmes. The cause of clefts is multi factorial with both genetic and environmental input and intensive research efforts have yielded significant advances in recent years facilitated by molecular technologies in the genetic field. India has tremendous potential to contribute by virtue of improving research expertise and a population that has genetic, cultural and socio-economic diversity. In 2008, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has recognised that non-communicable diseases, including birth defects cause significant infant mortality and childhood morbidity and have included cleft lip and palate in their Global Burden of Disease (GBD) initiative. This will fuel the interest of India in birth defects registration and international efforts aimed at improving quality of care and ultimately prevention of non-syndromic clefts of the lip and palate. PMID:19884687

  12. Appropriate Tongue Blade Length of the Dingman Mouth Gag for Japanese Pediatric Patients With Cleft Palate and Mandibular Micrognathia.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Koji; Aizawa, Takako; Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Mizutani, Hideki; Yamada, Morimasa

    2016-03-01

    Objective Our objective is to determine appropriate specifications for smaller tongue blade for Japanese pediatric patients with cleft palate (CP) and mandibular micrognathia. Patients We investigated 59 patients who underwent palatoplasty. Patients were divided into two groups: the micrognathia (MG) group consisted of 11 patients and the normognathia (NG) group consisted of 48 patients. Interventions The following five items were investigated retrospectively: (1) gender, (2) cleft type, (3) age at the time of surgery, (4) weight at the time of surgery, and (5) distance from the tongue blade base to the posterior pharyngeal wall (Dis). Results There was a significant difference (P < .01) in age at the time of surgery and in Dis between groups, but not in weight. The minimum values were 55 mm for the MG group. As for correlations between age and weight at the time of surgery, the P values for the MG and NG groups were .993 and .052, respectively. As for correlations between weight at the time of surgery and Dis, the P values for the MG and NG groups were .987 and .099, respectively. Conclusions It was difficult to predict Dis on the basis of the patient's age and weight measured preoperatively. The minimum Dis was 55 mm, equal to the length from the base to the tip of the Dingman Mouth Gag tongue blade currently in use, suggesting that a tongue blade of approximately 50 mm in length, shorter than the current minimum specifications, may be appropriate. PMID:25607241

  13. Maternal stress, superstition and communicative behaviour with Nigerian cleft lip and palate children.

    PubMed

    Nwanze, H O; Sowemimo, G O

    1987-01-01

    This study examines, through video recordings and interviews, superstitions held by families of children with cleft lip and palates (CLP) and the mothers' communicative relationship with them. 10 CLP children, 10 non-cleft (NC) children and their mothers, were the subjects. Evil spirits were cited as the dominant cause of the cleft. Husbands or the extended family blamed the mother for the defect in 70% of the homes. Negative family support was evident in 6 of the families. Mothers of CLP children were indulgent with them, but afforded them less autonomy than did mothers of NC children. There was also more linguistic sensitivity between mother and CLP child than within the control group, perhaps facilitating language development in the CLP children. Mothers were, however, withdrawn in relation to children with unrepaired cleft lips. Family education and counselling were recommended. PMID:3589574

  14. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies/USP (HRAC/USP) - Part 5: Institutional outcomes assessment and the role of the Laboratory of Physiology

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, José Alberto de Souza; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira das; de ALMEIDA, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; YAEDÚ, Renato Yassukata Faria; OLIVEIRA, Thaís Marchini; SOARES, Simone; LAURIS, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; YAMASHITA, Renata Paciello; TRINDADE JR, Alceu Sergio; TRINDADE, Inge Elly Kiemle; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    The Laboratory of Physiology provides support for the diagnosis of functional disorders associated with cleft lip and palate and also conducts studies to assess, objectively, the institutional outcomes, as recommended by the World Health Organization. The Laboratory is conceptually divided into three units, namely the Unit for Upper Airway Studies, Unit for Stomatognathic System Studies and the Unit for Sleep Studies, which aims at analyzing the impact of different surgical and dental procedures on the upper airways, stomatognathic system and the quality of sleep of individuals with cleft lip and palate. This paper describes the main goals of the Laboratory in the assessment of procedures which constitute the basis of the rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate, i.e., Plastic Surgery, Orthodontics and Maxillofacial Surgery and Speech Pathology. PMID:24037080

