Note: This page contains sample records for the topic clementine reactor from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

The Clementine mechanisms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clementine spacecraft was developed under the 'faster, better, cheaper' theme. The constraints of a low budget coupled with an unusually tight schedule forced many departures from the normal spacecraft development methods. This paper discusses technical lessons learned about several of the mechanisms on the Clementine spacecraft as well as managerial lessons learned for the entire mechanisms subsystem. A quick overview of the Clementine mission is included; the mission schedule and environment during the mechanisms releases and deployment are highlighted. This paper then describes the entire mechanisms subsystem. The design and test approach and key philosophies for a fast-track program are discussed during the description of the mechanisms subsystem. The mechanism subsystem included a marman clamp separation system, a separation nut separation system, a solar panel deployment and pointing system, a high gain antenna feed deployment system, and two separate sensor cover systems. Each mechanism is briefly discussed. Additional technical discussion is given on the marman clamp design, the sensor cover designs, and the design and testing practices for systems driven by heated actuators (specifically paraffin actuators and frangibolts). All of the other mechanisms were of conventional designs and will receive less emphasis. Lessons learned are discussed throughout the paper as they applied to the systems being discussed. Since there is information on many different systems, this paper is organized so that information on a particular topic can be quickly referenced.

Purdy, William; Hurley, Michael

1995-01-01

2

Clementine UVVIS multispectral processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new control net of the moon has been completed from Clementine UVVIS image data. These data cover 99 percent of the lunar surface at resolutions from 88250 m/pixel. From this control net and about 43,000 750-nm-filter images a basemap has been completed resampled at 100 m/pixel. The average relative positional accuracy for the basemap is about 80 m, and the average absolute accuracy is estimated at about 250 m/pixel globally. The UVVIS calibration for all bands is nearing completion. A new series of 30 x 30 deg multiband quadrangles are being mosaicked from the full UVVIS multispectral data (415, 750, 900, 950, 1000 nm). These quad mosaics will be geometrically tied to the 750-nm basemap at subpixel resolution. Progress is being made on the NIR calibration.

Lee, E. M.; Edwards, K. E.; Becker, T. L.; Cook, D.; Eliason, E.; Robinson, M. S.; McEwen, A. S.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; Duxbury, T.; Sorenson, T.

1997-03-01

3

CLEMENTINE: “The Deep Space Program Science Experiment”  

Microsoft Academic Search

CLEMENTINE, the Deep Space Program Science Experiment (DSPSE), was a technology demonstration jointly sponsored by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that was launched on January 25, 1994. The principle objective of the CLEMENTINE mission was to use the Moon, a near-Earth asteroid, and the spacecraft's Interstage Adapter (ISA) as targets to

R. Baugh; R. J. Chapman

1995-01-01

4

The Clementine bistatic radar experiment.  

PubMed

During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, beta, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same-sense polarization enhancement around beta = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole. PMID:8929403

Nozette, S; Lichtenberg, C L; Spudis, P; Bonner, R; Ort, W; Malaret, E; Robinson, M; Shoemaker, E M

1996-11-29

5

The Clementine bistatic radar experiment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, ??, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same- sense polarization enhancement around ?? = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C. L.; Spudis, P.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E. M.

1996-01-01

6

The Clementine Bistatic Radar Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, beta, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same-sense polarization enhancement around beta = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C. L.; Spudis, P.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E. M.

1996-01-01

7

The Clementine longwave infrared camera  

SciTech Connect

The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The longwave-infrared (LWIR) camera supplemented the UV/Visible and near-infrared mapping cameras providing limited strip coverage of the moon, giving insight to the thermal properties of the soils. This camera provided {approximately}100 m spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 7 km across-track swath. This 2.1 kg camera using a 128 x 128 Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) FPA viewed thermal emission of the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 8.0 to 9.5 {micro}m wavelength region. A description of this light-weight, low power LWIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Massie, M.A. [Pacific Advanced Technology, Solvang, CA (United States); Metschuleit, K. [Amber/A Raytheon Co., Goleta, CA (United States)

1995-04-01

8

Lessons Learned from the Clementine Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

According to BMDO, the Clementine mission achieved many of its technology objectives during its flight to the Moon in early 1994 but, because of a software error, was unable to test the autonomous tracking of a cold target. The preliminary analyses of the returned lunar data suggest that valuable scientific measurements were made on several important topics but that COMPLEX's highest-priority objectives for lunar science were not achieved. This is not surprising given that the rationale for Clementine was technological rather than scientific. COMPLEX lists below a few of the lessons that may be learned from Clementine. Although the Clementine mission was not conceived as a NASA science mission exactly like those planned for the Discovery program, many operational aspects of the two are similar. It is therefore worthwhile to understand the strengths and faults of the Clementine approach. Some elements of the Clementine operation that led to the mission's success include the following: (1) The mission's achievements were the responsibility of a single organization and its manager, which made that organization and that individual accountable for the final outcome; (2) The sponsor adopted a hands-off approach and set a minimum number of reviews (three); (3) The sponsor accepted a reasonable amount of risk and allowed the project team to make the trade-offs necessary to minimize the mission's risks while still accomplishing all its primary objectives; and (4) The development schedule was brief and the agreed-on funding (and funding profile) was adhered to. Among the operational shortcomings of Clementine were the following: (1) An overly ambitious schedule and a slightly lean budget (meaning insufficient time for software development and testing, and leading ultimately to human exhaustion); and (2) No support for data calibration, reduction, and analysis. The principal lesson to be learned in this category is that any benefits from the constructive application of higher risk for lower cost and faster schedule will be lost if the schedule does not allow adequate time for the development of all essential systems or makes no allowance for human frailties. Another lesson to be drawn is that despite its limitations, if judged strictly as a science mission, Clementine attested that significant scientific information can be gathered during a technology-demonstration mission. In the current era of limited funds, when science missions will be infrequent, the opportunity to fly scientific instruments aboard missions whose objectives might be other than science must be seized and, indeed, encouraged. During such opportunities it would be inexcusable to do second-class science. Thus the scientific community must be actively involved in such projects from their initiation.

1997-01-01

9

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The...

1998-01-01

10

Mapping the Inner Zodiacal Light with Clementine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Images of the inner zodiacal light were acquired by the Clementine spacecraft while orbiting the Moon in 1994. An all-sky map of the inner zodiacal light is obtained, and the distribution of dust throughout the inner solar system will also be reported. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Hahn, J. M.; Zook, H. A.; Cooper, B.; Sunkara, B.

2001-01-01

11

7 CFR 319.56-38 - Clementines, mandarins, and tangerines from Chile.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Clementines, mandarins, and tangerines from Chile. 319.56-38 Section 319.56-38...Clementines, mandarins, and tangerines from Chile. Clementines (Citrus reticulata ...be imported into the United States from Chile only under the following...

2009-01-01

12

77 FR 63311 - Lake Clementine Hydro, LLC; Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission [Project No. 13432-002] Lake Clementine Hydro, LLC; Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit...Applications On October 2, 2012, Lake Clementine Hydro, LLC (Lake Clementine Hydro) filed an application for a successive...

2012-10-16

13

Lunar Rotation and Flyby from Clementine Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Clementine was a joint project between the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization and NASA. The objective of the mission was to test sensors and spacecraft components under extended exposure to the space environment and to make scientific observations of the Moon and the near-Earth asteroid 1620 Geographos. Clementine was launched on 25 January 1994 at 16:34 UTC (12:34 PM EDT) from Vandenberg AFB aboard a Titan IIG rocket. After two Earth flybys, lunar insertion was achieved on February 21. Lunar mapping took place over approximately two months, in two parts. The first part consisted of a 5 hour elliptical polar orbit with a perilune of about 400 km at 28 degrees S latitude. After one month of mapping the orbit was rotated to a perilune of 29 degrees N latitude, where it remained for one more month. This allowed global imaging as well as altimetry coverage from 60 degrees S to 60 degrees N.

Starr, Cindy; Smith, David; Zuber, Maria; Lemoine, Frank; Neumann, Gregory

1995-06-09

14

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael

1998-10-01

15

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael

1998-10-01

16

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a side, which spans approximately 2.2 deg. Two mosaics are provided for each pole: one corresponding to data acquired while periapsis was in the south, the other while periapsis was in the north. The CD-ROMs also contain ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files.

1998-10-01

17

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a side, which spans approximately 2.2 deg. Two mosaics are provided for each pole: one corresponding to data acquired while periapsis was in the south, the other while periapsis was in the north. The CD-ROMs also contain ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files.

1998-01-01

18

Clementine Star-Tracker Images of the Inner Zodiacal Light  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excellent photographs of the inner zodiacal light, using the Moon as an occulting disk, have been obtained with the Clementine star-tracker cameras. With exposures that vary from 50 milliseconds to 700 milliseconds, with a dynamic range of 256 for each exposure, and with a 28.9 degree by 43.4 degree field of view, the Clementine cameras have recorded the zodiacal light

B. L. Cooper; H. A. Zook; J. M. Hahn; A. E. Potter

2000-01-01

19

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar image mosaics developed by Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS). These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. The geometric control is provided by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD are compiled from polar data (latitudes greater than 80 degrees), and are presented in the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel at the pole, a resolution 5 times greater than that (150 m/pixel) of the corresponding UV/Vis polar basemap. This 5:1 scale ratio is in keeping with the sub-polar mosaic, in which the HiRes and UV/Vis mosaics had scales of 20 m/pixel and 100 m/pixel, respectively. The equal-area property of the stereographic projection made this preferable for the HiRes polar mosaic rather than the basemap's orthographic projection. Thus, a necessary first step in constructing the mosaic was the reprojection of the UV/Vis basemap to the stereographic projection. The HiRes polar data can be naturally grouped according to the orbital periapsis, which was in the south during the first half of the mapping mission and in the north during the second half. Images in each group have generally uniform intrinsic resolution, illumination, exposure and gain. Rather than mingle data from the two periapsis epochs, separate mosaics are provided for each, a total of 4 polar mosaics. The mosaics are divided into 100 square tiles of 2250 pixels (approximately 2.2 deg near the pole) on a side. Not all squares of this grid contain HiRes mosaic data, some inevitably since a square is not a perfect representation of a (latitude) circle, others due to the lack of HiRes data. This CD also contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael

1998-10-01

20

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar image mosaics developed by Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS). These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. The geometric control is provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD are compiled from polar data (latitudes greater than 80 degrees), and are presented in the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel at the pole, a resolution 5 times greater than that (150 m/pixel) of the corresponding UV/Vis polar basemap. This 5:1 scale ratio is in keeping with the sub-polar mosaic, in which the HiRes and UV/Vis mosaics had scales of 20 m/pixel and 100 m/pixel, respectively. The equal-area property of the stereographic projection made this preferable for the HiRes polar mosaic rather than the basemap's orthographic projection. Thus, a necessary first step in constructing the mosaic was the reprojection of the UV/Vis basemap to the stereographic projection. The HiRes polar data can be naturally grouped according to the orbital periapsis, which was in the south during the first half of the mapping mission and in the north during the second half. Images in each group have generally uniform intrinsic resolution, illumination, exposure and gain. Rather than mingle data from the two periapsis epochs, separate mosaics are provided for each, a total of 4 polar mosaics. The mosaics are divided into 100 square tiles of 2250 pixels (approximately 2.2 deg near the pole) on a side. Not all squares of this grid contain HiRes mosaic data, some inevitably since a square is not a perfect representation of a (latitude) circle, others due to the lack of HiRes data. This CD also contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael

1998-10-01

21

77 FR 22463 - Importation of Clementines From Spain; Amendment to Inspection Provisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0579-AD27 Importation of Clementines From Spain; Amendment to Inspection Provisions AGENCY...governing the importation of clementines from Spain by removing from the regulations the number...number of clementines per consignment from Spain to be sampled, we will have the...

2012-04-16

22

75 FR 81942 - Importation of Clementines From Spain; Amendment to Inspection Provisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0579-AD27 Importation of Clementines From Spain; Amendment to Inspection Provisions AGENCY...governing the importation of clementines from Spain by removing from the regulations the number...number of clementines per consignment from Spain to be sampled, APHIS would have the...

2010-12-29

23

The Clementine mission: Initial results from lunar mapping  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clementine was a mission designed to test the space worthiness of a variety of advanced sensors for use on military surveillance satellites while, at the same time, gathering useful scientific information on the composition and structure of the Moon and a near Earth asteroid. Clementine was dispatched for an extended stay in the vicinity of Earth's Moon on 25 Jan. 1994 and arrived at the Moon on 20 Feb. 1994. The spacecraft started systematic mapping on 26 Feb., completed mapping on 22 Apr., and left lunar orbit on 3 May. The entire Clementine project, from conception through end of mission, lasted approximately three years. Topographic profiles derived from lidar laser altimetry permitted construction of a global topographic map of the Moon. Clementine also aimed at mapping the color of the Moon in eleven different wavelengths in the visible and near infrared parts of the system. With rock and soil samples of known geological context available from the Apollo and Lunar programs, the Clementine mission offers the data needed to construct a global digital image model of the Moon.

Spudis, P. D.; Shoemaker, E.; Acton, C.; Burratti, B.; Duxbury, T.; Baker, D.; Smith, D.; Blamont, J.; Davies, M.; Eliason, E.

1994-01-01

24

The Clementine Mission: Initial Results from lunar mapping  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clementine was a mission designed to test the space-worthiness of a variety of advanced sensors for use on military surveillance satellites while, at the same time, gathering useful scientific information on the composition and structure of the Moon and a near-Earth asteroid. Conducted jointly by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO, formerly the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization) of the US Department of Defense and NASA, Clementine was dispatched for an extended stay in the vicinity of Earth's moon on 25 January 1994 and arrived at the Moon on 20 February 1994. The spacecraft started systematic mapping on 26 February, completed mapping on 22 April, and left lunar orbit on 3 May. The entire Clementine project, from conception through end-of-mission, lasted approximately 3 years.

Spudis, P. D.; Shoemaker, E.; Acton, C.; Burratti, B.; Duxbury, T.; Baker, D.; Smith, D.; Blamont, J.; Davies, M.; Eliason, E.

1994-01-01

25

Asteroid approach covariance analysis for the Clementine mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clementine mission is designed to test Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) technology, the Brilliant Pebbles and Brilliant Eyes sensors, by mapping the moon surface and flying by the asteroid Geographos. The capability of two of the instruments available on board the spacecraft, the lidar (laser radar) and the UV\\/Visible camera is used in the covariance analysis to obtain the

Rodica Ionasescu; David Sonnabend

1993-01-01

26

The Clementine Mission to the Moon: Scientific Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the course of 71 days in lunar orbit, from 19 February to 3 May 1994, the Clementine spacecraft acquired just under two million digital images of the moon at visible and infrared wavelengths. These data are enabling the global mapping of the rock types of the lunar crust and the first detailed investigation of the geology of the lunar

Stewart Nozette; I. T. Lewis; C. L. Lichtenberg; D. M. Horan; E. Malaret; E. M. Shoemaker; J. H. Resnick; C. J. Rollins; D. N. Baker; J. E. Blamont; B. J. Buratti; C. M. Pieters; M. E. Davies; M. S. Robinson; E. M. Eliason; B. M. Jakosky; T. C. Sorenson; R. W. Vorder Bruegge; P. G. Lucey; M. A. Massie; H. S. Park; A. S. McEwen; R. E. Priest; R. A. Reisse; R. A. Simpson; D. E. Smith; R. W. Vorder Breugge; M. T. Zuber

1994-01-01

27

UV/visible camera for the Clementine mission.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This article describes the Clementine UV/Visible (UV/Vis) multispectral camera, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. While the primary objective of the C...

J. F. Kordas I. T. Lewis R. E. Priest

1995-01-01

28

A Sharper View of Impact Craters from Clementine Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ultraviolet-visible camera on the Clementine spacecraft obtained high-spatial resolution images of the moon in five spectral channels. Impact craters mapped with these multispectral images show a scale of lithologic diversity that varies with crater size and target stratigraphy. Prominent lithologic variations (feldspathic versus basaltic) occur within the south wall of Copernicus (93 kilometers in diameter) on the scale of

C. M. Pieters; M. I. Staid; E. M. Fischer; S. Tompkins; G. He

1994-01-01

29

Clementine: An inexpensive mission to the Moon and Geographos  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clementine Mission, a joint project of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) and NASA, has been planned primarily to test and demonstrate a suite of lightweight sensors and other lightweight spacecraft components under extended exposure to the space environment. Although the primary objective of the mission is to space-qualify sensors for Department of Defense applications, it was recognized in

Eugene M. Shoemaker; Stewart Nozette

1993-01-01

30

UV/visible camera for the Clementine mission  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the Clementine UV/Visible (UV/Vis) multispectral camera, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. While the primary objective of the Clementine Program was to qualify a suite of 6 light-weight, low power imagers for future Department of Defense flights, the mission also has provided the first systematic mapping of the complete lunar surface in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The 410 g, 4.65 W UV/Vis camera uses a 384 x 288 frame-transfer silicon CCD FPA and operates at 6 user-selectable wavelength bands between 0.4 and 1.1 {micro}m. It has yielded lunar imagery and mineralogy data with up to 120 in spatial resolution (band dependent) at 400 km periselene along a 39 km cross-track swath.

Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T.; Priest, R.E. [and others

1995-04-01

31

Lunar Rotation and Flyby from Clementine Data (with route map)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Clementine was a joint project between the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization and NASA. The objective of the mission was to test sensors and spacecraft components under extended exposure to the space environment and to make scientific observations of the Moon and the near-Earth asteroid 1620 Geographos. Clementine was launched on 25 January 1994 at 16:34 UTC (12:34 PM EDT) from Vandenberg AFB aboard a Titan IIG rocket. After two Earth flybys, lunar insertion was achieved on February 21. Lunar mapping took place over approximately two months, in two parts. The first part consisted of a 5 hour elliptical polar orbit with a perilune of about 400 km at 28 degrees S latitude. After one month of mapping the orbit was rotated to a perilune of 29 degrees N latitude, where it remained for one more month. This allowed global imaging as well as altimetry coverage from 60 degrees S to 60 degrees N.

Starr, Cindy; Smith, David; Zuber, Maria; Lemoine, Frank; Neumann, Gregory

1995-06-09

32

Clementine: An inexpensive mission to the Moon and Geographos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clementine Mission, a joint project of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) and NASA, has been planned primarily to test and demonstrate a suite of lightweight sensors and other lightweight spacecraft components under extended exposure to the space environment. Although the primary objective of the mission is to space-qualify sensors for Department of Defense applications, it was recognized in 1990 that such a mission might also be designed to acquire scientific observations of the Moon and of Apollo asteroid (1620) Geographos. This possibility was explored jointly by SDIO and NASA, including representatives from NASA's Discovery Program Science Working Group, in early 1991. Besides the direct return of scientific information, one of the benefits envisioned from a joint venture was the development of lightweight components for possible future use in NASA's Discovery-class spacecraft. In Jan. 1992, SDIO informed NASA of its intent to fly a 'Deep Space Program Science Experiment,' now popularly called Clementine; NASA then formed an advisory science working group to assist in the early development of the mission. The Clementine spacecraft is being assembled at the Naval Research Laboratory, which is also in charge of the overall mission design and mission operations. Support for mission design is being provided by GSFC and by JPL. NASA's Deep Space Network will be utilized in tracking and communicating with the spacecraft. Following a recommendation of the COMPLEX committee of the Space Science Board, NASA will issue an NRA and appoint a formal science team in early 1993. Clementine is a 3-axis stabilized, 200 kg (dry weight) spacecraft that will be launched on a refurbished Titan-2G. One of the goals has been to build two spacecraft, including the sensors, for $100M. Total time elapsed from the decision to proceed to the launch will be two years.

Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Nozette, Stewart

1993-03-01

33

Clementine: An inexpensive mission to the Moon and Geographos  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clementine Mission, a joint project of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) and NASA, has been planned primarily to test and demonstrate a suite of lightweight sensors and other lightweight spacecraft components under extended exposure to the space environment. Although the primary objective of the mission is to space-qualify sensors for Department of Defense applications, it was recognized in 1990 that such a mission might also be designed to acquire scientific observations of the Moon and of Apollo asteroid (1620) Geographos. This possibility was explored jointly by SDIO and NASA, including representatives from NASA's Discovery Program Science Working Group, in early 1991. Besides the direct return of scientific information, one of the benefits envisioned from a joint venture was the development of lightweight components for possible future use in NASA's Discovery-class spacecraft. In Jan. 1992, SDIO informed NASA of its intent to fly a 'Deep Space Program Science Experiment,' now popularly called Clementine; NASA then formed an advisory science working group to assist in the early development of the mission. The Clementine spacecraft is being assembled at the Naval Research Laboratory, which is also in charge of the overall mission design and mission operations. Support for mission design is being provided by GSFC and by JPL. NASA's Deep Space Network will be utilized in tracking and communicating with the spacecraft. Following a recommendation of the COMPLEX committee of the Space Science Board, NASA will issue an NRA and appoint a formal science team in early 1993. Clementine is a 3-axis stabilized, 200 kg (dry weight) spacecraft that will be launched on a refurbished Titan-2G. One of the goals has been to build two spacecraft, including the sensors, for $100M. Total time elapsed from the decision to proceed to the launch will be two years.

Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Nozette, Stewart

1993-01-01

34

Clementine: Anticipated scientific datasets from the Moon and Geographos  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clementine spacecraft mission is designed to test the performance of new lightweight and low-power detectors developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A secondary objective of the mission is to acquire useful scientific data, principally of the Moon and the near-Earth asteroid Geographos. The spacecraft will be in an elliptical polar orbit about the Moon for about 2 months beginning in February of 1994 and it will fly by Geographos on August 31. Clementine will carry seven detectors each weighing less than about 1 kg: two Star Trackers wide-angle uv/vis wide-angle Short Wavelength IR (SWIR) Long-Wavelength IR (LWIR) and LIDAR (Laser Image Detection And Ranging) narrow-angle imaging and ranging. Additional presentations about the mission detectors and related science issues are in this volume. If fully successful Clementine will return about 3 million lunar images, a dataset with nearly as many bits of data (uncompressed) as the first cycle of Magellan and more than 5000 images of Geographos. The complete and efficient analysis of such large data sets requires systematic processing efforts. Described below are concepts for two such efforts for the Clementine mission: global multispectral imaging of the Moon and videos of the Geographos flyby. Other anticipated datasets for which systematic processing might be desirable include multispectral observations of Earth; LIDAR altimetry of the Moon with high-resolution imaging along each ground track; high-resolution LIDAR color along each lunar ground track which could be used to identify potential titanium-rich deposits at scales of a few meters; and thermal IR imaging along each lunar ground track (including nighttime observations near the poles).

Mcewen, A. S.

1993-01-01

35

System level mechanical testing of the Clementine spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper discusses the system level structural testing that was performed to qualify the Clementine Spacecraft for flight. These tests included spin balance, combined acoustic and axial random vibration, lateral random vibration, quasi-static loads, pyrotechnic shock, modal survey and on-orbit jitter simulation. Some innovative aspects of this effort were: the simultaneously combined acoustic and random vibration test; the mass loaded interface modal survey test; and the techniques used to assess how operating on board mechanisms and thrusters affect sensor vision.

Haughton, James; Hauser, Joseph; Raynor, William; Lynn, Peter

1994-01-01

36

Analysis of Absorption Trough Features Using Clementine UVVIS+NIR Imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study explores the mapping of spectral parameters of lunar features, describing the absorption trough near 1000 nm, using the calibrated Clementine UVVIS+NIR data set covering the wavelength range between 415 and 2000 nm.

Evans, R.; Wöhler, C.; Lena, R.

2009-03-01

37

Clementine 2: A double asteroid flyby and impactor mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recently JPL was asked by SDIO to analyze and develop a preliminary design for a deep-space mission to fly by two near-Earth asteroids, Eros and Toutatis. As a part of this mission, JPL was also asked to assess the feasibility of deploying a probe on approach to impact Toutatis. This mission is a candidate for SDIO's Clementine 2. SDIO's motivations were to provide further demonstrations of precision, autonomous navigation for controlling the flight paths of both a spacecraft and a probe. NASA's interest in this mission is driven by the opportunity to obtain the first close-up images and other scientific measurements from a spacecraft of two important near-Earth objects. For Toutatis this is especially important since it was observed and imaged extensively just last Dec. using Earth-based radar; Clementine 2 will provide the opportunity to corroborate the radar data and validate the ultimate potential of the radar technique. Scientifically, the probe impact at Toutatis will allow the acquisition of data pertaining to the dynamic strength of surface material and data on the properties of the regolith and on stratification below the surface, and will potentially allow the measurement of thermal diffusivity between the interior and the surface. These determinations will be accomplished by means of high-resolution imagery of the impact crater and its surroundings in visible, ultraviolet, and infrared wave bands from the spacecraft flying by some 30 min. after the probe strike. In addition, if the spacecraft can be equipped with a lightweight mass spectrometer and dust analyzer, the potential also exists to measure the particle sizes and distribution and the composition of the eject a cloud. This mission is planned to be launched in Jul. 1995, with the Eros encounter on 13 Mar. 1996, and the Toutatis flyby on 4 Oct. 1996, some 440 days after launch.

