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Sample records for cleidocranial dysplasia patients

  1. Familial Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, MK; Maheshwari, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia or mutational dysostosis or cleidocranial dysostosis is a generalized skeletodental dysplastic disorder, inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The expression of this disorder can vary widely in severity, even within the same family. This is a relatively rare disease and has no standard effective treatment option as of yet. Here we present a case report of affected mother and son with classical manifestations of the disease.

  2. Complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed cleidocranial dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Zeng, Binghui; Yu, Dongsheng; Jing, Xiangyi; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yiming

    2015-09-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital disorder, typically characterized by persistently open skull sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, and supernumerary teeth. Mutations in the gene encoding the runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) protein are responsible for approximately two thirds of CCD patients. We report a 20-year-old CCD patient presenting not only with typical skeletal changes, but also complex dental anomalies. A previously undiagnosed odontoma, 14 supernumerary teeth, a cystic lesion, and previously unreported fused primary teeth were discovered on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Mutation analysis identified the causal c.578G>A (p.R193Q) mutation in the RUNX2 gene. At 20 years of age, the patient had already missed the optimal period for dental intervention. This report describes the complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed CCD patient, and emphasizes the significance of CBCT assessment for the detection of dental anomalies and the importance of early treatment to achieve good outcomes. PMID:26389062

  3. Complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed cleidocranial dysplasia patient

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Zeng, Binghui; Yu, Dongsheng; Jing, Xiangyi; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital disorder, typically characterized by persistently open skull sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, and supernumerary teeth. Mutations in the gene encoding the runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) protein are responsible for approximately two thirds of CCD patients. We report a 20-year-old CCD patient presenting not only with typical skeletal changes, but also complex dental anomalies. A previously undiagnosed odontoma, 14 supernumerary teeth, a cystic lesion, and previously unreported fused primary teeth were discovered on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Mutation analysis identified the causal c.578G>A (p.R193Q) mutation in the RUNX2 gene. At 20 years of age, the patient had already missed the optimal period for dental intervention. This report describes the complex dental anomalies in a belatedly diagnosed CCD patient, and emphasizes the significance of CBCT assessment for the detection of dental anomalies and the importance of early treatment to achieve good outcomes. PMID:26389062

  4. Broad Spectrum of Skeletal Malformation Complex in Patients with Cleidocranial Dysplasia Syndrome: Radiographic and Tomographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ben Chehida, Farid; Kenis, Vladimir; Ganger, Rudolf; Radler, Christof; Hofstaetter, Jochen G.; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cleidocranial dysplasia is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by defective ossification of the intramembraneous ossification (primarily the clavicles, cranium, and pelvis), and it is caused by mutations in the RUNX2 gene that is responsible for osteoblast differentiation. Spine deformities were of progressive nature and considered to be the major orthopedic abnormalities encountered in our practice in patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. We aimed to further delineate the underlying spine pathology and its etiological understanding. Extraspinal deformities were dealt with respectively. Material and methods In this paper, we describe 7 patients who were consistent with the phenotypic and the genotypic characterization of cleidocranial dysplasia. Reformatted computed tomography (CT) scans have been applied in several instances to further understand the underlying pathology of progressive spine tilting. Radiographs were sufficient to illustrate other skeletal malformations. Results Anatomical survey demonstrates that a broad spectrum of frequently unrecognized orthopedic aberrations were encountered. We believe that torticollis has evolved in connection with the persistence of synchondrosis of the skull base and the upper cervical spine and these are strongly correlated to the well-known pathology of posterior occipital synchondrosis. Similarly, scoliosis and kyphoscoliosis resulted from the pathologic aberration of the cartilaginous stage of disrupted embryological development. All our results are discussed for the first time. Coxa vara, patellar dysplasia, and genu valgum were observed as extraspinal deformities. Conclusion This paper includes for the first time the anatomical analysis of the malformation complex of the craniocervical and the entire spine in patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Reformatted CT scan was the modality of choice. We were able to illustrate that the persistence of skull base and the cervical spine synchondrosis were

  5. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with cleidocranial dysplasia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zi-Jian; Wang, Jun-Yan; Gao, Ming-Fei; Wu, Da-Lei; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare autosomal dominant condition that affects ossification. The dental abnormalities associated with CCD present an obstacle to orthodontic treatment planning. Early diagnosis is crucial to provide the patient with different treatment modalities that will suit the particular patient. In the present case, combined surgical and orthodontic treatment were performed to guide multiple impacted teeth. A single nucleotide missense variation was identified in exon 3 of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) in this patient. The current results suggest a correlation between dental alterations and mutations in the runt domain of RUNX2 in CCD patients. Further clinical and genetic studies may required to confirm the association between phenotypes and genotypes in CCD and to identify other factors that may influence the clinical features of this disease. Patients with cleidocranial dysplasia require a team approach which demands good communication and cooperation from the patient. Timing of the intervention is critical, and numerous surgeries may be required. The patient in the present case report was treated by a team of practitioners, which involved several dental specialties to achieve an optimal result. PMID:27446262

  6. Cranioplasty Using a Modified Split Calvarial Graft Technique in Cleidocranial Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Taek; Cho, Jae Ik; Lee, Sang Pyung

    2015-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia is a well-documented rare autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by hypoplastic/aplastic clavicles, brachycephalic skull, patent sutures and fontanelles, midface hypoplasia, and abnormalities of dentition. Patients with cleidocranial dysplasia often complain about undesirable esthetic appearance of their forehead and skull. Notwithstanding many studies of molecular, genetics and skeletal abnormalities of this congenial disorder, there have been very few written reports of cranioplasty involving cleidocranial dysplasia. Thus, we report a rare case of successful cranioplasty using a modified split calvarial graft technique in patient with cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:26279819

  7. Cranioplasty Using a Modified Split Calvarial Graft Technique in Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young Taek; Cho, Jae Ik

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia is a well-documented rare autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by hypoplastic/aplastic clavicles, brachycephalic skull, patent sutures and fontanelles, midface hypoplasia, and abnormalities of dentition. Patients with cleidocranial dysplasia often complain about undesirable esthetic appearance of their forehead and skull. Notwithstanding many studies of molecular, genetics and skeletal abnormalities of this congenial disorder, there have been very few written reports of cranioplasty involving cleidocranial dysplasia. Thus, we report a rare case of successful cranioplasty using a modified split calvarial graft technique in patient with cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:26279819

  8. Cleidocranial dysplasia: A report of two cases with brief review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kusum; Goswami, Mridula

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a genetic disorder primarily causing dysplasia of bones and teeth with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Affected individuals presented with several skeletal and dental abnormalities mainly hypoplasia of clavicles, open fontanelles, short stature, retention of primary teeth, supernumerary teeth, delayed eruption of permanent teeth, multiple impacted permanent teeth etc. The present series of two cases illustrates the clinical and radiological features of pediatric patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. The early diagnosis of the condition helps in proper orientation of the treatment thereby offering better quality of life to such patients. PMID:27195196

  9. Cleidocranial Dysplasia with Autosomal Dominant Inheritance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  10. Cleidocranial dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  11. Cleidocranial Dysplasia: A Clinico-radiographic Spectrum with Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Purva Prakash; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the clavicles, characteristic craniofacial malformations, and the presence of numerous supernumerary and unerupted teeth. It affects bones derived from both intra-membranous and endochondral ossification. Incidence has been reported as 1 in 10,00,000. It is caused by mutation in the gene encoding transcription factor Core Binding Factor Subunit Alpha l (CBFAl) or Runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Case Report: This presentation discusses the clinical and radiographic features of a familial case of cleidocranial dysplasia occurring in a father and a child. All the clinical and radiographic features, except that of the chest x-ray, were more prominent in the child than the father. This supports the fact that CCD is transmitted by an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is sporadic in about 40% of cases. Each child of an individual with CCD has a 50% chance of in heriting the mutation. Conclusion: Diagnosis is mostly made on the basis of clinical and radiographic features. Molecular genetic testing such as sequence analysis or deletion analysis can be used in cleidocranial dysplasia. Some cases are diagnosed through incidental findings by physicians, treating patients for unrelated conditions. Treatment of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach which includes orthopaedic and dental corrections along with management of any complications of cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:27299035

  12. Histological examination and clinical evaluation of the jawbone of an adult patient with cleidocranial dysplasia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Schnutenhaus, Sigmar; Luthardt, Ralph G; Rudolph, Heike; Götz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome, inherited autosomal-dominantly. During a course of treatment including surgical, implantological and restorative procedures, an opportunity arose to histologically examine biopsies of the maxilla and mandible of a CCD patient 47 years of age. Case report: The aim of this case report is to present the results of the histological evaluation of the alveolar bone and the surgical pretreatment for and placement of six implants each in the maxilla and the mandible. The implants were inserted in a minimally invasive procedure using 3D template guidance. Following uneventful healing of the implants, ceramically veneered bridges were cemented on individual titanium abutments. Since the patient had not received orthodontic treatment in childhood-which would have been the treatment modality of choice-this implantological and prosthodontic approach was necessary. Biopsies were taken from the maxilla and the mandible before placing the implants. Histological evaluation showed bone with strong, coarsely interconnecting trabeculae, especially in the maxilla. Both the bone and the gingiva otherwise exhibited a normal structure without pathological features or anomalies. Conclusion: The clinical parameters and histological evaluation of this one clinical case suggest that the concepts familiar from general oral implantology in terms of surgical and prosthetic procedures can be adopted for older patients with CCD. PMID:26339428

  13. Cone-beam computed tomography: An inevitable investigation in cleidocranial dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nandita S.; Gogri, Ajas A.; Kajale, Manasi M.; Kadam, Sonali G.

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia is a heritable skeletal dysplasia and one of the most common features of this syndrome is multiple impacted supernumerary teeth. Cone-beam computed tomography, the most recent advancement in maxillofacial imaging, provides the clinician to view the morphology of the skull and the dentition in all three dimensions and help in treatment planning for the patient. PMID:26097368

  14. Cleidocranial Dysplasia Case Report: Remodeling of Teeth as Aesthetic Restorative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Caetano, Isabela Maria; Dalitz, Fernando; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Mondelli, José

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), is an autosomal dominant disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is generally characterized by orofacial manifestations, including enamel hypoplasia, retained primary teeth, and impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth. The successful treatment involving a timing intervention (orthodontic-maxillofacial surgeons-restorative) is already described. However, the restorative treatment might improve the aesthetic final result in dentistry management for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Objective. Therefore, this clinical report presents a conservative restorative management (enamel microabrasion, dental bleaching, and direct composite resin) for aesthetic solution for a patient with CCD. Clinical Considerations. The cosmetic remodeling is a conservative, secure, and low cost therapy that can be associated with other procedures such as enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to achieve optimal outcome. Additionally, the Golden Proportion can be used to guide dental remodeling to improve the harmony of the smile and the facial composition. Conclusions. Thus, dentists must know and be able to treat dental aesthetic problems in cleidocranial dysplasia patients. The intention of this paper is to describe a restorative approach with the cosmetic remodeling teeth (by grinding or addicting material) associated with enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to reestablish the form, shape, and color of smile for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:25045546

  15. An assessment of root cementum in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Counts, A L; Rohrer, M D; Prasad, H; Bolen, P

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine if there is a difference between the amount of cellular and acellular cementum on the roots of 2 teeth extracted from a subject with cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) compared to 10 teeth extracted from 10 subjects unaffected by CCD. The cementum of 2 permanent teeth, which had been extracted from the CCD subject, was examined and histomorphometrically analyzed for comparison to the cementum of 10 anterior teeth that had been extracted from individuals who were unaffected by CCD. The percentage of the root covered by cellular or acellular cementum was quantified to determine if patients affected by CCD typically lack cellular cementum. In the roots of the 2 permanent teeth of the subject with CCD, a mean of 18.05 +/- 10.67% was covered by cellular cementum and 76.90 +/- 3.53% was covered by acellular cementum. In the 10 permanent teeth from subjects without CCD, a mean of 19.12 +/- 15.60% of the root was covered by cellular cementum and 80.34 +/- 15.71% was covered by acellular cementum. The findings indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between the amount of either cellular or acellular cementum covering the roots of the study subject with CCD and the roots of the 10 control teeth. The presumption that a lack of cellular cementum causes the increased number of unerupted teeth in patients with CCD is not supported by the findings of this study. PMID:11510638

  16. Prospective signs of cleidocranial dysplasia in Cebpb deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) has been considered a determinant of cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), some CCD patients were free of RUNX2 mutations. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (Cebpb) is a key factor of Runx2 expression and our previous study has reported two CCD signs including hyperdontia and elongated coronoid process of the mandible in Cebpb deficient mice. Following that, this work aimed to conduct a case-control study of thoracic, zygomatic and masticatory muscular morphology to propose an association between musculoskeletal phenotypes and deficiency of Cebpb, using a sample of Cebpb-/-, Cebpb+/- and Cebpb+/+ adult mice. Somatic skeletons and skulls of mice were inspected with soft x-rays and micro-computed tomography (μCT), respectively. Zygomatic inclination was assessed using methods of coordinate geometry and trigonometric function on anatomic landmarks identified with μCT. Masseter and temporal muscles were collected and weighed. Expression of Cebpb was examined with a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Results Cebpb-/- mice displayed hypoplastic clavicles, a narrow thoracic cage, and a downward tilted zygomatic arch (p < 0.001). Although Cebpb+/- mice did not show the phenotypes above (p = 0.357), a larger mass percentage of temporal muscles over masseter muscles was seen in Cebpb+/- littermates (p = 0.012). The mRNA expression of Cebpb was detected in the clavicle, the zygoma, the temporal muscle and the masseter muscle, respectively. Conclusions Prospective signs of CCD were identified in mice with Cebpb deficiency. These could provide an additional aetiological factor of CCD. Succeeding investigation into interactions among Cebpb, Runx2 and musculoskeletal development is indicated. PMID:24885110

  17. Multiple, supernumerary retained teeth in the course of cleido-cranial dysplasia. A case report.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Bogumił; Martula-Gala, Katarzyna; Brodowski, Robert; Zych, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Cleido-cranial dysplasia, often referred to as Scheuthauer-Marie-Sainton syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder of the musculo-skeletal system. Patients with cleido-cranial dysplasia are characterized by short stature, frequent varus or valgus hip, kyphoscoliosis, underdevelopment of the scapulas and the sternum, incorrect number of ribs. The most characteristic feature is unilateral or bilateral, partial or total underdevelopment of clavicles. Mental development is not affected in this syndrome. Malocclusion, occlusal irregularities, multiple supernumerary teeth, impacted teeth, and persistent milk teeth are found in the stomatognathic system. Teeth often have abnormal anatomy. Gothic palate, cleft hard and soft palate are diagnosed. The aim of this paper is to present a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with irregularities in the masticatory system involving an additional number of retained teeth. The boy was referred by an orthodontist for surgical and orthodontic team therapy. The case presented confirms the observations of other authors that only the multi-specialty collaboration of a pediatrician, a geneticist, an orthopedist, an orthodontist, a maxillofacial surgeon, an implant prosthetic surgeon and a physiotherapist can provide proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26982761

  18. Intragenic microdeletion of RUNX2 is a novel mechanism for cleidocranial dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; Chou, Ching-Heng; Sun, Feng-Mei; Huang, Li-Chen; Yen, Pauline; Lin, Chyi-Chyang; Liu, Chih-Yang; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2008-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD; MIM 119600) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by facial, dental, and skeletal malformations. To date, rearrangement and mutations involving RUNX2, which encodes a transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation on 6p21, has been the only known molecular etiology for CCD. However, only 70% patients were found to have point mutations, 13% large/contiguous deletion but the rest of 17% remains unknown. We ascertained a family consisted of eight affected individuals with CCD phenotypes. Direct sequencing analysis revealed no mutations in the RUNX2. Real time quantitative PCR were performed which revealed an exon 2 to exon 6 intragenic deletion in RUNX2. Our patients not only demonstrated a unique gene change as a novel mechanism for CCD, but also highlight the importance of considering “deletion” and “duplication” in suspected familial cases before extensive effort of gene hunting be carried. PMID:18696259

  19. A 13-year-old caucasian boy with cleidocranial dysplasia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare congenital autosomal dominant skeletal disorder. The disorder is caused by heterozygosity of mutations in human RUNX2, which is present on the short arm of chromosome 6p21. The incidence of CCD is one per million births. CCD appears spontaneously with no apparent genetic cause in approximately 40% of affected patients, and one in three patients has unaffected parents. The most prevalent features associated with CCD are aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, supernumerary teeth, failed eruption of permanent teeth, and a hypoplastic maxilla. Case presentation A 13-year-old Caucasian boy presented with a chief complaint of delayed eruption of the permanent anterior teeth. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with CCD based on the clinical examination, panoramic X-ray, anterior-posterior and lateral cephalogram, and chest radiograph findings. The details of this case are herein reported because of the extremely low incidence of this disorder. Conclusions CCD is of clinical importance in dentistry and medicine because it affects the bones and teeth and is characterized by many changes in skeletal patterning and growth. Particularly in dentistry, CCD is of great clinical significance because is associated with delayed ossification of the skull sutures, delayed exfoliation of the primary teeth, lack of permanent teeth eruption, multiple supernumerary teeth, and morphological abnormalities of the maxilla and mandible. Patients with CCD seek treatment mainly for dental problems. Knowledge of the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and diagnostic tools of CCD will enable clinicians to render the appropriate treatment to improve function and aesthetics. Early diagnosis of CCD is crucial for timely initiation of an appropriate treatment approach. PMID:23289840

  20. A gene for cleidocranial dysplasia maps to the short arm of chromosome 6.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, G J; Robin, N H; Brueton, L A; Robertson, E; Thompson, E M; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Gasser, D L; Bailey, L C; Zackai, E H; Muenke, M

    1995-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant generalized bone dysplasia characterized by mild-to-moderate short stature, clavicular aplasia or hypoplasia, supernumerary and ectopic teeth, delayed eruption of secondary teeth, a characteristic craniofacial appearance, and a variety of other skeletal anomalies. We have performed linkage studies in five families with CCD, with 24 affected and 20 unaffected individuals, using microsatellite markers spanning two candidate regions on chromosomes 8q and 6. The strongest support for linkage was with chromosome 6p microsatellite marker D6S282 with a two-point lod score of 4.84 (theta = .03). Furthermore, the multipoint lod score was 5.70 in the interval between D6S282 and D6S291. These data show that the gene for autosomal dominant CCD is located within a 19-cM interval on the short arm of chromosome 6, between D6S282 and D6S291. Images Figure 1 PMID:7717404

  1. A review of clinical and radiological features of cleidocranial dysplasia with a report of two cases and a dental treatment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Paul, S. Arun; Simon, S. Sibu; Karthik, A. Kaneesh; Chacko, Rabin K.; Savitha, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare autosomal dominant condition with generalized dysplasia of bone characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles, short stature, dental abnormalities and a variety of other skeletal abnormalities. We report two cases presenting with classical features of CCD because of its rarity. PMID:26538892

  2. A rare case of cleidocranial dysplasia presenting with failure to thrive

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Parag Suresh; Mahajan, Anuradha Parag; Mahajan, Prashant Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare (1:1,000,000) congenital condition secondary to spontaneous mutation (40%) or autosomal dominant inheritance (60%) affecting skeletal and dental systems. Hypomineralization of the hypoplastic clavicles and/or cranium is the major feature observed by prenatal ultrasound. Radiologically clavicles are hypoplastic or absent in chest X-ray. Delayed closure of the fontanelle and the skull sutures in pediatric and adolescent population and increased mobility of shoulders in all age groups (exhibited by the ability to bring shoulders close to each other) are prominent clinical diagnostic features of CCD. The diagnosis of CCD is often missed or significantly delayed. The management of CCD involves a multidisciplinary approach and its early diagnosis is essential to select an optimum plan and therapeutic benefit. We present here a case of CCD in a 17-month-old girl referred to us for investigation of below average weight and height gain; we stress on the usefulness of early diagnosis in the management of CCD and discuss current management concepts. PMID:25810671

  3. Mapping of the gene for cleidocranial dysplasia in the historical Cape Town (Arnold) kindred and evidence for locus homogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Ramesar, R S; Greenberg, J; Martin, R; Goliath, R; Bardien, S; Mundlos, S; Beighton, P

    1996-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder, features of which include a patient anterior fontanelle, a bulging calvarium, hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, a wide public symphysis, dental anomalies, vertebral malformation, and short stature. The Cape Town kindred which is under our genetic management was originally described more than four decades ago and now consists of more than 1000 people. Following reports of rearrangements on chromosomes 6 and 8 in people with CCD, we have carried out linkage analyses between highly information microsatellite dinucleotide repeat markers in the rearranged regions and the disorder in a branch of this South African CCD kindred, consisting of 38 subjects, 18 of whom are affected. Maximum lod scores (at theta = 0.00) of 7.14 (for marker D6S459), 4.32 (TCTE), 4.99 (D6S452), 5.97 (D6S269), and 3.95 (D6S465) confirm linkage of the disorder to the short arm of chromosome 6. Our data indicate that the CCD gene is located within a minimal region of approximately 10 cM flanked by the marker D6S451 distally and D6S466 proximally. This information is vital towards isolating and characterising the gene for CCD, and is being used to construct a physical map of 6p21.1-6p21.3. More importantly, mapping of the locus in the South African kindred of mixed ancestry, in which the "founder" of the disorder was of Chinese origin, suggests that a single locus is responsible for classic CCD. Images PMID:8782054

  4. Mapping of the gene for cleidocranial dysplasia in the historical Cape Town (Arnold) kindred and evidence for locus homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ramesar, R S; Greenberg, J; Martin, R; Goliath, R; Bardien, S; Mundlos, S; Beighton, P

    1996-06-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder, features of which include a patient anterior fontanelle, a bulging calvarium, hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, a wide public symphysis, dental anomalies, vertebral malformation, and short stature. The Cape Town kindred which is under our genetic management was originally described more than four decades ago and now consists of more than 1000 people. Following reports of rearrangements on chromosomes 6 and 8 in people with CCD, we have carried out linkage analyses between highly information microsatellite dinucleotide repeat markers in the rearranged regions and the disorder in a branch of this South African CCD kindred, consisting of 38 subjects, 18 of whom are affected. Maximum lod scores (at theta = 0.00) of 7.14 (for marker D6S459), 4.32 (TCTE), 4.99 (D6S452), 5.97 (D6S269), and 3.95 (D6S465) confirm linkage of the disorder to the short arm of chromosome 6. Our data indicate that the CCD gene is located within a minimal region of approximately 10 cM flanked by the marker D6S451 distally and D6S466 proximally. This information is vital towards isolating and characterising the gene for CCD, and is being used to construct a physical map of 6p21.1-6p21.3. More importantly, mapping of the locus in the South African kindred of mixed ancestry, in which the "founder" of the disorder was of Chinese origin, suggests that a single locus is responsible for classic CCD. PMID:8782054

  5. Generation of cleidocranial dysplasia-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells in completely serum-, feeder-, and integration-free culture.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Sachiko; Hamada, Atsuko; Akagi, Eri; Nakatao, Hirotaka; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Nakanishi, Mahito; Toratani, Shigeaki; Okamoto, Tetsuji

    2016-02-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for their practical and scientific potentials. To improve understanding of self-renewal and differentiation, we previously reported a defined serum-free medium hESF9 could generate and maintain human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in serum- and feeder-free culture conditions using retroviral vectors. To avoid the unpredictable side effects associated with retrovirus integration, we report here the successful generation of hiPSCs from dental pulp cells with a non-integrating replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp) vector expressing four key reprogramming genes. We found that hESF9 medium in combination with fibronectin are effective for generating and maintaining hiPSCs with SeVdp (KOSM). Using this system, pluripotent and self-renewing hiPSCs could be easily and stably generated and propagated. With this system, we successfully generated hiPSCs from cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) caused by a heterozygous germ-line mutation of runt-related protein2 (RUNX2), which has an important role in the differentiation of osteoblasts and maturation of chondrocytes. This is the first report of the establishment of CCD-specific iPSCs. The cartilage in the teratomas of CCD-iPSCs showed abnormalities. These CCD-iPSCs would be beneficial to clarify the molecular mechanism and for development of medical applications. Moreover, it brings new pathophysiological role of RUNX2 in the differentiation of the human chondrocytes and osteocytes. PMID:26559068

  6. Genetics Home Reference: cleidocranial dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... knees; and an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). Characteristic facial features may include a wide, short ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  7. Hip dysplasia in the skeletally mature patient.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rachel Y; Kaye, Ian David; Slover, James; Feldman, David

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hip development causes one-quarter to one-half of all hip disease. Dysplastic hips typically share characteristic anatomic abnormalities. The dysplastic acetabulum is typically shallow, lateralized, and anteverted with insufficient coverage anteriorly, superiorly, and laterally. The dysplastic proximal femur has a small femoral head with excessive femoral neck anteversion and a short neck with an increased neck shaft angle. These characteristic changes result in intraarticular pathology leading to hip arthritis. A variety of treatment options exist based on the degree of dysplasia and the amount of concomitant hip arthritis. Treatment options include hip arthroscopy, acetabular or femoral osteotomies, hip arthrodesis, and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25150325

  8. Telescopic overdenture for oral rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patient

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Verma, Mahesh; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra

    2015-01-01

    Reduced number of teeth with underdeveloped alveolar ridges poses a greatest prosthetic challenge in rehabilitation of ectodermal dysplasia patients (ED). Furthermore, surgical risks and financial constraints may preclude the implant supported prosthesis, the most desirable treatment option in an adult ED patient. Long edentulous span does not permit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) as well. Telescopic denture by incorporating the best of both fixed and removable prosthesis can be a viable treatment alternative for ED patients with compromised dentition and limited finances. A 21-year-old young girl presented with chief complaint of esthetics and mastication due to missing upper and lower teeth. A provisional diagnosis of ED was made based on familial history, physical, and oral examination. This clinical report describes management of an adult ED patient by means of telescopic overdenture prosthesis in mandibular arch and FDP in maxillary arch which restored esthetics, function, and social confidence of the patient in a cost effective manner. PMID:26604583

  9. Conventional Complete Denture in Patients with Ectodermal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Sánchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Ribeiro, Giselle Rodrigues; Campos, Camila Heitor; Farias-Neto, Arcelino

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is described as heritable conditions that involve anomalies of structures derived from the ectoderm, including hypodontia. In the cases of edentulous young patients, who did not finish their craniofacial growth, treatment with conventional complete denture is a suitable alternative. The aim of this study was to report a case of mandibular edentulism treated with conventional complete denture in a thirteen-year-old patient diagnosed with hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. Typical features, such as frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, protuberant lips, scarce hair, and brittle nails, were visualized during the extraoral examination. The intraoral inspection and radiographic analysis revealed oligodontia, dental malformation, and prolonged retention of deciduous teeth at maxilla and total edentulism at mandible. A conventional complete denture was planned and constructed following the same steps of technique as recommended in adults. Although this option is not a definitive treatment, the patient and his parents were satisfied with his improvement in chewing and speech, as well as with the aesthetic benefits. PMID:26425372

  10. [Guidelines for the follow up of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Tarazona, S; Rueda Esteban, S; Alfonso Diego, J; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Callejón Callejón, A; Cortell Aznar, I; de la Serna Blázquez, O; Domingo Miró, X; García García, M L; García Hernández, G; Luna Paredes, C; Mesa Medina, O; Moreno Galdó, A; Moreno Requena, L; Pérez Pérez, G; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M; Torrent Vernetta, A; Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Vilella Sabaté, M

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth, and remains a major problem in pediatric pulmonology units. The decision of discharging from the Neonatal Unit should be based on a thorough assessment of the condition of the patient and compliance with certain requirements, including respiratory and nutritional stability, and caregiver education on disease management. For proper control of the disease, a schedule of visits and complementary tests should be established prior to discharge, and guidelines for prevention of exacerbations and appropriate treatment should be applied. In this paper, the Working Group in Perinatal Respiratory Diseases of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology proposes a protocol to serve as a reference for the follow up of patients with BPD among different centers and health care settings. Key factors to consider when planning discharge from the Neonatal Unit and during follow up are reviewed. Recommendations on treatment and prevention of complications are then discussed. The final section of this guide aims to provide a specific schedule for follow-up and diagnostic interventions to be performed in patients with BPD. PMID:26089228

  11. [Anesthetic management of a patient with metatropic dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Marie; Niiyama, Yukitoshi; Nawa, Yuko; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2013-02-01

    A 5-year-old girl with metatropic dysplasia was scheduled for an operation of posterior cervical fusion. This disease is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by long trunk and short limbs and severe scoliosis. As she had been suspected to have a difficult airway, we attempted fiberoptic intubation with a nasopharyngeal airway to prevent airway obstruction. The nasopharyngeal airway ensured a patent airway sufficient oxygenation, and anesthesia. Thus, it was possible to perform a fiberoptic intubation via the opposite nostril with no adverse event. The combination of a nasopharyngeal airway and fiberoptic guided tracheal intubation is a reliable and safe procedure for small children with metatropic dysplasia and difficult airway. PMID:23479930

  12. Relative risk of dysplasia for patients with intestinal metaplasia in the distal oesophagus and in the gastric cardia

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P; Weston, A; Morales, T; Topalovski, M; Mayo, M; Sampliner, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Biopsy specimens obtained from the gastro-oesophageal junction can reveal intestinal metaplasia in patients presenting for routine upper endoscopy. The site of biopsy may play a critical role in determining the dysplasia risk of a patient.
AIMS—To evaluate prospectively the dysplasia risk in patients with intestinal metaplasia of the distal oesophagus or within the gastric cardia.
METHODS—Patients with short segment Barrett's oesophagus (SSBO) and cardia intestinal metaplasia (CIM) were followed prospectively.
RESULTS—177 patients with SSBO were identified (mean age 62 years, range 38-82; 91% whites). Twenty prevalence cases of dysplasia in SSBO were detected: 17 low grade dysplasia (LGD), three high grade dysplasia (HGD). Seventy six patients with CIM were identified (mean age 67 years, range 37-81; 81% whites). A single prevalence case of LGD in CIM was detected. During follow up of 78 SSBO and 34 CIM patients, dysplasia developed in nine (seven LGD, two HGD) with SSBO and in one (LGD) with CIM. There were significant differences between the two groups with respect to age, ethnicity, dysplasia prevalence, and incidence. Time to dysplasia progression was significantly longer in CIM compared with SSBO patients. Of the five patients with SSBO and HGD, one developed adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus on follow up. No HGD or cancers have been detected over this time period in CIM patients.
CONCLUSIONS—The dysplasia risk is significantly greater in SSBO than in CIM patients, indicating two potentially different clinical processes. Future studies should separate SSBO from CIM in order to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiology and malignant potential of each entity.


Keywords: high grade dysplasia; low grade dysplasia; metaplasia; Barrett's oesophagus; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease PMID:10601047

  13. Contemporary Concepts in the Young Adult Hip Patient: Periacetabular Osteotomy for Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Coobs, Benjamin R; Xiong, Ao; Clohisy, John C

    2015-07-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy, as originally described by Dr. Reinhold Ganz, is an effective treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in the pre-arthritic young adult hip. This technique has experienced several recent modifications in an attempt to optimize the clinical outcomes of these patients. We will review the clinical presentation of acetabular dysplasia, indications for surgery, contemporary refinements in technique and clinical results following periacetabular osteotomy. In well-selected patients, this reconstructive osteotomy should be considered safe and effective in alleviating pain and improving hip function. PMID:25865812

  14. Effectiveness of Fulkerson Osteotomy with Femoral Nerve Stimulation for Patients with Severe Femoral Trochlear Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Crebs, D.T.; Anthony, C.A.; McCunniff, P.T.; Nieto, M.J.; Beckert, M.W.; Albright, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with femoral trochlear dysplasia are at risk for chronic recurrent patellofemoral dislocations, with extreme cases often requiring a surgical procedure. Anteromedialization of the tibial tubercle with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent medial patella-femoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a previously reported method of maximizing patello-femoral congruency. We hypothesize the Fulkerson osteotomy with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent MPFL reconstruction in patients with severe trochlear dysplasia provides equivalent postoperative clinical outcomes to the same procedure in patients with low level trochlear dysplasia. Methods 48 knees underwent Fulkerson osteotomy with intraoperative femoral nerve stimulation and concurrent MPFL reconstruction for recurrent lateral patellar dislocations. MRI, surgeon intraoperative assessment, and X-ray were used to assess degrees of trochlear dysplasia; inter-observer and intra-observer error were measured. The knees positive for severe dysplasia on MRI, intraoperative assessment, and X-ray were considered as a comparison cohort to the rest of the study population. We considered postoperative dislocation events and patellar tracking kinematics as outcome measures. Independent student t tests and Fisher exact tests were used to evaluate differences between groups. Significance was set at P<0.05. Results 11 knees were positive for severe dysplasia (SD) by combined MRI, surgeon intraoperative assessment, and X-ray with the remaining 37 knees categorized as low dysplasia (LD). No patients in either group exhibited apprehension or required re-operation. Mean sulcus angle in the SD group was 175.8 +−2.45 degrees (95% CI 171.0–180.6); the LD group mean sulcus angle was 154.3 +− 0.98 degrees (95% CI 152.4–156.2) (P<.001). Postoperatively there was no significant difference in dislocation events between the SD group (0/11) and the LD group (2/37) (P>0.999). Patellar

  15. [Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Firinci, Binali; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives. PMID:26655713

  16. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Firinci, Binali; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives. PMID:26614152

  17. [Fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Desbois, A C; Koskas, F; Cacoub, P

    2015-04-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia is a segmentary, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disease that may result in stenosis, occlusion, aneurysms or dissection of medium arteries. Renal involvement is the most frequent location, described in 60-100% of patients. Renal stenosis can be asymptomatic or complicated with arterial hypertension or less frequently with renal insufficiency. Carotid and vertebral involvements are less frequent (10-35%). Surgical management of fibromuscular dysplasia is now less common because of the better efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Thus, histologic characteristics are no longer relevant prognostic criteria. Clinical features and outcome vary according to angiographic presentation (focal or multifocal disease), with an increased recovery rate of hypertension with focal lesions. In the presence of renal fibromuscular dysplasia, only symptomatic patients are revascularized (recent or resistant hypertension) or patients with asymmetric renal size or impaired renal function. Transluminal angioplasty is the first-line treatment except for patients with complex lesions or stenosis associated with aneurysm. PMID:25455952

  18. Cartilage Status at Time of Arthroscopy Predicts Failure in Patients With Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Maureen K; Lee, Jo-Ann; McCarthy, Joseph C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine whether chondral damage at the time of arthroscopy predicted conversion to THA in patients with dysplasia. We identified 166 patients with dysplasia who underwent hip arthroscopy. Forty-seven went on to receive THA. The articular cartilage of three regions of the acetabulum and femoral head were assessed for signs of chondral damage (absent, mild, or severe]). A stepwise multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed mild damage on the posterior femoral head (P=0.001) and severe damage on the anterior acetabulum (P=0.007) made a significant contribution to the predictor. The presence of mild posterior femoral head chondral changes was indicative of more global cartilage damage in this series of patients. Our findings show that chondral damage on the posterior femoral head and anterior acetabulum is a strong predictor of ultimate conversion to THA in dysplastic patients. PMID:26059500

  19. [Connective tissue dysplasia in patients with celiac desease as a problem of violation of adaptation reserve islands of the body].

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, E; Oreshko, L S; Soloveva, E A; Shabanova, A A; Zhuravleva, M S

    2015-01-01

    Clinically significant dysplasia of connective tissue in patients with celiac disease is often responsible for various visceral disorders. Different disturbances of motor and evacuation functions are often determined in this patients (gastroesophageal reflux, duodenogastral reflux, spastic and hyperkinetic dyskinesia). The clinical course of the celiac disease, associated with connective tissue dysplasia, is characterized by asthenovegetative syndrome, reduced tolerance to physical activity, general weakness, fatigue and emotional instability. These data should be considered in choosing a treatment. PMID:25993866

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Dysplasia in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease of the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Thomas; Odze, Robert; Farraye, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    To minimize the possibility of developing lethal colorectal cancer (CRC) in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s colitis, patients are usually enrolled in a program of dysplasia surveillance. The success of a surveillance program depends on the identification of patients with dysplasia and timely referral for colectomy. While a number of issues might stand in the way of a surveillance system achieving its maximal effect (less than ideal agreement in the interpretation of biopsy specimens, sampling error by endoscopists, delays in referral to surgery, and patient drop-out among others), circumstantial evidence supports the concept that colonoscopic dysplasia surveillance is an effective means of reducing CRC mortality and morbidity while minimizing the application of colectomy for cancer prevention. This review critically appraises key issues in the diagnosis and management of dysplasia in UC and Crohn’s disease as well as adjunct efforts to prevent CRC in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:18942763

  1. Full mouth rehabilitation of a young patient with partial expressions of ectodermal dysplasia: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Torbati, Arman; Kar, Kian; Aalam, Alexandre Amir; Takanashi, Kazunari; Chee, Winston W L

    2014-09-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is a hereditary disorder characterized by the abnormal development of specific tissues and structures of ectodermal origin. This clinical report describes the multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of a 24-year-old patient with partial expression of ED. The treatment plan used dental implants to support fixed prostheses and ceramic restorations to establish acceptable esthetics and provide function. PMID:24952881

  2. Application of MSI in MRI-negative focal cortical dysplasia patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jilin; Jia, Xiuchuan; Liu, Xi; Wu, Jie; Li, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is the most common cause of intractable epilepsy in children and adolescent. Purpose: To evaluate the application value of magnetic source imaging (MSI) in treatment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative FCD patients with epilepsy. Methods: MSI characteristics of 17 cases of MRI-negative focal cortical dysplasia patients with epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were treated by surgery. Results: In 17 patients, there were 3 cases of FCD Ia, 7 cases of FCDIb, 3 cases of FCDIIa and 4 cases of FCDIIb. FCD was located at temporal lobe in 8 cases, occipital lobe in 3 cases, frontal lobe in 2 cases and two lobes in 4 cases. In follow-up, 14 patients obtained satisfied curative effect. 1 patient was improved significantly and 2 patients were fine. The concordance between MSI and electrocorticogram in localizing epileptogenic foci was 65%. Conclusion: MSI is a new prospective noninvasive functional neuroimaging technique for identifying and delineating epileptogenic foci in MRI-negative FCD patients. PMID:26770448

  3. Osteogenic sarcoma and soft tissue myxoma in a patient with fibrous dysplasia and hemoglobins JBaltimore and S.

    PubMed

    Witkin, G B; Guilford, W B; Siegal, G P

    1986-03-01

    A 41-year-old man with recognized polyostotic fibrous dysplasia since late childhood developed fibroblastic osteogenic sarcoma in the left tibia. Four months after the initial diagnosis, an intramuscular myxoma was discovered in the left thigh. Twenty years previously he had been found to be heterozygous for hemoglobins JBaltimore and S. Malignant transformation in fibrous dysplasia is unusual and may be associated in some individuals with prior irradiation. Soft tissue myxomas associated with fibrous dysplasia are even rarer. To the best of the authors' knowledge the occurrence of both of these lesions in a patient with fibrous dysplasia has been reported only once before. Patients with both fibrous dysplasia and myxomas may be at greater risk for malignant transformation than are individuals with only one of these lesions. There is no well-recognized association between hemoglobinopathies and either fibrous dysplasia or bone tumors. It is therefore probable that the rare constellation of findings is in this patient a stochastic event. PMID:3456858

  4. Clinical outcomes of implant therapy in ectodermal dysplasia patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; He, J; Decker, A M; Hu, J C; Zou, D

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine the outcome of oral function reconstruction in ectodermal dysplasia (ED) patients who have received dental implant therapy. A search was made of the PubMed and Web of Science databases; key words used were "(ectodermal dysplasia) AND (implant OR implants)", with supplementary retrieval key words "dental implant", "zygomatic implant", "anodontia", and "edentulous". Patient age, use of bone graft, implant site, type of implant, and survival rate of the implants were included in the subsequent data analysis. Forty-five articles published between 1988 and October 2015 were included in this analysis. The cases of a total of 96 patients were retrieved (22 children and 74 adults); these patients received a total of 701 implants. Fourteen implants were removed during a median follow-up time of 24 months. The 24-month implant survival rate was 97.9% in adult subjects and 98.6% in children. Sixty-eight percent of adult patients underwent bone augmentation prior to implant placement. Based on this review, dental implants are commonly used in the oral reconstruction of ED patients. However, long-term data on bone augmentation and implant success are needed, as well as additional clinical evidence on bone resorption, the esthetic outcomes of implant therapy, and physiological considerations in ED patients. PMID:27052318

  5. Role of random biopsies in surveillance of dysplasia in ulcerative colitis patients with high risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bopanna, Sawan; Roy, Maitreyee; Das, Prasenjit; Dattagupta, S; Sreenivas, V; Mouli, V Pratap; Kedia, Saurabh; Dhingra, Rajan; Pradhan, Rajesh; Kumar, N Suraj; Yadav, Dawesh P; Makharia, Govind

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Recent data suggest that the incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) related colorectal cancer (CRC) in India is similar to that of West. The optimum method for surveillance is still a debate. Surveillance with random biopsies has been the standard of care, but is a tedious process. We therefore undertook this study to assess the yield of random biopsy in dysplasia surveillance. Methods Between March 2014 and July 2015, patients of UC attending the Inflammatory Bowel Disease clinic at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences with high risk factors for CRC like duration of disease >15 years and pancolitis, family history of CRC, primary sclerosing cholangitis underwent surveillance colonoscopy for dysplasia. Four quadrant random biopsies at 10 cm intervals were taken (33 biopsies). Two pathologists examined specimens for dysplasia, and the yield of dysplasia was calculated. Results Twenty-eight patients were included. Twenty-six of these had pancolitis with a duration of disease greater than 15 years, and two patients had associated primary sclerosing cholangis. No patient had a family history of CRC. The mean age at onset of disease was 28.89±8.73 years and the duration of disease was 19.00±8.78 years. Eighteen patients (64.28%) were males. A total of 924 biopsies were taken. None of the biopsies revealed any evidence of dysplasia, and 7/924 (0.7%) were indefinite for dysplasia. Conclusions Random biopsy for surveillance in longstanding extensive colitis has a low yield for dysplasia and does not suffice for screening. Newer techniques such as chromoendoscopy-guided biopsies need greater adoption. PMID:27433149

  6. Relationship between angiogenic squamous dysplasia and bronchogenic carcinoma in patients undergoing white light bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Mohammadi, Forouzan; Khodadad, Kian; Sadr, Makan; Seyfollahi, Leila; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To better understand the characteristic morphology of angiogenic squamous dysplasia (ASD) and its association with different types of common bronchogenic carcinomas using routine white light bronchoscopy. METHODS: Using a case-control design, 186 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks of bronchial tissue (136 cases, 50 controls) obtained from patients who underwent routine nonfluorescence bronchoscopy between 2004 and 2005 were studied. RESULTS: ASD occurred at a higher frequency in patients with neoplastic lesions compared with those without neoplastic lesions (28 of 136 versus one of 50). ASD was also more prevalent in patients with squamous cell carcinoma compared with other neoplasms. Seventy six per cent of the ASD patients (22 of 29) smoked cigarettes. The morphology of ASD on hematoxylin and eosin- and CD31-stained sections was characterized by prominent microvasculature and capillary projections closely juxtaposed to variable degrees of dysplasia in all of the bronchogenic carcinoma specimens, and to metaplasia in one case in the control group. CONCLUSION: ASD is a unique morphological entity that should be considered by pathologists even on bronchoscopic biopsies from patients who undergo white light bronchoscopy. The presence of ASD may represent a risk biomarker of bronchogenic carcinoma in screening programs and in chemoprevention of lung cancer. PMID:22679613

  7. Upper tract juvenile polyps in juvenile polyposis patients: dysplasia and malignancy are associated with foveolar, intestinal, and pyloric differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changqing; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    Patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS), a hereditary autosomal dominant hamartomatous polyposis syndrome, are at increased risk for colorectal adenocarcinoma. The upper gastrointestinal tract is less often involved by JPS than the colorectum, and, consequently, upper tract juvenile polyps (JPs) are not well studied. We reviewed upper endoscopies and corresponding biopsies in JPS patients documented in our Polyposis Registry. A total of 199 upper gastrointestinal biopsies from 69 endoscopies were available in 22 of 41 (54%) JPS patients. Thirteen of the 22 patients (59%) had ≥1 gastric JP; 5 also had 6 small bowel JPs. Gastric JP was identified as early as age 7 in a patient with an SMAD4 gene mutation. Two patients (9%) had high-grade dysplasia in gastric JP. Invasive adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the gastrectomy specimen of 1 patient. Five patients had a huge gastric polyp burden; 3 underwent total gastrectomy. Three patients died of complications associated with extensive upper JP. Histologically, 8 of the 56 (14%) gastric JPs identified had dysplasia. All of the 8 polyps demonstrated intestinalized and pyloric gland differentiation intermixed with foveolar epithelium. Dysplasia was seen arising in all 3 types of epithelium. The flat gastric mucosa in 11 patients was unremarkable without inflammation or intestinal metaplasia. The 6 small bowel JPs had no dysplasia. Our findings suggest that JPS patients are at increased risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. Detection of malignancy in syndromic gastric JP indicates that the current screening procedures are insufficient in removal of precursor lesions to prevent progression to carcinoma. PMID:25390638

  8. The expanding spectrum of COL2A1 gene variants IN 136 patients with a skeletal dysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barat-Houari, Mouna; Dumont, Bruno; Fabre, Aurélie; Them, Frédéric Tm; Alembik, Yves; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Amiel, Jeanne; Audebert, Séverine; Baumann-Morel, Clarisse; Blanchet, Patricia; Bieth, Eric; Brechard, Marie; Busa, Tiffany; Calvas, Patrick; Capri, Yline; Cartault, François; Chassaing, Nicolas; Ciorca, Vidrica; Coubes, Christine; David, Albert; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; El Chehadeh, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Giuliano, Fabienne; Goldenberg, Alice; Isidor, Bertrand; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Julia, Sophie; Kaplan, Josseline; Lacombe, Didier; Lebrun, Marine; Marlin, Sandrine; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Martinovic, Jelena; Masurel, Alice; Melki, Judith; Mozelle-Nivoix, Monique; Nguyen, Karine; Odent, Sylvie; Philip, Nicole; Pinson, Lucile; Plessis, Ghislaine; Quélin, Chloé; Shaeffer, Elise; Sigaudy, Sabine; Thauvin, Christel; Till, Marianne; Touraine, Renaud; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Geneviève, David; Touitou, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous COL2A1 variants cause a wide spectrum of skeletal dysplasia termed type II collagenopathies. We assessed the impact of this gene in our French series. A decision tree was applied to select 136 probands (71 Stickler cases, 21 Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita cases, 11 Kniest dysplasia cases, and 34 other dysplasia cases) before molecular diagnosis by Sanger sequencing. We identified 66 different variants among the 71 positive patients. Among those patients, 18 belonged to multiplex families and 53 were sporadic. Most variants (38/44, 86%) were located in the triple helical domain of the collagen chain and glycine substitutions were mainly observed in severe phenotypes, whereas arginine to cysteine changes were more often encountered in moderate phenotypes. This series of skeletal dysplasia is one of the largest reported so far, adding 44 novel variants (15%) to published data. We have confirmed that about half of our Stickler patients (46%) carried a COL2A1 variant, and that the molecular spectrum was different across the phenotypes. To further address the question of genotype-phenotype correlation, we plan to screen our patients for other candidate genes using a targeted next-generation sequencing approach. PMID:26626311

  9. BK virus encephalopathy and sclerosing vasculopathy in a patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Darbinyan, Armine; Major, Eugene O; Morgello, Susan; Holland, Steven; Ryschkewitsch, Caroline; Monaco, Maria Chiara; Naidich, Thomas P; Bederson, Joshua; Malaczynska, Joanna; Ye, Fei; Gordon, Ronald; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Fowkes, Mary; Tsankova, Nadejda M

    2016-01-01

    Human BK polyomavirus (BKV) is reactivated under conditions of immunosuppression leading most commonly to nephropathy or cystitis; its tropism for the brain is rare and poorly understood. We present a unique case of BKV-associated encephalopathy in a man with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and immunodeficiency (HED-ID) due to IKK-gamma (NEMO) mutation, who developed progressive neurological symptoms. Brain biopsy demonstrated polyomavirus infection of gray and white matter, with predominant involvement of cortex and distinct neuronal tropism, in addition to limited demyelination and oligodendroglial inclusions. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated polyoma T-antigen in neurons and glia, but expression of VP1 capsid protein only in glia. PCR analysis on both brain biopsy tissue and cerebrospinal fluid detected high levels of BKV DNA. Sequencing studies further identified novel BKV variant and disclosed unique rearrangements in the noncoding control region of the viral DNA (BKVN NCCR). Neuropathological analysis also demonstrated an unusual form of obliterative fibrosing vasculopathy in the subcortical white matter with abnormal lysosomal accumulations, possibly related to the patient's underlying ectodermal dysplasia. Our report provides the first neuropathological description of HED-ID due to NEMO mutation, and expands the diversity of neurological presentations of BKV infection in brain, underscoring the importance of its consideration in immunodeficient patients with unexplained encephalopathy. We also document novel BKVN NCCR rearrangements that may be associated with the unique neuronal tropism in this patient. PMID:27411570

  10. Are cam and pincer deformities as common as dysplasia in Japanese patients with hip pain?

    PubMed

    Mori, R; Yasunaga, Y; Yamasaki, T; Nakashiro, J; Fujii, J; Terayama, H; Ohshima, S; Ochi, M

    2014-02-01

    In Japan, osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip secondary to acetabular dysplasia is very common, and there are few data concerning the pathogeneses and incidence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). We have attempted to clarify the radiological prevalence of painful FAI in a cohort of Japanese patients and to investigate the radiological findings. We identified 176 symptomatic patients (202 hips) with Tönnis grade 0 or 1 osteoarthritis, whom we prospectively studied between August 2011 and July 2012. There were 61 men (65 hips) and 115 women (137 hips) with a mean age of 51.8 years (11 to 83). Radiological analyses included the α-angle, centre-edge angle, cross-over sign, pistol grip deformity and femoral head neck ratio. Of the 202 hips, 79 (39.1%) had acetabular dysplasia, while 80 hips (39.6%) had no known aetiology. We found evidence of FAI in 60 hips (29.7%). Radiological FAI findings associated with cam deformity were the most common. There was a significant relationship between the pistol grip deformity and both the α-angle (p < 0.001) and femoral head-neck ratio (p = 0.024). Radiological evidence of symptomatic FAI was not uncommon in these Japanese patients. PMID:24493180

  11. Esophagectomy for failed endoscopic therapy in patients with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hunt, B M; Louie, B E; Dunst, C M; Lipham, J C; Farivar, A S; Sharata, A; Aye, R W

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy (ablation +/- endoscopic resection) for high-grade dysplasia and/or intramucosal carcinoma (IMC) of the esophagus has demonstrated promising results. However, there is a concern that a curable, local disease may progress to systemic disease with repeated endotherapy. We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent esophagectomy after endotherapy at three tertiary care esophageal centers from 2006 to 2012. Our objective was to document the clinical and pathologic outcomes of patients who undergo esophagectomy after failed endotherapy. Fifteen patients underwent esophagectomy after a mean of 13 months and 4.1 sessions of endotherapy for progression of disease (53%), failure to clear disease (33%), or recurrence (13%). Initially, all had Barrett's, 73% had ≥3-cm segments, 93% had a nodule or ulcer, and 91% had multifocal disease upon presentation. High-grade dysplasia was present at index endoscopy in 80% and IMC in 33%, and some patients had both. Final pathology at esophagectomy was T0 (13%), T1a (60%), T1b (20%), and T2 (7%). Positive lymph nodes were found in 20%: one patient was T2N1 and two were T1bN1. Patients with T1b, T2, or N1 disease had more IMC on index endoscopy (75% vs. 18%) and more endotherapy sessions (median 6.5 vs. 3). There have been no recurrences a mean of 20 months after esophagectomy. Clinical outcomes were comparable to other series, but submucosal invasion (27%) and node-positive disease (20%) were encountered in some patients who initially presented with a locally curable disease and eventually required esophagectomy after failed endotherapy. An initial pathology of IMC or failure to clear disease after three treatments should raise concern for loco-regional progression and prompt earlier consideration of esophagectomy. PMID:23795720

  12. Translocation and deletion around SOX9 in a patient with acampomelic campomelic dysplasia and sex reversal.

    PubMed

    Jakubiczka, S; Schröder, C; Ullmann, R; Volleth, M; Ledig, S; Gilberg, E; Kroisel, P; Wieacker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (MIM 114290) is a severe malformation syndrome frequently accompanied by male-to-female sex reversal. Causative are mutations within the SOX9 gene on 17q24.3 as well as chromosomal aberrations (translocations, inversions or deletions) in the vicinity of SOX9. Here, we report on a patient with muscular hypotonia, craniofacial dysmorphism, cleft palate, brachydactyly, malformations of thoracic spine, and gonadal dysgenesis with female external genitalia and müllerian duct derivatives in the presence of a male karyotype. X-ray examination and clinical examinations revealed no signs of campomelia. The combination of molecular cytogenetic analysis and array CGH revealed an unbalanced translocation between one chromosome 7 and one chromosome 17 [46,XY,t(7;17)(q33;q24).ish t(7;17)(wcp7+,wcp17+;wcp7+wcp17+)] with a deletion of approximately 4.2 Mb located about 0.5 Mb upstream of SOX9. STS analysis confirmed the deletion of chromosome 17, which has occurred de novo on the paternal chromosome. The proximal breakpoint on chromosome 17 is localized outside the known breakpoint cluster regions. The deletion on chromosome 17q24 removes several genes. Among these genes PRKAR1A is deleted. Inactivating mutations of PRKAR1A cause Carney complex. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with acampomelic campomelic dysplasia, carrying both a deletion and a translocation. PMID:20453475

  13. Novel diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for surveillance of dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Iacucci, M; Uraoka, T; Gasia, M Fort; Yahagi, N

    2014-01-01

    The risk for developing dysplasia and colorectal cancer in patients with longstanding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involving the colon is well documented. Random biopsies during white-light, standard-definition colonoscopy (33 to 50 biopsies) with or without dye spraying chromoendoscopy has been the recommended strategy in North America to detect dysplastic lesions in IBD. However, there are several limitations to this approach including poor physician adherence, poor sensitivity, increased procedure time and considerable cost. The new generation of high-definition endoscopes with electronic filter technology provide an opportunity to visualize colonic mucosal and vascular patterns in minute detail, and to identify subtle flat, multifocal, polypoid and pseudopolypoid neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions. The application of these new technologies in IBD is slowly being adopted in clinical practice. In addition, the advent of confocal laser endomicroscopy provides an opportunity to explore real-time histology, thus redefining the understanding and characterization of the lesions in IBD. There is emerging evidence that serrated adenomas are also associated with longstanding IBD colitis and may be recognized as another important contributing factor to colorectal cancer development. The circumscribed neoplastic lesions can be treated using endoscopic therapeutic management such as mucosal resection or, especially, endoscopic submucosal dissection. This may replace panproctocolectomy in selected patients. The authors review the potential of these techniques to transform endoscopic diagnosis and therapeutic management of dysplasia in IBD. PMID:25157526

  14. Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL): neuroradiological findings in three patients and a new association with fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Luciana Nogueira; Fariello, Giuseppe; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Aiello, Costanza; Menchini, Laura; Devito, Rita; Zama, Mario; Claps, Dianella; Vigevano, Federico; Longo, Daniela

    2011-07-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by involvement of tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin such as skin, eye, adipose tissue, and brain. Since 1970, when Haberland and Perou had described the first patient, 54 cases of ECCL have been reported in literature. We report on three new boys with ECCL. In addition to their typical dermal, ocular and central nervous system anomalies, one of them had a spheno-ethmoidal osseous lesion. Histopathological evaluation confirmed the benign nature of the lesion and was consistent with fibrous dysplasia. The aim of our study is to review clinical records and brain imaging studies of these three new patients with ECCL and compare these findings with those reported in literature to better define the phenotypic spectrum and radiological findings in ECCL. PMID:21626669

  15. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  16. [Compression of a nasotracheal tube in the nasal cavity of a patient with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Tatsushige; Uehara, Keiji; Shiba, Mayuka; Koga, Yoshihisa

    2008-06-01

    A 42-year-old woman with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia underwent osteoplasty of maxillary and mandibular bone. Preoperative CT images showed osteosclerosis and ground glass appearance of the right side of the skull including the orbit, temporal bone, paranasal sinus, and maxillary and mandibular bones, as well as hypertrophy of the nasal septum. Inhalation anesthesia was induced and 8.0-mmID polyvinyl chloride endotracheal tube was inserted via the left nostril with slight resistance. At emergence, a 10-Fr suction catheter could not be passed throgh the tube but an 8-Fr nasogastric tube could be passed. A part of the tube positioned in the nasal cavity was apparently compressed. Preoperative examination of the nasal cavity and nasal septum using CT or MRI may be desirable for nasotracheal intubation in the patients with craniofacial tumor, and the application of a spiral reinforced endotracheal tube may contribute to prevent such cases of airway obstruction in the nasal cavity. PMID:18546906

  17. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kim, Helen J.; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W.; Stevenson, David A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  18. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical dysplasia is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are many types of HPV. Some types lead to cervical dysplasia or cancer. ...

  19. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... following early in life: blood-filtering treatments called dialysis a kidney transplant Children with dysplasia in only ... mild dysplasia of both kidneys may not need dialysis or a kidney transplant for several years. Kidney ...

  20. [Nonarthroplasty methods for developmental dysplasia of the hip with complete dislocation at the age of 8-25 patients].