  15. Prevalence and management of natal/neonatal teeth in cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, R. Burcu Nur; Cakan, Derya Germec; Mesgarzadeh, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of natal/neonatal teeth in infants with cleft lip and palate (CLP) according to gender, involving jaw and side and to show the management of some cases. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on medical history and photographic records of 69 infants with CLP, who were treated at the CLP clinic of Yeditepe University between years 2014–2015. The presence of neonatal teeth was determined, and if present the gender, type of cleft, and position were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed. Results: Neonatal teeth were observed in 7% of the study group. No significant differences were found between cleft types and gender (P > 0.05). The prevalence of neonatal teeth in bilateral, unilateral and isolated cleft type was 16.5%, 6.5%, and none, respectively. All neonatal teeth were located in the maxilla and on the cleft-side (100%). Conclusion: The presence of natal/neonatal teeth in infants with CLP was not rare. In all of these cases the teeth were located adjacent to the cleft region. In isolated palatal cleft, where the alveolar region including the teeth buds are away from the cleft, no neonatal teeth were observed. It may be concluded that neonatal teeth in infants with CLP are frequently present and located inside the borders of the presurgical orthopedic treatment (POT) plate. Therefore, if possible, immediate extraction of the neonatal teeth is advised or if not possible because of systemic health reasons, modifications of the plate are required. PMID:27011740

  16. Frontal cephalometric evaluation of transverse dentofacial morphology and growth of children with isolated cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, A E; Moyers, R E; Mazaheri, M; Toutountzakis, N

    1991-08-01

    The transverse dentofacial morphology and growth of 64 children operated on for clefting of the hard and soft palate was studied by means of a frontal proportional cephalometric analysis and was compared to a normal sample at the ages 3-4, 8-9 and 12 years. The cross-sectional comparison of the cleft palate and normal samples at the three periods indicated: (a) The presence in the cleft group of significantly increased ratios of the inner orbital width to the interorbital width and of the width of the nasal cavity to the interorbital width; (b) the absence of any significant differences in the ratio of the maxillary intermolar width to the interorbital width; and (c) the presence of almost identical ratios of the intergonial width of the mandible to the interorbital width and of the width of the maxilla to the intergonial width of the mandible. Evaluation of the changes of all cephalometric variables during the period 8-12 years showed the absence of any significant difference between the cleft palate and normal groups. PMID:1939671

  17. Rhinoplasty for the Cleft Lip and Palate Patient.

    PubMed

    Cuzalina, Angelo; Jung, Calvin

    2016-05-01

    Septorhinoplasties in cleft patients are challenging procedures to perform for even the most experienced surgeon. Unilateral cleft rhinoplasties present a unique challenge given that the tissue bed has had previous manipulation and scarring is found around the tissue matrix, making it typically necessary to place several sturdy cartilaginous grafts to provide structural support. Rib graft provides an abundance of cartilage that can be used for multiple areas. The ability to manipulate and adjust the thickness of the cartilage strut allows for improved integrity of the graft to resist deformation and warping from the formant scar tissue. PMID:26960915

  18. The Effect of Cleft Lip and Palate, and the Timing of Lip Repair on Mother-Infant Interactions and Infant Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Lynne; Hentges, Francoise; Hill, Jonathan; Karpf, Janne; Mistry, Beejal; Kreutz, Marianne; Woodall, Peter; Moss, Tony; Goodacre, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Background: Children with cleft lip and palate are at risk for psychological problems. Difficulties in mother-child interactions may be relevant, and could be affected by the timing of lip repair. Method: We assessed cognitive development, behaviour problems, and attachment in 94 infants with cleft lip (with and without cleft palate) and 96…