Boain, R. J.

1993-01-01

38

Lunar South Pole Topography Derived from Clementine Imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the Clementine Mission both oblique and vertical multispectral images were collected. The oblique and vertical images from a single spectral band collected during the same orbit form a stereo pair that can be used to derive the topography. These stereo pairs are being used to derive the topography of an area (90 deg S to 650S latitude) surrounding the lunar south pole. Work on the lunar north pole topography will start after completion of the south pole topography. This report provides an update on the initial results for the lunar south pole topography. In 1994, the Clementine spacecraft acquired digital images of the Moon at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Onboard there were four camera systems and a laser altimeter. During the first pass, periapsis was at 30S and the highest resolution images were obtained in the southern hemisphere. Over the northern polar area, a series of oblique and vertical images were obtained with the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) camera on each orbit. During the second pass, periapsis was at 30N and the image acquisition strategy was reversed. The UV-VIS camera image size was 384 x 288 pixels with five spectral bands and one broad band. The 750-nm-band stereo pairs are the primary image source for this study. The ground sample distances (GSD) for oblique images range from 300 to 400m. The GSD for the vertical images, acquired at the end of an orbit, are slightly larger and range from 325 to 450 m. Using the formula for stereo-height accuracy, an estimate of height accuracy is 180m. This formula is IFOVMAX)/(K*B/H with IFOVMAX defined as Maximum Instantaneous Field of View; B/H is the base-to-height ratio and K is an estimate of pixel measurement accuracy on the imagery. The Clementine laser altimeter (LIDAR) data were used previously to produce a global topographic model of the Moon . The model has a vertical accuracy of about 100 m and a spatial resolution of 2.5 deg. Altimetry data were collected between 79S and 810N. These data were filtered and then interpolated to fill in the polar regions where the altimeter did not collect data. A global topography model was then derived based on spherical harmonic expansion. Image mosaic. A global image mosaic of the Moon was produced from the 750-nm. Clementine data . The mosaic includes high-resolution, oblique, and vertical images. Match points were picked to tie the imagery together, and the camera pointing angles were adjusted to align the imagery. This adjustment used a spherical surface, and the elevation of all points was held to a constant value, 1737.4 km. This produced a seamless image mosaic with latitude and longitude information but no information on the elevation. The imagery and support information were downloaded to our digital photogrammetric workstation from the Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) system. The support data included the camera location and pointing angles. Match points used to, produce the image mosaic were also downloaded. The camera angles were adjusted to account for the elevation of the match points. This was accomplished with the Multi Sensor Triangulation (MST) software from LH Systems SOCET Set software package. The revised camera angles allowed for the derivation of a digital elevation model (DEM) from the stereo pairs. The match-point latitude and longitude from the global image mosaic are accurate and used for an initial estimate of the horizontal position. The elevations of the match points were estimated from the altimetry data. The camera angles used in the altimetry processing and in the creation of the image mosaic were adjusted independently. Hence, the horizontal position of the altimetry data and the image mosaic are not aligned correctly. Clementine was designed so the altimeter shared the optical system of the HIRES camera system. The HIRES and UV-VIS camera systems were aligned so the HIRES image was centered in the UV-VIS image. We therefore made an adjustment so that the altimetry points would fall near the centerline of the UV-VIS imagery. A DEM was created from

Rosiek, M. R.; Kirk, R.; Howington-Kraus, A.

1999-01-01

39

Asteroid approach covariance analysis for the Clementine mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clementine mission is designed to test Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) technology, the Brilliant Pebbles and Brilliant Eyes sensors, by mapping the moon surface and flying by the asteroid Geographos. The capability of two of the instruments available on board the spacecraft, the lidar (laser radar) and the UV/Visible camera is used in the covariance analysis to obtain the spacecraft delivery uncertainties at the asteroid. These uncertainties are due primarily to asteroid ephemeris uncertainties. On board optical navigation reduces the uncertainty in the knowledge of the spacecraft position in the direction perpendicular to the incoming asymptote to a one-sigma value of under 1 km, at the closest approach distance of 100 km. The uncertainty in the knowledge of the encounter time is about 0.1 seconds for a flyby velocity of 10.85 km/s. The magnitude of these uncertainties is due largely to Center Finding Errors (CFE). These systematic errors represent the accuracy expected in locating the center of the asteroid in the optical navigation images, in the absence of a topographic model for the asteroid. The direction of the incoming asymptote cannot be estimated accurately until minutes before the asteroid flyby, and correcting for it would require autonomous navigation. Orbit determination errors dominate over maneuver execution errors, and the final delivery accuracy attained is basically the orbit determination uncertainty before the final maneuver.

Ionasescu, Rodica; Sonnabend, David

1993-01-01

40

Asteroid approach covariance analysis for the Clementine mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clementine mission is designed to test Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) technology, the Brilliant Pebbles and Brilliant Eyes sensors, by mapping the moon surface and flying by the asteroid Geographos. The capability of two of the instruments available on board the spacecraft, the lidar (laser radar) and the UV/Visible camera is used in the covariance analysis to obtain the spacecraft delivery uncertainties at the asteroid. These uncertainties are due primarily to asteroid ephemeris uncertainties. On board optical navigation reduces the uncertainty in the knowledge of the spacecraft position in the direction perpendicular to the incoming asymptote to a one-sigma value of under 1 km, at the closest approach distance of 100 km. The uncertainty in the knowledge of the encounter time is about 0.1 seconds for a flyby velocity of 10.85 km/s. The magnitude of these uncertainties is due largely to Center Finding Errors (CFE). These systematic errors represent the accuracy expected in locating the center of the asteroid in the optical navigation images, in the absence of a topographic model for the asteroid. The direction of the incoming asymptote cannot be estimated accurately until minutes before the asteroid flyby, and correcting for it would require autonomous navigation. Orbit determination errors dominate over maneuver execution errors, and the final delivery accuracy attained is basically the orbit determination uncertainty before the final maneuver.

Ionasescu, Rodica; Sonnabend, David

41

Near-infrared camera for the Clementine mission  

SciTech Connect

The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The near-infrared (NIR) multi-spectral camera, one of two workhorse lunar mapping cameras (the other being the UV/visible camera), provided {approximately}200 in spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 39 km across-track swath. This 1.9 kg infrared camera using a 256 x 256 InSb FPA viewed reflected solar illumination from the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 1 to 3 {micro}m wavelength region, extending lunar imagery and mineralogy studies into the near infrared. A description of this light-weight, low power NIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Massie, M.A. [Pacific Advanced Technology, Solvang, CA (United States); Metschuleit, K. [Amber/A Raytheon Co., Goleta, CA (United States)

1995-04-01

42

The Astrometric Recognition of the Solar Clementine Gnomon (1702)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clementine gnomon has been built in 1702 to measure the Earth's obliquity variation. For this reason the pinhole was located in the walls of Diocletian's times (305 a. D.) in order to remain stable along the centuries, but its original form and position have been modified. We used an astrometric method to recover the original position of the pinhole: reshaping the pinhole to a circle of 1.5 cm of diameter, the positions of the Northern and Southern limbs have been compared with the ephemerides. A sistematic shift of 4.5 mm Southward of the whole solar image shows that the original pinhole was 4.5 mm North of the actual position, as the images in the Bianchini's book (1703) suggest. The oval shape of the actual pinhole is also wrong. Using a circle the larger solar spots are clearly visible. Some reference stars of the catalogue of Philippe de la Hire (1702), used originally for measuring the ecliptic latitude of the Sun, are written next to the meridian line, but after the last restauration (2000), four of them are wrongly located. Finally the deviation from the true North, of the meridian line's azimuth confirms the value recovered in 1750. This, with the local deviations of a true line, will remain as systematic error, like for all these historical instruments.

Sigismondi, Costantino

43

Star tracker stellar compass for the Clementine mission  

SciTech Connect

The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. Two star tracker stellar compasses (star tracker camera + stellar compass software) were included on the spacecraft, serving a primary function of providing angle updates to the guidance and navigation system. These cameras served a secondary function by providing a wide field of view imaging capability for lunar horizon glow and other dark-side imaging data. This 290 g camera using a 576 x 384 FPA and a 17 mm entrance pupil, detected and centroided stars as dim and dimmer than 4.5 m{sub v}, providing rms pointing accuracy of better than 100 {micro}rad pitch and yaw and 450 {micro}rad roll. A description of this light-weight, low power star tracker camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T.; Wilson, B.A. [and others

1995-04-01

44

Contributions of the Clementine mission to our understanding of the processes and history of the Moon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clementine mission will provide us with an abundance of information about lunar surface morphology, topography, and composition, and it will permit us to infer the history of the Moon and the processes that have shaped that history. This information can be used to address fundamental questions in lunar science and allow us to make significant advances towards deciphering the complex story of the Moon. The Clementine mission will also permit a first-order global assessment of the resources of the Moon and provide a strategic base of knowledge upon which future robotic and human missions to the Moon can build.

Spudis, Paul D.; Lucey, Paul G.

1993-01-01

45

Clementine Star Tracker Stellar Compass: Final report part 1  

SciTech Connect

The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. Two star stracker stellar compasses (star tracker camera + stellar compass software) were included on the spacecraft, serving a primary function of providing angle updates to the guidance and navigation system. These cameras served a secondary function by providing a wide field of view imaging capability for lunar horizon glow and other dark-side imaging data. This 290 g camera using a 576 x 384 focal plane array and a 17 mm entrance pupil, detected and centroided stars as dim and dimmer than 4.5 m{sub v}, providing rms pointing accuracy of better than 100 {mu}rad pitch and yaw and 450 {mu}rad roll. A description of this light-weight, low power star tracker camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights. Documentation generated during the design, analysis, build, test and characterization of the star tracker cameras are presented. Collectively, this documentation represents a small library of information for this camera, and may be used as a framework for producing copy units by commercial enterprises, and therefore satisfies a Department of Defense and Department of Energy goal to transfer technology to industry. However, the considerable knowledge gained from the experience of the individuals involved in the system trades, design, analysis, production, testing and characterization of the star tracker stellar compass is not contained in this documentation.

Priest, R.E.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

1995-07-01

46

Overview of the fast reactors fuels program. [LMFBR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each nation involved in LMFBR development has its unique energy strategies which consider energy growth projections, uranium resources, capital costs, and plant operational requirements. Common to all of these strategies is a history of fast reactor experience which dates back to the days of the Manhatten Project and includes the CLEMENTINE Reactor, which generated a few watts, LAMPRE, EBR-I, EBR-II,

E. A. Evans; C. M. Cox; B. R. Hayward; L. H. Rice; H. H. Yoshikawa

1980-01-01

47

Lunar Topography and Basins Mapped Using a Clementine Stereo Digital Elevation Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planet-wide (1 km/pixel and 5 km/pixel) Digital Elevation Models (DEM) of the Moon have been produced using Clementine UVVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) stereo. Six new basins have been discovered, two suspected basins have been confirmed, and the dimensions of existing basins better defined. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Cook, A. C.; Spudis, P. D.; Robinson, M. S.; Watters, T. R.

2002-01-01

48

A Clementine Derived Control Network and Topographic Model - The Unified Lunar Control Network 2005  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

U. S. Geological Survey, Astrogeology Team, Flagstaff, AZ, United States Introduction: We have completed a new general unified lunar control network and lunar topographic model based on Clementine images. It includes the determination, in the lunar mean Earth/polar axis system, of the 3-D positions of 272,931 points on the lunar surface and the correction of the camera angles for 43,866 Clementine images, using 546,126 tie point measurements. The solution RMS is 0.9 pixels in the image plane, with the largest residual of 6.4 pixels. We are now documenting our solution and plan to release the solution results soon, initially as a USGS Open File report. ULCN 2005 Features: The new network is a combination of the Unified Lunar Control Network (ULCN), derived from the Apollo, Mariner 10, and Galileo missions, and Earth-based photographs, [1] and the Clementine Lunar Control Network (CLCN) [2], both derived from (mostly 750-nm) Clementine images, by M. Davies and T. Colvin at RAND. The primary difference between our new network and the previous ones is that we solve for the radii of the control points. This avoids (~7 km) distortion of horizontal positions present in the CLCN. The expected precision of such information is on the order of several hundred m, and compatible with Clementine LIDAR [3]. Thus, a by-product of this network is a global lunar topographic model that is denser than that provided by LIDAR and of similar accuracy, and denser than any other lunar topography information except that provided in limited areas ([4-7]). This is the only lunar topographic model positioning where both heights and horizontal positions are estimated in a globally-consistent system. Other features of the ULCN 2005 are that the camera angles to their values as measured during the mission, supposedly with an accuracy of 0.03º [8], and we have identified a majority of the original ULCN points on Clementine images. Future Work: The Lunar Orbiter (LO) digital mosaics now being generated [9] will be registered to the ULCN 2005. We will also further improve this network through the addition of Mariner 10, Galileo, and LO image measurements, and Clementine stereo [10], and by adding ties to the current absolute LLR and ALSEP network [11]. Although unfunded, the Clementine mosaics could also be regenerated in this system. It will be absolutely essential to further update and improve this network with data from future missions. This is necessary so that these new datasets can be compared to the prior data, particularly the LO and Clementine multispectral products. References: [1] Davies, M. E. et al. (1994) JGR, 99, E11, 23,211-23,214. [2] Edwards, et al. (1996), LPS XXVII, 335-336. [3] Smith, D. E. et al. (1997), JGR, 102, E1, 1591-1611. [4] Cook, A. C. et al. (2000), JGR, 105, E5, 12,023-12,033. [5] Rosiek, M. R. et al. (1998), LPS XXX, Abstract #1853. Rosiek, M. R., and Aeschliman, R. A. (2001) LPS XXXII, Abstract #1943. [6] Margot, J-L. C. (1999), PhD Thesis, Cornell University. [7] Wu, S. S. C. and Doyle, F. J. (1990), in Planetary Mapping, R. Greeley and R.M. Batson, eds., CUP, 169-207. [8] Nozette, S., et al. (1994), Science, 266, 1835-1839. [9] Weller, L., et al. (2006), LPS XXXVII, Abstract #2143. [10] Cook, A. C. et al. (2002), AGU Fall Meeting, Abstract #P22D-09. [11] Davies, M. E. and Colvin, T. R. (2000), JGR, 105, E8, 20,277-20,280.

Archinal, B. A.; Rosiek, M. R.; Kirk, R. L.; Redding, B. L.

2006-08-01

49

Discrimination Between Maturity and Composition from Integrated Clementine UltraViolet-Visible and Near-Infrared Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clementine UV-VIS dataset has greatly improved our understanding of the Moon. The UV-VIS camera was limited to five spectral channels from 415 to 1000 nm. The Clementine near-infrared (NIR) camera was designed to complement this spectral coverage. The NIR filter at 2000 run allows the discrimination between olivine and pyroxene within identified mare basalts. In addition, we will show

S. Le Mouelic; Y. Langevin; S. Erard; P. Pinet; Y. Daydou; S. Chevrel

1999-01-01

50

The Lunar Crustal Thickness from Analysis of the Lunar Prospector Gravity and Clementine Topography Datasets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Prospector spacecraft has mapped the gravity field of the Moon to a level of resolution never achieved before, and a spherical harmonic representation to degree and order 100 is available. When combined with the topography dataset produced by the Clementine mission, the resulting Bouguer anomaly map is interpreted to model the thickness of the lunar crust. Such models are crucial to understanding the lunar thermal history and the formation of geological features such as mascon basins, several more of which have been newly discovered from this dataset. A two-layer planetary model was used to compute the variations of the depth to the lunar Moho. The thickness values ranged from near 0 to 120 km. There is significant agreement with previous work using the Clementine gravitational field data with differences in specific locations such as South Pole-Aitken Basin, for example.

Asmar, S.; Schubert, G.; Konopliv, A.; Moore, W.

1999-01-01

51

Analysis of data of "Clementine" and "KAGUYA" missions and "ULCN" and "KSC-1162" catalogues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper an analysis of data coordinate systems from selenographic catalogues and space missions was carried out. The lunar macrorelief models were made on basis of the software package ASNI USTU using method of the spherical harmonic expansion. These models accurately describe the global features of the lunar figure. To construct these models the following sources of topographic information were used: "Clementine" and "K?GUY?" (Selena, Japan mission) missions, "KSC-1162" (Kazan selenocentric catalogue), "Kiev" (selenodesic catalogue), "SAI" (Chuikova (1975)), "Bills, Ferrari", "ULCN" (The Unified Lunar Control Network 2005). Direct comparison hypsometric information "KS?-1162" catalogue data with "Clementine" mission was carried out. These researches confirmed a good agreement of the hypsometric information of compared systems. The normalized coefficients were obtained on basis of the hypsometric information expansion for eight sources. The displacement of the lunar center of mass (LCM) relatively to the lunar center of figure (LCF) was obtained by using topographic data selenodetical catalogues and space missions.

Nefedyev, Y. A.; Valeev, S. G.; Mikeev, R. R.; Andreev, A. O.; Varaksina, N. Y.

2012-12-01

52

A New Global Digital Map of the Moon from Clementine Image Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new cartographic control net for the Moon has been completed utilizing Clementine image data. Previous geometric control for the Moon contained errors of _˜1-2 km on the near side and up to _˜10 km for the far side. Selection of over 265,000 match points from _˜43,000 images has improved the global accuracy to _˜250 m\\/pixel. Several automated procedures were

T. L. Becker; K. E. Edwards; D. Cook; E. Eliason; E. M. Lee; A. S. McEwen; H. Morgan; M. S. Robinson; T. Colvin; M. Davies; T. Duxbury; T. Sorensen

1996-01-01

53

A 70th Degree Lunar Gravity Model (GLGM-2) from Clementine and other tracking data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A spherical harmonic model of the lunar gravity field complete to degree and order 70 has been developed from S band Doppler tracking data from the Clementine mission, as well as historical tracking data from Lunar Orbiters 1-5 and the Apollo 15 and 16 subsatellites. The model combines 361,000 Doppler observations from Clementine with 347,000 historical observations. The historical data consist of mostly 60-s Doppler with a noise of 0.25 to several mm/s. The Clementine data consist of mostly 10-s Doppler data, with a data noise of 0.25 mm/s for the observations from the Deep Space Network, and 2.5 mm/s for the data from a naval tracking station at Pomonkey, Maryland. Observations provided Clementine, provide the strongest satellite constraint on the Moon's low-degree field. In contrast the historical data, collected by spacecraft that had lower periapsis altitudes, provide distributed regions of high-resolution coverage within +/- 29 deg of the nearside lunar equator. To obtain the solution for a high-degree field in the absence of a uniform distribution of observations, we applied an a priori power law constraint of the form 15 x 10(exp -5)/sq l which had the effect of limiting the gravitational power and noise at short wavelengths. Coefficients through degree and order 18 are not significantly affected by the constraint, and so the model permits geophysical analysis of effects of the major basins at degrees 10-12. The GLGM-2 model confirms major features of the lunar gravity field shown in previous gravitational field models but also reveals significantly more detail, particularly at intermediate wavelengths (10(exp 3) km). Free-air gravity anomaly maps derived from the new model show the nearside and farside highlands to be gravitationally smooth, reflecting a state of isostatic compensation. Mascon basins (including Imbrium, Serenitatis, Crisium, Smythii, and Humorum) are denoted by gravity highs first recognized from Lunar Orbiter tracking. All of the major mascons are bounded by annuli of negative anomalies representing significant subsurface mass deficiencies. Mare Orientale appears as a minor mascon surrounded by a horseshoe-shaped gravity low centered on the Inner and Outer Rook rings that is evidence of significant subsurface structural heterogeneity. Although direct tracking is not available over a significant part of the lunar farside, GLGM-2 resolves negative anomalies that correlate with many farside basins, including South Pole-Aitken, Hertzsprung, Korolev, Moscoviense, Tsiolkovsky, and Freundlich-Sharonov.

Lemonie, Frank G. R.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.

1997-01-01

54

The south pole region of the moon as seen by Clementine  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Clementine mission has provided the first comprehensive set of high-resolution images of the south pole region of the moon. Within 5?? of latitude of the pole, an area of an estimated 30,000 square kilometers remained in shadow during a full lunar rotation and is a promising target for future exploration for ice deposits. The Schrodinger Basin (320 kilometers in diameter), centered at 75??S, is one of the two youngest, least modified, great multiring impact basins on the moon. A large maar-type volcano localized along a graben within the Schrodinger Basin probably erupted between 1 and 2 billion years ago.

Shoemaker, E. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Eliason, E. M.

1994-01-01

55

A New Global Digital Map of the Moon from Clementine Image Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new cartographic control net for the Moon has been completed utilizing Clementine image data. Previous geometric control for the Moon contained errors of _˜1-2 km on the near side and up to _˜10 km for the far side. Selection of over 265,000 match points from _˜43,000 images has improved the global accuracy to _˜250 m/pixel. Several automated procedures were developed to aid in finding matchpoints, with a success rate exceeding 90%. These new mosaicking techniques will be applicable to future planetary datasets and are included in the ISIS software package available at no cost through the Internet (http://wwwflag.wr.usgs.gov/USGSFlag/Data/software/isis.html). Matchpoints were processed at RAND for analytic triangulation. Absolute control was obtained by holding known locations (such as Apollo landing sites) as truth. Camera angles for each image were updated using a least squares fit to minimize offsets between matchpoints. The mean error for the entire Moon is less than 1 pixel. The final 1 km monochromatic basemap was constructed using 750 nm images except where gaps existed in the coverage; these gaps were filled using 900 nm images, empirically fit to match the brightness of the adjacent 750 nm data. The data have been normalized to a phase angle of 30deg using an improved photometric function derived from Clementine and Galileo image data. Work is currently underway processing the remaining bands covering the wavelength range of 415-2780 nm.

Becker, T. L.; Edwards, K. E.; Cook, D.; Eliason, E.; Lee, E. M.; McEwen, A. S.; Morgan, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; Duxbury, T.; Sorensen, T.

1996-09-01

56

HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

1995-04-01

57

A Near-Infrared (NIR) Global Multispectral Map of the Moon from Clementine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In May and June of 1994, the NASA/DoD Clementine Mission acquired global, 11- band, multispectral observations of the lunar surface using the ultraviolet-visible (UVVIS) and near-infrared (NIR) camera systems. The global 5-band UVVIS Digital Image Model (DIM) of the Moon at 100 m/pixel was released to the Planetary Data System (PDS) in 2000. The corresponding NIR DIM has been compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey for distribution to the lunar science community. The recently released NIR DIM has six spectral bands (1100, 1250, 1500, 2000, 2600, and 2780 nm) and is delivered in 996 quads at 100 m/pixel (303 pixels/degree). The NIR data were radiometrically corrected, geometrically controlled, and photometrically normalized to form seamless, uniformly illuminated mosaics of the lunar surface.

Eliason, E. M.; Lee, E. M.; Becker, T. L.; Weller, L. A.; Isbell, C. E.; Staid, M. I.; Gaddis, L. R.; McEwen, A. S.; Robinson, M. S.; Duxbury, T.

2003-01-01

58

The clementine bistatic radar experiment: Evidence for ice on the moon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ice deposits, derived from comets and water-bearing meteorites hitting the Moon over geological times, have long been postulated to exist in dark areas near the poles of the Moon. The characteristics of radio waves beamed from the Clementine spacecraft into the polar areas, reflected from the Moon's surface, and received on the large dish antennas of the Deep Space Network here on Earth show that roughly the volume of a small lake (???0.9-1.8 km3) of water ice makes up part of the Moon's surface layer near the south pole. The discovery of ice near the lunar south pole has important ramifications for a permanent return to the Moon. These deposits could be used to manufacture rocket propellant and to support human life on the Moon. ?? 1998 MAHK Hayka/Interperiodica Publishing.

Spudis, P. D.; Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E.

1998-01-01

59

Hot water, sodium carbonate, and sodium bicarbonate for the control of postharvest green and blue molds of clementine mandarins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clementine mandarins cv. ‘Clemenules’, artificially inoculated with Penicillium digitatum or Penicillium italicum, were immersed in 0, 2, or 3% (w\\/v) sodium carbonate (SC) solutions at 20, 45 or 50°C for 60 or 150 s. Decay incidence was determined after 7 days of storage at 20°C and 90% relative humidity (RH). Hot water (HW) at 45 or 50°C did not satisfactorily

Llu??s Palou; Josep Usall; José A Muñoz; Joseph L Smilanick; Inmaculada Viñas

2002-01-01

60

Effects of rootstock and flushing on the incidence of three insects on 'Clementine de Nules' citrus trees.  