    PubMed

    Zang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    It is a tough challenge treatment of complete dislocation from developmental dysplasia of the hip at the age of 8-25 patients. Although the procedure of total hip arthroplasty (THA) can improve joint function significantly, the failure rate still remains high. Hip arthrodesis remains a sensible and safe option. A stable and painless hip joint can be obtained without multiple operations. Ganz et al.had described a modified Colonna capsular arthroplasty and surgical hip dislocation with well joint functions, radiographic findings and the less complications of the femoral head osteonecrosis. There is a obvious advantage in postponing THA, and subsequent THA could be technically easier and safer in a dislocated hip. The procedure of pelvic support osteotomy, which is proposed by Ilizarov, combined two steps of femur osteotomy and femur lengthening, provides an effective treatment option for adolescent hip dysplasia or dislocation. By this procedure, the hip could be reserved, the limb length recovered and the gait improved significantly. Resection arthroplasty is a reliable method, by which 90% dysplasia patients received a painless joint and good functional outcomes. In view of certain drawbacks, it is used only as a salvage operation currently. This article reviews some alternative nonarthroplasty methods for developmental dysplasia of the hip with complete dislocation. Good clinical results can be obtained through strict indications and nice surgical skills. PMID:26359064

  1. Novel IFT122 mutations in three Argentinian patients with cranioectodermal dysplasia: Expanding the mutational spectrum.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Shahida; Obregon, Maria Gabriela; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Fano, Virginia; Wollnik, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Cranioectodermal dysplasia (CED), also known as Sensenbrenner syndrome, is an autosomal recessive ciliary chondrodysplasia characterized by a recognizable craniofacial gestalt, skeletal abnormalities, and ectodermal features. To date, four genes have been shown to underlie the syndrome, namely, IFT122 (WDR10), WDR35 (IFT121), IFT43 (C14orf179), and WDR19 (IFT144). Clinical characterization of a larger cohort of patients with CED has been undertaken previously. Nevertheless, there are too few molecularly confirmed patients reported in the literature to determine precise genotype-phenotype correlations. To date, biallelic IFT122 mutations have been described in only five families. We therefore studied three unrelated Argentinian patients with typical features of CED using a 4813 next-generation sequencing (NGS) gene panel, which we call the "Mendeliome." The three patients had different, novel, compound heterozygous mutations in IFT122. Consequently, we compared these three patients to those previously described with IFT122 mutations. Thus, our report serves to add 6 novel mutations to the IFT122 mutation spectrum and to contribute to the IFT122-related clinical characterization. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26792575

  2. CT and MR Imaging in a Large Series of Patients with Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Mehmet Haydar; Salk, Ismail; Savas, Recep; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Egilmez, Hulusi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background In this retrospective review of patients with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia (FD), the clinical and radiological findings of CT and MR scan were analyzed. Material/Methods The study material included 32 patients, at 9 to 68 years of age that were directed for differential diagnostics of several disorders in the head. We recorded CT and MRI data related to the lesion number, location, sidedness, appearance, and sex of the cases with craniofacial FD. Results Of 32 patients involved in this study, 17 had monostotic and 15 had polyostotic involvement pattern. Bones most commonly involved by monostotic involvement in females were, in descending order, mandibular, maxillary, and sphenoid bones, while the sphenoid bone was involved the most in males. Leontiasis ossea was observed in 2 patients. Sclerotic and mixed lesion types were more common in both females and males. In T1- and T2-weighted MRI sequences, hypointensity was more common compared to hyperintensity or heterogeneous intensity. The type of enhancement of lesions was found similar after contrast medium administration. Conclusions In the presence of craniofacial FD during CT or MRI imaging of the head, a detailed description of FD lesions may provide an important clinical benefit by increasing radiological experience during the diagnostics of this rare disorder. PMID:26000068

  3. Shielding during x-ray examination of pediatric female patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Shan; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chuang, Ming-Tsung; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Lai, Cheng-Shih; Tsai, Hong-Ming; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Lu, Chia-Hsing

    2014-12-01

    Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) generally undergo multiple x-ray examinations of both hip joints. During these examinations, the gonads are completely exposed to radiation, unless shielded. Although many types and sizes of gonad shields exist, they often do not provide adequate protection because of size and placement issues; additionally, these shields are frequently omitted for female patients. Our aim was to assess gonad protection during x-ray examination that is provided by gonad shields designed for individual female patients with DDH.We retrospectively retrieved data from the Picture Archiving and Communication System database; pelvic plain x-ray films from 766 females, 18 years old or younger, were included in our analysis. Based on x-ray measurements of the anterior superior iliac spine, we developed a system of gonad shield design that depended on the distance between anterior superior iliac spine markers. We custom-made shields and then examined shielding rates and shielding accuracy before and after these new shields became available. Standard (general-purpose) shields were used before our custom design project was implemented. The shielding rate and shielding accuracy were, respectively, 14.5% and 8.4% before the project was implemented and 72.7% and 32.2% after it was implemented. A shield that is more anatomically correct and available in several different sizes may increase the likelihood of gonad protection during pelvic x-ray examinations. PMID:25325378

  4. Expression of TRPC6 and BDNF in Cortical Lesions From Patients With Focal Cortical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Da-Hai; Guo, Wei; Sun, Fei-Ji; Xu, Guang-Zhen; Zang, Zhen-Le; Shu, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) likely results from abnormal migration of neural progenitor cells originating from the subventricular zone. To elucidate the roles in molecules that are involved in neural migration pathway abnormalities in FCDs, we investigated the expression patterns of transient receptor potential canonical channel 6 (TRPC6) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in cortical lesions from FCD patients and in samples of normal control cortex. TRPC6 and BDNF mRNA and protein levels were increased in FCD lesions. By immunohistochemistry, they were strongly expressed in microcolumns, heterotopic neurons, dysmorphic neurons, and balloon cells (BCs). Colocalization assays revealed that most of the misshapen TRPC6-positive or heterotopic cells had a neuronal lineage with the exception of TRPC6-positive FCDiib patient BCs, which had both neuronal and glial features. Most TRPC6-positive cells were glutamatergic neurons. There was also greater expression of calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV), the downstream factor of TRPC6, in FCD lesions, suggesting that TRPC6 expression promoted dendritic growth and the development of dendritic spines and excitatory synapses via the CaMKIV-CREB pathway in FCD. Thus, overexpression of BDNF and TRPC6 and activation of the TRPC6 signal transduction pathway in cortical lesions of FCD patients may contribute to FC pathogenesis and epileptogenesis. PMID:27288906

  5. Anetoderma in a patient with terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects.

    PubMed

    Connor, Cody J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Ciliberto, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects (TODPD) is a rare, X-linked syndrome classically characterized by distal limb anomalies, pigmented skin defects of the face, and recurrent digital fibromas. X-inactivation plays a major role in determining the range of phenotypic expression. Thus, patients can demonstrate a wide spectrum of disease severity, making accurate diagnosis more challenging. Recent studies have identified a FLNA c.5217G>A mutation as the cause of TODPD, allowing for diagnostic genetic testing. We present a case of molecularly confirmed TODPD in a girl with the 47,XXX chromosomal complement and deformities of the hands and feet, craniofacial abnormalities, and discolored, linear facial lesions. Skin biopsy of the patient's facial lesion revealed absent papillary dermal elastic fibers, consistent with anetoderma, which contrasts with the dermal hypoplasia described in the only other such facial biopsy reported in the literature. The finding of absent elastic fibers in the skin lesions suggests that mutated filamin A, in part, exerts its effects through dysregulated elastin biology, which may explain the nature of many connective tissue pleotropic effects in FLNA-related disorders. PMID:26059211

  6. A patient with Mullerian abnormalities, renal dysplasia, cervical spine fusion, cataracts and intellectual disability: MURCS-plus?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tiong Yang; Whitelaw, Charlotte; Savarirayan, Ravi

    2007-10-01

    We report a 15-year-old girl with features of the MURCS (Mullerian abnormalities, renal agenesis/ectopy and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association and birth defects not typically associated with MURCS. In addition to seizures and intellectual disability, she has cortical brain heterotopia, bilateral subclinical cataracts, submucous cleft palate and patent ductus arteriosus. We propose that this patient represents a more severe form of MURCS, or 'MURCS-plus', which may represent a defect of or insult to mesodermal morphogenesis. PMID:17786121

  7. A novel SMARCAL1 missense mutation that affects splicing in a severely affected Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Belinchón, Alberta; Fernández-Camblor, Carlota; Valenciano-Fuente, Blanca; Lapunzina, Pablo; Heath, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal failure and immunodeficiency. In this work, we report the molecular studies undertaken in a severely affected SIOD patient that died at six years old due to nephropathy. The patient was screened for mutations using a targeted skeletal dysplasias panel. A homozygous novel missense mutation was identified, c.1615C > G (p.[Leu539Val]) that was predicted as mildly pathogenic by in silico pathogenicity prediction tools. However, splicing prediction software suggested that this variant may create a new splicing donor site in exon 9, which was subsequently confirmed using a minigene assay in HEK293 cells. Thus, the splicing alteration, c.1615C > G; r.1615c > g, 1615_1644del; (p.[Leu539_Ile548del]), results in the loss of 10 amino acids of the HARP-ATPase catalytic domain and the RPA-binding domain. Several studies have demonstrated a weak genotype-phenotype correlation among such patients. Thus, the molecular characterization has helped us to understand why a predicted weakly pathogenic missense mutation results in severe SIOD and should be considered in similar scenarios. PMID:27282802

  8. Cervical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix is preceded by a series of premalignant changes described as mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. These premalignant states are identified by cervical cytology, diagnosed by colposcopy and if effectively treated, can prevent invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix. Because of the apparent biological variation of the premalignant states, even the most aggressive cervical screening program cannot be expected to eliminate all invasive squamous cancer of the cervix. Optimal results of a cervical screening program will be achieved when all women under 35 years of age and sexually active have an annual cytological smear; the cytology is screened by a laboratory with high quality control; the patient's positive cytology is accurately assessed by an experienced colposcopist, and the premalignant lesion is effectively treated. PMID:21283455

  9. Computer-Assisted Rotational Acetabular Osteotomy for Patients with Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) is a well-established surgical procedure for patients with acetabular dysplasia, and excellent long-term results have been reported. However, RAO is technically demanding and precise execution of this procedure requires experience with this surgery. The usefulness of computer navigation in RAO includes its ability to perform three-dimensional (3D) preoperative planning, enable safe osteotomy even with a poor visual field, reduce exposure to radiation from intraoperative fluoroscopy, and display the tip position of the chisel in real time, which is educationally useful as it allows staff other than the operator to follow the progress of the surgery. In our results comparing 23 hips that underwent RAO with navigation and 23 hips operated on without navigation, no significant difference in radiological assessment was observed. However, no perioperative complications were observed in the navigation group whereas one case of transient femoral nerve palsy was observed in non-navigation group. A more accurate and safer RAO can be performed using 3D preoperative planning and intraoperative assistance with a computed tomography-based navigation system. PMID:26929806

  10. A patient with focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia in the distal femur and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Hatori, Masahito; Hosaka, Masami; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Kita, Atsushi; Ochiai, Tatsuhiro; Itoi, Eiji

    2008-08-01

    Focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia (FFCD) is a rare and benign bone lesion that induces bowing deformity of the long bones in young children. Excessive production of fibrocartilage by abnormal differentiation in the metaphysis or by trauma during delivery or after birth is thought to cause growth disturbance. Radiologically, the lesion is characterized by a lucent defect with marginal sclerosis in the medial metaphysis of the long bone. However, there have been few reports about the initial radiological changes of FFCD before bowing started. We report a patient with FFCD in the left distal femur in whom the radiological changes were serially observed during the course of the disorder. A 2-week-old boy first visited our hospital because of left thigh pain. Plain radiographs did not show any abnormal findings at that time. At 10 weeks, a well-defined lucent defect with bony fragment inside was observed in the distal femoral medial cortex. At 1 year, this bony fragment gradually vanished but varus deformity progressed and reached approximately 40 degrees at the age of 2. After removal of the lesion, osteotomy and immobilization was performed with Ilizarov external fixator comprising rings, rods and wires. Complete bone union was achieved 3 months after operation. It is noteworthy that we could observe the initial radiological changes of FFCD before varus deformity occurred. As far as we know, there have been no descriptions of the bony fragment inside a lucent defect of the lesion. Radiological features may vary in the early phase of FFCD. PMID:18679004

  11. Fibrofatty Changes: Incidence at Cardiac MR Imaging in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, Neda; Te Riele, Anneline S J M; James, Cynthia A; Bhonsale, Aditya; Murray, Brittney; Tichnell, Crystal; Calkins, Hugh; Tandri, Harikrishna; Bluemke, David A; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence of ventricular fatty replacement and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) at cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular (RV) dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) and the relationship of these findings to disease severity. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study. All subjects provided written informed consent. Seventy-six patients with ARVD/C were enrolled from 2002 to 2012. Quantitative and qualitative cardiac MR imaging analyses of the RV and the left ventricle (LV) were performed to determine cardiac MR imaging-specific Task Force Criteria (TFC) and non-TFC features (ARVD/C-type pattern of fatty infiltration and/or nonischemic pattern LGE). Patients were separated into four groups on the basis of cardiac MR imaging TFC: (a) patients with major cardiac MR imaging criteria, (b) patients with minor criteria, (c) patients with partial criteria, and (d) patients with no criterion. Continuous variables were compared by using the independent Student t test and analysis of variance. Categoric variables were compared by using the Fisher exact test. Results Of 76 patients (mean age, 34.2 years ± 14 [standard deviation]; 51.3% men), 42 met major cardiac MR imaging criteria, seven met minor criteria, seven met partial criteria, and 20 met no criterion. Most probands (36 [80.0%] of 45) met major or minor cardiac MR imaging criteria. Only 13 (41.9%) of 31 family members met any cardiac MR imaging criterion. The most common non-TFC MR imaging features were RV fatty infiltration (28.9%) and LV LGE (35.5%). Non-TFC cardiac MR imaging features were seen in 88.1% of subjects with major criteria, in 28.6% of those with minor criteria, in 71.4% of those with partial criteria, and in 10.0% of those with no criteria. Conclusion In this large cohort of patients with ARVD/C, non-TFC findings of ventricular fatty infiltration and LGE were frequent

  12. Prosthodontic Management of Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia with Anodontia: A Case Report in Pediatric Patient and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ladda, R; Gangadhar, SA; Kasat, VO; Bhandari, AJ

    2013-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias are rare hereditary disorders characterized by abnormal development of certain tissues and structures of ectodermal origin. The condition is important for dentists as it affects teeth resulting in hypodontia or anodontia and dentist plays an important role in rehabilitation of the patient. Affected young children with anodontia not only have difficulties in eating and speaking but can also feel that they look different from their contemporaries. Well-fitting and functioning prosthesis could be a great help during their schooling years as it will improve appearance and thus boost their self confidence. We report a case of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in an 8-year-old boy who exhibited anodontia and was successfully rehabilitated with conventional complete dentures in both maxillary and mandibular arches. The aim of the treatment was to improve psychological development apart from promoting better functioning of the stomatognathic system. PMID:23919206

  13. Full mouth implant rehabilitation of a patient with ectodermal dysplasia after orthognathic surgery, sinus and ridge augmentation: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Mohammad; Khobyari, Mohammad Mohsen; Dalband, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    An 18-year-old male presented severe hypodontia due to hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia was treated with Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy with simultaneous sinus floor augmentation using the mixture of cortical autogenous bone graft harvested from iliac crest and organic Bio-Oss to position the maxilla in a right occlusal plane with respect to the mandible, and to construct adequate bone volume at posterior maxilla allowing proper implant placement. Due to the poor bone quality at other sites, ridge augmentation with onlay graft was done to construct adequate bone volume allowing proper implant placement, using tissue harvested from the iliac bone. Seven implants were placed in the maxilla and 7 implants were inserted in the mandible and screw-retained metal ceramic FPDs were fabricated. The two year follow up data showed that dental implants should be considered as a good treatment modality for patients with ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:21814619

  14. Less invasive modified Spitzy shelf procedure for patients with dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Okanoue, Yusuke; Kawakami, Teruhiko; Izumi, Masashi; Aso, Koji; Sugimura, Natsuki; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    The shelf procedure for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a simpler technique compared with periarticular acetabular osteotomies. However, the most commonly used approach involves the exposure of a large section of the outer iliac surface via a long skin incision and is relatively invasive. We have developed a mini one-incision technique for shelf procedure using bioabsorbable material, based on a modified Spitzy method. In the present report, we describe this procedure and outcomes. For the procedure, the patients are positioned in the lateral position and a 6-8-cm skin incision is made. The interval between the gluteus medius and the tensor fascia lata is developed without any muscle splitting. Thereafter, image intensification is used for accurate positioning of a slot for the new shelf, and a bone graft for the new shelf is obtained from the internal cortex of the iliac wing. The patient is then positioned with the hip in flexion; through the same sliding skin incision, the bone graft is impacted into the slot, and bioabsorbable screws or plates are implanted to cover and stabilise the new shelf. Cancellous bone chips are packed into the triangular space surrounded by the outer iliac surface, the new shelf, and the bioabsorbable screws or plate. We performed this procedure in 9 patients (12 hips). No progression of osteoarthritis was observed during the follow-up period (mean 28 months). The advantages of this procedure include the small, single, skin incision and minimal removal of the gluteus medius from the outer iliac surface. Based on our results, we believe that this procedure could be effective for the treatment of DDH. PMID:25205470

  15. Malignant transformation in monostotic fibrous dysplasia: clinical features, imaging features, outcomes in 10 patients, and review.

    PubMed

    Qu, Nan; Yao, Weiwu; Cui, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Huizhen

    2015-01-01

    Malignant transformation in fibrous dysplasia (FD) is uncommon. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and imaging features, and outcomes of malignant transformation in monostotic FD.Data for 10 pathologically confirmed malignant transformations in monostotic FD from January 2005 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient data were recorded, and radiographs (n = 10), computed tomography (CT) (n = 5), magnetic resonance (MR) (n = 4), and bone scintigrams (n = 10) were evaluated for lesion location, margin, cortical destruction, marrow involvement, periosteal reaction, and soft tissue mass by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists with agreement by consensus. Clinical features, management, and prognosis were also analyzed for each of the 10 cases.There were 8 male and 2 female patients (mean age 46.5 ± 15.9 years). The affected sites were the femur (n = 4), humerus (n = 2), tibia (n = 3), and ilium (n = 1). Five cases had received previous surgery and 5 cases had no history of surgery. No patients had been given prior irradiation treatment. For the 5 cases with surgery, radiographs and CT showed purely osteolytic lesions with poor margination in the curettage area (n = 5), cortical destruction (n = 5), obvious soft tissue mass (n = 1), and mineralization (n = 2). For the 5 cases without surgery, radiographs and CT identified poorly marginated, osteolytic lesions within or near the area with "ground-glass" opacity (n = 4), cortical erosion (n = 4), and mineralization (n = 2). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also identified lesions with heterogeneous signal intensity and pronounced enhancement. Bone scintigraphy revealed eccentric increased uptake of radionuclide in monostotic lesion (n = 10). Pathology reports revealed osteosarcoma (n = 7), fibrosarcoma (n = 2), and malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) (n = 1). At the end of the study, 1 patient died from tumors, 1

  16. Surveillance colonoscopy for colitis-associated dysplasia and cancer in ulcerative colitis patients.

    PubMed

    Hata, Keisuke; Kishikawa, Junko; Anzai, Hiroyuki; Shinagawa, Takahide; Kazama, Shinsuke; Ishii, Hiroaki; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    Long-standing ulcerative colitis patients are known to be at high risk for the development of colorectal cancer. Therefore, surveillance colonoscopy has been recommended for these patients. Because colitis-associated colorectal cancer may be difficult to identify even by colonoscopy, a random biopsy method has been recommended. However, the procedure of carrying out a random biopsy is tedious and its effectiveness has also not yet been demonstrated. Instead, targeted biopsy with chromoendoscopy has gained popularity in European and Asian countries. Chromoendoscopy is generally considered to be an effective tool for ulcerative colitis surveillance and is recommended in the guidelines of the British Society of Gastroenterology and the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Although image-enhanced endoscopy, such as narrow-band imaging and autofluorescence imaging, has been investigated as a potential ulcerative colitis surveillance tool, it is not routinely applied for ulcerative colitis surveillance in its present form. The appropriate intervals of surveillance colonoscopy have yet to be determined. Although the Japanese and American guidelines recommend annual or biannual colonoscopy, the British Society of Gastroenterology and the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation stratified their guidelines according to the risks of colorectal cancer. A randomized controlled trial comparing random and targeted biopsy methods has been conducted in Japan and although the final analysis is still ongoing, the results of this study should address this issue. In the present review, we focus on the current detection methods and characterization of dysplasia/cancer and discuss the appropriate intervals of colonoscopy according to the stratified risks. PMID:26096182

  17. Manipulating Cx43 expression triggers gene reprogramming events in dermal fibroblasts from oculodentodigital dysplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Esseltine, Jessica L; Shao, Qing; Huang, Tao; Kelly, John J; Sampson, Jacinda; Laird, Dale W

    2015-11-15

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is primarily an autosomal dominant disorder linked to over 70 GJA1 gene [connexin43 (Cx43)] mutations. For nearly a decade, our laboratory has been investigating the relationship between Cx43 and ODDD by expressing disease-linked mutants in reference cells, tissue-relevant cell lines, 3D organ cultures and by using genetically modified mouse models of human disease. Although salient features of Cx43 mutants have been revealed, these models do not necessarily reflect the complexity of the human context. To further overcome these limitations, we have acquired dermal fibroblasts from two ODDD-affected individuals harbouring D3N and V216L mutations in Cx43, along with familial controls. Using these ODDD patient dermal fibroblasts, which naturally produce less GJA1 gene product, along with RNAi and RNA activation (RNAa) approaches, we show that manipulating Cx43 expression triggers cellular gene reprogramming. Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescent analysis of ODDD patient fibroblasts show unusually high levels of extracellular matrix (ECM)-interacting proteins, including integrin α5β1, matrix metalloproteinases as well as secreted ECM proteins collagen-I and laminin. Cx43 knockdown in familial control cells produces similar effects on ECM expression, whereas Cx43 transcriptional up-regulation using RNAa decreases production of collagen-I. Interestingly, the enhanced levels of ECM-associated proteins in ODDD V216L fibroblasts is not only a consequence of increased ECM gene expression, but also due to an apparent deficit in collagen-I secretion which may further contribute to impaired collagen gel contraction in ODDD fibroblasts. These findings further illuminate the altered function of Cx43 in ODDD-affected individuals and highlight the impact of manipulating Cx43 expression in human cells. PMID:26349540

  18. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E.; Koerkkoe, J.; Ala-Kokko, L.

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature with varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Dysplasia of the contralateral hip in patients with unilateral late-detected congenital dislocation of the hip: 50 years' follow-up of 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Terjesen, T

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of dysplasia in the 'normal' contralateral hip in patients with unilateral developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH) and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of such hips. A total of 48 patients (40 girls and eight boys) were treated for late-detected unilateral DDH between 1958 and 1962. After preliminary skin traction, closed reduction was achieved at a mean age of 17.8 months (4 to 65) in all except one patient who needed open reduction. In 25 patients early derotation femoral osteotomy of the contralateral hip had been undertaken within three years of reduction, and later surgery in ten patients. Radiographs taken during childhood and adulthood were reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 50.9 years (43 to 55) at the time of the latest radiological review. In all, eight patients (17%) developed dysplasia of the contralateral hip, defined as a centre-edge (CE) angle < 20° during childhood or at skeletal maturity. Six of these patients underwent surgery to improve cover of the femoral head; the dysplasia improved in two after varus femoral osteotomy and in two after an acetabular shelf operation. During long-term follow-up the dysplasia deteriorated to subluxation in two patients (CE angles 4° and 5°, respectively) who both developed osteoarthritis (OA), and one of these underwent total hip replacement at the age of 49 years. In conclusion, the long-term prognosis for the contralateral hip was relatively good, as OA occurred in only two hips (4%) at a mean follow-up of 50 years. Regular review of the 'normal' side is indicated, and corrective surgery should be undertaken in those who develop subluxation. PMID:25183584

  20. Ectodermal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the skin, hair, nails, teeth, or sweat glands. Causes There are many different types of ... equally. Symptoms People with ectodermal dysplasia may not sweat or may have decreased sweating because of a ...

  1. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN); Precancerous changes of the cervix; Cervical cancer - dysplasia ... lesion (SIL). On the Pap smear report, these changes will be described as: Low-grade (LSIL) High- ...

  2. Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia: a potentially lethal bone dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Kamoda, T; Nakajima, R; Matsui, A; Nishimura, G

    2001-02-01

    We report a Japanese boy, who is considered as having Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia, a rare, as yet undefined, skeletal dysplasia. The diagnosis was warranted by the constellation of skeletal abnormalities - mild platyspondyly, hypoplastic ilia, broad proximal femora with prominent lesser trochanters, mild brachymetacarpalia and, most importantly, rhizomelic shortening of the upper limbs with lateral bowing, medial cortical thickening, and medial metaphyseal notching of the humeri. Our patient, unlike previously reported patients, had respiratory distress and died suddenly of unknown cause in late infancy. Our experience may imply the heterogeneity or phenotypic variability of Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia. PMID:11214690

  3. Endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy in a pediatric patient with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia after failure of external dacryocystorhinostomy and as first procedure.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Matteo; Serafino, Massimiliano; Dragonetti, Alberto; Lembo, Andrea; Nucci, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A 9-year-old patient affected by ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia was referred to our clinic complaining of epiphora in both eyes. She had previous external dacryocystorhinostomy in her left eye. Ophthalmic examination revealed absence of the superior tear ducts and discharge in both eyes. Lacrimal irrigation through the inferior canaliculi revealed nasolacrimal duct obstruction on both sides. A bilateral endo-dacryocystorhinostomy was performed as a revision procedure in the left eye and as first procedure in the right eye. A monocanalicular silicone stent through the inferior tear duct was introduced on both sides at the end of the surgery. Follow up was 8 and 5 months for the left and the right eye, respectively. Epiphora was absent, and lacrimal irrigation showed a patent osteum at last follow-up. This case suggests that endo-dacryocystorhinostomy seems to be a safe and effective procedure, both as revision and as first procedure, even in children with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:23128529

  4. Implication of acetabular width on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph of patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Li, Zongming

    2015-03-01

    Radiographic parameters that can help acetabular reconstruction during total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) are few. The radiographs of 138 dysplastic hips that had undergone cementless THA were evaluated regarding the acetabular width above the acetabular component and the coverage of the component by native bone. The acetabular reconstruction process was simulated using 3D models from CT data, and the acetabular component coverage was calculated in 3D space based on the measurement and algorithm we proposed. Significant positive correlation between the acetabular width and the acetabular component coverage was found. Our study introduced a useful parameter, which can mark the superior reference position of the acetabular component for acetabular reconstruction in DDH patients. PMID:25311162

  5. Skeletal dysplasias: A radiographic approach and review of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are not uncommon entities and a radiologist is likely to encounter a suspected case of dysplasia in his practice. The correct and early diagnosis of dysplasia is important for management of complications and for future genetic counselling. While there is an exhaustive classification system on dysplasias, it is important to be familiar with the radiological features of common dysplasias. In this article, we enumerate a radiographic approach to skeletal dysplasias, describe the essential as well as differentiating features of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias and conclude by presenting working algorithms to either definitively diagnose a particular dysplasia or suggest the most likely differential diagnoses to the referring clinician and thus direct further workup of the patient. PMID:25349664

  6. Skeletal dysplasias: A radiographic approach and review of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2014-10-28

    Skeletal dysplasias are not uncommon entities and a radiologist is likely to encounter a suspected case of dysplasia in his practice. The correct and early diagnosis of dysplasia is important for management of complications and for future genetic counselling. While there is an exhaustive classification system on dysplasias, it is important to be familiar with the radiological features of common dysplasias. In this article, we enumerate a radiographic approach to skeletal dysplasias, describe the essential as well as differentiating features of common non-lethal skeletal dysplasias and conclude by presenting working algorithms to either definitively diagnose a particular dysplasia or suggest the most likely differential diagnoses to the referring clinician and thus direct further workup of the patient. PMID:25349664

  7. Comparative analyses of lung transcriptomes in patients with alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins and in foxf1 heterozygous knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of Pulmonary Veins (ACDMPV) is a developmental disorder of the lungs, primarily affecting their vasculature. FOXF1 haploinsufficiency due to heterozygous genomic deletions and point mutations have been reported in most patients with ACDMPV. The majority...

  8. Fibrous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Fibrous dysplasia is a bone disease that destroys and replaces normal bone with fibrous ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bone Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  9. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dimes National Kidney Foundation Urology Care Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Kidney Dysplasia Page Content On this page: What is ...

  10. Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: Prosthetic and Endodontic Management

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Alok; Rahangdale, Tripty

    2010-01-01

    Individuals affected by ectodermal dysplasia syndromes have abnormalities of the glands, tooth buds, hair follicles, and nail development. Oral finding in ectodermal dysplasia patient are significant and can include multiple abnormalities of the dentition such as anodontia, hy-podontia or malformed and widely spaced peg like teeth, loss of occlusal vertical dimension, protuberant lips and lack of normal alveolar ridge development. This clinical report describes a combined surgical, pedodontic, and prosthodontic approach for the treatment of a patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

  11. Mandibuloacral dysplasia and LMNA A529V mutation in Turkish patients with severe skeletal changes and absent breast development.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Leyla; Unsal, Evrim; Aktuna, Suleyman; Baltaci, Volkan; Celikkol, Pelin; Akyigit, Fatma; Sen, Askin; Ayvaz, Ozge; Balci, Sevim

    2016-07-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by acroosteolysis (resorption of terminal phalanges), skin changes (hyperpigmentation), clavicular hypoplasia, craniofascial anomalies, a hook nose and prominent eyes, delayed closures of the cranial sutures, lipodystrophy, alopecia, and skeletal anomalies. MAD patients are classified according to lipodystrophy patterns: type A and type B. The vast majority of MAD cases are caused by LMNA gene mutations. MAD patients with type A lipodystrophy (MADA) have been reported to have LMNA R527H, A529V, or A529T mutations. In this report, we describe two MADA patients with progressive skeletal changes, absent breast development, and cataract in addition to the classical MAD phenotype. Both patients were found to be homozygous for the Ala529Val mutation of the LMNA gene. Our female patient is the oldest MADA patient (59 years old) who has ever been reported with the LMNA mutation and also the LMNA Ala529Val mutation. This study is the second report on MADA patients with a homozygous Ala529Val mutation. PMID:27100822

  12. Quantitative proteomics of the human skin secretome reveal a reduction in immune defense mediators in ectodermal dysplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Burian, Marc; Velic, Ana; Matic, Katarina; Günther, Stephanie; Kraft, Beatrice; Gonser, Lena; Forchhammer, Stephan; Tiffert, Yvonne; Naumer, Christian; Krohn, Michael; Berneburg, Mark; Yazdi, Amir S; Maček, Boris; Schittek, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    In healthy human skin host defense molecules such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) contribute to skin immune homeostasis. In patients with the congenital disease ectodermal dysplasia (ED) skin integrity is disturbed and as a result patients have recurrent skin infections. The disease is characterized by developmental abnormalities of ectodermal derivatives and absent or reduced sweating. We hypothesized that ED patients have a reduced skin immune defense because of the reduced ability to sweat. Therefore, we performed a label-free quantitative proteome analysis of wash solution of human skin from ED patients or healthy individuals. A clear-cut difference between both cohorts could be observed in cellular processes related to immunity and host defense. In line with the extensive underrepresentation of proteins of the immune system, dermcidin, a sweat-derived AMP, was reduced in its abundance in the skin secretome of ED patients. In contrast, proteins involved in metabolic/catabolic and biosynthetic processes were enriched in the skin secretome of ED patients. In summary, our proteome profiling provides insights into the actual situation of healthy versus diseased skin. The systematic reduction in immune system and defense-related proteins may contribute to the high susceptibility of ED patients to skin infections and altered skin colonization. PMID:25347115

  13. Cervical spine surgery in patients with diastrophic dysplasia: Case report with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jasiewicz, Barbara; Potaczek, Tomasz; Duda, Sławomir; Tęsiorowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Cervical kyphosis in diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a very dangerous deformity which may lead to compression of neural structures resulting in tetraplegia or even. Treatment of this deformity is usually surgical, but no long-term follow-up studies are presented in the literature. Authors present a case of two children with DTD who underwent anterior corpectomy due to severe cervical kyphosis. The kyphotic deformity was corrected and the normal spinal canal width was restored. The effects of the correction remained stable for respectively 6 and 10 years of the follow-up period. The unique follow-up confirms that this type of intervention leads to an effective and long lasting results. Significant cervical kyphosis in patients suffering from DTD may be treated surgically using anterior approach even in young children with a favorable and lasting results. PMID:26692703

  14. A Novel and Easy Approach for Contouring Surgery in Patients With Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Joo; Oh, Min Joon; Jeon, Seong Pin

    2015-09-01

    Although the bone-shaving procedure is the optimal alternative treatment of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia affecting the maxilla and zygoma, it is difficult to determine the appropriate amount of bone to be removed. The authors therefore developed a novel method for bone shaving using three-dimensional printing technology on computed tomography (CT) scans and screws as a guide. In our method, we implanted screws of predetermined lengths into surgical sites and then performed a burring within the visual field. By using screws, the exact amount of bone could be removed, as determined preoperatively. Thus, the operation time was shorted and the method was less effort intensive. Moreover, this procedure had reduced risk of radiation exposure owing to frequent use of CT, and had a low cost. This simple new method is more precise and effective, and shows satisfactory cosmetic outcomes than those with current bone-shaving practices. PMID:26192030

  15. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Overview What is arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (say: “uh-rith-mo-jen-ic right ven-trick- ...

  16. Patient-specific Analysis of Cartilage and Labrum Mechanics in Human Hips with Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Henak, Corinne R; Abraham, Christine L; Anderson, Andrew E; Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Peters, Christopher L; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acetabular dysplasia is a major predisposing factor for development of hip osteoarthritis, and may result from alterations to chondrolabral loading. Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling can be used to evaluate chondrolabral mechanics in the dysplastic hip, thereby providing insight into mechanics that precede osteoarthritis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate chondrolabral contact mechanics and congruency in dysplastic hips and normal hips using a validated approach to subject-specific FE modeling. METHODS FE models of ten subjects with normal acetabula and ten subjects with dysplasia were constructed using a previously validated protocol. Labrum load support, and labrum and acetabular cartilage contact stress and contact area were compared between groups. Local congruency was determined at the articular surface for two simulated activities. RESULTS The labrum in dysplastic hips supported 2.8 to 4.0 times more of the load transferred across the joint than in normal hips. Dysplastic hips did not have significantly different congruency in the primary load-bearing regions than normal hips, but were less congruent in some unloaded regions. Normal hips had larger cartilage contact stress than dysplastic hips in the few regions that had significant differences. CONCLUSIONS The labrum in dysplastic hips has a far more significant role in hip mechanics than it does in normal hips. The dysplastic hip is neither less congruent than the normal hip, nor subjected to elevated cartilage contact stresses. This study supports the concept of an outside-in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in dysplastic hips and that the labrum in dysplastic hips should be preserved during surgery. PMID:24269633

  17. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm of infundibular origin in patients with a concealed form of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Martini, B; Nava, A; Thiene, G; Buja, G F; Canciani, B; Miraglia, G; Scognamiglio, R; Boffa, G M; Daliento, L

    1988-01-01

    Five apparently healthy people (aged 16-47) presented with recurrent episodes of accelerated idioventricular rhythm characterised by left bundle branch block and right axis deviation. Clinical history, physical findings, basic electrocardiogram, chest x ray, and blood tests were within normal limits in all. Holter monitoring, exercise stress test, and electrophysiological study (in three patients) showed that accelerated idioventricular rhythm was mainly bradycardia dependent, easily suppressed by effort and overdrive pacing, and originated from the outflow tract of the right ventricle. The mechanism could be enhanced automaticity. Data from cross sectional echocardiography (in all patients) and from haemodynamic evaluation (in three) identified structural or wall motion abnormalities of the right ventricle or both without appreciable dilatation of the ventricle. Biopsy specimens of the right ventricular endomyocardium showed fibrosis in one patient, fibrosis and fatty infiltration in the second, and pronounced fatty infiltration in the third. These results show that some patients with accelerated idioventricular rhythm have right ventricular abnormalities that are typical of the localised and concealed forms of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:3382568

  18. Detection superiority of 7 T MRI protocol in patients with epilepsy and suspected focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Colon, A J; van Osch, M J P; Buijs, M; Grond, J V D; Boon, P; van Buchem, M A; Hofman, P A M

    2016-09-01

    In 11 adult patients with suspicion of Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) on 1.5 T (n = 1) or 3 T (n = 10) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 7 T MRI was performed. Visibility, extent, morphological features and delineation were independently rated and subsequently discussed by three observers. Additionally, head-to-head comparisons with corresponding 3 T images were made in the eight patients with a previous 3 T MRI and sustained suspicion of FCD. Comparison with histopathology was done in the five patients that underwent surgery. All lesions, seen at 1.5 and 3 T, were also recognized on 7 T. At 7 T FLAIR highlighted the FCD-like lesions best, whereas T2 and T2* were deemed better suited to review structure and extent of the lesion. Image quality with the used 7 T MRI setup was higher than the quality with the used 3 T MRI setup. In 2 out of 11 patients diagnosis changed, in one after re-evaluation of the images, and in the other based on histopathology. With the used 7 T MRI setup, FCD-like lesions can be detected with more confidence and detail as compared to lower field strength. However, concordance between radiologic diagnosis and final diagnosis seems to be lower than expected. PMID:27389578

  19. Rootless teeth: Dentin dysplasia type I

    PubMed Central

    Fulari, Sangamesh G; Tambake, Deepti P

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of hereditary disturbance of dentine, Dentin dysplasia type I is presented, which is characterized by short or total absence of roots, obliterated pulp chambers, and peri-apical radiolucencies. It affects both primary and secondary dentition. Management of patients with dentinal dysplasia is difficult and requires a multidisciplinary approach. An overview of dentin dysplasia and its management along with a case report is discussed. PMID:24403801

  20. Mesenchymal dysplasia of placenta.

    PubMed

    Balachandran Nair, Krishna G; Srinish, Minu; Balan, Preesha; Sadasivan, Santha

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) in a 26-year-old patient is reported. Ultrasound scan at 17 weeks of gestation showed placenta with multiple cystic spaces and a normal appearing fetus. Following delivery of a term live baby, histological examination of the placenta was suggestive of PMD. The early recognition of this rare condition by characteristic ultrasonographic findings is herein emphasized and hence that PMD is distinguished from molar pregnancy. PMID:26275269

  1. Diastrophic dysplasia and atelosteogenesis type II as expression of compound heterozygosis: first report of a Mexican patient and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Macías-Gómez, Nelly Margarita; Mégarbané, André; Leal-Ugarte, Evelia; Rodríguez-Rojas, Lisa Ximena; Barros-Núñez, Patricio

    2004-08-30

    The osteochondrodysplasias represent a heterogeneous group of cartilage and bone diseases. Among these, achondrogenesis 1B, atelosteogenesis type II, diastrophic dysplasia, and autosomal recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia are caused by mutations in the solute carrier family 26 (sulfate transporter), member 2 gene (SLC26A2). This group of osteochondrodysplasias shows a continuous spectrum of clinical variability and shares many features in common. Usually, it is difficult to distinguish clinically among these patients. To date, several efforts have been made to correlate mutations in the SLC26A2 gene with phenotypic severity in the patients. We report on a Mexican girl with diastrophic dysplasia presenting some unusual clinical and radiographic features that are usually observed in atelosteogenesis type II. Molecular analysis of the SLC26A2 gene in this patient showed compound heterozygosity for the R178X and R279W mutations. In this patient, the combination of a mild and a severe mutation has apparently led to an intermediate or transitional clinical picture, showing an apparent genotype-phenotype correlation. PMID:15316973

  2. Skeletal Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Synoposis The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  3. Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are a group of more than 450 heritable disorders of bone. They frequently present in the newborn period with disproportion, radiographic abnormalities, and occasionally other organ system abnormalities. For improved clinical care, it is important to determine a precise diagnosis to aid in management, familial recurrence, and identify those disorders highly associated with mortality. Long-term management of these disorders is predicated on an understanding of the associated skeletal system abnormalities, and these children are best served by a team approach to health care surveillance. PMID:26042906

  4. de la Chapelle dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Whitley, C B; Burke, B A; Granroth, G; Gorlin, R J

    1986-09-01

    Since the description by de la Chapelle and colleagues of two sibs with a unique skeletal dysplasia, two additional cases have occurred, one in the original Finnish family and one sporadic patient born to unrelated parents of Belgian descent. The original Finnish family has later had a fourth child, a normal daughter who was found to be unaffected upon radiographic examination in the 19th week of gestation. These additional findings are compatible with recessive inheritance. Physical features common to these four patients include cleft palate, small thorax, moderately severe micromelia with small hands, and equinovarus deformity. In each case, the ulnae and fibulae were reduced to an almost triangular osseous remnant. Other long bones were short and bowed. Neonatal death occurred in all cases and may be attributed to a consistent triad of respiratory tract malformations: laryngeal stenosis, tracheobronchomalacia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. Clinical and radiographic features are sufficiently unique to distinguish de la Chapelle dysplasia from other disorders in the spectrum of neonatal lethal osteochondrodysplasias. Lacunar halos were identified as a distinctive histopathologic feature also observed in achondrogenesis but not in several other skeletal dysplasias. PMID:3799721

  5. Double homozygous missense mutations in DACH1 and BMP4 in a patient with bilateral cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schild, Raphael; Knüppel, Tanja; Konrad, Martin; Bergmann, Carsten; Trautmann, Agnes; Kemper, Markus J; Wu, Kongming; Yaklichkin, Sergey; Wang, Jing; Pestell, Richard; Müller-Wiefel, Dirk E; Schaefer, Franz; Weber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Renal hypodysplasia (RHD) is characterized by small and/or disorganized kidneys following abnormal organogenesis. Mutations in several genes have been identified recently to be associated with RHD in humans, including BMP4, a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of growth factors. DACH1 has been proposed as a candidate gene for RHD because of its involvement in the EYA-SIX-DACH network of renal developmental genes. Here, we present a patient with renal dysplasia carrying homozygous missense mutations in both BMP4 (p.N150K) and DACH1 (p.R684C). The genotype-phenotype correlation in the family hints at an oligogenic mode of inheritance of the disease in this kindred. Functional analyses of the identified DACH1 mutation in HEK293T cells demonstrated enhanced suppression of the TGF-β pathway suggesting that both mutations could act synergistically in the development of the phenotype in this patient. This finding provides a model for RHD as an oligo-/polygenic disorder and supports a role for DACH1 in the development of RHD in humans. PMID:23262432

  6. Functional characterization of connexin43 mutations found in patients with oculodentodigital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Junko; Paznekas, William; Seki, Akiko; Taffet, Steven; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Delmar, Mario; Musa, Hassan

    2005-05-27

    Specific mutations in GJA1, the gene encoding the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43), cause an autosomal dominant disorder called oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD). Here, we characterize the effects of 8 of these mutations on Cx43 function. Immunochemical studies have shown that most of the mutant proteins formed gap junction plaques at the sites of cell-cell apposition. However, 2 of the mutations (a codon duplication in the first extracellular loop, F52dup, and a missense mutation in the second extracellular loop, R202H, produced full-length connexins that failed to properly form gap junction plaques. Cx43 proteins containing ODDD mutations found in the N-terminus (Y17S), first transmembrane domain (G21R, A40V), second transmembrane domain (L90V), and cytoplasmic loop (I130T, K134E) do form gap junction plaques but show compromised channel function. L90V, I130T, and K134E demonstrated a significant decrease in junctional conductance relative to Cx43WT. Mutations Y17S, G21R, and A40V demonstrated a complete lack of functional electrical coupling even in the presence of significant plaque formation between paired cells. Heterologous channels formed by coexpression of Cx43WT and mutation R202H resulted in electrically functional gap junctions that were not permeable to Lucifer yellow. Therefore, the mutations found in ODDD not only cause phenotypic variability, but also result in various functional consequences. Overall, our data show an extensive range of molecular phenotypes, consistent with the pleiotropic nature of the clinical syndrome as a whole. PMID:15879313

  7. White Matter Abnormalities in Patients with Focal Cortical Dysplasia Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Imaging Analysis in a Voxelwise Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Viviane de Carvalho; Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Tedeschi, Guilherme Garlipp; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Cendes, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows the analysis of changes in microstructure, through the quantification of the spread and direction of water molecules in tissues. We used fractional anisotropy (FA) maps to compare the integrity of WM between patients and controls. The objective of the present study was to investigate WM abnormalities in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy secondary to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Materials and Methods: We included 31 controls (12 women, 33.1 ± 9.6 years, mean ± SD) and 22 patients (11 women, 30.4 ± 10.0 years), recruited from our outpatient clinic. They had clinical and EEG diagnosis of frontal lobe epilepsy, secondary to FCD detected on MRI. Patients and controls underwent 3T MRI, including the DTI sequence, obtained in 32 directions and b value of 1000 s/mm2. To process the DTI we used the following softwares: MRIcroN and FSL/TBSS (tract-based spatial statistics). We used a threshold-free cluster enhancement with significance at p < 0.05, fully corrected for multiple comparisons across space. Results: Areas with FA reduction in patients were identified in both hemispheres, mainly in the frontal lobes, cingulum, and forceps minor (p = 0.014), caudate e anterior thalamic radiation (p = 0.034), superior longitudinal fasciculus (p = 0.044), uncinate fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (p = 0.042). Conclusion: Our results showed a widespread pattern of WM microstructural abnormalities extending beyond the main lesion seen on MRI (frontal lobe), which may be related to frequent seizures or to the extent of MRI-invisible portion of FCD. PMID:22855684

  8. Autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: I. An undescribed dysplasia/malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bustos, T; Simosa, V; Pinto-Cisternas, J; Abramovits, W; Jolay, L; Rodriguez, L; Fernandez, L; Ramela, M

    1991-12-15

    We describe 27 individuals of 7 families related to each other with high probability who showed manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia and other anomalies affecting females as severely as males with variable expressivity. All parents were normal. These families were detected in a relatively isolated and inbred population with very small neighbouring communities from a Caribbean Sea island, Margarita Island, in Northeastern Venezuela (Nueva Esparta State). The clinical picture common to all patients could not be classified within the heterogeneous group of known ectodermal dysplasias and the published cases do not resemble our patients. We believe that this condition constitutes a newly recognized autosomal recessive dysplasia/malformation syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:1776626

  9. Dilemmas in imaging for peri-acetabular osteotomy: the influence of patient position and imaging technique on the radiological features of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, D; Cordier, T; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W

    2014-09-01

    Peri-acetabular osteotomy is an established surgical treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in young adults. An anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis is commonly used to assess the extent of dysplasia as well as to assess post-operative correction. Radiological prognostic factors include the lateral centre-edge angle, acetabular index, extrusion index and the acetabular version. Standing causes a change in the pelvis tilt which can alter certain radiological measurements relative to the supine position. This article discusses the radiological indices used to assess dysplasia and reviews the effects of patient positioning on these indices with a focus on assessment for a peri-acetabular osteotomy. Intra-operatively, fluoroscopy is commonly used and the implications of using fluoroscopy as a modality to assess the various radiological indices along with the effects of using an anteroposterior or posteroanterior fluoroscopic view are examined. Each of these techniques gives rise to a slightly different image of the pelvis as the final image is sensitive to the position of the pelvis and the projection of the x-ray beam. PMID:25183583

  10. Ocular manifestations of frontonasal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Roarty, J D; Pron, G E; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Posnick, J C; Buncic, J R

    1994-01-01

    The ophthalmologic findings associated with frontonasal dysplasia have not been defined previously in a large series of untreated children. We reviewed the ophthalmic manifestations of a series of patients with frontonasal dysplasia who were seen as part of their craniofacial evaluation. All had undergone a complete ophthalmologic examination before any manipulation of either the orbits or the soft tissues of the orbital contents. From 1986 to 1991, 23 patients with frontonasal dysplasia were seen; ophthalmologic abnormalities were found in 20 (87 percent). Abnormalities included significant refractive errors, strabismus, nystagmus, and eyelid ptosis. Three patients had amblyopia, a treatable cause of visual loss, from strabismus or anisometropia. Ten eyes in seven patients (30 percent) had severe structural anomalies, such as optic nerve hypoplasia, optic nerve colobomas, microphthalmia, cataract, corneal dermoid, or inflammatory retinopathy, that resulted in an acuity of 20/100 or worse. The high incidence of ocular abnormalities indicates that early assessment by an ophthalmologist should be part of the initial evaluation of patients with frontonasal dysplasia to detect treatable visual or ocular problems. PMID:8278482

  11. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Pat; Magliocca, Kelly R; Lee, Janice S

    2012-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the natural history and molecular abnormalities, many questions remain surrounding the progression and management of fibrous dysplasia (FD). In the absence of comorbidities, the expected behavior of craniofacial FD (CFD) is to be slow growing and without functional consequence. Understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to the various phenotypes of this condition, as well as the predictors of the different behaviors of FD lesions, must be improved. Long-term follow-up of patients with CFD is vital because spontaneous recovery is unlikely, and the course of disease can be unpredictable. PMID:22771278

  12. Pigmented ganglioglioma in a patient with chronic epilepsy and cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kerolus, Mena G; Kellogg, Robert G; Novo, Jorge; Arvanitis, Leonidas D; Byrne, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    We report a rare case of a 22-year-old woman with biopsy-proven pigmented ganglioglioma. The patient initially underwent a right temporal lobectomy for intractable seizures at the age of 9 and remained seizure free for several years but subsequently developed complex partial seizures. Due to enhancement of a left mesial occipital lesion on preoperative MRI of the brain, the patient underwent a left subdural electrode placement and simultaneous biopsy of the left mesial occipital lesion. Biopsy results revealed a rare pigmented ganglioglioma, World Health Organization Grade I. The seizure focus was identified in the left mesial occipital lobe and the patient underwent tumor resection. An extensive literature search revealed that our patient is the fourth case of pigmented ganglioglioma described in the literature and was positive for BRAF V600E mutation by molecular studies. PMID:26432496

  13. A novel TUBB3 mutation in a sporadic patient with asymmetric cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have led to the discovery of several genes related to human malformations of cortical development (MCDs). The beta-tubulin class III gene (TUBB3) was identified as a gene responsible for MCDs. Although mouse-model experiments have not revealed any findings of neuronal migration disorders, human TUBB3 mutations have been identified in patients with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles. Since the discovery of a TUBB3 mutation, only 15 mutations have been identified. In this study, comprehensive mutation screening through next-generation sequencing identified a novel TUBB3 mutation (p.Ser230Leu) in a sporadic patient with moderate developmental delay associated with mild MCD. Compared to patients with the alpha-tubulin class 1a gene (TUBA1A) mutations, patients with TUBB3 mutations show milder phenotypic manifestations and milder MCD. Therefore, patients with milder MCD manifestations may be under-diagnosed, and TUBB3 mutations may be rarely identified. Additional genotype-phenotype information should be accumulated for further understanding of the TUBB3 functional relevance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26739025

  14. Oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-01-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  15. Oculodentodigital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Dharmil C; Limdi, Purvi K; Parekh, Nilesh V; Gohil, Neepa R

    2016-03-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo), teeth (dento), and fingers and/or toes (digital). The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood. PMID:27146935

  16. Genetics Home Reference: oculodentodigital dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paznekas W, Seki A, Taffet S, Jabs EW, Delmar M, Musa H. Functional characterization of connexin43 mutations found in patients with oculodentodigital dysplasia. Circ Res. 2005 May 27;96(10):e83-91. Epub 2005 May 5. Citation on PubMed Vreeburg M, de Zwart-Storm EA, Schouten MI, Nellen RG, ...

  17. Therapy-Associated Myeloid Dysplasia in a Long-Surviving Patient with Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzukida, Jillian; Kaley, Kristin; Raza, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a diagnosis of poor prognosis with a median survival time of four-six months in patients with advanced stage of the disease. Although, with the development of novel chemotherapy agents some patients are able to live a little longer if they respond to therapy. However, long-term complications of chemotherapy or radiotherapy are not known due to the short survival period of patients with pancreatic cancer. We present a case of a 55-year-old-woman who developed therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) during a survival of approximately eight years during which she received multiple chemotherapies and radiation therapy. She presented with progressive fatigue and pancytopenia, which led to further work-up and led to the diagnosis of t-MDS. The latency period to developing hematologic abnormalities as well as the presence of the chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities in this patient are likely consistent with t-MDS and possibly related to the use of chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin or irinotecan and radiation therapy. PMID:27555985

  18. Therapy-Associated Myeloid Dysplasia in a Long-Surviving Patient with Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzukida, Jillian; Kaley, Kristin; Raza, Azra; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a diagnosis of poor prognosis with a median survival time of four-six months in patients with advanced stage of the disease. Although, with the development of novel chemotherapy agents some patients are able to live a little longer if they respond to therapy. However, long-term complications of chemotherapy or radiotherapy are not known due to the short survival period of patients with pancreatic cancer. We present a case of a 55-year-old-woman who developed therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) during a survival of approximately eight years during which she received multiple chemotherapies and radiation therapy. She presented with progressive fatigue and pancytopenia, which led to further work-up and led to the diagnosis of t-MDS. The latency period to developing hematologic abnormalities as well as the presence of the chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities in this patient are likely consistent with t-MDS and possibly related to the use of chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin or irinotecan and radiation therapy. PMID:27555985

  19. Fibrous dysplasia of the orbit.

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, K; McFadzean, R

    1994-01-01

    Twelve patients with fibrous dysplasia of the orbit are reviewed and the ophthalmic findings described. Three case histories are presented in detail. Six patients were managed conservatively; four have shown radiological progression of the disease. Six patients underwent surgery. A conservative procedure, comprising debulking dysplastic bone, was carried out in four--all required further surgery including radical excision in two patients. Two subjects had primary radical operations. No recurrence was encountered in the four patients who had undergone radical surgery. It would appear that fibrous dysplasia is not a disease confined to adolescence but may continue into adulthood, and even middle age. Patients may never require surgery, but require follow up for late progression. If surgical intervention is deemed necessary, an attempt should be made to excise all dysplastic bone, since progression of the disease after conservative surgery is relatively common. Images PMID:8199111

  20. Biological features of bronchial squamous dysplasia followed up by autofluorescence bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hidehisa; Shibuya, Kiyoshi; Chiyo, Masako; Iyoda, Akira; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Sekine, Yasuo; Iizasa, Toshihiko; Saitoh, Yukio; Baba, Masayuki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Ohwada, Hidemi; Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2004-11-01

    Some dysplasias in the bronchial epithelium are thought to be precancerous lesions that can develop into squamous cell carcinomas. In this investigation, we assessed the biological behavior of bronchial squamous dysplasia in order to define which dysplasias have the potential to progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Using autofluorescence bronchoscopy, we followed up periodically localized dysplasias and examined for correlation between histological outcome and smoking status during the follow-up period, telomerase activity, Ki-67 labeling index, and p53 immunoreactivity of initial biopsy specimens. Ninety-nine dysplasias from 50 participants mainly with sputum cytology suspicious or positive for malignancy were followed up. Of 99 dysplasias, 3 dysplasias progressed to squamous cell carcinoma, 41 dysplasias remained as dysplasia, 6 dysplasias changed to metaplasia, 14 dysplasias changed to hyperplasia, and 35 dysplasias regressed to bronchitis or normal bronchial epithelium. There were no significant associations between histological outcome and smoking status. Mean initial telomerase activity and Ki-67 labeling index values in the dysplasias increased in proportion to the severity of the histological outcome at the second biopsy. There was also a significant difference between p53-positive and p53-negative dysplasia in terms of histological outcome at the second biopsy. Our results suggested that dysplasias with high telomerase activity, increased Ki-67 labeling index, and p53-positivity tended to remain as dysplasia and might have the potential to progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with dysplastic lesions with these characteristics should be carefully followed up. PMID:15474667

  1. Pseudoachondroplastic Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jeff W

    1999-01-01

    Lamellar inclusions of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in growth plate chondrocytes, first identified (1972) in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Iowa, has become the cytochemical hallmark for the pseudoachondroplastic dysplasia (PSACH) phenotype, linking an endoplasmic reticulum storage disorder with the osteochondrodysplasia. Since this original observation, great advances have been made, leading to the molecular understanding of this altered longitudinal bone growth anomaly. A PSACH canine model suggested that abatement of cumulative vertical growth of growth plate chondrocytes seen in PSACH results from (1) altered extracellular matrix constraints for horizontal growth and (2) uncoupling of endochondral and perichondral growth that causes metaphyseal flaring. PSACH, an autosomal dominant disease, is linked to mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene. Amino acid substitutions, deletions, or additions is proposed to alter COMP structure that cause its retention in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of growth plate chondrocytes, leading to (1) compositional and structural change of the extracellular matrix, and (2) altered cellular proliferation and volume expansion. Normal growth and development occurs in COMP gene knockout mice that do not synthesis COMP, demonstrating that a mutant COMP, not absence of COMP, is required for the PSACH phenotype. The mechanism by which mutant COMP induces a PSACH phenotype remains to be elucidated. At the University of Iowa a cell culture system has been developed whereby mutant COMP transgenes are introduced into chondrocytes and the expressed product COMP is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. This readily manipulated system makes it possible to decipher systematically the system's cellular secretory processing pathway, in order to clarify the mechanism(s) by which the mutant COMP is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. Concurrent with this is the development of transgenic mice

  2. The "pirate sign" in fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Singnurkar, Amit; Rush, Chris

    2006-11-01

    Fibrous dysplasia commonly involves the skull in both its monostotic and polyostotic variants. We present two cases of fibrous dysplasia involving the sphenoid wing, which were strikingly similar in their bone scan appearance. Both patients demonstrated intense increased uptake of Tc-99m MDP in a pattern reminding us of a "pirate wearing an eyepatch." We propose that this characteristic appearance of fibrous dysplasia of the sphenoid wing be called the "pirate sign." A review of the literature revealed several other pathologic conditions that have been reported to involve the sphenoid bone and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abnormal bone tracer uptake in this region. PMID:17053398

  3. Pagetoid polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Rashmi Maruti; Pathak, Jigna; Swain, Niharika; Mohanty, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign skeletal lesion occurring due to mutation of Gs α gene and involves one or multiple bones. We present a case of a 30-year-old female patient, with a 1-year history of swelling under her right eye that had gradually increased in size. Extraoral examination revealed a diffuse swelling extending anteroposteriorly from preauricular region to nasolabial fold, frontonasal region and superoinferiorly from zygoma to body of mandible, causing ipsilateral proptosis and contralateral deviation of nose. Intraoral examination showed obliteration of right upper and lower buccal vestibule. CT disclosed expansile lytic lesions involving multiple skull bones, jaws, sternum, rib and thoracic vertebrae. Histopathology displayed broad and interconnected trabeculae connected to the host bone exhibiting reversal lines resembling the mosaic pattern of Paget's disease. These features suggested pagetoid polyostotic FD. The patient underwent cosmetic recontouring and is under regular follow-up postoperatively. PMID:25969488

  4. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, RK

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  5. Fibrous dysplasia and cherubism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a non-malignant fibro-osseous bony lesion in which the involved bone/bones gradually get converted into expanding cystic and fibrous tissue. The underlying defect in FD is post-natal mutation of GNAS1 gene, which leads to the proliferation and activation of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells arresting the bone development in woven phase and ultimately converting them into fibro-osseous cystic tissue. Cherubism is a hereditary form of fibrous dysplasia in which the causative factor is transmission of autosomal dominant SH3BP2 gene mutation. The disease may present in two distinct forms, a less severe and limited monostotic form, and a more aggressive and more widespread polyostotic form. Polyostotic form may be associated with various endocrine abnormalities, which require active management apart from the management of FD. Management of FD is not free from controversies. While total surgical excision of the involved area and reconstruction using newer micro-vascular technique is the only definitive treatment available from the curative point of view, but this can be only offered to monostotic and very few polyostotic lesions. In polyostotic varieties on many occasions these radical surgeries are very deforming in these slow growing lesions and so their indication is highly debated. The treatment of cranio-facial fibrous dysplasia should be highly individualized, depending on the fact that the clinical behavior of lesion is variable at various ages and in individual patients. A more conservative approach in the form of aesthetic recontouring of deformed bone, orthodontic occlusal correction, and watchful expectancy may be the more accepted form of treatment in young patients. Newer generation real-time imaging guidance during recontouring surgery adds to accuracy and safety of these procedures. Regular clinical and radiological follow up is required to watch for quiescence, regression or reactivation of the disease process. Patients must be

  6. Impaired epithelial differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from ectodermal dysplasia-related patients is rescued by the small compound APR-246/PRIMA-1MET.

    PubMed

    Shalom-Feuerstein, Ruby; Serror, Laura; Aberdam, Edith; Müller, Franz-Josef; van Bokhoven, Hans; Wiman, Klas G; Zhou, Huiqing; Aberdam, Daniel; Petit, Isabelle

    2013-02-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a group of congenital syndromes affecting a variety of ectodermal derivatives. Among them, ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate (EEC) syndrome is caused by single point mutations in the p63 gene, which controls epidermal development and homeostasis. Phenotypic defects of the EEC syndrome include skin defects and limbal stem-cell deficiency. In this study, we designed a unique cellular model that recapitulated major embryonic defects related to EEC. Fibroblasts from healthy donors and EEC patients carrying two different point mutations in the DNA binding domain of p63 were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. EEC-iPSC from both patients showed early ectodermal commitment into K18(+) cells but failed to further differentiate into K14(+) cells (epidermis/limbus) or K3/K12(+) cells (corneal epithelium). APR-246 (PRIMA-1(MET)), a small compound that restores functionality of mutant p53 in human tumor cells, could revert corneal epithelial lineage commitment and reinstate a normal p63-related signaling pathway. This study illustrates the relevance of iPSC for p63 related disorders and paves the way for future therapy of EEC. PMID:23355677

  7. Ultrasonography of nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hips.

    PubMed

    Grissom, L E; Harcke, H T

    1997-01-01

    We examined 45 infants with nondevelopmental dysplasia of the hip (non-DDH), including congenital deficiency of the femur (CDF) (20 infants), neuromuscular syndrome (five infants), skeletal dysplasia (15 infants), and infection (five infants), and present the sonographic findings. Dysmorphic proximal femora, coxa vara, and abnormal echogenicity of the soft tissue and cartilage are features which differentiate patients with non-DDH from those with typical DDH. PMID:8995174

  8. Fibrous Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... MAGIC Foundation Website: http://www.magicfoundation.org Rare Bone Disease Patient Network Website: http://usbjd.org/projects/RBDPN_ ... Pub. No. 15-7774 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  9. Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and B), or even serious complications such as aneurysms (bulging of the arteries) or dissections (tears of ... of FMD? Patients with FMD can develop an aneurysm or dissection in the affected arteries that can ...

  10. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  11. WISP3 mutational analysis in Indian patients diagnosed with progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia and report of a novel mutation at p.Y198*

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, M.; Rajagopal, K.; Sugumar, L. K.; Balaji, V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the pattern of mutations of the WISP3 gene in clinically identified progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) in an Indian population. Patients and Methods A total of 15 patients with clinical features of PPD were enrolled in this study. Genomic DNA was isolated and polymerase chain reaction performed to amplify the WISP3 gene. Screening for mutations was done by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis, beginning with the fifth exon and subsequently proceeding to the remaining exons. Sanger sequencing was performed for both forward and reverse strands to confirm the mutations. Results In all, two of the 15 patients had compound heterozygous mutations: one a nonsense mutation c.156C>A (p.C52*) in exon 2, and the other a missense mutation c.677G>T (p.G226V) in exon 4. All others were homozygous, with three bearing a nonsense mutation c.156C>A (p.C52*) in exon 2, three a missense mutation c.233G>A (p.C78Y) in exon 2, five a missense mutation c.1010G>A (p.C337Y) in exon 5, one a nonsense mutation c.348C>A (p.Y116*) in exon 3, and one with a novel deletion mutation c.593_597delATAGA (p.Y198*) in exon 4. Conclusion We identified a novel mutation c.593_597delATAGA (p.Y198*) in the fourth exon of the WISP3 gene. We also confirmed c.1010G>A as one of the common mutations in an Indian population with progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia. Cite this article: V. Madhuri, M. Santhanam, K. Rajagopal, L. K. Sugumar, V. Balaji. WISP3 mutational analysis in Indian patients diagnosed with progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia and report of a novel mutation at p.Y198* Bone Joint Res 2016;5:301–306. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.2000520. PMID:27436824

  12. Comparison of 2.5D and 3D Quantification of Femoral Head Coverage in Normal Control Subjects and Patients with Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui; Liu, Li; Yu, Weimin; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Dianzhong; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is characterized by insufficient femoral head coverage (FHC). Quantification of FHC is of importance as the underlying goal of the surgery to treat hip dysplasia is to restore a normal acetabular morphology and thereby to improve FHC. Unlike a pure 2D X-ray radiograph-based measurement method or a pure 3D CT-based measurement method, previously we presented a 2.5D method to quantify FHC from a single anteriorposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph. In this study, we first quantified and compared 3D FHC between a normal control group and a patient group using a CT-based measurement method. Taking the CT-based 3D measurements of FHC as the gold standard, we further quantified the bias, precision and correlation between the 2.5D measurements and the 3D measurements on both the control group and the patient group. Based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs), we investigated the influence of the pelvic tilt on the 2.5D measurements of FHC. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for absolute agreement was used to quantify interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of the 2.5D measurement technique. The Pearson correlation coefficient, r, was used to determine the strength of the linear association between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements. Student's t-test was used to determine whether the differences between different measurements were statistically significant. Our experimental results demonstrated that both the interobserver reliability and the intraobserver reproducibility of the 2.5D measurement technique were very good (ICCs > 0.8). Regression analysis indicated that the correlation was very strong between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Student's t-test showed that there were no statistically significant differences between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements of FHC on the patient group (p > 0.05). The results of this study provided convincing evidence demonstrating the validity of the 2.5D measurements

  13. A study of the clinical and radiological features in a cohort of 93 patients with a COL2A1 mutation causing spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita or a related phenotype.