  19. Non-syndromic cleft lip and palate: could stress be a causal factor?

    PubMed

    Wallace, Graeme H; Arellano, Jacinta M; Gruner, Tini M

    2011-03-01

    The aetiology of non-syndromic cleft lip and palate has as yet not been clearly defined. Familial relationships, environmental toxins and nutritional status have all been considered without conclusive results, although in some studies a potential link between non-syndromic cleft lip and palate and any one or more of these factors has been proposed. Elevated stress, particularly an extended term of traumatic stress, can lead to oxidative damage at the cellular level via hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, high cortisol and cytokine production. The effect of this hormonal shift is to re-direct the blood supply to the mother's muscles, thereby reducing the supply to the placenta, causing a potential nutritional deficiency which may then result in a genetic alteration in the foetus. Mothers with a child aged two years or younger who had been born with a cleft, who were members of CleftPals, a family support group, volunteered to be participants in this qualitative study. The research first called for a survey to be completed by the mother and this was then followed by an interview conducted by the researcher. The study involved families living in the three eastern States of Australia. The results suggest that physical and/or emotional stress may well be implicated in clefting. While little work has been done in considering stress as a causal factor, the existing literature suggests, as does this study, that elevated stress levels at, or soon after, conception appear to affect foetal development. PMID:20832377

  20. Automatic evaluation of hypernasality based on a cleft palate speech database.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Qi; Yin, Heng; Lech, Margaret; Huang, Yunzhi

    2015-05-01

    The hypernasality is one of the most typical characteristics of cleft palate (CP) speech. The evaluation outcome of hypernasality grading decides the necessity of follow-up surgery. Currently, the evaluation of CP speech is carried out by experienced speech therapists. However, the result strongly depends on their clinical experience and subjective judgment. This work aims to propose an automatic evaluation system for hypernasality grading in CP speech. The database tested in this work is collected by the Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, which has the largest number of CP patients in China. Based on the production process of hypernasality, source sound pulse and vocal tract filter features are presented. These features include pitch, the first and second energy amplified frequency bands, cepstrum based features, MFCC, short-time energy in the sub-bands features. These features combined with KNN classier are applied to automatically classify four grades of hypernasality: normal, mild, moderate and severe. The experiment results show that the proposed system achieves a good performance. The classification rates for four hypernasality grades reach up to 80.4%. The sensitivity of proposed features to the gender is also discussed. PMID:25814462

  1. Replication of 13q31.1 Association in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with Cleft Palate in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Margaret E.; Butali, Azeez; Standley, Jennifer; Rigdon, Jennifer; Suzuki1, Satoshi; Gongorjav, Ayana; Shonkhuuz, T. Enkhtur; Natsume, Nagato; Shi, Bing; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association (GWA) studies have successfully identified at least a dozen loci associated with orofacial clefts. However, these signals may be unique to specific populations and require replication to validate and extend findings as a prelude to etiologic SNP discovery. We attempted to replicate the findings of a recent meta-analysis of orofacial cleft GWA studies using four different ancestral populations. We studied 946 pedigrees (3436 persons) of European (US white and Danish) and Asian (Japanese and Mongolian) origin. We genotyped six SNPs which represented the most significant P value associations identified in published studies: rs742071 (1p36), rs7590268 (2p21), rs7632427 (3p11.1), rs12543318 (8q21.3), rs8001641 (13q31.1) and rs7179658 (15q22.2). We directly sequenced three non-coding conserved regions 200kb downstream of SPRY2 in 713 cases, 438 controls, and 485 trios from the US, Mongolia, and the Philippines. We found rs8001641 to be significantly associated with cleft lip with cleft palate (NSCLP) in Europeans (p-value=4 × 10−5, ORtransmission=1.86 with 95% confidence interval: 1.38-2.52). We also found several novel sequence variants in the conserved regions in Asian and European samples, which may help to localize common variants contributing directly to the risk for NSCLP. This study confirms the prior association between rs8001641 and NSCLP in European populations. PMID:25786657

  2. Whorl Patterns on the Lower Lip are Associated with Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Neiswanger, Katherine; Chirigos, Kevin W.; Klotz, Cherise M.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Bardi, Kathleen M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Weinberg, Seth M.; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Martin, Rick A.; Czeizel, Andrew E.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Poletta, Fernando A.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common birth defect due to both genetic and environmental factors. Whorl lip print patterns are circular grooves on the central upper lip and/or the left and right lower lip. To determine if whorls are more common in families with CL/P than in controls, the Pittsburgh Orofacial Cleft Study collected lip prints from over 450 subjects, i.e., individuals with CL/P, their relatives, and unrelated controls—from the U.S., Argentina, and Hungary. Using a narrow definition of lower-lip whorl, the frequency of whorls in the U.S sample was significantly elevated in cleft individuals and their family members, compared to unrelated controls (14.8% and 13.2% versus 2.3%; P = 0.003 and 0.001, respectively). Whorls were more frequent in CL/P families from Argentina than in CL/P families from the U.S. or Hungary. If these results are confirmed, whorl lip print patterns could be part of an expanded phenotypic spectrum of nonsyndromic CL/P. As such, they may eventually be useful in a clinical setting, allowing recurrence risk calculations to incorporate individual phenotypic information in addition to family history data. PMID:19921634

  3. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP) - Part 2: Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, José Alberto de Souza; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; LAURIS, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; de ALMEIDA, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; YAEDÚ, Renato Yassutaka Faria; SOARES, Simone; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the pediatric dentistry and orthodontic treatment protocol of rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate patients performed at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP). Pediatric dentistry provides oral health information and should be able to follow the child with cleft lip and palate since the first months of life until establishment of the mixed dentition, craniofacial growth and dentition development. Orthodontic intervention starts in the mixed dentition, at 8-9 years of age, for preparing the maxillary arch for secondary bone graft procedure (SBGP). At this stage, rapid maxillary expansion is performed and a fixed palatal retainer is delivered before SBGP. When the permanent dentition is completed, comprehensive orthodontic treatment is initiated aiming tooth alignment and space closure. Maxillary permanent canines are commonly moved mesially in order to substitute absent maxillary lateral incisors. Patients with complete cleft lip and palate and poor midface growth will require orthognatic surgery for reaching adequate anteroposterior interarch relationship and good facial esthetics. PMID:22666849

  4. Rehabilitation of an Edentulous Maxilla in a Patient with Isolated Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Bardia; Barzanji, S Agrin; Patel, Mital; Shahdad, Shakeel

    2016-04-01

    This article aims to discuss the use of short dental implants in cleft patients, the construction of an implant-retained obturator and the use of a Createch milled titanium bar with three Locator overdenture attachments incorporated within the bar. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Implant-retained obturators offer a possible solution for treating patients with isolated cleft palate who are struggling with dentures due to the unfavourable soft and hard tissue profile. This paper demonstrates how to manage such patients and shows all the clinical and laboratory stages involved. PMID:27439268

  5. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis for treatment of cleft lip and palate in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Katsuki, Yuko; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital immune deficiency disorder caused by abnormal antibody production. It is a rare disease with an estimated frequency of 1 in 379,000 that has X-linked recessive heredity and develops only in males. The clinical problems include bacterial infection such as otitis media, sinusitis, and bronchitis. In recent years it has become possible to diagnose XLA in the early stage and intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy has permitted survival to adulthood. However, there have been no reports of oral surgery in patients with XLA. Here, we describe a case in which immunoglobulin replacement therapy given pre- and postoperatively was used to control infection in oral surgery and maxillary distraction osteogenesis performed for improving occlusion and appearance of a cleft lip and palate in a patient with XLA. PMID:24947966

  6. Prenatal Counseling, Ultrasound Diagnosis, and the Role of Maternal-Fetal Medicine of the Cleft Lip and Palate Patient.

    PubMed

    James, Jeffrey N; Schlieder, Daniel W

    2016-05-01

    A multidisciplinary team is the standard of care and the cornerstone of management of cleft patients. With readily improving advanced diagnostic modalities, early prenatal diagnosis of cleft lip and palate increasingly becomes a topic of importance for both the team caring for and families of cleft patients. Maternal-fetal medicine is a fellowship subspecialty of obstetrics that can offer high-quality care and coordination to the cleft team. Both 3-D and 4-D sonography lead to early prenatal diagnosis of cleft patients; however, differences in training result in variations in its diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26928557

  7. Tbx22null mice have a submucous cleft palate due to reduced palatal bone formation and also display ankyloglossia and choanal atresia phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pauws, Erwin; Hoshino, Aya; Bentley, Lucy; Prajapati, Suresh; Keller, Charles; Hammond, Peter; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro; Moore, Gudrun E; Stanier, Philip