PubMed

We evaluated the influence of six different citrus rootstocks on the incidence of the citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), and the aphid species, Aphis gossypii Glover and A. spiraecola Patch (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on 'Clementine de Nules' trees (Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan.). Sampling was conducted during 2005 and 2006 in a grove of 3-yr-old trees in southern Spain with six rootstocks arranged in a completely randomized block design. Incidence (i.e., degree of infestation) and availability of resources for herbivores were assessed bi-weekly, and in addition, a "flushing index" was estimated as the number of young shoots (as a percentage of total shoots) susceptible to herbivore injury. Our results showed that contrasting factors affected the incidence of populations of P. citrella, A. gossypii, and A. spiraecola on 'Clementine de Nules'. Incidence of P. citrella was significantly dependent on the flushing pattern observed throughout the study, whereas the reverse was true for the aphid species. Among these, A. spiraecola had similar levels of incidence regardless of rootstock, whereas A. gossypii were found almost exclusively on leaves of 'Clementine de Nules' grafted on 'Cleopatra mandarin' (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan). Potential implications of these results on pest control are discussed. PMID:19161697

Muñoz, S Trapero; García, A Hervalejo; Pérez, M Jiménez; Boyero, J R; Vela, J M; Martínez-Ferri, E

2008-12-01

61

Preliminary Analysis of the Absolute Cartographic Accuracy of the Clementine UVVIS Mosaics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our analysis reveals that the UVVIS basemap absolute cartographic accuracy may be in the range of +/-1 km to +/- 10 km locally. No absolute ground control points exist on the lunar farside making assessment of any lunar control network problematic. Bore sighted centers for Clementine UVVIS images derived from mission produced NAIF archived spacecraft position and orientation data were compared with image centers derived from the USGS/RAND photogrammetrically adjusted pointing (using an assumed lunar radius of 1737.4 km). Offsets are typically < 1 km within the USGS/RAND absolute control net region (enclosed within +/-40 deg E/W and N/S region on the nearside), worsening up to approximately 10 km in the vicinity of the 90W and 90E longitude lines (albeit smaller near the poles), and then reducing to <1 km towards the center of the farside. The USGS 750 nm basemap (upon which all other UVVIS and NIR mosaics are registered) shows several km discrepancies in absolute spatial position with respect to an earlier "Unified Control Net"; these differences are being measured and a comparison will be made with the mission produced NAIF archived position and pointing data. We propose that when the RAND control net was constructed from the Clementine images, the fact that a constant radius of the Moon was used, and that the images were relatively small (requiring approximately 140 thousand images to cover the Moon), may have resulted in poorly constrained fits in regions where no absolute control was available i.e the entire farside and the nearside beyond the absolute control area. Compounding this problem is the fact that the Moon exhibits +/- 8 km of relief on the farside thus resulting in +/-2% scale errors for a significant portion of the images that compose the basemap. The lack of control, and the scaling problems on the farside, must negatively affect the control network solution in complex ways due to the large number of uncontrolled frames. At this time a definitive resolution of the discrepancies is not possible. However, we can make progress by generating synthetic images of the Moon using the UVVIS mosaic and a planet-wide 1 km/pixel Digital Elevation Model and then compare these to large area lunar images taken from Earth or from spacecraft. Obtaining an accurate cartographic solution of the entire Moon is required before future sample return missions are attempted for the farside or nearside limb areas.

Cook, A. C.; Robinson, M. S.; Semenov, B.; Watters, T. R.

2002-12-01

62

Lunar mare basalts in the Aristarchus region: Implications for the stratigraphic sequence from Clementine UVVIS data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Aristarchus region of Oceanus Procellarum is an area concentrated with lunar basalts, which were mainly produced by the last major phase of lunar volcanism on the western nearside. A group of lunar sample and remote sensing scientists have carried out the extensive task of characterization of lunar mare soils with regard to their mineralogical and chemical makeup and regional geologic mapping. Spectral parameters of the high spatial resolution Clementine images are used to identify and define these basalts as different compositional and spectral units. This endeavor is aimed at deciphering the subtle spectral characteristics of mare soils and validating the mapping technique used in this study, together with making statistical analysis of the links between the basalt types with ages in order to provide a further understanding of material types and geologic evolution in the Aristarchus region of the Moon. From the new perspective of mining geologic information in multivariable image-spaces, spectrally distinct 9 high-Ti and 11 low-Ti basalt reference spectra have been distinguished and as a result, more than 70 spectrally and compositionally basaltic units, which range in age from 1.20 b.y. to 3.74 b.y., have been identified. To some extent, a potential relationship between composition and relative age exists in the statistical analysis of the links between spectral types (related with the Clementine ratio colors) of various basalts and ages in this study, which suggests that composition with different states of maturity correlate with age to some extent. The mineralogical characteristics and spectra-age relationship in the Marius Hills region indicate that the early basalts may still be exposed at the surface deposit after prolonged volcanic activity in this region. This may be a result of not being blanketed by later lava flows, or lava extrusions of underlying low-Ti basalts. In addition, stratigraphic analysis also reveals and confirms that TiO2 concentrations appear to vary independently with time, and generally eruptions of TiO2-rich and TiO2-poor basalts have occurred contemporaneously.

Zhang, F.; Zou, Y. L.; Zheng, Y. C.; Fu, X. H.; Zhu, Y. C.

2014-01-01

63

Reanalysis of Clementine Bistatic Radar Data from the Lunar South Pole  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On 9 April 1994 the Clementine spacecraft high-gain antenna was aimed toward the Moon's surface and the resulting 13-cm wavelength radio echoes were received on Earth. Using these data, we have found that the lunar surface generally follows a Lambertian bistatic scattering function sigma(sub 0) = K(sub D)cos(theta(sub i) with K(sub D) approx. 0.003 for the opposite (expected) sense of circular polarization and K(sub D) approx. 0.001 for the same (unexpected) sense. But there are important deviations-of up to 50% in some parts of the echo spectrum-from this simple form. Based on an earlier analysis of these same data, Nozette et al. claimed detection of an enhancement in echoes with right circular polarization from regions near the South Pole in a near-backscatter geometry. Such behavior would be consistent with presence of perhaps large quantities of water ice near the Pole. We have been unable to reproduce that result. Although we find weak suggestions of enhanced echoes at the time of South Pole backscatter, similar features are present at earlier and later times, adjacent frequencies, and in left circular polarization. If enhanced backscatter is present, it is not unique to the South Pole; if not unique to the Pole, then ice is less likely as an explanation for the enhancement.

Simpson, Richard A.; Tyler, G. Leonard

1998-01-01

64

Ancient multiring basins on the moon revealed by clementine laser altimetry.  

PubMed

Analysis of laser altimetry data from Clementine has confirmed and extended our knowledge of nearly obliterated multiring basins on the moon. These basins were formed during the early bombardment phase of lunar history, have been filled to varying degrees by mare lavas and regional ejecta blankets, and have been degraded by the superposition of large impact craters. The Mendel-Rydberg Basin, a degraded three-ring feature over 600 kilometers in diameter on the lunar western limb, is about 6 kilometers deep from rim to floor, only slightly less deep than the nearby younger and much better preserved Orientale Basin (8 kilometers deep). The South Pole-Aitken Basin, the oldest discernible impact feature on the moon, is revealed as a basin 2500 kilometers in diameter with an average depth of more than 13 kilometers, rim crest to floor. This feature is the largest, deepest impact crater yet discovered in the solar system. Several additional depressions seen in the data may represent previously unmapped ancient impact basins. PMID:17737079

Spudis, P D; Gillis, J J; Reisse, R A

1994-12-16

65

A Hybrid Method for Calculating TiO2 Concentrations Using Clementine UVVIS Data, and Verified with Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present a new algorithm for extracting TiO2 concentrations from Clementine UVVIS data, which accounts for soil darkness and UV/VIS ratio. The accuracy of these TiO2 estimates are examined with Lunar Prospector thermal/epithermal neutron flux data. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Gillis, J. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.

2001-01-01

66

Compositional analyses of small lunar pyroclastic deposits using Clementine multispectral data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Clementine ultraviolet-visible (UVVIS) data are used to examine the compositions of 18 pyroclastic deposits (15 small, three large) at 13 sites on the Moon. Compositional variations among pyroclastic deposits largely result from differing amounts of new basaltic (or juvenile) material and reworked local material entrained in their ejecta upon eruption. Characterization of pyroclastic deposit compositions allows us to understand the mechanisms of lunar explosive volcanism. Evidence for compositional differences between small pyroclastic deposits at a single site is observed at Atlas crater. At all sites, compositional variation among the small pyroclastic deposits is consistent with earlier classification based on Earth-based spectra: three compositional groups can be observed, and the trend of increasing mafic absorption band strength from Group 1 to Group 2 to Group 3 is noted. As redefined here, Group 1 deposits include those of Alphonsus West, Alphonsus Southeast, Alphonsus Northeast 2, Atlas South, Crüger, Franklin, Grimaldi, Lavoisier, Oppenheimer, Orientale, and Riccioli. Group 1 deposits resemble lunar highlands, with weak mafic bands and relatively high UV/VIS ratios. Group 2 deposits include those of Alphonsus Northeast 1, Atlas North, Eastern Frigoris East and West, and Aristarchus Plateau; Group 2 deposits are similar to mature lunar maria, with moderate mafic band depths and intermediate UV/VIS ratios. The single Group 3 deposit, J. Herschel, has a relatively strong mafic band and a low UV/VIS ratio, and olivine is a likely juvenile component. Two of the deposits in these groups, Orientale and Aristarchus, are large pyroclastic deposits. The third large pyroclastic deposit, Apollo 17/Taurus Littrow, has a very weak mafic band and a high UV/VIS ratio and it does not belong to any of the compositional groups for small pyroclastic deposits. The observed compositional variations indicate that highland and mare materials are also present in many large and small pyroclastic deposits, and they suggest that volcanic glasses or spheres may not be dominant juvenile components in all large pyroclastic deposits. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

Gaddis, L. R.; Hawke, B. R.; Robinson, M. S.; Coombs, C.

2000-01-01

67

Clementine Observations of the Zodiacal Light and the Dust Content of the Inner Solar System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using the Moon to occult the Sun, the Clementine spacecraft used its navigation cameras to map the inner zodiacal light at optical wavelengths over elongations of 3 approx. less than epsilon approx. less than 30 deg from the Sun. This surface brightness map is then used to infer the spatial distribution of interplanetary dust over heliocentric distances of about 10 solar radii to the orbit of Venus. The averaged ecliptic surface brightness of the zodiacal light falls off as Z(epsilon) is a member of epsilon(sup -2.45 +/- 0.05), which suggests that the dust cross-sectional density nominally falls off as sigma(r) is a member of r(sup - 1.45 +/- 0.05). The interplanetary dust also has an albedo of alpha approx. = 0.1 that is uncertain by a factor of approx. 2. Asymmetries of approx. 10% are seen in directions east-west and north-south of the Sun, and these may be due the giant planets' secular gravitational perturbations. We apply a simple model that attributes the zodiacal light as due to three dust populations having distinct inclination distributions, namely, dust from asteroids and Jupiter-family comets (JFCs) having characteristic inclinations of i approx. 7 deg, dust from Halley-type comets having i approx. 33 deg, and an isotropic cloud of dust from Oort Cloud comets. The best-fitting scenario indicates that asteroids + JFCs are the source of about 45% of the optical dust cross section seen in the ecliptic at 1 AU but that at least 89% of the dust cross section enclosed by a 1-AU-radius sphere is of a cometary origin. Each population's radial density variations can also deviate somewhat from the nominal sigma(r) is a member of r(sup -1.45). When these results are extrapolated out to the asteroid belt, we find an upper limit on the mass of the light-reflecting asteroidal dust that is equivalent to a 12-km asteroid, and a similar extrapolation of the isotropic dust cloud out to Oort Cloud distances yields a mass equivalent to a 30-km comet, although the latter mass is uncertain by orders of magnitude.

Hahn, Joseph M.; Zook, Herbert A.; Cooper, Bonnie; Sunkara, Bhaskar

2002-01-01

68

Mapping and compositional analysis of mare basalts in the Aristarchus region of the Moon using Clementine data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The process of accurately defining and outlining mare basalt units is necessary for constraining the stratigraphy and ages of basalt units, which are used to determine the duration and the flux of lunar volcanism. We use a combination of Clementine's five-band ultraviolet/visible data and TiO2 and FeO abundance distribution maps to define homogenous mare basalt units and characterize their compositional variations (with maturity) in the Aristarchus region. With 20 groups of distinct mare basaltic soils identified using the method in this paper, six additional spectrally defined areas and five basaltic units are constructed, and their mineralogic quantization values provide new constraints on their temporal and spatial evolution. Our results indicate that the Aristarchus region has diverse basalt units and a complex history of volcanic evolution. We also demonstrate that the techniques, from which spectrally distinct mare basalts can be mapped, performed well in this study and can be confidently expanded to other mare regions of the Moon.

Zhang, Feng; Zou, Yong-Liao; Zheng, Yong-Chun; Fu, Xiao-Hui; Zhu, Yong-Chao

2014-01-01

69

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 12; CL 6012; 0 deg N to 80 deg N Latitude, 240 deg to 270 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

70

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 4; CL 6004; 0 deg S to 80 deg S Latitude, 30 deg E to 60 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

71

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 17; CL 6017; 0 deg to 80 deg S Latitude, 330 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

72

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 18; CL 6018; 80 deg N to 80 deg S Latitude, 330 deg E to 360 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

73

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 13; CL 6013; 0 deg S to 80 deg S Latitude, 240 deg to 270 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

74

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 1; CL 6001; 0 deg N to 80 deg N Latitude, 0 deg E to 30 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

75

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 3; CL 6003; 0 deg N to 80 deg N Latitude, 30 deg E to 60 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

76

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 16; CL 6016; 0 deg N to 80 deg N Latitude, 300 deg E to 330 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

77

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 9; CL 6009; 80 deg N to 80 deg S Latitude, 180 deg to 210 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

78

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 2; CL 6002; 0 deg S to 80 deg S Latitude, 0 deg E to 30 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

79

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 6; CL 6006; 80 deg N to 80 deg S Latitude, 90 deg E to 120 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

80

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 7; CL 6007; 80 deg N to 80 deg S Latitude; 120 deg E to 150 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

81

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 15; CL 6015; 0 deg S to 80 deg S Latitude, 270 deg E to 300 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

82

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 7; CL 6007; 80 deg N to 80 deg S Latitude, 120 deg E to 150 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

83

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 5; CL 6005, 80 deg N to 80 deg S Latitude, 60 deg E to 90 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

84

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 14; CL 6014; 0 deg N to 80 deg N Latitude, 270 deg E to 300 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

85

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 10; CL 6010; 0 deg N to 80 deg N Latitude, 210 deg E to 240 deg E Longitude; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) effort to mosaic Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar images. These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. These mosaics are spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel. The geometric control is provided by the 100 m/pixel U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD were compiled from sub-polar data (latitudes 80 degrees South to 80 degrees North; -80 to +80) within the longitude range 0-30 deg E. The mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 degrees of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. This CD contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

86

Physiological and molecular analysis of the maturation process in fruits of Clementine Mandarin and one of its late-ripening mutants.  

PubMed

Peel color is one of the main features affecting citrus quality. Clementine is a widespread citrus species with several mutants showing a delay in pigmentation and harvesting. This work characterizes the fruit development and ripening of two clementine clones, 'Comune', a widespread variety, and one of its natural mutations, 'Tardivo', which differ by a delayed color-break and extended harvest period. Morphological, chemical, and molecular analyses were carried out on fruits of both genotypes during the whole maturation process. Analysis showed that mutation did not affect ripening characteristics such as juice acidity and TSS. However, biochemical and molecular analysis revealed marked differences in the flavedo regarding carotenogenesis and chlorophyllase gene expression. Carotenoid showed quantitative differences at biochemical and molecular levels. Results demonstrated that the mutation in 'Tardivo' influenced the transcriptional activation of PSY, a key step in carotenoid biosynthesis. The differential PSY expression led to a significant quantitative difference in phytoene accumulation between the two genotypes. Also, 'Tardivo' showed delayed accumulation of carotenes, lutein, and beta,beta-xanthophylls. The differential expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and perception suggested differing responses to ethylene signaling between the two genotypes. Moreover, exogenous application of ethylene revealed a different sensitivity of the two varieties to this hormone. The analysis added new information to better understand the complex process of ripening in citrus. PMID:19655798

Distefano, Gaetano; Las Casas, Giuseppina; Caruso, Marco; Todaro, Aldo; Rapisarda, Paolo; La Malfa, Stefano; Gentile, Alessandra; Tribulato, Eugenio

2009-09-01

87

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 19; CL 6019; 80 deg N to 90 deg N Latitude, North Periapsis; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar image mosaics developed by Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS). These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. The geometric control is provided by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD are compiled from polar data (latitudes greater than 80 degrees), and are presented in the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel at the pole, a resolution 5 times greater than that (150 m/pixel) of the corresponding UV/Vis polar basemap. This 5:1 scale ratio is in keeping with the sub-polar mosaic, in which the HiRes and UV/Vis mosaics had scales of 20 m/pixel and 100 m/pixel, respectively. The equal-area property of the stereographic projection made this preferable for the HiRes polar mosaic rather than the basemap's orthographic projection. Thus, a necessary first step in constructing the mosaic was the reprojection of the UV/Vis basemap to the stereographic projection. The HiRes polar data can be naturally grouped according to the orbital periapsis, which was in the south during the first half of the mapping mission and in the north during the second half. Images in each group have generally uniform intrinsic resolution, illumination, exposure and gain. Rather than mingle data from the two periapsis epochs, separate mosaics are provided for each, a total of 4 polar mosaics. The mosaics are divided into 100 square tiles of 2250 pixels (approximately 2.2 deg near the pole) on a side. Not all squares of this grid contain HiRes mosaic data, some inevitably since a square is not a perfect representation of a (latitude) circle, others due to the lack of HiRes data. This CD also contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

88

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 20; CL 6020; 80 deg N to 90 deg N Latitude, South Periapsis; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar image mosaics developed by Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS). These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. The geometric control is provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD are compiled from polar data (latitudes greater than 80 degrees), and are presented in the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel at the pole, a resolution 5 times greater than that (150 m/pixel) of the corresponding UV/Vis polar basemap. This 5:1 scale ratio is in keeping with the sub-polar mosaic, in which the HiRes and UV/Vis mosaics had scales of 20 m/pixel and 100 m/pixel, respectively. The equal-area property of the stereographic projection made this preferable for the HiRes polar mosaic rather than the basemap's orthographic projection. Thus, a necessary first step in constructing the mosaic was the reprojection of the UV/Vis basemap to the stereographic projection. The HiRes polar data can be naturally grouped according to the orbital periapsis, which was in the south during the first half of the mapping mission and in the north during the second half. Images in each group have generally uniform intrinsic resolution, illumination, exposure and gain. Rather than mingle data from the two periapsis epochs, separate mosaics are provided for each, a total of 4 polar mosaics. The mosaics are divided into 100 square tiles of 2250 pixels (approximately 2.2 deg near the pole) on a side. Not all squares of this grid contain HiRes mosaic data, some inevitably since a square is not a perfect representation of a (latitude) circle, others due to the lack of HiRes data. This CD also contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

89

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 21; CL 6021; 80 deg S to 90 deg S Latitude, North Periapsis; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar image mosaics developed by Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS). These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. The geometric control is provided by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD are compiled from polar data (latitudes greater than 80 degrees), and are presented in the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel at the pole, a resolution 5 times greater than that (150 m/pixel) of the corresponding UV/Vis polar basemap. This 5:1 scale ratio is in keeping with the sub-polar mosaic, in which the HiRes and UV/Vis mosaics had scales of 20 m/pixel and 100 m/pixel, respectively. The equal-area property of the stereographic projection made this preferable for the HiRes polar mosaic rather than the basemap's orthographic projection. Thus, a necessary first step in constructing the mosaic was the reprojection of the UV/Vis basemap to the stereographic projection. The HiRes polar data can be naturally grouped according to the orbital periapsis, which was in the south during the first half of the mapping mission and in the north during the second half. Images in each group have generally uniform intrinsic resolution, illumination, exposure and gain. Rather than mingle data from the two periapsis epochs, separate mosaics are provided for each, a total of 4 polar mosaics. The mosaics are divided into 100 square tiles of 2250 pixels (approximately 2.2 deg near the pole) on a side. Not all squares of this grid contain HiRes mosaic data, some inevitably since a square is not a perfect representation of a (latitude) circle, others due to the lack of HiRes data. This CD also contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

90

Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project. Volume 22; CL 6022; 80 deg S to 90 deg S Latitude, South Periapsis; 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This compact disk (CD) is part of the Clementine I high resolution (HiRes) camera lunar image mosaics developed by Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS). These mosaics were developed through calibration and semi-automated registration against the recently released geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic, which is available through the PDS, as CD-ROM volumes CL_3001-3015. The HiRes mosaics are compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution observations from the HiRes imaging system onboard the Clementine Spacecraft. The geometric control is provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Clementine Basemap Mosaic compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity largely caused by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The mosaics on this CD are compiled from polar data (latitudes greater than 80 degrees), and are presented in the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel at the pole, a resolution 5 times greater than that (150 m/pixel) of the corresponding UV/Vis polar basemap. This 5:1 scale ratio is in keeping with the sub-polar mosaic, in which the HiRes and UV/Vis mosaics had scales of 20 m/pixel and 100 m/pixel, respectively. The equal-area property of the stereographic projection made this preferable for the HiRes polar mosaic rather than the basemap's orthographic projection. Thus, a necessary first step in constructing the mosaic was the reprojection of the UV/Vis basemap to the stereographic projection. The HiRes polar data can be naturally grouped according to the orbital periapsis, which was in the south during the first half of the mapping mission and in the north during the second half. Images in each group have generally uniform intrinsic resolution, illumination, exposure and gain. Rather than mingle data from the two periapsis epochs, separate mosaics are provided for each, a total of 4 polar mosaics. The mosaics are divided into 100 square tiles of 2250 pixels (approximately 2.2 deg near the pole) on a side. Not all squares of this grid contain HiRes mosaic data, some inevitably since a square is not a perfect representation of a (latitude) circle, others due to the lack of HiRes data. This CD also contains ancillary data files that support the HiRes mosaic. These files include browse images with UV/Vis context stored in a Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format, index files ('imgindx.tab' and 'srcindx.tab') that tabulate the contents of the CD, and documentation files. For more information on the contents and organization of the CD volume set refer to the "FILES, DIRECTORIES AND DISK CONTENTS" section of this document. The image files are organized according to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. An image file (tile) is organized as a PDS labeled file containing an "image object".

Malin, Michael; Revine, Michael; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

91

Clementine sensor processing system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of the DSPSE Satellite Controller (DSC) is baselined as a single-string satellite controller. The DSC performs two main functions: health and maintenance of the spacecraft; and image capture, storage, and playback. The DSC contains two processors: a radiation-hardened Mil-Std-1750, and a commercial R3000. The Mil-Std-1750 processor performs all housekeeping operations, while the R3000 is mainly used to perform the image processing functions associated with the navigation functions, as well as performing various experiments. The DSC also contains a data handling unit (DHU) used to interface to various spacecraft imaging sensors and to capture, compress, and store selected images onto the solid-state data recorder. The development of the DSC evolved from several key requirements; the DSPSE satellite was to do the following: (1) have a radiation-hardened spacecraft control system and be immune to single-event upsets (SEU's); (2) use an R3000-based processor to run the star tracker software that was developed by SDIO (due to schedule and cost constraints, there was no time to port the software to a radiation-hardened processor); and (3) fly a commercial processor to verify its suitability for use in a space environment. In order to enhance the DSC reliability, the system was designed with multiple processing paths. These multiple processing paths provide for greater tolerance to various component failures. The DSC was designed so that all housekeeping processing functions are performed by either the Mil-Std-1750 processor or the R3000 processor. The image capture and storage is performed either by the DHU or the R3000 processor.

Feldstein, A. A.

1993-01-01

92

The use of Vis/NIRS and chemometric analysis to predict fruit defects and postharvest behaviour of 'Nules Clementine' mandarin fruit.  