    PubMed

    Terhal, Paulien A; Nievelstein, Rutger Jan A J; Verver, Eva J J; Topsakal, Vedat; van Dommelen, Paula; Hoornaert, Kristien; Le Merrer, Martine; Zankl, Andreas; Simon, Marleen E H; Smithson, Sarah F; Marcelis, Carlo; Kerr, Bronwyn; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kinning, Esther; Mansour, Sahar; Elmslie, Frances; Goodwin, Linda; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Herkert, Johanna C; Lund, Allan M; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Mégarbané, André; Lees, Melissa M; Wilson, Louise C; Male, Alison; Hurst, Jane; Alanay, Yasemin; Annerén, Göran; Betz, Regina C; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Dieux, Anne; David, Albert; Elting, Mariet W; van den Ende, Jenneke; Green, Andrew; van Hagen, Johanna M; Hertel, Niels Thomas; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; den Hollander, Nicolette; Homfray, Tessa; Hove, Hanne D; Price, Susan; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rohrbach, Marianne; Schroeter, Barbara; Suri, Mohnish; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Tobias, Edward S; Toutain, Annick; Vreeburg, Maaike; Wakeling, Emma; Knoers, Nine V; Coucke, Paul; Mortier, Geert R

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 collagen disorders encompass a diverse group of skeletal dysplasias that are commonly associated with orthopedic, ocular, and hearing problems. However, the frequency of many clinical features has never been determined. We retrospectively investigated the clinical, radiological, and genotypic data in a group of 93 patients with molecularly confirmed SEDC or a related disorder. The majority of the patients (80/93) had short stature, with radiological features of SEDC (n = 64), others having SEMD (n = 5), Kniest dysplasia (n = 7), spondyloperipheral dysplasia (n = 2), or Torrance-like dysplasia (n = 2). The remaining 13 patients had normal stature with mild SED, Stickler-like syndrome or multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Over 50% of the patients had undergone orthopedic surgery, usually for scoliosis, femoral osteotomy or hip replacement. Odontoid hypoplasia was present in 56% (95% CI 38-74) and a correlation between odontoid hypoplasia and short stature was observed. Atlanto-axial instability, was observed in 5 of the 18 patients (28%, 95% CI 10-54) in whom flexion-extension films of the cervical spine were available; however, it was rarely accompanied by myelopathy. Myopia was found in 45% (95% CI 35-56), and retinal detachment had occurred in 12% (95% CI 6-21; median age 14 years; youngest age 3.5 years). Thirty-two patients complained of hearing loss (37%, 95% CI 27-48) of whom 17 required hearing aids. The ophthalmological features and possibly also hearing loss are often relatively frequent and severe in patients with splicing mutations. Based on clinical findings, age at onset and genotype-phenotype correlations in this cohort, we propose guidelines for the management and follow-up in this group of disorders. PMID:25604898

  14. The role of intraoperative MRI in resective epilepsy surgery for peri-eloquent cortex cortical dysplasias and heterotopias in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sacino, Matthew F; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Murnick, Jonathan; Keating, Robert F; Gaillard, William D; Oluigbo, Chima O

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated that an important factor in seizure freedom following surgery for lesional epilepsy in the peri-eloquent cortex is completeness of resection. However, aggressive resection of epileptic tissue localized to this region must be balanced with the competing objective of retaining postoperative neurological functioning. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) as a complement to existing epilepsy protocol techniques and to compare rates of seizure freedom and neurological deficit in pediatric patients undergoing resection of perieloquent lesions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of pediatric patients who underwent resection of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) or heterotopia localized to eloquent cortex regions at the Children's National Health System between March 2005 and August 2015. Patients were grouped into two categories depending on whether they underwent conventional resection (n = 18) or iMRI-assisted resection (n = 11). Patient records were reviewed for factors including demographics, length of hospitalization, postoperative seizure freedom, postoperative neurological deficit, and need for reoperation. Postsurgical seizure outcome was assessed at the last postoperative follow-up evaluation using the Engel Epilepsy Surgery Outcome Scale. RESULTS At the time of the last postoperative follow-up examination, 9 (82%) of the 11 patients in the iMRI resection group were seizure free (Engel Class I), compared with 7 (39%) of the 18 patients in the control resection group (p = 0.05). Ten (91%) of the 11 patients in the iMRI cohort achieved gross-total resection (GTR), compared with 8 (44%) of 18 patients in the conventional resection cohort (p = 0.02). One patient in the iMRI-assisted resection group underwent successful reoperation at a later date for residual dysplasia, compared with 7 patients in the conventional resection cohort (with 2/7 achieving

  15. Exome sequencing reveals two novel compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations in a Polish patient with Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer, Aleksander; Olech, Ewelina M; Kozłowski, Kazimierz; Niedziela, Marek; Sowińska-Seidler, Anna; Obara-Moszyńska, Monika; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Karczewski, Marek; Zemojtel, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 (DBQD2) is a rare recessively inherited skeletal genetic disorder characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, generalized joint laxity with dislocation of large joints and facial dysmorphism. The condition was recently described to result from autosomal recessive mutations in XYLT1, encoding the enzyme xylosyltransferase-1. In this paper, we report on a Polish patient with DBQD2 who presented with severe short stature of prenatal onset, joint laxity, psychomotor retardation and multiple radiological abnormalities including short metacarpals, advanced bone age and exaggerated trochanters. Endocrinological examinations revealed that sleep-induced growth hormone (GH) release and GH peak in clonidine- and glucagon-induced provocative tests as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein-3 levels were all markedly decreased, confirming deficiency of GH secretion. Bone age, unlikely to GH deficiency, was significantly advanced. To establish the diagnosis at a molecular level, we performed whole-exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis in the index patient, which revealed compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations: c.595C>T(p.Gln199*) and c.1651C>T(p.Arg551Cys), both of which are novel. Sanger sequencing showed that the former mutation was inherited from the healthy mother, whereas the latter one most probably occurred de novo. Our study describes the first case of DBQD2 resulting from compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutation, expands the mutational spectrum of the disease and provides evidence that the severe growth retardation and microsomia observed in DBQD2 patients may result not only from the skeletal dysplasia itself but also from GH and IGF-1 deficiency. PMID:27030147

  16. Novel DDR2 mutation identified by whole exome sequencing in a Moroccan patient with spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Maria; Kayserili, Hülya; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Nishimura, Gen; Iida, Aritoshi; Lyahyai, Jaber; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type (SMED, SL-AC), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder with various skeletal changes characterized by premature calcification leading to severe disproportionate short stature. Twenty-two patients have been reported until now, but only five mutations (four missense and one splice-site) in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene has been identified. We report here a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.370C > T (p.Arg124Trp) in a Moroccan girl with SMED, SL-AC, identified by whole exome sequencing. Our study has expanded the mutational spectrum of this rare disease and it has shown that exome sequencing is a powerful and cost-effective tool for the diagnosis of clinically heterogeneous disorders such as SMED. PMID:26463668

  17. Anal Dysplasia Screening

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review considered the role of the anal Pap test as a screening test for anal dysplasia in patients at high risk of anal SCC. The screening process is now thought to be improved with the addition of testing for the human papillomavirus (HPV) in high-risk populations. High-resolution anoscopy (a method to view the rectal area, using an anoscope, a lighted instrument inserted into the rectum) rather than routine anoscopy-guided biopsy, is also now considered to be the diagnostic standard. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Anal cancer, like cervical cancer, is a member of a broader group of anogenital cancers known to be associated with sexually transmitted viral HPV infection. Human papillomavirus is extremely prevalent, particularly in young, sexually active populations. Sexual practices involving receptive anal intercourse lead to significantly elevated risk for anal dysplasia and cancer, particularly in those with immune dysfunctions. Anal cancer is rare. It occurs at a rate of about 1 to 2 per 100,000 in the general population. It is the least common of the lower gastrointestinal cancers, representing about 4% of them, in contrast to colorectal cancers, which remain the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy. Certain segments of the population, however, such as HIV-positive men and women, other chronic immune-suppressed patients (e.g., after a transplant), injection drug users, and women with genital dysplasia /cancer, have a high susceptibility to anal cancer. Those with the highest identified risk for anal cancer are HIV-positive homosexual and bisexual men, at a rate of 70 per 100,000 men. The risk for anal cancer is reported to be increasing dramatically in HIV-positive males and females, particularly since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s. The introduction of effective viral therapy has been said to have transformed the AIDS epidemic in developed countries into a chronic

  18. FGFR3-related condition: a skeletal dysplasia with similarities to thanatophoric dysplasia and SADDAN due to Lys650Met.

    PubMed

    Farmakis, Shannon G; Shinawi, Marwan; Miller-Thomas, Michelle; Radmanesh, Alireza; Herman, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene account for six related skeletal dysplasia conditions: achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia types 1 and 2, SADDAN (severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans), and platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, San Diego type. This group of disorders has very characteristic clinical and radiologic features, which distinguish them from other skeletal dysplasias. They display a spectrum of severity in the skeletal findings, ranging from relatively mild hypochondroplasia to lethal thanatophoric dysplasia. We report a patient who has the missense FGFR3 mutation, Lys650Met, previously reported in association only with SADDAN, who exhibits some findings similar to both thanatophoric dysplasia (types 1 and 2) in addition to those findings characteristic of SADDAN. PMID:25119967

  19. Clinical and radiographic medium‐term evaluation on patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip, who were submitted to open reduction, capsuloplasty and Salter osteotomy☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Válney Luiz; Marques, Guilherme Lima; da Silva, Leonardo Jorge; di Macedo Bernardes, Tiago Augusto; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the clinical and radiographic medium‐term results from surgical treatment of developmental dysplasia through open reduction, Salter et al.’s osteotomy and capsuloplasty. Methods 13 patients were evaluated, 13 hips treated surgically by the proposed technique between 2004 and 2011. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was conducted by Dutoit et al. and Severin et al. criteria, respectively. Results the acetabular preoperative index for the 13 surgically treated hips ranged from 27° to 50° (average of 36), and after surgical correction to 18.5° (10–28°), so that the evaluations of preoperative and postoperative acetabular indexes showed up significant statistic reduction (p < 0.05). Regarding the postoperative clinical evaluation, it was found: nine excellent hips (69.2%), three good ones (23.1%), no fair hips (0%) and a poor one (7.7%). In radiographic evaluation, it was found: six excellent hips (46.1%), three good ones (23.1%), no fair hips (0%) and four poor ones (30.8%). Therefore, favorable results were obtained (92.3%), with grouped hips with excellent and good ratings as satisfactory and with fair and bad ratings as unsatisfactory. It is also important to notice that there was no significance among occurrence of complications, the patient's age, the time of surgery and the preoperative acetabular index (p > 0.05). As complications occurred, it was found that three subluxations and a subluxation associated with avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Conclusion open reduction, Salter et al.’s osteotomy and capsuloplasty are seen to be a viable option for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip, according to clinical and radiological medium‐term evaluations. PMID:26229772

  20. Maxillofacial fibrous dysplasia: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Markov, Peter; Syed, Ali Zakir; Markova, Christiana; Mendes, Rui Amaral

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented for orthodontic treatment, with a chief symptom of a 'shifting bite' and concurrent facial asymmetry with aesthetic concerns. The patient had previously received treatment from several general dentists and several specialists, without accurate diagnosis. Radiological investigation coupled with biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. Proper diagnosis led to changes in the treatment plan and gave the patient realistic expectations about the options she had for the outcome of treatment. Prompt diagnosis by dental practitioners is critical to patient satisfaction and successful outcome; therefore, it is important to familiarise ourselves with the signs, symptoms and proper course of management of fibrous dysplasia. PMID:27358102

  1. Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: evidence for autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed

    Kassner, E G; Haller, J O; Reddy, V H; Mitarotundo, A; Katz, I

    1976-12-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia is a syndrome that encompasses cranial hyperostosis, abnormal tubulation of cylindrical bones, and other skeletal and extraskeletal abnormalities. The most striking features are overgrowth of the supraorbital ridges which results in a Mephistophelian facial appearance and a radiographic configuration of the skull that has been likened to a soldier's helmet. Most patients have severe hearing loss, defective dentition, poorly developed musculature, and joint contractures. Dominant inheritance has been suggested in previous reports, but an appropriate pedigree has been documented in only one family. This paper describes three additional patients in two unrelated families: (1) an 8-year-old boy whose mother has mild metaphyseal dysplasia and several minor skeletal abnormalities that have occurred in patients with the syndrome; and (2) two maternal half-brothers. These cases provide additional evidence that frontometaphyseal dysplasia is an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance. PMID:998829

  2. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  3. Treatment of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A

    2011-04-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common orthopaedic developmental disorder of dogs. This paper reviews the treatment options available for management of the condition in the skeletally immature and adult dog. PMID:21906059

  4. Ectodermal dysplasia associated with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Volpato, Maria Carmen Palma Faria; de Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; Palma, Vinicius Canavarros; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia and sickle cell anaemia are inherited disorders that affect, respectively, the tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm and the production of erythrocytes by the bone marrow. The simultaneous occurrence of both disorders is extremely rare. This is a case of both ectodermal dysplasia and sickle cell anaemia reported in a 6-year-old. The patient had been diagnosed with sickle cell anaemia for only six months when he sought treatment presenting with the following: hypotrichosis, dry skin, periocular hyperpigmentation, protruding lips, hypodontia, and morphologically altered teeth. The clinical features combined with his medical history led to the diagnosis of ectodermal dysplasia. Dentists should be prepared to recognise patterns that escape normality to aid in the diagnosis of systemic changes, even in patients with other previous diagnoses. PMID:25343049

  5. The Bone Dysplasia Ontology: integrating genotype and phenotype information in the skeletal dysplasia domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Skeletal dysplasias are a rare and heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting skeletal development. Patients with skeletal dysplasias suffer from many complex medical issues including degenerative joint disease and neurological complications. Because the data and expertise associated with this field is both sparse and disparate, significant benefits will potentially accrue from the availability of an ontology that provides a shared conceptualisation of the domain knowledge and enables data integration, cross-referencing and advanced reasoning across the relevant but distributed data sources. Results We introduce the design considerations and implementation details of the Bone Dysplasia Ontology. We also describe the different components of the ontology, including a comprehensive and formal representation of the skeletal dysplasia domain as well as the related genotypes and phenotypes. We then briefly describe SKELETOME, a community-driven knowledge curation platform that is underpinned by the Bone Dysplasia Ontology. SKELETOME enables domain experts to use, refine and extend and apply the ontology without any prior ontology engineering experience--to advance the body of knowledge in the skeletal dysplasia field. Conclusions The Bone Dysplasia Ontology represents the most comprehensive structured knowledge source for the skeletal dysplasias domain. It provides the means for integrating and annotating clinical and research data, not only at the generic domain knowledge level, but also at the level of individual patient case studies. It enables links between individual cases and publicly available genotype and phenotype resources based on a community-driven curation process that ensures a shared conceptualisation of the domain knowledge and its continuous incremental evolution. PMID:22449239

  6. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jhamb, Aakarsh; Mohanty, Sujata; Jhamb, Parul A

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia can present clinically in varied forms which may appear as collision of different pathologic processes. We report a rare case of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia with coexisting epithelial lined cyst and superimposed osteomyelitis with sequestrum formation. Its clinical features and management with possible hypotheses are described along with the post operative course. Pertinent literature has been reviewed with emphasis on pathogenesis of this unique occurrence. PMID:23248490

  7. Cloning of the anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia gene: Identification of cDNAs associated with CpG islands mapped near translocation breakpoint in two female patients

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.K.; Schlessinger, D.; Kere, J.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for the X chromosomal developmental disorder anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) has been mapped to Xq12-q13 by linkage analysis and is expressed in a few females with chromosomal translocations involving band Xq12-q13. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig (2.0 Mb) spanning two translocation breakpoints has been assembled by sequence-tagged site (STS)-based chromosomal walking. The two translocation breakpoints (X:autosome translocations from the affected female patients) have been mapped less than 60 kb apart within a YAC contig. Unique probes and intragenic STSs (mapped between the two translocations) have been developed and a somatic cell hybrid carrying the translocated X chromosome from the AK patient has been analyzed by isolating unique probes that span the breakpoint. Several STSs made from intragenic sequences have been found to be conserved in mouse, hamster and monkey, but we have detected no mRNAs in a number of tissues tested. However, a probe and STS developed from the DNA spanning the AK breakpoint is conserved in mouse, hamster and monkey, and we have detected expressed sequences in skin cells and cDNA libraries. In addition, unique sequences have been obtained from two CpG islands in the region that maps proximal to the breakpoints. cDNAs containing these sequences are being studied as candidates for the gene affected in the etiology of EDA.

  8. Hexasomy of the Prader-Willi/Angelman critical region, including the OCA2 gene, in a patient with pigmentary dysplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Chaabouni, Myriam; Ewers, Elisabeth; Chelly, Imen; Ouertani, Ines; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Maazoul, Faouzi; Liehr, Thomas; Chaabouni, Habiba

    2011-01-01

    Derivatives of chromosome 15, often referred to as inv dup(15), represent the most common supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). SMC(15)s can be classified into two major groups according to their length: small SMC(15) and large ones. Depending on the amount of euchromatin, the carriers may either present with a normal phenotype or with a recognizable syndrome. Here we describe a patient with severe mental retardation, epilepsy, dysmorphic features and pigmentary dysplasia. His karyotype was 47,XY,+mar[41]/46,XY[9]. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the SMC to be originating from chromosome 15, dicentric and containing four copies of the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome Critical Region (PWACR), including the OCA2 gene. Molecular studies indicated that it is maternally derived. This report supports the previous observations assuming that severity of phenotype in patients with SMC(15) depends on the dosage of the PWACR and that skin pigmentation is correlated to OCA2 gene copy number. PMID:21621018

  9. [A Case of Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Patient with Various Main Trunk Dissections in the Head and Neck over a Short Period].

    PubMed

    Ando, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Osamu; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Nashimoto, Takeo; Kikuchi, Bumpei

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH)from an intracranial vertebral artery(VA)dissection in a patient with fibromuscular dysplasia(FMD)who presented with headache. A 54-year-old woman complained of spontaneous occipital headache. The dilatation of the left VA was detected on magnetic resonance angiography(MRA). She was diagnosed with left VA dissection(headache onset type). After sudden onset of headache on the second day of hospitalization, her consciousness level, as defined by the Japan Coma Scale, was 300. Computed tomography(CT)revealed SAH. Cerebral angiography showed the dilatation of the left intracranial VA and contrast material pooling, which was suspected to be a sign of dissection. We performed VA intravascular ligation by coil embolization. The postoperative course was good but postoperative MRA revealed arterial wall irregularities in both the extra cranial internal carotid artery and the right VA. Cerebral angiography showed the presence of the string-of-beads sign at these arteries. She was diagnosed with FMD. SAH might develop during the follow-up period in patients with VA dissection, even those in whom the initial symptom is headache. In addition, cases of FMD might also be complicated by various lesions of the main trunk of the cerebral artery. PMID:27384119

  10. Ectodermal dysplasia in identical twins

    PubMed Central

    Puttaraju, Gurkar Haraswarupa; Visveswariah, Paranjyothi Magadi

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is typically inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, characterized by deformity of at least two or more of the ectodermal structures - hair, teeth, nails and sweat glands. Two cases of hereditary HED involving identical male twins, is being documented for the rarity of its occurrence with special attention given to genetics, pathophysiology, clinical, intraoral manifestations and to the methods to improve the masticatory function, the facial esthetics and psychology of patients affected by this disease. PMID:23956595

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Greenberg dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop properly, causing a distinctive spotted appearance called moth-eaten bone, which is visible on x-ray ... Greenberg dysplasia is also called hydrops-ectopic calcification-moth-eaten skeletal dysplasia (HEM), which reflects the condition's ...

  12. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  13. [Renal dysplasia: clinico-pathologic review].

    PubMed

    Cunha, A S; de Sousa, J F; Garcia, C

    1992-05-01

    Histology records from 63 nephrectomies were reviewed; 22 patients had unilateral totally dysplastic kidneys and 5 had polar or segmental dysplasia. A clinicopathological study of these cases was undertaken. In the first group, there was a slight male preponderance and 75% of the patients presented were under two years of age. Urinary tract infection was the most common complaint. 4 patients were diagnosed in utero by ultrasound and 5 infants presented an abdominal mass. Hypertension was documented in a newborn baby. Ipsilateral lower urinary tract anomalies were found in 12 patients and those of the contralateral kidney in 2 children. There were 3 cases of extrarenal anomalies. Histological examination revealed 13 cases of multicystic dysplasia and 9 of solid dysplasia. Metaplastic cartilage was found in 1 case. In the group of segmental dysplasia, age ranging from 27 weeks' gestation to 8 years, at the time of the diagnosis. They all had duplex kidneys and 4 had ureterocele. Histological study in these cases was similar to the one found in the previous series, although superimposed inflammatory changes were more pronounced. Some of the theories regarding the pathogenesis of this disorder are reviewed and the importance of its diagnosis is emphasised. PMID:1502940

  14. The Association of High Risk Human Papillomaviruses in Patients With Cervical Cancer: An Evidence Based Study on Patients With Squamous Cell Dysplasia or Carcinoma for Evaluation of 23 Human Papilloma Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mostafavi Zadeh, Seyed Mostafa; Madani, Azita; Soleimani, Reza; Nedaeinia, Reza; Niakan, Mohammad; Avan, Amir; Manian, Mostafa; Moradi, Mohammad; Eftekhar, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in females. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the major risk factor of cervical cancer. Objectives The aim of the current study was to explore the frequency and role of 23 different HPVs in patients with cervical cancer. Materials and Methods Overall, 117 formalin-fix and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from cervical cancer patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or dysplasia were collected from Mirza-Kochakkhan-Jangali hospital, Tehran, Iran during year 2013, to investigate the presence of HPV- HPV- 67, 68, 6, 11, 13, 16, 17, 30, 69, 39, 40, 42, 64, 66 and 51 to 59 genotypes. Results The Pap smear report illustrated the presence of malignancy in 71 cases, while 11 cases had no evidence of malignancy. Among the patients, 26 cases had sexually transmitted disease with relative frequency of 0.58. Infection with papilloma virus was observed in 83.6% of SCC patients and 45% of the dysplasia group. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were 18 with 31.62% and 16 with 27.35% of cases. Moreover the relative frequencies of HPV-33, -6, -58, -52, -35 and -51, genotypes were 15.38, 7.69, 5.98, 5.12 and 3.41%, respectively. Among the different genotypes of HPV, 31 had the lowest and 16 had the highest relative frequency. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that HPV-16 and -18 have a higher prevalence in our population than 31 and 51. Further investigations are required to evaluate the role of these genotypes in a larger multicenter setting for establishing their values for early detection of patients, which is useful for screening and vaccination programs of cancerous and precancerous lesions of cervical cancer. PMID:27279992

  15. Glenoid Dysplasia: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Josef K; Galvin, Joseph W; Grassbaugh, Jason A; Parada, Stephen A; Li, Xinning

    2016-06-01

    ➤Subtle forms of glenoid dysplasia may be more common than previously thought and likely predispose some patients to symptomatic posterior shoulder instability. Severe glenoid dysplasia is a rare condition with characteristic radiographic findings involving the posteroinferior aspect of the glenoid that often remains asymptomatic.➤Instability symptoms related to glenoid dysplasia may develop over time with increased activities or trauma. Physical therapy focusing on rotator cuff strengthening and proprioceptive control should be the initial management.➤Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic arthrograms are useful for detecting subtle glenoid dysplasia by revealing the presence of an abnormally thickened or hypertrophic posterior part of the labrum, increased capsular volume, glenoid retroversion, and posteroinferior glenoid deficiency.➤Open and arthroscopic labral repair and capsulorrhaphy procedures have been described for symptomatic posterior shoulder instability. Glenoid retroversion of >10° may be a risk factor for failure following soft-tissue-only procedures for symptomatic glenoid dysplasia.➤Osseous procedures are categorized as either glenoid reorientation (osteotomy) or glenoid augmentation (bone graft), and no predictable results have been demonstrated for any surgical strategy. Glenoid osteotomies have been described for increased retroversion, with successful results, although others have noted substantial complications and poor outcomes.➤In severe glenoid dysplasia, the combination of bone deficiency and retroversion makes glenoid osteotomy extremely challenging. Bone grafts placed in a lateralized position to create a blocking effect may increase the risk of the development of arthritis, while newer techniques that place the graft in a congruent position may decrease this risk. PMID:27252441

  16. Recurrent Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nilton; de Oliveira, Reinaldo José; Takehana, Denise; Deana, Naira Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a condition in which normal bone marrow is replaced by an abnormal proliferation of new fibrous connective tissue. Female patient, white, 20 years old, attended the dental clinic reporting a slow increase in volume in the right mandible region over the last 5 years. She was examined by imaging: the panoramic X-ray revealed a lesion with the appearance of ground glass while the cone-beam computed tomography showed an extensive lesion in the region of the right hemimandible. The histopathological examination was compatible with fibrous dysplasia. Bone gammagraphy was indicated, plus an endocrinological study to eliminate polyostotic forms, which produced a negative result. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the right hemimandible was diagnosed. Conservative surgery was carried out and after 1 year recurrence of the tumour was observed. We may conclude that conservative surgery might not be the best choice for treatment for monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the mandible and that other options must be considered, such as radical surgery or the use of bisphosphonates. In our study, we may also conclude that it is very important to explain to the patient the possibility of recurrence of the lesion and the need for monitoring with periodic imaging studies. PMID:27340572

  17. Recurrent Monostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Reinaldo José; Takehana, Denise; Deana, Naira Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a condition in which normal bone marrow is replaced by an abnormal proliferation of new fibrous connective tissue. Female patient, white, 20 years old, attended the dental clinic reporting a slow increase in volume in the right mandible region over the last 5 years. She was examined by imaging: the panoramic X-ray revealed a lesion with the appearance of ground glass while the cone-beam computed tomography showed an extensive lesion in the region of the right hemimandible. The histopathological examination was compatible with fibrous dysplasia. Bone gammagraphy was indicated, plus an endocrinological study to eliminate polyostotic forms, which produced a negative result. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the right hemimandible was diagnosed. Conservative surgery was carried out and after 1 year recurrence of the tumour was observed. We may conclude that conservative surgery might not be the best choice for treatment for monostotic fibrous dysplasia in the mandible and that other options must be considered, such as radical surgery or the use of bisphosphonates. In our study, we may also conclude that it is very important to explain to the patient the possibility of recurrence of the lesion and the need for monitoring with periodic imaging studies. PMID:27340572

  18. Effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy on the mechanical stress within the hip joint in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip: a subject-specific finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ike, H; Inaba, Y; Kobayashi, N; Yukizawa, Y; Hirata, Y; Tomioka, M; Saito, T

    2015-04-01

    In this study we used subject-specific finite element analysis to investigate the mechanical effects of rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) on the hip joint and analysed the correlation between various radiological measurements and mechanical stress in the hip joint. We evaluated 13 hips in 12 patients (two men and ten women, mean age at surgery 32.0 years; 19 to 46) with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) who were treated by RAO. Subject-specific finite element models were constructed from CT data. The centre-edge (CE) angle, acetabular head index (AHI), acetabular angle and acetabular roof angle (ARA) were measured on anteroposterior pelvic radiographs taken before and after RAO. The relationship between equivalent stress in the hip joint and radiological measurements was analysed. The equivalent stress in the acetabulum decreased from 4.1 MPa (2.7 to 6.5) pre-operatively to 2.8 MPa (1.8 to 3.6) post-operatively (p < 0.01). There was a moderate correlation between equivalent stress in the acetabulum and the radiological measurements: CE angle (R = -0.645, p < 0.01); AHI (R = -0.603, p < 0.01); acetabular angle (R = 0.484, p = 0.02); and ARA (R = 0.572, p < 0.01). The equivalent stress in the acetabulum of patients with DDH decreased after RAO. Correction of the CE angle, AHI and ARA was considered to be important in reducing the mechanical stress in the hip joint. PMID:25820887

  19. Early severe scoliosis in a patient with atypical progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD): Identification of two WISP3 mutations, one previously unreported.

    PubMed

    Montané, Lucia Sentchordi; Marín, Oliver R; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Vallespín, Elena; Del Pozo, Ángela; Heath, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia associated with pain and stiffness of multiple joints, enlargement of the interphalangeal joints, normal inflammatory parameters, and absence of extra-skeletal manifestations. Homozygous or compound heterozygous WISP3 mutations cause PPD. We report two siblings from a non-consanguineous Ecuadorian family with a late-onset spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia. Mutation screening was undertaken in the two affected siblings using a customized skeletal dysplasia next generation sequencing (NGS) panel and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Two compound heterozygous mutations were identified in WISP3 exon 2, c.[190G>A];[197G>A] (p.[(Gly64Arg)];[(Ser66Asn)]) in the two siblings, both of which had been inherited. The p. (Gly64Arg) mutation has not been previously described whilst the p. (Ser66Asn) mutation has been reported in two PPD families. The two siblings presented with atypical PPD, as they presented during late childhood, yet the severity was different between them. The progression was particularly aggressive in the male sibling who suffered severe scoliosis by the age of 13 years. This case reaffirms the clinical heterogeneity of this disorder and the clinical utility of NGS to genetically diagnose skeletal dysplasias, enabling adequate management, monitorization, and genetic counseling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991965

  20. Co-existence of acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia and Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhira, Michihide; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nemoto, Tomoe; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kameda, Hideto; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease mediated by inflammatory processes mainly at the joints. Recently, awareness of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (T-LPD) has been heightened for its association with methotraxate usage in RA patients. In the contrary, acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia (AML-MLD) has never been documented to be present concomitantly with the above two conditions. In this report we present a case of an autopsy-proven co-existence of AML-MLD and EBV-associated T-LPD in a patient with RA. PMID:19566938

  1. Optic disc anomalies and frontonasal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, P; Lees, M; Lawson, J; Reardon, W; Leitch, J; Thorogood, P; Winter, R; Taylor, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To document the optic disc abnormalities in patients with frontonasal dysplasia in association with basal encephalocele.
METHODS—Names and hospital numbers of patients with midline clefts were obtained from the ophthalmology and genetics database. Six patients were identified who had the following common findings: midline facial cleft with midline cleft lip and palate; hypertelorism; absent corpus callosum; basal (sphenoethmoidal) encephalocele; and pituitary deficiency (five out of six cases). Ophthalmic examination was performed with fundal photography where possible.
RESULTS—Two patients had unilateral and one a bilateral peripapillary staphyloma. Two patients had bilateral optic disc hypoplasia and one appeared to have a peripapillary staphyloma in one eye and a morning glory disc in the other.
CONCLUSION—Optic disc abnormalities were found in all patients with this constellation of clinical findings. This association appears to represent a distinct subgroup within the spectrum of frontonasal dysplasia. The presence of midline facial anomalies and any dysplastic disc should alert the physician as to the presence of an encephalocele.

 Keywords: frontonasal dysplasia; optic disc; encephalocele PMID:9602627

  2. Syntelencephaly associated with connected transhemispheric cleft of focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Togari, H; Banno, T; Wada, Y

    1999-05-01

    The authors report a female with syntelencephaly associated with a connected transhemispheric cleft of focal cortical dysplasia. Syntelencephaly is a rare anomaly characterized by fusion of the hemispheres in the posterior frontal and parietal regions and is considered a new variant of holoprosencephaly. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging of the patient revealed syntelencephaly associated with bilateral fused clefts of focal cortical dysplasia without the pial-ependymal seam, which was regarded as an incomplete type of schizencephaly. The underlying mechanism is discussed. PMID:10371387

  3. Ipsilateral Sphenoid Wing Dysplasia, Orbital Plexiform Neurofibroma and Fronto-Parietal Dermal Cylindroma in a Patient with Segmental Neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Hagel, Christian; Mautner, Victor-Felix

    2015-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disease affecting various parts of the body. Penetrance is almost complete but the phenotype varies considerably. Recently, mosaicism in NF1 has come into the focus of scientific interest. This report refers to a patient with orbitotemporal-confined neurofibromatosis who developed a rare skin tumor in the region. PMID:26637901

  4. "Baby rattle" pelvis dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Daire, V; Savarirayan, R; Lachman, R S; Neidich, J A; Grace, K; Rimoin, D L; Wilcox, W R

    2001-04-15

    We report an apparently previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia, clinically resembling achondrogenesis, but with distinct radiologic and chondro-osseous morphologic features. These comprise bifid distal ends of the long bones of the limbs, absent vertebral body ossification, a unique "baby rattle" pelvic configuration with tall and broad ilia, absent endochondral ossification, regions of mesenchymal cells within the resting cartilage, and abnormal mesenchymal ossification. PMID:11337746

  5. Thanatophoric dysplasia: A review.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, H

    2016-01-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia is a well-known cause of potentially lethal short-limbed dwarfism in the newborn. The diagnosis is usually made by the recognition of characteristic radiological changes and confirmed at autopsy by demonstration of specific morphological and histological changes in the brain. This review is based upon the author's personal experience and archived data of 19 cases and concerns the clinical and radiographic manifestations, autopsy findings, molecular pathogenesis and the approach to antenatal diagnosis. PMID:27245526

  6. Severity grading in radial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vilkki, S K

    2014-11-01

    A functional scoring method to grade the usefulness and quality of the upper limbs in congenital radial dysplasia is presented. It is based on the author's examinations of 44 arms with congenital deficiency of the radius. The hand (H), wrist (W) and proximal parts (P) of the extremity are each scored from 0 to 10 points for severity. The scoring is expressed similarly to the TNM (tumour, nodes, metastasis) tumour classification, for example as H5W4P2. The maximum severity index is 30 points. A severity grade of mild is between 1 and 8 points, moderate between 9 and 16 points and severe 17 points and over. In the author's series, the grades were mild in eight, moderate in 21 and severe in 15 cases. The functional severity grading should allow better comparison of radially deficient limbs and the results of treatment between groups of patients. PMID:24401744

  7. Treatment of Dysplasia in Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Hernandez, Javier; Cirocco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Barrett esophagus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage with a 5-year survival rate of 15%. Most of these patients present de novo and are not part of a surveillance program. Endoscopic screening with improvement in recognition of early lesions may change this pattern. In the past, patients diagnosed with dysplasia and mucosal cancer were best managed by esophagectomy. Endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and radiofrequency ablation have resulted in high curative rates and a shift away from esophagectomy. This pathway is supported by the literature review of esophagectomies performed for mucosal disease, as well as pathologists' interpretation of endoscopic mucosal specimens, which document the low risk of lymph node metastasis. The role of endoscopic therapy for superficial submucosal disease continues to be a challenge. PMID:24570884

  8. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia with Raynaud's phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. V. S. Hari; Aravinda, K.; Narayanan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone disorder characterized by alteration in bone morphology. Monostotic FD is the commonest variant and affects the craniofacial bones. Raynaud's phenomenon is recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes due to cold exposure. The disease is usually idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disorders. Raynaud's phenomenon is not described previously with FD. We recently encountered two interesting patients of craniofacial monostotic FD with Raynaud's phenomenon and report the same in this report. PMID:26283854

  9. Grading of cervical dysplasias by frozen section.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, S; Smart, G E; Livingstone, J R

    1985-09-14

    Grading of cervical dysplasias at colposcopy by means of rapid frozen section avoids the delay inevitable with paraffin sections. The immediacy of the diagnosis benefits the patient, who can be treated at her first visit. A comparison of grading by frozen sections with paraffin sections has confirmed the safety of the frozen method. Additional advantages are opportunities for optimum orientation and "rescue" of specimens, improved colposcopic training, and the facilitation of special investigations on fresh cervical tissue. PMID:2863606

  10. Spatial changes of the peri-acetabular pelvic in developmental dysplasia of the hip---a combined 3-dimentional computed tomography (3D-CT) study in patients and experimental study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Cong; Liu, Tianjing; Xie, Hengcui; Li, Jianjun; Gao, Sizhe; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Enbo

    2014-01-01

    Few previous studies noticed the three bony structures that formed the acetabulum in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). This study aimed at investigating the spatial changes of the peri-acetabular pelvis in developmental dysplasia of the hip through radiological evaluation of the patients and experimental observations in rat models. 115 unilateral DDH patients were studied through 3D-CT. In reconstruction workstation, the iliopubic inner plate angle, ilioischial inner plate angle and ischialpubic inner plate angle were measured and compared. 58 neonatal Wistar rats were divided into two groups and the rats in experiment group were swaddled to establish DDH models. The hips were sectioned, stained. The same three angles were measured and compared. The ilioischial inner plate angle of the affected hip decreased while the ischialpubic inner plate angle increased compared to those of the contralateral side. The iliopubic inner plate angle showed no difference between the affected and unaffected hips. In animal models we observed the same pathological pattern. The three angles measured on the sections showed similar tendency as those in the patients with DDH. The ischium rotates up and forwardly around the posterior and vertical limbs of the triradiate cartilage complex in DDH, just as a lifted piece of Pizza. PMID:25663996

  11. Initial respiratory management in preterm infants and bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    López, Ester Sanz; Rodríguez, Elena Maderuelo; Navarro, Cristina Ramos; Sánchez-Luna, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventilator injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Avoiding invasive ventilation could reduce lung injury, and early respiratory management may affect pulmonary outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of initial respiratory support on survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia at a gestational age of 36 weeks. DESIGN/METHODS: A prospective 3-year observational study. Preterm infants of <32 weeks gestational age were classified into 4 groups according to the support needed during the first 2 hours of life: room air, nasal continuous positive airway pressure, intubation/surfactant/extubation and prolonged mechanical ventilation (defined as needing mechanical ventilation for more than 2 hours). RESULTS: Of the 329 eligible patients, a total of 49% did not need intubation, and 68.4% did not require prolonged mechanical ventilation. At a gestational age of 26 weeks, there was a significant correlation between survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia and initial respiratory support. Preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation showed a higher risk of death and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. After controlling for gestational age, antenatal corticosteroid use, maternal preeclampsia and chorioamnionitis, the survival rate without bronchopulmonary dysplasia remained significantly lower in the mechanically ventilated group. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, the need for more than 2 hours of mechanical ventilation predicted the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants with a gestational age >26 weeks (sensitivity = 89.5% and specificity = 67%). The need for prolonged mechanical ventilation could be an early marker for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. This finding could help identify a target population with a high risk of chronic lung disease. Future research is needed to determine other strategies to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in this high-risk group of patients. PMID

  12. Treatment of High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in High Risk Patients: Outcome at an Urban Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Assoumou, Sabrina Annick; Panther, Lori Ann; Feng, Yang; Gelman, Rebecca Sue; Fugelso, Dana Kailani; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Human immunodeficiency (HIV)-infected patients and men who have sex with men (MSM) have a higher rate of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), a likely precursor to anal cancer. This retrospective study describes the outcome of treating MSM with incident biopsy-proven HGAIN in an urban community health setting with access to outpatient ablation or operative treatment. The main outcome was freedom from HGAIN at follow-up. 153 met inclusion criteria; 86 (56%) were HIV-infected. Eighty (52%) received outpatient ablation, 49(61%) had a follow-up within 9 months. Among those, 26 (53%) were free of high-grade disease, 19 (39%) had high-grade disease; and 4 (8%) had unknown grading. In a logistic regression model, a lower extent of anal disease (1 quadrant vs. 2,3, or 4 quadrants) was significantly associated with a lower probability of high-grade disease (p-value 0.04.) HGAIN could be managed in a community health setting; however, systems are needed to ensure follow-up care. PMID:23535356

  13. Cost-effectiveness of surveillance strategies after treatment for high-grade anal dysplasia in high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; Panther, Lori; Linas, Benjamin P.; Kim, Jane J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected male patients. Currently, there is no consensus on post-treatment surveillance of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) who have been treated for high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the likely precursor to anal cancer. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of a range of strategies for anal cancer surveillance in HIV-infected MSM previously treated for HGAIN. Methods We developed a Markov model to project quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE), lifetime costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) of five strategies using high resolution anoscopy (HRA) and/or anal cytology testing after treatment. Results Performing HRA alone at 6- and 12-month visits was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio of $4,446 per QALY gained. In comparison, combined HRA and anal cytology at both visits provided the greater health benefit at a cost of $ 17,373 per QALY gained. Our results were robust over a number of scenarios and assumptions, including patients’ level of immunosuppression. Results were most sensitive to test characteristics and cost, and progression rates of normal to HGAIN and HGAIN to cancer. Conclusions Our results suggest that combined HRA and anal cytology at 6 and 12 months may be a cost-effective surveillance strategy following treatment of HGAIN in HIV-infected MSM. PMID:23486494

  14. A patient-specific model of the biomechanics of hip reduction for neonatal Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: Investigation of strategies for low to severe grades of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Huayamave, Victor; Rose, Christopher; Serra, Sheila; Jones, Brendan; Divo, Eduardo; Moslehy, Faissal; Kassab, Alain J; Price, Charles T

    2015-07-16

    A physics-based computational model of neonatal Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) following treatment with the Pavlik Harness (PV) was developed to obtain muscle force contribution in order to elucidate biomechanical factors influencing the reduction of dislocated hips. Clinical observation suggests that reduction occurs in deep sleep involving passive muscle action. Consequently, a set of five (5) adductor muscles were identified as mediators of reduction using the PV. A Fung/Hill-type model was used to characterize muscle response. Four grades (1-4) of dislocation were considered, with one (1) being a low subluxation and four (4) a severe dislocation. A three-dimensional model of the pelvis-femur lower limb of a representative 10 week-old female was generated based on CT-scans with the aid of anthropomorphic scaling of anatomical landmarks. The model was calibrated to achieve equilibrium at 90° flexion and 80° abduction. The hip was computationally dislocated according to the grade under investigation, the femur was restrained to move in an envelope consistent with PV restraints, and the dynamic response under passive muscle action and the effect of gravity was resolved. Model results with an anteversion angle of 50° show successful reduction Grades 1-3, while Grade 4 failed to reduce with the PV. These results are consistent with a previous study based on a simplified anatomically-consistent synthetic model and clinical reports of very low success of the PV for Grade 4. However our model indicated that it is possible to achieve reduction of Grade 4 dislocation by hyperflexion and the resultant external rotation. PMID:25957995

  15. Calcification of basal ganglia and cerebellar roof nuclei in mentally defective patient with hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. Analysis of intracranial concretions by electon microprobe.

    PubMed

    Copeland, D D; Lamb, W A; Klintworth, G K

    1977-11-01

    This report describes, for the first time, an analysis by electron microprobe of concretions in the brain of an individual with striopallidodentate calcification. We also report the unique association of this intracranial syndrome with hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. An institutionalized male with impaired intellectual function and hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia was known since the age of 3 years to have bilateral radiopaque densities in the region of the basal ganglia on skull roentgenogram. He died at age 29 in congestive heart failure from rheumatic pancarditis. At autopsy, concretions were identified in globus pallidus, caudate nuclei, thalamus, and dentate nuclei. Mineral deposits within the brain, analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, consisted predominately of calcium and phosphorus. Trace amounts of magnesium, iron, and silicon also were detected. PMID:562997

  16. Congenital generalised bone dysplasias: a clinical, radiological, and epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P E; Hauge, M

    1989-01-01

    The point prevalence at birth of generalised bone dysplasias was estimated by a study of all children born between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1983 in the county of Fyn (Denmark). Additionally the population prevalence on 31 December 1983 of all patients with generalised bone dysplasias in this county was determined. The county is a well defined, representative subregion of Denmark which demographically comprises a cross section of about 9% of the Danish population. In total, bone dysplasias were found to be more frequent than generally assumed. Achondroplasia was, however, less common with a point prevalence at birth of 1.3 per 100,000, while osteogenesis imperfecta (21.8), multiple epiphyseal dysplasia tarda (9.0), achondrogenesis (6.4), osteopetrosis (5.1), and thanatophoric dysplasia (3.8) were found more frequently. It is striking how many bone dysplasias are still erroneously classified as achondroplasia. Correct diagnosis is important for a valid prognosis, for treatment, and for genetic counselling. The diagnosis relies almost exclusively on the radiographical findings. PMID:2783977

  17. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  18. Endoscopic options for treatment of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Vance, R Brooks; Dunbar, Kerry B

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the endoscopic treatment of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) have allowed endoscopists to provide effective and durable eradication therapies. This review summarizes the available endoscopic eradication techniques for dysplasia in patients with BE including endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection, photodynamic therapy, argon plasma coagulation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. PMID:26722612

  19. Fibromuscular Dysplasia Presenting with Bilateral Renal Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Doody, O.; Adam, W. R.; Foley, P. T.; Lyon, S. M.

    2009-03-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) describes a group of conditions which cause nonatheromatous arterial stenoses, most commonly of the renal and carotid arteries, typically in young women. We report a rare case of bilateral segmental renal infarction secondary to FMD in a young male patient. His initial presentation with loin pain and pyrexia resulted in a delay in the definitive diagnosis of FMD. He was successfully treated with bilateral balloon angioplasty. The delayed diagnosis in this patient until the condition had progressed to bilateral renal infarcts highlights the need for prompt investigation and diagnosis of suspected cases of FMD.

  20. Placentomegaly and placental mesenchymal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Minakshi; Siwatch, Sujata; Jain, Vanita; Nijhawan, Raje

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old primigravida presented to the labour ward at 37 weeks gestation referred with intrauterine growth restriction, oligohydramnios and placentomegaly. Differential diagnoses of placentomegaly were considered. Her antenatal blood screening tests were normal. There were no fetal malformations. However, triple screen and fetal karyotype were not done as patient presented late in pregnancy. The patient soon went into spontaneous labour and delivered a girl weighing 2.15 kg with a normal Apgar score. The cord was long and twisted; placenta was bulky, 1.7 kg, with prominent grape-like vesicles involving whole placenta with a rim of normal placenta at the periphery. Microscopy showed some areas of multiple villi with marked hydropic changes and myxoid degeneration, preserved vasculature and no trophoblastic proliferation. Placental mesenchymal dysplasia was thus diagnosed. The baby had no evidence of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. The child is now 3 years old with normal development and is doing well. PMID:23266781

  1. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Clinical Overview for the Dental Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Halai, Tina; Stevens, Claire

    2015-10-01

    The term ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is used to describe a group of rare congenital disorders characterized by abnormalities of two or more ectodermal structures such as the skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands. This paper will give an overview of the aetiology of ED and describe the manifestations and dental management of this condition. In particular, the important role of the dental practitioner in the identification and management of patients with ED will be highlighted. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Dental practitioners should be aware of the oral features of ectodermal dysplasia and be able to make timely referrals and provide appropriate continuing care for these patients. PMID:26685476

  2. Genetics Home Reference: osteoglophonic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... images. Premature fusion of certain bones in the skull (craniosynostosis) typically occurs in osteoglophonic dysplasia . The craniosynostosis ... in the medical literature as a tower-shaped skull , or a relatively mild version of a deformity ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: campomelic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a severe disorder that affects development of the skeleton, reproductive system, and other parts of the body. ... those that are important for development of the skeleton and reproductive organs. Most cases of campomelic dysplasia ...

  4. Guide to Understanding Fibrous Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is usually involved. It can also result in cranial nerve problems. If the temporal bone is affected, the ... paralysis or dizziness. However, any of our 12 cranial nerves can be involved with fibrous dysplasia. The more ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: craniometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Craniofacial Association International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, UCLA National ... F, Sørensen ES, Kaartinen MT, McKee MD. Pyrophosphate inhibits mineralization of osteoblast cultures by binding to mineral, up-regulating osteopontin, and ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: acromicric dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACROMICRIC DYSPLASIA Sources for This Page Faivre L, Le Merrer M, Baumann C, Polak M, Chatelain P, ... or Free article on PubMed Central Klein C, Le Goff C, Topouchian V, Odent S, Violas P, Glorion ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: metatropic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a skeletal disorder characterized by short stature (dwarfism) with other skeletal abnormalities. The term "metatropic" is ... my area? Other Names for This Condition metatropic dwarfism metatropic dysplasia type 1 Related Information How are ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: frontonasal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Frontonasal dysplasia 3 KidsHealth from Nemours: Cleft Lip and Palate MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Head and Face Reconstruction ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Centers for Disease Control and ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: frontometaphyseal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowed limbs, an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), and abnormalities of the fingers and hands. Characteristic ... and genetic heterogeneity in frontometaphyseal dysplasia: severe progressive scoliosis in two families. Am J Med Genet A. ...

  10. Diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maha S; Saleem, Sahar N; Dobyns, William B; Barkovich, A James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-08-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic 'butterfly'-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term 'diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia' to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation. PMID:22822038

  11. New directions in clinical imaging of cortical dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Madan, Neel; Grant, P Ellen

    2009-10-01

    Neuroimaging is essential in the work-up of patients with intractable epilepsy. In pediatric patients with medically refractory epilepsy, cortical dysplasias account for a large percentage of the epileptogenic substrate. Unfortunately, these are also the most subtle lesions to identify. For this reason, there has been ongoing interest in utilizing new advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to improve the ability to identify, diagnose, characterize, and delineate cortical dysplasias. Technologic gains such as multichannel coils (32 phased array and beyond) and higher field strengths (3T, 7T, and greater) coupled with newer imaging sequences such as arterial spin labeling (ASL), susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) and diffusion tensor/spectrum imaging (DTI/DSI) are likely to increase yield. Improved MRI techniques coupled with a multimodality approach including magnetoencephalography (MEG), positron emission tomography (PET), and other techniques will increase sensitivity and specificity for identifying cortical dysplasias. PMID:19761449

  12. A retrospective study of clinical and mutational findings in 45 Danish families with ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann Svendsen, Mathias; Henningsen, Emil; Hertz, Jens Michael; Vestergaard Grejsen, Dorthe; Bygum, Anette

    2014-09-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias form a complex, nosologic group of diseases with defects in at least 2 ectodermal structures. A retrospective study of patients with ectodermal dysplasia seen at our department over a period of 19 years (1994-2013) was performed. The study population consisted of 67 patients covering 17 different diagnoses. Forty-five families were identified of which 26 were sporadic cases with no affected family members. In 27 tested families a disease-causing mutation was identified in 23 families. Eleven mutations were novel mutations. To our knowledge, we present the first large ectodermal dysplasia cohort focusing on clinical manifestations in combination with mutational analysis. We recommend a nationwide study to estimate the prevalence of the ectodermal dysplasia and to ensure relevant molecular genetic testing which may form the basis of a national ectodermal dysplasia database. PMID:24514865

  13. Bilateral Staged Total Hip Replacement and the Natural Progress of an Untreated Case of Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip: A Clinical Case Report by the Surgeon and the Patient.

    PubMed

    Honarpisheh, Hamid; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-07-01

    The natural history of an untreated case of a Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip (DDH) associated with multiple congenital abnormalities is reported in a 55-years-old man. The patient's complaints and the varieties of the typical manifestations emerged in other parts of the body throughout the life are reviewed and discussed as comorbidities of a dysplastic condition. Two-stage bilateral total hip replacement (THR) operations were performed at the age of 55. In addition, to relieve the pain, the walking disabilities were overcome, hence gaining normal walking in swing and stances. The leg length discrepancy was corrected by anatomically positioned prostheses, examined by the knee bending test and characterized and evidenced by radiological features and indices. PMID:26170527

  14. Langerhans cells and T cells sense cell dysplasia in oral leukoplakias and oral squamous cell carcinomas--evidence for immunosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Öhman, J; Magnusson, B; Telemo, E; Jontell, M; Hasséus, B

    2012-07-01

    Leukoplakias (LPLs) are lesions in the oral mucosa that may develop into oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The objective of this study was to assess presence and distribution of dendritic Langerhans cells (LCs) and T cells in patients with LPLs with or without cell dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Biopsy specimens from patients with leukoplakias (LPLs) with or without dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) were immunostained with antibodies against CD1a, Langerin, CD3, CD4, CD8 and Ki67, followed by quantitative analysis. Analyses of epithelium and connective tissue revealed a significantly higher number of CD1a + LCs in LPLs with dysplasia compared with LPLs without dysplasia. Presence of Langerin + LCs in epithelium did not differ significantly between LPLs either with or without dysplasia and OSCC. T cells were found in significantly increased numbers in LPLs with dysplasia and OSCC. The number of CD4+ cells did not differ significantly between LPLs with and without dysplasia, but a significant increase was detected when comparing LPLs with dysplasia with OSCC. CD8+ cells were significantly more abundant in OSCC and LPLs with dysplasia compared with LPLs without dysplasia. Proliferating cells (Ki67+) were significantly more abundant in OSCC compared to LPLs with dysplasia. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed colocalization of LCs and T cells in LPLs with dysplasia and in OSCC. LCs and T cells are more numerous in tissue compartments with dysplastic epithelial cells and dramatically increase in OSCC. This indicates an ongoing immune response against cells with dysplasia. PMID:22469080

  15. Clinical features of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia expressed in the knee.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Noguchi, Y; Mitsuyasu, H; Nagamine, R; Urabe, K; Matsuda, S; Iwamoto, Y

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of the knee affected by multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Thirty-one cases of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia were reviewed. Of the patients, 11 were male and 20 were female. The average age at onset of symptoms was 22.5 years. The average age at initial visit to the authors' hospital was 28.9 years. Radiographic findings showed epiphyseal abnormality of the knee in all but two (93%) cases. Irregularity, segmentation of the epiphysis, widening of the joint space, and genu valgum deformity were the dominant findings before epiphyseal closure. After epiphyseal closure, the most characteristic finding was a shallow femoral trochlear groove, which was observed in 56.5% of the cases. Other findings in adult patients included early onset osteoarthritic change, genu valgum, depression of the lateral tibial plateau, and multiple free bodies. However, there still is a possibility that multiple epiphyseal dysplasia exists, even if the patient lacks a shallow femoral trochlear groove. If genu valgum or varum, free bodies, and premature osteoarthritis are observed, one should evaluate other joints, keeping a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia in mind. Patients with knees that have a femoral trochlear groove of normal or near normal shape do exist, and premature osteoarthritic changes may develop in such patients. PMID:11064990

  16. Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (tufting enteropathy).

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Salomon, Julie; Ruemmele, Frank; de Serres, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Brousse, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), also known as tufting enteropathy, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset severe intractable diarrhea causing sometimes irreversible intestinal failure. To date, no epidemiological data are available, however, the prevalence can be estimated at around 1/50,000-100,000 live births in Western Europe. The prevalence seems higher in areas with high degree of consanguinity and in patients of Arabic origin. Infants develop within the first days after birth a watery diarrhea persistent in spite of bowel rest and parenteral nutrition. Some infants are reported to have associated choanal rectal or esophageal atresia. IED is thought to be related to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. Nonspecific punctuated keratitis was reported in more than 60% of patients. Histology shows various degree of villous atrophy, with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria but specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium with disorganization of surface enterocytes with focal crowding, resembling tufts. Several associated specific features were reported, including abnormal deposition of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) in the basement membrane, increased expression of desmoglein and ultrastructural changes in the desmosomes, and abnormal distribution of alpha2beta1 integrin adhesion molecules. One model of transgenic mice in which the gene encoding the transcription factor Elf3 is disrupted have morphologic features resembling IED. Parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggest an autosomal recessive transmission but the causative gene(s) have not been yet identified making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Some infants have a milder phenotype than others but in most patients, the severity of the intestinal malabsorption even with enteral feeding make them totally dependent on daily long-term parenteral nutrition with a subsequent risk of complications

  17. Dysplasia and carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Marques, Rita C; Montironi, Rodolfo; Reymundo, Carlos; Fonseca, Jorge; Cheng, Liang

    2015-02-01

    Urothelial dysplasia (low-grade intraurothelial neoplasia) is recognized as a premalignant urothelial lesion in the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) classification system. Although clarification of the diagnostic criteria of urothelial dysplasia has improved in recent years, there is still a lack of interobserver reproducibility. Active clinical follow-up is mandatory in patients with a diagnosis of urothelial dysplasia since it constitutes a marker of urothelial instability, and disease progression, in up to 19% of cases. The differential diagnosis of urothelial dysplasia is with other flat urothelial lesions with atypia, including flat urothelial hyperplasia, reactive urothelial atypia, urothelial atypia of unknown significance, and urothelial carcinoma in situ (high-grade intraurothelial neoplasia). In most cases, especially when small amounts of tissue are available, morphologic features alone may not be sufficient for diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry can be of help in selected cases, and a panel of cytokeratin 20, p53, and CD44 may help in the diagnosis. The use of HER2, p16, and Racemase remains as an option pending validation. Herein, we present the pathologic features and clinical significance of urothelial dysplasia and carcinoma in situ with emphasis on differential diagnosis from common flat lesions with atypia. PMID:26072632

  18. Computed tomographic features of fibrous dysplasia of maxillofacial region

    PubMed Central

    Karjodkar, Freny R; Umarji, Hemant R

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was to find the computed tomographic features of fibrous dysplasia of the maxillofacial region. Materials and Methods All eight cases included in the study reported either to Government Dental College and Hospital or Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai between 2003 and 2009. The patients were prescribed computed tomogram in addition to conventional radiographs of maxillofacial region which were studied for characteristic features of fibrous dysplasia. The diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia was confirmed by histopathological report. Results All cases showed the ill-defined margins of lesions except in the region where the lesions were extending to cortex of the involved bone. Internal structure of all cases showed ground glass appearance. Four cases of maxillary lesion showed the displacement of maxillary sinus maintaining the shape of maxillary sinus. Two cases showed complete obliteration of maxillary sinus. Displacement of inferior alveolar canal did not follow any typical pattern in any of the cases but was displaced in different directions. Conclusion The craniofacial type of fibrous dysplasia is as common as fibrous dysplasia of jaw. The margins, extent, internal structure and effect on surrounding structure are well detected on computed tomographic images. PMID:21977470

  19. Epithelial dysplasia of the oral cavity and lips.

    PubMed

    Kaugars, G E; Burns, J C; Gunsolley, J C

    1988-11-15

    Between 1970 and 1986, 1651 biopsy specimens from the oral cavity or lips with a diagnosis of epithelial dysplasia were accessioned by the Medical College of Virginia Oral Pathology Diagnostic Service (Richmond, VA). Of the four histologic grades of epithelial dysplasia (focal mild, mild, moderate, and severe), most of the cases were diagnosed as mild (54.1%) and the fewest (8.1%) were in the severe category. The overall mean age at time of diagnosis was 56.7 years. A predilection for occurrence in males was confirmed, but a lower than expected incidence in blacks was noted. The most common anatomic sites were the buccal mucosa, palate, and floor of mouth. The anatomic areas which were most likely to have a severe epithelial dysplasia were the ventral surface of the tongue and the lip. Patients with dysplasias in more than one site had a slightly higher probability of being diagnosed as either moderate or severe. The cases associated with lichen planus usually were found on the buccal mucosa and demonstrated a shift toward a milder degree of dysplasia. PMID:3179929

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  1. A case of thanatophoric dysplasia type 2: a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Gülaşı, Selvi; Atıcı, Aytuğ; Çelik, Yalçın

    2015-03-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) is a lethal form of skeletal dysplasia with short-limb dwarfism. Two types distinguished with their radiological characteristics have been defined clinically. The femur is curved in type 1, while it is straight in type 2. TD is known to be due to a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. We report a male patient who showed clinical findings congruent with TD type 2 and a new mutation in the FGFR3 gene, a finding which has not been reported previously. PMID:25800480

  2. Elucidating drivers of oral epithelial dysplasia formation and malignant transformation to cancer using RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Caroline; Graham, Jennifer L.; Chengot, Preetha; Daly, Catherine; Chalkley, Rebecca; Ross, Lisa; Droop, Alastair; Rabbitts, Pamela; Stead, Lucy F.