    2009-11-01

    Craniofacial defects involving the lip and/or palate are among the most common human birth defects. X-linked cleft palate and ankyloglossia results from loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the T-box transcription factor TBX22. Further studies show that TBX22 mutations are also found in around 5% of non-syndromic cleft palate patients. Although palate defects are obvious at birth, the underlying developmental pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we report a Tbx22(null) mouse, which has a submucous cleft palate (SMCP) and ankyloglossia, similar to the human phenotype, with a small minority showing overt clefts. We also find persistent oro-nasal membranes or, in some mice a partial rupture, resulting in choanal atresia. Each of these defects can cause severe breathing and/or feeding difficulties in the newborn pups, which results in approximately 50% post-natal lethality. Analysis of the craniofacial skeleton demonstrates a marked reduction in bone formation in the posterior hard palate, resulting in the classic notch associated with SMCP. Our results suggest that Tbx22 plays an important role in the osteogenic patterning of the posterior hard palate. Ossification is severely reduced after condensation of the palatal mesenchyme, resulting from a delay in the maturation of osteoblasts. Rather than having a major role in palatal shelf closure, we show that Tbx22 is an important determinant for intramembranous bone formation in the posterior hard palate, which underpins normal palate development and function. These findings could have important implications for the molecular diagnosis in patients with isolated SMCP and/or unexplained choanal atresia. PMID:19648291

  8. Do patients with isolated Pierre Robin Sequence have worse outcomes after cleft palate repair: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wan, Teng; Chen, Yang; Wang, Guomin

    2015-08-01

    Cleft palate repair for Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS) patients has always been a challenge for surgeons and anesthetists. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the outcome of cleft palate repair for PRS patients compared with cleft palate-only patients. All papers published before October 2014 were searched in the databases PubMed and MEDLINE. Search terms included "Pierre Robin Sequence," "cleft palate repair," and "speech result." Additional studies were identified by hand searching the reference lists of the papers retrieved from electronic search. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted the data, and assessed the quality of the studies. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. All but one study had multiple deficiencies in study designs. Four studies assessed the fistula rate of both groups, and all studies assessed some aspect of the speech results. Conflicting results and a lack of high-quality and long-term outcomes of reviewed studies provided no conclusive scientific evidence about whether the outcome of cleft palate repair for PRS patients was better or worse than cleft palate-only patients. Further well-designed, well-controlled, and long-term studies are needed. PMID:26187812

  9. Cellular alterations and enhanced induction of cleft palate after coadministration of retinoic acid and TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and retinoic acid (RA) are both teratogenic in mice. TCDD is a highly toxic, stable environmental contaminant, while RA is a naturally occurring form of vitamin A. Exposure to TCDD induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate, and exposure to RA induces limb defects and cleft palate. Teratology studies previously have shown that the incidence of clefting is higher after exposure to RA + TCDD than would be observed for the same doses of either compound given alone. This study examines the cellular effects which result in cleft palate, after po administration on gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12 of RA + TCDD in corn oil (10 ml/kg total volume). Exposure on GD 10 to 6 micrograms TCDD + 40 mg RA/kg inhibited early growth of the shelves and clefting was due to a failure of shelves to meet and fuse. This effect on mesenchyme was observed in previous studies to occur after exposure on GD 10 to 40 mg/kg RA alone, but not after TCDD alone. After exposure on GD 12 to 6 micrograms TCDD + 80 mg RA/kg, clefting was due to a failure of shelves to fuse after making contact, because the medial cells differentiated into an oral-like epithelium. This response was observed in previous studies to occur after exposure to TCDD alone, but RA alone on GD 12 resulted in differentiation toward nasal-like cells. The interaction between TCDD and RA results in RA-like clefting after exposure on GD 10 and TCDD-like clefting after exposure on GD 12, and this clefting occurs at higher incidences than would occur after the same levels of either agent alone. After exposure on either GD 10 or 12 to RA + TCDD, the programmed cell death of the medial cells does not occur, and these cells continue to express EGF receptors and to bind 125I-EGF. The effects of RA and TCDD may involve modulation of the cells responses to embryonic growth and differentiation factors.

  10. The Impact of Early Infant Jaw-Orthopaedics on Early Speech Production in Toddlers with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohmander, Anette; Lillvik, Malin; Friede, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of study was to investigate the impact of pre-surgical Infant Orthopaedics (IO) on consonant production at 18 months of age in children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) and to compare the consonant production to that of age-matched children without clefts. The first ten children in a consecutive series of 20 with UCLP…