PubMed

The use of chemometrics to analyse Vis/NIRS signal collected from intact 'Nules Clementine' mandarin fruit at harvest, to predict the rind physico-chemical profile after eight weeks postharvest was explored. Vis/NIRS signals of 150 fruit were obtained immediately after harvest. Reference data on the rind were obtained after eight-week storage, including colour index (CI), rind dry matter (DM), and concentration of sugars. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was applied to develop models. Principal component analysis (PCA) followed by PLS-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to classify fruit according to canopy position. Optimal PLS model performances for DM, sucrose, glucose and fructose were obtained using multiple scatter correction pre-processing, showing respective residual predictive deviation (RPD) of 3.39, 1.75, 2.19 and 3.08. Clusters of sample distribution in the PCA and PLS-DA models based on canopy position were obtained. The results demonstrated the potential applications of Vis/NIRS to predict postharvest behaviour of mandarin fruit. PMID:24912725

Magwaza, Lembe Samukelo; Landahl, Sandra; Cronje, Paul J R; Nieuwoudt, Hélène H; Mouazen, Abdul Mounem; Nicolaï, Bart M; Terry, Leon A; Opara, Umezuruike Linus

2014-11-15

93

Transferability of the EST-SSRs developed on Nules clementine (Citrus clementina Hort ex Tan) to other Citrus species and their effectiveness for genetic mapping  

PubMed Central

Background During the last decade, numerous microsatellite markers were developed for genotyping and to identify closely related plant genotypes. In citrus, previously developed microsatellite markers were arisen from genomic libraries and more often located in non coding DNA sequences. To optimize the use of these EST-SSRs as genetic markers in genome mapping programs and citrus systematic analysis, we have investigated their polymorphism related to the type (di or trinucleotide) or their position in the coding sequences. Results Among 11000 unigenes from a Clementine EST library, we have found at least one microsatellite sequence (repeated units size ranged from 2 to 6 nucleotides) in 1500 unigenes (13.6%). More than 95% of these SSRs were di or trinucleotides. If trinucleotide microsatellites were encountered trough all part of EST sequences, dinucleotide microsatellites were preferentially (50%) concentrated in the 5' 100th nucleotides. We assessed the polymorphism of 41 EST-SSR, by PCR amplification droved with flanking primers among ten Citrus species plus 3 from other genera. More than 90% of EST-SSR markers were polymorphic. Furthermore, dinucleotide microsatellite markers were more polymorphic than trinucleotide ones, probably related to their distribution that was more often located in the 5' UnTranslated Region (UTR). We obtained a good agreement of diversity relationships between the citrus species and relatives assessed with EST-SSR markers with the established taxonomy and phylogeny. To end, the heterozygosity of each genotype and all dual combinations were studied to evaluate the percentage of mappable markers. Higher values (> 45%) were observed for putative Citrus inter-specific hybrids (lime lemon, or sour orange) than for Citrus basic true species (mandarin, pummelo and citron) (<30%). Most favorable combinations for genome mapping were observed in those involving interspecific hybrid genotypes. Those gave higher levels of mappable markers (>70%) with a significant proportion suitable for synteny analysis. Conclusion Fourty one new EST-SSR markers were produced and were available for citrus genetic studies. Whatever the position of the SSR in the ESTs the EST-SSR markers we developed are powerful to investigate genetic diversity and genome mapping in citrus.

Luro, Francois L; Costantino, Gilles; Terol, Javier; Argout, Xavier; Allario, Thierry; Wincker, Patrick; Talon, Manuel; Ollitrault, Patrick; Morillon, Raphael

2008-01-01

94

Stellar and Solar Positions in 1701-1703 Observed by Francesco Bianchini at the Clementine Meridian Line in the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome, and its Calibration Curve  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stellar aberration is the largest special relativistic effect discovered in astronomy (in 1727 by James Bradley), involving the speed of light when composed with Earth orbital motion. This effect with nutation affected the measurement of latitude with Polaris uppper and lower transits in the first week of January, 1701 made by Francesco Bianchini (1662-1729). Equinoxes and Solstices of 1703 were measured by timing solar and stellar transits at the Meridian Line of Pope Clement XI built in the Basilica of S. Maria degli Angeli in Rome. Original Eastward 4' 28.8" ± 0.6" deviation of the Line affects all measurements. The calibration curve of Clementine Line -here firstly published after 2 years of measurements- includes also local deviations of the Line, and it is used to correct solar and lunar ephemerides at 0.3 s level of accuracy, when meridian transits are there observed and timed.

Sigismondi, Costantino

2008-09-01

95

Nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor of the type which uses liquid metal as primary and secondary coolants, and wherein the reactor vessel contains a core and a plurality of vertically extending cylindrical intermediate heat exchangers for carrying out heat exchange between the primary and secondary coolants; primary coolant circulation pumps disposed outside of the reactor vessel; a pipe for conducting to the

1984-01-01

96

Catalytic reactor  

DOEpatents

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10

97

(Reactor dosimetry)  

SciTech Connect

The lead in most aspects of research reactor design and use passed from the USA about 15 years ago, soon after the construction of the HFIR and HFBR. The Europeans have consistently upgraded and improved their existing facilities and have built new ones including the HFR at Grenoble and ORPHEE at Saclay. They studied ultra-high flux concepts ({approximately}10{sup 20}/m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1}) about 10 years ago, and are in the design phase of a new, highly efficient medium flux reactor to be built at Garching, near Munich in Germany. A visit was made to Interatom, the firm -- the equivalent of the Architect/Engineer for the ANS project -- responsible, under contract to the Technical University of Munich, for the new Munich reactor design. There are many similarities to the ANS design, and we reviewed and discussed technical and safety aspects of the two reactors. A request was made for some new, hitherto proprietary, experimental data on reactor thermal hydraulics and cooling that will be very valuable to the ANS project. I presented a seminar on the ANS project. A visit was made to Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe and knowledge was gained from Dr. Kuchle, a true pioneer of ultra-high flux reactor concepts, of their work. Dr. Kuchle kindly reviewed the ANS reference core and cooling system design (with favorable conclusions). I then talked with researchers working on materials irradiation damage and activation of structural materials by neutron irradiation, both key issues for the ANS. I was shown some new techniques they have developed for testing materials irradiation effects at high fluences, in a short time, using accelerated particle beams.

West, C.D.

1990-09-13

98

ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy ; particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an ; artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear ; transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an ; accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious ; quantities of low-energy neutrons for

E. O. Lawrence; E. M. McMillan; L. W. Alvarez

1960-01-01

99

Neutronic reactor  

DOEpatents

A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

Wende, Charles W. J. (Augusta, GA) [Augusta, GA; Babcock, Dale F. (Wilmington, DE) [Wilmington, DE; Menegus, Robert L. (Wilmington, DE) [Wilmington, DE

1983-01-01

100

Catalytic Reactor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substant...

M. M. Shah R. J. Jibb T. M. Aaron

2004-01-01

101

Nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a satellite tank for use in conjunction with a liquid metal reactor. It comprises: an outer tank; a pump; a heat exchanger; inlet and outlet means for liquid metal; the heat exchanger being annularly disposed around the pump; a separate sealed containment vessel around the satellite vessel; and means for a self-contained secondary liquid metal loop contained

Garabedian

1990-01-01

102

Nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor is described including a core having fuel assemblies, upper internals, and neutron-flux adjusting rods and means for moving the neutron-flux adjusting rods between the fuel assemblies and the upper internals. The upper internals includes guide means for guiding the neutron-flux adjusting rods, including columnar guides for guiding certain of the neutron-flux adjusting rods. Each columnar guide coextensive

L. Veronesi; F. D. Obermeyer; J. R. Chrise

1987-01-01

103

A New Clementine Basemap of the Moon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new basemap of the Moon based on ULCN2005 will be distributed through USGS Map-A-Planet web site (http://www.mapaplanet.org). The image geometry was verified for accuracy, and radiometric and photometric corrections applied and mosaicked.

Lee, E. M.; Gaddis, L. R.; Weller, L.; Richie, J. O.; Becker, T.; Shinaman, J.; Rosiek, M. R.; Archinal, B. A.

2009-03-01

104

The Solar Collector on Clementine Street.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Listed are 12 energy activities, experiments, and projects which some eighth-grade students performed in their classroom and local community before they helped install a solar heating system on the roof of an old house during school time and on Saturdays. The building conversion project is described. (KC)

Stranix, Edward; Fleishman, Michael

1980-01-01

105

A New Clementine Basemap of the Moon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new basemap of the Moon based on ULCN2005 will be distributed through USGS Map-A-Planet web site (http:\\/\\/www.mapaplanet.org). The image geometry was verified for accuracy, and radiometric and photometric corrections applied and mosaicked.

E. M. Lee; L. R. Gaddis; L. Weller; J. O. Richie; T. Becker; J. Shinaman; M. R. Rosiek; B. A. Archinal

2009-01-01

106

Nuclear reactor safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

An account is given of the basic physics and engineering underlying the design of nuclear reactors, descriptions of the types of reactor currently operating, the principles of reactor fault detection and control, safety analysis and hazards assessment. The more serious hypothetical accidents are reviewed for water cooled and gas cooled reactors and for the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor.

J. L. Head; A. J. H. Goddard; P. J. Grant

1979-01-01

107

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOEpatents

A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

1999-01-19

108

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

DOEpatents

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

2011-03-01

109

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

2011-01-01

110

Reactor safety method  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

1980-03-11

111

Nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

2004-03-16

112

Nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear reactor is described including a core having fuel assemblies, upper internals, and neutron-flux adjusting rods and means for moving the neutron-flux adjusting rods between the fuel assemblies and the upper internals. The upper internals includes guide means for guiding the neutron-flux adjusting rods, including columnar guides for guiding certain of the neutron-flux adjusting rods. Each columnar guide coextensive generally vertical guide sections aligned to receive the certain neutron-flux adjusting rods, the guide means also including generally horizontal plate sections connected to the guide sections and positioned generally vertically along the upper internals. Each plate section nested in the manner of a ''jig-saw'' puzzle and secured to, adjacent plate sections at the generally vertical level of each plate section to form an integrated composite plate at each level. These extend laterally substantially throughout the upper internals, each plate section having perforations patterned to pass others of the neutron-flux adjusting rods, the plate sections being oriented each at its generally vertical level with their perforations for the others of the neutron-flux adjusting rods aligned so that the composite plates serve as guides for the others of the neutron-flux adjusting rods.

Veronesi, L.; Obermeyer, F.D.; Chrise, J.R.

1987-07-21

113

THE HIGH FLUX REACTOR OF REACTOR CENTRUM NEDERLAND  

Microsoft Academic Search

The High Flux Reactor at Petten went critical November 9, 1961. The ; reactor was furnished by Allis-Chalmers. The following details are described: ; reactor formation. reactor tank, reactor core, control rods, shielding, beam ; tubes, irradiation facilities, cooling systems, and reactor building. The ; reactor fuel consists of 90% enriched uranium; the maximum power amounts to 20 Mw. ;

Nelissen

1962-01-01

114

Tokamak reactor studies  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features.

Baker, C.C.

1981-01-01

115

Catalytic Reactor Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A literature search identified design and safety concerns for plug flow, pressurized reactors. A modular plug flow reactor was designed. The vaporizer and mixing section were constructed. Thermodynamic calculations show the influence of the water-gas shif...

J. Steciak S. Beyerlein H. Jones M. Klein S. Kramer X. Wang

2001-01-01

116

Reactor physics and reactor computations. Proceedings of the internal conference on reactor physics and reactor computations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main int...

Y. Ronen E. Elias

1994-01-01

117

Attrition reactor system  

DOEpatents

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxvile, TN)

1993-01-01

118

Biochemical Reactor Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A nitrifying culture was developed in a continuous stirred tank reactor system, fed with a pure mineral salts medium containing no carbon. A distinguishing feature of the reactor was the preference of the nitrifying bacteria for available surfaces, expres...

R. C. Ahlert B. Sharma

1977-01-01

119

Advanced spheromak fusion reactor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The spheromak has no toroidal magnetic field coils or other structure along its geometric axis, and is thus more attractive than the leading magnetic fusion reactor concept, the tokamak. As a consequence of this and other attributes, the spheromak reactor...

T. K. Fowler E. B. Hooper

1996-01-01

120

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOEpatents

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01

121

University Reactor Instrumentation Grant  

SciTech Connect

A noble gas air monitoring system was purchased through the University Reactor Instrumentation Grant Program. This monitor was installed in the Kansas State TRIGA reactor bay at a location near the top surface of the reactor pool according to recommendation by the supplier. This system is now functional and has been incorporated into the facility license.

S. M. Bajorek

2000-02-01

122

Mirror reactor surface study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are

A. L. Hunt; C. C. Damm; A. H. Futch; J. R. Hiskes; R. G. Meisenheimer; R. W. Moir; T. C. Simonen; B. W. Stallard; C. E. Taylor

1976-01-01

123

Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) study the feasibility of achieving a fusion power plant based on the EBT confinement concept was evaluated. If the present understanding of the physics can be extrapolated to reactor scale devices the reactor could o...

D. G. McAlees N. A. Uckan L. M. Lidsky

1976-01-01

124

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28

125

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01

126

Chemical reactor system  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A reactor comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a conically spiraling fluid flow channel coupled between the inlet and the outlet. The reactor may be an electrochemical reactor comprising a fluid flow channel that spirals about an axis, the fluid flow channel comprising an anode, a cathode across from the anode, and a membrane disposed between the anode and the cathode. The reactor may have a number of design parameters that are based upon one or more reaction species and that favor the occurrence of a reaction associated with the species. The reactor may be used for the electrolysis of water or for the production of other chemical products.

2005-09-13

127

Fission reactors and materials  

SciTech Connect

The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions.

Frost, B.R.T.

1981-12-01

128

Spinning fluids reactor  

DOEpatents

A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

2012-11-20

129

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOEpatents

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01

130

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOEpatents

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20

131

SNAP reactor reentry characteristics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comprehensive aerospace nuclear safety program was conducted as part of the SNAP 10A flight test program. Considerable effort was expended to characterize the response of the reactor to reentry conditions. The objective of the reentry studies was to demonstrate the breakup of the reactor and the dispersal of the fuel in the upper atmosphere. The program included analyses and tests of reactor disintegration. Hypersonic and arc jet wind tunnel tests were performed. Additionally, a full-size, nonradioactive model of the SNAP 10A reactor was flight tested. Subsequent analyses of the test results indicated that the reactor could not be broken up during reentry. The results of the SNAP 8 tests were used to validate a thermal computer model for analysis of the reentry behavior of an SP-100 type reactor. The results of the SNAP and SP-100 studies support the current SP-100 position to design for intact reentry for safety purposes.

Smith, Thomas W.; Dix, Terry E.; Mills, Joseph C.

132

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOEpatents

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09

133

High Flux Isotope Reactor  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The High Flux Reactor Isotope Facility (HFIR) produces transuranium isotopes for research, industrial, and medical applications. It is also used for a variety of neutron flux experiments. The HFIR Website gives an informative overview of the history, science, and engineering behind the reactor. Other features of the site include illustrated sections on horizontal beam poles and neutron scattering as well as daily operation status of the reactor.

2003-11-10

134

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01

135

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-03-19

136

Decommissioning of the Cintichem reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cintichem nuclear reactor facility is located within the town of Tuxedo, New York, in the industrial park known as Sterling Forest. The reactor is a pool type research reactor and licensed to operate at thermal power levels of up to 5 MW. The reactor is a light water moderated, cooled, shielded, and reflected solid fuel reactor. It has graphite

T. S. LaGuardia; J. McGovern

1992-01-01

137

The Oklo Fossil Fission Reactors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page gives an overview of the Oklo Fossil Fission Reactors, including the history of the area where the reactor is located, the science behind the nuclear reactions, and reasons for studying this nuclear reactor. This page also includes graphics describing the Physics behind the reactors, maps, and pictures of the reactor.

Loss, Robert

2012-06-15

138

Fast Reactor Program in Switzerland.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The R and D program at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is outlined under the following heading: R and D in GCFR core thermohydraulics; experimental reactor physics studies; theoretical fast reactor physics studies; development at mixed ca...

R. W. Stratton

1978-01-01

139

Compact Toroid Refueling of Reactors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded tha...

M. J. Gouge J. T. Hogan S. L. Milora C. E. Thomas

1988-01-01

140

HEAVY WATER MODERATED REACTORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of heavy water as moderator offers a number of important ; advantages that was possible to fully realize in the construction of research ; reactors. Even though up to the present time there were not many opportunities ; for ac quiring practical experience with heavy water moderated power reactors, ; our knowledge in the sphere of lattice physics

Ferrarini

1960-01-01

141

Evaluation of Research Reactors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present status of research reactors with highly enriched (93%) uranium fuel at JAERI, JRR-2 and JMTR is described. JRR-2 is a heterogeneous type of reactor, using heavy water as moderator and coolant. It uses both MTR type and cylindrical type of fuel...

1978-01-01

142

Reactor Operations Monitoring System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Reactor Operations Monitoring System (ROMS) is a VME based, parallel processor data acquisition and safety action system designed by the Equipment Engineering Section and Reactor Engineering Department of the Savannah River Site. The ROMS will be analyzing over 8 million signal samples per minute. Sixty-eight microprocessors are used in the ROMS in order to achieve a real-time data analysis.

1989-01-01

143

Nuclear Reactor Safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS), published monthly, is a collection of abstracts of worldwide information available on all safety-related aspects of reactors, including accident analysis, safety systems, radiation protection, decommissioning and dismantling, and security measures. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the

J. D. Bales; R. Boshears

1996-01-01

144

Nuclear reactor safety device  

Microsoft Academic Search

A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two

Hutter

1983-01-01

145

NUCLEAR REACTOR SAFETY SYSTEMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor safety system is designed to provide an automatic ; safeguard for the reactor under fault conditions. It is also important that the ; safety system does not generate faults of its own. The basic layout of a safety ; system is described, and it is shown that application of the principles of ; coincidence and redundancy to

Jervis

1962-01-01

146

Nuclear reactor safety device  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a nuclear reactor having a core, a coolant for contacting and cooling the core, at least one control rod movable axially relative to the core for varying the power output of the reactor, and control means for moving the control rod to regulate the power output, a safety device is described to afford additional protection against an upward thermal

Hutter

1986-01-01

147

Nuclear reactor safety device  

Microsoft Academic Search

A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a

Hutter; Ernest

1986-01-01

148

Geological age of reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear reactors become obsolete by wearing out or by becoming outclassed or out of date. The lifetime of a conventional power reactor is probably less that 30 years, but the life of its potentially dangerous radioactivity is now known to be of a geological time scale. When a reactor is shutdown permanently, the fuel rods, cooling water, and radioactively ‘hot’ pieces are removed for long-term storage. High-level and low-level radioactive isotopes contained in the liquids and solids removed present a special problem (see Eos, Feb. 9, 1982, p. 147). It is the main frame and construction of worn out reactors that are the major problem, however. Mainly because of neutron activation processes that occur during reactor operation, components have been found to contain nickel-59 and niobium-94, both of which have very long half-lives: 80,000 and 20,300 years, respectively. The two isotopes are only present in trace amounts in metals incorporated in reactor components, but they emit levels of radiation above acceptable levels. The result is that the entire reactors must be dismantled, reduced to shippable size pieces, and the pieces stored for geologic time periods (several half-lives).

Bell, Peter M.

149

REACTOR BASE, SOUTHEAST CORNER. INTERIOR WILL CONTAIN REACTOR TANK, COOLING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

REACTOR BASE, SOUTHEAST CORNER. INTERIOR WILL CONTAIN REACTOR TANK, COOLING WATER PIPES, COOLING AIR DUCTS, AND SHIELDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 776. Unknown Photographer, 10/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

150

Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique

P. Delmolino

2005-01-01

151

Reactor physics of natriun-cooled fast breeder reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reactor properties of liquid metal fast breeder reactors and pertinent computational methods with their applications and results are presented. Designs of reactor core and fuel are outlined. Main characteristics and layout of the homogenous and the heterogenous core are described. Reactor safety and the possibility of a hypothetical core descriptive accident is discussed. The influence of the neutron flux on

M. Rajamaeki

1980-01-01

152

Simulation fidelity issues in reactor irradiation of electronics -- Reactor environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast burst reactors (FBRs), such as SPR III, and pool-type reactors, such as the University of Illinois TRIGA and the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor, are used as sources of neutrons and\\/or gamma rays in transient radiation effects in electronics (TREE) research and testing. Here the authors identify the important simulation fidelity issues, compare radiation environments produced in representative reactors,

J. G. Kelly; T. F. Luera; L. D. Posey; J. G. Williams

1988-01-01

153

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOEpatents

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03

154

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOEpatents

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01

155

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOEpatents

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

1994-06-07

156

Microfluidic electrochemical reactors  

DOEpatents

A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Mitrovski, Svetlana M. (Urbana, IL)

2011-03-22

157

Fast Breeder Reactor studies  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

1980-07-01

158

Methanogenesis in thermophilic biogas reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methanogenesis in thermophilic biogas reactors fed with different wastes is examined. The specific methanogenic activity with acetate or hydrogen as substrate reflected the organic loading of the specific reactor examined. Increasing the loading of thermophilic reactors stabilized the process as indicated by a lower concentration of volatile fatty acids in the effluent from the reactors. The specific methanogenic activity in

Birgitte Kiær Ahring

1995-01-01

159

Moving-Medium Biofilm Reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four moving-medium biofilm reactors treating wastewater were reviewed in this paper: the rotating biological contactor (RBC), the moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), the vertically moving biofilm reactor (VMBR) and the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). The RBC process has been applied widely. MBBR is a good process for upgrading current wastewater treatment systems. VMBR is suitable for treating small wastewater flows. FBR

M. Rodgers; X.-M. Zhan

2003-01-01

160

Advanced MAPLE reactor concept.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

High-flux neutron sources are continuing to be of interest both in Canada and internationally to support materials testing for advanced power reactors, new developments in extracted-neutron-beam applications, and commercial production of selected radioiso...

R. F. Lidstone A. G. Lee G. E. Gillespie H. J. Smith

1989-01-01

161

Physics of Reactor Safety.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Quarterly progress report summarizes work done during the months of July-September 1979 in Argonne National Laboratory's Applied Physics and Components Technology Divisions for the Division of Reactor Safety Research (RSR) of the U.S. Nuclear Regulat...

1980-01-01

162

Advanced spheromak fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

The spheromak has no toroidal magnetic field coils or other structure along its geometric axis, and is thus more attractive than the leading magnetic fusion reactor concept, the tokamak. As a consequence of this and other attributes, the spheromak reactor may be compact and produce a power density sufficiently high to warrant consideration of a liquid `blanket` that breeds tritium, converts neutron kinetic energy to heat, and protects the reactor vessel from severe neutron damage. However, the physics is more complex, so that considerable research is required to learn how to achieve the reactor potential. Critical physics problems and possible ways of solving them are described. The opportunities and issues associated with a possible liquid wall are considered to direct future research.

Fowler, T.K. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Hooper, E.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-06-19

163

Mirror Reactor Surface Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena...

A. L. Hunt C. C. Damm A. H. Futch J. R. Hiskes R. G. Meisenheimer

1976-01-01

164

Packed Bed Reactor Experiment  

NASA Video Gallery

The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

165

Indian fusion test reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fusion reactor as a volumetric neutron source can serve many applications needed for realizing fusion power reactor. For the Indian energy scenario, such a device can also produce fissile fuel for accelerating the nuclear power production. The Indian Fusion Test Reactor (FTR) is a low fusion gain (Q = 3-5) device to be used as component test facility for qualifying future reactor materials as well as for demonstrating the production of fissile fuel. FTR will be a medium sized tokamak device with a neutron wall load of 0.2 MW/m2. The presently available structural materials can be used for this device and such a device can be realized in ten years time from now. This device should produce about 25-50 kg of fissile fuel in one full-power-year and also produce the tritium needed for its operation. This device will greatly help the nuclear fission power program by producing fissile fuel.

Srinivasan, R.; FTR Team

2012-06-01

166

K-Reactor readiness  

SciTech Connect

This document describes some of the more significant accomplishments in the reactor restart program and details the magnitude and extent of the work completed to bring K-Reactor to a state of restart readiness. The discussion of restart achievements is organized into the three major categories of personnel, programs, and plant. Also presented is information on the scope and extent of internal and external oversight of the efforts, as well as some details on the startup plan.

Rice, P.D.

1991-12-04

167

Molten metal reactors  

DOEpatents

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05

168

Synthol reactor technology development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since Sasol introduced the Kellogg designed circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactors at Sasol 1 in the 1950s, the commercial high-temperature Fischer–Tropsch (HTFT) process has had a dynamic ongoing development resulting, recently, in the introduction of Sasol advanced synthol (SAS) reactor operation only at Secunda, 1999. It has reached a stage now where the emphasis has shifted for developing a catalyst

Dawid J. Duvenhage; Terry Shingles

2002-01-01

169

Nuclear reactor safety system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A safety system (10) for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is provided using a series of parallelconnected computing modules (14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 14e) each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter (P, t, phi t, phi b, w) and each of which produces a function (F(P), f(T), f( Phi t), f( Phi b), f(W))

Ball

1981-01-01

170

Nuclear reactor safety system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is provided using a series of parallelconnected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter (P, t, phi t, phi b, w) and each of which has stored therein a precalculated functional value (F(P); f(T); f( Phi t); f( Phi b);

R. M. Ball; R. C. Roberts

1981-01-01

171

Trickle-bed reactors  

SciTech Connect

Trickle-bed reactors can be defined as a fixed bed of catalyst particles, contacted by a gas-liquid, two-phase flow. The flow may be cocurrent (downflow or upflow) or countercurrent. In this article, we will focus on cocurrent downflow, which, because of its relatively lower pressure drop and the absence of flooding, is by far the most common mode of operation in industrial practice. Trickle-bed reactors are used primarily in the petroleum industry for hydrocracking, hydrodesulfurization, and hydrodenitrogenation. It is estimated that a significant fraction of all the petroleum processed passes through a trickle-bed reactor in one way or another. Other commercial applications of trickle-bed reactors can be found in the petrochemical industry, involving mainly hydrogenation and oxidation of organic compounds. Because of the industrial significance of this reactor type, a large number of review papers and monographs have appeared in the literature, stressing primarily the development and use of various empirical correlations. For this reason, this aspect of trickle-beds, despite its significance, is not emphasized in this article. Instead, the authors intend to offer an overview of the key concepts and design considerations of this reactor type. They also focus on relevant physical phenomena, particularly particle-level physics, which provides insights for evaluating existing correlations or a given design procedure.