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a prevalent cancer with poor prognosis. Most OSCC progresses via a non-malignant stage called dysplasia. Effective treatment of dysplasia prior to potential malignant transformation is an unmet clinical need. To identify markers of early disease, we performed RNA sequencing of 19 matched HPV negative patient trios: normal oral mucosa, dysplasia and associated OSCC. We performed differential gene expression, principal component and correlated gene network analysis using these data. We found differences in the immune cell signatures present at different disease stages and were able to distinguish early events in pathogenesis, such as upregulation of many HOX genes, from later events, such as down-regulation of adherens junctions. We herein highlight novel coding and non-coding candidates for involvement in oral dysplasia development and malignant transformation, and speculate on how our findings may guide further translational research into the treatment of oral dysplasia. PMID:26515596

  3. Ureaplasma and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gancia, Paolo; Delogu, Antonio; Pomero, Giulia

    2014-03-01

    Advances in neonatal intensive care have greatly improved survival rates for children born in a very early stage of lung development (i.e. less than 26 weeks of gestation). In these premature babies, even low levels of oxygen and methods of minimally invasive ventilation may disrupt the growth of the distal airways, a condition described as "new" bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Ureaplasma infection can occur in utero or in the perinatal period in premature infants, in some of which the infection with these organisms triggers an important lung pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic response, and may increase the risk of developing BPD. The inflammation may be worsened by exposure to oxygen and mechanical ventilation. At present, clinical studies have not clarified the role of Ureaplasma in the pathogenesis of BPD and there is insufficient evidence to determine whether antibiotic treatment of Ureaplasma has influence on the development of BPD and its comorbidities. Future research in the context of well-designed and controlled clinical trials of adequate statistical power should focus on how to determine whether the treatment of Ureaplasma decreases lung inflammation, reduces rates of BPD, and improves long-term neurodevelopment. PMID:24709455

  4. Multidisciplinary management of hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Suja; Cherackal, George J; Jacob, Jose; Varghese, Alex K

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a hereditary disorder, which affects ectodermal derivatives. It manifests several abnormalities of the teeth, and is commonly inherited through female carriers. This case report presents a patient with compromised esthetics and function. A multidisciplinary approach was planned involving an oral pathologist, endodontist, orthodontist and a prosthodontist. PMID:25984305

  5. Photocoagulation therapy for laryngeal dysplasia using angiolytic lasers.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yo; Suzuki, Ryo; Kawai, Yoshitaka; Hiwatashi, Nao; Kitamura, Morimasa; Tateya, Ichiro; Hirano, Shigeru

    2016-05-01

    In the management of laryngeal pre-cancerous lesions such as dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (CIS), it is important that lesion regression occur without any complications. As a minimally invasive treatment option, photocoagulation therapy using angiolytic lasers has been attracting attention. Therapeutic effects have been reported for this type of treatment, however, vocal function after treatment has not been well discussed. In this retrospective case series, we examined the therapeutic effects of photocoagulation therapy on laryngeal dysplasia and the impact on vocal function. Twenty-four patients with laryngeal dysplasia or CIS were treated with photocoagulation therapy using angiolytic lasers. Two patients were treated under general anesthesia, the remaining 22 patients were treated with topical anesthesia. Before and after treatment the extent of the lesion and vocal function was evaluated by endoscopic examination and acoustic and aerodynamic analyses, respectively. More than 50 % disease regression was observed in 20 of 24 patients. Acoustic and aerodynamic analyses revealed improvement in pitch perturbation quotient with no impairment in other parameters. Photocoagulation therapy using angiolytic lasers has proven to be feasible and safe for the treatment of laryngeal dysplasia. PMID:26742908

  6. Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) lesion analysis with complex diffusion approach.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Jeny; Kannan, K; Kesavadas, C; Thomas, Bejoy

    2009-10-01

    Identification of Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) can be difficult due to the subtle MRI changes. Though sequences like FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) can detect a large majority of these lesions, there are smaller lesions without signal changes that can easily go unnoticed by the naked eye. The aim of this study is to improve the visibility of focal cortical dysplasia lesions in the T1 weighted brain MRI images. In the proposed method, we used a complex diffusion based approach for calculating the FCD affected areas. Based on the diffused image and thickness map, a complex map is created. From this complex map; FCD areas can be easily identified. MRI brains of 48 subjects selected by neuroradiologists were given to computer scientists who developed the complex map for identifying the cortical dysplasia. The scientists were blinded to the MRI interpretation result of the neuroradiologist. The FCD could be identified in all the patients in whom surgery was done, however three patients had false positive lesions. More lesions were identified in patients in whom surgery was not performed and lesions were seen in few of the controls. These were considered as false positive. This computer aided detection technique using complex diffusion approach can help detect focal cortical dysplasia in patients with epilepsy. PMID:19560319

  7. Avascular necrosis of the hip in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, W.G.; Bassett, G.S.; Mandell, G.A.; Scott, C.I. Jr. )

    1989-11-01

    We observed radiographic changes of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the capital femoral epiphysis in 9 hips of 11 patients with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Plain roentgenography, bone scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies all revealed characteristic asymmetric changes in the presence of AVN superimposed on dysplastic femoral heads.

  8. Ectodermal dysplasia: a genetic review.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Seema; Prashanth, S

    2012-09-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. It is a genetic disorder affecting the development or function of the teeth, hair, nails and sweat glands. Depending on the particular syndrome ectodermal dysplasia can also affect the skin, the lens or retina of the eye, parts of the inner ear, the development of fingers and toes, the nerves and other parts of the body. Each syndrome usually involves a different combination of symptoms, which can range from mild to severe. The history and lessons learned from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) may serve as an example for unraveling of the cause and pathogenesis of other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes by demonstrating that phenotypically identical syndromes can be caused by mutations in different genes (EDA, EDAR, EDARADD), that mutations in the same gene can lead to different phenotypes and that mutations in the genes further downstream in the same signaling pathway (NEMO) may modify the phenotype quite profoundly. The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss the etiology, genetic review, clinical manifestations and treatment options of this hereditary disorder. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Prashanth S. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):197-202. PMID:25206167

  9. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prashanth, S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. It is a genetic disorder affecting the development or function of the teeth, hair, nails and sweat glands. Depending on the particular syndrome ectodermal dysplasia can also affect the skin, the lens or retina of the eye, parts of the inner ear, the development of fingers and toes, the nerves and other parts of the body. Each syndrome usually involves a different combination of symptoms, which can range from mild to severe. The history and lessons learned from hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) may serve as an example for unraveling of the cause and pathogenesis of other ectodermal dysplasia syndromes by demonstrating that phenotypically identical syndromes can be caused by mutations in different genes (EDA, EDAR, EDARADD), that mutations in the same gene can lead to different phenotypes and that mutations in the genes further downstream in the same signaling pathway (NEMO) may modify the phenotype quite profoundly. The aim of this paper is to describe and discuss the etiology, genetic review, clinical manifestations and treatment options of this hereditary disorder. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Prashanth S. Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Genetic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):197-202. PMID:25206167

  10. Importance of neurologic and cutaneous signs in the diagnosis of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Polat, Ayşe İpek; Yiş, Uluç; Ayanoğlu, Müge; Hız, Ayşe Semra; Güleryüz, Handan; Öztürk Atasoy, Tülay; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2015-01-01

    Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder caused by defects in SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1 gene (SMARCAL1). SMARCAL1 product is a helicase that has role in selective cellular proliferation. The disorder is characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with short stature, nephropathy, T cell deficiency, neurologic and cutaneous signs. Patients may have hyperpigmented skin lesions similar to café au lait spots. Symptoms and disease severity in Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia varies from patient to patient. Genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors play role on the severity of the disease. Here we report on a patient with short stature, steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome and recurrent infections. Cutaneous findings and developmental delay helped us to reach the diagnosis of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia. A homozygous missense mutation in SMARCAL1 gene confirmed the clinical diagnosis. PMID:27411420

  11. Rab11 in dysplasia of Barrett's epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, J. R.; Ray, G. S.; Lee, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus predisposes affected patients to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The development of adenocarcinoma proceeds along a progression through low- and high-grade dysplasia. Surveillance of Barrett's patients requires serial endoscopic investigations and grading mucosal biopsies. Unfortunately, grading of biopsies by conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining is fraught with significant interobserver variations. We have found in both biopsy and resection specimens that immunostaining for the small GTP binding protein Rab11 is increased in low-grade dysplastic cells. This staining is lost in high-grade dysplastic cells. These results suggest that low-grade dysplastic cells undergo an apical trafficking blockade, which is released as cells progress to the less differentiated phenotype of high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Examination of the SKGT-4 esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line demonstrated prominent mRNA and protein expression for Rab11. Rab11 immunostaining was present in SKGT-4 cells as a perinuclear nidus of punctate staining along with a more diffuse punctate pattern. Thus, Rab11 expression was present in a esophageal adenocarcinoma cells in culture. Markers of vesicle trafficking may be critical factors for grading of mucosal dysplastic transitions leading to adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10780572

  12. Campomelic dysplasia and malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Andreia; Teixeira, Filomena; Camacho, Maria Carmo; Alves, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a rare clinical entity, usually fatal in the first year of life. It is characterised by bowing and angulations of long bones, along with other congenital anomalies. The occurrence of malignant hyperthermia is rare, but it has been associated with skeletal dysplasias. The authors present the case of a boy, born at 40 weeks of gestational age, with multiple congenital anomalies and subsequently diagnosed with CD, who died at 16 months of age as a consequence of malignant hyperthermia. PMID:22691592

  13. The nature of fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia has been regarded as a developmental skeletal disorder characterized by replacement of normal bone with benign cellular fibrous connective tissue. It has now become evident that fibrous dysplasia is a genetic disease caused by somatic activating mutation of the Gsα subunit of G protein-coupled receptor resulting in upregulation of cAMP. This leads to defects in differentiation of osteoblasts with subsequent production of abnormal bone in an abundant fibrous stroma. In addition there is an increased production of IL-6 by mutated stromal fibrous dysplastic cells that induce osteoclastic bone resorption. PMID:19895712

  14. Genotype-phenotype correlation in DTDST dysplasias: Atelosteogenesis type II and diastrophic dysplasia variant in one family.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Ellen; Hyland, James; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) cause a spectrum of autosomal recessive chondrodysplasias. In decreasing order of severity, they include processes designated as achondrogenesis type IB (ACG-1B), atelosteogenesis type II (AO2), diastrophic dysplasia (DTD), diastrophic dysplasia variant (DTDv), and recessively inherited multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED). This is the first report of an extended family with unequivocally distinct phenotypes on the DTDST spectrum. Two siblings have DTDv and their first cousin had AO2. They all share the common Finnish mutation (IVS1 + 2C>T). The two patients with DTDv have the previously reported R279W extracellular domain missense mutation. The second mutation in the patient with AO2 is c.172delA, a deletion of one nucleotide causing a previously unreported frameshift mutation. This is the first published case of an individual with a frameshift mutation combined with the Finnish mutation. These three patients provide an opportunity, in concert with a review of previous literature, to further examine the genotype-phenotype correlation of DTDST. Analysis suggests that, while the DTDST family of disorders contains at least seven different conditions, mutations in the DTDST gene, in fact, appear to cause a phenotypic continuum. Furthermore, DTDST genotype alone is an imperfect predictor of clinical severity along this continuum. PMID:21077202

  15. 7 tesla T2*-weighted MRI as a tool to improve detection of focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Veersema, Tim J; van Eijsden, Pieter; Gosselaar, Peter H; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Spliet, Wim G M; Aronica, Eleonora; Braun, Kees P J; Ferrier, Cyrille H

    2016-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is one of the most common underlying pathologies in patients who undergo surgery for refractory epilepsy. Absence of a MRI-visible lesion necessitates additional diagnostic tests and is a predictor of poor surgical outcome. We describe a series of six patients with refractory epilepsy due to histopathologically-confirmed focal cortical dysplasia, for whom pre-surgical 7 tesla T2*-weighted MRI was acquired. In four of six patients, T2* sequences showed areas of marked superficial hypointensity, co-localizing with the epileptogenic lesion. 7 tesla T2* hypointensities overlying focal cortical dysplasia may represent leptomeningeal venous vascular abnormalities associated with the underlying dysplastic cortex. Adding T2* sequences to the MRI protocol may aid in the detection of focal cortical dysplasias. PMID:27435411

  16. Colorectal cancer and dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zisman, Timothy L; Rubin, David T

    2008-05-01

    Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease carry an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Established risk factors for cancer among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include the younger age at diagnosis, greater extent and duration of disease, increased severity of inflammation, family history of colorectal cancer and coexisting primary sclerosing cholangitis. Recent evidence suggests that current medical therapies and surgical techniques for inflammatory bowel disease may be reducing the incidence of this complication. Nonetheless heightened vigilance and a careful, comprehensive approach to prevent or minimize the complications of invasive cancer are warranted in this unique cohort of patients. Current guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cancer in this high risk population are grounded in the concept of an inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. A thorough understanding of the definition and natural history of dysplasia in IBD, as well as the challenges associated with detection and interpretation of dysplasia are fundamental to developing an effective strategy for surveillance and prevention, and understanding the limitations of the current approach to prevention. This article reviews the current consensus guidelines for screening and surveillance of cancer in IBD, as well as presenting the evidence and rationale for chemoprevention of cancer and a discussion of emerging technologies for the detection of dysplasia. PMID:18461651

  17. Craniometaphyseal dysplasia in a 14-month old: a case report and review of imaging differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sumit; Qin, Curtis; Medarametla, Srikanth; Hegde, Shilpa V

    2016-09-01

    We report a 14-month-old male with craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD). The patient presented with a history of diminishing vision and hearing loss. Cranial computed tomography scan showed diffuse calvarial and skull base hyperostosis with excessive bone narrowing the internal auditory canals and skull base foramina. A subsequent skeletal survey revealed other skeletal abnormalities, which led to the diagnosis of CMD. This was later confirmed by ANKH mutation. CMD is a rare genetic disorder that belongs to the group of craniotubular bone dysplasias. It is important to recognize this condition from other causes of craniotubular bone dysplasias to institute early treatment and explain prognosis. PMID:27594963

  18. [Fibrous dysplasia of the skull. Radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Amato, C; Moschini, M; Colavita, N; Tagliaferri, G

    1993-09-01

    The authors examined 11 patients with fibrous dysplasia of the skull pointing out its radiologic features and preferential sites. Conventional radiology, CT and MR imaging were used. As for conventional radiology, tangential scans which of great value to depict the most typical morphologic patterns. Lesions of the skull base were most frequent in the sphenoid (7 of 11 cases), where 5 of 7 exhibited a sclerotic pattern. Bone changes in the skull vault were: mixed (3 cases), pagetoid (2 cases), "ground glass" (1 case) and lytic (1 case): none of these cases was of the sclerotic type. A typical feature of vault lesions was the widening of diploic space associated with expansion of the outer bone and integrity of the inner bone. Radiologic findings, often associated with suggestive clinical manifestations, always allowed a diagnostic hypothesis; histopathologic confirmation was needed only in a few cases (4 of 11 patients). PMID:8210526

  19. Thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 with cloverleaf skull in a dichorionic twin.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Torres, V M

    2015-01-01

    Here is reported for the first time, a case of thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 with cloverleaf skull in a (Mexican) dichorionic female twin. The patient's main clinical and radiographic findings included severe limb shortening, narrow thorax shape; short ribs, marked platyspondyly, curved short femurs, and a cloverleaf skull. The female twin sib had normal growth parameters and phenotypic appearance. According to the literature, cloverleaf skull in thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 is rare, even more so in dichorionic twins. Moreover, the present observation confirms that thanatophoric dysplasia type 1 patients may show phenotypic heterogeneity related to cloverleaf skull and other congenital anomalies. Therefore, a careful family history along with clinical, radiological, and molecular investigations is suggested, in order to achieve an accurate parental counseling for thanatophoric dysplasia. PMID:26043509

  20. Clinical significance and management of Barrett's esophagus with epithelial changes indefinite for dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Thota, Prashanthi N; Kistangari, Gaurav; Esnakula, Ashwini K; Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Liu, Xiu-Li

    2016-08-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is defined as the extension of salmon-colored mucosa into the tubular esophagus ≥ 1 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction with biopsy confirmation of intestinal metaplasia. Patients with BE are at increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and undergo endoscopic surveillance biopsies to detect dysplasia or early EAC. Dysplasia in BE is classified as no dysplasia, indefinite for dysplasia (IND), low grade dysplasia (LGD) or high grade dysplasia (HGD). Biopsies are diagnosed as IND when the epithelial abnormalities are not sufficient to diagnose dysplasia or the nature of the epithelial abnormalities is uncertain due to inflammation or technical issues. Specific diagnostic criteria for IND are not well established and its clinical significance and management has not been well studied. Previous studies have focused on HGD in BE and led to changes and improvement in the management of BE with HGD and early EAC. Only recently, IND and LGD in BE have become focus of intense study. This review summarizes the definition, neoplastic risk and clinical management of BE IND. PMID:27602241

  1. Clinical significance and management of Barrett’s esophagus with epithelial changes indefinite for dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Prashanthi N; Kistangari, Gaurav; Esnakula, Ashwini K; Gonzalo, David Hernandez; Liu, Xiu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is defined as the extension of salmon-colored mucosa into the tubular esophagus ≥ 1 cm proximal to the gastroesophageal junction with biopsy confirmation of intestinal metaplasia. Patients with BE are at increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and undergo endoscopic surveillance biopsies to detect dysplasia or early EAC. Dysplasia in BE is classified as no dysplasia, indefinite for dysplasia (IND), low grade dysplasia (LGD) or high grade dysplasia (HGD). Biopsies are diagnosed as IND when the epithelial abnormalities are not sufficient to diagnose dysplasia or the nature of the epithelial abnormalities is uncertain due to inflammation or technical issues. Specific diagnostic criteria for IND are not well established and its clinical significance and management has not been well studied. Previous studies have focused on HGD in BE and led to changes and improvement in the management of BE with HGD and early EAC. Only recently, IND and LGD in BE have become focus of intense study. This review summarizes the definition, neoplastic risk and clinical management of BE IND. PMID:27602241

  2. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  3. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E K; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S; Winton, Douglas J; Neves, André A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apc(min) mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  4. Surgical treatment of hip dysplasia in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Wenger, Dennis R

    2012-07-01

    Residual hip dysplasia (a relatively common condition in young children and adolescents) left undetected or partially treated, almost certainly leads to further progression of deformity, eventually ending in a nonfunctional, painful hip joint. Therefore, every effort should be made to identify and treat hip dysplasia early.The use of 3D imaging, including CT and MRI assessment, has enhanced the diagnosis and treatment of patients with dysplasia because they facilitate proper identification of important pathomorphologic anatomy and cartilage degeneration. Future studies should take these novel imaging modalities into consideration with the attempt to (re-) evaluate optimal selection criteria for surgery, risk factors for clinical failure and optimal deformity correction. Treatment of residual hip dysplasia requires corrective surgery. The goal of surgical treatment is to normalize joint loading by increasing the contact area and improving the level arm of the hip to forestall the development of OA. Proper selection and performance of a correction osteotomy and adjunctive procedures are prerequisites for a good clinical outcome and high survivorship of the reconstructed hip. Augmentation procedures, such as the Chiari osteotomy or the shelf procedure described by Staheli, remain as a salvage option in cases when irreversible cartilage damage is present or when reorientation is not feasible. PMID:22819159

  5. Isolation of cosmids corresponding to the chromosome breakpoints of a de novo autosomal translocation, t(6;19)(p21;q13.1), in a patient with multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Groenen, P M; Garcia, E; Thoelen, R; Aly, M; Schoenmakers, E F; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J P; Van de Ven, W J

    1996-01-01

    Hydronephrosis caused by pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) is a frequent urological malformation assumed to result from a deficient development of the ureteric bud. The exact etiology of pelvi-ureteric junction stenosis is unknown, but there is convincing evidence for a genetic cause, with linkage analysis predicting a hereditary hydronephrosis locus on chromosome 6p. We encountered a patient with a de novo autosomal t(6;19)(p21;q13.1) and attendant bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia (MRD), bilateral PUJO resulting in massive hydronephrosis, and an associated von Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster disorder. On the basis of the presumption that in this patient the putative hydronephrosis gene might be disrupted by the translocation, we sought to isolate DNA from the breakpoint regions as the initial step in a strategy to identify genes affected by the t(6; 19). Using sequential rounds of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmids selected from a detailed integrated map of the long arm of chromosome 19, we have identified a cosmid clone that spans the breakpoint. The position of the breakpoint was further localized by Southern blot analysis. Using a vectorette PCR approach, rearranged DNA fragments were isolated and, by comparative nucleotide sequence analysis, these were shown to contain ectopic sequences. A cosmid clone containing these ectopic sequences was isolated and shown by CASH (chromosome assignment using somatic cell hybrids) and FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) analysis to map to the short arm of chromosome 6 and to span the breakpoint found in the MRD patient. The isolated cosmid clones are useful reagents for analysis of other MRD patients and for the search for genes at or flanking the breakpoints. PMID:9067426

  6. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-01-01

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  7. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia: Surgical technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F

    2016-05-18

    For young, active patients with healthy hip cartilage, pelvic osteotomy is a surgical option in to address hip pain and to improve mechanical loading conditions related to dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may lead to arthrosis at an early age due to poor coverage of the femoral head and abnormal loading of the joint articulation. In patients with symptomatic dysplasia and closed triradiate cartilage (generally over age 10), including adolescents and young adults (generally up to around age 40), the Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a durable technique for addressing underlying structural deformity. The PAO involves a modified Smith-Petersen approach. Advantages of the Bernese osteotomy include preservation of the weight-bearing posterior column of the hemi-pelvis, preservation of the acetabular blood supply, maintenance of the hip abductor musculature, and the ability to effect powerful deformity correction about an ideal center of rotation. There is an increasing body of evidence that preservation of the native hip can be improved through pelvic osteotomy. In contrast to hip osteotomy and joint preservation, the role of total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients with correctable hip deformity remains controversial. Moreover, the durability of hip replacement in young patients is inherently limited. Pelvic osteotomy should be considered the preferred method to address correctable structural deformity of the hip in the young, active patient with developmental dysplasia. The Bernese PAO is technically demanding, yet offers reproducible results with good long-term survivorship in carefully selected patients with preserved cartilage and the ability to meet the demands of rehabilitation. PMID:27190755

  8. Paradigm Shift in the Surveillance and Management of Dysplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (West).

    PubMed

    Soetikno, Roy; Kaltenbach, Tonya; McQuaid, Kenneth R; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Kumar, Rahul; Barkun, Alan N; Laine, Loren

    2016-04-01

    Patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) colitis have a 2.4-fold higher risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) than the general population, for both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) colitis. Surveillance colonoscopy is recommended to detect early CRC and dysplasia. Most dysplasia discovered in patients with IBD is actually visible. Recently published SCENIC (Surveillance for Colorectal Endoscopic Neoplasia Detection and Management in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients: International Consensus Recommendations) consensus statements provide unifying recommendations for the optimal surveillance and management of dysplasia in IBD. SCENIC followed the prescribed processes for guideline development from the Institute of Medicine (USA), including systematic reviews, full synthesis of evidence and deliberations by panelists, and incorporation of the GRADE methodology. The new surveillance paradigm involves high-quality visual inspection of the mucosa, using chromoendoscopy and high-definition colonoscopy, with endoscopic recognition of colorectal dysplasia. Lesions are described according to a new classification, which replaces the term 'dysplasia associated lesion or mass (DALM)' and its derivatives. Targeted biopsies are subsequently done on areas suspicious for dysplasia, and resections are carried out for discrete, resectable lesions. PMID:26866420

  9. Oculomotor-corpus callosum dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Acers, T E; Blackwell, C

    1982-01-01

    An infant with congenital bilateral ophthalmoplegia with levator and pupillary sparing is presented. The eyes are fixed in a divergent position with no apparent motility. The baby is otherwise clinically normal and is developing in a normal fashion except for delayed growth pattern. Visual attention is present and he fixates with either eye. Computed tomography demonstrates an associated dysplasia of the corpus callosum and an abnormal ventricular system. Neuroendocrine studies performed at one year of age demonstrate subnormal levels of growth hormone. It is postulated that this represents an embryodysgenesis involving the developing mesencephalic tegmentum (oculomotor nuclei) and the diencephalic lamina reuniens (corpus callosum). It is the first reported case of congenital ophthalmoplegia with corpus callosum dysplasia. The "embryodysgenic" relationship with other forebrain-ocular anomalies has been alluded to and remains speculative. PMID:7182958

  10. [Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: definitions and classifications].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Luna, M; Moreno Hernando, J; Botet Mussons, F; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Herranz Carrillo, G; Rite Gracia, S; Salguero García, E; Echaniz Urcelay, I

    2013-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common sequelae related to very low birth weight infants, mostly with those of extremely low birth weight. Even with advances in prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome associated with prematurity, there is still no decrease in the incidence in this population, although a change in its clinical expression and severity has been observed. There are, however, differences in its frequency between health centres, probably due to a non-homogeneously used clinical definition. In this article, the Committee of Standards of the Spanish Society of Neonatology wishes to review the current diagnosis criteria of bronchopulmonary dysplasia to reduce, as much as possible, these inter-centre differences. PMID:23582451

  11. [Yunis-Varon syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Elizondo-Dueñaz, Ricardo; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Marcos Abdala, Hernán; López-Altamirano, Marcelo; Martínez-Menchaca, Héctor R

    2012-01-01

    In 1980, Yunis-Varon described this disease. Yunis-Varon syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease. This cleidocranial dysplasia is characterized by bone and tooth disorders, in addition tends to affect the cardiovascular system and tissues from ectoderm. This report describes the radiologic image of a patient with Yunis-Varon syndrome. PMID:22367312

  12. Low-Grade Dysplasia in Ulcerative Colitis: Risk Factors for Developing High-Grade Dysplasia or Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-ho Ryan; Ignjatovic-Wilson, Ana; Askari, Alan; Lee, Gui Han; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Moorghen, Morgan; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Saunders, Brian P; Rutter, Matthew D; Graham, Trevor A; Hart, Ailsa L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with development of high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or colorectal cancer (CRC) in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients diagnosed with low-grade dysplasia (LGD). METHODS: Patients with histologically confirmed extensive UC, who were diagnosed with LGD between 1993 and 2012 at St Mark's Hospital, were identified and followed up to 1 July 2013. Demographic, endoscopic, and histological data were collected and correlated with the development of HGD or CRC. RESULTS: A total of 172 patients were followed for a median of 48 months from the date of initial LGD diagnosis (interquartile range (IQR), 15–87 months). Overall, 33 patients developed HGD or CRC (19.1% of study population; 20 CRCs) during study period. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that macroscopically non-polypoid (hazard ratio (HR), 8.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.0–24.8; P<0.001) or invisible (HR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.3–13.4; P=0.02) dysplasia, dysplastic lesions ≥1 cm in size (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–13.4; P=0.01), and a previous history of “indefinite for dysplasia” (HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2–6.5; P=0.01) were significant contributory factors for HGD or CRC development. Multifocal dysplasia (HR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.9–7.8; P<0.001), metachronous dysplasia (HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6–7.5; P=0.001), or a colonic stricture (HR, 7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–22.1; P<0.001) showed only univariate correlation to development of HGD or CRC. CONCLUSIONS: Lesions that are non-polypoid or endoscopically invisible, large (≥1 cm), or preceded by indefinite dysplasia are independent risk factors for developing HGD or CRC in UC patients diagnosed with LGD. PMID:26416190

  13. Thanatophoric Dysplasia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jyoti; Jain, Rekha; Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) is a congenital, sporadic and the most lethal skeletal dysplasia caused by new mutation in the FGFR3 gene. At birth, it is characterized by shortening of the limbs (micromelia), small conical thorax, platyspondyly (flat vertebral bodies) and macrocephaly. TD is divided into two clinically defined subtypes: type I and II with some clinical overlap between the two subtypes. They can be differentiated by the skull shape and femur morphology. Ultrasound examination in the second trimester is often straight forward in diagnosing the congenital anomaly. We report a case of pre term fresh stillborn baby with dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, micromelia with short stubby fingers and deep skin creases, narrow thorax and protuberant abdomen which delivered at our hospital. The ultrasound examination showed shortening of long bones with femur shaped like telephone receiver. Dysmorphic facial features and skeletal abnormalities in the baby lead us to make the diagnosis of TD type I. Because of the rarity of this condition we report this case of thanatophoric dysplasia with a short review of literature. PMID:26675119

  14. Neonatal Incidence of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Eli; Eidelman, Mark; Katzman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The advantages of sonographic examination are well known, but its main disadvantage is that it might lead to overdiagnosis, which might cause overtreatment. Variations in the incidence of developmental dysplasia of the hip are well known. We ascertained the incidence of neonatal sonographic developmental dysplasia of the hip without considering the development of those joints during followup. All 45,497 neonates (90,994 hips) born in our institute between January 1992 and December 2001 were examined clinically and sonographically during the first 48 hours of life. Sonography was performed according to Graf’s method, which considers mild hip sonographic abnormalities as Type IIa. We evaluated the different severity type incidence pattern and its influence on the total incidence during and between the investigated years. According to our study, sonographic Type IIa has major effects on the incidence of overall developmental dysplasia of the hip with a correlation coefficient of 0.95, whereas more severe sonographic abnormalities show relatively stable incidence patterns. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288551

  15. Guidelines for genetic skeletal dysplasias for pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasia (SD) is a kind of heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by abnormal growth, development, differentiation, and maintenance of the bone and cartilage. The patients with SD most likely to be seen by a pediatrician or orthopedic surgeon are those who present with short stature in childhood. Because each category has so many diseases, classification is important to understand SD better. In order to diagnose a SD accurately, clinical and radiographic findings should be evaluated in detail. In addition, genetic diagnosis of SD is important because there are so various SDs with complex phenotypes. To reach an exact diagnosis of SDs, cooperative approach by a clinician, a radiologist and a geneticist is important. This review aims to provide an outline of the diagnostic approach for children with disproportional short stature. PMID:26817005

  16. Hip Dysplasia in the Young Adult.

    PubMed

    Gala, Luca; Clohisy, John C; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a leading precursor of osteoarthritis and is seen in 20% to 40% of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. An increase in mechanical stress on the cartilage matrix with failure of the acetabular labrum represents the major pathomechanism of degeneration. Because the prevalence of associated femoral deformities is high (>50%), the structural anatomy of the dysplastic hip must be assessed in multiple planes using radiographs and, if needed, advanced imaging modalities. Acetabular osteotomy (periacetabular and/or rotational) is the most commonly used procedure for the treatment of the majority of dysplastic hips in adults. Modern total hip replacement remains an excellent option for the more arthritic joints. Difficulties can arise from anatomical abnormalities and previous operations. PMID:26738905

  17. Guidelines for genetic skeletal dysplasias for pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal dysplasia (SD) is a kind of heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by abnormal growth, development, differentiation, and maintenance of the bone and cartilage. The patients with SD most likely to be seen by a pediatrician or orthopedic surgeon are those who present with short stature in childhood. Because each category has so many diseases, classification is important to understand SD better. In order to diagnose a SD accurately, clinical and radiographic findings should be evaluated in detail. In addition, genetic diagnosis of SD is important because there are so various SDs with complex phenotypes. To reach an exact diagnosis of SDs, cooperative approach by a clinician, a radiologist and a geneticist is important. This review aims to provide an outline of the diagnostic approach for children with disproportional short stature. PMID:26817005

  18. Skin symptoms in four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes including two case reports of Rapp-Hodgkin-Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knaudt, Björn; Volz, Thomas; Krug, Markus; Burgdorf, Walter; Röcken, Martin; Berneburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The skin, hair and nail changes in four distinct ectodermal dysplasia syndromes are compared and reviewed. These syndromes comprise Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome; ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome; ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome. A comprehensive overview of the dermatological signs and symptoms in these syndromes was generated from the database of the Ectodermal Dysplasia Network Germany, the clinical findings in the patients seen in our department and an extensive review of the literature. The findings included abnormalities of skin, sweating, hair and nails. These clinical findings are discussed in relation to the underlying molecular defects known to play a role in these four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. PMID:22759387

  19. Low risk of adenocarcinoma and high-grade dysplasia in patients with non-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus: Results from a cohort from a country with low esophageal adenocarcinoma incidence

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in non-dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (NDBE) is considered to be approximately 0.3% per year or even lower, according to population-based studies. Data from countries with low EAC incidence are scarce. Our principal aim was to determine the incidence of high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and EAC in NDBE. Our secondary aims were to identify the predictors of progression and to calculate the incidence of HGD/EAC, by using the calculation method for surveillance time in population-based studies. Materials and methods A cohort of NDBE patients was prospectively followed up. Cases of HGD and EAC (study end points) diagnosed during the first year of follow-up were considered as prevalent. Only cases with an endoscopic surveillance time > 1 year were included in our analysis. Results We enrolled 331 patients (251 men) in the surveillance program. Their median age was 59 years (interquartile range (IQR): 47–67 years). Their median NDBE length was 3 cm (IQR: 2–4 cm). Of these patients, 80 died during the follow-up (one from EAC) and two were lost to follow-up. After 2284 patient-years of endoscopic follow-up (median surveillance time, 5 years (IQR: 2–10 years)), we found that five cases of HGD and two cases of EAC were diagnosed. The incidence of HGD/EAC was 3.1 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 1.3–6.0) and that of EAC was 0.9 (95% CI: 0.2–2.9). The incidence of HGD/EAC in short segments (≤ 3 cm) was 0.7 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 0.3–3.4). The sole variable that we found associated with progression was NDBE length. If the total surveillance time was considered (3537 patient-years), the incidence of HGD and EAC was only slight lower. Conclusions The incidence of HGD and EAC was very low in NDBE. Therefore, current surveillance guidelines must be reassessed, at least for short-segment BE. PMID:27403300

  20. Ultrasound for Infants at Risk for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    LeBa, Thu-Ba; Carmichael, Kelly D; Patton, Andrew G; Morris, Randal P; Swischuk, Leonard E

    2015-08-01

    The best screening method for developmental dysplasia of the hip is controversial. Ultrasonography is sensitive, but cost-effectiveness may limit its use. This study assessed whether ultrasound screening would increase in effectiveness if targeted toward infants with established risk factors for developmental dysplasia of the hip and normal findings on physical examination. All ultrasound scans performed at the authors' institution from January 2007 through January 2011 to screen for developmental dysplasia of the hip were reviewed. Infants with risk factors for developmental dysplasia of the hip and normal findings on physical examination by orthopedic faculty or a pediatrician were selected. Of the 530 cases that were reviewed, 217 had risk factors for developmental dysplasia of the hip and normal findings on physical examination. Mean age of the 217 selected patients was 6.9 weeks. Of the patients, 83% were female, 77% had breech presentation, 30% were firstborn children, 13% had intrauterine packaging abnormalities, and 3% had a family history of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Of the 217 infants, 44 had 1 risk factor, 121 had 2 risk factors, 46 had 3 risk factors, and 6 had 4 risk factors. Dynamic ultrasound evaluation showed instability in 17 patients, for a 7.8% incidence of developmental dysplasia of the hip. All 17 patients were treated with a Pavlik harness. The results suggested that selective ultrasound screening may be effective in infants with risk factors and normal findings on physical examination. Selective ultrasound screening changed treatment management in almost 8% of patients and clinical follow-up in 6.5%. Analysis of the cost-effectiveness of screening is needed. PMID:26270760

  1. Focal cortical dysplasias in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate the presence of histological abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggestive of a dysplastic process. In this study we identified areas of abnormal cortical thinning within the cerebral cortex of ASD individuals and examined the same for neuronal morphometric abnormalities by using computerized image analysis. Results The study analyzed celloidin-embedded and Nissl-stained serial full coronal brain sections of 7 autistic (ADI-R diagnosed) and 7 age/sex-matched neurotypicals. Sections were scanned and manually segmented before implementing an algorithm using Laplace’s equation to measure cortical width. Identified areas were then subjected to analysis for neuronal morphometry. Results of our study indicate the presence within our ASD population of circumscribed foci of diminished cortical width that varied among affected individuals both in terms of location and overall size with the frontal lobes being particularly involved. Spatial statistic indicated a reduction in size of neurons within affected areas. Granulometry confirmed the presence of smaller pyramidal cells and suggested a concomitant reduction in the total number of interneurons. Conclusions The neuropathology is consistent with a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Results from the medical literature (e.g., heterotopias) and our own study suggest that the genesis of this cortical malformation seemingly resides in the heterochronic divisions of periventricular germinal cells. The end result is that during corticogenesis radially migrating neuroblasts (future pyramidal cells) are desynchronized in their development from those that follow a tangential route (interneurons). The possible presence of a pathological mechanism in common among different conditions expressing an autism-like phenotype argue in favor of considering ASD a “sequence” rather than a syndrome. Focal cortical dysplasias in ASD may serve to

  2. Dental Anomalies Associated with Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-P; Tadinada, A; Dutra, E H; Utreja, A; Uribe, F; Reichenberger, E J

    2014-06-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare genetic disorder encompassing hyperostosis of craniofacial bones and metaphyseal widening of tubular bones. Dental abnormalities are features of CMD that have been little discussed in the literature. We performed dentofacial examination of patients with CMD and evaluated consequences of orthodontic movement in a mouse model carrying a CMD knock-in (KI) mutation (Phe377del) in the Ank gene. All patients have a history of delayed eruption of permanent teeth. Analysis of data obtained by cone-beam computed tomography showed significant bucco-lingual expansion of jawbones, more pronounced in mandibles than in maxillae. There was no measurable increase in bone density compared with that in unaffected individuals. Orthodontic cephalometric analysis showed that patients with CMD tend to have a short anterior cranial base, short upper facial height, and short maxillary length. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis in homozygous Ank (KI/KI) mice, a model for CMD, showed that molars can be moved by orthodontic force without ankylosis, however, at a slower rate compared with those in wild-type Ank (+/+) mice (p < .05). Histological analysis of molars in Ank (KI/KI) mice revealed decreased numbers of TRAP(+) osteoclasts on the bone surface of pressure sides. Based on these findings, recommendations for the dental treatment of patients with CMD are provided. PMID:24663682

  3. Dental Anomalies Associated with Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I.-P.; Tadinada, A.; Dutra, E.H.; Utreja, A.; Uribe, F.; Reichenberger, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare genetic disorder encompassing hyperostosis of craniofacial bones and metaphyseal widening of tubular bones. Dental abnormalities are features of CMD that have been little discussed in the literature. We performed dentofacial examination of patients with CMD and evaluated consequences of orthodontic movement in a mouse model carrying a CMD knock-in (KI) mutation (Phe377del) in the Ank gene. All patients have a history of delayed eruption of permanent teeth. Analysis of data obtained by cone-beam computed tomography showed significant bucco-lingual expansion of jawbones, more pronounced in mandibles than in maxillae. There was no measurable increase in bone density compared with that in unaffected individuals. Orthodontic cephalometric analysis showed that patients with CMD tend to have a short anterior cranial base, short upper facial height, and short maxillary length. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis in homozygous AnkKI/KI mice, a model for CMD, showed that molars can be moved by orthodontic force without ankylosis, however, at a slower rate compared with those in wild-type Ank+/+ mice (p < .05). Histological analysis of molars in AnkKI/KI mice revealed decreased numbers of TRAP+ osteoclasts on the bone surface of pressure sides. Based on these findings, recommendations for the dental treatment of patients with CMD are provided. PMID:24663682

  4. Craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia, wormian bone type.

    PubMed

    Santolaya, J M; Hall, C M; García-Miñaur, S; Delgado, A

    1998-05-18

    We report on a 4-year-old boy with craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia (CMDD), wormian bone type. Component manifestations include a large head with prominent forehead, skull changes showing multiple wormian bones, wide long tubular bones without the usual metaphyseal flare, wide and short tubular bones without the normal diaphyseal constriction, and wide ribs and clavicles. In addition to these findings, the propositus, his brother, his father, and a paternal aunt all have parietal protuberances, which seem not related to CMDD. Parental consanguineity supports the autosomal recessive transmission of the condition. PMID:9605592

  5. Schimke immune-osseous dysplasia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Ashraf; Eid, Riham; Sarhan, Amr; Hammad, Ayman; El-Refaey, Ahmed Mahmoud; El-Mougy, Atef; Zedan, Mohammed Magdy; ElHusseini, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    Schimke immune-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spondylo-epiphyseal dysplasia (SED), progressive renal insufficiency beginning as steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and defective cellular immunity. This article reports a case from Egypt with a mild form of SIOD. A 14.5-year-old male patient presented with disproportionate short stature, SRNS (focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis), laboratory evidence of cellular immune deficiency and radiologic characteristics of SED. He died at the age of 16.5 years with bone marrow failure and severe pneumonia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of SIOD to be reported from Egypt. PMID:26354575

  6. Pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia: when inflammation meets organ development.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Tayyab; Radajewski, Sarah; Chao, Cho-Ming; Bellusci, Saverio; Ehrhardt, Harald

    2016-12-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease of preterm infants. It is caused by the disturbance of physiologic lung development mainly in the saccular stage with lifelong restrictions of pulmonary function and an increased risk of abnormal somatic and psychomotor development. The contributors to this disease's entity are multifactorial with pre- and postnatal origin. Central to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary is the induction of a massive pulmonary inflammatory response due to mechanical ventilation and oxygen toxicity. The extent of the pro-inflammatory reaction and the disturbance of further alveolar growth and vasculogenesis vary largely and can be modified by prenatal infections, antenatal steroids, and surfactant application.This minireview summarizes the important recent research findings on the pulmonary inflammatory reaction obtained in patient cohorts and in experimental models. Unfortunately, recent changes in clinical practice based on these findings had only limited impact on the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID:27357257

  7. Developmental dysplasia of the hip: diagnosis and management to 18 months.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip represents a spectrum of disease ranging from transient neonatal instability to established dislocation. It is accepted that female sex, breech presentation, and family history are risk factors for the disease. Early diagnosis by clinical examination or ultrasound imaging is emphasized, with splint treatment ideally commencing by 6 weeks of age. Treatment using the Pavlik harness is successful in up to 90% of patients. Ultrasound imaging is the gold standard for monitoring a patient during harness wear. Failed splintage or late presentation usually necessitates surgical intervention depending on the patient's age and the severity of the hip dysplasia and displacement. PMID:24720316

  8. Hip Arthroscopy in the Presence of Acetabular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jayasekera, Narlaka; Aprato, Alessandro; Villar, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : Hip arthroscopy is a well established therapeutic intervention for an increasing number of painful hip conditions. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is commonly associated with intra-articular hip pathology. However, some surgeons perceive patients with hip dysplasia as poor candidates for hip arthroscopy. Our aim was to describe early outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for patients with DDH, who also had femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treated when necessary, and to compare these outcomes against a control group of patients without DDH. Methods : Prospective case-control study of 68 consecutive hip arthroscopy patients assessed with a modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) preoperatively and at six weeks, six months, and one year after surgery. Presence of DDH was determined using a standard anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph to measure the centre-edge angle (CEA) of Wiberg, with a CEA < 20º used as threshold for diagnosis of DDH. Results : 12 patients (eight female and four male) with acetabular dysplasia and mean CEA of 15.4º (9º to 19º). The control, nondysplastic group comprised 54 patients (23 females and 31 males) with a mean CEA of 33.1º (22º to 45º). All patients in the dysplastic group had a labral tear and 11 (91.7%) had associated femoral cam impingement lesion addressed at arthroscopy. Our study demonstrates a significant (p=0.02) improvement in outcome in the dysplastic group at one year using the mHHS. Conclusion : Hip arthroscopy in the presence of DDH is effective in relieving pain for at least one year after surgery although does not address underlying acetabular abnormality. PMID:26069512

  9. DYSPLASIA OF HIP DEVELOPMENT: UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Guarniero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The term “developmental dysplasia of the hip” (DDH) includes a wide spectrum of abnormalities that affect the hip during its growth, ranging from dysplasia to joint dislocation and going through different degrees of coxofemoral subluxation. The incidence of DDH is variable, and depends on a number of factors, including geographical location. Approximately one in 1,000 newborn infants may present hip dislocation and around 10 in 1,000 present hip instability. Brazil has an incidence of five per 1,000 in terms of findings of a positive Ortolani sign, which is the early clinical sign for detecting the disorder. The risk factors for DDH include: female sex, white skin color, primiparity, young mother, breech presentation at birth, family history, oligohydramnios, newborns with greater weight and height, and deformities of the feet or spine. Hip examinations should be routine for newborns, and should be emphasized in maternity units. Among newborns and infants, the diagnosis of DDH is preeminently clinical and is made using the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers. Conventional radiography is of limited value for confirming the diagnosis of DDH among newborns, and ultrasound of the hip is the ideal examination. The treatment of DDH is challenging, both for pediatric orthopedists and for general practitioners. The objectives of the treatment include diagnosis as early as possible, joint reduction and stabilization of the hip in a secure position. Classically, treatment options are divided according to different age groups, at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27022528

  10. Sudden death in spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cristina; Cairns, Robyn; Patel, Millan S

    2009-01-01

    The spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasias are an expanding group of skeletal dysplasias with specific features differentiating each subtype. We review the precocious carpal mineralization, unique metacarpal shape, triangular distal phalanges and mushroom cloud-shaped proximal phalanges present at an early age in spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type (SMED SL-AC) and report two patients with clinical and radiographic features consistent with SMED SL-AC, who died suddenly because of spinal cord compression. The patients presented are female siblings, providing further evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance. Cervical cord compression is found in half of reported patients and is the major cause of mortality. SMED SL-AC should be added to the list of genetic causes of sudden death. Radiological features in the hand may be used in the first few years of life to support an early diagnosis and thus allow for prevention of premature demise. PMID:19050401

  11. Dentin dysplasia type I: a challenge for treatment with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Depprich, Rita A; Ommerborn, Michelle A; Handschel, Jörg GK; Naujoks, Christian D; Meyer, Ulrich; Kübler, Norbert R

    2007-01-01

    Background Dentin dysplasia type I is characterized by a defect of dentin development with clinical normal appearance of the permanent teeth but no or only rudimentary root formation. Early loss of all teeth and concomitant underdevelopment of the jaws are challenging for successful treatment with dental implants. Methods A combination of sinus lifting and onlay bone augmentation based on treatment planning using stereolithographic templates was used in a patient with dentin dysplasia type I to rehabilitate the masticatory function. Results (i) a predisposition for an increased and accelerated bone resorption was observed in our patient, (ii) bone augmentation was successful using a mixture of allogenic graft material with autogenous bone preventing fast bone resorption, (iii) surgical planning, based on stereolithographic models and surgical templates, facilitated the accurate placement of dental implants. Conclusion Bony augmentation and elaborate treatment planning is helpful for oral rehabilitation of patients with dentin dysplasia type I. PMID:17714586

  12. Autosomal recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia with homozygosity for C653S in the DTDST gene: double-layer patella as a reliable sign.

    PubMed

    Mäkitie, Outi; Savarirayan, Ravi; Bonafé, Luisa; Robertson, Stephen; Susic, Miki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Cole, William G

    2003-10-15

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene result in a family of skeletal dysplasias, which comprise lethal (achondrogenesis type 1B and atelosteogenesis type 2) and non-lethal conditions (diastrophic dysplasia and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED)). The most frequent mutation is R279W, which in a homozygous state results in rMED with bilateral clubfoot, MED, and "double layered" patella. We describe three patients with rMED caused by a previously unreported homozygous mutation in the DTDST gene. The three patients (from two families) were born to healthy, non-consanguineous parents. All developed signs of hip dysplasia in early childhood and two had episodes of recurrent patella dislocation. Two underwent bilateral total hip replacements at ages 13 and 14 years. The feet, external ears, and palate were normal. Stature was normal in all cases. Radiographs showed dysplastic femoral heads, mild generalized epiphyseal dysplasia, abnormal patella ossification, and normal hands and feet. Direct sequence analysis of genomic DNA demonstrated a homozygous 1984T > A (C653S) change in the DTDST gene in all patients. The clinically normal parents were heterozygous for the change. This is the first description of a homozygous C653S mutation of the DTDST gene. Hip dysplasia and patella hypermobility dominates the otherwise mild phenotype. These patients further expand the range of causative mutations in the DTD skeletal dysplasia family. PMID:12966518

  13. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  14. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    PubMed

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  15. Dentin dysplasia: single-tooth involvement?

    PubMed

    Naik, Veena V; Kale, Alka D

    2009-03-01

    Dentin dysplasia is a genetic defect of dentin formation inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation with abnormal pulpal morphology. Once thought to be a single entity, dentin dysplasia has now been divided into type I (radicular) and II (coronal). Type I is by far the more common. Both types include multiple/generalized involvement of primary and permanent dentition. Combinations of both types have also been described in the literature. Four distinct forms of dentin dysplasia type I and 1 form of dentin dysplasia type II are identified. Although there seems to be no need to identify more than 2 distinct types of this relatively rare inherited defect of human dentin, the possible existence of additional forms of the disease cannot be ruled out. Here is a case report of dentin dysplasia in a single tooth, with crown and roots of normal dimensions, associated with severe pain and mobility and histologically involving both coronal and radicular dentin. Focal odontoblastic dysplasia or dentin dysplasia type III could be the new entity. PMID:19417880

  16. Frontometaphyseal dysplasia and keloid formation without FLNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Basart, Hanneke; van de Kar, Annekatrien; Adès, Lesley; Cho, Tae-Joon; Carter, Erin; Maas, Saskia M; Wilson, Louise C; van der Horst, Chantal M A M; Wade, Emma M; Robertson, Stephen P; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2015-06-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is a distinctive sclerosing skeletal dysplasia associated with a number of non-skeletal manifestations including hearing loss, cardiac malformations, and stenosis, particularly of the upper airway and urinary tract. Some, but not all, patients have mutations in FLNA causing the condition. Consonant with the X chromosomal location of FLNA males are generally more severely affected than females. FLNA mutations can be detected in 82% of affected males. We describe seven patients (one male, six females) all of whom have the major clinical and radiological features of FMD, but without detectable mutations in FLNA. The females in our cohort are affected to a similar degree as is usually found in males. In addition, all patients have marked keloid formation at various body sites, including the eye, from an early age. Other features that may indicate a different etiology in these patients are the increased frequency of cleft palate, Robin sequence, tracheal stenosis, and mild intellectual disability, which all occur in three of more patients in the present group. All patients are isolated. We hypothesize that the presently reported patients represent further evidence that phenotypes strongly resembling FMD exist that are not accounted for by mutations in FLNA. Since the frequency of several of the manifestations, their sporadic presentations, and the presence of keloid formation differ from the X-linked form of this condition we propose de novo autosomal dominant acting mutations in a gene functionally related to FLNA, underpin this disorder. PMID:25899317

  17. Safety and efficacy of endoscopic spray cryotherapy for Barrett's dysplasia: results of the National Cryospray Registry.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, S; Tsai, F C; Greenwald, B D; Jang, S; Dumot, J A; McKinley, M J; Shaheen, N J; Habr, F; Coyle, W J

    2016-04-01

    Retrospective series have shown the efficacy of endoscopic spray cryotherapy in eradicating high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett's esophagus (BE); however, prospective data are lacking, and efficacy for low-grade dysplasia (LGD) is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of spray cryotherapy in patients with LGD or HGD. A multicenter, prospective open-label registry enrolled patients with dysplastic BE. Spray cryotherapy was performed every 2-3 months until there was no endoscopic evidence of BE and no histological evidence of dysplasia, followed by surveillance endoscopies up to 2 years. Primary outcome measures were complete eradication of dysplasia (CE-D) and complete eradication of all intestinal metaplasia (CE-IM). Ninety-six subjects with Barrett's dysplasia (67% HGD; 65% long-segment BE; mean length 4.5 cm) underwent 321 treatments (mean 3.3 per subject). Mean age was 67 years, 83% were male. Eighty patients (83%) completed treatment with follow-up endoscopy (mean duration 21 months). In patients with LGD, rate of CE-D was 91% (21/23) and rate of CE-IM was 61% (14/23). In HGD, CE-D rate was 81% (46/57) and CE-IM was 65% (37/57). In patients with short-segment BE (SSBE) with any dysplasia, CE-D was achieved in 97% (30/31) and CE-IM in 77% (24/31). There were no esophageal perforations or related deaths. One subject developed a stricture, which did not require dilation. One patient was hospitalized for bleeding in the setting of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. In the largest prospective cohort to date, data suggest endoscopic spray cryotherapy is a safe and effective modality for eradication of BE with LGD or HGD, particularly with SSBE. PMID:25708903

  18. Optimal management of renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gottsäter, Anders; Lindblad, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory angiopathy of unknown cause affecting medium-sized (most commonly renal) arteries and causing renovascular hypertension. The most common medial multifocal type of FMD (with the “string of beads” appearance) is more than four times more prevalent in females than in males. FMD accounts for up to 10% of cases of renovascular hypertension. Compared with patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, patients with FMD are younger, have fewer risk factors for atherosclerosis, and a lower occurrence of atherosclerosis in other vessels. The etiology is multifactorial, including vessel wall ischemia and smoking, as well as hormonal and genetic factors. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is still the gold standard for exclusion or confirmation of renal artery stenosis caused by FMD, at least in young patients, who more often have lesions in branches of the renal artery. For FMD patients with atherosclerosis and those who are older (>50–55 years), significant renal artery stenosis may be confirmed or excluded with ultrasonography. The FMD lesion is typically truncal or distal, whereas atherosclerotic lesions are more often proximal or ostial. Treatment options are medical, endovascular (percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty [PTRA]), and surgical. Invasive treatment should be considered when hypertension cannot be controlled with antihypertensive drugs and in patients with impaired renal function or ischemic nephropathy. PTRA has become the treatment of choice and normally yields good results, especially in unifocal disease and young patients. Pressure gradients are normally completely abolished, and there is no indication for stent placement. Surgical revascularization is indicated after PTRA complications; thrombosis, perforation, progressive dissection, repeated PTRA failure or restenosis. Centralization of handling is recommended. PMID:25114536

  19. Three Cases of Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Tarda in One Korean Family

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang Wan; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Ha, You-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) tarda is an inherited skeletal arthropathy. Because SED tarda involves the joints and resemble the clinical findings of chronic arthropathies, this disease is frequently misdiagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report here on three patients (father and his two daughters) in one family with SED tarda. All patients had back pain and polyarthralgia. Their radiographs revealed typical changes for SED tarda including platyspondyly and dysplastic bone changes. This rare disease has major clinical importance in that it is similar with JIA or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27401665

  20. Three Cases of Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Tarda in One Korean Family.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sang Wan; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Ha, You Jung; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-09-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) tarda is an inherited skeletal arthropathy. Because SED tarda involves the joints and resemble the clinical findings of chronic arthropathies, this disease is frequently misdiagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report here on three patients (father and his two daughters) in one family with SED tarda. All patients had back pain and polyarthralgia. Their radiographs revealed typical changes for SED tarda including platyspondyly and dysplastic bone changes. This rare disease has major clinical importance in that it is similar with JIA or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27401665

  1. Undersulfation of proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes from a patient with achondrogenesis type 1B homozygous for an L483P substitution in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bonaventure, J; Delezoide, A L; Cetta, G; Superti-Furga, A

    1996-08-01

    Achondrogenesis type 1B is an autosomal recessive, lethal chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the gene encoding a sulfate/chloride antiporter of the cell membrane (Superti-Furga, A., Hästbacka, J., Wilcox, W. R., Cohn, D. H., van der Harten, J. J., Rossi, A., Blau, N., Rimoin, D. L., Steinmann, B., Lander, E. S., and Gitzelmann, R.(1996) Nat. Genet. 12, 100-102). To ascertain the consequences of the sulfate transport defect on proteoglycan synthesis, we studied the structure and sulfation of proteoglycans in cartilage tissue and in fibroblast and chondrocyte cultures from a fetus with achondrogenesis 1B. Proteoglycans extracted from epiphyseal cartilage and separated on agarose gels migrated more slowly than controls and stained poorly with alcian blue. The patient's cultured cells showed reduced incorporation of [35S]sulfate relative to [3H]glucosamine, impaired uptake of sulfate, and higher resistance to chromate toxicity compared to control cells. Epiphyseal chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads synthesized proteoglycans of normal molecular size as judged by gel filtration chromatography, but undersulfated as judged by ion exchange chromatography and by the amount of nonsulfated disaccharide. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of chondroitinase-digested proteoglycans showed that sulfated disaccharides were present, although in reduced amounts, indicating that at least in vitro, other sources of sulfate can partially compensate for sulfate deficiency. A t1475c transition causing a L483P substitution in the eleventh transmembrane domain of the sulfate/chloride antiporter was present on both alleles in the patient who was the product of a consanguineous marriage. The results indicate that the defect of sulfate transport is expressed in both chondrocytes and fibroblasts and results in the synthesis of proteoglycans bearing glycosaminoglycan chains which are poorly sulfated but of normal length. PMID:8702490

  2. Association of migraine-like headaches with Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Donmez, Osman; Sloan, Emily A; Elizondo, Leah I; Huang, Cheng; André, Jean-Luc; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Cockfield, Sandra; Cordeiro, Isabel; Deschenes, Georges; Fründ, Stefan; Kaitila, Ilkka; Lama, Giuliana; Lamfers, Petra; Lücke, Thomas; Milford, David V; Najera, Lydia; Rodrigo, Francisco; Saraiva, Jorge M; Schmidt, Beate; Smith, Graham C; Stajic, Nastasa; Stein, Anja; Taha, Doris; Wand, Dorothea; Armstrong, Dawna; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2005-06-01

    Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. SIOD is caused by mutations in the putative chromatin remodeling protein SMARCAL1. We report an 8-year-old boy with SIOD and recurrent, severe, refractory migraine-like headaches. Through a retrospective questionnaire-based study, we found that refractory and severely disabling migraine-like headaches occur in nearly half of SIOD patients. We have also found that the vasodilator minoxidil provided symptomatic relief for one patient. We hypothesize that these headaches may arise from an intrinsic vascular, neuroimmune, or neurovascular defect resulting from loss of SMARCAL1 function. PMID:15884045

  3. Effect of acetabular reinforcement ring with hook for acetabular dysplasia clarified by three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Chosa, Etsuo; Yamako, Go; Watanabe, Shinji; Deng, Gang; Totoribe, Koji

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to biomechanically determine the effect of the severity of acetabular dysplasia, number and positions of screws and type of bone graft material used on the initial fixation strength of the acetabular reinforcement ring with hook (Ganz ring) using the finite element method. Relative micromotion increased as the severity of acetabular dysplasia increased and tended to decrease as the number of screws increased, but varied according to screw placement position. Increased strength of the bone graft material led to decreased relative micromotion. Biomechanically, the Ganz ring can be placed securely using 3 screws in patients with Crowe 1 dysplasia. However, in patients with Crowe 2 or higher dysplasia, it is necessary to spread at least 4 screws across an area of good host bone. PMID:23993349

  4. Mutation in WNT10A is associated with an autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: the odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Adaimy, Lynn; Chouery, Eliane; Megarbane, Hala; Mroueh, Salman; Delague, Valerie; Nicolas, Elsa; Belguith, Hanen; de Mazancourt, Philippe; Megarbane, Andre

    2007-10-01

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome in which the presenting phenotype is dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, keratoderma and hyperhidrosis of palms and soles, and hyperkeratosis of the skin. We studied three consanguineous Lebanese Muslim Shiite families that included six individuals affected with odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia. Using a homozygosity-mapping strategy, we assigned the disease locus to an ~9-cM region at chromosome 2q35-q36.2, located between markers rs16853834 and D2S353, with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 5.7. Screening of candidate genes in this region led us to identify the same c.697G-->T (p.Glu233X) homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 of the WNT10A gene in all patients. At the protein level, the mutation is predicted to result in a premature truncated protein of 232 aa instead of 417 aa. This is the first report to our knowledge of a human phenotype resulting from a mutation in WNT10A, and it is the first demonstration of an ectodermal dysplasia caused by an altered WNT signaling pathway, expanding the list of WNT-related diseases. PMID:17847007

  5. Mutation in WNT10A Is Associated with an Autosomal Recessive Ectodermal Dysplasia: The Odonto-onycho-dermal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Adaimy, Lynn ; Chouery, Eliane ; Mégarbané, Hala ; Mroueh, Salman ; Delague, Valérie ; Nicolas, Elsa ; Belguith, Hanen ; de Mazancourt, Philippe ; Mégarbané, André 

    2007-01-01

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome in which the presenting phenotype is dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, keratoderma and hyperhidrosis of palms and soles, and hyperkeratosis of the skin. We studied three consanguineous Lebanese Muslim Shiite families that included six individuals affected with odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia. Using a homozygosity-mapping strategy, we assigned the disease locus to an ∼9-cM region at chromosome 2q35-q36.2, located between markers rs16853834 and D2S353, with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 5.7. Screening of candidate genes in this region led us to identify the same c.697G→T (p.Glu233X) homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 of the WNT10A gene in all patients. At the protein level, the mutation is predicted to result in a premature truncated protein of 232 aa instead of 417 aa. This is the first report to our knowledge of a human phenotype resulting from a mutation in WNT10A, and it is the first demonstration of an ectodermal dysplasia caused by an altered WNT signaling pathway, expanding the list of WNT-related diseases. PMID:17847007

  6. Wake-up test in total hip arthroplasty with high-riding developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip is technically challenging. This group of patients has a higher incidence of nerve injury during THA. Although neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring has been developed to provide nerve monitoring, it is not always available. The wake-up test has been used for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring during major spinal surgery, but no study has reported the use of the wake-up test for neurologic monitoring during THA in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip. The authors retrospectively reviewed 22 THA procedures in 20 patients with Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip who underwent the wakeup test during THA. In the current study, 1 patient could not dorsiflex her foot during the wake-up test. Therefore, the authors immediately reduced the length of limb lengthening by 1 cm. Postoperative drop foot and numbness occurred but resolved completely 2 months later. None of the patients who showed no deficits in motion of the feet during the intraoperative wake-up test had signs of postoperative nerve injury. In the current study, there was no false-positive or false-negative finding. The authors concluded that the wake-up test, which is simple, safe, and reliable, is a useful technique and a possible alternative to neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring in checking nerve function during THA in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:24992057

  7. Establishment of the Certification System "Gynaecological Dysplasia" in Germany.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, M W; Quaas, J; Bischofberger, A; Kämmerle, A; Lux, M P; Wesselmann, S

    2014-09-01

    Gynaecological cancer centres have been established nationwide in Germany since 2008 according to the certification system of the German Cancer Society (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft e. V. [DKG]) and the German Society for Gynaecology and Obstetrics (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe e. V. [DGGG]). However, patient access to the certified gynaecological cancer centres is currently only possible through direct referrals. A longitudinal structure with the corresponding long-term documentation of both the high-grade precursors as well as the cancers does not exist as yet. According to the aims of the National Cancer Plan, a corresponding structure for the cancer entity "cervix carcinoma" should be established. The foundations for such a structure are appropriate diagnostic units that are responsible, after nationwide screening, for clarification according to guideline-conform principles. On the basis of the vote of the certification commission for gynaecological cancer centres under the chairmanship of the DKG, the Working Group for Gynaecological Oncology (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie e. V. [AGO]), the Committee on Cervical Pathology and Colposcopy (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Zervixpathologie & Kolposkopie [AG-CPC]) and the DGGG the certification system for gynaecological dysplasia has been established. As a general principle, a distinction is made between the certification of a consulting practice for gynaecological dysplasia and a gynaecological dysplasia facility in order to integrate both outpatient and inpatient health-care facilities into the certification system. In analogy to the further catalogue of requirements from the DKG, quantitative and qualitative minimum numbers are demanded. Furthermore, the requirements of the certification process include a summary of patient information, the applied guidelines, continuing and further training, interdisciplinary cooperation in tumour boards, contents or, respectively, procedure

  8. Clinico-pathological profile of 22 cases of cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sompal; Gupta, Ruchika; Nigam, Sonu; Khurana, Nita; Aggarwal, Satish Kumar; Chaturvedi, K Uma; Mandal, Ashish Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysplasia is one of the major renal developmental anomaly characterized by abnormal structural organization and development of metanephric elements. It is usually detected antenatally or in early childhood. The kidney may be multicystic, aplastic, hypoplastic or duplex. We studied 22 cases of cystic renal dysplasia diagnosed over a period often years to identify the spectrum of morphological changes in dysplastic kidney, with special emphasis on mesenchymal changes. Clinical, radiological and gross morphologicalfeatures were noted. Microscopic features were studied in detail, including the epithelial and mesenchymal changes. Twenty-one of the 22 cases studied were children. One case was a 21-year-old adult, which is a rare age at presentation. Male to female ratio was 1.1:1. One of our patients had contra-lateral ureteric stenosis, a rare anomaly reported with renal dysplasia. Ten patients, all autopsy cases, had multi-system congenital anomalies. As cystic renal dysplasia is not a hereditary disease, it must be differentiated from polycystic kidney disease. Other differential diagnoses are cystic nephroma and cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma. Histopathological examination is the final diagnostic tool since radiological features alone may not be sufficient to exclude other cystic renal lesions. Cartilage may not be seen in all cases of renal dysplasia. Once diagnosed, other associated anomalies should also be looked for. PMID:17474245

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures including the skin , hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands. Most people with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia have a reduced ability to sweat (hypohidrosis) because they have fewer sweat glands than ...