Ng, K.M.; Chu, C.F.

1987-11-01

172

Moon base reactor system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

1989-01-01

173

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28

174

EBT reactor analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a recent ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor study that includes ring and core plasma properties with consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. Within this operating window, physics and engineering systems analysis and cost sensitivity studies indicate that reactors with <..beta../sub core/> approx. 6 to 10%, P approx. 1200 to 1700 MW(e), wall loading approx. 1.0 to 2.5 MW/m/sup 2/, and recirculating power fraction (including ring-sustaining power and all other reactors auxiliaries) approx. 10 to 15% are possible. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters. These include, but are not limited to, the use of: (1) supplementary coils or noncircular mirror coils to improve magnetic geometry and reduce size, (2) energetic ion rings to improve ring power requirements, (3) positive potential to enhance confinement and reduce size, and (4) profile control to improve stability and overall fusion power density.

Uckan, N. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Santoro, R. T.; Spong, D. A.; Uckan, T.; Owen, L. W.; Barnes, J. M.; McBride, J. B.

1983-08-01

175

Reactor antineutrino anomaly  

SciTech Connect

Recently, new reactor antineutrino spectra have been provided for {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 238}U, increasing the mean flux by about 3%. To a good approximation, this reevaluation applies to all reactor neutrino experiments. The synthesis of published experiments at reactor-detector distances <100 m leads to a ratio of observed event rate to predicted rate of 0.976{+-}0.024. With our new flux evaluation, this ratio shifts to 0.943{+-}0.023, leading to a deviation from unity at 98.6% C.L. which we call the reactor antineutrino anomaly. The compatibility of our results with the existence of a fourth nonstandard neutrino state driving neutrino oscillations at short distances is discussed. The combined analysis of reactor data, gallium solar neutrino calibration experiments, and MiniBooNE-{nu} data disfavors the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% C.L. The oscillation parameters are such that |{Delta}m{sub new}{sup 2}|>1.5 eV{sup 2} (95%) and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub new})=0.14{+-}0.08 (95%). Constraints on the {theta}{sub 13} neutrino mixing angle are revised.

Mention, G.; Fechner, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lasserre, Th.; Cribier, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Astroparticule et Cosmologie APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Mueller, Th. A.; Lhuillier, D.; Letourneau, A. [CEA, Irfu, SPhN, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2011-04-01

176

Reactor for exothermic reactions  

DOEpatents

A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

1993-03-02

177

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect

Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

Schock, Alfred

1994-08-01

178

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOEpatents

A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

1986-01-01

179

Dynamic bed reactor  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix. 27 figs.

Stormo, K.E.

1996-07-02

180

Dynamic bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

Stormo, Keith E. (Moscow, ID)

1996-07-02

181

Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and Repossessed Uranium in Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

182

Advanced Light Water Reactor Requirements Document: Chapter 4, Reactor Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this chapter of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Plant Requirements Document is to establish utility requirements for the design of the Reactor Systems of Advanced LWR plants consistent with the objectives and principles of the ALWR ...

1987-01-01

183

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOEpatents

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

1988-01-01

184

Particle bed reactor modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

1993-01-01

185

Diagnostics for hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

Orsitto, Francesco Paolo [ENEA Unita' Tecnica Fusione , Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla Fusione C R Frascati v E Fermi 45 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2012-06-19

186

Diagnostics for hybrid reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

Orsitto, Francesco Paolo

2012-06-01

187

Light Water Seed Blanket Reactor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A seed blanket light water breeder reactor and a light water seed blanket thorium burner reactor have been considered. Both these proposals make use of geometry control in order to regulate reactivity. (Atomindex citation 11:538563)

1979-01-01

188

Power calibrations for TRIGA reactors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to establish a framework for the calorimetric power calibration of TRIGA reactors so that reliable results can be obtained with a precision better than {+-} 5%. Careful application of the same procedures has produced power calibration results that have been reproducible to {+-} 1.5%. The procedures are equally applicable to the Mark I, Mark II and Mark III reactors as well as to reactors having much larger reactor tanks and to TRIGA reactors capable of forced cooling up to 3 MW in some cases and 15 MW in another case. In the case of forced cooled TRIGA reactors, the calorimetric power calibration is applicable in the natural convection mode for these reactors using exactly the same procedures as are discussed below for the smaller TRIGA reactors (< 2 MW)

Whittemore, W.L.; Razvi, J.; Shoptaugh, J.R. Jr. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

1988-07-01

189

In-Reactor Creep Measurements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Creep studies have produced experimental results which are being used for design and performance analyses of fast breeder reactors. These programs enabled the development of experimental methods which have produced in-reactor creep data over a broad range...

E. R. Gilbert B. A. Chin

1978-01-01

190

Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported...

R. J. Cerbone T. Ginsberg J. G. Guppy C. Sastre

1981-01-01

191

Nuclear Reactor Safety.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents blind pretest predictions of the nuclear LOFT test L2-3 performed with the TRA code, and SIMMER-II analysis of the transition phase behavior of a single LMFBR subassembly. In the gas-cooled reactor area, work continued in support of t...

J. F. Jackson M. G. Stevenson

1979-01-01

192

University Reactor Instrumentation Program  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented.

Vernetson, W.G.

1992-11-01

193

NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor  

ScienceCinema

NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

None

2014-06-26

194

Progressing Batch Hydrolysis Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In all dilute acid hydrolysis processes for glucose production, conditions severe enough to hydrolyze crystalline cellulose to glucose are also severe enough to degrade the glucose into undesirable compounds such as hydroxy-methylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid, and formic acid. One way to minimize the sugar degradation is to remove the sugars from the reaction zone before substantial degradation occurs. Sugars are most efficiently removed by a reactor system that uses countercurrent flow of liquids and solids, which allows simultaneous achievement of high yields and high sugar concentrations. The progressing batch hydrolysis process, invented and now under development at SERI, uses several percolation reactors in series to simulate countercurrent flow of liquids and solids. In this way, the advantages of countercurrent flow are achieved, and the mechanical and operational simplicity of the percolation reactor is retained. This paper describes the theory and operation of the progressing batch hydrolysis reactor and presents the results of our mathematical modeling of the system. 25 refs., 7 figs.

Wright, J.D.; Bergeron, P.W.; Werdene, P.J.

1985-09-01

195

Metallic fast reactor fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metallic fuels are neutronically ideal for fast reactors because they produce an extremely hard neutron spectrum. Early metallic fuels had little endurance, due to excessive swelling. By incorporating space for swelling, very high burnups are now routinely achieved. Uranium-plutonium alloys with 10% zirconium to raise the melting point have been shown to be extremely reliable. Fuel swelling, mechanical and chemical

G. L. Hofman; L. C. Walters; T. H. Bauer

1997-01-01

196

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01

197

Nuclear reactor building  

DOEpatents

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

1994-01-01

198

Nuclear reactor building  

DOEpatents

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-04-05

199

Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

Fowler, T

2007-04-03

200

Kazakhstan Reactor Becomes Operational.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The reactor is a powerful source of neutron and gamma-radiation and is designed for a wide range of scientific research experiments. Water is used both as the moderator and the reflector as well as for the coolant. It is fueled with enriched uranium, and ...

1968-01-01

201

Nuclear reactor dip seal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arrangements are provided for sealing cover gas from the clearance spaces among primary vessel head structure components in a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor. These include a dip seal having a trough and blade respectively suspended from adjacent head structure components, such as rotatable plugs, the trough and blade extending downward to an elevation below the operating level

J. M. Kazan; J. E. Sharbaugh

1982-01-01

202

Nuclear Reactors and Technology  

SciTech Connect

This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

1992-01-01

203

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOEpatents

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01

204

Cermet fuel reactors  

SciTech Connect

Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

1987-09-01

205

(Thermal reactor safety)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the trip was for the traveler to participate in The International NUCSAFE 88 Conference on Thermal Reactor Safety, held in Avignon, France, October 3--7, 1988, including presentation of a paper entitled, Results of Material Investigations on Low-Upper-Shelf (LUS) Steel within the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program (HSST).'' The major thrust of the conference was the safety of commercial power reactors, predominantly light-water reactors (LWRs). The principal areas of discussion and presentation included thermal-hydraulics, operational experience, severe accidents and their predictions and management, reactivity excursions, source-term evaluations, plant aging, and human factors considerations. These areas were considered for both the current and the next generation of LWRs. There was only limited discussion of issues relating to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity other than the prospect of a complete core melt-through, resulting from overall system failure. This report will primarily cover the overall impact of the conference with short sections on the limited information presented on pressure vessels and the results of discussions on the extension and expansion of the cooperative research agreement between the HSST Program and the Swiss-nuclear program. 5 refs.

Corwin, W.R.

1988-10-21

206

NRC Targets University Reactors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) wants universities to convert to low-grade fuel in their research reactions. Researchers claim the conversion, which will bring U.S. reactors in line with a policy the NRC is trying to impress on foreigners, could be financially and scientifically costly. Impact of the policy is considered. (JN)

Marshall, Eliot

1984-01-01

207

In and Out Reactor  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about material balances, a fundamental concept of chemical engineering. They use stoichiometry to predict the mass of carbon dioxide that escapes after reacting measured quantities of sodium bicarbonate with dilute acetic acid. Students then react the chemicals in a small reactor made from a plastic water bottle and balloon.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering,

208

Nuclear Reactor Safety; (USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This publication announces on an monthly basis the current worldwide information available on all safety-related aspects of reactors, including: accident analysis, safety systems, radiation protection, decommissioning and dismantling, and security measures. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month.

D. L. Cason; S. C. Hicks

1991-01-01

209

NUCLEAR REACTOR SAFETY DEVICE  

Microsoft Academic Search

A self-contained, self-actuating safety device is designed which will ; shut down the reactor upon the occurrence of a predetermined excessively high ; temperature in the core. The safety device comprises a closed tube partially ; filled with a mixture of fissionable material and a liquid having a high vapor ; pressure at a temperature slightly above the desired operating

1963-01-01

210

Reactor operation environmental information document  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All

J. S. Haselow; V. Price; D. E. Stephenson; H. W. Bledsoe; B. B. Looney

1989-01-01

211

Fast Breeder Reactors in France  

Microsoft Academic Search

France is the only country in the world ever to operate a commercial scale (1,200 MWe) sodium cooled, plutonium fuelled fast breeder reactor, the Superphénix at Creys-Malville. However, the French fast breeder reactor program turned out to be too costly and could never compete with light water reactor technology. Numerous technical problems, low uranium prices and massive opposition exacerbated the

MYCLE SCHNEIDER

2009-01-01

212

Interim normal limits DR reactor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As specified in PITA IP-26-I, a test has been conducted at DR reactor to find the amount of nonpressure sensitive air entering the reactor, and gain other information on the reactor gas system. The purpose of this document is to place in effect interim no...

D. K. George

1964-01-01

213

Nuclear reactor coolant transport system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system for transporting reactor coolant in nuclear reactors using a liquid coolant is described. The system diverts a portion of the output from the main circulating pump in the nuclear reactor primary flow system and introduces this diverted coolant back into the system upstream of the main circulating pump. This diverted coolant compensates for any pressure drop which may

Mangus

1980-01-01

214

Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance

Shawn Kang; Ronald Lipinski; William McAlpine

2006-01-01

215

Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

Roth, R. J.

1976-01-01

216

7 CFR 319.56-34 - Clementines from Spain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...must be placed in Mediterranean fruit fly host plants at least 6 weeks prior to harvest. Bait treatments using malathion, spinosad, or another pesticide that is approved by APHIS and the Government of Spain must be applied in the production areas at...

2010-01-01

217

7 CFR 319.56-34 - Clementines from Spain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...must be placed in Mediterranean fruit fly host plants at least 6 weeks prior to harvest. Bait treatments using malathion, spinosad, or another pesticide that is approved by APHIS and the Government of Spain must be applied in the production areas at...

2009-01-01

218

Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O. [and others

1995-04-01

219

The nuclear reactor strategy between light water reactors and advanced pressurized water reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor strategy that involves light water reactors (LWRs) and advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs) with a high conversion ratio was analyzed in a logistical manner assuming a finite resource of about 5 million metric tons of natural uranium. The emphasis lies in the treatment of the dynamics of deploying this two-component LWR-APWR system. The result is that the

Seifritz

1983-01-01

220

Spatial kinetics in fast reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of the solution to the spatial nonstationary equation of neutron transport is presented by the example of a fast reactor. Experiments in spatial kinetics conducted recently at the complex of critical assemblies (fast physical stand) and computations of their data using the TIMER code (for solving the nonstationary equation in multidimensional diffusion approximation for direct and inverse problems of reactor kinetics) have shown that kinetics of fast reactors substantially differs from kinetics of thermal reactors. The difference is connected with influence of the delayed neutron spectrum on rates of the process in a fast reactor.

Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Panova, I. S.; Matvienko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.

2013-12-01

221

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOEpatents

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09

222

Materials for passively safe reactors  

SciTech Connect

Future nuclear power capacity will be based on reactor designs that include passive safety features if recent progress in advanced nuclear power developments is realized. There is a high potential for nuclear systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the current generation of reactors, especially when passive or intrinsic characteristics are applied to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction and to minimize the burden on equipment and operating personnel. Taylor, has listed the following common generic technical features as the most important goals for the principal reactor development systems: passive stability, simplification, ruggedness, case of operation, and modularity. Economic competitiveness also depends on standardization and assurance of licensing. The performance of passively safe reactors will be greatly influenced by the successful development of advanced fuels and materials that will provide lower fuel-cycle costs. A dozen new designs of advanced power reactors have been described recently, covering a wide spectrum of reactor types, including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, heavy-water reactors, modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), and fast breeder reactors. These new designs address the need for passive safety features as well as the requirement of economic competitiveness.

Simnad, T. (Univ. of California, San Diego, (United States))

1993-01-01

223

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOEpatents

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01

224

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOEpatents

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

Jassby, D.L.

1987-09-04

225

Integrated Microfluidic Reactors  

PubMed Central

Summary Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

2009-01-01

226

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOEpatents

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01

227

Reactors in orbit  

SciTech Connect

The majority of today's satellites are run off solar cells and batteries and need only 1 or 2 kW. By contrast, laser weapons could require 100 mW. The radar and advanced communications satellites would need a more modest 100 kW or so, but even that is far more than existing space power systems can deliver. Until a new source of power can be devised, all of this exotic space hardware will be so many flashlights without batteries. Discussed is the possibility of nuclear reactors for power in space. The crux of the problem is heat: how materials withstand it, how to discharge the excess. The military does not seem particularly interested now, but technological optimists predict space reactors can be ready when the missile defense and antisatellite weapons are, in the 21st century.

Roberts, L.

1983-12-01

228

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOEpatents

A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

Hutter, E.

1983-08-15

229

Tokamak fusion power reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major parameters and corresponding economic characteristics of a representative class of commercial Tokamak fusion power reactors are examined as a function of four major design parameters: plasma beta-t, toroidal magnetic field strength, first-wall lifetime, and power output. It is shown that for beta-t greater than or equal to 0.06, the minimum cost of energy is obtained for toroidal field

W. M. Stacey Jr.; M. A. Abdou

1978-01-01

230

Privatized multipurpose reactor initiative  

SciTech Connect

ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB CE) and seven other companies have submitted a plan to the DOE for deploying a multipurpose reactor at the Savannah River Plant. The facility would consume excess plutonium as fuel, irradiate tritium producing targets, and generate electricity. The plan proposes to establish a consortium that would privately finance and own two System 80+ nuclear units and a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility.

Davis, G.A. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)

1995-12-31

231

Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

232

Polarized advanced fuel reactors  

SciTech Connect

The d-/sup 3/He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs.

Kulsrud, R.M.

1987-07-01

233

Nuclear reactor sealing system  

DOEpatents

A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel.

McEdwards, James A. (Calabasas, CA)

1983-01-01

234

Aging degradation of BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) reactor internals  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently performed an assessment of the aging of the reactor internals in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), and identified the unresolved technical issues related to the degradation of these components. Several failures in BWR reactor internals have been caused by a combination of susceptible materials, environment, preload stress, and flow-induced vibration. ASME Code Section XI inservice inspection requirements are insufficient for detecting aging-related degradation in reactor internals. Many of the susceptible locations are not accessible for inspection. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Ware, A.G.

1989-01-01

235

Fast quench reactor and method  

DOEpatents

A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

1998-05-12

236

Reactor Coolant Pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft int...

C. J. Ruger J. C. Higgins

1993-01-01

237

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS)  

SciTech Connect

Progress in a two year study of a 1200 MWe commercial tandem mirror reactor (MARS - Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) has reached the point where major reactor system technologies are identified. New design features of the magnets, blankets, plug heating systems and direct converter are described. With the innovation of radial drift pumping to maintain low plug density, reactor recirculating power fraction is reduced to 20%. Dominance of radial ion and impurity losses into the halo permits gridless, circular direct converters to be dramatically reduced in size. Comparisons of MARS with the Starfire tokamak design are made.

Logan, B.G.

1983-03-28

238

High Flux Reactor Isotope Facility  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Tennessee, the High Flux Reactor Isotope Facility (HFIR) produces transuranium isotopes for research, industrial, and medical applications. It is also used for a variety of neutron flux experiments. The HFIR Website gives an informative overview of the science and engineering behind the reactor. Visitors can get acquainted with HFIR's history, facilities, and experiments. Other features of the site include illustrated sections on horizontal beam poles and neutron scattering as well as daily operation status of the reactor. Photographs and schematics of the reactor and control room are other interesting parts of the site.

1969-12-31

239

Rotating reactor studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is thicker and extends all the way around the reactor.

Roberts, Glyn O.

1991-01-01

240

Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The

D. Kokkinos

2005-01-01

241

Reactor refueling containment system  

DOEpatents

A method of refueling a nuclear reactor whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01

242

Reactor refueling containment system  

DOEpatents

A method of refueling a nuclear reactor is disclosed whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced. 2 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Meuschke, R.E.

1995-05-02

243

High flux reactor  

DOEpatents

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01

244

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01

245

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1996-02-27

246

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

1996-01-01

247

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

1995-01-01

248

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOEpatents

A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1995-04-25

249

Reactor coolant pump flywheel  

DOEpatents

A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

2013-11-26

250

Cascade ICF power reactor  

SciTech Connect

The double-cone-shaped Cascade reaction chamber rotates at 50 rpm to keep a blanket of ceramic granules in place against the wall as they slide from the poles to the exit slots at the equator. The 1 m-thick blanket consists of layers of carbon, beryllium oxide, and lithium aluminate granules about 1 mm in diameter. The x rays and debris are stopped in the carbon granules; the neutrons are multiplied and moderated in the BeO and breed tritium in the LiAlO/sub 2/. The chamber wall is made up of SiO tiles held in compression by a network of composite SiC/Al tendons. Cascade operates at a 5 Hz pulse rate with 300 MJ in each pulse. The temperature in the blanket reaches 1600 K on the inner surface and 1350 K at the outer edge. The granules are automatically thrown into three separate vacuum heat exchangers where they give up their energy to high pressure helium. The helium is used in a Brayton cycle to obtain a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of 55%. Studies have been done on neutron activation, debris recovery, vaporization and recondensation of blanket material, tritium control and recovery, fire safety, and cost. These studies indicate that Cascade appears to be a promising ICF reactor candidate from all standpoints. At the 1000 MWe size, electricity could be made for about the same cost as in a future fission reactor.

Hogan, W.J.; Pitts, J.H.

1986-05-20

251

Zero Power Reactor Simulation  

ScienceCinema

Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here's a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by Argonne's unique "UNIC" code. Here, we use VisIt to visualize a numerical model of the ZPR-6 Assembly 6a experiment simulated using the Argonne UNIC code. 0:00-0:06: The fuel and other plates are dropped into an example drawer, and the drawer is inserted into the matrix tube. 0:06-0:21: The two matrix halves are brought together to make a critical (self-sustaining) assembly. 0:21-0:35: The fission power is revealed to be centralized in the thin, enriched Uranium plates. 0:35-0:53: Returning to our example drawer, we show the detailed local plate powers and their relation to the drawer composition. 0:53-1:11: Our model shows that each plate can have widely-varying local changes in the space and energy neutron densities. Read more at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2010/news100121.html

252

Development of fast breeder reactors in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principle of a fusion-fission hybrid nuclear reactor is described. The nuclear physics foundation of the hybrid reactor is outlined. Two types of hybrid reactors--fission and retarded fission reactors--are described. The means by which hybrid reactors can advance the use of fusion energy are set forth. Two types of breeder reactors are described: fusion and fission breeder reactors. A case is made that hybrid reactor breeder energy is much greater than that of fast reactors, and that the hybrid reactor is not inhibited by industrial plutonium. It is further maintained that the price of electric energy of the hybrid reactor-pressure water reactor co-generation system is cheaper than that of the fast reactor-pressure water reactor co-generation system; that hybride reactor-LWR co-generation systems consume less uranium than fast reactor systems; that a Th/U system hybrid reactor-LWR co-generation system is economical in the use of thorium resources; and that hybrid reactors are safer than fast reactors.

Li, Shounan

1988-05-01

253

Hybrid Reactor Simulation of Boiling Water Reactor Power Oscillations  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) of boiling water reactor (BWR) instabilities, including in-phase and out-of-phase (OOP) oscillations, has been implemented on The Pennsylvania State University TRIGA reactor. The TRIGA reactor's power response is used to simulate reactor neutron dynamics for in-phase oscillation or the fundamental mode of the reactor modal kinetics for OOP oscillations. The reactor power signal drives a real-time boiling channel simulation, and the calculated reactivity feedback is in turn fed into the TRIGA reactor via an experimental changeable reactivity device. The thermal-hydraulic dynamics, together with first harmonic mode power dynamics, is digitally simulated in the real-time environment. The real-time digital simulation of boiling channel thermal hydraulics is performed by solving constitutive equations for different regions in the channel and is realized by a high-performance personal computer. The nonlinearity of the thermal-hydraulic model ensures the capability to simulate the oscillation phenomena, limit cycle and OOP oscillation, in BWR nuclear power plants. By adjusting reactivity feedback gains for both modes, various oscillation combinations can be realized in the experiment. The dynamics of axially lumped power distribution over the core is displayed in three-dimensional graphs. The HRS reactor power response mimics the BWR core-wide power stability phenomena. In the OOP oscillation HRS, the combination of reactor response and the simulated first harmonic power using shaping functions mimics BWR regional power oscillations. With this HRS testbed, a monitoring and/or control system designed for BWR power oscillations can be experimentally tested and verified.

Huang Zhengyu; Edwards, Robert M. [Pennsylvania State University (United States)

2003-08-15

254

Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor Concept.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A preliminary conceptual study is made of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR). A steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor is proposed for use as a central electric-power station. The MSR concept combines the physics of the classic stella...

R. L. Miller R. A. Krakowski

1981-01-01

255

Induced Sludge Bed Anaerobic Reactor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An induced sludge bed anaerobic reactor includes a vessel in which a septum or other partition is positioned to maintain solids in wastewater being treated toward a lower zone in the reactor. A gas trap, which may also comprise an overpressure protection ...

C. L. Hansen C. S. Hansen E. D. Watts K. D. Pack

2005-01-01

256

DOE/university reactor sharing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the US Department of Energy's program of reactor sharing is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering instruction and nuclear research opportunities in non-reactor-owning colleges and universities. The benefits of the program and need for the continuation of the program in the future are discussed.

Young, H.H.

1985-01-01

257

Reactor internals loose parts strainer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes an upright cylindrical nuclear reactor pressure vessel having a hemispherical lower head section with a curved inner surface and defining an annular flange extending radially inward near its upper end, reactor internals suspended within the pressure vessel from the flange. The internals extending downward into the hemispherical lower head section but with the lower end thereof terminating

M. R. Gasparro; R. E. Tome

1987-01-01

258

Proton Collimators for Fusion Reactors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proton collimators have been proposed for incorporation into inertial-electrostatic-confinement (IEC) fusion reactors. Such reactors have been envisioned as thrusters and sources of electric power for spacecraft and as sources of energetic protons in commercial ion-beam applications.

Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu

2003-01-01

259

Dynamics of Molten Salt Reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dynamics of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the 'Generation IV International Forum' concepts, was studied in this paper. The graphite-moderated channel type MSR was selected for the numerical simulation. The MSR represents a liquid fueled reactor and its dynamics is very specific because of two physical peculiarities: the delayed neutrons precursors are drifted by the fuel flow and the

Jiri Krepel; Ulrich Rohde; Ulrich Grundmann

2006-01-01

260

LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is ; described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially ; cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid ; member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods ; held in a geometrical arrangement

R. F. Christy; A. M. Weinberg

1957-01-01

261

A FAST NEUTRON BURST REACTOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fast-burst reactor constructed at the Joint Institute of Nuclear ; Research became critical in June 1960. The reactor is operating with periodic ; pulse power of nearly 1 kw. The half-width of the power pulse is 36 mu sec. ; The pulse frequency varies from 8 to 80 pulses\\/sec. (tr-auth);

G. E. Blokhin; D. I. Blokhintsev; Yu. A. Blyumkina

1961-01-01

262

CIRCULATING MAGNETICALLY STABILIZED BED REACTORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Circulating magnetically stabilized bed reactors (CMSBR's) operate in nearly plug flow for both the catalyst and fluid phases. Computer simulations show that they allow programming of temperature profiles without using either internal heat exchangers or interstage cooling of reactant. For highly exothermic, irreversible reactions, co-current CMSBR's are far less sensitive to temperature runaway than cbnventional nonadiabatic fixed-bed reactors. Thus, significant

J. C. PIRKLE JR; P. A. RUZISKA; L. J. SHULIK

1988-01-01

263

N Reactor secondary loop contamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

N Reactor primary loop water circulates entirely within Zone 1 and the piping is, therefore, heavily shielded. Secondary loop piping crosses the Zone 1 boundaries into areas which may be unshielded and accessible during reactor operation. The leakage of primary loop water to the secondary side of the cooling loop permits contaminated fluid to leave the shielded area. It becomes

Stepnewski

1963-01-01

264

Solvent refined coal reactor quench system  

DOEpatents

There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01

265

Decommissioning of the Cintichem reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Cintichem nuclear reactor facility is located within the town of Tuxedo, New York, in the industrial park known as Sterling Forest. The reactor is a pool type research reactor and licensed to operate at thermal power levels of up to 5 MW. The reactor is a light water moderated, cooled, shielded, and reflected solid fuel reactor. It has graphite thermal column and numerous beam tubes arranged radially around the core centerline for experiments. The fuel core is supported and moved on rails by a core support bridge. The primary cooling system consists of a demineralized water system, heat exchangers, and pumps. Primary coolant piping is aluminum except for portions that penetrate concrete. Based on the on-site radiological characterization, Cintichem decided to shut down the facility permanently and begin decommissioning immediately.

LaGuardia, T.S. (TLG Engineering, Inc., Bridgewater, CT (United States)); McGovern, J. (Cintichem, Inc., Tuxedo, NY (United States))

1992-01-01

266

Reactor for making uniform capsules  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present invention provides a novel reactor for making capsules with uniform membrane. The reactor includes a source for providing a continuous flow of a first liquid through the reactor; a source for delivering a steady stream of drops of a second liquid to the entrance of the reactor; a main tube portion having at least one loop, and an exit opening, where the exit opening is at a height substantially equal to the entrance. In addition, a method for using the novel reactor is provided. This method involves providing a continuous stream of a first liquid; introducing uniformly-sized drops of the second liquid into the stream of the first liquid; allowing the drops to react in the stream for a pre-determined period of time; and collecting the capsules.

Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Anikumar, Amrutur V. (Inventor); Lacik, Igor (Inventor)

1999-01-01

267

Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology, and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by ?- emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for the production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

Mirzadeh, S.; Mausner, L. F.; Garland, M. A.

268

Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL; Mausner, Leonard [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Garland, Marc A [ORNL

2011-01-01

269

Reactor antineutrino experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neutrinos are elementary particles in the standard model of particle physics. There are three flavors of neutrinos that oscillate among themselves. Their oscillation can be described by a 3×3 unitary matrix, containing three mixing angles ?12, ?23, ?13, and one CP phase. Both ?12 and ?23 are known from previous experiments. ?13 was unknown just two years ago. The Daya Bay experiment gave the first definitive non-zero value in 2012. An improved measurement of the oscillation amplitude sin 22(? 13) = 0.090+0.008-0.009 and the first direct measurement of the \\bar ? e mass-squared difference ? ? m2ee? = (2.59+0.19-0.20)× 10-3 eV2 were obtained recently. The large value of ?13 boosts the next generation of reactor antineutrino experiments designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, such as JUNO and RENO-50.

Lu, Haoqi

2014-05-01

270

University Reactor Sharing Program  

SciTech Connect

Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center.

W.D. Reese

2004-02-24

271

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOEpatents

Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-10-25

272

Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor design basics. Fourth edition, Volume One  

SciTech Connect

This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new material on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management, and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; neutron transport; nuclear design basics; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; radiation protection and shielding; and reactor materials.

Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

1994-12-31

273

Reactor service life extension program  

SciTech Connect

A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

1990-01-01

274

Reactor service life extension program  

SciTech Connect

A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

1990-12-31

275

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R[sub 0] = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B[sup 0] = 4.8-7.5 T, B[sub max] (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. (Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)) [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01

276

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R{sub 0} = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B{sup 0} = 4.8-7.5 T, B{sub max} (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01

277

Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters  

SciTech Connect

Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

Snoj, L.; Kromar, M.; Zerovnik, G. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2012-07-01

278

Directions for improved fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts.

Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

1986-01-01

279

Fueling of tandem mirror reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the fueling requirements for experimental and demonstration tandem mirror reactors (TMRs), reviews the status of conventional pellet injectors, and identifies some candidate accelerators that may be needed for fueling tandem mirror reactors. Characteristics and limitations of three types of accelerators are described; neutral beam injectors, electromagnetic rail guns, and laser beam drivers. Based on these characteristics and limitations, a computer module was developed for the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (TMRSC) to select the pellet injector/accelerator combination which most nearly satisfies the fueling requirements for a given machine design.

Gorker, G.E.; Logan, B.G.

1985-01-01

280

Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector  

DOEpatents

A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-02-15

281

Conceptual design study of advanced power reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conceptual design studies of advanced power reactors are summarized. The concept of power reactors cooled by supercritical water was developed. The coolant system is once through type like a supercritical fossil-fired power plant. It attains higher thermal efficiency and simpler reactor system than the light water reactors. Breeding is possible in the tight lattice core. The coolant void reactivity of

Y. Oka; S. Koshizuka

1998-01-01

282

Novel photocatalytic reactor for water purification  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel photocatalytic reactor design for water treatment is characterized by the use of new extremely narrow diameter lamps, thus allowing for much higher surface area for catalyst coating per unit reactor volume and consequently for much higher specific reactor capacity. Experiments in a reactor containing 21 novel U-shaped lamps coated with catalyst showed a 695% increase in efficiency of

Ajay K. Ray; Antonie A. C. M. Beenackers

1998-01-01

283

Evolution of the tandem mirror reactor concept  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the evolution of the tandem mirror reactor concept from the original conceptual reactor design (1977) through the first application of the thermal barrier concept to a reactor design (1979) to the beginning of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (1982).

Carlson, G.A.; Logan, B.G.

1982-03-09

284

Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can

J. M. OHara; J. Higgins; R. Deem; J. Xing; A. DAgostino

2010-01-01

285

Evolution of the Hanford graphite reactor technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanford Site (Hanford) has played an important part in the development of nuclear energy and reactors in the first 50 yrs. This paper follows the evolution of the graphite-moderated, light-water cooled reactor technology at Hanford through the various generations of reactor types. Nine reactors were built and operated successfully between 1944 and 1987. Design improvements, safety feature advances, and

Toffer

1989-01-01

286

Plasma Reactor Waste Management Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produc...

R. O. Ness J. R. Rindt S. R. Ness

1992-01-01

287

Sequencing Batch Reactors: Summary Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report provides information on Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR), a fill-and-draw activated sludge treatment system. SBRs are capable of handling all wastewaters commonly treated by conventional activated sludge plants. The report discusses the process, ...

T. Bartell

1986-01-01

288

Overview of fusion reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power.

Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

1981-01-01

289

Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships  

SciTech Connect

Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized.

Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

1987-01-01

290

Combustion synthesis continuous flow reactor  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a reactor for combustion synthesis of inorganic powders. The reactor includes a reaction vessel having a length and a first end and a second end. The reaction vessel further has a solution inlet and a carrier gas inlet. The reactor further has a heater for heating both the solution and the carrier gas. In a preferred embodiment, the reaction vessel is heated and the solution is in contact with the heated reaction vessel. It is further preferred that the reaction vessel be cylindrical and that the carrier gas is introduced tangentially into the reaction vessel so that the solution flows helically along the interior wall of the reaction vessel. As the solution evaporates and combustion produces inorganic material powder, the carrier gas entrains the powder and carries it out of the reactor. 10 figs.

Maupin, G.D.; Chick, L.A.; Kurosky, R.P.

1998-01-06

291

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOEpatents

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

Cooke, F.E.

1992-12-08

292

STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems ; employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water ; and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

B. W. Kinyon; G. D. Whitman

1963-01-01

293

Overview of fusion reactor safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Use of deuterium-tritium fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control; (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment; (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions; (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices; and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power.

Cohen, S.; Crocker, J. G.

294

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOEpatents

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

1992-01-01

295

Combustion synthesis continuous flow reactor  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a reactor for combustion synthesis of inorganic powders. The reactor includes a reaction vessel having a length and a first end and a second end. The reaction vessel further has a solution inlet and a carrier gas inlet. The reactor further has a heater for heating both the solution and the carrier gas. In a preferred embodiment, the reaction vessel is heated and the solution is in contact with the heated reaction vessel. It is further preferred that the reaction vessel be cylindrical and that the carrier gas is introduced tangentially into the reaction vessel so that the solution flows helically along the interior wall of the reaction vessel. As the solution evaporates and combustion produces inorganic material powder, the carrier gas entrains the powder and carries it out of the reactor.

Maupin, Gary D. (Richland, WA); Chick, Lawrence A. (West Richland, WA); Kurosky, Randal P. (Maple Valley, WA)

1998-01-01

296

Vertical Reactor Coolant Pump Instabilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper describes the investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes...

1985-01-01

297

Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent studies have demonstrated the applicability and versatility of immobilized enzyme reactors (IMERS) for chemical and biochemical synthesis and analysis. The majority of IMER systems rely on enzymes immobilized to packed matrices within flow-through ...

H. R. Luckarift

2007-01-01

298

SUMMARY REPORT: SEQUENCING BATCH REACTORS  

EPA Science Inventory

This 23 - page Technology Transfer Summary Report summarizes one of the potential innovative technologies, Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBR) for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. ontained in the report are process descriptions, performance evaluations, and economic com...

299

Modelling anaerobic biofilm reactors--a review.  

PubMed

Anaerobic treatment has become a technically as well as economically feasible option for treatment of liquid effluents after the development of reactors such as the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor, anaerobic biofilter and anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR). Considerable effort has gone into developing mathematical models for these reactors in order to optimize their design, design the process control systems used in their operation and enhance their operational efficiency. This article presents a critical review of the different mathematical models available for these reactors. The unified anaerobic digestion model (ADM1) and its application to anaerobic biofilm reactors are also outlined. PMID:16517049

Saravanan, V; Sreekrishnan, T R

2006-10-01

300

Solid State Reactor Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

Mays, G.T.

2004-03-10

301

Reactor shroud joint  

DOEpatents

A shroud for a nuclear reactor is described. In one embodiment, the shroud includes first and second shroud sections, and each shroud section includes a substantially cylindrical main body having a first end and a second end. With respect to each shroud section, a flange is located at the main body first end, and the flange has a plurality of bolt openings therein and a plurality of scalloped regions. The first shroud section is welded to the second shroud section, and at least some of the bolt openings in the first shroud section flange align with respective bolt openings in the second shroud section flange. In the event that the onset of inter-granular stress corrosion cracking is ever detected in the weld between the shroud section, bolts are inserted through bolt openings in the first shroud section flange and through aligned bolt openings the second shroud section flange. Each bolt, in one embodiment, has a shank section and first and second threaded end sections. Nuts are threadedly engaged to the threaded end sections and tightened against the respective flanges.

Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA); Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ganz, Israel (San Jose, CA)

1998-01-01

302

Reactor shroud joint  

DOEpatents

A shroud for a nuclear reactor is described. In one embodiment, the shroud includes first and second shroud sections, and each shroud section includes a substantially cylindrical main body having a first end and a second end. With respect to each shroud section, a flange is located at the main body first end, and the flange has a plurality of bolt openings therein and a plurality of scalloped regions. The first shroud section is welded to the second shroud section, and at least some of the bolt openings in the first shroud section flange align with respective bolt openings in the second shroud section flange. In the event that the onset of inter-granular stress corrosion cracking is ever detected in the weld between the shroud section, bolts are inserted through bolt openings in the first shroud section flange and through aligned bolt openings the second shroud section flange. Each bolt, in one embodiment, has a shank section and first and second threaded end sections. Nuts are threadedly engaged to the threaded end sections and tightened against the respective flanges. 4 figs.

Ballas, G.J.; Fife, A.B.; Ganz, I.

1998-04-07

303

Reactor pressure vessel nozzle  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Upton, Hubert A. (Morgan Hill, CA)

1994-01-01

304

Reactor pressure vessel nozzle  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

1994-10-04

305

Reactor Simulator Testing Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test Objectives Summary: a) Verify operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation & control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. b) Examine cooling & heat regeneration performance of the cold trap purification. c) Test the ALIP pump at voltages beyond 120V to see if the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s can be obtained in the RxSim. Testing Highlights: a) Gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively for operations (NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain). b) Instrumentation & Control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings and ramped within prescribed constraints. It effectively interacted with reactor simulator control model and defaulted back to temperature control mode if the transient fluctuations didn't dampen. c) Cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the minimum temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. d) ALIP produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

Schoenfeld, Michael P.

2013-01-01

306

Reactor Simulator Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise J.

2013-01-01

307

Solar solids reactor  

DOEpatents

A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

Yudow, B.D.

1986-02-24

308

Trickle-Bed Oxidation Reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

For reactions necesitating a solid catalyst and which invoive both reisuvely volatile and nonvclarile reactants, three-phase reactirs are required. Equipment used to achieve intimate contacting of the three phases has been procominantly in the form of slurry reactors, analogous to the stirred-tank homogenous system, or fixed-bed reactors in which the two fluid phases flow through a stationary bed of catalyst

Seigeo Goto; Janez Levec; J. M. Smith

1977-01-01

309

Alternate-fuel reactor studies  

SciTech Connect

A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

1983-02-01

310

MARS: Mirror Advanced Reactor Study  

SciTech Connect

A recently completed two-year study of a commercial tandem mirror reactor design (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS)) is briefly reviewed. The end plugs are designed for trapped particle stability, MHD ballooning, balanced geodesic curvature, and small radial electric fields in the central cell. New technologies such as lithium-lead blankets, 24T hybrid coils, gridless direct converters and plasma halo vacuum pumps are highlighted.

Logan, B.G.

1984-09-10

311

Superphenix 1 reactor block fabrication  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reactor block constitutes a highly complex key component in a pool-type breeder reactor, the difficulties involved being considerably heightened for Creys-Malville by its prototype character, involving a considerable scale-up from Phenix, with several important design changes. Problems arose in the course of design engineering, but also throughout the manufacturing stage: steel plate elaboration, welding, shaping, etc. The construction approach

J. Branchu; C. Gigarel

1985-01-01

312

Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events;

1982-01-01

313

Automatic safety rod for reactors  

DOEpatents

An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

Germer, John H. (San Jose, CA)

1988-01-01

314

Propellant actuated nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve  

DOEpatents

A nuclear fission reactor combined with a propellant actuated depressurization and/or water injection valve is disclosed. The depressurization valve releases pressure from a water cooled, steam producing nuclear reactor when required to insure the safety of the reactor. Depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel enables gravity feeding of supplementary coolant water through the water injection valve to the reactor pressure vessel to prevent damage to the fuel core.

Ehrke, Alan C. (San Jose, CA); Knepp, John B. (San Jose, CA); Skoda, George I. (Santa Clara, CA)

1992-01-01

315

Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV Project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed, designed and operated fast burst reactors for over 20 years. These reactors have been used for a variety of radiation effects programs. During this period, programs have required larger irradiation volumes primarily to expose complex electronic systems to postulated threat environments. As experiment volumes increased, a new reactor was built so that these components could be tested. The Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV is a logical evolution of the two decades of fast burst reactor development at Sandia.

Reuscher, J.A.

1983-01-01

316

National strategies for nuclear power reactor development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The document assesses the potential for design innovation in three areas of nuclear power plant technology: light-water reactor systems; liquid-metal reactor systems; and high-temperature-gas reactor systems. The question of how capital costs scale with unit size in nuclear power reactor systems is addressed. Small modular high temperature gas reactor designs are reviewed, and an electric-power-system capacity-planning model that allows estimates

R. K. Lester; M. J. Driscoll; M. W. Golay; D. D. Lanning; L. M. Lidsky

1985-01-01

317

When Do Commercial Reactors Permanently Shut Down?  

EIA Publications

For those wishing to obtain current data, the following resources are available: U.S. reactors, go to the Energy Information Administration's nuclear reactor shutdown list. (Note: As of April 30, 2010, the last U.S. reactor to permanently shut down was Big Rock Point in 1997.) Foreign Reactors, go to the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) on the International Atomic Energy Agency's website.

Information Center

2011-05-10

318

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, June 1995  

SciTech Connect

Part one of this report gives the operating history of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of June. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Facility at HFBR for June. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-06-01

319

Reactor Simulator Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz. Keywords: fission, space power, nuclear, liquid metal, NaK.

Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise Jon

2013-01-01

320

98. ARAIII. ML1 reactor pressure vessel is lowered into reactor ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

98. ARA-III. ML-1 reactor pressure vessel is lowered into reactor pit by hoist. July 13, 1963. Ineel photo no. 63-4049. Photographer: Lowin. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

321

56. ARAII. View inside reactor building looking at SL1 reactor ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

56. ARA-II. View inside reactor building looking at SL-1 reactor vessel. November 19, 1957. Ineel photo no. 57-5864. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

322

Radioactive air effluent emission measurements at two research reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories operates two reactors which fall under US Environmental Protection Agency regulations for emission of radionuclides to the ambient air. These reactors are: (1) the Annular Core Research Reactor, a pool-type reactor and (2) the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III, a Godiva-type reactor. The annual radioactive air emissions from these two reactors had been estimated based on engineering calculations

M. J. McDonald; F. Ghanbari; M. J. Burger; C. Holm

1996-01-01

323

Pulsed reactor experiments at Oak Ridge  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes dynamic experiments for 3 pulsed reactors. 1st reactor was pulsed from some average power by rotating a partial Be reflector past an unreflected core face; the other 2 reactors were pulsed by rapid insertion of a fuel rod into the unmoderated and unreflected reactor at essentially zero neutron level with no significant neutron source present. The first reactor was a mockup of an EURATOM design (never constructed) of the proposed SORA Reactor, and the other two were the Health Physics Research Reactor and the Army Pulse Radiation Facility Reactor (APRFR). This paper describes the experiments performed in initial testing of these systems, including destructive tests of APRFR, to set operating limits for this type of reactor in pulsed operation. All the experiments described were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility.

Mihalczo, J.T.

1994-12-31

324

ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) reactor building design study  

SciTech Connect

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is at the midpoint of a two-year conceptual design. The ITER reactor building is a reinforced concrete structure that houses the tokamak and associated equipment and systems and forms a barrier between the tokamak and the external environment. It provides radiation shielding and controls the release of radioactive materials to the environment during both routine operations and accidents. The building protects the tokamak from external events, such as earthquakes or aircraft strikes. The reactor building requirements have been developed from the component designs and the preliminary safety analysis. The equipment requirements, tritium confinement, and biological shielding have been studied. The building design in progress requires continuous iteraction with the component and system designs and with the safety analysis. 8 figs.

Thomson, S.L.; Blevins, J.D.; Delisle, M.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, Mississauga, ON (Canada))

1989-01-01

325

Update on reactors and reactor instruments in Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 1980s have seen the commissioning of several medium flux (?10 14 neutrons/cm 2s) research reactors in Asia. The reactors are based on indigenous design and development in India and China. At Dhruva reactor (India), a variety of neutron spectrometers have been established that have provided useful data related to the structure of high- Tc materials, phonon density of states, magnetic moment distributions and micellar aggregation during the last couple of years. Polarised neutron analysis, neutron interferometry and neutron spin echo methods are some of the new techniques under development. The spectrometers and associated automaton, detectors and neutron guides have all been indigenously developed. This paper summarises the developments and on-going activities in Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand.

Rao, K. R.

1991-10-01

326

Rapid starting methanol reactor system  

DOEpatents

The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

1984-01-01

327

International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15

328

Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons  

SciTech Connect

A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Masuda, Koji [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Perry, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2013-05-15

329

Proposed reactor coolant density monitor  

SciTech Connect

Until now there has been no feasible method of monitoring coolant density in the environment of an operating reactor core. By analysis of output from self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) in the core of the Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) Reactor, the author has successfully estimated local coolant densities under post-scram conditions during a large break loss of coolant transient. The model used for estimation is not fully explained by published principles on the interaction of gamma rays with SPNDs. However, based on the success of the model, the author proposes employing self powered gamma detectors (SPGDs) to monitor reactor coolant density and discusses areas of experimental work to establish the best conditions for this application. 9 refs., 12 figs.

Mackley, A.D.

1986-01-01

330

Plasma reactor waste management systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produce plasmas for the treatment of materials. The plasma reactors offer several advantages over other systems, including low operating temperatures, low operating pressures, mechanical simplicity, and relatively safe operation. Human fecal material, sunflowers, oats, soybeans, and plastic were oxidized in a batch plasma reactor. Over 98 percent of the organic material was converted to gaseous products. The solids were then analyzed and a large amount of water and acid-soluble materials were detected. These materials could possibly be used as nutrients for biological systems.

Ness, Robert O., Jr.; Rindt, John R.; Ness, Sumitra R.

1992-01-01

331

On fast reactor kinetics studies  

SciTech Connect

The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A. [Nuclear Safety Inst. of the Russian Academy of Sciences IBRAE (Russian Federation); Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01

332

Light water reactor health physics.  

PubMed

In this article an overview of the historical development of light water reactor health physics programs is presented. Operational health physics programs have developed and matured as experience in operating and maintaining light water reactors has been gained. Initial programs grew quickly in both size and complexity with the number and size of nuclear units under construction and in operation. Operational health physics programs evolved to face various challenges confronted by the nuclear industry, increasing the effectiveness of radiological safety measures. Industry improvements in radiological safety performance have resulted in significant decreases in annual collective exposures from a high value of 790 person-rem in 1980 to 117 person-rem per reactor in 2002. Though significant gains have been made, the continued viability of the nuclear power industry is confronted with an aging workforce, as well as the challenges posed by deregulation and the need to maintain operational excellence. PMID:15551785

Prince, Robert J; Bradley, Scott E

2004-11-01

333

Reactor control rod timing system  

DOEpatents

A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

1982-01-01

334

Light water reactor health physics.  

PubMed

In this article an overview of the historical development of light water reactor health physics programs is presented. Operational health physics programs have developed and matured as experience in operating and maintaining light water reactors has been gained. Initial programs grew quickly in both size and complexity with the number and size of nuclear units under construction and in operation. Operational health physics programs evolved to face various challenges confronted by the nuclear industry, increasing the effectiveness of radiological safety measures. Industry improvements in radiological safety performance have resulted in significant decreases in annual collective exposures from a high value of 790 person-rem in 1980 to 117 person-rem per reactor in 2002. Though significant gains have been made, the continued viability of the nuclear power industry is confronted with an aging workforce, as well as the challenges posed by deregulation and the need to maintain operational excellence. PMID:15891460

Prince, Robert J; Bradley, Scott E

2005-06-01

335

Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

1975-01-01

336

The Very High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are types of nuclear power plants that, as the names imply, operate at temperatures above those of the conventional nuclear power plants that currently generate electricity in the US and other countries. Like existing nuclear plants, heat generated from the fission of uranium or plutonium atoms is carried off by a working fluid and can be used generate electricity. The very hot working fluid also enables the VHTR to drive other industrial processes that require high temperatures not achievable by conventional nuclear plants (Figure 1). For this reason, the VHTR is being considered for non-electrical energy applications. The reactor and power conversion system are constructed using special materials that make a core meltdown virtually impossible.

Hans D. Gougar; David A. Petti

2011-06-01

337

Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer  

SciTech Connect

Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events; various accident scenarios; single- and two-phase flow; single- and two-phase heat transfer; nuclear systems safety modeling; startup and shutdown; transient response during normal and upset conditions; vapor explosions, natural convection cooling; blockages in LMFBR subassemblies; sodium boiling; and Three Mile Island.

Jones, O.C.

1982-07-01

338

Toward reactor monitoring with antineutrinos  

SciTech Connect

The fundamental knowledge on neutrino properties acquired in recent years as well as the great experimental progress made on neutrino detection open nowadays the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) asked to its member states to study the possibility of nuclear reactor monitoring applications, such as the thermal power measurement or the fuel composition bookkeeping. In this context, we report studies aiming at a better determination of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by nuclear power plants, necessary for reactor monitoring applications, but also for experiments studying the ground properties of these particles. (authors)

Guillon, Benoit; Cormon, S.; Fallot, M.; Giot, L.; Martino, J. [SUBATECH-Ecole des Mines, La Chantrerie, Nantes cedex 3, France, 44307 cedex 3 (France); Cribier, M.; Lasserre, T. [CEA/DAPNIA/SPP, APC 10, rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, Paris cedex 13, France, 75205 (France); Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D. [CEA/DAPNIA/SPhN, Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France, 91191 (France)

2007-07-01

339

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01

340

SP-100 space reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

The SP-100 space reactor power system is being developed to meet the large electrical power requirements of civilian and military missions planned for the 1990's and beyond. It will remove the restrictions on electrical power generation that have tended to limit missions and will enable the fuller exploration and utilization of space. This booklet describes the SP-100 space reactor power system and its development. Particular emphasis is given to safety. The design aand operational features as well as the design and safety review process that will assure that the SP-100 can be launched nd operated safely are described.

Not Available

1987-05-01

341

Space reactor preliminary mechanical design  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was performed on the SABRE reactor space power system to determine the effect of the number and size of heat pipes on the design parameters of the nuclear subsystem. Small numbers of thin walled heat pipes were found to give a lower subsystem mass, but excessive fuel swelling resulted. The SP-100 preliminary design uses 120 heat pipes because of acceptable fuel swelling and a minimum nuclear subsystem mass of 1875 kg. Salient features of the reactor preliminary design are: individual fuel modules, ZrO/sub 2/ block core mounts, bolted collar fuel module restraints, and a BeO central plug.

Meier, K.L.

1983-01-01

342

Deep beam reactor vessel head and nuclear reactor including same  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a combined calandria and deep beam head adapted to seal the top opening of a pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor. The pressure vessel has an outer pressure resistant wall with a top edge and the calandria is disposed within the upper portion of the pressure vessel. The calandria has an upper support plate and a lower

Drake

1987-01-01

343

Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive.

1977-01-01

344

Summary of advanced LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) evaluations: PRISM (Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module) and SAFR (Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed independent analyses of two advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) concepts. The designs, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) (Berglund, 1987) and the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) (Baumeister, 1987), were developed primarily by General Electric (GE)

G. J. Van Tuyle; G. C. Slovik; B. C. Chan; R. J. Kennett; H. S. Cheng; P. G. Kroeger

1989-01-01

345

IPFR: Integrated Pool Fusion Reactor Concept.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The IPFR (Integrated Pool Fusion Reactor) concept is to place a fusion reactor into a pool of molten Flibe. The Flibe will serve the multiple functions of breeding, cooling, shielding, and moderating. Therefore, the only structural material between the su...

D. K. Sze

1986-01-01

346

Fusion Reactor Blanket: Neutronic Studies in France.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The problem of effective tritium regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, especially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanke...

F. Barre F. Gervaise L. Giancarli

1983-01-01

347

Search for Other Natural Fission Reactors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Precambrian uranium ores have been surveyed for evidence of other natural fission reactors. The requirements for formation of a natural reactor direct investigations to uranium deposits with large, high-grade ore zones. Massive zones with volumes approxim...

K. E. Apt J. P. Balagna E. A. Bryant G. A. Cowan W. R. Daniels

1977-01-01

348

MAPLE research reactor beam-tube performance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has been developing the MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental) reactor concept as a medium-flux neutron source to meet contemporary research reactor applications. This paper gives a brief descripti...

A. G. Lee R. F. Lidstone G. E. Gillespie

1989-01-01

349

REACTOR PHYSICS OF TEAPOT PART I  

Microsoft Academic Search

Initial criticality studies for boiling water reactor application are ; presented. The critical volume for a 17.5-in.diameter experimental reactor using ; enriched UOâSOâ is calculated. Temperature and pressure effects are ; considered. (D.E.B.);

Kasten

1952-01-01

350

Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor Annual Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included. (ERA citation 05:000957)

T. V. Anderson A. G. Johnson S. L. Bennett J. C. Ringle

1979-01-01

351

Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

D. Kokkinos

2005-04-28

352

Nuclear Reactor: On Schedule and Under Cost.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Society of Professional Engineers has named the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), an experimental nuclear reactor cooled by molten sodium, one of the nation's ten top engineering achievements of 1982. The reactor is located at Richland, Washing...

R. D. Larson

1983-01-01

353

Fuel Systems for Compact Fast Space Reactors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

About 200 refractory metal clad ceramic fuel pins have been irradiated in thermal reactors under the 1200 K to 1550 K cladding temperature conditions of primary relevance to space reactors. This paper reviews performance with respect to fissile atom densi...

C. M. Cox D. S. Dutt R. A. Karnesky

1983-01-01

354

Superphénix: A Full-Scale Breeder Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Design characteristics of LMFBR type reactors are described. The development programs for LMFBR's in different countries are compared. The design specifications and plant layout for the Super Phenix Reactor are presented.

Georges A. Vendryes

1977-01-01

355

What can recycling in thermal reactors accomplish?  

SciTech Connect

Thermal recycle provides several potential benefits when used as stop-gap, mixed, or backup recycling to recycling in fast reactors. These three roles involve a mixture of thermal and fast recycling; fast reactors are required to some degree at some time. Stop-gap uses thermal reactors only until fast reactors are adequately deployed and until any thermal-recycle-only facilities have met their economic lifetime. Mixed uses thermal and fast reactors symbiotically for an extended period of time. Backup uses thermal reactors only if problems later develop in the fast reactor portion of a recycling system. Thermal recycle can also provide benefits when used as pure thermal recycling, with no intention to use fast reactors. However, long term, the pure thermal recycling approach is inadequate to meet several objectives. (authors)

Piet, Steven J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Jacobson, Jacob J. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 N. Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2007-07-01

356

What can Recycling in Thermal Reactors Accomplish?  

SciTech Connect

Thermal recycle provides several potential benefits when used as stop-gap, mixed, or backup recycling to recycling in fast reactors. These three roles involve a mixture of thermal and fast recycling; fast reactors are required to some degree at some time. Stop-gap uses thermal reactors only until fast reactors are adequately deployed and until any thermal-recycle-only facilities have met their economic lifetime. Mixed uses thermal and fast reactors symbiotically for an extended period of time. Backup uses thermal reactors only if problems later develop in the fast reactor portion of a recycling system. Thermal recycle can also provide benefits when used as pure thermal recycling, with no intention to use fast reactors. However, long term, the pure thermal recycling approach is inadequate to meet several objectives.

Steven Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson

2007-09-01

357

Nuclear Reactor Safety: a current awareness bulletin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear Reactor Safety announces on a semimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on all safety-related aspects of fission reactors, including: accident analysis, safety systems, radiation protection, decommissioning and dismantling, and security measures.

1985-01-01

358

Comparative evaluation of fuel utilisation by different thermal reactor systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A comparative assessment of fuel utilization efficiency of pressurised water reactors, pressure tube type pressurised heavy water reactors, pressure vessel type pressurised heavy water reactors and high temperature gas cooled graphite reactors operating o...

M. R. Balakrishnan

1992-01-01

359

77 FR 60039 - Non-Power Reactor License Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Manager, Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch...Rulemaking, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation...September 2012. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Chief, Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch...Rulemaking, Office of Nuclear Reactor...

2012-10-02

360

Fission reactor pumped lasers: History and prospects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A historical account is given of work at Sandia since 1979, beginning with initial experiments on reactor ionized electrical excitation of CO2 lasers. An account of recent work at Sandia is also given centering on the Pulsed Reactor III for experiments at high excitation rates with small laser volumes, and the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor for experiments at lower excitation rates with larger laser volume. Prospects are given for future reactor pumped laser work.

McArthur, David A.

361

Integrated modular water reactor (IMR) design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrated modular water reactor (IMR) has been developed as one of the advanced small-scale light water reactors, with a thermal output of 1000MW. The IMR adopts natural circulation and self-pressurization in the primary cooling system, and a reactor vessel built-in steam generators. The core design has been performed using the current light water reactor technology. Thermal-hydraulic sensitivity analyses have been

Koki Hibi; Hitoi Ono; Takashi Kanagawa

2004-01-01

362

Reactor Coolant Pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft into the containment. The relatively large number of RCP seal and seal auxiliary system failures experienced at US operating plants during

C. J. Ruger; J. C. Higgins

1993-01-01

363

Performance of the PRISM (power reactor - innovative, small module) reactor's passive decay heat removal system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PRISM (power reactor - innovative, small module) modular reactor concept has a totally passive decay heat removal system referred to as the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) that rejects heat from the reactor by radiation and natural convection of air. The system is inherently reliable and is not subject to the failure modes commonly associated with active cooling

P. M. Magee; A. Hunsbedt

1989-01-01

364

MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603, REACTOR FLOOR. DETAIL OF REACTOR TEST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603, REACTOR FLOOR. DETAIL OF REACTOR TEST HOLE OPENING IN WEST FACE. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-2-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

365

MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA603, REACTOR FLOOR. DETAIL OF REACTOR'S SOUTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

MTR BUILDING INTERIOR, TRA-603, REACTOR FLOOR. DETAIL OF REACTOR'S SOUTH FACE. CAMERA FACING NORTHWESTERLY. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-1-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

366

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

1996-04-02

367

High performance light water reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the

D. Squarer; T. Schulenberg; D. Struwe; Y. Oka; D. Bittermann; N. Aksan; C. Maraczy; R. Kyrki-Rajamäki; A. Souyri; P. Dumaz

2003-01-01

368

Requirements for Reactor Physics Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It has been recognized that there is a need for requirements and guidance for design and operation of nuclear power plants. This is becoming more important as more reactors are being proposed to be built. In parallel with activities in individual countrie...

D. J. Diamond

2008-01-01

369

Fluidized-Bed Reactor System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gas pyrolysis in hot fluidized beds minimized by use of selectively filtered radiation and parabolic cavity. Reactor is parabolic cavity of two or more axes in which light emanating from one axis bounces off walls of cavity and passes through object axis to heat sample.

Morrison, A. D.

1985-01-01

370

A Simple Tubular Reactor Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using the hydrolysis of crystal violet dye by sodium hydroxide as an example, the theory, apparatus, and procedure for a laboratory demonstration of tubular reactor behavior are described. The reaction presented can occur at room temperature and features a color change to reinforce measured results. (WB)

Hudgins, Robert R.; Cayrol, Bertrand

1981-01-01

371

SRP reactor moderator piping inspections  

SciTech Connect

A program has been planned and initiated to provide inspection of SRP reactor moderator piping for intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Inspections will be accomplished by SRP personnel and subcontractors, using state of the art inspection techniques and equipment. Computerized ultransonic inspection systems are being evaluated on R-Area piping. A related program is in progress to determine acceptance criteria for inspection results.

Sprayberry, R.E.

1984-01-01

372

SRP reactor moderator piping inspections  

Microsoft Academic Search

A program has been planned and initiated to provide inspection of SRP reactor moderator piping for intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Inspections will be accomplished by SRP personnel and subcontractors, using state of the art inspection techniques and equipment. Computerized ultransonic inspection systems are being evaluated on R-Area piping. A related program is in progress to determine acceptance criteria for inspection

Sprayberry

1984-01-01

373

Petascale algorithms for reactor hydrodynamics.  

SciTech Connect

We describe recent algorithmic developments that have enabled large eddy simulations of reactor flows on up to P = 65, 000 processors on the IBM BG/P at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Petascale computing is expected to play a pivotal role in the design and analysis of next-generation nuclear reactors. Argonne's SHARP project is focused on advanced reactor simulation, with a current emphasis on modeling coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics (TH). The TH modeling comprises a hierarchy of computational fluid dynamics approaches ranging from detailed turbulence computations, using DNS (direct numerical simulation) and LES (large eddy simulation), to full core analysis based on RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subchannel models. Our initial study is focused on LES of sodium-cooled fast reactor cores. The aim is to leverage petascale platforms at DOE's Leadership Computing Facilities (LCFs) to provide detailed information about heat transfer within the core and to provide baseline data for less expensive RANS and subchannel models.

Fischer, P.; Lottes, J.; Pointer, W. D.; Siegel, A. (Mathematics and Computer Science); ( NE)

2008-01-01

374

Particle Bed Reactor engine technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) based propulsion system being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. A PBR engine is a light weight, compact propulsion system which offers significant improvement over current technology systems. Current performance goals are a system thrust of 75,000 pounds at an Isp of 1000 sec. A target thrust to weight

S. Sandler; R. Feddersen

1992-01-01

375

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

1995-11-07

376

Fast neutron source reactor, YAYOI  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of the fast neutron source reactor, YAYOI of the University of Tokyo are described. The results of major researches are summarized. Those are the studies of fast neutron shielding and neutron transport, development of standard neutron field, advanced neutron detection, measurement of decay heat, development of epithermal neutron columns for boron neutron capture therapy, on-line tritium recovery from

Y. Oka; S. Koshizuka; I. Saito; K. Okamura; N. Aizawa; N. Sasuga; T. Sukegawa; T. Terakado; Y. Mabuchi; T. Nakagawa; S. An

1998-01-01

377

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01

378

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01

379

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01

380

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01

381

Catalytic reactor with disposable cartridge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Catalytic reactor, disposable cartridge enclosing iron catalyst, acts as container for solid carbon formed by decomposition of carbon monoxide. Deposition of carbon in other parts of oxygen recovery system does not occur because of lack of catalytic activity; filters trap carbon particles and prevent their being transported outside reaction zone.

Mccullough, C. M.

1973-01-01

382

Nuclear Reactor Core Clamping System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The clamping system is for the core of a nuclear reactor having a neutron reflector control system. The clamping system is situated between the core and the reflector system and is of such a size to permit closer spacing of the reflector system to the cor...

R. W. Guenther

1965-01-01

383

Directions in advanced reactor technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Successful nuclear power plant concepts must simultaneously performance in terms of both safety and economics. To be attractive to both electric utility companies and the public, such plants must produce economical electric energy consistent with a level of safety which is acceptable to both the public and the plant owner. Programs for reactor development worldwide can be classified according to

Golay

1990-01-01

384

Physics of nuclear reactor safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Provides a concise review of the physical aspects of safety of nuclear fission reactors. It covers the developments of roughly the last decade. The introductory chapter contains an analysis of the changes in safety philosophy that are characteristic of the last decade and that have given rise to an increased importance of physical aspects because of the emphasis on passive

H. van Dam

1992-01-01

385

Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear Reactor Safety Heat Transfer is presented in five major sections.The first section presents the background material placing nuclear power in perspective. Starting with a historical overview, followed by fundamental concepts of nuclear energy and the philosphy of risk, the first three chapters: give the reader a brief but thorough introduction to nuclear power generation; describe the different types of

O. C. Jr

1981-01-01

386

Nuclear-reactor-safety computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dual safety computers monitor coolant flow and temperature for each fuel and target assembly in the Savannah River Plant production reactors, providing rapid shutdown capability if any assembly is in danger of melting. The same computers also monitor twenty-four other safety circuits and enforce shutdown by a second mechanism if the primary (safety rod) system fails.

Kritz

1981-01-01

387

Global Trends in Reactor Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper offers a synthetical description of the main advanced reactor designs currently being developed in the world. The aim is to make comparisons and give an indication of new technological trends. The advanced designs are relevant to PWR, BWR, HTGR...

1987-01-01

388

INVESTIGATIONS WITH MERCURY FLOW REACTOR  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of the research performed in the Mercury Flow Reactor is to investigate short residence-time (seconds) adsorption of mercury species using different sorbents. Emphasis is placed on the effects of mercury concentration, flow rates, reaction temperatures, exposure ti...

389

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

1998-06-02

390

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOEpatents

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

1998-04-14

391

Immobilized enzyme reactors in proteomics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast, efficient characterization of proteins is becoming one of the hottest topics in the bioanalytical community, especially for large-scale proteomic studies. As an attractive approach, protein digestion by enzymes supported on various matrices (referred to as immobilized enzyme reactors, IMERs) has recently attracted much attention.In this article, we present a critical overview of some highly efficient IMERs and related analytical

Junfeng Ma; Lihua Zhang; Zhen Liang; Yichu Shan; Yukui Zhang

2011-01-01

392

Advances in ICF power reactor design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen ICF power reactor design studies published since 1980 are reviewed to illuminate the design trends they represent. There is a clear, continuing trend toward making ICF reactors inherently safer and environmentally benign. Since this trend accentuates inherent advantages of ICF reactors, it is expected to be further emphasized in the future. An emphasis on economic competitiveness appears to be

W. J. Hogan; G. L. Kulcinski

1985-01-01

393

Fuel transfer system for a nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disclosed is a fuel transfer system for moving nuclear reactor fuel assemblies from a new fuel storage pit to a containment area containing the nuclear reactor, and for transferring spent fuel assemblies under water from the reactor to a spent fuel storage area. The system includes an underwater track which extends through a wall dividing the fuel building from the

L. R. Katz; J. R. Marshall; W. E. Desmarchais

1977-01-01

394

Fuel transfer system for a nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fuel transfer system is described for moving nuclear reactor fuel assemblies from a new fuel storage pit to a containment area containing the nuclear reactor, and for transferring spent fuel assemblies under water from the reactor to a spent fuel storage area. The system includes an underwater track which extends through a wall dividing the fuel building from the

L. R. Katz; J. R. Marshall; W. Desmarchais

1976-01-01

395

Safety of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Some physical and technical aspects of sodium-cooled fast reactor safety are discussed. An approach to the solution of safety problems in the designs of the first fast-reactor generation in the USSR was based (as a result of thermal reactor operating expe...

Y. E. Bagdasarov L. A. Kochetkov V. I. Matveev M. Y. Kulakovskii I. A. Kuznetsov

1977-01-01

396

Search for other natural fission reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Precambrian uranium ores have been surveyed for evidence of other natural fission reactors. The requirements for formation of a natural reactor direct investigations to uranium deposits with large, high-grade ore zones. Massive zones with volumes approximately greater than 1 m³ and concentrations approximately greater than 20 percent uranium are likely places for a fossil reactor if they are approximately greater

K. E. Apt; J. P. Balagna; E. A. Bryant; G. A. Cowan; W. R. Daniels; R. J. Vidale

1977-01-01

397

Element immersed in coolant of nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the method of processing a coolant-displacement rod of a nuclear reactor, preparatory to the installation of the rod in the nuclear reactor, to preclude the formation undesirably of an unsupported permanent axial gap in the cladding of the rod over the anticipated time of use of the rod in the nuclear reactor by reason of neutron bombardment

1990-01-01

398

TRIGA Mark-II, III Reactor Operation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

TRIGA Mark-II reactor has been primarily utilized for the fundamental reactor experiments, which were offered to the junior and senior students of Seoul National University and Hanyang University for 328 hours. The annual operating time of this reactor wa...

J. B. Lee C. K. Lee S. W. Cho B. J. Juhn G. Y. Han

1983-01-01

399

Analysis of the TRIGA Reactor Pool Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The reactor at AFRRI is a Mark F, 1 megawatt TRIGA (training, research, isotope, General Atomic) reactor. The reactor hangs in a cloverleaf-shaped tank that contains 15,000 gallons of demineralized water. The aluminum tank varies in thickness from 1/4 inc...

J. Dickson L. Moore M. Moore R. George

1993-01-01

400

FUZZY MODELLING APPLIED TO AN UASB REACTOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-rate anaerobic systems, such as the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, are widely used in municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. Even though UASB reactors have several operational advantages, many industries are still reluctant to use them due to the fact that these reactors usually demand constant monitoring of effluent quality, excess sludge discharge and biogas production rate. Otherwise, they

R. M. Borges; C. J. Munaro; R. F. Gonçalves

401

FAST NEUTRON REACTORS OVER THE WORLD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast reactors should lead to very efficient use of all nuclear fuel ; stocks through the conversion of uranium-238 and thorium-232 into flssile ; materials. The use of plu tonium-240 produced in thermal reactors should also be ; possible. A review is given of accomplishments in this field, viz experimental ; reactors of zero or low power and nuclear plant

M. M. Solanes; C. P. Zaleski

1962-01-01

402

Compact reactor\\/ORC power source  

Microsoft Academic Search

A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor\\/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite

K. L. Meier; W. L. Kirchner; G. J. Willcutt

1986-01-01

403

Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandia National Laboratories has developed, designed and operated fast burst reactors for over 20 years. These reactors have been used for a variety of radiation effects programs. During this period, programs have required larger irradiation volumes primarily to expose complex electronic systems to postulated threat environments. As experiment volumes increased, a new reactor was built so that these components could

Reuscher

1983-01-01

404

Simulation fidelity in reactor irradiation of electronics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast Burst Reactors (FBRs), and pool-type reactors, such as TRIGAs and the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), are used as sources of neutrons and gamma rays in radiation effects testing of electronics. The applicability of test results to other test or operational radiation environments depends on adequate measurement and control of the test environment, and on the use of

Theodore F. Luera; Patrick J. Griffin; John G. Kelly

1991-01-01

405

The modular high-temperature reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearly all problems encountered in large high-temperature reactor power plants with respect to design and safety are related to the mere physical size of a larger reactor core. Our analyses show that it is feasible to subdivide a larger reactor core into modular units, analogous to the common practice of using several smaller units instead of one large unit. In

H. Reutler; G. H. Lohnert

1983-01-01

406

Optimal temperature profile in methanol synthesis reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

An optimal temperature profile is determined for a methanol synthesis reactor of LURGI type. The temperature profile is estimated so that methanol production rate in the reactor outlet will be maximized. First, the reactor is simulated based on heterogeneous one- and two-dimensional models. The comparison of the simulation results and plant data shows that the heterogeneous one-dimensional model can reliably

A. Jahanmiri; R. Eslamloueyan

2002-01-01

407

Modular Helium Reactor for Hydrogen Production.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor ...

A. Shenoy K. Schultz L. Brown M. Fukuie M. Richards

2006-01-01

408

Design and operation of immobilized enzyme reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review encompasses recent advances in the design and operation of immobilized enzyme reactors for industrial applications. Basic immobilized enzyme reactor engineering concepts are described as a reference point for recent innovations. Although practical examples are cited, the subject is approached from the viewpoint of reactor design and operation and the potential general applicability of new concepts or developments. Areas

409

REACTOR PHYSICS CALCULATIONS FOR THE MSRE  

Microsoft Academic Search

A compilation is presented of results obtained to date from a number of ; reactor physics calculations for the molten salt reactor experiment (MSRE). ; Included are one-dimensional multigroup and two-dimensional twogroup calculations ; of critical mass, flux, and power density distributions; gamma heating in the ; core can, reactor vessel, and core support grid; drain tank criticality; and an

Nestor; C. W. Jr

1960-01-01

410

Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors – history and perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core

Jan Uhlír

2007-01-01

411

Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal  

DOEpatents

An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

Hunsbedt, Anstein N. (Los Gatos, CA)

1988-01-01

412

Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion.

Groh, Edward F. (Naperville, IL); Olson, Arne P. (Western Springs, IL); Wade, David C. (Naperville, IL); Robinson, Bryan W. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1984-01-01

413

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOEpatents

A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, Oleg M. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01

414

Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)  

SciTech Connect

A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.; Barrett, R.J.; Gorker, G.E.; Spampinaton, P.T.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dorn, D.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Ghose, S.

1985-09-01

415

Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor  

DOEpatents

The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN)

1998-06-23

416

Savannah River Site production reactor technical specifications. K Production Reactor  

SciTech Connect

These technical specifications are explicit restrictions on the operation of the Savannah River Site K Production Reactor. They are designed to preserve the validity of the plant safety analysis by ensuring that the plant is operated within the required conditions bounded by the analysis, and with the operable equipment that is assumed to mitigate the consequences of an accident. Technical specifications preserve the primary success path relied upon to detect and respond to accidents. This report describes requirements on thermal-hydraulic limits; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance for the reactor, power distribution control, instrumentation, process water system, emergency cooling and emergency shutdown systems, confinement systems, plant systems, electrical systems, components handling, and special test exceptions; design features; and administrative controls.

NONE

1996-02-01

417

Reactor instrumentation renewal of the TRIGA reactor Vienna, Austria  

SciTech Connect

The TRIGA Mark-II reactor at the Atominstitut in Vienna, Austria is replacing its twenty-four year old instrumentation system with a microprocessor based control system supplied by General Atomics. Ageing components, new governmental safety requirements and a need for state of the art instrumentation for training students has spurred the demand for new reactor instrumentation. In Austria a government appointed expert is assigned the responsibility of reviewing the proposed installation and verifying all safety aspects. After a positive review, final assembly and checkout of the instrumentation system may commence. The instrumentation system consists of three basic modules: the control system console, the data acquisition console and the NH-1000 wide range channel. Digital communications greatly reduce interwiring requirements. Hardwired safety channels are independent of computer control, thus, the instrumentation system in no way relies on any computer intervention for safety function. In addition, both the CSC and DAC computers are continuously monitored for proper operation via watchdog circuits which are capable of shutting down the reactor in the event of computer malfunction. Safety channels include two interlocked NMP-1000 multi-range linear channels for steady state mode, an NPP-1000 linear safety channel for pulse mode and a set of three independent fuel temperature monitoring channels. The microprocessor controlled wide range NM- 1000 digital neutron monitor (fission chamber based) functions as a startup/operational channel, and provides all power level related Interlocks. The Atominstitut TRIGA reactor is configured for four modes of operation: manual mode, automatic mode (servo control), pulsing mode and square wave mode. Control of the standard control rods is via stepping motor control rod drives, which offers the operator the choice of which control rods are operated by the servo system in automatic and square wave model. (author)

Boeck, H. [Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria); Weiss, H. [Technical University, Graz (Austria); Hood, W.E.; Hyde, W.K. [General Atomics, TRIGA Division, San Diego, CA (United States)

1992-07-01

418

Fission fragment assisted reactor concept for space propulsion: Foil reactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The concept is to fabricate a reactor using thin films or foils of uranium, uranium oxide and then to coat them on substrates. These coatings would be made so thin as to allow the escaping fission fragments to directly heat a hydrogen propellant. The idea was studied of direct gas heating and direct gas pumping in a nuclear pumped laser program. Fission fragments were used to pump lasers. In this concept two substrates are placed opposite each other. The internal faces are coated with thin foil of uranium oxide. A few of the advantages of this technology are listed. In general, however, it is felt that if one look at all solid core nuclear thermal rockets or nuclear thermal propulsion methods, one is going to find that they all pretty much look the same. It is felt that this reactor has higher potential reliability. It has low structural operating temperatures, very short burn times, with graceful failure modes, and it has reduced potential for energetic accidents. Going to a design like this would take the NTP community part way to some of the very advanced engine designs, such as the gas core reactor, but with reduced risk because of the much lower temperatures.