  10. Birth prevalence rates of skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Dott, B; Roth, M P; Alembik, Y

    1989-02-01

    This study establishes the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias which can be diagnosed in the perinatal period or during pregnancy. Using a population-based register of congenital anomalies, a prevalence rate of 3.22 0/000 was observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.64 0/000, 1/15,000 births), thanatophoric dysplasia and achondrogenesis (0.28 0/000). The mutation rate for achondroplasia was higher in our material than in the other studies: 3.3 x 10(-5) per gamete per generation. Our study demonstrates that prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound is possible in some skeletal dysplasias. PMID:2785882

  11. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: septo-optic dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Septo-optic dysplasia is a disorder of early brain development. Although its signs and symptoms vary, this condition ... in the brain. In the early stages of brain development, these structures may form abnormally or fail to ...

  13. Renal dysplasia in boxers and Finnish harriers.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, A; Karlstam, E

    2000-09-01

    Puppies from two litters of dogs were found to have severe polyuria and polydipsia. Four of the dogs were investigated by means of clinical examination, haematological and biochemical analysis, and urinalysis. A modified water deprivation response test was also performed in two of the dogs. Renal changes on postmortem examination in three of the dogs were found to be consistent with renal dysplasia. A possible explanation for the finding of hyposthenuria and the extreme polyuria and polydipsia in association with renal dysplasia may be lack of response to antidiuretic hormone owing to anomalous maturation of the renal tubules. Six other puppies from the two litters of dogs did not show any clinical signs of polyuria and polydipsia, although postmortem examination in one of them also revealed renal dysplasia. The clinical features of renal dysplasia may therefore vary greatly between individuals. PMID:11023130

  14. [Multicystic renal dysplasia and Wilms tumor].

    PubMed

    Muguerza, R; Martínez-Urrutia, M J; López Pereira, P; Picazo, L; Blesa, E; Jaureguizar, E

    1996-10-01

    We review a case of multicystic right dysplasia containing nodular renal blastema in a 3-year-old girl with left Wilms tumor. In relation to this finding the management of the asymptomatic multicystic dysplastic kidney in discussed. PMID:9131988

  15. Holoprosencephaly with caudal dysplasia. Pseudo-trisomy 13 or a distinct entity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.P.B.; Aylsworth, A.S.; Timmons, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    We have studied three chromosomally normal patients with multiple anomalies that include holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia. Each has features found in patients with pseudo-trisomy 13, though each lacks malformations common in that syndrome. Patients 1 and 2 did not have polydactyly and patients 2 and 3 had no congenital heart malformation. Patient 1 is also unusual in that he does not have typical holoprosencephalic facies and is alive at age 25 months. We have also identified two other similar patients in the London Dysmorphology Database, each of which had holoprosencephaly, congenital heart malformation, and imperforate anus. Isolated caudal dysplasia and holoprosencephaly are both causally heterogeneous. They have been reported together rarely in patients with several different syndromes including chromosomal abnormalities, monogenic syndromes, teratogenic insults, and syndromes of unknown cause. Over thirty cases of {open_quotes}pseudo-trisomy 13{close_quotes} have now been reported and eight of these have had features of caudal dysplasia. There have been four with imperforate anus or anal stenosis, one with lumbosacral vertebral anomaly, and three others with bilateral renal agenesis or hypoplasia. Based on our patients and this review of other reported and unreported cases, we suggest that caudal dysplasia may be a significant clinical feature of pseudo-trisomy 13. Alternatively, holoprosencephaly and caudal dysplasia with a normal karyotype may represent a similar though distinct entity. Some may have submicroscopic chromosomal deletions. Molecular studies of regions known to be associated with holoprosencephaly are currently in progress on tissue from Patient 1. We hope these observations will stimulate reports of similarly affected patients to allow better definition of pseudo-trisomy 13 and other overlap syndromes.

  16. Optic nerve hypoplasia: septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Acers, T E

    1981-01-01

    Forty-five patients with the common clinical factor of optic nerve hypoplasia are analyzed regarding their clinical appearance, echographic and computed tomographic measurements of the optic nerves, and the correlation of anatomic size with visual function. Computed axial tomographic studies of the midline brain were performed on all 45 patients to determine the incidence of correlated structural defects, especially the septum pellucidum, and neuroendocrine dysfunction. Review of the spectrum of septo-optic-pituitary syndrome is separately developed to include historical background, embryogenesis, histopathology, and pathogenesis of the three major components of the syndrome. In summary, 45 patients had optic nerve hypoplasia, 32 with evidence of segmental or partial hypoplasia and 13 with evidence of complete or diffuse hypoplasia--the optic nerve hypoplasia syndrome. Twelve of these patients demonstrated absence of the septum pellucidum by computed axial tomography--the septo-optic dysplasia syndrome. Of these 12 patients with partial or complete absence of the septum pellucidum, six demonstrated evidence of pituitary hypofunction--the septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 a FIGURE 3 b FIGURE 4 a FIGURE 4 b FIGURE 4 c FIGURE 4 d PMID:7043865

  17. Clinical and molecular characterization of Diastrophic Dysplasia in the Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, M; Sousa, A B; Medeira, A; Lourenço, T; Saraiva, J; Pinto-Basto, J; Soares, G; Fortuna, A M; Superti-Furga, A; Mittaz, L; Reis-Lima, M; Bonafé, L

    2011-12-01

    SLC26A2-related dysplasias encompass a spectrum of diseases: from lethal achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG1B; MIM #600972) and atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO2; MIM #256050) to classical diastrophic dysplasia (cDTD; MIM #222600) and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED; MIM #226900). This study aimed at characterizing clinically, radiologically and molecularly 14 patients affected by non-lethal SLC26A2-related dysplasias and at evaluating genotype-phenotype correlation. Phenotypically, eight patients were classified as cDTD, four patients as rMED and two patients had an intermediate phenotype (mild DTD - mDTD, previously 'DTD variant'). The Arg279Trp mutation was present in all patients, either in homozygosity (resulting in rMED) or in compound heterozygosity with the known severe alleles Arg178Ter or Asn425Asp (resulting in DTD) or with the mutation c.727-1G>C (causing mDTD). The 'Finnish mutation', c.-26+2T>C, and the p.Cys653Ser, both frequent mutations in non-Portuguese populations, were not identified in any of the patients of our cohort and are probably very rare in the Portuguese population. A targeted mutation analysis for p.Arg279Trp and p.Arg178Ter in the Portuguese population allows the identification of approximately 90% of the pathogenic alleles. PMID:21155763

  18. HPV immunohistochemical testing and cervical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    MUREŞAN, DANIEL; ROTAR, IOANA CRISTINA; APOSTOL, SILVANA; COROIU, GEORGIANA; STAMATIAN, FLORIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) infection represents a necessary condition for cervical carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of HPV testing using an immunohistochemical staining kit with implications upon both diagnosis and treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Methods Seventy-nine patients and eighty-six controls were enrolled in the study. Each patient had completed a physical examination, gynecological examination with cervical sampling using a liquid-based cytology system and also colposcopy. The cervical samples were analyzed according to Bethesda terminology and HPV-HR immunohistochemical staining was performed. In all the patients with high-grade lesion a surgical excision procedure was performed followed by pathological examination of the specimen. The collected data were analyzed using statistical software. Results The colposcopic examination has detected acetowhite modifications of the cervical epithelium in 47% of patients with ASC-US (Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance) in 71% of patients with LSIL (Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and in 100% of patients with HSIL ( High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion). The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of LSIL in 27% of biopsy specimens in patients with ASC-US and in 79.99% of patients with LSIL respectively. In all patients with HSIL the diagnosis was CIN II or higher. The percentage of HPV-HR (Human Papilloma Virus – High Risk) positivity porportionaly increased with the severity of cytological diagnosis: 30% in ASC-US, 42.86% in LSIL and 75% in HSIL patients. The sensitivity of detection of HPV-HR was 50% with CI 95% [17.45;82.55] for ASC-US, 77.77% with CI 95% [51.91;92.62] for LSIL and 81.81% with CI 95% [58.99;94.00] for HSIL. Conclusion HPV testing can be an important screening tool for cervical dysplasia. The HPV testing targeting high risk types is indicated for ASC-US and LSIL triage. The present work

  19. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia is a risk factor for the subsequent development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Neda; Barbon, Carlotta; Zaki, Ahmed; He, Jin; Salman, Bulent; Hruban, Ralph H.; Cameron, John L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Ahuja, Nita; Lennon, Anne Marie; Weiss, Matthew J.; Wood, Laura D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with high-grade dysplasia and IPMN-associated invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently included under the term “malignancy”. The goal of this study is to clarify the difference between these two entities. Methods From 1996 to 2013, data of 616 patients who underwent pancreatic resection for an IPMN were reviewed. Results The median overall survival for patients with IPMN with high-grade dysplasia (92 months) was similar to survival for patients with IPMN with low/intermediate-grade dysplasia (118 months, p = 0.081), and superior to that of patients with IPMN-associated PDAC (29 months, p < 0.001). IPMN-associated PDAC had lymph node metastasis in 53%, perineural invasion in 58%, and vascular invasion in 33%. In contrast, no lymph node metastasis, perineural or vascular invasion was observed with high-grade dysplasia. None of the patients with IPMN with high-grade dysplasia developed recurrence outside the remnant pancreas. In stark contrast 58% of patients with IPMN-associated PDAC recurred outside the remnant pancreas. The rate of progression within the remnant pancreas was significant in patients with IPMN with high-grade (24%) and with low/intermediate dysplasia (22%, p = 0.816). Conclusion Non-invasive IPMN with high-grade dysplasia should not be considered a malignant entity. Compared to patients with IPMN with low/intermediate-grade dysplasia, those with high-grade dysplasia have an increased risk of subsequent development of PDAC in the remnant pancreas. PMID:27017163

  20. PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS OF FOCAL CORTICAL DYSPLASIA

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Guerrini, Renzo; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) constitute a prevalent cause of intractable epilepsy in children, and one of the leading conditions requiring epilepsy surgery. Despite the recent advances on the cellular and molecular biology of these conditions, the pathogenetic mechanisms of FCDs remain largely unknown. The purpose if this work is to review the molecular underpinnings of FCDs and to highlight potential therapeutic targets. Methods A systematic review of the literature regarding the histological, molecular, and electrophysiological aspects of FCDs was conducted. Results Disruption of the mTOR signaling comprises a common pathway underlying the structural and electrical disturbances of some FCDs. Other mechanisms such as viral infections, prematurity, head trauma, and brain tumors are also posited. mTOR inhibitors (i.e., rapamycin) have shown positive results on seizure management in animal models and in a small cohort of patients with FCD. Significance Encouraging progresses have been achieved on the molecular and electrophysiological basis of constitutive cells in the dysplastic tissue. Despite the promising results of mTOR inhibitors, large-scale randomized trials are in need to evaluate their efficacy and side effects, along with additional mechanistic studies for the development of novel, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:24861491

  1. Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia: clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Roghi, Marco; Scapparone, Chiara; Crippa, Rolando; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Angiero, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia (PCOD) is a rare benign lesion, often asymptomatic, in which fibrous tissue replaces the normal bone tissue, with metaplasic bone and neo-formed cement. We present a rare case of mandibular PCOD in a woman of 55 years, who presented with moderate swelling and mobility of teeth 32-33-34. Endoral radiography showed that these teeth had been devitalized; they had deep periodontal pockets and marked radicular radiotransparency; the root apices exhibited mixed radiotransparency and radio-opacity. Clinical and radiographical findings led to a diagnosis of periapical rarefying osteitis, and the three teeth were thus extracted. Due to the persistence of swelling and slight pain post-extraction, a cone-beam computed tomographic scan was taken; this showed a mixed radiotransparent and radio-opaque lesion in the area of the extracted teeth. A bone biopsy of the affected area was taken for histopathological evaluation; a diagnosis of PCOD was rendered. This case demonstrates the importance of a full investigation when a patient presents after tooth extraction with non-healing socket, pain, and swelling. A multidisciplinary approach is required to manage these rare cases. PMID:24778071

  2. Scattering attenuation microscopy of oral epithelial dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Pete H.; Adegun, Oluyori; Hagi-Pavli, Eleni; Piper, Kim; Bader, Dan; Fortune, Farida

    2010-11-01

    We present a new method for quantitative visualization of premalignant oral epithelium called scattering attenuation microscopy (SAM). Using low-coherence interferometry, SAM projects measurements of epithelial optical attenuation onto an image of the tissue surface as a color map. The measured attenuation is dominated by optical scattering that provides a metric of the severity of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). Scattering is sensitive to the changes in size and distribution of nuclear material that are characteristic of OED, a condition recognized by the occurrence of basal-cell-like features throughout the epithelial depth. SAM measures the axial intensity change of light backscattered from epithelial tissue. Scattering measurements are obtained from sequential axial scans of a 3-D tissue volume and displayed as a 2-D SAM image. A novel segmentation method is used to confine scattering measurement to epithelial tissue. This is applied to oral biopsy samples obtained from 19 patients. Our results show that imaging of tissue scattering can be used to discriminate between different dysplastic severities and furthermore presents a powerful tool for identifying the most representative tissue site for biopsy.

  3. Cochlear implantation in pontine tegmental cap dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bacciu, Andrea; Ormitti, Francesca; Pasanisi, Enrico; Vincenti, Vincenzo; Zanetti, Diego; Bacciu, Salvatore

    2010-08-01

    Pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD) is an exceptionally rare brain stem and cerebellar malformation characterized by ventral pontine hypoplasia, vaulted pontine tegmentum, hypoplasia of the vermis, subtotal absence of middle cerebellar peduncles, lateralized course of the superior cerebellar peduncles, and absence or alteration of the inferior olivary nucleus. The main clinical features are multiple cranial neurophaties and ataxia. Sensorineural hearing loss of varying severity is almost always present. To date, 14 cases of PTCD have been reported in the literature. We present a child with PTCD and profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who underwent cochlear implantation. To the best of our knowledge, cochlear implantation in PTCD has not been previously reported. Functional outcome was assessed using the Speech Perception Categories and the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale. At 22 months' postoperative evaluation, the patient who was placed into speech perception category 0 (no detection of speech) preoperatively progressed to category 3 (beginning word identification). Before implantation, the child had connected speech unintelligible. At the last follow-up, she had connected speech intelligible to a listener who has little experience of a deaf person's speech. Cochlear implantation allowed this child to improve her quality of life, increasing her self-confidence, independence, and social integration. PMID:20627414

  4. Pulmonary hemosiderosis in children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kurahara, David; Morie, Marina; Yamane, Maya; Lam, Sarah; Matthews, Wallace; Yee, Keolamau; Yamamoto, Kara

    2014-01-01

    We describe a possible association between pulmonary hemosiderosis (PH) and a history of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Both patients were born at 28-week gestation and presented with PH at ages 22 months and 6 years, respectively. Both initially presented with cough and tachypnea, and bronchoalveolar lavage showed evidence of hemosiderin-laden macrophages. Initial hemoglobin levels were < 4 g/dL and chest radiographs showed diffuse infiltrates that cleared dramatically within days after initiation of intravenous corticosteroids. In the first case, frank pulmonary blood was observed upon initial intubation, prompting the need for high frequency ventilation, immediate corticosteroids, and antibiotics. The mechanical ventilation wean was made possible by the addition of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and hydroxychloroquine. Slow tapering off of medications was accomplished over 6 years. These cases represent a possible correlation between prematurity-associated BPD and PH. We present a review of the literature regarding this possible association. In addition, MMF proved to be life-saving in one of the PH cases, as it has been in pulmonary hemorrhage related to systemic lupus erythematosus. Further studies are warranted to investigate the possible association between PH and prematurity-related BPD, as well as the use of MMF in the treatment of PH. PMID:25309768

  5. Recognizable cerebellar dysplasia associated with mutations in multiple tubulin genes.

    PubMed

    Oegema, Renske; Cushion, Thomas D; Phelps, Ian G; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Collins, Sarah; Mullins, Jonathan G L; Dudding, Tracy; Gill, Harinder; Green, Andrew J; Dobyns, William B; Ishak, Gisele E; Rees, Mark I; Doherty, Dan

    2015-09-15

    Mutations in alpha- and beta-tubulins are increasingly recognized as a major cause of malformations of cortical development (MCD), typically lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria; however, sequencing tubulin genes in large cohorts of MCD patients has detected tubulin mutations in only 1-13%. We identified patients with a highly characteristic cerebellar dysplasia but without lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria typically associated with tubulin mutations. Remarkably, in seven of nine patients (78%), targeted sequencing revealed mutations in three different tubulin genes (TUBA1A, TUBB2B and TUBB3), occurring de novo or inherited from a mosaic parent. Careful re-review of the cortical phenotype on brain imaging revealed only an irregular pattern of gyri and sulci, for which we propose the term tubulinopathy-related dysgyria. Basal ganglia (100%) and brainstem dysplasia (80%) were common features. On the basis of in silico structural predictions, the mutations affect amino acids in diverse regions of the alpha-/beta-tubulin heterodimer, including the nucleotide binding pocket. Cell-based assays of tubulin dynamics reveal various effects of the mutations on incorporation into microtubules: TUBB3 p.Glu288Lys and p.Pro357Leu do not incorporate into microtubules at all, whereas TUBB2B p.Gly13Ala shows reduced incorporation and TUBA1A p.Arg214His incorporates fully, but at a slower rate than wild-type. The broad range of effects on microtubule incorporation is at odds with the highly stereotypical clinical phenotype, supporting differential roles for the three tubulin genes involved. Identifying this highly characteristic phenotype is important due to the low recurrence risk compared with the other (recessive) cerebellar dysplasias and the apparent lack of non-neurological medical issues. PMID:26130693

  6. Chromoendoscopy and Dysplasia Surveillance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence supporting the practice of dysplasia surveillance in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has remained sparse, and optimal detection strategies are still lacking. These issues, added to the declining incidence of dysplasia in IBD, have led to much debate over the diagnosis and management of dysplasia. White-light endoscopy with targeted and random biopsies remains the technique of choice for most practicing gastroenterologists. However, during the past decade, a surge of literature has questioned the efficacy of this strategy. Simultaneously, chromoendoscopy has emerged as an alternative, and perhaps superior, technique that has been included in some society guidelines. Nevertheless, many issues remain unclear, such as the best way to implement chromoendoscopy into everyday practice, whether there are any outcome benefits that can be attributed to the use of chromoendoscopy, and, perhaps most importantly, how to manage dysplasia uncovered by this and other advanced techniques. In this article, we discuss the various techniques currently available for dysplasia surveillance in IBD, with a focus on chromoendoscopy. Additionally, we highlight the overarching issues of setting appropriate endpoints and individualizing the care of patients with long-standing colitis.

  7. Clinical examination versus ultrasonography in detecting developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, H.; Yavuz, O. Y.; Sayli, U.

    2007-01-01

    Although hip ultrasonography is gaining acceptance as the most effective method for the early diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip, there is still some controversy regarding the use of ultrasonography as a screening method. The purpose of this study was to investigate prospectively the capacity of clinical examination findings and associated risk factors to detect developmental dysplasia of the hip defined ultrasonographically in infants. A total of 3,541 infants underwent clinical examination and hip ultrasonography. Measured against ultrasonography as a standard, the sensitivity and specificity of clinical examination were 97% and 13.68%, respectively. Graf type IIb or more severe developmental dysplasia was found in 167 infants (208 hips), at an overall frequency of 4.71%. Graf type IIa physiological immaturity was encountered in 838 hips, and of these, 15 hips (1.78%) developed Graf type IIb dysplasia and underwent treatment. Patient characteristics that were found to be significant risk factors were swaddling use, female gender, breech delivery and positive family history. Given its low specificity, our findings suggest that clinical examination does not reliably detect ultrasonographically defined developmental dysplasia of the hip in infants being screened for this disease. PMID:17333184

  8. Imaging methods used for children with hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore

    2005-05-01

    Ultrasound has been used to examine the infant hip for more than 20 years. The Thornbury model for assessing the clinical efficacy of a diagnostic imaging procedure has been used in this review to determine what has been achieved and what remains to be learned. To accomplish the effective and efficient treatment of patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip, orthopaedic, radiologic, and pediatric organizations must collaborate in writing and revising standards of care and guidelines for treatment as our knowledge base grows. PMID:15864034

  9. Osteofibrous dysplasia of the tibia treated by bracing.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, N; Hamada, Y; Kohno, H; Siddiqi, N A

    1992-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia of the tibia in children will commonly recur after surgical resection. The use of a leg brace until puberty offers a useful method of conservative management. Seven female patients, age three months to nine years at the time of brace treatment, have been followed for 3.5 to 18 years, an average of nine years, with evidence of satisfactory healing of the lesions in all. Three of the cases had recurred after surgery, two with fibular grafts and one required leg lengthening. The use of a brace to control bowing of the tibia while awaiting spontaneous regression is advised until epiphyseal closure. PMID:1428320

  10. Lumbar nerve root avulsions with secondary ipsilateral hip dysplasia in a child.

    PubMed

    Polyzoidis, Konstandinos; Petropoulou, Calliope; Argyropoulou, Paraskevi I; Vranos, Georgios; Sarmas, Ioannis; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2002-09-01

    We report on an 8-year-old child with avulsions of the left L3, L4 and L5 nerve roots and traumatic meningoceles that were not associated with lumbar spine or pelvic girdle fractures. The patient had a history of a road traffic accident. Plain radiographs of the pelvis revealed left hip dysplasia. The magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine are illustrated. The pathogenesis of lumbar nerve root avulsions and their association with ipsilateral hip dysplasia are discussed. PMID:12221453

  11. Pyle metaphyseal dysplasia in an African child: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wonkam, A; Makubalo, N; Roberts, T; Chetty, M

    2016-01-01

    Pyle disease (OMIM 265900), also known as metaphyseal dysplasia, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with no known gene mutation. We report a case of Pyle disease in a 7-year-old African boy of mixed ancestry who presented with finger and wrist fractures following minor trauma. The radiological findings revealed abnormally broad metaphyses of the tubular bones, known as Erlenmeyer-flask bone deformity, and mild cranial sclerosis, both hallmarks of the condition. We report the first case in a patient with African ancestry, which could help in the gene discovery of this rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with unknown mutations. PMID:27245543

  12. Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia Associated with Undifferentiated Carcinoma and a Novel SMARCAL1 Mutation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Clinton; Badu-Nkansah, Akosua; Hunley, Tracy; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Cortez, David; Frangoul, Haydar

    2013-01-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood with classical features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, renal failure, and T cell immunodeficiency. SIOD has been associated with several malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma and osteosarcoma. About half of SIOD patients have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1). This gene encodes an annealing helicase and replication stress response protein that localizes to damage-stalled DNA replication forks. We report a child with SIOD and a novel S859P missense mutation in SMARCAL1 who developed undifferentiated carcinoma of the sinus. PMID:23630135

  13. Acampomelic campomelic dysplasia with de novo 5q;17q reciprocal translocation and severe phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Savarirayan, R; Bankier, A

    1998-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a rare skeletal malformation syndrome caused by mutations in the SRY related gene SOX9, mapped to 17q24.3-q25.1. A small proportion of cases are associated with structural rearrangements involving 17q and it has been proposed that this subgroup have a milder phenotype and better prognosis compared to those with mutations in the SOX9 gene. We report a severely affected infant with the acampomelic form of campomelic dysplasia, who died at 11 days and was found to have a de novo reciprocal translocation, 46,XX,t(5;17)(q15;q25.1). This is the second reported case of severe campomelic dysplasia associated with a structural rearrangement involving 17q and suggests that this subgroup of patients may not significantly differ from those without chromosomal rearrangements with regards to phenotype or prognosis. Images PMID:9678706

  14. Reorganization of the primary somatosensory area in epilepsy associated with focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gondo, K; Kira, H; Tokunaga, Y; Harashima, C; Tobimatsu, S; Yamamoto, T; Hara, T

    2000-12-01

    A 5-year-old boy with focal cortical dysplasia was referred to our hospital because of epileptic seizures. He showed mild weakness of the left hand without sensory disturbance. Brain MRI revealed extensive cortical dysplasia with pachygyria and microgyria around the right central sulcus. On EEG examination, interictal spikes were noted over the right fronto/centro/parietal region. A 37-channel magnetometer revealed that the sources of the spikes were in a small, restricted region of the normal frontal lobe adjacent to the dysplastic brain. Somatosensory evoked magnetic fields indicated that the location of the current source of N2O was in the same area. Our patient shows a unique case of plasticity and reorganization of the somatosensory function due to cortical dysplasia. PMID:11132258

  15. Phenotypic expansion of TBX4 mutations to include acinar dysplasia of the lungs.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep H; Rupps, Rosemarie; Grazioli, Serge; Wensley, David; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Popek, Edwina; Lee, Anna F; Lupski, James R; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in the T-box transcription factor TBX4 gene have been reported in patients with Ischiocoxopodopatellar syndrome (MIM# 147891) and childhood-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension. Whole exome sequencing of DNA from a 1 day old deceased newborn, with severe diffuse developmental lung disorder exhibiting features of acinar dysplasia, and her unaffected parents identified a de novo TBX4 missense mutation p.E86Q (c.256G>C) in the DNA-binding T-box domain. We propose phenotypic expansion of the TBX4-related clinical disease spectrum to include acinar dysplasia of the lungs. The reported mutation is the first identified genetic variant causative for acinar dysplasia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27374786

  16. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results. PMID:27218252

  17. Fibrous Dysplasia of the Spine – A Case Involving Three Levels of Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Kenneth M; O’hEireamhoin, Sven; Sheng, Michael Tan Chien; Devitt, Aiden

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Involvement of the spinal column in either monostotic or polyostotic form is rare, with fewer than thirty-five cases discussed in the literature. Most of the cases of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of spine have involvement of the appendicular skeleton. Case Report: We report a case of a 74-year-old Irish man with a two month history of back pain. Investigations revealed a diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia involving three levels of the thoracic spine in isolation. The patient underwent T2-T9 stabilization and bone grafting. Conclusion: A case of fibrous dysplasia involving three levels of the thoracic spine in isolation has never previously been reported. The extreme rarity of this type of presentation can pose a diagnostic dilemma, and in cases with spinal involvement, a consensus of management has not yet been achieved. PMID:27298965

  18. SLC26A2 disease spectrum in Sweden - high frequency of recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED).

    PubMed

    Mäkitie, O; Geiberger, S; Horemuzova, E; Hagenäs, L; Moström, E; Nordenskjöld, M; Grigelioniene, G; Nordgren, A

    2015-03-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia caused by SLC26A2 mutations. Clinical features include short stature, joint contractures, spinal deformities, and cleft palate. SLC26A2 mutations also result in other skeletal dysplasias, including the milder recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED). DTD is overrepresented in Finland and we speculated that this may have influenced the prevalence and spectrum of SLC26A2-related skeletal conditions also in Sweden. We reviewed the patient registry at Department of Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm to identify subjects with SLC26A2 mutations. Seven patients from six families were identified; clinical data were available for six patients. All but one patient had one or two copies of the Finnish SLC26A2 founder mutation IVS1+2T>C. Arg279Trp mutation was present in compound heterozygous form in five patients with phenotypes consistent with rMED. Their heights ranged from -2.6 to -1.4 standard deviation units below normal mean and radiographic features included generalised epiphyseal dysplasia and double-layered patellae. Two rMED patients had hypoplastic C2 and cervical kyphosis, a severe manifestation previously described only in DTD. Our study confirms a high prevalence of rMED in Sweden and expands the phenotypic manifestations of rMED. PMID:24598000

  19. [Thirty-eight cases of dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Cormier, F; Cormier, J-M

    2005-07-01

    Dysplasia of the renal and cervical arteries are well known, but dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is less frequent and has specific presentation. There have been few reports on the different types of presentations. We report a series of 38 cases and present the characteristic features together with a comparison with data in the literature. These non-atheromatous non-inflammatory lesions of the arterial wall occurred either in a context of fibromuscular disease which cause is unknown (30/38 patients) or in patients with genetic disease such as neurofibromatosis (3/38) or Ehlers-Danlos disease (5/38). The fibromuscular disease presented three aspects with specific characteristics. a) stenosing lesions found predominantly in women with a different morphology than in the other localization (usually associated): irregular diffuse stenosis discovered in patients with hypertension, or ischemic digestive symptoms (6/14 patients). b) Aneurysms, also found predominantly in women, but less frequently associated with other dysplasias. These aneurysms were generally sacciform. Unlike data in the literature, our series only included rupture in 1/8 cases. The aneurysm was discovered during the exploration of abdominal pain or hypertension. c) The third type of fibromuscular disease concerned dissections which were observed in the male population, (except one case of segmental dysplasia), and presented with signs of digestive ischemia in the other seven patients, four in an emergency context requiring immediate treatment. Two genetic diseases were observed. a) Neurofibromatosis led to dysplasia analogous to fibromuscular disease, but with abnormal nerve formations in the wall. For the three cases observed, one involved only the visceral arteries and the two others thoraco-abdominal coarctation. b) We had five patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery. For three there was a fusiform dilatation and in one small aneurysms

  20. Mucinous cyst exhibiting severe dysplasia in gastric heterotopic pancreas associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Antony; Storey, David; Lee, Cheok Soon; Murali, Rajmohan

    2007-11-21

    Heterotopic pancreatic tissue within the stomach is rare and dysplasia within heterotopic pancreatic tissue is very rare. We present the first report of a patient with concurrent occurrence of heterotopic pancreas in the stomach with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. PMID:17963310

  1. Diagnostic yield of endomicroscopy for dysplasia in primary sclerosing cholangitis associated inflammatory bowel disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Dlugosz, Aldona; Barakat, Ammar Mohkles; Björkström, Niklas K.; Öst, Åke; Bergquist, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Primary sclerosing cholangitis associated inflammatory bowel disease (PSC-IBD) is characterized by a high risk of colorectal dysplasia. Surveillance colonoscopies with random biopsies have doubtful power for dysplasia detection. Our aim was to prospectively investigate the feasibility and efficacy of pCLE in surveillance colonoscopies in patients with PSC-IBD. Patients and methods: Sixty-nine patients with PSC-IBD underwent colonoscopy in 2 steps. On the way from rectum to cecum, the mucosa was inspected with high definition endoscopy (HDE) and random biopsies were taken according to the standard routine. On the way from cecum to rectum, fluorescein-enhanced pCLE and chromoendoscopy were performed. Regions where random biopsies had been taken, as well as visible lesions, were examined with pCLE and targeted biopsies were taken of lesions suspicious for dysplasia. Two investigators, blinded to histology and endoscopy results, analyzed all pCLE videos off-line. Results: Nineteen biopsies obtained in 13 patients (17 targeted biopsies, 2 random biopsies) revealed the presence of low-grade dysplasia. Thirteen lesions with dysplasia were endoscopically visible but by using pCLE-targeted biopsies, additional endoscopically invisible dysplasias in 4 biopsies obtained from 3 patients were detected. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of pCLE in predicting dysplasia were respectively 89 % (95 % CI: 65 – 98), 96 % (95 % CI: 94 – 97), and 96 % (95 % CI: 94 – 97). pCLE showed a good performance for differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic mucosa with negative predictive value of 99 %. Conclusions: pCLE in PSC-IBD surveillance is feasible and may be a good complement to HDE. Future research should aim at elucidating whether real-time pCLE is applicable in PSC-IBD surveillance. PMID:27540581

  2. Neuromotor outcomes in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Tsakalidis, Christos; Kyriakidou, Maria; Mitsiakos, Georgios; Chatziioanidis, Helias; Porpodi, Maria; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Nikolaides, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    We examine the neuromotor outcomes of preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Two hundred and nineteen infants (gestational age, ≤ 32 weeks; birth weight, ≤ 1500 g) were studied. Neuromotor development was assessed using the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination. All potential risk factors associated with neuromotor scores (P < 0.015) were included in the generalized linear model (multiple linear regression) to determine if bronchopulmonary dysplasia had an independent relationship with neuromotor scores. Infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia had lower global scores at ages 6 and 12 months. After adjustment for confounding factors, scores of infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia were reduced by 13.2 units, whereas scores for those with periventricular leukomalacia were reduced by 11.1 units, at age 6 months. At age 12 months, scores for those with periventricular leukomalacia were reduced by 11.9 units. Duration of hospital stay reduced scores by 0.1 for each additional day increase in hospital. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia constitutes a major cause of poor neuromotor outcomes at age 6 months, but improvements in motor outcomes occur over time. PMID:21147386

  3. Multiple copy number variants in a pediatric patient with Hb H disease and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Scheps, Karen G; Francipane, Liliana; Nevado, Julián; Basack, Nora; Attie, Myriam; Bergonzi, María Fernanda; Cerrone, Gloria E; Lapunzina, Pablo; Varela, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Two distinct syndromes that link α-thalassemia and intellectual disability (ID) have been described: ATR-X, due to mutations in the ATRX gene, and ATR-16, a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in the telomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 16. A critical region where the candidate genes for the ID map has been established. In a pediatric patient with Hemoglobin H disease, dysmorphic features and ID, 4 novel and clinically relevant Copy Number Variants were identified. PCR-GAP, MLPA and FISH analyses established the cause of the α-thalassemia. SNP-array analysis revealed the presence of 4 altered loci: 3 deletions (arr[hg19]Chr16(16p13.3; 88,165-1,507,988) x1; arr[hg19]Chr6(6p21.1; 44,798,701-45,334,537) x1 and arr[hg19]Chr17(17q25.3; 80,544,855-81,057,996) x1) and a terminal duplication (arr[hg19]Chr7(7p22.3-p22.2; 4,935-4,139,785) x3). The -α(3.7) mutation and the ∼1.51 Mb in 16p13.3 are involved in the alpha-thalassemic phenotype. However, the critical region for ATR-16 cannot be narrowed down. The deletion affecting 6p21.1 removes the first 2 exons and part of intron 2 of the RUNX2 gene. Although heterozygous loss of function mutations affecting this gene have been associated with cleidocranial dysplasia, the patient does not exhibit pathognomonic signs of this syndrome, possibly due to the fact that the isoform d of the transcription factor remains unaffected. This work highlights the importance of searching for cryptic deletions in patients with ID and reiterates the need of the molecular analysis when it is associated to microcytic hypochromic anemia with normal iron status. PMID:26753516

  4. Olfactory dysfunction as first presenting symptom of cranial fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiropoulou, Evangelia; Konstantinidis, Iordanis; Chatziavramidis, Angelos; Constantinidis, Jannis

    2013-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone disorder presenting with a variety of clinical manifestations. This is the first reported case of anosmia as presenting symptom of FD. We present the case of a 72-year-old female patient with a progressive olfactory dysfunction. Clinical examination revealed evidence of chronic rhinosinusitis; therefore the patient was treated with a course of oral corticosteroids. The patient had no improvement in her olfactory ability and imaging studies were ordered. Bony lesions characteristic of craniofacial FD were found, causing obstruction of the central olfactory pathway. This case emphasises the need to conduct further investigations in patients with rhinosinusitis and olfactory dysfunction especially when they present no response to oral steroid treatment. PMID:23893286

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis contributes to a skeletal dysplasia resembling platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type, in a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Ichimura, Satoki; Sasaki, Kuniaki; Masuya, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ikegawa, Shiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya

    In humans, mutations in the COL2A1 gene encoding the α1(II) chain of type II collagen, create many clinical phenotypes collectively termed type II collagenopathies. However, the mechanisms generating this diversity remain to be determined. Here we identified a novel Col2a1 mutant mouse line by screening a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutant mouse library. This mutant possessed a p.Tyr1391Ser missense mutation in the C-propeptide coding region, and this mutation was located in positions corresponding to the human COL2A1 mutation responsible for platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type (PLSD-T). As expected, p.Tyr1391Ser homozygotes exhibited lethal skeletal dysplasias resembling PLSD-T, including extremely short limbs and severe dysplasia of the spine and pelvis. The secretion of the mutant proteins into the extracellular space was disrupted, accompanied by an abnormally expanded endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the up-regulation of ER stress-related genes in chondrocytes. Chondrocyte apoptosis was severely induced in the growth plate of the homozygotes. These findings strongly suggest that ER stress-mediated apoptosis caused by the accumulated mutant proteins in ER contributes to skeletal dysplasia in Co12a1 mutant mice and PLSD-T patients. PMID:26545783

  6. A pilot study of gene testing of genetic bone dysplasia using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiwen; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yu; Ye, Jun; Han, Lianshu; Qiu, Wenjuan; Gu, Xuefan

    2015-12-01

    Molecular diagnosis of genetic bone dysplasia is challenging for non-expert. A targeted next-generation sequencing technology was applied to identify the underlying molecular mechanism of bone dysplasia and evaluate the contribution of these genes to patients with bone dysplasia encountered in pediatric endocrinology. A group of unrelated patients (n=82), characterized by short stature, dysmorphology and X-ray abnormalities, of which mucopolysacharidoses, GM1 gangliosidosis, mucolipidosis type II/III and achondroplasia owing to FGFR3 G380R mutation had been excluded, were recruited in this study. Probes were designed to 61 genes selected according to the nosology and classification of genetic skeletal disorders of 2010 by Illumina's online DesignStudio software. DNA was hybridized with probes and then a library was established following the standard Illumina protocols. Amplicon library was sequenced on a MiSeq sequencing system and the data were analyzed by MiSeq Reporter. Mutations of 13 different genes were found in 44 of the 82 patients (54%). Mutations of COL2A1 gene and PHEX gene were found in nine patients, respectively (9/44=20%), followed by COMP gene in 8 (18%), TRPV4 gene in 4 (9%), FBN1 gene in 4 (9%), COL1A1 gene in 3 (6%) and COL11A1, TRAPPC2, MATN3, ARSE, TRPS1, SMARCAL1, ENPP1 gene mutations in one patient each (2% each). In conclusion, mutations of COL2A1, PHEX and COMP gene are common for short stature due to bone dysplasia in outpatient clinics in pediatric endocrinology. Targeted next-generation sequencing is an efficient way to identify the underlying molecular mechanism of genetic bone dysplasia. PMID:26377240

  7. A Case of Dentin Dysplasia with Full Mouth Rehabilitation: A 3-year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dheeraj; Likhyani, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dentin dysplasia, a rare hereditary disorder of dentin formation, is characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation along with abnormal pulpal morphology. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It has been divided into two clinical entities: type I (radicular) and type II (coronal). Early diagnosis and initiation of effective regular dental treatments may help the patients with this condition to delay or prevent the loss of the entire dentition and help them in cope up with edentulous state in early ages. The condition undoubtedly has a negative impact on the physical and psychological well-being of the affected individual. Numerous factors have to be considered during the prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with dentin dysplasia. Treatment protocol varies according to clinical case. Although literature reports suggest general guidelines for treatment planning, the present case report describes a full mouth rehabilitation of an 8-year-old female patient with dentin dysplasia. How to cite this article: Khandelwal S, Gupta D, Likhyani L. A Case of Dentin Dysplasia with Full Mouth Rehabilitation: A 3-year Longitudinal Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2): 119-124. PMID:25356011

  8. Denosumab Treatment for Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, AM; Chong, WH; Yao, J; Gafni, RI; Kelly, MH; Chamberlain, CE; Bassim, C; Cherman, N; Ellsworth, M; Kasa-Vubu, JZ; Farley, FA; Molinolo, AA; Bhattacharyya, N; Collins, MT

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a skeletal disease caused by somatic activating mutations of the cAMP-regulating protein, Gsα. These mutations lead to replacement of normal bone by proliferative osteogenic precursors, resulting in deformity, fracture, and pain. Medical treatment has been ineffective in altering the disease course. RANK ligand (RANKL) is a cell surface protein involved in many cellular processes, including osteoclastogenesis, and is reported to be overexpressed in FD-like bone cells. Denosumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody to RANKL approved for treatment of osteoporosis and prevention of skeletal-related events from bone metastases. We present the case of a 9-year-old boy with severe FD who was treated with denosumab for a rapidly expanding femoral lesion. Immunohistochemical staining on a pre-treatment bone biopsy specimen revealed marked RANKL expression. He was started on monthly denosumab, with an initial starting dose of 1 mg/kg and planned 0.25 mg/kg dose escalations every three months. Over seven months of treatment he showed marked reduction in pain, bone turnover markers, and tumor growth rate. Denosumab did not appear to impair healing of a femoral fracture that occurred while on treatment. With initiation of treatment he developed hypophosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism, necessitating supplementation with phosphorus, calcium and calcitriol. Bone turnover markers (BTM) showed rapid and sustained suppression. With discontinuation there was rapid and dramatic rebound of BTM) with CTX (reflecting osteoclast activity) exceeding pre-treatment levels, and accompanied by severe hypercalcemia. In this child, denosumab lead to dramatic reduction of FD expansion and FD-related bone pain. Denosumab was associated with clinically significant disturbances of mineral metabolism both while on treatment and after discontinuation. Denosumab treatment of FD warrants further study to confirm efficacy and determine potential morbidity, as well as

  9. Assessment of adult hip dysplasia and the outcome of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    Hip dysplasia and hip joint deformities in general are recognized as possible precursors of osteoarthritic development. Early and correct identification of hip dysplasia is important in order to offer timely joint preserving treatment. In the contemporary literature, several controversies exist, and some of these were the focus of this doctoral thesis. Categorized into subjects, the major findings and their possible importance are listed below. DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF HIP DYSPLASIA: A multi-observer study quantified the variability of different methods for diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis and resulted in general recommendations regarding diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia. Pelvic tilt was shown to differ significantly between the supine and weight-bearing positions in patients with dysplastic hip joints. This is a finding that adds controversy to the application of neutral pelvic positioning during assessment of hip deformities because pelvic tilt affects the appearance of acetabular version. Weight-bearing assessment of acetabular version showed the presence of retroversion in 33% of dysplastic hips. The establishment of retroversion as a rather frequent entity in dysplastic hips is contradictory to the historical finding that hip dysplasia is characterized by insufficient anterior and lateral coverage. In general, the findings have important implications for orthopedic surgeons and radiologists dealing with diagnostic assessment of painful hips in young adults, and for surgeons planning and performing joint-preserving periacetabular osteotomies. ASSESSMENT OF ACETABULAR LABRAL TEARS IN HIP DYSPLASIA: The roles of ultrasound and clinical tests in acetabular labral tear diagnostics were established. After overcoming an initial learning curve, ultrasound investigation was highly reliable in diagnosing labral tears, whereas only a positive impingement or FABER test was reliable in identifying a labral tear. It seems that non-invasive and

  10. Diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction with a characteristic ‘butterfly’-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term ‘diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia’ to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation. PMID:22822038

  11. Barrett's oesophagus: frequency and prediction of dysplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Falk, Gary W

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma is continuing to increase at an alarming rate in the Western world today. Barrett's oesophagus is a clearly recognized risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, but the overwhelming majority of patients with Barrett's oesophagus will never develop oesophageal cancer. A number of endoscopic, histologic and epidemiologic risk factors identify Barrett's oesophagus patients at increased risk for progression to high-grade dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic factors include segment length, mucosal abnormalities as seemingly trivial as oesophagitis and the 12 to 6 o'clock hemisphere of the oesophagus. Both intestinal metaplasia and low grade dysplasia, the latter only if confirmed by a pathologist with expertise in Barrett's oesophagus pathologic interpretation are the histologic risk factors for progression. Epidemiologic risk factors include ageing, male gender, obesity, and smoking. Factors that may protect against the development of adenocarcinoma include a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and the use of proton pump inhibitors, aspirin/NSAIDs and statins. PMID:25743461

  12. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments. PMID:26489825

  13. Mucin1 expression in focal epidermal dysplasia of actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Luz Marina; Rojas, Héctor; Ramírez, Richard; Reyes, Oscar; Suárez, Ambar; Ortega, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Background Actinic keratoses (AKs) are generally considered as premalignant skin lesions that can progress into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ and invasive SCC. However, its progression to SCC is still matter of debate. A transmembrane glycoprotein that contributes to the progression of certain premalignant and malignant lesions is mucin1 (MUC1). Nevertheless, their functions in the skin lesions are not yet fully clear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to ascertain whether MUC1 is present in the focal epidermal dysplasia of AK. Methods Fourteen skin biopsies from patients diagnosed with AK were selected. They were classified according to the degree of dysplasia in keratinocyte intraepidermal neoplasia (KIN) I, KIN II, and KIN III. In five biopsies the three degrees were present, in two biopsies both KIN I and KIN II, in four biopsies only KIN I, and in three biopsies only KIN III. The presence of MUC1 was assessed by immunofluorescence staining using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Immunostaining revealed that MUC1 was present over the entire cell surface of only a few atypical basal keratinocytes confined to the lower third of the epidermis (KIN I). While in KIN II where atypical keratinocytes occupy the lower two thirds, MUC1 was localized at the apical surface of some atypical keratinocytes and over the entire cell surface of some of them. Interestingly, in KIN III where the atypical keratinocytes extend throughout the full thickness, MUC1 was localized at the apical surface and over the entire cell surface of many of these cells. Conversely, MUC1 expression was not detected in the epidermis of normal skin. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the expression of MUC1 in AK would be induced by alteration of keratinocyte stratification and differentiation and associated to the degree of dysplasia rather than the thickness of the epidermis. PMID:26605291

  14. Diagnostic methods and treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Renzo; Duchowny, Michael; Jayakar, Prasanna; Krsek, Pavel; Kahane, Philippe; Tassi, Laura; Melani, Federico; Polster, Tilman; Andre, Véronique M; Cepeda, Carlos; Krueger, Darcy A; Cross, J Helen; Spreafico, Roberto; Cosottini, Mirco; Gotman, Jean; Chassoux, Francine; Ryvlin, Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bernasconi, Andrea; Stefan, Hermann; Miller, Ian; Devaux, Bertrand; Najm, Imad; Giordano, Flavio; Vonck, Kristl; Barba, Carmen; Blumcke, Ingmar

    2015-11-01

    Our inability to adequately treat many patients with refractory epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), surgical inaccessibility and failures are significant clinical drawbacks. The targeting of physiologic features of epileptogenesis in FCD and colocalizing functionality has enhanced completeness of surgical resection, the main determinant of outcome. Electroencephalography (EEG)-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography are helpful in guiding electrode implantation and surgical treatment, and high-frequency oscillations help defining the extent of the epileptogenic dysplasia. Ultra high-field MRI has a role in understanding the laminar organization of the cortex, and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is highly sensitive for detecting FCD in MRI-negative cases. Multimodal imaging is clinically valuable, either by improving the rate of postoperative seizure freedom or by reducing postoperative deficits. However, there is no level 1 evidence that it improves outcomes. Proof for a specific effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in FCD is lacking. Pathogenic mutations recently described in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) genes in FCD have yielded important insights into novel treatment options with mTOR inhibitors, which might represent an example of personalized treatment of epilepsy based on the known mechanisms of disease. The ketogenic diet (KD) has been demonstrated to be particularly effective in children with epilepsy caused by structural abnormalities, especially FCD. It attenuates epigenetic chromatin modifications, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell, thereby modifying disease progression. This could imply lasting benefit of dietary manipulation. Neurostimulation techniques have produced variable clinical outcomes in FCD. In widespread dysplasias, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has achieved responder rates >50%; however, the efficacy of noninvasive

  15. Dental and maxillofacial characteristics of six Japanese individuals with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Erika; Suda, Naoto; Baba, Yoshiyuki; Fukuoka, Hiroki; Ogawa, Takuya; Ohkuma, Mizue; Ahiko, Nozomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Tengan, Toshimoto; Shiga, Momotoshi; Tsuji, Michiko; Moriyama, Keiji

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome is a congenital anomaly characterized by ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly, cleft lip and palate, and lacrimal duct anomalies. Because this syndrome is frequently accompanied by a congenital lack of teeth, narrow palate, and malocclusion, comprehensive orthodontic intervention is required. Design : To highlight the specific dental and maxillofacial characteristics of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome, six Japanese individuals diagnosed with the syndrome are described here. Patients : The subjects consisted of two boys and four girls (age range, 6.0 to 13.9 years) diagnosed with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome by medical and dental specialists. Their conditions included ectodermal dysplasia (hypodontia, microdontia, enamel hypoplasia, and abnormalities in hair and nails), cleft lip and/or palate, and ectrodactyly. Cephalograms, panoramic x-rays, and dental casts were taken; systemic complications were recorded at the first visit to our dental hospital. Results : All individuals had severe oligodontia with 9 to 18 missing teeth. The missing teeth were mainly maxillary and mandibular incisors and second bicuspids, arranged in a symmetrical manner. Cephalometric analysis showed retruded and short maxilla due to cleft lip and/or palate. It is interesting that all individuals showed a characteristically shaped mandibular symphysis with a retruded point B. It is likely that this unusual symphyseal morphology is due to the lack of mandibular incisors. Conclusions : This study demonstrates the presence of severe oligodontia in the incisal and premolar regions and describes a characteristic maxillary and mandibular structure in Japanese individuals with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome. PMID:22236363

  16. Ultrasonic demonstration of fetal skeletal dysplasia. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Muller, L M; Cremin, B J

    1985-02-01

    Reports on prenatal diagnosis in cases of skeletal dysplasia have mostly been in high-risk mothers with a suspect genetic background where the fetal lesion could probably be predetermined. We deal with routine ultrasonographic appraisal of the fetal skeleton when dysplasia is not initially suspected, and relate our experience of the lethal forms of this condition. During the 4-year period 1981-1984, 6 cases of skeletal dysplasia, including thanatophoric dysplasia, achondrogenesis, the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (chondro-ectodermal dysplasia) and osteogenesis imperfecta, were detected; the ultrasonographic findings are discussed. PMID:3885435

  17. Squamous Dysplasia of the Urinary Bladder: A Consecutive Cystectomy Series.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Kaag, Matthew; Raman, Jay D; Chan, Wilson; Tran, Truc; Kunchala, Sudhir; DeGraff, David; Chen, Guoli

    2016-06-01

    Squamous dysplasia of the urinary bladder is uncommon and may represent a precursor to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Though significant focus has been devoted to squamous differentiation in invasive bladder cancer, relatively little attention has been given to squamous dysplasia. We methodically reviewed microscopic slides from a consecutive cystectomy series at our institution (n = 303; 2001-2014), with special attention given to squamous dysplasia and squamous differentiation within association invasive carcinoma. Of these 303 cases, 3% (9 cases) had squamous dysplasia. The majority (89%; 8/9) had a similar morphological appearance to squamous dysplasia of the head and neck (ie, cytological atypia, architectural disturbances, and abnormal keratinization). Invasive carcinoma was present in 230 of the cystectomy cases. Of these 230 cases with invasive carcinoma, 4% (8 cases) also had squamous dysplasia. The invasive carcinoma had evidence of squamous differentiation in all cases with concurrent squamous dysplasia. Concurrent flat urothelial carcinoma in situ was present in 3 of the 8 cases with both invasive carcinoma and squamous dysplasia. Squamous dysplasia was not associated with clinical outcomes data, including death from bladder cancer and bladder cancer recurrence. The data from this study indicate that squamous dysplasia is uncommon in the cystectomy setting, frequently has the morphology of head and neck dysplasia, and is often associated with invasive carcinoma with squamous differentiation. PMID:26860905

  18. Detection of intestinal dysplasia using angle-resolved low coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Neil; Zhu, Yizheng; Thacker, Julie K. M.; Migaly, John; Guy, Cynthia; Mantyh, Christopher R.; Wax, Adam

    2011-10-01

    Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is an optical biopsy technique that allows for depth-resolved, label-free measurement of the average size and optical density of cell nuclei in epithelial tissue to assess the tissue health. a/LCI has previously been used clinically to identify the presence of dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus patients undergoing routine surveillance. We present the results of a pilot, ex vivo study of tissues from 27 patients undergoing partial colonic resection surgery, conducted to evaluate the ability of a/LCI to identify dysplasia. Performance was determined by comparing the nuclear morphology measurements with pathological assessment of co-located physical biopsies. A statistically significant correlation between increased average nuclear size, reduced nuclear density, and the presence of dysplasia was noted at the basal layer of the epithelium, at a depth of 200 to 300 μm beneath the tissue surface. Using a decision line determined from a receiver operating characteristic, a/LCI was able to separate dysplastic from healthy tissues with a sensitivity of 92.9% (13/14), a specificity of 83.6% (56/67), and an overall accuracy of 85.2% (69/81). The study illustrates the extension of the a/LCI technique to the detection of intestinal dysplasia, and demonstrates the need for future in vivo studies.

  19. Multicystic renal dysplasia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Kiran; Varshney, Manoranjan; Aziz, Mehar; Maheshwari, Veena; Basha, Mahfooz; Gaur, Kavita; Ghani, Imran

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year-old male child had left-sided abdominal lump for 4 months. Radiological examination revealed a cystic mass in the left kidney. A tentative diagnosis of multicystic nephroma was made on clinical and radiological examination. Cytology was inconclusive. Nephrectomy was done. A final diagnosis of multicystic dysplasia was made on histological examination. PMID:22696732

  20. Specific skeletal dysplasias in utero: sonographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, D H; Rumack, C M; Manco-Johnson, M L; Manchester, D; Meier, P; Bramble, J; Clewell, W

    1986-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed of 13 short-limbed fetuses with lethal skeletal dysplasias that were evaluated with ultrasound (US) from 1981 to 1984. The specific diagnoses were thanatophoric dwarfism, achondrogenesis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and campomelic dwarfism. Death occurred in utero or within 2 weeks after delivery in all cases. US examination showed other associated abnormalities, including polyhydramnios, hydrops, shortened femurs, and CNS abnormalities. Radiographs confirmed these findings and provided more information regarding the shape of the limbs and thorax and the appearance of the spine. The probable diagnosis of lethal short-limbed dwarfism was made antenatally using US in eleven of the fetuses. Spinal appearance, thoracic shape, and associated hydrops and polyhydramnios were most helpful in determining the specific type of dysplasia present. Lethal short-limbed skeletal dysplasia may be diagnosed confidently in utero using US examination; however, obstetric plain film radiography may be required to determine the definitive type of dysplasia. In certain cases, US may be sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:3513248

  1. Antenatal diagnosis of lethal skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Tretter, A E; Saunders, R C; Meyers, C M; Dungan, J S; Grumbach, K; Sun, C C; Campbell, A B; Wulfsberg, E A

    1998-02-17

    Lethal skeletal dysplasias (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of rare but important genetic disorders characterized by abnormal growth and development of bone and cartilage. We describe the diagnosis and outcome of 29 cases of lethal skeletal dysplasias evaluated between January 1989 and December 1996 at the University of Maryland Medical Center and the Ultrasound Institute of Baltimore. Two cases presented at delivery with no prenatal care while the remaining 27 cases were identified by antenatal sonography. Final diagnoses included thanatophoric dysplasia (14), osteogenesis imperfecta, type II (6), achondrogenesis (2), short rib syndromes (3), campomelic syndrome (2), atelosteogenesis (1), and no evidence of a skeletal dysplasia (1). Twenty out of 27 pregnancies were terminated with an average at detection of 21.6 weeks. The other 7 pregnancies that went on to deliver had an average age at detection of 29.2 weeks. Fetal abnormalities in the terminated pregnancies were identified at a significantly earlier gestational age (P = 0.0016) than the pregnancies that continued. While the identification of LSD by sonography was excellent (26/27), only 13/27 (48%) were given an accurate specific antenatal diagnosis. In 8/14 (57%) cases with an inaccurate or nonspecific diagnosis there was a significant or crucial change in the genetic counseling. Thus, while antenatal sonography is an excellent method for discovering LSD, clinical examination, radiographs, and autopsy are mandatory for making a specific diagnosis. PMID:9489797

  2. IQ Measurement in Children with Skeletal Dysplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John G.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    IQ studies on 68 children (5 months-15 years) with skeletal dysplasia (dwarfism) were reviewed to provide counseling to parents of newborn affected children. Results of the study show that this population performs intellectually in the same range as other children. Journal availability: see EC 115 198. (PHR)

  3. Follicular dysplasia of the adult doberman pinscher.

    PubMed

    Moura, Enio; Cirio, Silvana M

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the case of an adult female, red Doberman pinscher affected by permanent hypotrichosis, limited to the dorsolumbar region and sides of the trunk. The hypotrichosis began at approximately the age of 2 years and progressed slowly with no skin hyperpigmentation. The clinical and histopathological characteristics are of an uncommon form of follicular dysplasia. PMID:20194372

  4. Multicystic renal dysplasia: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Alam, Kiran; Varshney, Manoranjan; Aziz, Mehar; Maheshwari, Veena; Basha, Mahfooz; Gaur, Kavita; Ghani, Imran

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year-old male child had left-sided abdominal lump for 4 months. Radiological examination revealed a cystic mass in the left kidney. A tentative diagnosis of multicystic nephroma was made on clinical and radiological examination. Cytology was inconclusive. Nephrectomy was done. A final diagnosis of multicystic dysplasia was made on histological examination. PMID:22696732

  5. Ellis-Van Creveld Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

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  6. 2008 International Conference on Ectodermal Dysplasias Classification Conference Report

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Carlos F.; Jorgenson, Ronald J.; Wright, J. Timothy; DiGiovanna, John J.; Fete, Mary D.

    2009-01-01

    There are many ways to classify ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. Clinicians in practice use a list of syndromes from which to choose a potential diagnosis, paging through a volume, such as Freire-Maia and Pinheiro's corpus, matching their patient's findings to listed syndromes. Medical researchers may want a list of syndromes that share one (monothetic system) or several (polythetic system) traits in order to focus research on a narrowly defined group. Special interest groups may want a list from which they can choose constituencies, and insurance companies and government agencies may want a list to determine for whom to provide (or deny) health care coverage. Furthermore, various molecular biologists are now promoting classification systems based on gene mutation (e.g. TP63 associated syndromes) or common molecular pathways. The challenge will be to balance comprehensiveness within the classification with usability and accessibility so that the benefits truly serve the needs of researchers, health care providers and ultimately the individuals and families directly affected by ectodermal dysplasias. It is also recognized that a new classification approach is an ongoing process and will require periodical reviews or updates. Whatever scheme is developed, however, will have far-reaching application for other groups of disorders for which classification is complicated by the number of interested parties and advances in diagnostic acumen. Consensus among interested parties is necessary for optimizing communication among the diverse groups whether it be for equitable distribution of funds, correctness of diagnosis and treatment, or focusing research efforts. PMID:19681152

  7. Surgical treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Dennis R

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, developmental dysplasia of the hip is treated early in childhood by nonsurgical methods. If these methods are ineffective, surgical reduction in a nonambulating child is required. A young child (age 6 to 18 months) who requires surgical reduction can be treated by formal anterior open reduction or by the medial Ludloff approach to the hip. Additional bony procedures are usually not required in these young patients. Delayed diagnosis is still common, requiring surgical reduction for children of walking age. These older children usually require formal open reduction (anterior approach) plus an associated bony osteotomy (acetabular, proximal femoral, or, in some cases, both types of osteotomies) to better stabilize the hip. The addition of a proximal femoral derotational shortening osteotomy for open reduction in older children was first used in children older than 3 years, but now it is commonly used in children as young as 2 years. This osteotomy decreases the forces on the reduced hip and minimizes the chances for redislocation and osteonecrosis. In all surgical procedures for developmental dysplasia of the hip, the surgeon must avoid too great a focus on bony osteotomies because the management of soft-tissue abnormalities is critical in achieving a stable reduction. PMID:24720317

  8. Non-invasive treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-TING; ZHOU, DONG

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) presents a strong clinical challenge especially for the treatment of the associated epilepsy. Epilepsy in FCD is often treatment-resistant and constitutes 50% of treatment-resistant cases. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely used in the treatment of FCD. However, evidence to suggest their specific effect on the treatment of FCD remains to be established. In view of this resistance, several alternative treatments have been suggested. Although treatment currently involves surgical management, non-invasive treatments have been identified. The aim of the present review, was to assess non-invasive management strategies including, i) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, ii) ketogenic diet (KD), and iii) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). In addition, we discussed the literature available regarding the use of AEDs in FCD. Experiments conducted with mammals detailing rapamycin gene mutations in FCD have produced vital information for exploring treatment options using mTOR inhibitors. Of note is the importance of KD in children with FCD. This diet has been shown to modify disease progression by attenuating chromatin modification, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell. FCD has also been studied widely with neurostimulation techniques. The outcomes of these techniques have been found to be variable. For widespread dysplasias, VNS has been shown to produce responder rates of >50%. Nevertheless, non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation techniques such as transcutaneous VNS and non-invasive VNS are gaining better patient compatibility, albeit their efficacy remains to be established. PMID:27168769

  9. Automated measurement of diagnostic angles for hip dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Raedt, Sepp; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken; Rømer, Lone; Søballe, Kjeld; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-03-01

    A fully automatic method for measuring diagnostic angles of hip dysplasia is presented. The method consists of the automatic segmentation of CT images and detection of anatomical landmarks on the femur and acetabulum. The standard angles used in the diagnosis of hip dysplasia are subsequently automatically calculated. Previous work in automating the measuring of angles required the manual segmentation or delineation of the articular joint surface. In the current work automatic segmentation is established using graph-cuts with a cost function based on a sheetness score to detect the sheet-like structure of the bone. Anatomical landmarks are subsequently detected using heuristics based on ray-tracing and the distance to the approximated acetabulur joint surface. Standard diagnositic angles are finally calculated and presented for interpretation. Experiments using 26 patients, showed a good agreement with gold standard manual measurements by an expert radiologist as performed in daily practice. The mean difference for the five angles was between -1:1 and 2:0 degrees with a concordance correlation coefficient between 0:87 and 0:93. The standard deviation varied between 2:3 and 4:1 degrees. These values correspond to values found in evaluating interobserver and intraobserver variation for manual measurements. The method can be used in clinical practice to replace the current manual measurements performed by radiologists. In the future, the method will be integrated into an intraoperative surgical guidance system.

  10. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ermertcan, Aylin Türel; Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebı; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-09-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  11. Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia Associated with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebİ; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  12. Epidermal nevus syndrome associated with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, CNS lipoma, and aplasia cutis.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Miguel; Aneiros, Angel; Monteagudo, Benigno; Santos-García, Diego; Suárez-Amor, Oscar; Ramírez-Santos, Aquilina

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal nevus syndrome is a rare congenital sporadic neurocutaneous disorder characterized by an epidermal nevus and various developmental abnormalities of the skin, eyes, nervous, cardiovascular and urogenital systems. We describe a patient with an extensive epidermal nevus associated with various organ abnormalities, particularly polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, central nervous system lipoma, and aplasia cutis. Our patient demonstrates the polymorphic spectrum of involvement in epidermal nevus syndrome. PMID:19951625

  13. [Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome, report of a case with variable expressivity].

    PubMed

    Meza Escobar, Luis Enrique; Isaza, Carolina; Pachajoa, Harry

    2012-10-01

    The ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate syndrome is a rare entity associated with mutations in the genes that express the protein p63. We present a case of a patient with right foot ectrodactyly associated with cleft lip and palate, without other evident anomalies. The patient has a positive familiar history for cleft lift and palate and mortality during the perinatal period. The management of each case must be specific and multidisciplinary. PMID:23070194

  14. [Association of the degree of bronchial epithelial dysplasia to the serum level of non-enzymatic antioxidants].

    PubMed

    Kondakova, I V; Cheremisina, O V; Kakurina, G V; Choĭnzonov, E L

    2007-12-01

    The serum levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants were studied in patients with chronic nonspecific lung diseases with first-to-third-degree dysplasia of the bronchial epithelium (BE) before and after therapeutic correction. The development of BE dysplastic changes was ascertained to cause a considerable reduction in the content of antioxidant vitamin A. During the therapy contributing to reversal of BE dysplastic alterations, there was an increase in the serum levels of vitamin A and uric acid in patients with simple chronic bronchitis with both first- and second-degree dysplasia. If no therapeutic effect occurred, the systemic level of the antioxidants remained unchanged. PMID:18228666

  15. Bilateral Staged Total Hip Replacement and the Natural Progress of an Untreated Case of Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip: A Clinical Case Report by the Surgeon and the Patient

    PubMed Central

    Honarpisheh, Hamid; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of an untreated case of a Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip (DDH) associated with multiple congenital abnormalities is reported in a 55-years-old man. The patient’s complaints and the varieties of the typical manifestations emerged in other parts of the body throughout the life are reviewed and discussed as comorbidities of a dysplastic condition. Two-stage bilateral total hip replacement (THR) operations were performed at the age of 55. In addition, to relieve the pain, the walking disabilities were overcome, hence gaining normal walking in swing and stances. The leg length discrepancy was corrected by anatomically positioned prostheses, examined by the knee bending test and characterized and evidenced by radiological features and indices. PMID:26170527

  16. Fetal imaging in the skeletal dysplasias: overview and experience.

    PubMed

    Lachman, R S

    1994-01-01

    The skeletal dysplasias (osteochondrodysplasias) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by generalized abnormalities of skeletal growth and development. Of approximately 125 well-described skeletal dysplasias, about 50 are clinically apparent and identifiable at birth. The prevalence of these dysplasias in the newborn is quite frequent and has been estimated to be between 3-4.5 per 10,000, and the overall frequency of skeletal dysplasias among perinatal deaths to be about 9 per 1,000. Over the past 23 years we have acquired an enormous experience in the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry with skeletal dysplasias diagnosable at birth or earlier. More and more cases referred to the registry over the past 2 years have been diagnosed as abnormal by ultrasound during the second trimester. The results of our evaluation of almost 400 fetuses and stillborn babies with reference to detailed prenatal history and postmortem evaluation including radiographs, chondro-osseous morphology and even some biochemical and molecular studies are presented. The most common disorders diagnosed were osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), thanatophoric dysplasia, campomelic dysplasia and achondrogenesis type II. Twenty-two types of neonatally diagnosable skeletal dysplasias are discussed together with potential fetal (second trimester) ultrasound findings, the number of fetal ultrasound cases referred to this registry, the number of total cases of that disorder sent to our registry, and the inheritance pattern of that skeletal dysplasia. This information should prove helpful in the evaluation of future cases ascertained by ultrasonography in the second trimester. PMID:7700717

  17. Range of Hip Joint Motion in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Patients Following Total Hip Arthroplasty With the Surgical Technique Using the Concept of Combined Anteversion: A Study of Crowe I and II Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Wei, Jianhe; Mao, Yuanqing; Li, Huiwu; Xie, Youzhuan; Zhu, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    The combined anteversion surgical technique has been proposed and used in clinical practice. To more objectively evaluate the feasibility of this surgical technique using combined anteversion concept for DDH patients, we studied 34 DDH patients (40 hips) in this research. Every patient underwent pelvic CT scans before and after surgery and the HHSs were recorded. Optimal range of joint motion was measured using a three-dimensional reconstruction technique and a dynamic measurement technique. The results revealed that joint function met the requirements of daily life and the range of motion was not over-limited by impingement between the prosthesis and the skeleton. Moreover, the combined anteversion was found to be the most critical parameter in this study. PMID:26228491

  18. Coexistent ganglioglioma, focal cortical dysplasia, and hippocampal sclerosis (triple pathology) in chronic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A; Gales, Jordan M

    2015-10-01

    The most commonly identified pathologies in patients with medically intractable epilepsy include focal cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, tumors, and remote ischemic damage. Surgery has proven to be an effective therapeutic modality in most of such patients. The coexistence of multiple pathologies in resected tissues is well documented, particularly ganglioglioma and focal cortical dysplasia. Cases of triple pathology are, however, extraordinarily unusual. We report 2 cases of triple pathology including hippocampal sclerosis, ganglioglioma, and focal cortical dysplasia. Cases of pathologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis diagnosed between January 2000 to December 2012 (n= 349) were reviewed, and only 2 cases (0.6%) with triple pathology were identified. The histopathologic and clinical features of these 2 cases are reviewed. The patients included a 6-year-old girl and 10-year-old boy. The former patient presented with a 4-year history of epilepsy and oppositional defiant disorder. Imaging identified a lesion in the left parahippocampal gyrus and posterior hippocampus. The latter patient presented with an 8-year history of epilepsy, attention deficient hyperactivity disease, and a pervasive developmental disorder. Imaging identified a lesion in the left posterior temporal and occipital region. Resected tissues in both patients showed a ganglioglioma (World Health Organization grade I) with accompanying focal cortical dysplasia and hippocampal sclerosis. Both patients were seizure free on antiepileptic medication at last follow-up at 20 and 38 months, respectively. The prevalence of triple pathology including hippocampal sclerosis is low (<1% in the current study). Surgical intervention for triple pathology cases anecdotally appears effective in achieving seizure control. PMID:26235882

  19. Post-ablation lymphocytic esophagitis in Barrett esophagus with high grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kissiedu, Juliana; Thota, Prashanthi N; Gohel, Tushar; Lopez, Rocio; Gordon, Ilyssa O

    2016-06-01

    In patients who have undergone ablation therapy for treatment of Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia, histologic features of eosinophilic esophagitis, but not lymphocytic esophagitis, have been described. We evaluated for histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis and lymphocytic esophagitis and correlated with endoscopic findings in this population. A single-institution Barrett's esophagus registry was searched for patients who had received radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, or both for treatment of Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia. Clinical and endoscopic data were collected and biopsies were reviewed for inflammation and reactive changes at three time points: pre-intervention, first surveillance after ablation therapy, and most recent surveillance. Of the 173 patients initially identified, 102 met the inclusion criteria. Intraepithelial eosinophils were increased at first surveillance (60%, P=0.096) and last surveillance (69%, P=0.048) compared with pre-intervention (50%), although histologic evidence of post-ablation eosinophilic esophagitis was not significant. Prevalence of lymphocytic esophagitis was significantly higher at first surveillance (17%, P=0.02) and at last surveillance (43%, P<0.001), compared with pre-intervention (7%). Smoking, hyperlipidemia, and cryotherapy were identified as independent risk factors for developing histologic lymphocytic esophagitis. This is the first report that histologic evidence of lymphocytic esophagitis increased over time in patients undergoing ablation for Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia. Though the pathophysiology of lymphocytic esophagitis remains unknown, patients in our study with a history of smoking, hyperlipidemia, or cryotherapy were more likely to develop post-ablation lymphocytic esophagitis. PMID:26965580

  20. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Its prevalence has been estimated to vary from 1:2,500 to 1:5,000. ARVC/D is a major cause of sudden death in the young and athletes. The pathology consists of a genetically determined dystrophy of the right ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement to such an extent that it leads to right ventricular aneurysms. The clinical picture may include: a subclinical phase without symptoms and with ventricular fibrillation being the first presentation; an electrical disorder with palpitations and syncope, due to tachyarrhythmias of right ventricular origin; right ventricular or biventricular pump failure, so severe as to require transplantation. The causative genes encode proteins of mechanical cell junctions (plakoglobin, plakophilin, desmoglein, desmocollin, desmoplakin) and account for intercalated disk remodeling. Familiar occurrence with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable penetrance has been proven. Recessive variants associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair have been also reported. Clinical diagnosis may be achieved by demonstrating functional and structural alterations of the right ventricle, depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, arrhythmias with the left bundle branch block morphology and fibro-fatty replacement through endomyocardial biopsy. Two dimensional echo, angiography and magnetic resonance are the imaging tools for visualizing structural-functional abnormalities. Electroanatomic mapping is able to detect areas of low voltage corresponding to myocardial atrophy with fibro-fatty replacement. The main differential diagnoses are idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract tachycardia, myocarditis, dialted cardiomyopathy and sarcoidosis. Only palliative therapy is available and consists of antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation and

  1. Two-stage release in Streeter's dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Zohaib Gulzar; Rao, Irfan; Anwer, Wahid; Yaseen, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Streeter's dysplasia is a rare disorder of congenital constricting bands, occurring in 1-10 000 birth, with no sex predilection. In severe cases, it is associated with autoamputation of distal extremities such as fingers and toes. Recent advances have made it possible, in developed countries, to recognise this condition in the prenatal period and to initiate prompt intrauterine management, however, these, being uncommon procedures, need technical advances and experienced hands. In developing countries, recognition of the condition with timely management of primary and associated abnormalities required. We present a case of a 4-month-old child with type IV Streeter's dysplasia associated with right flexible clubfoot, who underwent successful two-stage release of symptomatic constricting bands from bilateral legs. PMID:25899511

  2. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. A cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, R I; Wood, B P

    1980-07-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita is a form of primary short dwarfism, that is manifest at birth generally has not been regarded as a cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism. Seven neonates with severe dwarfism are presented. The first survived the newborn period, but the other six were early neonatal deaths. All displayed the clinical and radiologic features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. The striking similarities between spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita and achondrogenesis type 2 are discussed. PMID:6773018

  3. Steroid contraceptive use and cervical dysplasia: increased risk of progression.

    PubMed

    Stern, E; Forsythe, A B; Youkeles, L; Coffelt, C F

    1977-06-24

    In a prospective study of women with dysplasia of the cervix, there was an increase in severity of dysplasia and of conversion to cancer in situ in users of the contraceptive pill compared with users of other contraceptive methods. There was a delay in this adverse response. Nonreversal of dysplasia within the first 6 months of pill use is predictive of progression after prolonged exposure. PMID:867043

  4. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Avimadje, A M; Goupille, P; Zerkak, D; Begnard, G; Brunais-Besse, J; Valat, J P

    2000-01-01

    Monostotic fibrous dysplasia is exceedingly rare. We report a case in a 61-year-old woman with a history of recurrent low back pain and sciatica since 35 years of age. While walking, she suddenly experienced pain in her right thigh. The pain spread gradually to the buttock and calf on the same side, becoming increasingly severe. The time pattern was mechanical, with exacerbation during straining. Paresthesia developed over the dorsal aspect of the right foot. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were ineffective. Radiographs of the spine showed an expansile and heterogeneous lesion in the body of L2. Hyperactivity of L3 and L4 was seen on the bone scan. Computed tomography demonstrated heterogeneity of L2, L3, and L4, as well as hypertrophy of the neural arch of L3 and of the right posterior lamina and spinous process of L4. Alterations in L2, L3, and L4 were noted on the magnetic resonance imaging study, which showed no evidence of epidural involvement. Laboratory tests were normal. A surgical biopsy of L3 established the diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. Since the seminal description of fibrous dysplasia in 1891, only 21 cases of monostotic spinal involvement have been published. The spinal lesions can remain clinically silent or cause spinal pain with or without neurological symptoms. Radiographic findings are variable (heterogeneity, osteolysis, expansion without cortical violation or soft tissue involvement). Calcium and phosphate levels are normal. The diagnosis depends on examination of a vertebral biopsy specimen. PMID:10773971

  5. Focal dysplasia of the cerebral cortex in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D. C.; Falconer, M. A.; Bruton, C. J.; Corsellis, J. A. N.

    1971-01-01

    An unusual microscopic abnormality has been identified in the lobectomy specimens removed surgically from the brains of 10 epileptic patients. The abnormality could seldom be identified by palpation or with the naked eye. Histologically, it consisted of congregations of large, bizarre neurones which were littered through all but the first cortical layer. In most, but not in all cases, grotesque cells, probably of glial origin, were also present in the depths of the affected cortex and in the subjacent white matter. This kind of abnormality appears to be a malformation. The picture is reminiscent of tuberous sclerosis but too many distinguishing features, both in the clinical and in the pathological aspects, make this diagnosis untenable. The cases are therefore looked on provisionally (since all but one are still alive) as comprising a distinct form of cortical dysplasia in which localized, exotic populations of nerve cells underlie the electrical and clinical manifestations of certain focal forms of epilepsy. Images PMID:5096551

  6. Intestinal neuronal dysplasia-like histopathology in infancy.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Iinuma, Yasushi; Numano, Fujito; Masui, Daisuke; Iida, Hisataka; Komatsuzaki, Naoko; Nagayama, Yosihisa; Naito, Shinichi; Nitta, Koju

    2015-06-01

    The present patient was delivered at a gestational age of 27 weeks. She had abdominal bloating with symptoms of respiratory distress. We suspected Hirschsprung disease (HD) or small intestinal stricture, but examinations were not definitive. Exploratory laparotomy was performed at 97 days of age. Intraoperative findings showed no evidence of small intestinal stricture or changes in intestinal caliber. A transanal drainage tube was inserted, and decompression therapy and intestinal lavage were started. Rectal mucosal biopsy was performed at 184 days of age, and HE and acetylcholinesterase staining showed intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND)-like pathological findings. At 15 months, giant ganglia were no longer present on follow-up rectal mucosal biopsy, and the pathological diagnosis was normoganglionosis. It should be recognized that while the enteric nervous system is developing, IND-like pathological findings may be seen as a pathological condition during the maturation process. PMID:25711721

  7. Isolated dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia: revision of the classification.

    PubMed

    de La Dure-Molla, Muriel; Philippe Fournier, Benjamin; Berdal, Ariane

    2015-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by severe hypomineralization of dentin and altered dentin structure. Dentin extra cellular matrix is composed of 90% of collagen type I and 10% of non-collagenous proteins among which dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) are crucial in dentinogenesis. These proteins are encoded by a single gene: dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and undergo several post-translational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation to contribute and to control mineralization. Human mutations of this DSPP gene are responsible for three isolated dentinal diseases classified by Shield in 1973: type II and III dentinogenesis imperfecta and type II dentin dysplasia. Shield classification was based on clinical phenotypes observed in patient. Genetics results show now that these three diseases are a severity variation of the same pathology. So this review aims to revise and to propose a new classification of the isolated forms of DI to simplify diagnosis for practitioners. PMID:25118030

  8. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  9. Postural correction reduces hip pain in adult with acetabular dysplasia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Khuu, Anne; Marinko, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is often diagnosed in infancy, but less severe cases of acetabular dysplasia are being detected in young active adults. The purpose of this case report is to present a non-surgical intervention for a 31-year-old female with mild acetabular dysplasia and an anterior acetabular labral tear. The patient presented with right anterior hip and groin pain, and she stood with the trunk swayed posterior to the pelvis (swayback posture). The hip pain was reproduced with the anterior impingement test. During gait, the patient maintained the swayback posture and reported 6/10 hip pain. Following correction of the patient’s posture, the patient’s pain rating was reduced to a 2/10 while walking. The patient was instructed to maintain the improved posture. At the 1 year follow-up, she demonstrated significantly improved posture in standing and walking. She had returned to recreational running and was generally pain-free. The patient demonstrated improvement on self-reported questionnaires for pain, function and activity. These findings suggest that alteration of posture can have an immediate and lasting effect on hip pain in persons with structural abnormality and labral pathology. PMID:25731688

  10. Late-presenting developmental dysplasia of the hip in Jordanian males

    PubMed Central

    Samarah, Omar Q.; Hadidi, Fadi A. Al; Hamdan, Mohammad Q.; Hantouly, Ashraf T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the pattern of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in late presenting Jordanian male patients and identify the risk factors and associated findings. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1145 male patients who attended the Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for a DDH check up. This study was carried out in the Orthopedic Section, Special Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between March 2011 and October 2014. Data was collected from medical records, and x-ray measurements were evaluated. Results: Of the 1145 male patients, 43 (3.75%) with 70 involved hips were diagnosed with late- presenting DDH. Being a first-born baby resulted in 41.9% increased risk for DDH. Cesarian delivery was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip dislocation (p=0.004) while normal delivery was significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia (p=0.004). No predictable risk factors were found in 44.2% patients with DDH. Bilateral cases were more common than unilateral cases: (26 [60.5%] versus 17 [39.5%]). Limited abduction was a constant finding in all dislocated hips (p<0.001). Associated conditions, such as club foot and congenital muscular torticollis were not observed. Conclusion: Cesarian section is a significant risk for dislocated hips while normal delivery is significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia. Bilateral DDH is more common than the unilateral. Club foot and torticollis were not observed in this series. PMID:26837397

  11. Sonographic measurement of the fetal rib cage perimeter to thoracic circumference ratio: application to prenatal diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Dugoff, L; Coffin, C T; Hobbins, J C

    1997-10-01

    The object of this study was to establish new normative data for the fetal rib cage perimeter to thoracic circumference ratio, and to evaluate the potential application of this measurement in the diagnosis of short rib and other skeletal dysplasias. Rib cage perimeter (RCP) and thoracic circumference (TC) were measured in a prospective, cross-sectional sample of 88 patients with normal pregnancies between 14 and 39 weeks of gestation. The RCP and TC were both measured in cross-section, at a level of the four-chamber view of the fetal heart. RCP and TC measurements were also obtained from eight cases known to have skeletal dysplasias. The mean (+/- SE) RCP:TC ratio in normal pregnancies, regardless of gestational age, was 0.670 +/- 0.004. In five of eight cases with skeletal dysplasias the RCP:TC ratio was significantly decreased, and in one case it was increased. The RCP:TC ratio in normal fetuses is independent of gestational age. In this small series the ratio was abnormal in fetuses with certain skeletal dysplasias, and particularly decreased in the fetus with a short rib-polydactyly syndrome. After further evaluation, this technique may prove to be of clinical significance in helping to diagnose skeletal dysplasias, particularly in cases where the gestational age is uncertain. PMID:9383879

  12. Fibrocartilaginous Dysplasia of the Bone: A Rare Variant of Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Fibrocartilaginous dysplasia (FCD) is a rare variant of fibrous dysplasia (FD) which frequently involves the long bones, and the proximal femur is the most commonly affected site. This benign, lytic, and expansile bone lesion causes progressive deformity in the bones and may lead to pathological fracture. Radiologically, this lesion may mimic cartilaginous benign and malignant bone tumors. Therefore, histopathological differentiation of FCD from other cartilaginous tumors is of the utmost importance. The treatment is often surgical, in the form of curettage and bone grafting or corrective osteotomy, to treat progressive deformity in the long bones. The risk of pathological fracture is high in FCD with bony deformity and often requires surgery. PMID:26918216

  13. Rapid detection of common mutations of the FGFR3 gene causing thanatophoric dysplasia type I: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Liu, Ying-Na; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2012-06-01

    Thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) is a relatively common lethal skeletal dysplasia. These malformations result from the mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, which is located on the short arm of chromosome 4. Accurate diagnosis of fetal TD is important for patient counseling and to plan the management. A definite diagnosis can be established by molecular genetic analysis to find out the abnormal mutations in the FGFR3 gene. We reported on two cases of TD type I found by prenatal ultrasound and confirmed by molecular analysis of FGFR3 gene using high-resolution melting analysis. PMID:22414243

  14. Endoscopic Shelf Acetabuloplasty Combined With Labral Repair, Cam Osteochondroplasty, and Capsular Plication for Treating Developmental Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Soshi; Wada, Takahiko; Sakoda, Shinsuke; Ariumi, Akihiro; Sakai, Akinori; Iida, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the underlying shallow acetabular deformity, a patient with hip dysplasia has a greater risk of development of a labral tear, a cam lesion, and capsular laxity. This combination of abnormalities exacerbates joint instability, ultimately leading to osteoarthritis. Unsurprisingly, only repairing the acetabular labrum remains controversial, and the outcome is unpredictable. In this technical note, with video, we demonstrate an entirely endoscopic approach for simultaneously repairing the most common mechanical abnormalities found in moderate hip dysplasia: labral repair, cam osteochondroplasty, capsular plication, and shelf acetabuloplasty using an autologous iliac bone graft. PMID:24749043

  15. Detection of a molecular deletion at the DXS732 locus in a patient with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), with the identification of a unique junctional fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J; Gault, J; Davies, K J; Jones, M; Browne, D; Litt, M; Brockdorff, N; Rastan, S; Clarke, A; Thomas, N S

    1993-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) has been localized to the Xq12-q13.1 region. A panel of genomic DNA samples from 80 unrelated males with EDA has been screened for deletions at seven genetic loci within the Xq12-13 region. A single individual was identified with a deletion at the DXS732 locus by hybridization with the mouse genomic probe pcos169E/4. This highly conserved DNA probe is from locus DXCrc169, which is tightly linked to the Ta locus, the putative mouse homologue of EDA. The proband had the classical phenotype of EDA, with no other phenotypic abnormalities, and a normal cytogenetic analysis. A human genomic DNA clone, homologous to pcos169E/4, was isolated from a human X-chromosome cosmid library. On hybridization with the cosmid, the proband was found to be only partially deleted at the DXS732 locus, with a unique junctional fragment identified in the proband and in three of his maternal relatives. This is the first determination of carrier status for EDA in females, by direct mutation analysis. Failure to detect deletion of the other loci tested in the proband suggests that the DXS732 locus is the closest known locus to the EDA gene. Since the DXS732 locus contains a highly conserved sequence, it must be considered to be a candidate locus for the EDA gene itself. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8434608

  16. Abnormal Development of the Femoral Head Epiphysis in an Infant with no Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Apparent on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Hakan; Gunay, Cuneyd; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the investigation of hip development in newborns and infants, ultrasonography and radiography are widely used, but their optimal roles in this setting remain controversial. Case Report: Here we describe an 8.5-month-old infant who had undergone hip radiography at a primary care facility and was referred to our hospital to be evaluated for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Ultrasonography showed no developmental dysplasia of the hip according to standard criteria, but developmental retardation of the femoral head was apparent on the radiograph. Conclusion: This patient's findings demonstrate that abnormalities in femoral head epiphysis development can go undetected during routine ultrasonographic evaluations for developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:27298982

  17. Implant-based oral rehabilitation of a variant model of type I dentinal dysplasia: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Nettem, Sowmya; Nettemu, Sunil Kumar; Basha, K.; Venkatachalapathi, S

    2014-01-01

    Dentin dysplasia is an exceptionally rare, autosomal-dominant, hereditary condition, primarily characterized by defective dentin formation affecting both the deciduous and permanent dentitions. The etiology remains imprecise to date, in spite of the numerous hypotheses put forward and the constant updates on this condition. This case report of type I dentin dysplasia exhibits radiographic findings that are unique and diverse from the classical findings of various subtypes of this disease reported to date. This article also depicts the implant-based oral rehabilitation of the young patient diagnosed with this variant model of dentin dysplasia type I. Early diagnosis and implementation of this preventive and curative therapy is vital for avoiding premature exfoliation of deciduous and permanent dentition and the associated residual ridge resorption, thereby overcoming functional and esthetic deficits and ensuring protection of the remaining dentition from further harm. PMID:25225567

  18. Renal Artery Stenosis in a Young Female without Fibromuscular Dysplasia with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Paloma; Cholankeril, Matthew; Goldberg, Daniel; Koneru, Jayanth; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is rare in young patients without fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). RAS is primarily classified as having two major etiologies, namely, atherosclerosis and FMD, with 90% and 10%, respectively. We report a case of a female in her mid 20s who developed hypertension due to RAS with no evidence of FMD or underlying renal dysfunction and underwent successful angioplasty and stenting. PMID:27398034

  19. Partial Renal Embolization for Pediatric Renovascular Hypertension Secondary to Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Ishijima, Hideyuki; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minako; Ito, Kazuto; Endo, Keigo

    1997-09-15

    We report a 7-year-old boy with renovascular hypertension showing multiple stenoses and microaneurysms of the dorsal branch of the left renal artery caused by fibromuscular dysplasia. Hypertension was successfully treated with transcatheter alcohol and gelatin sponge embolization of the dorsal branch and its distribution. The vertebral branch remained intact. No severe complication was encountered. Loss of renal function by renal scintigraphy was minimal. The patient remains asymptomatic at 1 year.

  20. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML. |

  1. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: A rare case report evaluated with cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Eren; Bağlar, Serdar; Ciftci, Mehmet Ertugrul; Ozcan, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old systemically healthy female patient presented to our department. Cone-beam computed tomographic images showed multiple well-defined sclerotic masses with radiolucent border in both right and left molar regions of the mandible. These sclerotic masses were surrounded by a thin radiolucent border. We diagnosed the present pathology as florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and decided to follow the patient without taking biopsy. For the patient, who did not have any clinical complaints, radiographic followupis recommended twice a year. The responsibility of the dentist is to ensure the follow-up of the diagnosed patients and take necessary measures for preventing the infections. PMID:27601835

  2. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: A rare case report evaluated with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Eren; Bağlar, Serdar; Ciftci, Mehmet Ertugrul; Ozcan, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old systemically healthy female patient presented to our department. Cone-beam computed tomographic images showed multiple well-defined sclerotic masses with radiolucent border in both right and left molar regions of the mandible. These sclerotic masses were surrounded by a thin radiolucent border. We diagnosed the present pathology as florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and decided to follow the patient without taking biopsy. For the patient, who did not have any clinical complaints, radiographic followupis recommended twice a year. The responsibility of the dentist is to ensure the follow-up of the diagnosed patients and take necessary measures for preventing the infections. PMID:27601835

  3. Reduced DOCK4 expression leads to erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sundaravel, Sriram; Duggan, Ryan; Bhagat, Tushar; Ebenezer, David L.; Liu, Hui; Yu, Yiting; Bartenstein, Matthias; Unnikrishnan, Madhu; Karmakar, Subhradip; Liu, Ting-Chun; Torregroza, Ingrid; Quenon, Thomas; Anastasi, John; McGraw, Kathy L.; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Yajnik, Vijay; Artz, Andrew; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Steidl, Ulrich; List, Alan F.; Evans, Todd; Verma, Amit; Wickrema, Amittha

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the predominant clinical manifestation of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Loss or deletion of chromosome 7 is commonly seen in MDS and leads to a poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant, dysplasia-causing, genes on 7q remains unclear. Dedicator of cytokinesis 4 (DOCK4) is a GTPase exchange factor, and its gene maps to the commonly deleted 7q region. We demonstrate that DOCK4 is underexpressed in MDS bone marrow samples and that the reduced expression is associated with decreased overall survival in patients. We show that depletion of DOCK4 levels leads to erythroid cells with dysplastic morphology both in vivo and in vitro. We established a novel single-cell assay to quantify disrupted F-actin filament network in erythroblasts and demonstrate that reduced expression of DOCK4 leads to disruption of the actin filaments, resulting in erythroid dysplasia that phenocopies the red blood cell (RBC) defects seen in samples from MDS patients. Reexpression of DOCK4 in −7q MDS patient erythroblasts resulted in significant erythropoietic improvements. Mechanisms underlying F-actin disruption revealed that DOCK4 knockdown reduces ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) GTPase activation, leading to increased phosphorylation of the actin-stabilizing protein ADDUCIN in MDS samples. These data identify DOCK4 as a putative 7q gene whose reduced expression can lead to erythroid dysplasia. PMID:26578796

  4. Reduced DOCK4 expression leads to erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sundaravel, Sriram; Duggan, Ryan; Bhagat, Tushar; Ebenezer, David L; Liu, Hui; Yu, Yiting; Bartenstein, Matthias; Unnikrishnan, Madhu; Karmakar, Subhradip; Liu, Ting-Chun; Torregroza, Ingrid; Quenon, Thomas; Anastasi, John; McGraw, Kathy L; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Yajnik, Vijay; Artz, Andrew; Le Beau, Michelle M; Steidl, Ulrich; List, Alan F; Evans, Todd; Verma, Amit; Wickrema, Amittha

    2015-11-17

    Anemia is the predominant clinical manifestation of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Loss or deletion of chromosome 7 is commonly seen in MDS and leads to a poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant, dysplasia-causing, genes on 7q remains unclear. Dedicator of cytokinesis 4 (DOCK4) is a GTPase exchange factor, and its gene maps to the commonly deleted 7q region. We demonstrate that DOCK4 is underexpressed in MDS bone marrow samples and that the reduced expression is associated with decreased overall survival in patients. We show that depletion of DOCK4 levels leads to erythroid cells with dysplastic morphology both in vivo and in vitro. We established a novel single-cell assay to quantify disrupted F-actin filament network in erythroblasts and demonstrate that reduced expression of DOCK4 leads to disruption of the actin filaments, resulting in erythroid dysplasia that phenocopies the red blood cell (RBC) defects seen in samples from MDS patients. Reexpression of DOCK4 in -7q MDS patient erythroblasts resulted in significant erythropoietic improvements. Mechanisms underlying F-actin disruption revealed that DOCK4 knockdown reduces ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) GTPase activation, leading to increased phosphorylation of the actin-stabilizing protein ADDUCIN in MDS samples. These data identify DOCK4 as a putative 7q gene whose reduced expression can lead to erythroid dysplasia. PMID:26578796

  5. [Idiopathic dysplasia of undetermined/uncertain significance (IDUS) initially presenting erythroblastosis and hyperferritinemia].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akiko; Jona, Masahiro; Honda, Akira; Satoh, Yumiko; Kurokawa, Mineo; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of mild anemia, erythroblasts in peripheral blood, and hyperferritinemia. In our hospital, no evidence of cytopenia was found. The peripheral blood smear showed pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly and giant platelets. The serum ferritin level was extremely high (1,405 ng/ml). A bone marrow examination was performed for further evaluation and revealed trilineage dysplasia. Since the patient did not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for cytopenias associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, he was diagnosed as having idiopathic dysplasia of undetermined/uncertain significance (IDUS). The SF3B1 mutation was identified in this patient, suggesting that he might be at a stage prior to myelodysplastic syndrome. Some IDUS patients reportedly progress to myeloid neoplasms, making careful observation essential. If morphological dysplasia in peripheral blood and hyperferritinemia are present, these findings suggest bone marrow failure syndromes. In such cases, further evaluation including a bone marrow examination may be required. PMID:26725356

  6. Barrett's esophagus: management of high-grade dysplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruol, Alberto; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Costantini, Mario; Battaglia, Giorgio; Cagol, Matteo; Alfieri, Rita; Epifani, Magdalena; Ancona, Ermanno

    2004-03-01

    Esophagectomy remains the treatment of choice for the appropriate patient with Barrett's adenocarcinoma invading beyond the mucosa, without evidence of distant metastasis or invasion of adjacent organs. On the other hand, therapeutic management of patients with Barrett's high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or mucosal adenocarcinoma should be individualized, taking into account the patient's preferences, willingness to return for frequent endoscopic biopsies, and medical fitness to undergo esophagectomy. Surgery has to be considered the best treatment for HGD or superficial carcinoma, unless contraindicated by severe comorbidities, because it has proven to be the only treatment that is successful in curing the condition and preventing recurrent HGD or the development of invasive cancer. Nonsurgical treatment by photodynamic therapy or endoscopic mucosal resection may be a less invasive and organ-sparing option for elderly, poor-risk patients but it is still to be considered an investigational therapy that should only be conducted under a clinical trial protocol. Finally, intensive endoscopic biopsy surveillance of patients with HGD is another investigational option that may allow prompt treatment of cancer if it develops. However, few data document the safety of this observational approach. PMID:15013713

  7. Recessively inherited multiple epiphyseal dysplasia with normal stature, club foot, and double layered patella caused by a DTDST mutation.

    PubMed

    Superti-Furga, A; Neumann, L; Riebel, T; Eich, G; Steinmann, B; Spranger, J; Kunze, J

    1999-08-01

    We have observed over 25 different mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulphate transporter gene (DTDST) in association with the recessive disorders achondrogenesis 1B, atelosteogenesis 2, and diastrophic dysplasia. The c862t (R279W) transition is the most common mutation in non-Finnish patients, but in these disorders it is usually combined with other DTDST mutations. We had not seen a case of homozygosity for c862t (R279W) until we analysed DNA from a 36 year old male with tall-normal stature (180 cm) who asked for genetic counselling for suspected multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. He was treated for club foot and hip dysplasia at birth. Skeletal changes consistent with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, with the peculiar finding of a double layered patella, were recognised during childhood. Cleft palate, swelling of the ear pinna, and hitch hiker thumb were absent. He was found to be homozygous, and both healthy parents heterozygous, for the R279W mutation in DTDST, and his fibroblasts showed a sulphate incorporation defect typical of DTDST disorders. Counselling was given for a recessive disorder, thereby considerably reducing the probability of affected offspring. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia is more frequently caused by dominant mutations in the COMP (EDM1, McKusick 132400) and COL9A2 genes (EDM2, McKusick 600204). A few other patients and families with features similar to our proband have been described previously and considered to have autosomal recessive MED (EDM4, McKusick 226900). This observation confirms the existence of this entity and assigns it to the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations at the DTDST locus. PMID:10465113

  8. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children’s Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p < 0.001). Mean Hct in BPD patients was lower than non-BPD patients at different time points in 1d, 7d, 14d, and 21d. Controlling for other confounding factors, early anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants. PMID:26936610

  9. Plasma proteome changes associated with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) is a subgroup of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), which belongs to oncohematological diseases, occurring particularly in elderly patients, and represents a heterogeneous group of bone marrow diseases. The goal of this study was to look for plasma proteins that changed quantitatively or qualitatively in RCMD patients. Results A total of 46 plasma samples were depleted, proteins were separated by 2D SDS-PAGE (pI 4-7), and proteomes were compared using Progenesis SameSpots statistical software. Proteins were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Sixty-one unique, significantly (p < 0.05, ANOVA) different spots were found; proteins in 59 spots were successfully identified and corresponded to 57 different proteins. Protein fragmentation was observed in several proteins: complement C4-A, complement C4-B, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, and endorepellin. Conclusions This study describes proteins, which change quantitatively or qualitatively in RCMD patients, and represents the first report on significant alterations in C4-A and C4-B complement proteins and ITIH4 fragments in patients with MDS-RCMD. PMID:21975265

  10. [Right ventricular dysplasia and dilated cardiomyopathy observed by radionuclide images].

    PubMed

    Takamura, I; Ando, J; Miyamoto, A; Kobayashi, T; Sakamoto, S; Yasuda, H

    1985-12-01

    Four cases of right ventricular dysplasia (RVD) and 28 cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were studied. RVD was characterized clinically by syncope, sustained recurrent ventricular tachycardia with left bundle branch block patterns on the surface electrocardiogram, and right heart failure. Furthermore, moderate to severe dilatation of the right ventricle and depressed right ventricular function were apparent on radionuclide angiography. However, left ventricular dilatation and depressed left ventricular function were documented in DCM. Right ventricular volume was proportional to left ventricular volume in DCM, however, right ventricular volume was disproportionately greater in RVD. On the T1-201 perfusion image, left ventricular perfusion defects were delineated in 10 of 26 patients with DCM, and in one of four RVD patients. During two to eight year follow-up periods, six patients died suddenly five of whom had left ventricular perfusion defects. However, in 19 patients without left ventricular perfusion defects, only one sudden death was observed. A connecting link between sudden death and left ventricular perfusion defect is suggested. PMID:3841888

  11. Oxygen Saturation Targeting and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Darlow, Brian A; Morley, Colin J

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen saturation targeting is widely used in neonatal intensive care, but the optimal target range in very preterm infants has been uncertain and is the subject of recent debate and research. This review briefly discusses the technology of oxygen monitoring and the role of oxygen toxicity in preterm infants. The background to the recent trials of oxygen saturation targeting in acute and continuing care of very preterm infants is reviewed, and the findings and implications of the recent trials, particularly with respect to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, are discussed. PMID:26593080

  12. Oro-palatal dysplasia Bettex-Graf--clinical findings, genetic background, treatment.

    PubMed

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Gawrych, Elżbieta; Dydyk, Aldona; Studniak, Ewa; Biaduń-Popławska, Anna; Zajączek, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Oro-palatal dysplasia Bettex-Graf is an extremely rare syndrome consisting of microstomia, U-shaped cleft palate and micrognathia. Only two affected families have been reported before. We present the clinical findings, treatment and 13 year follow-up in a patient with this rare syndrome. The possible linkage to the fragile site 16q22 has been supported, contrary to earlier statements of its non-pathogenic character. The analysis of clinical symptoms and reference to the literature suggests, that ankyloglossia is a part of oropalatal dysplasia, whereas hypodontia is associated with the cleft itself. The authors postulate that a 20mm intercommissural distance allows acceptable function without the need for surgical correction. PMID:22831831

  13. Gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia: report of a family with a novel mutation of the ANO5 gene.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hannah A; Le, Karen T; Soulema, Albert L; Yueh, Ronald H; Scheuner, Maren T; Holick, Michael F; Christensen, Russell; Tajima, Tracey L; Leung, Angela M; Mallya, Sanjay M

    2016-05-01

    Gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia (GDD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by florid osseous dysplasia of the jaws, bone fragility, and diaphyseal cortical thickening and bowing of long bones. We present a family with previously undiagnosed GDD. The disorder was identified by the characteristic gnathic and skeletal manifestations in the father. Clinical and radiologic examination of the patient's son also revealed the characteristic features of GDD. Gene sequencing revealed a novel mutation (c. 1067 G>A, p. Cys356 Tyr) in the ANO5 gene, which is causative for GDD. This mutation was predicted to be detrimental by computational analyses and by structural modeling of the protein. The implications for recognition and management of this disease are discussed. PMID:27068316

  14. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Associated with Hematologic Abnormalities: Probable Manifestations of Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Payo, Cristina; Bernabeu, Rocio Alvarez; Villar, Isabel Salas; Goy, Enrique Iglesias

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Placental mesenchymal dysplasia is a rare vascular disease associated with intrauterine growth restriction, fetal demise as well as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Some neonates present hematologic abnormalities possibly related to consumptive coagulopathy and hemolytic anemia in the placental circulation. Case report We present a case of placental mesenchymal dysplasia in a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction and cerebellar hemorrhagic injury diagnosed in the 20th week of pregnancy. During 26th week, our patient had an intrauterine fetal demise in the context of gestational hypertension. We have detailed the ultrasound findings that made us suspect the presence of hematologic disorders during 20th week. Discussion We believe that the cerebellar hematoma could be the consequence of thrombocytopenia accompanied by anemia. If hemorrhagic damage during fetal life is found, above all associates with an anomalous placental appearance and with intrauterine growth restriction, PMD should be suspected along other etiologies. PMID:26495159

  15. Familial cortical dysplasia type IIA caused by a germline mutation in DEPDC5.

    PubMed

    Scerri, Thomas; Riseley, Jessica R; Gillies, Greta; Pope, Kate; Burgess, Rosemary; Mandelstam, Simone A; Dibbens, Leanne; Chow, Chung W; Maixner, Wirginia; Harvey, Anthony Simon; Jackson, Graeme D; Amor, David J; Delatycki, Martin B; Crino, Peter B; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie; Lockhart, Paul J; Leventer, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    Whole-exome sequencing of two brothers with drug-resistant, early-onset, focal epilepsy secondary to extensive type IIA focal cortical dysplasia identified a paternally inherited, nonsense variant of DEPDC5 (c.C1663T, p.Arg555*). This variant has previously been reported to cause familial focal epilepsy with variable foci in patients with normal brain imaging. Immunostaining of resected brain tissue from both brothers demonstrated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. This report shows the histopathological features of cortical dysplasia associated with a DEPDC5 mutation, confirms mTOR dysregulation in the malformed tissue and expands the spectrum of neurological manifestations of DEPDC5 mutations to include severe phenotypes with large areas of cortical malformation. PMID:26000329

  16. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia mimicking apical periodontitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Rekabi, Ali Reza; Ashouri, Rezvan; Torabi, Molok; Parirokh, Masoud; Abbott, Paul V

    2013-12-01

    Cemento-osseous dysplasia may present as a focal, periapical or florid lesion in the mandible or maxilla. The lesion may sometimes appear similar to peri-radicular lesions on a periapical radiograph. This report presents a case with irreversible pulpitis and root resorption as well as a mixed radiolucent/radiopaque lesion around a mandibular molar tooth root. Root canal treatment was performed and because of the radiographic signs of root resorption and the patient's fear of having a malignant disease, periapical surgery was also performed. The histopathology report confirmed the presence of florid cement-osseous dysplasia which was mimicking apical periodontitis. Follow-up radiography 12 months after the surgery illustrated complete healing of the radiolucent area. PMID:24279668

  17. A case with oto-spondylo-mega-epiphyseal-dysplasia (OSMED): the clinical recognition and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Karaer, Kadri; Rosti, Rasim Ozgür; Torun, Deniz; Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bahçe, Muhterem; Güran, Sefik

    2011-01-01

    The oto-spondylo-mega-epiphyseal-dysplasia (OSMED) phenotype is an autosomal recessive trait that is a skeletal dysplasia with the hallmark findings of limb shortening, multiple skeletal and radiological abnormalities, mid-face hypoplasia with a flat nasal bridge, small upturned nasal tip, and sensorineural hearing loss. A 3.5-year-old girl born to consanguineous Turkish parents had characteristic facial features at birth: mid-face hypoplasia, mild hypertelorism, upslanting palpebral fissures, prominent supraorbital ridges, depressed nasal bridge, small upturned nasal tip, long philtrum, and micrognathia. Radiological examination at three years of age revealed large flaring metaphyses and wide flat epiphyses. The humerus and femur showed the characteristic dumbbell shape. She had bilateral hearing loss with no ophthalmologic findings. There is continuing debate over the clinical overlap and differential diagnosis of OSMED syndrome. The patient was examined considering Weissenbacher-Zweymuller, Stickler type 3, Marshall syndrome, and Kniest dysplasia as possible differential diagnoses. We believe that the presented patient clinically manifested features of OSMED syndrome. We would like to point out that the management of OSMED calls for a coordinated multidisciplinary approach. PMID:21980822

  18. Craniofacial morphometric analysis of individuals with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Alice F; Larson, Jacinda R; Jones, Kyle B; Liberton, Denise K; Landan, Maya; Wang, Zhifeng; Boekelheide, Anne; Langham, Margaret; Mushegyan, Vagan; Oberoi, Snehlata; Brao, Rosalie; Wen, Timothy; Johnson, Ramsey; Huttner, Kenneth; Grange, Dorothy K; Spritz, Richard A; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Jheon, Andrew H; Klein, Ophir D

    2014-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most prevalent type of ectodermal dysplasia (ED). ED is an umbrella term for a group of syndromes characterized by missing or malformed ectodermal structures, including skin, hair, sweat glands, and teeth. The X-linked recessive (XL), autosomal recessive (AR), and autosomal dominant (AD) types of HED are caused by mutations in the genes encoding ectodysplasin (EDA1), EDA receptor (EDAR), or EDAR-associated death domain (EDARADD). Patients with HED have a distinctive facial appearance, yet a quantitative analysis of the HED craniofacial phenotype using advanced three-dimensional (3D) technologies has not been reported. In this study, we characterized craniofacial morphology in subjects with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) by use of 3D imaging and geometric morphometrics (GM), a technique that uses defined landmarks to quantify size and shape in complex craniofacial morphologies. We found that the XLHED craniofacial phenotype differed significantly from controls. Patients had a smaller and shorter face with a proportionally longer chin and midface, prominent midfacial hypoplasia, a more protrusive chin and mandible, a narrower and more pointed nose, shorter philtrum, a narrower mouth, and a fuller and more rounded lower lip. Our findings refine the phenotype of XLHED and may be useful both for clinical diagnosis of XLHED and to extend understanding of the role of EDA in craniofacial development. PMID:25333067

  19. Dentinal Dysplasia Type I: A Case Report with a 6-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Sezin; Ozden, Bora; Otan Ozden, Feyza; Gunduz, Kaan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Dentin dysplasia is a rare disturbance of dentin formation characterized by normal enamel but atypical dentin formation with abnormal pulpal morphology that is inherited as an autosomal pulpal morphology. Case Presentation. A 7-year-old female who had problems in chewing function was referred to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department at the Faculty of Dentistry in Ondokuz Mayıs University. In the radiographic examination, it was determined that some of the unerupted permanent teeth of the patient had short, blunted, and malformed roots with obliterated pulp chambers, although the bone below the teeth showed well-defined margins. This unusual case of generalized short roots presents a case demonstrating both classic and atypical features of dentinal dysplasia type I (DDI) in the mixed and permanent dentitions. Conclusion. There are still many issues in the diagnosis and management of patients with dentin dysplasia. Early diagnosis, clinical and radiographic findings, as well as treatment of this condition and the initiation of effective preventive strategies may help prevent or delay loss of dentition. PMID:23762649

  20. Axial Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia Is Caused by C21orf2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Fujita, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Toru; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Albalwi, Mohammed A.; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Isidor, Bertrand; David, Albert; Rustad, Cecilie F.; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Kou, Ikuyo; Nakajima, Masahiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Smithson, Sarah; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondylometaphyseal dysplasia (axial SMD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by dysplasia of axial skeleton and retinal dystrophy. We conducted whole exome sequencing and identified C21orf2 (chromosome 21 open reading frame 2) as a disease gene for axial SMD. C21orf2 mutations have been recently found to cause isolated retinal degeneration and Jeune syndrome. We found a total of five biallelic C21orf2 mutations in six families out of nine: three missense and two splicing mutations in patients with various ethnic backgrounds. The pathogenic effects of the splicing (splice-site and branch-point) mutations were confirmed on RNA level, which showed complex patterns of abnormal splicing. C21orf2 mutations presented with a wide range of skeletal phenotypes, including cupped and flared anterior ends of ribs, lacy ilia and metaphyseal dysplasia of proximal femora. Analysis of patients without C21orf2 mutation indicated genetic heterogeneity of axial SMD. Functional data in chondrocyte suggest C21orf2 is implicated in cartilage differentiation. C21orf2 protein was localized to the connecting cilium of the cone and rod photoreceptors, confirming its significance in retinal function. Our study indicates that axial SMD is a member of a unique group of ciliopathy affecting skeleton and retina. PMID:26974433

  1. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia involving occipital bone: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Basaran, Recep; Kaksi, Mustafa; Gur, Erdal; Efendioglu, Mustafa; Balkuv, Ece; Sav, Aydin

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a progressive systemic bone tumour of young and it can be seen on cranial bones. FD is divided into three types according to radiological features. The second most common subtype is polyostotic subtype. With this article, we aimed to review and present clinical features, radiological examination, differential diagnosis and treatment management of a case of solitary monostotic fibrous dysplasia of occipital bone. 15 years old female patient admitted to our hospital for a bump and in the back of his head that she noticed 1 month ago. Her physical and neurological examination was normal. On cranial CT examination we detected a bony defect. Her gadolinium enhanced cranial MRI revealed bony defect along with massive gadolinium enhancement in adjacent tissue. On histopathologic examination; PANCK, CD68, CD1a were found negative and CD45, S-100, Vimentine were found positive. Ki-67 was 4,8%. In conclusion, fibrous dysplasia is a progressive bone disease of the young patients. Despite its resemblance to a benign lesion by not being symptomatic it can progress and cause severe bony defects and skin lesions. Total surgical resection is necessary and sufficient for total treatment. PMID:25745531

  2. Body mass index, serum total cholesterol, and risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Kai; Kang, Wei-Ming; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Yu-Qin; Zhou, Li; Yu, Jian-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is related to an increased risk of gastric cardia cancer. However, the influences of excess body weight and serum total cholesterol on the risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia have not been fully characterized. A case–control study was conducted to explore the relationships between body mass index (BMI), serum total cholesterol level, and the risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia in Chinese adults. A total of 893 consecutive patients with gastric high-grade dysplasia (537 men and 356 women) and 902 controls (543 men and 359 women) were enrolled from January 2000 to October 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and a multivariate analysis was conducted. After adjusting for age, alcohol consumption, smoking status, family history of gastric cancer or esophageal cancer, and serum total cholesterol level, a BMI ranging from 27.5 to 29.9 was significantly related to an increased risk of gastric high-grade dysplasia in both men (adjusted OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.24–2.81) and women (adjusted OR = 2.72, 95% CI = 1.44–5.16). The 2 highest BMI categories (27.5–29.9 and ≥30.0) were identified as risk factors for gastric cardia high-grade dysplasia in both men (BMI = 27.5–29.9: adjusted OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.02–3.10; BMI ≥ 30.0: adjusted OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.27–5.08) and women (BMI = 27.5–29.9: adjusted OR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.27–6.55; BMI ≥ 30.0: adjusted OR = 2.77, 95% CI = 1.36–5.64), whereas only a BMI ranging from 27.5 to 29.9 was a risk factor for gastric noncardia high-grade dysplasia in both men (adjusted OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.25–3.14) and women (adjusted OR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.43–5.81). In addition, higher serum total cholesterol was associated with an increased risk of gastric noncardia high-grade dysplasia (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.25–2.69) in women. Increased BMI was associated with an increased risk

  3. Heterogeneity of Genetic Damage in Cervical Nuclei and Lymphocytes in Women with Different Levels of Dysplasia and Cancer-Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Moya, Carlos; Reynoso-Silva, Mónica; Canales-Aguirre, Alejandro A.; Chavez-Chavez, José O.; Castañeda-Vázquez, Hugo; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo I.

    2015-01-01

    The comet assay can be used to assess genetic damage, but heterogeneity in the length of the tails is frequently observed. The aims of this study were to evaluate genetic damage and heterogeneity in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with different levels of dysplasia and to determine the risk factors associated with the development of cervical cancer. The study included 97 females who presented with different levels of dysplasia. A comet assay was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cervical epithelial cells. Significant genetic damage (P ≤ 0.05) was observed only in patients diagnosed with nuclei cervical from dysplasia III (NCDIII) and lymphocytes from dysplasia I (LDI). However, the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with dysplasia I were significantly different (P ≤ 0.0001) from the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the nuclei cervical and lymphocytes from patients with DII and DIII (NCDII, NCDIII and LDII, LDIII), indicating a high heterogeneity in tail length. Results suggest that genetic damage could be widely present but only manifested as increased tail length in certain cell populations. This heterogeneity could obscure the statistical significance of the genetic damage. PMID:26339603

  4. Lethal Skeletal Dysplasia in Mice and Humans Lacking the Golgin GMAP-210

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Patrick; Bolton, Andrew D.; Funari, Vincent; Hong, Minh; Boyden, Eric D.; Lu, Lei; Manning, Danielle K.; Dwyer, Noelle D.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Prysak, Mary; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F.; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.; Kirchhausen, Tom; Warman, Matthew L.; Beier, David R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Establishing the genetic basis of phenotypes such as skeletal dysplasia in model organisms can provide insights into biologic processes and their role in human disease. METHODS We screened mutagenized mice and observed a neonatal lethal skeletal dysplasia with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Through genetic mapping and positional cloning, we identified the causative mutation. RESULTS Affected mice had a nonsense mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor interactor 11 gene (Trip11), which encodes the Golgi microtubule-associated protein 210 (GMAP-210); the affected mice lacked this protein. Golgi architecture was disturbed in multiple tissues, including cartilage. Skeletal development was severely impaired, with chondrocytes showing swelling and stress in the endoplasmic reticulum, abnormal cellular differentiation, and increased cell death. Golgi-mediated glycosylation events were altered in fibroblasts and chondrocytes lacking GMAP-210, and these chondrocytes had intracellular accumulation of perlecan, an extracellular matrix protein, but not of type II collagen or aggrecan, two other extracellular matrix proteins. The similarities between the skeletal and cellular phenotypes in these mice and those in patients with achondrogenesis type 1A, a neonatal lethal form of skeletal dysplasia in humans, suggested that achondrogenesis type 1A may be caused by GMAP-210 deficiency. Sequence analysis revealed loss-of-function mutations in the 10 unrelated patients with achondrogenesis type 1A whom we studied. CONCLUSIONS GMAP-210 is required for the efficient glycosylation and cellular transport of multiple proteins. The identification of a mutation affecting GMAP-210 in mice, and then in humans, as the cause of a lethal skeletal dysplasia underscores the value of screening for abnormal phenotypes in model organisms and identifying the causative mutations. PMID:20089971

  5. Undersulfation of cartilage proteoglycans ex vivo and increased contribution of amino acid sulfur to sulfation in vitro in McAlister dysplasia/atelosteogenesis type 2.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bonaventure, J; Delezoide, A L; Superti-Furga, A; Cetta, G

    1997-09-15

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene cause a family of chondrodysplasias including, in order of increasing severity, diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type 2 and achondrogenesis type 1B. McAlister dysplasia is a lethal chondrodysplasia considered on the basis of minor radiographic features to be a disorder different from atelosteogenesis type 2. Here, we demonstrate that McAlister dysplasia arises from mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene and that this disorder essentially coincides on molecular and biochemical grounds with atelosteogenesis type 2. The fetus affected by McAlister dysplasia we have studied is a compound heterozygote for mutations leading to R279W and N425D substitutions in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter. Proteoglycan sulfation was studied in epiphyseal cartilage and in chondrocyte cultures of the patient by high performance liquid chromatography of chondrotinase digested proteoglycans; a high amount of non-sulfated disaccharide was observed as a consequence of the alteration of the transporter function caused by the mutations. However, sulfated disaccharides were detectable even if in low amounts, both in cultured cells and tissue. Functional impairment of the sulfate transporter was demonstrated in vitro by reduced incorporation of [35S]sulfate relative to [3H]glucosamine in proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes and by sulfate-uptake assays in fibroblasts. Parallel in vitro studies in a patient with achondrogenesis 1B indicated that the severity of the clinical phenotype seems to be correlated to the residual activity of the sulfate transporter. The capacity of fibroblasts to use cysteine as an alternative source of sulfate was evaluated by double-labeling experiments. Relative incorporation of [35S]cysteine-derived sulfate in the glycosaminoglycan chains was increased in the patient's cells, indicating that, in vitro, the catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids can

  6. Familial Fibrocystic Pulmonary Dysplasia: A Detailed Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, A. G.; Chertkow, G.; Hayton, R. C.

    1966-01-01

    Six cases of familial fibrocystic pulmonary dysplasia are described involving five siblings and their father. The clinical findings and radiological features were similar in all six patients although there was some variation in the period of survival following the onset of the disease. In three the diagnosis was confirmed pathologically; the two brothers, who did not have lung biopsies, had disturbances in respiratory function which are considered typical of the impaired diffusion produced by interstitial fibrosis. One hundred and five members of the family were surveyed for evidence of this disease, but no further cases were discovered. Four of the patients had some elevation of their gamma globulin. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis, which was performed on three of the patients, the two healthy siblings, and 16 of their offspring, showed elevated immunoglobulin patterns. This evidence suggests the possibility of an inherited aberration in the immune response in this family. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:5912179

  7. Risk factors affecting the Barrett's metaplasia-dysplasia-neoplasia sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Craig S; Ujiki, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma has the fastest growing incidence rate of any cancer in the United States, and currently carries a very poor prognosis with 5 years relative survival rates of less than 15%. Current curative treatment options are limited to esophagectomy, a procedure that suffers from high complication rates and high mortality rates. Metaplasia of the esophageal epithelium, a condition known as Barrett’s esophagus (BE), is widely accepted as the precursor lesion for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Recently, radio-frequency ablation has been shown to be an effective method to treat BE, although there is disagreement as to whether radio-frequency ablation should be used to treat all patients with BE or whether treatment should be reserved for those at high risk for progressing to esophageal adenocarcinoma while continuing to endoscopically survey those with low risk. Recent research has been targeted towards identifying those at greater risk for progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma so that radio-frequency ablation therapy can be used in a more targeted manner, decreasing the total health care cost as well as improving patient outcomes. This review discusses the current state of the literature regarding risk factors for progression from BE through dysplasia to esophageal adenocarcinoma, as well as the current need for an integrated scoring tool or risk stratification system capable of differentiating those patients at highest risk of progression in order to target these endoluminal therapies. PMID:25992184

  8. BOB CAT: A Large-Scale Review and Delphi Consensus for Management of Barrett’s Esophagus With No Dysplasia, Indefinite for, or Low-Grade Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Cathy; Moayyedi, Paul; Corley, Douglas A.; DeCaestecker, John; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Falk, Gary; Vakil, Nimish; Sanders, Scott; Vieth, Michael; Inadomi, John; Aldulaimi, David; Ho, Khek-Yu; Odze, Robert; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Quigley, Eamonn; Gittens, Stuart; Watson, Peter; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Iyer, Prasad G.; Alexandre, Leo; Ang, Yeng; Callaghan, James; Harrison, Rebecca; Singh, Rajvinder; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bisschops, Raf; Geramizadeh, Bita; Kaye, Philip; Krishnadath, Sheila; Fennerty, M. Brian; Manner, Hendrik; Nason, Katie S.; Pech, Oliver; Konda, Vani; Ragunath, Krish; Rahman, Imdadur; Romero, Yvonne; Sampliner, Richard; Siersema, Peter D.; Tack, Jan; Tham, Tony C.K.; Trudgill, Nigel; Weinberg, David S.; Wang, Jean; Wang, Kenneth; Wong, Jennie Y.Y.; Attwood, Stephen; Malfertheiner, Peter; MacDonald, David; Barr, Hugh; Ferguson, Mark K.; Jankowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common premalignant lesion for which surveillance is recommended. This strategy is limited by considerable variations in clinical practice. We conducted an international, multidisciplinary, systematic search and evidence-based review of BE and provided consensus recommendations for clinical use in patients with nondysplastic, indefinite, and low-grade dysplasia (LGD). METHODS We defined the scope, proposed statements, and searched electronic databases, yielding 20,558 publications that were screened, selected online, and formed the evidence base. We used a Delphi consensus process, with an 80% agreement threshold, using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) to categorize the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. RESULTS In total, 80% of respondents agreed with 55 of 127 statements in the final voting rounds. Population endoscopic screening is not recommended and screening should target only very high-risk cases of males aged over 60 years with chronic uncontrolled reflux. A new international definition of BE was agreed upon. For any degree of dysplasia, at least two specialist gastrointestinal (GI) pathologists are required. Risk factors for cancer include male gender, length of BE, and central obesity. Endoscopic resection should be used for visible, nodular areas. Surveillance is not recommended for <5 years of life expectancy. Management strategies for indefinite dysplasia (IND) and LGD were identified, including a de-escalation strategy for lower-risk patients and escalation to intervention with follow-up for higher-risk patients. CONCLUSIONS In this uniquely large consensus process in gastroenterology, we made key clinical recommendations for the escalation/de-escalation of BE in clinical practice. We made strong recommendations for the prioritization of future research. PMID:25869390

  9. TRPV4 related skeletal dysplasias: a phenotypic spectrum highlighted byclinical, radiographic, and molecular studies in 21 new families

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TRPV4 gene encodes a calcium-permeable ion-channel that is widely expressed, responds to many different stimuli and participates in an extraordinarily wide range of physiologic processes. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia, spondylometaphyseal dysplasia Kozlowski type (SMDK) and metatropic dysplasia (MD) are currently considered three distinct skeletal dysplasias with some shared clinical features, including short stature, platyspondyly, and progressive scoliosis. Recently, TRPV4 mutations have been found in patients diagnosed with these skeletal phenotypes. Methods and Results We critically analysed the clinical and radiographic data on 26 subjects from 21 families, all of whom had a clinical diagnosis of one of the conditions described above: 15 with MD; 9 with SMDK; and 2 with brachyolmia. We sequenced TRPV4 and identified 9 different mutations in 22 patients, 4 previously described, and 5 novel. There were 4 mutation-negative cases: one with MD and one with SMDK, both displaying atypical clinical and radiographic features for these diagnoses; and two with brachyolmia, who had isolated spine changes and no metaphyseal involvement. Conclusions Our data suggest the TRPV4 skeletal dysplasias represent a continuum of severity with areas of phenotypic overlap, even within the same family. We propose that AD brachyolmia lies at the mildest end of this spectrum and, since all cases described with this diagnosis and TRPV4 mutations display metaphyseal changes, we suggest that it is not a distinct entity but represents the mildest phenotypic expression of SMDK. PMID:21658220

  10. The pathogenesis and diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, C L; Remedios, A M

    1995-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a common developmental problem affecting the canine population. Despite extensive research into the condition, many questions remain unanswered and numerous misconceptions are present among the general public. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the development of hip dysplasia, factors modifying its development, and current diagnostic techniques. A computerized literature search was conducted for the period of January 1983 to April 1985 using the MEDLINE and CAB databases, and the keywords hip dysplasia, hip, dog, and canine. Other articles, wherever possible original research articles, published before 1983 were also reviewed. Animals affected by hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but quickly develop subluxation of the femoral head. Degenerative joint disease follows. Hip dysplasia is a complex, inherited, polygenic trait. Selective breeding of only normal dogs with normal littermates, parents, and grandparents is the recommended method of reducing the incidence in the general population. Gene expression in affected individuals may be modified by a number of environmental factors. These factors do not cause hip dysplasia, but they alter manifestations of the trait and its severity. Nutrition is a major environmental factor. Excess energy consumption increases the frequency and severity of hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed dogs. Food intake should be regulated to maintain a slender figure with the ribs and dorsal vertebral spines easily palpable, but not visible. Excess dietary calcium and vitamin D contribute to hip dysplasia in genetically predisposed individuals and should be avoided. High dose vitamin C supplementation in growing puppies does not prevent hip dysplasia, and this practice should be discontinued.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7585436

  11. Type and level of RMRP functional impairment predicts phenotype in the cartilage hair hypoplasia-anauxetic dysplasia spectrum.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Christian T; Mortier, Geert; Kaitila, Ilkka; Reis, André; Rauch, Anita

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in the RMRP gene lead to a wide spectrum of autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasias, ranging from the milder phenotypes metaphyseal dysplasia without hypotrichosis and cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH) to the severe anauxetic dysplasia (AD). This clinical spectrum includes different degrees of short stature, hair hypoplasia, defective erythrogenesis, and immunodeficiency. The RMRP gene encodes the untranslated RNA component of the mitochondrial RNA-processing ribonuclease, RNase MRP. We recently demonstrated that mutations may affect both messenger RNA (mRNA) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage and thus cell-cycle regulation and protein synthesis. To investigate the genotype-phenotype correlation, we analyzed the position and the functional effect of 13 mutations in patients with variable features of the CHH-AD spectrum. Those at the end of the spectrum include a novel patient with anauxetic dysplasia who was compound heterozygous for the null mutation g.254_263delCTCAGCGCGG and the mutation g.195C-->T, which was previously described in patients with milder phenotypes. Mapping of nucleotide conservation to the two-dimensional structure of the RMRP gene revealed that disease-causing mutations either affect evolutionarily conserved nucleotides or are likely to alter secondary structure through mispairing in stem regions. In vitro testing of RNase MRP multiprotein-specific mRNA and rRNA cleavage of different mutations revealed a strong correlation between the decrease in rRNA cleavage in ribosomal assembly and the degree of bone dysplasia, whereas reduced mRNA cleavage, and thus cell-cycle impairment, predicts the presence of hair hypoplasia, immunodeficiency, and hematological abnormalities and thus increased cancer risk. PMID:17701897

  12. Idiopathic bone marrow dysplasia of unknown significance (IDUS): definition, pathogenesis, follow up, and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Valent, Peter; Jäger, Eva; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, Gerlinde; Müllauer, Leonhard; Schwarzinger, Ilse; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Thalhammer, Renate; Wimazal, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    Minimal diagnostic criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) include constant cytopenia recorded for at least 6 months, dysplasia, and exclusion of other causes of cytopenia and dysplasia. However, there are patients with dysplastic bone marrow features with or without a karyotype, who have only mild if any cytopenia. This condition has been termed idiopathic dysplasia of unknown significance (IDUS). Out of a series of 1,363 patients with suspected MDS or mild cytopenia seen between 1997 and 2010, we have identified 10 patients with IDUS, and analyzed their clinical course and outcome as well as features potentially involved in disease-evolution. Follow-up ranged between 2 and 13 years. Progression to an overt myeloid neoplasm was observed in 4 patients: two progressed to frank MDS, one to chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and one to a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm exhibiting 5q-and JAK2 V617F. Consecutive studies revealed that most IDUS patients have an adequate production of erythropoietin (EPO) and sufficient numbers of EPO-responsive erythroid progenitors, features rarely seen in MDS. The erythropoiesis-promoting JAK2 mutation V617F was only detectable in one case. We hypothesize that the dysplastic clone in IDUS cannot manifest as frank MDS because i) the clone retains responsiveness against EPO, and ii) an adequate EPO-production counteracts anemia. Evolution of IDUS to low risk MDS may thus depend on the biological properties of the clone as well as patient-related factors such as EPO production. The latter often decreases with age and may thus explain why MDS often manifests in the elderly. PMID:21984971

  13. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Reema Sharma; Bora, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia, and facial clefting along with some associated features. Presence of all the three major features in a single individual is extremely rare. We report a case of 4 year 11 months old child with EEC syndrome having ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and cleft palate and ectrodactyly with some associated features. Clinical features, diagnosis and role of a dentist in the multidisciplinary treatment approach have been elaborated in this case report. PMID:25231046

  14. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7880297

  15. Fetal biometry of skeletal dysplasias: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, L; Jeanty, P

    1994-12-01

    Twenty-three diagnostic centers worldwide contributed 127 cases of 17 skeletal dysplasias. Discriminant analysis showed that the femur length was the best biometric parameter to distinguish among the five most common disorders in this series (thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, achondrogenesis, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia). Fifty-four percent of fetuses with femur length below 30% of the mean for gestational age had achondrogenesis. Seventy-eight percent of measurements between 40 and 60% of the mean for gestational age represented either thanatophoric dysplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Fetuses who had over 80% of the mean for gestational age had predominantly hypochondroplasia, achondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta type III. PMID:7877211

  16. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a cause of renal dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Chan, Maren; Hecht, Jonathan L; Boyd, Theonia; Rosen, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most frequently encountered viral infections of the fetus and induces a wide range of histologic and clinical manifestations. Congenital abnormalities are typically restricted to the central nervous system despite evidence of CMV inclusions occurring in most epithelial cells. Although tissue injury and even glomerulonephritis have been observed in congenital CMV infections, renal multicystic dysplasia has not been reported. Herein, we describe a case of unilateral renal dysplasia in a 19-week fetus with concurrent CMV infection. We believe the present case to be the first description of a virus apparently inducing renal multicystic dysplasia. PMID:17638423

  17. Circulating Fibrocytes Are Increased in Neonates with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Li, Xiaoyu; Deng, Chun; Guo, Chunbao

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by the aberrant remodeling of the lung parenchyma, resulting from accumulation of fibroblasts or myofibroblasts. Circulating fibrocytes are implied in pulmonary fibrosis, but whether these cells are associated with the development of BPD or the progressive fibrosis is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of fibrocytes in peripheral venous blood and explore whether these cells might be associated with severity of BPD. Methods We investigated circulating fibrocytes in 66 patients with BPD, 23 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS) and 11 normal subjects. Circulating fibrocytes were defined and quantified as cells positive for CD45 andcollagen-1 by flow cytometry. Furthermore, serum SDF-1/CXCL12 and TGF-β1 were evaluated using ELISA methods. We also investigated the clinical value of fibrocyte counts by comparison with standard clinical parameters. Results The patients with BPD had significantly increased numbers of fibrocytes compared to the controls (p < 0.01). Patients with ARDS were not different from healthy control subjects. There was a correlation between the number of fibrocytes and pulmonary hypertension or oxygen saturation (p < 0.05). Fibrocyte numbers were not correlated with other clinical or functional variables or radiologic severity scores. The fibrocyte attractant chemokine CXCL12 increased in plasma (p < 0.05) and was detectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of 40% of the patients but not in controls. Conclusion These findings indicate that circulating fibrocytes are increased in patients with BPD and may contribute to pulmonary fibrosis in BPD. Circulating fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, might contribute to the production of TGF-β1 for the expansion of fibroblast/myofibroblast population in BPD. PMID:27309347

  18. Dysplastic conditions of the right ventricular myocardium: Uhl's anomaly vs arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gerlis, L M; Schmidt-Ott, S C; Ho, S Y; Anderson, R H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Since 1905 there have been many reports of cases in which the right ventricle was deficient in myocardium. Several terms have been used to describe this condition. Of these, "Uhl's anomaly" and "arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia" are most often used. Our study investigates the relation between these entities. METHOD--Five cases with a primary deficiency of the right ventricular musculature were examined. The findings were compared with those published reports to evaluate the similarities and differences between Uhl's anomaly and arrhythmogenic dysplasia. RESULTS--The five cases showed two patterns of myocardial deficiency in the right ventricle. On the one hand, the parietal wall was paper thin with complete absence of musculature and apposition of the endocardial and epicardial layers. On the other hand, patchy, localised fibrofatty tissue replacement was found within the parietal musculature. Evidence from our cases, combined with analysis of other publications, showed different modes and timing of clinical presentation of the patients with these two anatomical conditions, congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. CONCLUSIONS--The conditions variously described as Uhl's anomaly and arrhythmogenic dysplasia are separate and distinct morphological entities. Images PMID:8435240

  19. Morphological and functional analyses of two infants with obstructive renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kenichiro; Sekine, Takashi; Nishimura, Riki; Kanamori, Yutaka; Yanagisawa, Atsuhiro; Sakai, Kiyohide; Nagata, Michio; Igarashi, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Renal dysplasia associated with urinary tract obstruction comprises two distinct phenotypes, i.e., multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) and obstructive renal dysplasia (ORD). MCDK is a common manifestation in infants with renal dysplasia, which is characterized by multiloculated thin-walled cysts with no functional parenchyma and an atretic ureter owing to pyelocalyceal occlusion early in fetal life. In contrast, ORD is an extremely rare condition which is caused by severe obstruction of the distal ureter or urethra. Here, we report two infants with ORD. Both patients manifested unilateral kidney enlargement with multiple cortical cysts, mild hydronephrosis, and marked dilatation of the ipsilateral ureter. Contralateral kidneys and urinary tracts revealed no apparent radiological abnormalities. Serial ultrasonographic studies of fetal and neonatal kidneys in both cases revealed that ureteral dilatation was evident at gestational week 16 and 27, respectively, and most of the cortical cysts disappeared within 1-3 months after birth. The functions of the affected kidneys were severely impaired but evident at the time of birth. These manifestations were consistent with a diagnosis of ORD, and were distinct from the features of MCDK. Our observation of fetal and infantile kidneys in these two cases provides us with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of ORD. PMID:21455661

  20. Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in 20 Years Old Female with Neglected Developmental Dysplasia of Hip

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Jain, Jitesh K; Sharma, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Management of developmental dysplasia of hip in adult is challenging problem. Management protocols are not well defined in terms of operative technique. Patient may present very late. Usually they consult orthopaedic surgeons when osteoarthritic changes set in, leading to pain. Operative management is difficult because of difficult exposure, altered anatomy of soft tissue structures, hypoplastic femoral medullary canal and shallow and atypical acetabulum filled with soft tissues. Femoral head is up-ridden with contracted Abductors which resists reduction of femoral head into acetabulum. Altered anatomy of neurovascular structures also pose a risk of being injured during surgery. Case Report Here we are presenting a case of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in 20 years old female with developmental dysplasia of hip and sharing our experience of its operative management. Conclusion We concluded from this case study that total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of hip is technically demanding but gives good functional and clinical result. For getting functionally good result contracted soft tissues around joint need special attention. PMID:27298952

  1. Clinical results of cementless total hip arthroplasty with shortening osteotomy for high dislocation with developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Desteli, Engin Eren; Imren, Yunus; Tan, Erkan; Erdoğan, Murat; Özcan, Hüseyin

    2015-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty for severe developmental dysplasia of the hip is a technically challenging procedure. Subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy enables reducing the femoral head and restoring abductor muscle strength without compromising proximal femoral bone stock in advanced dysplasia.We aimed to retrospectively evaluate Crowe type III or IV developmental dysplasia of the hip who underwent reconstruction with cementless total hip arthroplasty combined with a transverse subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy. Sixty hips of 52 patients (11 male, 49 female) with Crowe type III (n: 37) or IV (n: 23) developmental dysplasia of the hip were included. The average age was 51.4 years. Surgery was performed in lateral decubitis position with posterolateral approach. Subtrochanteric transverse femoral osteotomy were used with cementless components. 40 of the femoral components were Secur-Fit type, and 20 of them were secur-fit plus max type. Ceramic-ceramic coupling was used in 24 cases and metal-polyethylene coupling was used in 36 cases. Merle D'Aubigne and Harris Hip score were used to rate the clinical outcome at the final follow up. All femoral shortening osteotomies were united at a mean of 5.7 months. Mean Merle D'Aubigne pain score was increased from 3.1 to 5.4, and mean Harris Hip score improved from 39 to 92.8, postoperatively (p<0.01). There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. 4 femoral stems had asymptomatic radiolucent lines. There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. PMID:26280851

  2. [The role of connective tissue dysplasia in the forming of mitral valve prolapse].

    PubMed

    Filipenko, P S; Malookaia, Iu S

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue (CT) is a multifunctional universal structure of great importance to the human organism. Constituting about 50% of the body mass, CT forms a frame (skeleton) and outer cover (skin), as well as the inner medium, through which all structural elements receive nutrients and extract metabolic products. The great number of links, constituting the CT system, each of which is controlled genetically and is liable to genetic lesions, creates conditions for heterogeneity of malformations and diseases involving CT. Non-differentiated CT dysplasia (NDCTD) is a genetically heterogenous group, presenting a basis for various chronic diseases. NDCTD may present the cause of dysplastic changes in the CT of different organs and systems. Thanks to modern diagnostic techniques, NDCTD is revealed frequently. NDCTD is underlied by molecular-, onto-, and pathogenetic mechanisms, leading to structural and functional changes in CT. This CT "weakness" is manifested by the peculiarities of the structure of various organs and systems. Mesenchimal heart dysplasias are the most widespread visceral markers of the given CT pathology. CT dysplasias of the heart are often combined with varied manifestations of system CT anomaly. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most wide-spread and well-studied minor heart anomalies. Primary MVP is a hereditary or congenital pathology and is not connected with a particular disease. It is a genetic pathology--CT dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance. Patients with MVP have an increased expression of Bw35 antigen of HLA system, which causes dysmetabolism of collagen in the mitral cusps. It has been revealed that tissue deficiency of magnesium is associated with antigen expression and correlates with clinical symptoms in MVP. Exogenic factors influencing MVP have been described. PMID:17294876

  3. Osteofibrous Dysplasia managed with Extraperiosteal excision, Autologous free fibular graft and bone graft substitute

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Vineet T; Marimuthu, Chandrasekaran; Subbaraj, Ravichandran; Rengarajan, Nandakumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Osteofibrous Dysplasia is a rare benign self-limiting fibro-osseous lesion most commonly seen in the diaphysis of the tibia. Its incidence is reported to be 0.2% of all primary bone tumors. It occurs in the first two decades of life with a slight male preponderance. Surgical options include extra periosteal resection, autologous graft, limb lengthening procedures etc. There are no case reports mentioning the use of synthetic bone graft to fill the defect following extraperiosteal excision. Case Report: A 13 year old girl presented with pain and swelling of the (R) leg since 2 months following a trivial injury at school. Examination revealed a 5×3cm tender swelling on the anteromedial aspect of the middle third tibia. Radiographs and MRI, revealed an eccentric expansile lytic lesion, which was multilocular and was present at the junction of the metaphysis and diaphysis on the antero -medial aspect of tibia. The cortex had ballooned out and there was a possibility of an impending fracture. Biopsy was done which revealed osteofibrous dysplasia. We did an extraperiosteal excision of the lesion. To fill the cavity we harvested 10 cm of the contralateral fibula and since there was still space in the cavity, we packed bone graft substitute (hydroxyapatite crystals) into the defect. The surgical management of osteofibrous dysplasia is controversial. Various methods of treatment of such cases have been described in literature. The use of synthetic graft is an option in these patients as it reduces morbidity; and in our case we had good graft incorporation with this method. Conclusion: Extraperiosteal Excision of Osteofibrous dysplasia combined with autologous free fibular graft and bone graft substitute is a good surgical option to prevent recurrence and mange bone defects in this rare lesion. PMID:27299018

  4. Oblique wedge osteotomy for femoral diaphyseal deformity in fibrous dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Hashimoto, Y; Mizuno, K

    2001-03-01

    A patient with fibrous dysplasia who had a three-dimensional diaphyseal deformity in the left femur was treated using an oblique wedge osteotomy. The patient was 26-year-old man with a history of two pathologic fractures in the midshaft of the femur. A 22 degrees angular deformity in the coronal plane and 15 degrees anterior bowing were corrected. The results at a followup 2 years after surgery were satisfactory in functional and radiologic terms. The technique and advantages of the oblique wedge osteotomy are discussed. PMID:11249172

  5. Arnold Chiari Malformation With Sponastrime (Spondylar and Nasal Changes, With Striations of the Metaphyses) Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, A Leum; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong Kyu; Im, Soo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract SPOndylar and NAsal changes, with STRIations of the Metaphyses (SPONASTRIME) dysplasia (SD) is a dwarfing autosomal recessive syndrome, characterized by a variety of clinical and radiographic features, which form the basis for diagnosis. We describe the presentation of an Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of SD. The malformation was successfully treated by decompression of the foramen magnum and elevation of the cerebellum, with complete resolution of pain. We report a rare case of Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient presenting with clinical and radiographic features strongly suggestive of SD and be successfully treated. PMID:27149441

  6. Ectodermal dysplasias: the p63 tail.

    PubMed

    Tadini, G; Santagada, F; Brena, M; Pezzani, L; Nannini, P

    2013-02-01

    Various combinations of limb anomalies, ectodermal dysplasias and orofacial clefts characterize heterozygous mutations in the transcription factor gene p63. The causative gene is crucial during embryonic ontogenesis, mostly in the development of limbs and other ectodermal derived tissues. The pattern of mutations in six different p63-related syndromes (EEC syndrome, AEC syndrome, ADULT syndrome, LMS syndrome, RHS syndrome, SHFM syndrome) shows genotype-phenotype correlations. The most frequent p63 mutation syndrome is the EEC syndrome, characterized by ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate. Ectodermal dysplasia is characterized by ectrodactyly often associated with syndactyly, sparse hair, dry skin, hypo-anodontia, dysplastic nails and alterations in sebaceous glands, mammary glands and nipples. The third hallmark of the EEC syndrome is orofacial clefting, in particular lip and palate. p63 mutations also cause the other five inherited syndromes: symptoms are overlapping, but each of these diseases has its own characteristic phenotypic features: for instance AEC syndrome (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate) has as distinctive feature ankyloblepharon, while mammary glands and nipples hypoplasia are frequent findings in LMS syndrome and in ADULT syndrome (acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth syndrome). The latter can be distinguished from other p63 syndromes by the absence of orofacial clefting and by prominent ectodermal signs. The narrowest genotype-phenotype correlation is in the EEC and AEC syndromes. All EEC missense mutations are clustered in the DNA binding domain and do not bind to DNA; in contrast, all missens mutations reported in AEC syndrome are localized in the α-motif domain, and it has been demonstrated that they disrupt interaction with other proteins. LMS and ADULT syndrome have their own unique mutated amino-acid residues. Only two amino-acid residues are known to be mutated amongst ADULT syndrome: asparagines 6 and

  7. Multiportal Combined Transorbital and Transnasal Endoscopic Resection of Fibrous Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Tham, Tristan; Costantino, Peter; Bruni, Margherita; Langer, David; Boockvar, John; Singh, Prabhjyot

    2015-11-01

    Introduction Historically, access to the anterior skull base was achieved with open procedures. The paradigms to this approach were challenged with the advent of minimally disruptive endoscopic surgical techniques and supporting technology. The next step in the evolution of minimally disruptive surgery was the combination of multiportal endoscopic surgery. Results The patient was an 18-year-old man who presented with right-sided proptosis. Further diagnostic tests revealed a fibrous dysplasia (FD) occupying the skull base and orbit. The lesion was successfully resected. Conclusions The location of the tumor in this case was challenging, in which surgeons at some centers would have opted to have performed as an open procedure instead of endoscopically. The combined transnasal/transorbital approach is an uncommonly used technique that we have used to remove this tumor successfully. The patient also had a unique disease (FD) in a unique location that was treated without complications. This case report highlights how surgeons may use an expanded armamentarium in dealing with complex pathologies. PMID:26623245

  8. Multiportal Combined Transorbital and Transnasal Endoscopic Resection of Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Tristan; Costantino, Peter; Bruni, Margherita; Langer, David; Boockvar, John; Singh, Prabhjyot

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Historically, access to the anterior skull base was achieved with open procedures. The paradigms to this approach were challenged with the advent of minimally disruptive endoscopic surgical techniques and supporting technology. The next step in the evolution of minimally disruptive surgery was the combination of multiportal endoscopic surgery. Results The patient was an 18-year-old man who presented with right-sided proptosis. Further diagnostic tests revealed a fibrous dysplasia (FD) occupying the skull base and orbit. The lesion was successfully resected. Conclusions The location of the tumor in this case was challenging, in which surgeons at some centers would have opted to have performed as an open procedure instead of endoscopically. The combined transnasal/transorbital approach is an uncommonly used technique that we have used to remove this tumor successfully. The patient also had a unique disease (FD) in a unique location that was treated without complications. This case report highlights how surgeons may use an expanded armamentarium in dealing with complex pathologies. PMID:26623245

  9. Exome analysis of connective tissue dysplasia: death and rebirth of clinical genetics?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Golder N

    2014-05-01

    Exome results are reported for two patients with connective tissue dysplasia, one refining a clinical diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos to Marfan syndrome, the other suggesting arthrogryposis derived from maternofetal Stickler syndrome. Patient 1 had mutations in transthyretin (TTR), fibrillin (FBN1), and a calcium channel (CACNA1A) gene suggesting diagnoses of transthyretin amyloidosis, Marfan syndrome, and familial hemiplegic migraines, respectively. Patient 2 presented with arthrogryposis that was correlated with his mother's habitus and arthritis once COL2A1 mutations suggestive of Stickler syndrome were defined. Although DNA results often defy prediction by the best of clinicians, these patients illustrate needs for ongoing clinical scholarship (e.g., to delineate guidelines for management of mutations like that for hyperekplexia in Patient 2) and for interpretation of polygenic change that is optimized by clinical genetic/syndromology experience (e.g., suggesting acetazolamide therapy for Patient 1 and explaining arthrogryposis in Patient 2). PMID:24664531

  10. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: a longitudinal study of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Zaramella, P; Benini, F; Dalla Barba, B; Rossetti, A; Zorzi, C

    1987-01-01

    Of 20 patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), 17 survived (85%) and were followed prospectively up to one year post-term. Lower respiratory tract infections occurred in 12 patients (70.5%), and in 7 (41%) at least one hospital admission was required. At one year post-term follow-up, 9 patient (52.9%) continued to present respiratory symptoms, and 5 out of 13 (38.4%) radiographic changes. Six cases (35%) presented chronic cor pulmonale. Only 6 children (35%) showed normal growth, while the others showed deficits in one or more growth parameters. Cerebral palsy occurred in 41% of the children; 3 cases of severe tetraparesis and 4 of moderately severe palsy (hemiparesis or diplegia). Developmental quotient (DQ) was less than 70 in 6 cases (35%), from 70-90 in 4 (23.5%), and greater than 90 in 7 (41%). The severe neurodevelopmental outcomes were significantly correlated with the presence of important neonatal cerebral pathology (3-4 degrees IVH or periventricular leukomalacia). Retinopathy due to prematurity was diagnosed in 7 patients (41%), and in 5 it progressed to retrolental fibroplasia. Ten cases (58.8%) showed strabism, of which 8 had previous eye background involvement. Hearing deficit was not detected in any patient. Esthetic and functional sequelae consisted of scalp eschar (3 cases), post-thoracotomy scar (1 case), pleural drainage scars (3 cases), nasal deformity due to prolonged intubation (1 case), laryngeal stenosis (1 case), and post-tracheostomy stenosis (1 case).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3443552

  11. Cervical spinal deformity in craniometaphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Yamanaka, T; Tanaka, Y; Nakamura, S

    1987-03-01

    A child with craniometaphyseal dysplasia had the presenting symptoms of progressive quadriparesis. She exhibited proportionate tall stature, peculiar face with craniomegaly, genu valgum, and 46,XX,t(12;18)(q13;q12) chromosome aberration. Delayed physical development and mild mental retardation were also present. Subluxation of C-2 on C-3 and kyphosis of the cervical spine, and myelographic blockage at this level were noted. Treatment consisted of fusion of the C-2 to C5-6 vertebra following laminectomies of C-3 and C-4 with satisfactory results. Early detection and surgery for cervical spine deformity and cord compression are necessary to prevent profound neurological deficits in this disorder. PMID:3810462

  12. Coronary Artery Manifestations of Fibromuscular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Michelis, Katherine C.; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; d’Escamard, Valentina; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) involving the coronary arteries is an uncommon but important condition that can present as acute coronary syndrome, left ventricular dysfunction, or potentially sudden cardiac death. Although the classic angiographic “string of beads” that may be observed in renal artery FMD does not occur in coronary arteries, potential manifestations include spontaneous coronary artery dissection, distal tapering or long, smooth narrowing that may represent dissection, intramural hematoma, spasm, or tortuosity. Importantly, FMD must be identified in at least one other noncoronary arterial territory to attribute any coronary findings to FMD. Although there is limited evidence to guide treatment, many lesions heal spontaneously; thus, a conservative approach is generally preferred. The etiology is poorly understood, but there are ongoing efforts to better characterize FMD and define its genetic and molecular basis. This report reviews the clinical course of FMD involving the coronary arteries and provides guidance for diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:25190240

  13. Fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of gastric dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-06-23

    This study aims to assess the clinical utility of a rapid fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy technique developed for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric precancer during endoscopic examination. We have developed a real-time fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy system capable of simultaneously acquiring both fingerprint (FP) (i.e., 800-1800 cm(-1)) and high-wavenumber (HW) (i.e., 2800-3600 cm(-1)) Raman spectra from gastric tissue in vivo at endoscopy. A total of 5792 high-quality in vivo FP/HW Raman spectra (normal (n = 5160); dysplasia (n = 155), and adenocarcinoma (n = 477)) were acquired in real-time from 441 tissue sites (normal (n = 396); dysplasia (n = 11), and adenocarcinoma (n = 34)) of 191 gastric patients (normal (n = 172); dysplasia (n = 6), and adenocarcinoma (n = 13)) undergoing routine endoscopic examinations. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with leave-one-patient-out cross validation (LOPCV) were implemented to develop robust spectral diagnostic models. The FP/HW Raman spectra differ significantly between normal, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma of the stomach, which can be attributed to changes in proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and the bound water content. PLS-DA and LOPCV show that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy provides diagnostic sensitivities of 96.0%, 81.8% and 88.2%, and specificities of 86.7%, 95.3% and 95.6%, respectively, for the classification of normal, dysplastic and cancerous gastric tissue, superior to either the FP or HW Raman techniques alone. Further dichotomous PLS-DA analysis yields a sensitivity of 90.9% (10/11) and specificity of 95.9% (380/396) for the detection of gastric dysplasia using FP/HW Raman spectroscopy, substantiating its clinical advantages over white light reflectance endoscopy (sensitivity: 90.9% (10/11), and specificity: 51.0% (202/396)). This work demonstrates that the fiber-optic FP/HW Raman spectroscopy technique has great promise for enhancing in vivo diagnosis of gastric

  14. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  15. Use of amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to differentiate cervical dysplasia (CIN).

    PubMed

    Santaella-Verdejo, Arturo; Gallegos, Belem; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro; Zenteno, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    Alterations in O-glycosylation of proteins in cell surfaces can originate disorder in cellular function, as well as in cell transformation and tumoral differentiation. In this work, we investigate changes in O-glycosylation in cervical intraepithelial dysplasia (CIN) at different stages of differentiation (CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III) using lectins specific for O-glycosidically linked glycans. Twenty cases with CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III dysplasias each, and 20 normal cases were studied by lectin histochemistry and evaluated under optical microscopy. The lectins from Glycine max and Griffonia simplicifolia showed no differences in their recognition pattern among the different CIN stages and normal tissue. Dolichos Biflorus lectin recognized CIN I dysplasia. Lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus showed increased reactivity in the presence of CIN II dysplasia, compared with CIN I and CIN III. These results suggest that subtle modifications in the O-glycosylation pattern could be considered in diagnosis or prognosis of cervical precancerous stages. PMID:17516251

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 links) Health Topic: Bone Diseases Health Topic: Dwarfism Health Topic: Immune System and Disorders Health Topic: ... Immune Deficiency Conditions University of Kansas Medical Center: Dwarfism/Short Stature GeneReviews (1 link) Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia ...

  17. Histomorphology of renal dysplasia--an autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Nandita; Menon, Santosh; Radotra, B D

    2006-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of pediatric autopsies in the past 18 years was done with the aim of studying the histomorphology of renal dysplasia. Renal dysplasia comprised 150 (3.66%) of the 4,099 pediatric autopsies from 20 weeks of gestation to 1 year of life. Primitive ducts with the fibromuscular collar, the sine qua non of renal dysplasia, was seen in all cases. Lobar disorganization and cysts were seen in all cases except for the 7 cases of hypodysplasia. Other elements were seen in varying proportions: cartilage in 33.7%, bone in 1.08%, thickening of basement membrane of the primitive ducts in 64.13%, extramedullary hematopoiesis in 98.9%, nerve twigs in 72.8%, and nodular renal blastema in 2.17% cases. In unilateral multicystic dysplasia/renal agenesis, the contralateral kidney showed abnormalities in 44.45% and 47.37% of cases, respectively. PMID:16908457

  18. Contraceptives and dysplasia: higher rate for pill choosers.

    PubMed

    Stern, E; Clark, V A; Coffelt, C F

    1970-07-31

    Among women choosing the pill in preference to other contraceptive methods there is a higher rate of the cancer precursor, dysplasia of the cervix, before any possible effect of the pill. PMID:17739011

  19. Esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett's dysplasia: a case report of double occurrence and prolonged survival after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vats, Hemender S; Banerjee, Tarit K; Resnick, Jeffrey; Khan, Qaseem

    2006-09-01

    A relatively young patient with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), obesity, smoking, and alcohol intake presented with widespread metastatic disease in lymph nodes, liver and lungs from a lower esophageal adenocarcinoma extending into the gastroesophageal junction associated with Barrett's mucosa and dysplasia.A complete response was achieved with six cycles of chemotherapy that sustained for more than 4 years without further recurrence. Unfortunately, there was presence of esophageal metaplasia after complete response which eventually converted to low to high grade dysplasia and ultimately to a second primary localized lower esophageal adenocarcinoma that was treated with thoracoabdominal esophagectomy and lymphadenectomy. No evidence of disease recurrence was seen 2 years later. The pathogenesis of a recent increase in the incidence of GERD, Barrett's esophagus and lower esophageal adenocarcinoma are discussed. Surgery, radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy are effective in the early stages leading to tumor shrinkage and prolongation of life and even cure in some cases. Lower esophageal adenocarcinoma is frequently associated with Barrett's high-grade dysplasia. Since there has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of Barrett's dysplasia, appropriate surveillance with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and preventive strategies, such as the use of aspirin, cyclo-oxygenase II inhibitors and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs known to be chemopreventive agents against colon, esophagus, gastric and bladder cancers, need to be studied. PMID:16988098

  20. A compound heterozygote of novel and recurrent DTDST mutations results in a novel intermediate phenotype of Desbuquois dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, and recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Atsushi; Nishimura, Gen; Futami, Toru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) is required for synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans in cartilage, and its loss-of-function mutations result in recessively inherited chondrodysplasias. The 40 or so DTDST mutations reported to date cause a group of disorders termed the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) group. The group ranges from the mildest recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (r-MED) through the most common DTD to perinatally lethal atelosteogenesis type II and achondrogenesis 1B. Furthermore, the relationship between DTDST mutations, their sulfate transport function, and disease phenotypes has been described. Here we report a girl with DTDST mutations: a compound heterozygote of a novel p.T266I mutation and a recurrent p.DeltaV340 mutation commonly found in severe phenotypes of the DTD group. In infancy, the girl presented with skeletal manifestations reminiscent of Desbuquois dysplasia, another recessively inherited chondrodysplasia, the mutations of which have never been identified. Her phenotype evolved with age into an intermediate phenotype between r-MED and DTD. Considering her clinical phenotypes and known phenotypes of p.DeltaV340, p.T266I was predicted to be responsible for mild phenotypes of the DTD group. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum of DTDST mutations, adding Desbuquois dysplasia to the list of differential diagnosis of the DTD group. PMID:18553123

  1. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with progressive arthropathy associated with subcapsular cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Sanjay Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mondal, Soumya Sarathi; Chatterjee, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda with progressive arthropathy is a form of inherited skeletal dysplasia involving the axial skeleton along with swelling and deformities of the peripheral joints that mimics juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of a 14-year-old school boy who presented with dwarfism, spine deformity, ocular anomaly and peripheral arthropathy with characteristic radiological changes in the vertebrae and multiple other joints. PMID:24862418

  2. Clinical management of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with anodontia: case report.

    PubMed

    Paschos, Ekaterini; Huth, Karin Christine; Hickel, Reinhard

    2002-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare hereditary disorder with a characteristic physiognomy. The case of a 5-year-old child with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and complete anodontia is presented. Because of the anodontia and the need for treatment at an early age, the prosthetic management of such a young child can be difficult. Complete dentures were provided to encourage a normal psychological development and to improve the function of the stomatognathic system. PMID:12413164

  3. Risk factors for cervical dysplasia in Kerala, India.

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, C.; Amma, N. S.; Chitrathara, K.; Dhakad, N.; Rani, P.; Malathy, L.; Nair, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    A study in Kerala, India, confirmed the importance of genital hygiene in the fight against infections that have a role in the development of cervical dysplasia and cancer. Many women cannot afford sanitary pads, while adequate facilities for washing after coitus are often unavailable. Health education, satisfactory living standards, and the empowerment of women are prerequisites for reducing the incidence of cervical dysplasia. PMID:10212523

  4. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  5. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  6. p63 in skin development and ectodermal dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Maranke I.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 is critically important for skin development and maintenance. Processes that require p63 include epidermal lineage commitment, epidermal differentiation, cell adhesion, and basement membrane formation. Not surprisingly, alterations in the p63 pathway underlie a subset of ectodermal dysplasias, developmental syndromes in which the skin and skin appendages do not develop normally. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of p63 in normal development and ectodermal dysplasias. PMID:20445549

  7. Trochleoplasty versus MPFL-Reconstruction in Severe Trochlear Dysplasia. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balcarek, Peter; Friede, Tim; Harden, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is an established operative procedure for the treatment of lateral patellar dislocation yielding good to excellent results with low rates of redislocation. However, few studies indicated less favourable results after an isolated MPFL reconstruction in patients with a severe trochlear dysplasia (Type B-D according to Dejour). In addition, some articles recommended the more invasive and demanding trochleoplasty (TP) as an additional procedure as the treatment of choice for those particular patients but the current literature lacks studies directly comparing both treatment strategies. Thus, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the results of MPFL-reconstruction techniques compared to TP-procedures with special emphasis on severe trochlear dysplasia and to assess the available scientific evidence. Materials and Methods: A systematic review (MEDline) was performed using the following mesh terms: #1. Patellar instability; #2. Patellar dislocation; #3. Patell* dislocation; #4. Trochlear dysplasia; #5. Luxating patella; #6. Luxating patellar; #7. Medial patellofemoral; #8. Medial patello-femoral; #9. Trochleoplasty; #10.Trochleoplasties; #11. MPFL. The final search algorithm (#1 OR #2 OR #3 OR #4 OR #5) AND (#7 OR #8 OR #9 OR #10 OR #11) yielded 425 articles. Two physicians independently screened all articles with decision reached by consensus. After applying the inclusion criteria (human study; MPFL reconstruction or TP procedure; exact documented pre- and postoperative validated knee score; and type of trochlear dysplasia) 8 Studies (2 MPFL studies; 6 TP studies) were available for further analysis. Statistical evaluation was performed with a random-effect meta-analysis including inverse variance weighting of pre- and postoperative mean differences. Results: All available studies were case-series (level of evidence IV). Overall, 419 knees were included in the

  8. Expression of laminin and fibronectin in renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Santosh; Kakkar, Nandita; Radotra, B D

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is a matter of debate. Recent theories have conceptualized the role of extracellular matrix proteins in the genesis of renal dysplasia. During normal nephrogenesis, collagen type I and III and fibronectins are lost and laminin and syndecan appear once proper induction has occurred. Any deviation from the normal pattern is said to lead to dysplasia. In this study, the expressions of adhesive glycoproteins, laminin, and fibronectin were studied immunohistochemically in 25 autopsy cases of renal dysplasia and normal age-matched control cases. These cases of renal dysplasia were categorized into 3 groups based on the period of gestation: 20 to 26 weeks, 27 to 33 weeks, and 34 to 40 weeks. The immunohistochemical findings were graded from 0 to 4+ based on the visual intensity. Chi-square analysis was used to calculate the difference in expressions of laminin and fibronectin in cases and controls as a whole and within and between age groups. Immunostaining for laminin in all age groups showed a significant difference in expression between dysplastic kidneys (less expression) and normal controls (greater expression). In the case of fibronectin expression, all but 1 group showed a significant difference, with dysplastic kidneys showing more and normal controls showing less expression. The inference derived is that laminin expression decreases and fibronectin expression increases in renal dysplasia compared with normal nephrogenesis. PMID:15630524

  9. Systemic connective tissue features in women with fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah; Kim, Esther Sh; Brinza, Ellen; Moran, Rocio; Fendrikova-Mahlay, Natalia; Wolski, Kathy; Gornik, Heather L

    2015-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a non-atherosclerotic disease associated with hypertension, headache, dissection, stroke, and aneurysm. The etiology is unknown but hypothesized to involve genetic and environmental components. Previous studies suggest a possible overlap of FMD with other connective tissue diseases that present with dissections and aneurysms. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of connective tissue physical features in FMD. A total of 142 FMD patients were consecutively enrolled at a single referral center (97.9% female, 92.1% of whom had multifocal FMD). Data are reported for 139 female patients. Moderately severe myopia (29.1%), high palate (33.1%), dental crowding (29.7%), and early-onset arthritis (15.6%) were prevalent features. Classic connective features such as hypertelorism, cleft palate, and hypermobility were uncommon. The frequency of systemic connective tissue features was compared between FMD patients with a high vascular risk profile (having had ⩾1 dissection and/or ⩾2 aneurysms) and those with a standard vascular risk profile. A history of spontaneous pneumothorax (5.9% high risk vs 0% standard risk) and atrophic scarring (17.6% high risk vs 6.8% standard risk) were significantly more prevalent in the high risk group, p<0.05. High palate was observed in 43.1% of the high risk group versus 27.3% in the standard risk group, p=0.055. In conclusion, in a cohort of women with FMD, there was a prevalence of moderately severe myopia, high palate, dental crowding, and early-onset osteoarthritis. However, a characteristic phenotype was not discovered. Several connective tissue features such as high palate and pneumothorax were more prominent among FMD patients with a high vascular risk profile. PMID:26156071

  10. Sclerosing bone dysplasias: genetic, clinical and radiology update of hereditary and non-hereditary disorders.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Cedric; Madani, Hardi; Lenchik, Leon; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Amalnath, Deepak S; de Mey, Johan; De Maeseneer, Michel

    2016-06-01

    There is a wide variety of hereditary and non-hereditary bone dysplasias, many with unique radiographic findings. Hereditary bony dysplasias include osteopoikilosis, osteopathia striata, osteopetrosis, progressive diaphyseal dysplasia, hereditary multiple diaphyseal sclerosis and pyknodysostosis. Non-hereditary dysplasias include melorheostosis, intramedullary osteosclerosis and overlap syndromes. Although many of these dysplasias are uncommon, radiologists should be familiar with their genetic, clinical and imaging findings to allow for differentiation from acquired causes of bony sclerosis. We present an overview of hereditary and non-hereditary bony dysplasias with focus on the pathogenesis, clinical and radiographic findings of each disorder. PMID:26898950

  11. Biomarkers for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in the Preterm Infant

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Lidys; Siddaiah, Roopa; Oji-Mmuo, Christiana; Silveyra, Gabriela R.; Silveyra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants, associated with arrested lung development and a need for supplemental oxygen. Over the past few decades, the incidence of BPD has significantly raised as a result of improved survival of VLBW infants requiring mechanical ventilation. While early disease detection is critical to prevent chronic lung remodeling and complications later in life, BPD is often difficult to diagnose and prevent due to the lack of good biomarkers for identification of infants at risk, and overlapping symptoms with other diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). Due to the current lack of effective treatment available for BPD and PH, research is currently focused on primary prevention strategies, and identification of biomarkers for early diagnosis, that could also represent potential therapeutic targets. In addition, novel histopathological, biochemical, and molecular factors have been identified in the lung tissue and in biological fluids of BPD and PH patients that could associate with the disease phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of biomarkers for pediatric BPD and PH that have been identified in clinical studies using various biological fluids. We also present a brief summary of the information available on current strategies and guidelines to prevent and diagnose BPD and PH, as well as their pathophysiology, risk factors, and experimental therapies currently available. PMID:27065351

  12. Brain somatic mutations in MTOR leading to focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Seok; Lee, Jeong Ho

    2016-02-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type II (FCDII) is a focal malformation of the developing cerebral cortex and the major cause of intractable epilepsy. However, since the molecular genetic etiology of FCD has remained enigmatic, the effective therapeutic target for this condition has remained poorly understood. Our recent study on FCD utilizing various deep sequencing platforms identified somatic mutations in MTOR (existing as low as 1% allelic frequency) only in the affected brain tissues. We observed that these mutations induced hyperactivation of the mTOR kinase. In addition, focal cortical expression of mutant MTOR using in utero electroporation in mice, recapitulated the neuropathological features of FCDII, such as migration defect, cytomegalic neuron and spontaneous seizures. Furthermore, seizures and dysmorphic neurons were rescued by the administration of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. This study provides the first evidence that brain somatic activating mutations in MTOR cause FCD, and suggests the potential drug target for intractable epilepsy in FCD patients. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 71-72]. PMID:26779999

  13. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity associated with intestinal neuronal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Berger, S; Ziebell, P; OFFsler, M; Hofmann-von Kap-herr, S

    1998-09-01

    A close relation between different forms of dysganglionosis such as intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B and aganglionosis has been established. No systematic analysis of other malformations and diseases accompanying IND has been made as yet. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity were analyzed in 109 patients with IND seen at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Mainz from 1977 to 1996. IND was associated with Hirschsprung's disease in 47 cases; 22 children with IND had other abdominal malformations, including anal atresia, rectal stenosis, sigmoidal stenosis, ileal atresia, pyloric stenosis, and esophageal atresia. A cystic bowel duplication, a choledochal cyst, and a persisting urachus were also found. Extra-abdominal malformations such as Down's syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, aortic stenosis, and malformations of vertebral bodies were seen. Twin siblings of children with IND were either healthy (n=3) or died in utero (n=1). Seventeen children with IND developed severe intra-abdominal complications during the perinatal period such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), meconium ileus, or bowel perforations. NEC was frequently associated with preterm birth. Bowel perforations were seen in mature and preterm newborns with IND. Taken together, IND is found in a variety of obstructive bowel diseases. This may support the hypothesis that IND is a secondary phenomenon or that congenital atresias and stenoses of the digestive tract have a pathogenesis similar to that of intestinal innervation disturbances. IND may also be a part of complex malformation patterns since it occurs with a number of extraintestinal and non-obstructive intestinal malformations. PMID:9716673

  14. Aberrant Pulmonary Vascular Growth and Remodeling in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to many other organs, a significant portion of lung development occurs after birth during alveolarization, thus rendering the lung highly susceptible to injuries that may disrupt this developmental process. Premature birth heightens this susceptibility, with many premature infants developing the chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a disease characterized by arrested alveolarization. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in the elucidation of mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development, including extensive data suggesting that impaired pulmonary angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of BPD. Moreover, in addition to impaired vascular growth, patients with BPD also frequently demonstrate alterations in pulmonary vascular remodeling and tone, increasing the risk for persistent hypoxemia and the development of pulmonary hypertension. In this review, an overview of normal lung development will be presented, and the pathologic features of arrested development observed in BPD will be described, with a specific emphasis on the pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Key pathways that promote normal pulmonary vascular development will be reviewed, and the experimental and clinical evidence demonstrating alterations of these essential pathways in BPD summarized. PMID:27243014

  15. Placental IL-10 dysregulation and association with bronchopulmonary dysplasia risk.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Elisabeth C; Kostadinov, Stefan; McLean, Kathryn; Gotsch, Francesca; Venturini, Deborah; Romero, Roberto; Laptook, Abbot R; Sharma, Surendra

    2009-10-01

    Cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid, cord serum, and tracheal aspirate of premature infants suggest a shift toward a proinflammatory state. Cytokines also contribute to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesize that the initiating events for BPD are reflected in the placenta and propose that placental expression of cytokines provide a blueprint of events leading to BPD. This is a retrospective, case-controlled study of placental cytokines of premature infants with (n = 49) and without (n = 49) BPD, matched for gender, birth weight, and year of birth at Women and Infants Hospital between 2003 and 2005. Cytokine expression, including IL-6 and IL-10, was determined by immunohistochemistry in membrane rolls, umbilical cords, and placentas. IL-6 was similarly expressed in all tissues of infants with and without BPD. In contrast, anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was less prominent in the placenta of patients with BPD compared with those without BPD. IL-10 expression in the villous trophoblast layer was associated with a reduced odds ratio of developing BPD (adjusted OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.01-0.70, p = 0.02). These results suggest that a placental balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is crucial to normal lung organogenesis. Importantly, IL-10 seems to be protective against the development of BPD. PMID:19581835

  16. Placental IL-10 dysregulation and association with bronchopulmonary dysplasia risk

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Elisabeth C.; Kostadinov, Stefan; McLean, Kathryn; Gotsch, Francesca; Venturini, Deborah; Romero, Roberto; Laptook, Abbot R.; Sharma, Surendra

    2009-01-01

    Cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid, cord serum, and tracheal aspirate of premature infants suggest a shift toward a pro-inflammatory state. Cytokines also contribute to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesize that the initiating events for BPD are reflected in the placenta and propose that placental expression of cytokines provide a blueprint of events leading to BPD. This is a retrospective, case controlled study of placental cytokines of premature infants with (n=49) and without (n=49) BPD, matched for gender, birthweight and year of birth at Women and Infants Hospital between 2003 and 2005. Cytokine expression, including IL-6 and IL-10, was determined by immunohistochemistry in membrane rolls, umbilical cords, and placentas. IL-6 was similarly expressed in all tissues of infants with and without BPD. In contrast, anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was less prominent in the placenta of patients with BPD compared to those without BPD. IL-10 expression in the villous trophoblast layer was associated with a reduced odds ratio of developing BPD (adjusted Odds Ratio 0.08, 95% confidence interval 0.01–0.70, p=0.02). These results suggest that a placental balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is crucial to normal lung organogenesis. Importantly, IL-10 appears to be protective against the development of BPD. PMID:19581835

  17. S-Nitrosoglutathione Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Murine Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Raffay, Thomas M; Dylag, Andrew M; Di Fiore, Juliann M; Smith, Laura A; Einisman, Helly J; Li, Yuejin; Lakner, Mitchell M; Khalil, Ahmad M; MacFarlane, Peter M; Martin, Richard J; Gaston, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by lifelong obstructive lung disease and profound, refractory bronchospasm. It is observed among survivors of premature birth who have been treated with prolonged supplemental oxygen. Therapeutic options are limited. Using a neonatal mouse model of BPD, we show that hyperoxia increases activity and expression of a mediator of endogenous bronchoconstriction, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase. MicroRNA-342-3p, predicted in silico and shown in this study in vitro to suppress expression of GSNO reductase, was decreased in hyperoxia-exposed pups. Both pretreatment with aerosolized GSNO and inhibition of GSNO reductase attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo among juvenile and adult mice exposed to neonatal hyperoxia. Our data suggest that neonatal hyperoxia exposure causes detrimental effects on airway hyperreactivity through microRNA-342-3p-mediated upregulation of GSNO reductase expression. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that this adverse effect can be overcome by supplementing its substrate, GSNO, or by inhibiting the enzyme itself. Rates of BPD have not improved over the past two decades; nor have new therapies been developed. GSNO-based therapies are a novel treatment of the respiratory problems that patients with BPD experience. PMID:27484068

  18. Diagnostic potential of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy in the stomach: differentiating dysplasia from normal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Teh, S K; Zheng, W; Ho, K Y; Teh, M; Yeoh, K G; Huang, Z

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a molecular vibrational spectroscopic technique that is capable of optically probing the biomolecular changes associated with diseased transformation. The purpose of this study was to explore near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy for identifying dysplasia from normal gastric mucosa tissue. A rapid-acquisition dispersive-type NIR Raman system was utilised for tissue Raman spectroscopic measurements at 785 nm laser excitation. A total of 76 gastric tissue samples obtained from 44 patients who underwent endoscopy investigation or gastrectomy operation were used in this study. The histopathological examinations showed that 55 tissue specimens were normal and 21 were dysplasia. Both the empirical approach and multivariate statistical techniques, including principal components analysis (PCA), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), together with the leave-one-sample-out cross-validation method, were employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classification of Raman spectra between normal and dysplastic gastric tissues. High-quality Raman spectra in the range of 800–1800 cm−1 can be acquired from gastric tissue within 5 s. There are specific spectral differences in Raman spectra between normal and dysplasia tissue, particularly in the spectral ranges of 1200–1500 cm−1 and 1600–1800 cm−1, which contained signals related to amide III and amide I of proteins, CH3CH2 twisting of proteins/nucleic acids, and the C=C stretching mode of phospholipids, respectively. The empirical diagnostic algorithm based on the ratio of the Raman peak intensity at 875 cm−1 to the peak intensity at 1450 cm−1 gave the diagnostic sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 80.0%, whereas the diagnostic algorithms based on PCA-LDA yielded the diagnostic sensitivity of 95.2% and specificity 90.9% for separating dysplasia from normal gastric tissue. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed that the most effective

  19. Evaluation of the hybrid capture 2 assay for detecting anal high-grade dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Stephen E; Lowe, Brian; Rothmann, Thomas; Nazarenko, Irina

    2012-10-01

    Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Test® is FDA approved and is a proven aid in detecting HPV infections of the cervix and as an aid in diagnosing, with cytology, cervical disease. A prospective feasibility study was conducted to determine if HC2 testing has utility when screening for high-grade anal dysplasia (AIN2+). We enrolled 298 patients (45% HIV+) who had AIN2+ screening with cytology, histology and HC2 testing for two specimens: a swab into liquid-based cytology medium and either a swab or a brush collection in specimen transport medium (STM). High-resolution anoscopy was performed on all patients with biopsy of AIN2+ suspicious lesions. Cytology was benign (42%), atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (30%), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (18%), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (1%), ASCUS possibly high-grade dysplasia (1.7%) and nondiagnostic (7%) and 36% had AIN2+ histology. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting AIN2+ histology for any abnormal cytology were 77 and 52%, whereas HC2 sensitivity and specificity were 91 and 40% (p = 0.005 for sensitivity), respectively. There was no significant difference in HC2 sensitivity or specificity between brush and swab or STM and residual cells from cytology. AIN2+ was found in 20% of patients with benign cytology. Only nine AIN2+ specimens were HC2-. This prospective study indicates that HC2 may be useful when screening for anal dysplasia; however, a larger study is recommended. PMID:22234750

  20. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C; Sørensen, S S; Haedersdal, M

    2015-11-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK and delays SCC development in mice. We investigated the effect of repeated PDT over 5 years for primary prophylaxis of skin dysplasia. These data represent an interim analysis of an on-going randomized controlled trial. During 2008-2011, 25 renal transplant recipients with clinically normal skin were randomized to split-side PDT of the face, forearm and hand, the contralateral side serving as untreated control. Patients received PDT on inclusion and at 6-monthly intervals for 5 years. Blinded evaluation was performed at each visit. We found that prophylactic PDT significantly delayed onset of AK compared with untreated skin, p = 0.020. At 3-year follow-up, we observed AK in 63% of patients in untreated skin areas compared with 28% of patients in PDT-treated skin, with a total number of cumulated AKs in untreated skin (n = 43) compared with PDT-treated skin (n = 8), p = 0.005. These preliminary data indicate a novel approach to early prevention of skin dysplasia that may reduce morbidity from multiple AKs and SCCs in OTR. PMID:26018207

  1. Eag1 potassium channels as markers of cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Cindy Sharon; Montante-Montes, Daniel; Saqui-Salces, Milena; Hinojosa, Luz María; Gamboa-Dominguez, Armando; Hernández-Gallegos, Elisabeth; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; Del Rosario Solís-Pancoatl, María; Garcia-Villa, Enrique; Ramírez, Ana; Aguilar-Guadarrama, Ricardo; Gariglio, Patricio; Pardo, Luis A; Stühmer, Walter; Camacho, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Human ether à-go-go 1 (Eag1) potassium channels are potential tumor markers and therapeutic targets for several types of malignancies, including cervical cancer. Estrogens and human papilloma virus oncogenes regulate Eag1 gene expression, suggesting that Eag1 may already be present in pre-malignant lesions. Therefore, Eag1 could be used as an early marker and/or a potential risk indicator for cervical cancer. Consequently, we studied Eag1 protein expression by immunochemistry in cervical cancer cell lines, normal keratinocytes, cervical cytologies from intraepithelial lesions, biopsies from cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN 1, 2 and 3) and in normal smears from patients taking or not taking estrogens. Two hundred and eighty-six samples obtained by liquid-based cytology and fifteen CIN biopsies were studied. We observed Eag1 protein expression in the cervical cancer cell lines, as opposed to normal keratinocytes. Eag1 was found in 67% of the cervical cytologies from low-grade intra-epithelial lesions and in 92% of the samples from high-grade intraepithelial lesions, but only in 27% of the normal samples. Noteworthy, morphologically normal cells obtained from dysplastic samples also exhibited Eag1 expression. In CIN biopsies we found that the higher the grade of the lesion, the broader the Eag1 protein distribution. Almost 50% of the normal patients taking estrogens displayed Eag1 expression. We suggest Eag1 as a potential marker of cervical dysplasia and a risk indicator for developing cervical lesions in patients taking estrogens. Eag1 detection in cervical cancer screening programs should help to improve early diagnosis and decrease mortality rates from this disease. PMID:21887469

  2. Small colonic microsatellite unstable adenocarcinomas and high-grade epithelial dysplasias in sessile serrated adenoma polypectomy specimens: a study of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Neal S

    2006-01-01

    Eight sessile serrated adenoma (SSA), right colon polypectomies with focal invasive adenocarcinoma or high-grade dysplasia were studied to identify features indicating a high risk of transformation and characterize the morphologic features of serrated dysplasia; 6 cases had invasive adenocarcinoma; 2 were high-grade dysplasia. All 8 were microsatellite unstable-high and had absent hMLH1 nuclear immunoreactivity. The mean patient age at polypectomy was 69.5 years (range, 57.1-83.9 years). Mean polyp maximum dimension was 8.5 mm (range, 6-12 mm). The majority of each polyp was nonmalignant SSA. All 8 cases had an abrupt transition from benign to high-grade in situ or invasive malignancy. In the 6 invasive adenocarcinomas, the neoplasm extended directly down into the submucosa without lateral intramucosal spread. The mean maximum dimension of the invasive adenocarcinoma was 2.9 mm (range, 2-4 mm). All 8 cases had high-grade serrated-type dysplasia. The nonmalignant SSAs had marked expansion of the proliferative zone. Crypts adjacent to malignancy had moderately enlarged nuclei, irregular nuclear membranes, and overly prominent nucleoli. SSA crypts were lined by a variety of gastric-type cells; no cell type predominated. Foci of adjacent crypts had similar cytologic features. Small proximal SSAs can transform into adenocarcinoma without a component of adenomatous dysplasia. PMID:16483002

  3. Correlation between bone imaging and the clinical picture in two unsuspected cases of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann's disease).

    PubMed

    D'Addabbo, A; Macarini, L; Rubini, G; Rubini, D; Salzillo, F; Lauriero, F

    1993-04-01

    Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia was incidentally discovered in two patients referred for Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy (one for intense sciatica, the other for the detection of breast cancer metastases). Tracer accumulation in the diaphyses of the lower limbs and the base of the skull was accompanied by bone thickening and patency of the medullary cavity, as demonstrated by radiography, MRI, and bone marrow scanning. Comparison of the clinical pictures with the results of instrumental examinations showed that these were cases of sporadic progressive diaphyseal dysplasia of slight and average gravity, respectively. The differentiation of Ribbing's disease is explained and reference also is made to a finding not mentioned in the literature, namely frontal bone resorption lacunules in one patient. PMID:8482029

  4. Bronchoconstriction following instillation of phenylephrine eye drops in premature infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia: two cases report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee; Choi, Jin Guk; Kwak, Kyung-Hwa

    2015-12-01

    Premature infants requiring an ophthalmic examination or even surgery for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) have a high prevalence of co-existing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Reactive airway is one of the clinical presentations of BPD. We report two cases of bronchoconstriction following instillation of mydriatic eye drops. One occurred during induction of anesthesia for laser photocoagulation and the other before screening of ROP. The most likely cause in each case was phenylephrine eye drops. We recommend that the minimal dosage of phenylephrine needed to attain proper mydriasis should be instilled to infant patients, and the possibility of bronchoconstriction occurrence kept in mind, especially for infants with low body weight with BPD. PMID:26634087

  5. Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy Meeting the Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Revised Criteria? Don't Forget Sarcoidosis!

    PubMed Central

    Vasaturo, Sabina; Ploeg, David E.; Buitrago, Guadalupe; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Veselic-Charvat, Maud

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman was referred for ventricular fibrillation with resuscitation. A CT-angiography showed signs of a right ventricular enlargement without obvious cause. A cardiac MRI demonstrated a dilated and hypokinetic right ventricle with extensive late gadolinium enhancement. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) was suspected according to the "revised ARVD task force criteria". An endomyocardial biopsy was inconclusive. The patient developed purulent pericarditis after epicardial ablation therapy and died of toxic shock syndrome. The post-mortem pathologic examination demonstrated sarcoidosis involving the heart, lungs, and thyroid gland. PMID:25995699

  6. Gastric atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Cyrus R

    2003-01-01

    interrater variability, especially between Western and Japanese pathologists, as to the different grades of dysplasia and early gastric cancer. Recent consensus conferences at Vienna and Padova have resulted in better understanding of what constitutes these lesions, and it is hoped that in the near future agreement between pathologists will improve as a consequence. For the present, it is imperative that clinicians obtain second opinions from two or more expert pathologists on biopsy specimens before arriving at a diagnosis of either low- or high-grade dysplasia. The former histologic diagnosis is tantamount to subjecting the patient to endoscopic surveillance and the latter is tantamount to a decision regarding the resection of the lesion, both decisions being psychologically disturbing for patients. At this time, population screening for H. pylori is not recommended in Western countries, but most experts would agree that H. pylori should be eradicated if detected as part of the appropriate investigation of a clinical disorder such as dyspepsia. Certain other specific conditions may also be considered to be precancerous, such as the gastric remnant after a partial gastrectomy and the gastric mucosa in familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and in familial Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and perhaps Ménétrier disease. PMID:12702963

  7. The surgically remediable syndrome of epilepsy associated with bottom-of-sulcus dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandelstam, Simone A.; Maixner, Wirginia J.; Leventer, Richard J.; Semmelroch, Mira; MacGregor, Duncan; Kalnins, Renate M.; Perchyonok, Yuliya; Fitt, Gregory J.; Barton, Sarah; Kean, Michael J.; Fabinyi, Gavin C.A.; Jackson, Graeme D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine clinical and EEG features that might help identify patients with epilepsy harboring small, intrinsically epileptogenic, surgically treatable, bottom-of-sulcus dysplasias (BOSDs). Methods: Retrospective review of clinical records, EEG, MRI, and histopathology in 32 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and MRI-positive (72% 3.0 tesla), pathologically proven (type 2B cortical dysplasia) BOSDs operated at our centers during 2005–2013. Results: Localization of BOSDs was frontal in 19, insula in 5, parietal in 5, and temporal in 3, on the convexity or interhemispheric surfaces. BOSDs were missed on initial MRI at our centers in 22% of patients. Patients presented with focal seizures during infancy in 9, preschool years in 15, and school years in 8 (median age 5 years). Seizures were stereotyped, predominantly nocturnal, and typically nonconvulsive, with semiology referable to the fronto-central or perisylvian regions. Seizures occurred at high frequency during active periods, but often went into prolonged remission with carbamazepine or phenytoin. Intellect was normal or borderline, except in patients with seizure onset during infancy. Scalp EEG frequently revealed localized interictal epileptiform discharges and ictal rhythms. Patients underwent lesionectomy (median age 14 years) guided by electrocorticography and MRI, with prior intracranial EEG monitoring in only one patient. Twenty-eight patients (88%) became seizure-free, and 20 discontinued antiepileptic medication (median follow-up 4.1 years). Conclusions: In patients with cryptogenic focal epilepsy, this clinical presentation and course should prompt review of or repeat MRI, looking for a BOSD in the frontal, parietal, or insula cortex. If a BOSD is identified, the patient might be considered for single-stage lesionectomy. PMID:25888556

  8. Comparison of open reduction alone and open reduction plus Dega osteotomy in developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Issin, Ahmet; Öner, Ali; Koçkara, Nizamettin; Çamurcu, Yalkin

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip, concentric reduction of the femoral head into the acetabular cavity plays a key role in the natural development of the acetabulum. However, there is still debate on the need for additional acetabular osteotomies and their timing. In this study, we compared open reduction (OR) alone with OR plus Dega osteotomy for acetabular index (AI) development. Twenty patients, 10 in each group, who underwent either OR alone or OR plus Dega osteotomy were studied retrospectively. All patients were diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip and none of them received treatment previously. Preoperative, early postoperative, and follow-up radiographs were gathered, radiological grading was performed according to Tönnis, and AI angles were measured. The OR group had a mean age of 24.5 months, whereas the Dega group had a mean age of 24.8 months. The mean follow-up period of the OR group and Dega group was 57.8 and 66.6 months, respectively. In the OR group, the initial mean AI was 37.5° whereas in the Dega group it was 46°. After the follow-up, despite the acetabular development in the OR group being twice as fast, the final mean AI was 25.5, whereas it was 15.9 in the Dega group. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Using Tönnis' definition, the Dega group ended up with 70% normal hips, 20% mild dysplasia, and 10% severe dysplasia, whereas the OR group had 20% normal hips, 30% mild dysplasia, and 50% severe dysplasia at the final visit. There was no correlation between the initial radiological grading of dislocation and the final result. OR plus Dega osteotomy is a good option to regain acetabular coverage over the femoral head. It provides better radiographic results after a 5-year follow-up period in patients with a mean age of 25 months. OR alone should not be performed unless the child had mildly dysplastic acetabulum according to Tönnis' definition. PMID:26352104

  9. Morphologic studies in the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Sillence, D. O.; Horton, W. A.; Rimoin, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the delineation of the genetic skeletal dysplasias, a heterogeneous group of disorders, that consist of over 80 distinct conditions. Morphologic studies have added a further dimension to the delineation of these conditions, their diagnosis, and the investigation of their pathogenetic mechanisms. In certain diseases, the morphologic alterations are characteristic and pathognomonic. In others only nonspecific alterations are observed, whereas in still other disorders growth-plate structure is essentially normal. Histologic, histochemical, and electronmicroscopic studies of growth-plate cartilage have provided new insights into the complexity of morphogenetic events in normal growth through the demonstration of morphologic defects in the genetic disorders of skeletal growth. As yet, very little is known of the biochemical abnormalities underlying the morphologic abnormalities. However, the great variety of morphologic findings points to a number of different pathogenetic defects in the synthesis, release, and assembly of connective tissue macromolecules and in the cells involved in growth-plate metabolism. Images Figure 4 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 10 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2 PMID:474720

  10. Dentin Dysplasia in Notum Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Read, R W; Hansen, G M; Powell, D R; Kantaputra, P N; Zambrowicz, B; Brommage, R

    2016-07-01

    Secreted WNT proteins control cell differentiation and proliferation in many tissues, and NOTUM is a secreted enzyme that modulates WNT morphogens by removing a palmitoleoylate moiety that is essential for their activity. To better understand the role this enzyme in development, the authors produced NOTUM-deficient mice by targeted insertional disruption of the Notum gene. The authors discovered a critical role for NOTUM in dentin morphogenesis suggesting that increased WNT activity can disrupt odontoblast differentiation and orientation in both incisor and molar teeth. Although molars in Notum(-/-) mice had normal-shaped crowns and normal mantle dentin, the defective crown dentin resulted in enamel prone to fracture during mastication and made teeth more susceptible to endodontal inflammation and necrosis. The dentin dysplasia and short roots contributed to tooth hypermobility and to the spread of periodontal inflammation, which often progressed to periapical abscess formation. The additional incidental finding of renal agenesis in some Notum (-/-) mice indicated that NOTUM also has a role in kidney development, with undiagnosed bilateral renal agenesis most likely responsible for the observed decreased perinatal viability of Notum(-/-) mice. The findings support a significant role for NOTUM in modulating WNT signaling pathways that have pleiotropic effects on tooth and kidney development. PMID:26926082

  11. Classifying functional manifestations of ectodermal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Simeonsson, Rune J

    2009-09-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias (ED) encompass more than 200 conditions involving some combination of disorders of hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands. The incidence of ED is relatively rare affecting about 7 of 10,000 births [Itin and Fistarol (2004)]. Individuals manifesting ED present with a wide range of disorders involving hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands and in many cases other characteristics as well. The complex nature of the disorder has presented challenges for clinical practice and required the involvement of multiple approaches and disciplines. It has also resulted in significant research initiatives on cause and symptomatology. A significant challenge has been the search for comprehensive documentation of the varied and complex manifestations associated with ED. Existing classification systems of ED have focused on physiological and structural dimensions. Classification approaches with a broader focus including characteristics of functioning in persons with ED could facilitate clinical work and research initiatives. In this context, the potential utility of available classifications that address functioning and disability would be appropriate to consider in the search for a consensus classification of ED. To that end, the purpose of this article is to (a) review the status of classification of ED, (b) provide a brief overview of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth, ICF-CY [World Health Organization (2007); International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth. Geneva: WHO.], and (c) identify possible contributions of the ICF-CY to classification of ED's. PMID:19681156

  12. Amolimogene bepiplasmid, a DNA-based therapeutic encoding the E6 and E7 epitopes from HPV, for cervical and anal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2008-12-01

    MGI Pharma Biologics is developing amolimogene bepiplasmid as a potential therapy for HPV-associated diseases, including cervical dysplasia. Amolimogene bepiplasmid is a polymer-encapsulated DNA vaccine consisting of a plasmid expressing a chimeric peptide comprising immunogenic hybrid epitopes from HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 and E7 proteins and an HLA-DRalpha intracellular trafficking peptide. In phase I and I/II clinical trials of ZYC-101 (the precursor of amolimogene bepiplasmid containing a single epitope from HPV-16 E7) in patients with cervical dysplasia and patients with anal dysplasia, ZYC-101 produced significant histological regression and was safe and well tolerated. Results from this trial led to a phase II clinical trial of amolimogene bepiplasmid in patients with cervical dysplasia. This phase II trial demonstrated that treatment with amolimogene bepiplasmid resolution of disease was not significantly superior to placebo except in the predefined group of women who were less than 25 years of age. A phase II/III clinical trial was ongoing at the time of publication examining amolimogene bepiplasmid in this patient population. PMID:19051140

  13. Transmantle dysplasia in tuberous sclerosis: clinical features and surgical outcome in four children.

    PubMed

    Vigliano, Piernanda; Canavese, Carlotta; Bobba, Barbara; Genitori, Lorenzo; Papalia, Francesco; Padovan, Sergio; Forni, Marco

    2002-10-01

    In the literature, several malformations of cortical development have been described as additional lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex. Among these lesions, a very large focal cortical dysplasia has peculiar magnetic resonance imaging features: a signal abnormality that extends radially inward toward the lateral ventricle from the pachygyric cortical surface plus a homogeneous clinical picture. Affected patients have early-onset drug-resistant epilepsy and severe developmental delay. We describe the clinical, genetic, neurophysiologic, and neuroradiologic characteristics of four patients affected by tuberous sclerosis and this type of cortical dysplasia these patients are of special interest because they have been operated on for their dysplastic lesions. Total control of seizures has been achieved in the three children who underwent a complete lesionectomy. This result cannot be permanent, however, because of the presence of other cortical tubers which could become epileptogenic. All things considered, our choice was to give these children at least temporary relief from severe epilepsy and possibly support for developmental progression. PMID:12546430

  14. Substitution of aspartate for glycine 103 of the type II collagen triple helical domain: Identification of the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, D.J.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    Kniest dysplasia is an autosomal dominant chondrodysplasia which results from mutations in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. Characteristics of the disorder include a short trunk and extremities, mid-face hypoplasia, cleft palate, myopia, retinal detachment, and hearing loss. Recently, deletions of all or part of exon 12 have been identified in individuals with Kniest dysplasia, suggesting that mutations within this region of the protein may primarily result in the Kniest dysplasia phenotype. We used SSCP to analyze an amplified genomic DNA fragment containing exon 12 from 7 individuals with Kniest dysplasia. An abnormality was identified in one patient. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the patient was heterozygous for a G to A transition that implied substitution of glycine{sup 103} of the triple helix by aspartate. The mutation was not observed in DNA from either of the proband`s parents. Protein microsequencing demonstrated expression of the abnormal allele in the proband`s cartilage, indicating that the Kniest phenotype results from the presence of abnormal type II collagen molecules in the extracellular matrix. These data demonstrate the minimal mutation which can produce Kniest dysplasia and further support the hypothesis that alteration of a domain which includes the region encoded by exon 12 in the type II collagen protein leads to this disorder. Experiments designed to identify specific effects that mutations in this region have on intermolecular interactions among abnormal type II collagen molecules and other components of the cartilage extracellular matrix may clarify the underlying pathophysiology of Kniest dysplasia.

  15. Ultrasonographic findings of renal dysplasia in cocker spaniels: eight cases.

    PubMed

    Felkai, C; Vörös, K; Vrabély, T; Vetési, F; Karsai, F; Papp, L

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study of eight young Cocker Spaniels aged 9-24 months was performed to describe the ultrasonographic findings of histologically confirmed renal dysplasia. Ultrasonography revealed kidneys of significantly (p < 0.001) reduced volume in all dogs. During qualitative evaluation, two different types of sonographic alterations could be seen. In one type of the ultrasound alterations, corticomedullary demarcation was distinct and the renal cortex was remarkably thin, which was best seen in the dorsal (frontal) imaging plane. In the other type of the ultrasound appearance, overall increased echogenicity with poor corticomedullary demarcation was noticed, and the kidneys could hardly be separated from their surroundings. These features were best recognised in the sagittal (coronal) imaging plane. In one dog with secondary hypercalcaemia, a hyperechoic corticomedullary area was also seen. Post-mortem histological diagnosis revealed renal dysplasia and secondary fibrosis. Based on ultrasound findings alone, renal dysplasia (renal familial disease) can be suspected when small kidneys with thin echogenic cortex are present in young dogs. An ultrasound image, similar to that of fibrotic kidneys (increased overall echogenicity and reduced corticomedullary definition) cannot be differentiated from chronic inflammatory disease and from end-stage kidneys. Therefore, ultrasound-guided biopsy or post-mortem histology is necessary for the definitive diagnosis of renal dysplasia. This is the first study reporting on the ultrasound appearance of renal dysplasia in Cocker Spaniel dogs. PMID:9557317

  16. An Attenuated Adenovirus, ONYX-015, As Mouthwash Therapy for Premalignant Oral Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Charles M.; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.; Silverman, Sol; Recant, Wendy; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Stenson, Kirsten; Lippman, Scott M.; Hong, Waun Ki; Vokes, Everett E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dysplastic lesions of the oral epithelium are known precursors of oral cancer. A significant proportion of oral dysplastic lesions have functional defects in p53 response pathways. The ONYX-015 adenovirus is selectively cytotoxic to cells carrying defects in p53-dependent signaling pathways. The current study sought to establish the feasibility and activity of ONYX-015 administered topically as a mouthwash to patients with clinically apparent and histologically dysplastic lesions of the oral mucosa. Patients and Methods A total of 22 patients (19 assessable patients) were enrolled onto the study. ONYX-015 was administered on three different schedules to consecutive cohorts. Biopsies of the involved mucosa were performed to evaluate histologic response and changes in expression of putative markers of malignant potential, including p53, cyclin D1, and Ki-67. Serology was performed to measure antiadenoviral titers. Results Histologic resolution of dysplasia was seen in seven (37%) of 19 patients, and the grade of dysplasia improved in one additional patient. The majority of responses were transient. No toxicity greater than grade 2 (febrile episode in one patient) was observed. Only one of seven patients demonstrated an increase in circulating antiadenoviral antibody titer while on therapy. Although responding and resistant lesions had similar mean p53 staining at baseline, histologic response correlated with a decrease in p53 positivity over time. Significant changes in cyclin D1 or Ki-67 were not observed. Viral replication was confirmed in two of three lesions examined. Conclusion This novel approach to cancer prevention is tolerable, feasible, and has demonstrable activity. PMID:14597742

  17. The birth prevalence rates for the skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Orioli, I M; Castilla, E E; Barbosa-Neto, J G

    1986-08-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the prevalence rates at birth of the skeletal dysplasias that can be recognised in the perinatal period. Using the data base of the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), for the years 1978 to 1983, on 349 470 births (live and stillbirths), a crude prevalence rate of 2.3/10 000 was observed. However, several indications of under-registration suggest that the real value is about twice that observed. The most frequent types of skeletal dysplasia were achondroplasia, with a prevalence rate between 0.5 and 1.5/10 000 births, the thanatophoric dysplasia/achondrogenesis group (0.2 and 0.5/10 000 births), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.4/10 000 births). The mutation rate for autosomal dominant achondroplasia was estimated at between 1.72 and 5.57 X 10(-5) per gamete per generation. PMID:3746832

  18. Ultrasonography and developmental dysplasia of the infant hip.

    PubMed

    Grissom, L E; Harcke, H T

    1999-02-01

    Hip sonography has been developed, refined, and critiqued for over 18 years. It is now widely accepted as a highly sensitive and useful technique for both the diagnosis and management of developmental dysplasia of the infant hip. Controversy continues surrounding the issue of when and how often hip sonography should be performed. Currently, clinical screening of newborns is the standard of care in the United States, with sonography employed selectively based on clinical findings. Universal ultrasound screening has been used in some countries and is under consideration by many investigators, using a variety of algorithms. This review will focus on recent reports dealing with issues of screening for developmental dysplasia of the infant hip and also will highlight techniques suggested for use in the treatment of development dysplasia of the infant hip. PMID:10084087

  19. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN CAIRN TERRIERS WITH PRECLINICAL RENAL DYSPLASIA

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Gabriela S.; Rhodes, James; Cianciolo, Rachel; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia is a hereditary disease characterized by abnormal differentiation of renal tissue. The ultrasonographic appearance of dysplastic canine kidneys has been reported in the late stage of the disease where inflammatory and degenerative changes are already present and the dogs are in chronic renal failure. In this study, we describe the ultrasonographic appearance of the kidneys of five related Cairn Terriers affected with renal dysplasia before the onset of clinical or laboratory evidence of renal failure. Common findings included poor corticomedullary definition and multifocal hyperechoic speckles in the renal medulla, or a diffusely hyperechoic medulla. Severity of ultrasonographic changes was related to the severity of histopathologic findings. The ability to detect dysplastic changes before clinical signs develop makes ultrasound a potentially useful screening method for canine renal dysplasia. PMID:20806879

  20. Canine Hip Dysplasia is Predictable by Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Gang; Zhou, Zhengkui; Wang, Yachun; Zhao, Keyan; Zhu, Lan; Lust, George; Hunter, Linda; Friedenberg, Steven; Li, Junya; Zhang, Yuan; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Paul; Sandler, Jody; Krotscheck, Ursula; Todhunter, Rory; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective To establish a predictive method using whole genome genotyping for early intervention in canine hip dysplasia (CHD) risk management, for the prevention of the progression of secondary osteoarthritis (OA), and for selective breeding. Design Two sets of dogs (6 breeds) were genotyped with dense SNPs covering the entire canine genome. The first set contained 359 dogs upon which a predictive formula for genomic breeding value (GBV) was derived by using their estimated breeding value (EBV) of the Norberg angle (a measure of CHD) and their genotypes. To investigate how well the formula would work for an individual dog with genotype only (without using EBV or phenotype), a cross validation was performed by masking the EBV of one dog at a time. The genomic data and the EBV of the remaining dogs were used to predict the GBV for the single dog that was left out. The second set of dogs included 38 new Labrador retriever dogs, which had no pedigree relationship to the dogs in the first set. Results The cross validation showed a strong correlation (r>0.7) between the EBV and the GBV. The independent validation showed a strong correlation (r=0.5) between GBV for the Norberg angle and the observed Norberg angle (no EBV was available for the new 38 dogs). Sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive value of the genomic data were all above 70%. Conclusions Prediction of CHD from genomic data is feasible, and can be applied for risk management of CHD and early selection for genetic improvement to reduce the prevalence of CHD in breeding programs. The prediction can be implemented before maturity, at which age current radiographic screening programs are traditionally applied, and as soon as DNA is available. PMID:21215318

  1. Tumours and dysplasias of the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, J. F.; Misdorp, W.

    1974-01-01

    As mammary tumours occur frequently in the dog and cat but rarely in other domestic animals, only the tumours of these two species are classified. The epithelial tumours are termed “complex” when they consist of cells resembling both secretory and myoepithelial cells: these tumours are biologically less malignant than tumours of the “simple” type in which only one of these kinds of cell is present. The carcinomas are subdivided into adenocarcinoma, solid carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma. The term “carcinosarcoma or malignant mixed tumour” was used only when there were cells morphologically resembling not only one or both of the epithelial components but also connective tissue cells with their products of differentiation. The benign tumours are classed as adenoma, papilloma, fibroadenoma, or benign soft tissue tumour. The dysplasias are described under the following headings: cyst, adenosis, regular typical epithelial proliferation in ducts and lobules (epitheliosis), duct ectasia, fibrosclerosis, and lobular hyperplasia. ImagesFig. 41Fig. 42Fig. 43Fig. 44Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 45Fig. 46Fig. 47Fig. 48Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36 PMID:4371737

  2. Mechanisms of Lung Injury and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Alan H

    2016-09-01

    Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most frequent adverse outcome for infants born at < 30 weeks gestational age, there remain major gaps in understanding the pathophysiology, and thus there are few effective targeted therapies to prevent and treat BPD. This review will focus on the substantial problems and knowledge gaps for the clinician and investigator when considering lung injury and BPD. The epidemiology of BPD is clear: BPD is a lung injury syndrome predominantly in extremely low-birth-weight infants with an incidence that increases as gestation/birth weight decrease, with growth restriction, in males and with fetal exposures and with injury from postdelivery respiratory care. However, we do not have a good definition of BPD that identifies the infants that die of respiratory disease before 36 weeks or that predicts long-term outcomes as well. The injury resulting in BPD likely begins as altered lung development before delivery in many infants (small for gestational age, chorioamnionitis, tobacco exposure), can be initiated by resuscitating at birth, and then amplified by postnatal exposures (oxygen, mechanical ventilation, infection). Conceptually the events leading to BPD are the continued interplay of lung development that is altered progressively by injury and repair to result in poorly defined phenotypes of BPD. The injury pathways prominently cause inflammation, and as a proof of principle, corticosteroids can decrease the incidence and severity of BPD, as demonstrated by three recent trials of the early use of steroids. There are likely "adaptation" and "tolerance" responses that modulate the injury and repair to increase or decrease the damage, interactions that are not understood. BPD is a more complex disease. PMID:27603539

  3. Developmental dysplasia of the hip: usefulness of next generation genomic tools for characterizing the underlying genes - a mini review.

    PubMed

    Basit, S; Hannan, M A; Khoshhal, K I

    2016-07-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common skeletal anomalies. DDH encompasses a spectrum of the disorder ranging from minor acetabular dysplasia to irreducible dislocation, which may lead to premature arthritis in later life. Involvement of genetic factors underlying DDH became evident when several studies reported chromosomal loci linked to DDH in families with multiple affected individuals. Moreover, using association studies, variants in genes involved in chondrogenesis and joint formation have been shown to be associated with DDH. At least, one study identified a pathogenic variant in the chemokine receptor gene in DDH. No genetic analysis has been reported or carried out in DDH patients from the Middle East. Here, we review the literature related to genetics of DDH and emphasized the usefulness of new generation technologies in identifying genetic variants underlying DDH in consanguineous families. PMID:26842108

  4. A compound heterozygote harboring novel and recurrent DTDST mutations with intermediate phenotype between atelosteogenesis type II and diastrophic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Koichi; Miyamoto, Yoshinari; Sawai, Hideaki; Karniski, Lawrence P; Nakashima, Eiji; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2006-06-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) is a sulfate transporter required for the synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans in the cartilage. Over 30 mutations have been described in the DTDST gene, which result in a continuous clinical spectrum of recessively inherited chondrodysplasias, including, in order of increasing severity, a recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED), diastrophic dysplasia (DTD), atelosteogenesis type II (AO-II) and achondrogenesis 1B (ACG-1B). Correlation between disease severity and residual sulfate transport activity has been reported. Here we report a patient with DTDST mutations, whose manifestations fell in a range between AO-II and DTD. The patient was a compound heterozygote for the recurrent c.835C>T (p.R279W) and novel c.1987G>A (p.G663R) mutations. Immunocytochemical analysis in HEK293 cells showed that the p.G663R mutation was localized within the cytoplasm, and not to the cell membrane, suggesting p.G663R is a loss-of-function mutation. Our case supports the previously described correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the putative level of residual transport function. PMID:16642506

  5. Real-time depth-resolved Raman endoscopy for in vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Ho, Khek Yu; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Teh, Ming; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational analytic technique sensitive to the changes in biomolecular composition and conformations occurring in tissue. With our most recent development of depth-resolved near-infrared (NIR) Raman endoscopy integrated with on-line diagnostic algorithms, in vivo real-time epithelial diagnostics has been realized under multimodal wide-field imaging (i.e., white- light reflectance (WLR), narrow-band imaging (NBI), autofluorescence imaging (AFI)) modalities. A selection of 43 patients who previously underwent Raman endoscopy (n=146 spectra) was used to render a robust model based on partial least squares - discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus. The Raman endoscopy technique was validated prospectively on 2 new esophageal patients for in vivo tissue diagnosis. The Raman endoscopic technique could identify esophageal high-grade dysplasia in vivo with an accuracy of 85.9% (sensitivity: 91.3% (21/23): specificity 83.3% (40/48)) on spectrum basis. This study realizes for the first time depth-resolved Raman endoscopy for real-time in vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett's epithelium at the biomolecular level.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic overlap between atelosteogenesis type 2 and diastrophic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; van der Harten, H J; Beemer, F A; Kleijer, W J; Gitzelmann, R; Steinmann, B; Superti-Furga, A

    1996-12-01

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene DTDST have been associated with a family of chondrodysplasias that comprises, in order of increasing severity, diastrophic dysplasia (DTD), atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO2), and achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG1B). To learn more about the molecular basis of DTDST chondrodysplasias and about genotype-phenotype correlations, we studied fibroblast cultures of three new patients: one with AO-2, one with DTD, and one with an intermediate phenotype (AO2/DTD). Reduced incorporation of inorganic sulfate into macromolecules was found in all three. Each of the three patients was found to be heterozygous for a c862t transition predicting a R279W substitution in the third extracellular loop of DTDST. In two patients (DTD and AO2/DTD), no other structural mutation was found, but polymerase chain reaction amplification and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of fibroblast cDNA showed reduced mRNA levels of the wild-type DTDST allele: these two patients may be compound heterozygotes for the "Finnish" mutation (as yet uncharacterized at the DNA level), which causes reduced expression of DTDST. The third patient (with AO2) had the R279W mutation compounded with a novel mutation, the deletion of cytosine 418 (delta c418), predicting a frameshift with premature termination. Also the delta c418 allele was underrepresented in the cDNA, in accordance with previous observations that premature stop codons reduce mRNA levels. The presence of the DTDST R279W mutation in a total of 11 patients with AO2 or DTD emphasizes the overlap between these conditions. This mutation has not been found so far in 8 analyzed ACG1B patients, suggesting that it allows some residual activity of the sulfate transporter. PMID:8931695

  7. Experience of a skeletal dysplasia registry in Turkey: a five-years retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Sukur, Eda Didem; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Utine, Gülen Eda; Boduroglu, Koray; Alanay, Yasemin

    2015-09-01

    This study shares data on 417 patients with genetic disorders of skeleton including 10 fetal autopsies encountered in a 5-year period at a tertiary university hospital in Ankara, Turkey. We included patients with osteochondrodysplasias, excluding overgrowth syndromes, dysostoses, and craniofacial syndromes. When grouped according to the "International Skeletal Dysplasia Society 2010 classification" the most frequent group is "FGFR3 group" (achondroplasia). "Decreased bone density group" takes the second place, consistent with the literature. We also demonstrated, a relatively higher frequency of recessively inherited skeletal dysplasias when the diagnosis is an entity other than achondroplasia or osteogenesis imperfecta. The literature on the incidence of genetic disorders of skeleton from the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean is limited to fetal and neonatal autopsies or birth prevelance reports. The higher rate of consanguineous marriages which increases the frequency of autosomal recessive entities makes it difficult to apply data from other parts of the world. Total consanguinity rate among parents in our study was 53% and there were regional differences. The highest (79%) was among parents from South-east Anatolia. This study is the first broad retrospective analysis of genetic disorders of skeleton from our region. We aim to provide a descriptive source for future studies and discuss our findings in comparison to reports from other parts of the world. PMID:25931420

  8. Respiratory complications in children with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed

    Harding, C O; Green, C G; Perloff, W H; Pauli, R M

    1990-01-01

    Mild respiratory distress at birth is a common occurrence in infants with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) while severe respiratory insufficiency and death have been reported only rarely. We describe three infants with SEDC who experienced severe respiratory complications and required tracheostomies. Two of these infants have also needed long-term continuous positive airway pressure to maintain adequate ventilation. The features and clinical course of these children are described, previous reports of respiratory complications in SEDC are summarized, mechanisms resulting in respiratory problems in SEDC are postulated, and comparison is made with mechanisms giving rise to respiratory risks in other skeletal dysplasias. PMID:2388781

  9. Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (Trevor disease) in the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Ozan, Fırat; Doğar, Fatih; Gürbüz, Kaan; Ekinci, Yakup; Bilal, Ökkeş; Öncel, Eyyüp Sabri

    2016-01-01

    Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica, also termed Trevor disease, is a rare disorder that, although benign in nature, can be locally aggressive, particularly when affecting the ankle joint, which is the joint most frequently affected, followed by the knee. The female:male ratio is 1:3, and it is generally diagnosed between 2 and 14 years of age. Surgical treatment with complete resection is recommended before irreversible joint damage and deformity occurs. We presented a case in which dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica was diagnosed on the medial aspect of a right ankle joint. PMID:27103813

  10. Skeletal Dysplasias That Cause Thoracic Insufficiency in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    İpek, Mehmet Sah; Akgul Ozmen, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with various abnormalities of the skeleton. Some of them are perinatally lethal and can be diagnosed at birth. Lethality is usually due to thoracic underdevelopment and lung hypoplasia. A correct diagnosis and typing of the skeletal disorder is essential for the prognosis as is genetic counseling of the family. A retrospective review of 12 cases of clinico-radiologic diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia, leading to thoracic insufficiency, was conducted. We aimed to make differential diagnosis with special emphasis on radiological findings, and to emphasize the importance of parental counseling. PMID:27057899

  11. Dental management of oculodentodigital dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aminabadi, Naser A; Pourkazemi, Maryam; Oskouei, Sina G; Jamali, Zahra

    2010-06-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is an extremely rare autosomal dominant pleiotropic disorder. The syndrome is characterized by abnormal facial features, central nervous system involvement, syndactyly and clinodactyly of fourth and fifth fingers, dry and lusterless hair, generalized enamel hypoplasia and odontodysplasia. Combination of odontodysplasia, poor oral hygiene, and parental neglect can lead to extensive destruction of tooth structure and the treatment options become limited. Early diagnosis with a proper treatment plan and meticulous oral hygiene program helps eliminate the necessity of multiple tooth extractions. This case report describes the comprehensive dental treatment aimed at rehabilitation of function and aesthetics of the dentition in an 8-year-old boy with oculodentodigital dysplasia. PMID:20587963

  12. Multicystic renal dysplasia in a Japanese black bull.

    PubMed

    Ushigaki, K; Uchida, K; Murakami, T; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S

    1999-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia was found in a 6-day-old Japanese black bull. Grossly, both kidneys were markedly small (2.0 x 3.5 cm) with numerous cysts ranging from 1 to 8 mm in diameter. Histopathologically, both kidneys consisted of many irregularly enlarged cysts, immature glomeruli, small ducts and anomalous stromal connective tissues containing focal persistent mesenchyme characterized by a proliferation of stellate cells with myxomatous area. These features are compatible with those of multicystic renal dysplasia in humans and other mammals. PMID:10458111

  13. Karyotyping, dermatoglyphic, and sweat pore analysis of five families affected with ectodermal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Manpreet; Kale, Alka D; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary ectodermal dysplasia is a genetic recessive trait characterized by hypohydrosis, hypotrichosis, and hypodontia. The affected individual show characteristic physiognomy like protruded forehead, depressed nasal bridge, periorbital wrinkling, protruded lips, etc. There is marked decrease in sweat and salivary secretion. Due to skin involvement palm and sole ridge patterns are disrupted. Aim: In this study an attempt has been made to classify the affected members according to the degree of penetrance by pedigree analysis and also study karyotyping for cytogenetics, dermatoglyphic analysis for the various ridge patterns and variations in the number of sweat glands by sweat pore analysis in affected individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of five families who were affected with ectodermal dysplasia were considered. Pedigree analysis was drawn up to three generation by obtaining history. Dermatoglyphics and sweat pore analysis was done by obtaining palm and finger print impression using stamp pad ink. Karyotyping was done by collecting 3–5 ml peripheral blood. Karyotyping was prepared using lymphocyte culture. Chromosomes were examined at 20 spreads selected randomly under ×100 magnification. Results were analyzed by calculating mean values and percentage was obtained. Results: Karyotyping did not show any abnormalities, dermatoglyphic analysis and sweat pore counts showed marked variations when compared with normal. Moreover, pedigree analysis confirmed the status of the disease as that of the recessive trait. Conclusion: Large number of affected patients needs to be evaluated for dermatoglypic analysis. Genetic aspect of the disease needs to be looked into the molecular level in an attempt to locate the gene locus responsible for ectodermal dysplasia and its manifestation. PMID:23248471

  14. Pathogenetics of alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Gambin, Tomasz; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Akdemir, Kadir Caner; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Schuette, Jennifer; Godiwala, Nihal; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Sebastian, Jessica; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Surti, Urvashi; Abellar, Rosanna G; Bateman, David A; Wilson, Ashley L; Markham, Melinda H; Slamon, Jill; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Palomares, María; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; Wong, Wai-Lap; Chu, Yoyo Wing Yiu; Mok, Gary Tsz Kin; Kerem, Eitan; Reiter, Joel; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Anderson, Scott A; Kelly, David R; Shieh, Joseph; Rosenthal, Taryn C; Scheible, Kristin; Steiner, Laurie; Iqbal, M Anwar; McKinnon, Margaret L; Hamilton, Sara Jane; Schlade-Bartusiak, Kamilla; English, Dawn; Hendson, Glenda; Roeder, Elizabeth R; DeNapoli, Thomas S; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Wolff, Daynna J; Wagner, Carol L; Yeung, Alison; Francis, David; Fiorino, Elizabeth K; Edelman, Morris; Fox, Joyce; Hayes, Denise A; Janssens, Sandra; De Baere, Elfride; Menten, Björn; Loccufier, Anne; Vanwalleghem, Lieve; Moerman, Philippe; Sznajer, Yves; Lay, Amy S; Kussmann, Jennifer L; Chawla, Jasneek; Payton, Diane J; Phillips, Gael E; Brosens, Erwin; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Maystadt, Isabelle; Fisher, Richard; Sebire, Neil; Male, Alison; Chopra, Maya; Pinner, Jason; Malcolm, Girvan; Peters, Gregory; Arbuckle, Susan; Lees, Melissa; Mead, Zoe; Quarrell, Oliver; Sayers, Richard; Owens, Martina; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Lioy, Janet; McKay, Eileen; de Leeuw, Nicole; Feenstra, Ilse; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Elmslie, Frances; Thiruchelvam, Timothy; Bacino, Carlos A; Langston, Claire; Lupski, James R; Sen, Partha; Popek, Edwina; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2016-05-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACDMPV) is a lethal lung developmental disorder caused by heterozygous point mutations or genomic deletion copy-number variants (CNVs) of FOXF1 or its upstream enhancer involving fetal lung-expressed long noncoding RNA genes LINC01081 and LINC01082. Using custom-designed array comparative genomic hybridization, Sanger sequencing, whole exome sequencing (WES), and bioinformatic analyses, we studied 22 new unrelated families (20 postnatal and two prenatal) with clinically diagnosed ACDMPV. We describe novel deletion CNVs at the FOXF1 locus in 13 unrelated ACDMPV patients. Together with the previously reported cases, all 31 genomic deletions in 16q24.1, pathogenic for ACDMPV, for which parental origin was determined, arose de novo with 30 of them occurring on the maternally inherited chromosome 16, strongly implicating genomic imprinting of the FOXF1 locus in human lungs. Surprisingly, we have also identified four ACDMPV families with the pathogenic variants in the FOXF1 locus that arose on paternal chromosome 16. Interestingly, a combination of the severe cardiac defects, including hypoplastic left heart, and single umbilical artery were observed only in children with deletion CNVs involving FOXF1 and its upstream enhancer. Our data demonstrate that genomic imprinting at 16q24.1 plays an important role in variable ACDMPV manifestation likely through long-range regulation of FOXF1 expression, and may be also responsible for key phenotypic features of maternal uniparental disomy 16. Moreover, in one family, WES revealed a de novo missense variant in ESRP1, potentially implicating FGF signaling in the etiology of ACDMPV. PMID:27071622

  15. Florid Cemento-osseous Dysplasia: A Case of Misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Delai, Débora; Bernardi, Anarela; Felippe, Gabriela Santos; da Silveira Teixeira, Cleonice; Felippe, Wilson Tadeu; Santos Felippe, Mara Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) belongs to the group of fibro-osseous lesions in which normal bone is replaced by fibrous connective tissue and calcified cementum tissue of the avascular type. Among the various types of fibro-osseous lesions, FCOD is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in clinical practice and may involve 3 or 4 of the quadrants. FCOD is located in the periapical regions of teeth, and the lesions are predominantly radiolucent (osteolytic phase), become mixed over time (cementoblast phase), and ultimately become radiopaque (osteogenic phase) with a thin radiolucent peripheral halo. The characteristics of FCOD in the initial stages are similar to those of periapical lesions of inflammatory origin, which may lead to misdiagnosis. A 38-year-old woman sought dental care because of complaints of pain on the right side of her face. A clinical examination revealed no marked alterations; a panoramic radiograph was therefore requested and revealed the presence of radiolucent lesions associated with the periapical regions of some of the lower teeth. Thus, the professional referred the patient for endodontic treatment of the associated teeth with the justification that the lesions were of endodontic origin. However, the endodontist found that the teeth responded positively to a sensitivity test. The initial diagnosis could have resulted in unnecessary root canal treatment, but after careful clinical, radiographic, and tomographic assessments by different professionals, FCOD was diagnosed, conservatively treated, and regularly monitored. It is important that dentists have a basic knowledge of the various injuries that affect the jaw bones to prevent errors in diagnosis and treatment and to promote oral health. PMID:26410152

  16. Treatment and prevention of hip dysplasia in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Judd, Julia; Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip in the infant are uniform, with consensus that diagnostic ultrasound and Pavlik harness management are standard procedures. Sequential procedures for failed early treatment, residual dysplasia and late diagnosis are dependent on the age and the severity of the dysplasia. This paper reviews the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip from birth to subsequent follow-up procedures, with particular reference to some of the senior authors' research and the Southampton approach to the management of hip dysplasia. PMID:25218939

  17. Dental perspectives in fibrous dysplasia and McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Boyce, Alison M; Collins, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (FD), endocrine disorders, and café-au-lait skin pigmentation. Ninety percent of MAS patients have FD lesions in the craniofacial area, resulting in significant orofacial deformity, dental disorders, bone pain, and compromised oral health. Maxillomandibular FD is also associated with dental developmental disorders, malocclusion, and high caries index. There are limited data on the outcomes of dental treatments in maxillomandibular FD/MAS patients, because clinicians and researchers have limited access to patients, and there are concerns that dental surgery may activate quiescent jaw FD lesions to grow aggressively. This report highlights current perspectives on dental management issues associated with maxillomandibular FD within the context of MAS. PMID:23953425

  18. Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia: Focus on current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Lekakos, Leonidas; Karidis, Nikolaos P; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Tsigris, Christos; Kouraklis, Gregory; Nikiteas, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    High-grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the critical step before invasive esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although its natural history remains unclear, an aggressive therapeutic approach is usually indicated. Esophagectomy represents the only treatment able to reliably eradicate the neoplastic epithelium. In healthy patients with reasonable life expectancy, vagal-sparing esophagectomy, with associated low mortality and low early and late postoperative morbidity, is considered the treatment of choice for BE with HGD. Patients unfit for surgery should be managed in a less aggressive manner, using endoscopic ablation or endoscopic mucosal resection of the entire BE segment, followed by lifelong surveillance. Patients eligible for surgery who present with a long BE segment, multifocal dysplastic lesions, severe reflux symptoms, a large fixed hiatal hernia or dysphagia comprise a challenging group with regard to the appropriate treatment, either surgical or endoscopic. PMID:22072848

  19. Dental Perspectives in Fibrous Dysplasia and McCune-Albright Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akintoye, Sunday O.; Boyce, Alison M.; Collins, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD), endocrine disorders and café-au-lait skin pigmentation. Ninety percent of MAS patients have FD lesions in the craniofacial area, resulting in significant orofacial deformity, dental disorders, bone pain and compromised oral health. Maxillo-mandibular FD is also associated with dental developmental disorders, malocclusion, and high caries index. There is limited data on the outcomes of dental treatments in maxillo-mandibular FD/MAS patients, because clinicians and researchers have limited access to patients, and there are concerns that dental surgery may activate quiescent jaw FD lesions to grow aggressively. This report highlights current perspectives on dental management issues associated with maxillo-mandibular FD within the context of MAS. PMID:23953425

  20. A novel mutation in the EDAR gene causes severe autosomal recessive hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, Emil; Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Lildballe, Dorte Launholt; Jensen, Peter Kjestrup Axel

    2014-08-01

    We report on a 2-year-old girl presenting with a severe form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED). The patient presented with hypotrichosis, anodontia, hypohidrosis, frontal bossing, prominent lips and ears, dry, pale skin, and dermatitis. The patient had chronic rhinitis with malodorous nasal discharge. The girl was the second born child of first-cousin immigrants from Northern Iraq. A novel homozygous mutation (c.84delC) in the EDAR gene was identified. This mutation most likely causes a frameshift in the protein product (p.S29fs*74). This results in abolition of all ectodysplasin-mediated NF-kB signalling. This complete loss-of-function mutation likely accounts for the severe clinical abnormalities in ectodermal structures in the described patient. PMID:24764207

  1. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. I. Quantification of hypoplasia and dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    In order to assess the relative effects of abnormal ureteric orifice position and abnormal urodynamics on the morphogenesis of hypoplasia and dysplasia in kidneys obtained from infants, we devised a method of quantifying the renal structures. The method was based on radial glomerular counts which ranged from zero to normal (seven to nine), a score for dysplastic structures, and the ratio of normal to abnormal tissues present. These three values, when plotted against each other, correlated closely. The glomerular count, with occasional minor adjustment for inconsistencies, was the best parameter of hypodysplasia. Severe to moderate grades of hypodysplasias fell in the low and middle ranges and hypoplasia through to normal in the highest range. By grading kidneys in this way, we were able to compare the effects of ureteral ectopy and abnormal urinary dynamics on the developing kidney. PMID:7024184

  2. DNA methylation as an adjunct to histopathology to detect prevalent, inconspicuous dysplasia and early-stage neoplasia in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Muhammad A; Liu, Xinxue; O’Donovan, Maria; Newton, Richard; Wernisch, Lorenz; Shannon, Nicholas B; Shariff, Kareem; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Ragunath, Krish; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endoscopic surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is problematic because dysplasia/early-stage neoplasia are frequently invisible and likely to be missed due to sampling bias. Molecular abnormalities may be more diffuse than dysplasia. The aim was therefore to test whether DNA methylation; especially on imprinted and X-chromosome genes; is able to detect dysplasia/early-stage neoplasia. Experimental design 27K methylation arrays were used to find genes best able to differentiate between 22 BE and 24 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) samples. These were validated using pyrosequencing on a retrospective cohort (60 BE, 36 dysplastic and 90 EAC) and then in a prospective multicenter study (98 BE patients, including 28 dysplastic and 9 early EAC) designed to utilize biomarkers to stratify patients according to their prevalent dysplasia/EAC status. Results 23% genes on the array, including 7% of X-linked and 69% of imprinted genes, demonstrated statistically significant changes in methylation in EAC vs. BE (Wilcoxon P<0.05). 6/7 selected candidate genes were successfully internally (Pearson’s P<0.01) and externally validated (ANOVA P<0.001). Four genes (SLC22A18, PIGR, GJA12 and RIN2) showed the greatest area under curve (0.988) to distinguish between BE and dysplasia/EAC in the retrospective cohort. This methylation panel was able to stratify patients from the prospective cohort into three risk groups based on the number of genes methylated (low risk: <2 genes, intermediate: 2 and high: >2). Conclusion Widespread DNA methylation changes were observed in Barrett’s carcinogenesis including ≈70% of known imprinted genes. A four-gene methylation panel stratified BE patients into three risk groups with potential clinical utility. PMID:23243219

  3. Increased nuclear ?-catenin expression in oral potentially malignant lesions: A marker of epithelial dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana, Andrea; Aitken, Juan-Pablo; Rojas, Carolina; Ortega, Ana-Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background Deregulation of ?-catenin is associated with malignant transformation; however, its relationship with potentially malignant and malignant oral processes is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the nuclear ?-catenin expression in oral dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Material and Methods Cross sectional study. Immunodetection of ?-catenin was performed on 72 samples, with the following distribution: 21 mild dysplasia, 12 moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia 3, 36 OSCC including 19 well differentiated, 15 moderately differentiated and 2 poorly differentiated. Through microscopic observation the number of positive cells per 1000 epithelial cells was counted. For the statistical analysis, the Kruskal Wallis test was used. Results Nuclear expression of ?-catenin was observed in all samples with severe and moderate dysplasia, with a median of 267.5, in comparison to mild dysplasia whose median was 103.75. Only 10 samples (27.7%) with OSCC showed nuclear expression, with statistically significant differences between groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our results are consistent with most of the reports which show increased presence of ?-catenin in severe and moderate dysplasia compared to mild dysplasia; however the expression of nuclear ?-catenin decreased after starting the invasive neoplastic process. This suggests a role for this protein in the progression of dysplasia and early malignant transformation to OSCC. Immunodetection of ?-catenin could be a possible immune marker in the detection of oral dysplasia. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), ?-catenin, oral dysplasia. PMID:26241451

  4. Relationship between developmental dislocation of the hip in infant and acetabular dysplasia at skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa; Ninomiya, Yoshikazu; Matsubayashi, Shohei; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuro

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrated 8-60% patients treated for developmental dislocation of hip (DDH) in infancy have residual acetabular dysplasia (AD) at skeletal maturity. AD patients reportedly exhibit abnormal morphology of the pelvis, high rates of comorbid spinal congenital anomalies and high bone mineral density. These physical findings suggest that AD patients have genetic background. We examined the percentage of AD patients with hip pain at skeletal maturity having a history of DDH in infancy and the correlation between the severity of AD at skeletal maturity and history of DDH treatment to investigate the relationship between AD and DDH.A total of 245 patients were radiographically examined for any history of DDH treatment in infancy. The study included 226 women and 19 men with a mean age at examination of 40.7 years (range 17-59 years).Eighty-eight patients (36%) had a history of DDH treatment (DDH group) and the remaining 157 patients (64%) had no history of DDH treatment (non-DDH group). The average age was lower and acetabular angle was larger in the DDH group. There was a significant increasing trend of the percentage of DDH patients associated with the severity of AD classified with CE, acetabular angle, and acetabular roof angle.Our data suggest that there are several AD patients without a history of DDH in Japan, and AD in patients without a history of DDH has different characteristics from AD in patients with a history of DDH. PMID:25569642

  5. [Prevalence of bone dysplasias in newborns at the Ruíz y Páez Hospital in Bolívar City. Venezuela. 1978-1990].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, O; Brito-Arreaza, A; Alvarez-Arratia, M C; Ramírez, N

    1991-01-01

    A congenital malformations surveillance program in effect at the Ruiz y Páez Hospital in Ciudad Bolívar since April 1978, has allowed us to detect 25 patients with osteochondrodysplasias (OCD) in a total of 70,152 newborns, up to August 1990, for a prevalence of one case of OCD every 2,806 newborns. The clinical entities found were: Achondroplasia, Thanatophoric Dysplasia, Osteogenesis Imperfecta II-A, Camptomelic Dysplasia, Kniest Dysplasia, Conradi-Hunnerman syndrome, Parenti-Fracaro type Achondrogenesis and Jeune Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia. The results presented in this paper indicate that this type of diseases represent a relatively important group of nosological entities adding up to more than 200 new annual cases in the country. This relatively high frequency, the different inheritance mechanisms involved, the variable complications and the high morbidity and mortality rate of these diseases, make the patients affected, a problematic group not receiving, in general, adequate medical attention regarding diagnosis, genetic counselling and treatment. PMID:1807399

  6. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on…

  7. Fetal Bowel Dilatation due to Intestinal Neuronal Dysplasia: A Rarity

    PubMed Central

    Anadut, Karar Orkun; Yalcin, Omer; Kaya, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B is characterized by malformation of parasympathetic plexus and manifests at more than 6 month of age with progressive severe constipation. We report a case of IND type B presented with bowel dilatation on antenatal scan and neonatal intestinal obstruction which is unusual with this type of IND. PMID:27170919

  8. Residual dysplasia after successful Pavlik harness treatment: early ultrasound predictors.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Venelin Alexandrov; Harcke, H Theodore; Kumar, S Jay

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a group of children treated with Pavlik harness for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) to determine early ultrasound characteristics that predict poor acetabular development after walking age. From a group of 487 infants with DDH, 55 met inclusion criteria of (1) ultrasound documentation of major neonatal hip instability, (2) treatment with Pavlik harness, and (3) a minimum of 4 years of follow-up. These 55 infants had 100 abnormal hips. Harness treatment alone was successful in treating 87 of 100 hips. Persistent or late acetabular dysplasia was defined from serial radiographs. At a mean follow-up of 5.3 years, 5 of the 87 (6%) were found to have sequelae (late acetabular dysplasia, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, or both). Three sonographic findings present on the initial ultrasound predicted late sequelae: (1) dynamic coverage index of 22% or less, (2) alpha angle less than 43 degrees, and (3) abnormal echogenicity of the cartilaginous roof on initial ultrasound. Abnormal echogenicity was the most specific single predictor of residual dysplasia (sensitivity 100% and specificity 88%). The structurally normal cartilaginous roof is non-echogenic except for a short triangular fibrous tip (the labrum). Pathologic cartilage becomes echogenic beyond the tip as hyaline cartilage becomes fibrous and deformed. In unstable hips that respond well to Pavlik harness treatment, it would appear that midterm acetabular development can be affected when early transformation of roof cartilage accompanies displacement and instability. PMID:16439895

  9. Anemia in a neonate with placental mesenchymal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Morikawa, Mamoru; Umazume, Takeshi; Yamada, Takahiro; Kanno, Hiromi; Takakuwa, Emi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-05-01

    Causes of intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) are uncertain in most placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) cases. Our case showed high α-fetoprotein levels in the maternal circulation, markedly dilated subchorionic vessels, and neonatal hemoglobin concentration of 8.4 g/dL, suggesting that fetal anemia may explain some adverse outcomes in PMD pregnancies. PMID:27190607

  10. Speech and Language Outcomes of Children with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Barbara A.; Singer, Lynn T.; Fulton, Sarah; Salvator, Ann; Short, Elizabeth J.; Klein, Nancy; Baley, Jill

    2002-01-01

    A study of very low birth weight babies with (n=89) and without (n=71) bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and term controls was conducted at age 8. The BPD group demonstrated reduced articulation, receptive language skills, performance IQ, and gross and fine motor skills, and almost half were enrolled in speech-language therapy. (Contains…

  11. A Case of Solitary Nonvascularized Corneal Epithelial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Morii, Tomoya; Sumioka, Takayoshi; Izutani-Kitano, Ai; Takada, Yukihisa; Okada, Yuka; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Saika, Shizuya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epithelial dysplasia is categorized as conjunctival/corneal intraepithelial neoplasia which is a precancerous lesion. The lesion is usually developed at the limbal region and grows towards central cornea in association with neovascularization into the lesion. Here, we report a case of isolated nonvascularized corneal epithelial dysplasia surrounded by normal corneal epithelium with immune histochemical finding of ocular surface tissues cytokeratins, for example, keratin 13 and keratin 12. Case Presentation. A 76-year-old man consulted us for visual disturbance with localized opacification of the corneal epithelium in his left eye. His visual acuity was 20/20 and 20/200 in his right and left eye, respectively. Slit lamp examination showed a whitish plaque-like lesion at the center of his left corneal epithelium. No vascular invasion to the lesion was found. The lesion was surgically removed and subjected to histopathological examination and diagnosed as epithelial dysplasia. Amyloidosis was excluded by direct fast scarlet 4BS (DFS) staining. Immunohistochemistry showed that the dysplastic epithelial cells express keratin 13 and vimentin, but not keratin 12, indicating that the neoplastic epithelial cells lacked corneal-type epithelium differentiation. Conclusions. The lesion was diagnosed as nonvascularized epithelial dysplasia of ocular surface. Etiology of the lesion is not known. PMID:27042371

  12. Glenoid dysplasia and osteochondritis dissecans in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, Rebecca A.; Tano, Cheryl A.; Carroll, Vincent W.

    2015-01-01

    A 2-year-old Maine coon cat was presented for a right forelimb lameness. Computed tomography of the shoulder revealed a shallow glenoid, osteophyte deposition at the caudal humeral head and medial glenoid, and an intra-articular osseous body. This cat had glenoid dysplasia and osteochondritis dissecans of the glenoid. PMID:26130839

  13. [Lower limb varicose veins as a manifestation of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Potapov, M P; Potapov, P P; Staver, E V; Mazepina, L S

    2016-01-01

    Analysed herein are the data of 737 patients (a total of 745 lower limbs) suffering from lower-limb varicose veins (LLVV) and subjected to treatment at the Surgical Department consisting of crossectomy, truncal and tributary phlebectomy, dissection of perforant veins exclusively in the basin of the great saphenous vein. Relapses during five-year follow up occurred in 13.8% (102/745) of cases. Based on clinical signs and laboratory findings we studied the effect of the factor of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia (UDCTD) on the development of lower-limb varicosity. We carried out comparative analysis in the groups with relapsing LLVV (n=43), without relapses (n=39) and control group comprising volunteers not suffering from LLVV (n=37). The median of blood serum total oxiprolin concentration in LLVV patients both with and without relapses was elevated and amounted to 18.4 (IR 14.9-19.65) and 14.3 (IR 13.1-16.5) versus 8.35 (5.75-9.75) μmol/l, respectively. The mode of the clinical parameter of UDCTD degree in accordance with the rating scale of Smolnova T.Yu. (2003) in the group of patients with LLVV relapses turned out to be higher (Mo=19) than in the group of patients without relapses (Mo=10, p=0.003). The lowest score was in the control group. In patients having immediate relatives with LLVV the level of blood serum total oxiprolin and clinical scores of LLVV turned out to be statistically significantly higher. Hence, based on the obtained during the study clinical and laboratory findings it may be supposed that undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia plays an important part in the development of both lower limb varicosity and relapses thereof. PMID:27100544

  14. Dominant mutations in the type II collagen gene, COL2A1, produce spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Polumbo, P A; Weis, M A; Bogaert, R; Lachman, R S; Cohn, D H; Rimoin, D L; Eyre, D R

    1995-09-01

    The chondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal growth or development of cartilage. Current classification is based on mode of inheritance as well as clinical, histologic, and/or radiographic features. A clinical spectrum of chondrodysplasia phenotypes, ranging from mild to perinatal lethal, is due to defects in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. This spectrum includes Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), achondrogenesis type II, and hypochondrogenesis. Individuals affected with these disorders exhibit abnormalities of the growth plate, nucleus pulposus, and vitreous humor, which are tissues that contain type II collagen. The Strudwick type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) is characterized by disproportionate short stature, pectus carinatum, and scoliosis, as well as dappled metaphyses (which are not seen in SEDC). The phenotype was first described by Murdoch and Walker in 1969, and a series of 14 patients was later reported by Anderson et al. The observation of two affected sibs born to unaffected parents led to the classification of SEMD Strudwick as an autosomal recessive disorder. We now describe the biochemical characterization of defects in alpha 1(II) collagen in three unrelated individuals with SEMD Strudwick, each of which is due to heterozygosity for a unique mutation in COL2A1. Our data support the hypothesis that some cases, if not all cases, of this distinctive chondrodysplasia result from dominant mutations in COL2A1, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with this gene. PMID:7550321

  15. Hip dysplasia, pelvic obliquity, and scoliosis in cerebral palsy: a qualitative analysis using 3D CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Mark D.; Abel, Mark F.

    1998-06-01

    Five patients with cerebral palsy, hip dysplasia, pelvic obliquity, and scoliosis were evaluated retrospectively using three dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) scans of the proximal femur, pelvis, and lumbar spine to qualitatively evaluate their individual deformities by measuring a number of anatomical landmarks. Three dimensional reconstructions of the data were visualized, analyzed, and then manipulated interactively to perform simulated osteotomies of the proximal femur and pelvis to achieve surgical correction of the hip dysplasia. Severe deformity can occur in spastic cerebral palsy, with serious consequences for the quality of life of the affected individuals and their families. Controversy exists regarding the type, timing and efficacy of surgical intervention for correction of hip dysplasia in this population. Other authors have suggested 3DCT studies are required to accurately analyze acetabular deficiency, and that this data allows for more accurate planning of reconstructive surgery. It is suggested here that interactive manipulation of the data to simulate the proposed surgery is a clinically useful extension of the analysis process and should also be considered as an essential part of the pre-operative planning to assure that the appropriate procedure is chosen. The surgical simulation may reduce operative time and improve surgical correction of the deformity.

  16. Combined cutaneous findings with segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia: Review of the literature and proposal of a new clinical classification.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Othman M; Rihani, Farouk B

    2008-01-01

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia is characterized by variability of its clinical and radiological features, and may mimic other fibro-osseous lesions. We describe the case of a segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia in a 12-year-old male comprising of dermal, gingival, bony, and dental abnormalities. He presented with left midfacial diffuse hyperkeratotic erythematous lesion, ipsilateral hypopigmentation of upper lip with indistinct vermilion border, left-sided facial swelling, unilateral maxillary enlargement and ipsilateral failure of eruption of permanent teeth. Radiographic imaging showed abnormal bony trabeculation, impacted and missing teeth. Histopathologic findings showed characteristic features of segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia. We herein report a case of this rare unusual anomaly, review the literature, and propose a new clinical classification based on the limited number of previously reported cases in an attempt to categorize the clinical variants of the condition which might be helpful when treatment options are to be considered. Clinicians should be aware of its presence when encountering patients presenting with a facial cutaneous lesion especially when it is associated with facial asymmetry and unresponsive to treatment. PMID:23745055

  17. Combined cutaneous findings with segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia: Review of the literature and proposal of a new clinical classification

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Othman M; Rihani, Farouk B

    2008-01-01

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia is characterized by variability of its clinical and radiological features, and may mimic other fibro-osseous lesions. We describe the case of a segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia in a 12-year-old male comprising of dermal, gingival, bony, and dental abnormalities. He presented with left midfacial diffuse hyperkeratotic erythematous lesion, ipsilateral hypopigmentation of upper lip with indistinct vermilion border, left-sided facial swelling, unilateral maxillary enlargement and ipsilateral failure of eruption of permanent teeth. Radiographic imaging showed abnormal bony trabeculation, impacted and missing teeth. Histopathologic findings showed characteristic features of segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia. We herein report a case of this rare unusual anomaly, review the literature, and propose a new clinical classification based on the limited number of previously reported cases in an attempt to categorize the clinical variants of the condition which might be helpful when treatment options are to be considered. Clinicians should be aware of its presence when encountering patients presenting with a facial cutaneous lesion especially when it is associated with facial asymmetry and unresponsive to treatment. PMID:23745055

  18. Trisomy 18 mosaicism in a woman with normal intelligence, pigmentary dysplasia, and an 18 trisomic daughter

    SciTech Connect

    Ukita, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Masaaki; Nakahori, Takashi

    1997-01-20

    Survival beyond the age of 10 years is rare among 18-trisomic individuals. Most of these long-term survivors, when more than one tissue is studied, are normal/trisomy mosaics. They are usually mentally severely retarded with a variety of anomalies. There is another group of mosaic individuals: 7 women and a 13-year-old girl, with a low frequency of 18-trisomic cells, normal or mildly retarded intelligence, and minor anomalies. Two of them were diagnosed after delivering malformed stillborn infants. One of them was the mother of a trisomy 18 patient who was coincidentally found to have trisomy 18 mosaicism. Pigmentary dysplasia, previously called hypomelanosis of Ito, is a disorder with linear, swirly, or patchy, hypo- or hyperpigmented areas of skin, resulting from migration and interaction of melanoblasts of different pigmentary potential. The disorder is often accompanied by mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, including mosaic trisomy 18. Here we report a 26-year-old woman with low frequency trisomy 18 mosaicism, normal intelligence, and pigmentary dysplasia, who gave birth to an 18-trisomic girl. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Developmental dysplasia of the hip: What has changed in the last 20 years?

    PubMed Central

    Kotlarsky, Pavel; Haber, Reuben; Bialik, Victor; Eidelman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) describes the spectrum of structural abnormalities that involve the growing hip. Early diagnosis and treatment is critical to provide the best possible functional outcome. Persistence of hip dysplasia into adolescence and adulthood may result in abnormal gait, decreased strength and increased rate of degenerative hip and knee joint disease. Despite efforts to recognize and treat all cases of DDH soon after birth, diagnosis is delayed in some children, and outcomes deteriorate with increasing delay of presentation. Different screening programs for DDH were implicated. The suspicion is raised based on a physical examination soon after birth. Radiography and ultrasonography are used to confirm the diagnosis. The role of other imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, is still undetermined; however, extensive research is underway on this subject. Treatment depends on the age of the patient and the reducibility of the hip joint. At an early age and up to 6 mo, the main treatment is an abduction brace like the Pavlik harness. If this fails, closed reduction and spica casting is usually done. After the age of 18 mo, treatment usually consists of open reduction and hip reconstruction surgery. Various treatment protocols have been proposed. We summarize the current practice for detection and treatment of DDH, emphasizing updates in screening and treatment during the last two decades. PMID:26716085

  20. Stem cell experiments moves into clinic: new hope for children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, K; Gładysz, D; Demkow, U; Boruczkowski, D

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease with long-term complications that affects mainly preterm born children with low birth weights, especially those treated with mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy. Successful treatment of BPD could reduce the incidence of other diseases of prematurity such as periventricular leukomalacia and retinopathy. The effects of current therapies are unsatisfactory; thus, searching for novel therapeutic is underway. One promising approach seems administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Preclinical data strongly support the role of progenitor cells in the preservation of lung structure. MSC can be found more often in pre-term than term umbilical cord and its isolation from Wharton's jelly carries a potential in treating diseases of prematurity. Several questions concerning the use of MSC in BPD remain to be answered, including the amount of transferred cells, intervals between infusions, the best route for administration and the timing. MSC can be administered as a treatment or prophylaxis. However, having in mind that not all prematurely born children are at risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a search for laboratory markers identifying potential patients should be conducted. This review summarizes the latest achievements in MSC therapy in the context of BPD. PMID:25252892