Wright, Steven A.

1991-01-01

419

Reactor pulse repeatability studies at the annular core research reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories is a water-moderated pool-type reactor designed for testing many types of objects in the pulse and steady-state mode of operations. Personnel at Sandia began working to improve the repeatability of pulse operations for experimenters in the facility. The ACRR has a unique UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel that makes the task of producing repeatable pulses difficult with the current operating procedure. The ACRR produces a significant quantity of photoneutrons through the {sup 9}Be({gamma}, n){sup 8}Be reaction in the fuel elements. The photoneutrons are the result of the gammas produced during fission and in fission product decay, so their production is very much dependent on the reactor power history and changes throughout the day/week of experiments in the facility. Because the photoneutrons interfere with the delayed-critical measurements required for accurate pulse reactivity prediction, a new operating procedure was created. The photoneutron effects at delayed critical are minimized when using the modified procedure. In addition, the pulse element removal time is standardized for all pulse operations with the modified procedure, and this produces less variation in reactivity removal times. (authors)

DePriest, K.R. [Applied Nuclear Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 1146, Post Office Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Trinh, T.Q. [Nuclear Facility Operations, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 0614, Post Office Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Luker, S. M. [Applied Nuclear Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 1146, Post Office Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States)

2011-07-01

420

TerraPower's Traveling Wave Reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TerraPower is moving forward with detailed plans for a sustainable, economic, and safe nuclear reactor. The Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR) -- a reactor in the 500-megawatt electric range - uses unique core physics to initiate a breed and burn wave which can be completely sustained in fertile material. This process allows the TWR to convert depleted uranium waste into usable fuel as the reactor operates, providing a sustainable base-load power source. TerraPower is the first company to create a practical engineering embodiment of this previously studied concept thanks to a powerful advanced reactor modeling interface, developed in-house, which enables the analysis of traveling wave reactor technology in a way that has not been possible before. This presentation will provide more detail about the origins of the TWR, the project's current status as well as some of the safety differences between TWRs and currently operating light water reactors.

Ellis, Tyler

2011-11-01

421

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOEpatents

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19

422

Design analysis of the upgraded TREAT reactor  

SciTech Connect

The TREAT reactor, fueled by a dilute dispersion of fully enriched UO/sub 2/ in graphite, has been a premier transient testing facility since 1959. A major Upgrade of the reactor is in progress to enhance its transient testing capability in support of the LMFBR safety program. The TREAT Upgrade (TU) reactor features a modified central zone of the core with higher fissile loadings of the same fuel, clad in Inconel to allow operation at higher temperatures. The demanding functional requirements on the reactor necessitated the use of unique features in the core design which, in turn, presented major calculational complexities in the analysis. Special design methods had to be used in many cases to treat these complexities. The addition of an improved Reactor Control System, a safety grade Plant Protection System and an enhanced Coolant/Filtration System produces a reactor that can meet the functional requirements on the reactor in a safe manner.

Bhattacharyya, S.K.

1982-01-01

423

Safety control circuit for a neutronic reactor  

DOEpatents

A neutronic reactor comprising an active portion containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy, means to control a neutronic chain reaction within the reactor comprising a safety device and a regulating device, a safety device including means defining a vertical channel extending into the reactor from an aperture in the upper surface of the reactor, a rod containing neutron-absorbing materials slidably disposed within the channel, means for maintaining the safety rod in a withdrawn position relative to the active portion of the reactor including means for releasing said rod on actuation thereof, a hopper mounted above the active portion of the reactor having a door disposed at the bottom of the hopper opening into the vertical channel, a plurality of bodies of neutron-absorbing materials disposed within the hopper, and means responsive to the failure of the safety rod on actuation thereof to enter the active portion of the reactor for opening the door in the hopper.

Ellsworth, Howard C. (Richland, WA)

2004-04-27

424

Reactor for gasifying solid fuels  

SciTech Connect

Solid fuels are gasified in a fixed bed with gasifying agents passed through the fixed bed from below. The gasification residues are withdrawn as solid ash or as liquid slag under the fixed bed. The reactor is charged with solid fuels through a lock chamber and with tar through a supply conduit. The tar is delivered to the fuel in numerous individual streams, which are distributed over the cross-section of the fixed bed. In the gasifying reactor, an inclined distributor surface is disposed over the fixed bed and has numerous passage openings for the tar and the solid fuels. The outlet end of the tar supply conduit is directed to the upper portion of the distributor surface. A tar tub having outlet openings is associated with the distributor surface and serves to receive the tar. The distributor surface is rotatable on a vertical axis.

Kupfer, H.; Rudolph, P.

1984-01-24

425

Microwave coupling in EBT reactor  

SciTech Connect

For a typical size ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor (approx. 1000 MWe), microwave frequencies required lie in the range of 60 to 110 GHz at power levels of 50 to 75 MW. As the frequency rises, the unloaded cavity (i.e., without plasma) quality factor Q decreases. Because of the short wavelengths of microwave heating power and the large cavity dimensions of a reactor, it is possible to apply quasi-optical principles in the efficient coupling of power to the plasma. The use of a confocal Fabry-Perot resonator with spherical mirrors is discussed; these serve to confine the microwave power to the region occupied by the plasma. The potential advantages of these resonators include high efficiency utilization of microwave power, minimal thermal burden on the cryopumping system, and significant benefit in preventing microwave leakage from the device. An estimation of the unloaded cavity quality factor Q and the design considerations of Fabry-Perot resonator are given.

Uckan, N.A.; Uckan, T.; Dandl, R.A.

1980-02-01

426

Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ``hands-on`` refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided.

Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

1994-04-01

427

Fluidized bed coal combustion reactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A fluidized bed coal reactor includes a combination nozzle-injector ash-removal unit formed by a grid of closely spaced open channels, each containing a worm screw conveyor, which function as continuous ash removal troughs. A pressurized air-coal mixture is introduced below the unit and is injected through the elongated nozzles formed by the spaces between the channels. The ash build-up in the troughs protects the worm screw conveyors as does the cooling action of the injected mixture. The ash layer and the pressure from the injectors support a fluidized flame combustion zone above the grid which heats water in boiler tubes disposed within and/or above the combustion zone and/or within the walls of the reactor.

Moynihan, P. I.; Young, D. L. (inventors)

1981-01-01

428

Reactor safeguards against insider sabotage  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual safeguards system is structured to show how both reactor operations and physical protection resources could be integrated to prevent release of radioactive material caused by insider sabotage. Operational recovery capabilities are addressed from the viewpoint of both detection of and response to disabled components. Physical protection capabilities for preventing insider sabotage through the application of work rules are analyzed. Recommendations for further development of safeguards system structures, operational recovery, and sabotage prevention are suggested.

Bennett, H.A.

1982-03-01

429

Thermophysical properties of reactor fuels  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented of the literature on the enthalpy of uranium, thorium, and plutonium oxide and an approach is described for calculating the vapor pressure and gaseous composition of reactor fuel. In these calculations, thermodynamic functions of gas phase molecular species (obtained from matrix-isolation spectroscopy) are employed in conjunction with condensed phase therodynamics. A summary is presented of the status of this work.

Leibowitz, L.

1981-01-01

430

Operate Your Own Tokamak Reactor!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Princeton University's Plasma Physics Laboratory's Interactive Plasma Physics Education Experience Web site has updated its interactive Virtual Tokamak. The Java applet is designed to illustrate the basic principles of magnetically confined fusion, and users can now type in the three parameters that include the heating power, magnetic field, and plasma density. Although the applet doesn't work on older PCs, older browsers, and on most Macs, it's worth finding a newer PC to interactively learn about these specific types of reactors.

Stotler, Daren.

2008-03-11

431

International standards for reactor technology  

SciTech Connect

The role of normative standards is to enhance the economic competitiveness of a nation by facilitating the free exchange of goods and services. Approximately 80 percent of all globally traded products are affected by standards and regulations that embody standards. In the present paper we provide a general discussion about the role of normative standards both in the United States and globally, and conclude with a specific discussion of international standards in the area of reactor technology. (authors)

Adams, J. M.; Londono, C. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 28099 (United States)

2006-07-01

432

Parallel Monte Carlo reactor neutronics  

SciTech Connect

The issues affecting implementation of parallel algorithms for large-scale engineering Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations are discussed. For nuclear reactor calculations, these include load balancing, recoding effort, reproducibility, domain decomposition techniques, I/O minimization, and strategies for different parallel architectures. Two codes were parallelized and tested for performance. The architectures employed include SIMD, MIMD-distributed memory, and workstation network with uneven interactive load. Speedups linear with the number of nodes were achieved.

Blomquist, R.N.; Brown, F.B.

1994-03-01

433

Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment, currently under construction in China, will be the most sensitive experiments in the world searching for the yet unknown neutrino mixing parameters, theta-13(theta13). With a thermal power of 17.4GW by 2011, the Daya Bay site provides an intense electron antineutrino flux, which together with 3 years of data taking from 4 pairs of identical

Yuenkeung Hor

2009-01-01

434

Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid

Neal P. Sullivan; Ellen Beth Stechel; Connor J. Moyer; Andrea Ambrosini; Robert J. Key

2010-01-01

435

Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

1995-04-01

436

Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

Daugherty, W.L.

1990-01-30

437

Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

Kang, Shawn; Lipinski, Ronald; McAlpine, William

2006-01-01

438

Using reactor operating experience to improve the design of a new Broad Application Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Increasing regulatory demands and effects of plant aging are limiting the operation of existing test reactors. Additionally, these reactors have limited capacities and capabilities for supporting future testing missions. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed sets of preliminary safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor design concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). Anticipated missions for the new reactor include fuels and materials irradiation testing, isotope production, space testing, medical research, fusion testing, intense positron research, and transmutation doping. The early BATR design decisions have benefited from operating experiences with existing reactors. This paper discusses these experiences and highlights their significance for the design of a new BATR.

Fletcher, C.D.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Drexler, R.L.; Leyse, C.F.

1993-07-01

439

The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor and Light Water Breeder Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, located in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, which was the first large-scale nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. A program was started in 1953 at the Bettis Laboratory to confirm the practical application of nuclear power for large-scale electric power generation. It led to the development of zirconium alloy (Zircaloy) clad fuel element containing bulk actinide oxide ceramics (UO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2} -- UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} -- UO{sub 2}) as nuclear reactor fuels. The program provided much of the technology being used for design and operation of the commercial, central-station nuclear power plants now in use. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) began initial power operation on December 18, 1957, and was a reliable electric power producer until February 1974. In 1965, subsequent to the successful operation of the Shippingport PWR (UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} -- UO{sub 2} fuels), the Bettis Laboratory undertook a research and development program to design and build a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core for operation in the Shippingport Station. Thorium was the fertile fuel in the LWBR core and was the base oxide for ThO{sub 2} and ThO{sub 2} -- UO{sub 2} fuel pellets. The LWBR core was installed in the pressure vessel of the original Shippingport PWR as its last core before decommissioning. The LWBR core started operation in the Shippingport Station in the autumn of 1977 and finished routine power operation on October 1, 1982. Successful LWBR power operation to over 160% of design lifetime demonstrated the performance capability of the core for both base-load and swing-load operation. Postirradiation examinations confirmed breeding and successful performance of the fuel system.

Clayton, J.C.

1993-11-01

440

Jules Horowitz Reactor: a high performance material testing reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physical modelling of materials' behaviour under severe conditions is an indispensable element for developing future fission and fusion systems: screening, design, optimisation, processing, licensing, and lifetime assessment of a new generation of structure materials and fuels, which will withstand high fast neutron flux at high in-service temperatures with the production of elements like helium and hydrogen. JANNUS and other analytical experimental tools are developed for this objective. However, a purely analytical approach is not sufficient: there is a need for flexible experiments integrating higher scales and coupled phenomena and offering high quality measurements; these experiments are performed in material testing reactors (MTR). Moreover, complementary representative experiments are usually performed in prototypes or dedicated facilities such as IFMIF for fusion. Only such a consistent set of tools operating on a wide range of scales, can provide an actual prediction capability. A program such as the development of silicon carbide composites (600-1200 °C) illustrates this multiscale strategy. Facing the long term needs of experimental irradiations and the ageing of present MTRs, it was thought necessary to implement a new generation high performance MTR in Europe for supporting existing and future nuclear reactors. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) project copes with this context. It is funded by an international consortium and will start operation in 2014. JHR will provide improved performances such as high neutron flux ( 10 n/cm/s above 0.1 MeV) in representative environments (coolant, pressure, temperature) with online monitoring of experimental parameters (including stress and strain control). Experimental devices designing, such as high dpa and small thermal gradients experiments, is now a key objective requiring a broad collaboration to put together present scientific state of art, end-users requirements and advanced instrumentation. To cite this article: D. Iracane et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

Iracane, Daniel; Chaix, Pascal; Alamo, Ana

2008-04-01

441

Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers  

SciTech Connect

A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

Edwards, R.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Weng, C.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lindsay, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01

442

Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers  

SciTech Connect

A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

Edwards, R.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Weng, C.K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Lindsay, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-06-01

443

Comparison of Fischer-Tropsch reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch process for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen, discovered in 1925, was used in Germany to produce military fuel during the 1940s and discontinued after World War II. Sasol has been running the process at its South Africa facility for over 20 years. The Sasol operations employ two different reactor systems, the Arge fixed bed reactor and the Synthol entrained bed reactor. Numerous other reactor types have been proposed for the process, all claiming superiority over each of the others. In order to provide guidance for further development efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested a direct comparison of four reactor systems available for Fischer-Tropsch technology. Of the four systems studied, the slurry reactor provided the best gasoline yield and had the lowest investment and catalyst costs. 17 refs.

Riekena, M.L.; Vickers, A.G.; Haun, E.C.; Koltz, R.C.

1982-04-01

444

Profiling a reactor component using ultrasonics  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactors have many components within the reactor vessel. During the life of a reactor it is possible for these components to be displaced or deformed because of the thermal cycles to which they are subject. Also, these components in situ therefore becomes important for the upkeep of the reactor. However, high radiation levels make it difficult to monitor using optical methods. This paper describes an ultrasonic method which was successfully employed in profiling a deformed guide tube of a reactor. The method uses the well-known ultrasonic ranging technique. However, the specialty of the method is the use of air transducers at 40 kHz to overcome the inherent divergence problems and the difficulties associated with high temperatures inherent in a sodium cooled reactor.

Pathak, L.; Seshadri, V.R.; Kumaravadivelu, C.; Sreenivasan, G.; Raghunathan, V.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)] [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

1995-04-01

445

Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thermionic reactor designs for a variety of space power applications spanning the range from 5 kWe to 3 MWe are described. In all of these reactors, nuclear heat is converted directly to electrical energy in thermionic fuel elements (TFEs). A circulating reactor coolant carries heat from the core of TFEs directly to a heat rejection radiator system. The recent design of a thermionic reactor to meet the SP-100 requirements is emphasized. Design studies of reactors at other power levels show that the same TFE can be used over a broad range in power, and that design modifications can extend the range to many megawatts. The design of the SP-100 TFE is similar to that of TFEs operated successfully in test reactors, but with design improvements to extend the operating lifetime to seven years.

Homeyer, W. G.; Merrill, M. H.; Holland, J. W.; Fisher, C. R.; Allen, D. T.

1985-01-01

446

PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Control of space and surface fission reactors should be kept as simple as possible, because of the need for high reliability and the difficulty to diagnose and adapt to control system failures. Fortunately, compact, fast-spectrum, externally controlled reactors are very simple in operation. In fact, for some applications it may be possible to design low-power surface reactors without the need for any reactor control after startup; however, a simple proportional, integral, derivative (PID) controller can allow a higher performance concept and add more flexibility to system operation. This paper investigates the effectiveness of a PID control scheme for several anticipated transients that a surface reactor might experience. To perform these analyses, the surface reactor transient code FRINK was modified to simulate control drum movements based on bulk coolant temperature.

Dixon, David D.; Marsh, Christopher L.; Poston, David I.

2007-01-01

447

Recent progress in stellarator reactor conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

The Stellarator/Torsatron/Heliotron (S/T/H) class of toroidal magnetic fusion reactor designs continues to offer a distinct and in several ways superior approach to eventual commercial competitiveness. Although no major, integrated conceptual reactor design activity is presently underway, a number of international research efforts suggest avenues for the substantial improvement of the S/T/H reactor embodiment, which derive from recent experimental and theoretical progress and are responsive to current trends in fusion-reactor projection to set the stage for a third generation of designs. Recent S/T/H reactor design activity is reviewed and the impact of the changing technical and programmatic context on the direction of future S/T/H reactor design studies is outlined.

Miller, R.L.

1985-01-01

448

NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration proposes to build a nuclear research reactor which will be located in the Plum Brook Ordnance Works near Sandusky, Ohio. The purpose of this report is to inform the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission in regard to the design Lq of the reactor facility, the characteristics of the site, and the hazards of operation at this location. The purpose of this research reactor is to make pumped loop studies of aircraft reactor fuel elements and other reactor components, radiation effects studies on aircraft reactor materials and equipment, shielding studies, and nuclear and solid state physics experiments. The reactor is light water cooled and moderated of the MTR-type with a primary beryllium reflector and a secondary water reflector. The core initially will be a 3 by 9 array of MTR-type fuel elements and is designed for operation up to a power of 60 megawatts. The reactor facility is described in general terms. This is followed by a discussion of the nuclear characteristics and performance of the reactor. Then details of the reactor control system are discussed. A summary of the site characteristics is then presented followed by a discussion of the larger type of experiments which may eventually be operated in this facility. The considerations for normal operation are concluded with a proposed method of handling fuel elements and radioactive wastes. The potential hazards involved with failures or malfunctions of this facility are considered in some detail. These are examined first from the standpoint of preventing them or minimizing their effects and second from the standpoint of what effect they might have on the reactor facility staff and the surrounding population. The most essential feature of the design for location at the proposed site is containment of the maximum credible accident.

1959-01-01

449

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOEpatents

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01

450

Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels  

DOEpatents

In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-11-22

451

Exploring new coolants for nuclear breeder reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breeder reactors are considered a unique tool for fully exploiting natural nuclear resources. In current Light Water Reactors (LWR), only 0.5% of the primary energy contained in the nuclei removed from a mine is converted into useful heat. The rest remains in the depleted uranium or spent fuel. The need to improve resource-efficiency has stimulated interest in Fast-Reactor-based fuel cycles,

A. Lafuente; M. Piera

2010-01-01

452

Silane-Pyrolysis Reactor With Nonuniform Heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved reactor serves as last stage in system processing metallurgical-grade silicon feedstock into silicon powder of ultrahigh purity. Silane pyrolized to silicon powder and hydrogen gas via homogeneous decomposition reaction in free space. Features set of individually adjustable electrical heaters and purge flow of hydrogen to improve control of pyrolysis conditions. Power supplied to each heater set in conjunction with flow in reactor to obtain desired distribution of temperature as function of position along reactor.

Iya, Sridhar K.

1991-01-01

453

Characteristics of Two-Reactor Electronuclear Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate electronuclear systems consisting of two-cascade subcritical zones: a liquid-metal fast reactor, which is used as a booster, and a thermal reactor, where most of the energy is released. Reactors of the type VVÉR-1000, MSBR-1000, and CANDU-6 are considered. The systems considered, functioning in the safe regime (keff = 0.94–0.98), possess much higher

S. A. Bznuni; V. M. Zhamkochyan; A. G. Khudaverdyan; V. S. Barashenkov; A. N. Sosnin; A. Polyanski

2002-01-01

454

Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

1987-01-01

455

A CANDU-Based Fast Irradiation Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new steady-state fast neutron reactor is needed to satisfy the testing needs of Generation IV reactors, the Space Propulsion Program, and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. This paper presents a new concept for a CANDU-based fast irradiation reactor that is horizontal in orientation, with individual pressure tubes running the entire length of the scattering-medium tank (Calandria) filled with Lead-Bismuth-Eutectic

Shatilla

2006-01-01

456

Dynamics of heat-pipe reactors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A split-core heat pipe reactor, fueled with either U(233)C or U(235)C in a tungsten cermet and cooled by 7-Li-W heat pipes, was examined for the effects of the heat pipes on reactor while trying to safely absorb large reactivity inputs through inherent shutdown mechanisms. Limits on ramp reactivity inputs due to fuel melting temperature and heat pipe wall heat flux were mapped for the reactor in both startup and at-power operating modes.

Niederauer, G. F.

1971-01-01

457

Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration  

SciTech Connect

This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

None

2012-11-29

458

Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration  

ScienceCinema

This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

None

2014-05-30

459

Analytical applications of reactors containing immobilized enzymes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theory for analytical packed-enzyme reactors is discussed and it is shown that a 100% conversion efficiency gives many\\u000a advantages. This concept has been applied to methods for substrate determinations of urea, amino acids, and glucose. Enzyme\\u000a reactors have also been used in the effluent from a Chromatographic column to enhance selectivity and sensitivity for cholesterol.\\u000a Enzyme reactors for the

Gillis Johansson

1982-01-01

460

Desirability of small reactors, HTGR in particular  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small reactors of about 100–300 MWe, High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) in particular, are considered desirable in future, based on the following ways of thinking;Global scale enhancement of nuclear energy is considered necessary from reduction of environment impact point of view.Small reactors are desirable, due to (a) enhanced safety in terms of fuel inventory and inherent safety, then (b)

Yasuo Tsuchie

2000-01-01

461

Space power reactor ground test in the Experimental Gas Cooled Reactor (EGCR) at Oak Ridge.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Experimental Gas Cooled Reactor (EGCR) facility and the supporting technical infrastructure at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have the capabilities of performing ground tests of space nuclear power reactor systems. A candidate test would be a 10 MW...

M. H. Fontana R. S. Holcomb R. H. Cooper

1992-01-01

462

PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Reactor vessel ready for insertion into ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Reactor vessel ready for insertion into pit. Photographer: Holmes. Date: February 26, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-991 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

463

PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Reactor vessel slips delicately into pit. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Reactor vessel slips delicately into pit. Photographer: Holmes. Date: February 26, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-982 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

464

Arkansas Tech University TRIGA nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the TRIGA nuclear reactor (ATUTR) proposed for construction on the campus of Arkansas Tech University in Russellville, Arkansas. The reactor will be part of the Center for Energy Studies located at Arkansas Tech University. The reactor has a steady state power level of 250 kW and can be pulsed with a maximum reactivity insertion of $2.0. Experience gained in dismantling and transporting some of the components from Michigan State University, and the storage of these components will be presented. The reactor will be used for education, training, and research. (author)

Sankoorikal, J.; Culp, R.; Hamm, J.; Elliott, D.; Hodgson, L.; Apple, S. [Arkansas Tech University, Engineering, Russellville, AR 72801 (United States)

1990-07-01

465

Thermomechanical analysis of fast-burst reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fast-burst reactors are designed to provide intense, short-duration pulses of neutrons. The fission reaction also produces extreme time-dependent heating of the nuclear fuel. An existing transient-dynamic finite element code was modified specifically to compute the time-dependent stresses and displacements due to thermal shock loads of reactors. Thermomechanical analysis was then applied to determine structural feasibility of various concepts for an EDNA-type reactor and to optimize the mechanical design of the new SPR III-M reactor.

Miller, J.D.

1994-08-01

466

TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

1991-06-01

467

Utilization of reactor bays of decommissioned submarines  

SciTech Connect

Radiation concerns regarding dismantling and storage of decommissioned reactors and reactor bays from nuclear submarines are briefly summarized. Calculation results are presented for gamma dose rates, contamination density, and the expected location of maximum exposure dose rate on the submarine hull. However, it is noted that radiation measurements must be obtained for each ship due to differences in operating conditions. Long-term storage options for containerized reactors and reactor bays are very briefly outlined; these include placing them in concrete-lined trenches shielded from the atmosphere or in underground tunnels shielded from water. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Lugavtsov, O.V.; Malakhov, A.G.; Popkov, K.K.

1994-11-01

468

Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors  

ScienceCinema

Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

469

Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical