Sample records for clinical chemistry haematology

  1. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data.MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process. PMID:26126036

  2. Clinical chemistry and haematology historical data in control Sprague-Dawley rats from pre-clinical toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Petterino, Claudio; Argentino-Storino, Alberta

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide historical data pertaining to clinical chemistry and haematology parameters, obtained from control Sprague-Dawley rats, used in pre-clinical toxicity studies. Mean, standard deviation, minimum and maximum values for haematological and coagulative profiles, haemato-biochemistry and urine analysis data, and the differences per sex and study duration, 4 versus 13 weeks, are presented. The studies were conducted in agreement with the GLP (Good Laboratory Practice) regulations. Statistically significant differences, at the confidence level of 99%, for the red blood cell (RBC) parameters, the white blood cell (WBC) series parameters, plasmatic albumin/globulin (A/G), alanine amino-transferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatinine, globulin, glucose, sodium, total protein, tryglycerides, urea and urine volume were observed in males, when 4-week study values were compared with those obtained from 13-week studies. Female rats showed statistically significant variations, at the confidence level of 99% for RBC number and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean red blood cell volume (MCV), WBCs count and lymphocytes percentage, A/G, albumin, ALT, AST, ALP, creatinine, globulin, and sodium, when 4-week study values were compared to 13-week studies. Similar differences were observed comparing the female with male haematological and biochemical data for the two different times of the sample collection. These data could be useful as a reference for evaluation of background pathology in Sprague-Dawley rats, when used in studies performed to evaluate the toxicological profile of a new chemical entity (NCE) in agreement with requirements from international regulatory agencies. PMID:16343876

  3. Haematological, coagulation and blood chemistry data in red-bellied tamarins Saguinus labiatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter F. Wadsworth; William A. Hiddleston; David V. Jones; John S. L. Fowler; Robert A. Ferguson

    1982-01-01

    Summary Haematology, coagulation and clinical chemistry data are reported for a group of male and female red-bellied tamarins (Saguinus labiatus). The tamarins were juvenile and young adults and were bred in captivity. High mean values for activities of alkaline phosphatase, alanine amino-transferase, aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase were noted. The findings are compared with data obtained from other members of

  4. Quality Management for Clinical Trials within the German Competence Network Paediatric Oncology and Haematology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Herold; G. Henze; U. Creutzig; M. Zimmermann; J. Hannemann; B. Pfistner

    2005-01-01

    The German ?Competence Network Paediatric Oncology and Haematology? aims at improving the structure of paediatric oncology and haematology as a whole, focussing in particular on the quality of clinical trials and study co-ordinating centres. This comprises the following measures: (1) Employment of research and trial assistants in order to improve the quality of documentation and study management in the participating

  5. Clinical haematology of the great bustard (Otis tarda)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Jimenez; R. Barrera; J. Sanchez; Rafaela Cuenca; J. Rodriguez; S. Andres; María Cinta Mañe

    1991-01-01

    The haematological parameters of healthy great bustards (Otis tarda L.) have been determined. The values obtained were red cell count (3.0 × 10 ± 0.2 × 101), white cell count (33.0 × 10 ± 2.6 × 10\\/1), haematocrit value (0.51 ± 0.01 1\\/1), haemoglobin (13.0 ± 0.3 g\\/dl), mean corpuscular volume (178.7 ± 12.5 fl), mean cell haemoglobin concentration (25.0

  6. Clinical, haematological and therapeutic studies on tropical theileriosis in water buffaloes ( Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salama A. Osman; Magdy H. Al-Gaabary

    2007-01-01

    Thirty buffaloes naturally infected with Theileria annulata and 10 parasitologically free controls were used to determine the potential clinical, haematological and therapeutic impact of tropical theileriosis in Egypt. The clinical signs in the infected buffaloes were pyrexia (40.5–41.5°C), enlargement of superficial lymph nodes, slight nasal and ocular discharges, salivation, anaemia and respiratory distress. Eye lesions also were recorded. There was

  7. Clinical, haematological, and neurocognitive findings in lead-exposed workers of a battery plant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Kalantari-Dehaghi, Razieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this comparative cross-sectional study was to assess neurocognitive impairment, haematological findings, and clinical symptoms of lead exposure among 316 male battery plant workers aged between 20 and 61 years. Compared to 123 matched controls (matching in age and years of work), the exposed workers showed significantly higher mean blood lead level (BLL) and lower haematocrit, haemoglobin, and red blood cell count. Mean BLL significantly correlated with clinical symptoms such as nocturia, increased urination frequency, oedema, drop in deep tendon reflex, concentration impairment, agitation, headache, depression, abdominal pain, palpitation, fatigue, and diminished sex drive. Workers with clinical disorders had higher BLL and lower haematological parameters. These findings warn that silent toxicological problems caused by lead might go unnoticed by health professionals. PMID:24384755

  8. Clinical performance of leukocyte differential on the new Roche Cobas Vega haematological analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lippi, G; Nicoli, M; Modena, N; Guidi, G

    1997-02-01

    The Roche Cobas Vega is a five-part differential haematological analyzer evolving from the former Cobas Helios, Argos and Micros. As the leukocyte differential of Cobas Vega displays several interesting features, we analyzed its clinical performance and compared it either to three other commercial haematological analyzers (Technicon-Bayer H*2, Coulter STKS and Abbott CD-3500) or to the manual reference method, as described in the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) H20-A protocol. Within- and between-batch coefficients of variations (CVs) of the white blood cell differential were satisfactory and close, or even better than the ones reported for the other instruments: 0.81% (neutrophils), 1.87% (lymphocytes), 6.76% (monocytes), 7.73% (eosinophils) and 22.55% (basophils). The identification of abnormalities in the white blood cell differential was obtained either on the basis of the instrument-specific ranges or on the generation of one or more flags by comparison with results of the manual reference method. The Vega demonstrated remarkable performance in terms of specificity (90.0%), sensitivity (91.6%) and both positive (97.7%) and negative (69.1%) predictive values; likewise, the global efficiency was the best (90.3%) among the analyzers we evaluated. The flags generated in the presence of morphological abnormalities of the samples displayed excellent sensitivity (from 88.9% to 100%), specificity (from 93.5% to 98.3%) and satisfactory positive (from 51.1% to 66.7%) and negative (from 98.3% to 100%) predictive values. We conclude that the analytical performance of the new Cobas Vega haematological analyzer can significantly improve the identification of various haematological abnormalities as an important contribution to the accuracy is provided by the new staining for granulocytes. PMID:9056752

  9. Virologic response and haematologic toxicity of boceprevir- and telaprevir-containing regimens in actual clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Butt, A A; Yan, P; Shaikh, O S; Freiberg, M S; Lo Re, V; Justice, A C; Sherman, K E

    2015-09-01

    Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of boceprevir (BOC) and telaprevir (TPV) in actual clinical settings remain unknown. We determined rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) and haematologic adverse effects among persons treated with BOC- or TPV-containing regimens, compared with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG/RBV). Using an established cohort of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons, Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES), we identified those treated with a BOC- or TPV-containing regimen and HCV genotype 1-infected controls treated with PEG/RBV. We excluded those with HIV coinfection and missing HCV RNA values to determine SVR. Primary endpoints were SVR (undetectable HCV RNA ?12 weeks after treatment completion) and haematologic toxicity (grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia). We evaluated 2288 persons on BOC-, 409 on TPV-containing regimen and 6308 on PEG/RBV. Among these groups, respectively, 31%, 43% and 9% were treatment-experienced; 17%, 37% and 14% had baseline cirrhosis; 63%, 54% and 48% were genotype 1a. SVR rates among noncirrhotics were as follows: treatment naïve: 65% (BOC), 67% (TPV) and 31% (PEG/RBV); treatment experienced: 57% (BOC), 54% (TPV) and 13% (PEG/RBV); (P-value not significant for BOC vs TPV; P < 0.0001 for BOC or TPV vs PEG/RBV). Haematologic toxicities among BOC-, TPV- and PEG/RBV-treated groups were as follows: grade 3/4 anaemia 7%, 11% and 3%; grade 4 thrombocytopenia 2.2%, 5.4% and 1.7%; grade 4 neutropenia 8.2%, 5.6% and 3.4%. SVR rates are higher and closer to those reported in pivotal clinical trials among BOC- and TPV-treated persons compared with PEG/RBV-treated persons. Haematologic adverse events are frequent, but severe toxicity is uncommon. PMID:25524834

  10. Resident training in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Genzen, Jonathan R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2007-06-01

    Practicing clinical chemists responded to an anonymous, open-ended questionnaire designed to define the state of clinical chemistry education in pathology training programs in the United States. Survey respondents identified many ideas for educational improvements and offered criticism regarding aspects of clinical chemistry education that are not working particularly well. Many of these findings are generalizable to other subspecialties of clinical pathology. It is hoped that this analysis will allow readers to compare their programs with national trends and identify new ways of improving clinical chemistry training at their institutions. PMID:17556088

  11. Capillary electrophoresis in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rainer Lehmann; Wolfgang Voelter; Hartmut M. Liebich

    1997-01-01

    Since its introduction, capillary electrophoresis has diversified, spreading out into different specialized fields covering solutions for almost any analytical questions arising in research laboratories. In the context of clinical chemistry, results must be provided at low costs and in a clinically relevent time frame; however, the attributes which have made capillary electrophoresis such a successful tool in basic research are

  12. (Analytical instrumentation in clinical chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, C.A.

    1987-07-14

    As chairman of the Expert Panel on Instrumentation (EPI) of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC), I presided over its closed and open meetings held on June 29, 1987, and July 2, 1987, respectively. As chairman-elect of the Organizing Committee of the 1990 International Congress on Clinical Chemistry, I also attended the meeting of the IFCC Congress Committee to give a progress report. This report was subsequently also presented to the IFCC Executive Board and Council and to its corporate members. These meetings were held prior to, or in conjunction with, the 13th International Congress of Clinical Chemistry. Consequently, I had an opportunity to attend several of the scientific sessions and the Trade Exposition of the Congress.

  13. Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Diane

    This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

  14. Effects of doxycycline on haematology, blood chemistry and peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets of healthy dogs and dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, A; García-Sancho, M; Rodríguez-Franco, F; Tesouro, M Á; Sainz, Á

    2015-06-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by Ehrlichia canis, is a vector-borne disease with a worldwide distribution. It has been proposed that the pathogenesis, clinical severity and outcome of disease caused by Ehrlichia spp. can be attributed to the immune response rather than to any direct rickettsial effect. Moreover, doxycycline, the antimicrobial of choice for the treatment of CME, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties associated with blood leukocyte proliferation function, cytokine synthesis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity. In order to assess the potential effects of doxycycline, dependent and independent of its antimicrobial activity, the present study compared changes in haematology, blood chemistry and circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in 12 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with CME after doxycycline therapy. Some changes were recorded only in the CME affected dogs, probably due to the antimicrobial effect of doxycycline. However, increases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, platelet count and ?2-globulins, and decreased plasma creatinine were observed in both healthy and CME affected dogs. The absolute count of B lymphocytes (CD21(+)) increased initially, but then decreased until the end of the study period in both groups. A potential effect of doxycycline unrelated to its antimicrobial activity against E.?canis is suggested, taking into account the results observed both in healthy dogs and in dogs with CME. PMID:25957920

  15. Towards optimal clinical and epidemiological registration of haematological malignancies: Guidelines for recording progressions, transformations and multiple diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Anna; Rous, Brian; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Middleton, Richard; Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Maynadie, Marc; Zanetti, Roberto; Visser, Otto

    2015-06-01

    Haematological malignancies (HM) represent over 6% of the total cancer incidence in Europe and affect all ages, ranging between 45% of all cancers in children and 7% in the elderly. Thirty per cent of childhood cancer deaths are due to HM, 8% in the elderly. Their registration presents specific challenges, mainly because HM may transform or progress in the course of the disease into other types of HM. In the context of cancer registration decisions have to be made about classifying subsequent notifications on the same patient as the same tumour (progression), a transformation or a new tumour registration. Allocation of incidence date and method of diagnosis must also be standardised. We developed European Network of Cancer Registries (ENCR) recommendations providing specific advice for cancer registries to use haematology and molecular laboratories as data sources, conserve the original date of incidence in case of change of diagnosis, make provision for recording both the original as well as transformed tumour and to apply precise rules for recording and counting multiple diagnoses. A reference table advising on codes which reflect a potential transformation or a new tumour is included. This work will help to improve comparability of data produced by population-based cancer registries, which are indispensable for aetiological research, health care planning and clinical research, an increasing important area with the application of targeted therapies. PMID:24630945

  16. The Clinical Laboratories (Chemistry and Hematology)

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    280 Chapter The Clinical Laboratories (Chemistry and Hematology) Donna MacMillan and Kent B. Lewandrowski The clinical laboratories (Clinical Chemistry and Hematology) at the Mas- sachusetts General and complex set of separate facilities. On the other hand, there is little mention of hematology

  17. Bacillus spp. among hospitalized patients with haematological malignancies: clinical features, epidemics and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ozkocaman, V; Ozcelik, T; Ali, R; Ozkalemkas, F; Ozkan, A; Ozakin, C; Akalin, H; Ursavas, A; Coskun, F; Ener, B; Tunali, A

    2006-10-01

    Between April 2000 and May 2005, 350 bacteraemic episodes occurred among patients treated in our haematology unit. Two hundred and twenty-eight of these episodes were caused by Gram-positive pathogens, most commonly coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus. One hundred and twenty-two episodes were due to Gram-negative pathogens, with a predominance of Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacillus bacteraemias constituted 12 of these episodes occurring in 12 patients, and accounted for 3.4% of all bacteraemic episodes. Of the 12 strains evaluated, seven were Bacillus licheniformis, three were Bacillus cereus and two were Bacillus pumilus. Seven episodes presented with bloodstream infection, three with pneumonia, one with severe abdominal pain and deterioration of liver function, and one with a catheter-related bloodstream infection. B. licheniformis was isolated from five patients who had been hospitalized at the same time. This outbreak was related to non-sterile cotton wool used during skin disinfection. B. cereus and B. licheniformis isolates were susceptible to cefepime, carbapenems, aminoglycosides and vancomycin, but B. pumilus isolates were resistant to all antibiotics except for quinolones and vancomycin. Two deaths were observed. In conclusion, Bacillus spp. may cause serious infections, diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas, and high morbidity and mortality in patients with haematological malignancies. Both B. cereus and B. licheniformis may be among the 'new' Gram-positive pathogens to cause serious infection in patients with neutropenia. PMID:16891037

  18. Continuing Education Instrumentation Training in Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Jacqueline; Frankel, Saundra

    1980-01-01

    Describes the continuing education program for clinical chemistry instrumentation training established at The College of Staten Island, New York. A course consisting of 14 sessions is outlined and discussed. (CS)

  19. Clinical chemistry as scientific discipline: historical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Büttner, J

    1994-12-31

    The fundamental ideas which underlie clinical chemistry as an independent scientific field were formed over the course of centuries. Exactly 200 years ago the first modern concepts for this discipline were formulated in close connection with the restructuring of medical education during the French Revolution on the one hand, and the emergence of a new idea of a 'clinic' on the other hand. However, not until 1840 was clinical chemistry institutionalized as academic subject and simultaneously integrated into medical teaching. After about 1860, clinical chemistry was practiced by the clinicians themselves in close relationship with clinical activities, yet again with emphasis on teaching. In this period, clinics and hospitals established 'clinical laboratories'. With the start of the 20th century, after biochemistry had developed into an independent scientific field, clinical chemistry continued to evolve in close relationship with that latter discipline. This was particularly true in the United States, where an 'American School of Clinical Biochemistry' emerged which was to greatly influence the field. PMID:7720266

  20. Clinical Chemistry: International Journal of Laboratory Medicine and Molecular Diagnostics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The American Association for Clinical Chemistry has recently made available online Clinical Chemistry: International Journal of Laboratory Medicine and Molecular Diagnostics. Clinical Chemistry contains full-text articles, figures, and tables in a searchable (by keyword) format. Coverage begins with the January 1998 issue. Abstracts begin with the January 1980 issue. Clinical Chemistry is made available through Stanford University's HighWire Press.

  1. Reference measurement systems in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda M. Thienpont; Katleen Van Uytfanghe; André P. De Leenheer

    2002-01-01

    Background: In clinical chemistry, traceability of measurements is of high priority. Methods: In this literature review, current recommendations on the process of establishing traceability (or standardization) are critically discussed. Results: Traceability is to be established to the highest international standards by a comprehensive reference measurement system. Elementary to this system are a metrological basis, a measurement unit system, i.e., the

  2. 78 FR 13347 - Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel...public. Name of Committee: Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel...every effort to accommodate persons with physical disabilities or special needs. If...

  3. Clinical chemistry of serotonin and metabolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ido P Kema; Elisabeth G. E de Vries; Frits A. J Muskiet

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of serotonin and other 5-hydroxyindoles, such as its precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan and major metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), are indispensable for the elucidation of their (patho)physiological roles. In clinical chemistry attention is mainly focused on the diagnosis and follow-up of carcinoid tumours. For this most laboratories routinely measure urinary 5-HIAA. More recently, measurements of serotonin in platelets and urine have been

  4. The Use of Hirudin as Universal Anticoagulant in Haematology, Clinical Chemistry and Blood Grouping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans D. Menssen; Karl Melber; Natascha Brandt; Eckhard Thiel

    2001-01-01

    RheinBiotech GmbH Düsseldorf (K.M.), Düsseldorf, Ger- many Undesirable interactions between anticoagulants and diagnostic test kit procedures so far have prevented the development of a single uniform blood sampling tube. Contrary to K2-EDTA, heparin and other antico- agulants, hirudin only minimally alters blood cells and dissolved blood constituents, thus qualifying as a uni- versal anticoagulant for diagnostic purposes. Auto- mated complete

  5. Inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal proteins (BET) as a potential therapeutic approach in haematological malignancies: emerging preclinical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chaidos, Aristeidis; Caputo, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of the nucleosomal histone proteins orchestrate chromatin organization and gene expression in normal and cancer cells. Among them, the acetylation of N-terminal histone tails represents the fundamental epigenetic mark of open structure chromatin and active gene transcription. The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins are epigenetic readers which utilize tandem bromodomains (BRD) modules to recognize and dock themselves on the acetylated lysine tails. The BET proteins act as scaffolds for the recruitment of transcription factors and chromatin organizers required in transcription initiation and elongation. The recent discovery of small molecules capable of blocking their lysine-binding pocket is the first paradigm of successful pharmacological inhibition of epigenetic readers. JQ1 is a prototype benzodiazepine molecule and a specific BET inhibitor with antineoplastic activity both in solid tumours and haematological malignancies. The quinolone I-BET151 and the suitable for clinical development I-BET762 benzodiazepine were introduced in parallel with JQ1 and have also shown potent antitumour activity in preclinical studies. I-BET762 is currently being tested in early phase clinical trials, along with a rapidly growing list of other BET inhibitors. Unlike older epigenetic therapies, the study of BET inhibitors has offered substantial, context-specific, mechanistic insights of their antitumour activity, which will facilitate optimal therapeutic targeting in future. Here, we review the development of this novel class of epigenetic drugs, the biology of BET protein inhibition, the emerging evidence from preclinical work and early phase clinical studies and we discuss their potential role in the treatment of haematological malignancies. PMID:26137204

  6. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2160...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  7. 21 CFR 862.2140 - Centrifugal chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Centrifugal chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2140...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...Instruments § 862.2140 Centrifugal chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2140 - Centrifugal chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Centrifugal chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2140...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...Instruments § 862.2140 Centrifugal chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2160...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 862.2150 - Continuous flow sequential multiple chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Continuous flow sequential multiple chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2150...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... Continuous flow sequential multiple chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 862.2150 - Continuous flow sequential multiple chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Continuous flow sequential multiple chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2150...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... Continuous flow sequential multiple chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  12. Mucormycosis in patients with haematological malignancies: a retrospective clinical study of 37 cases. GIMEMA Infection Program (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto).

    PubMed

    Pagano, L; Ricci, P; Tonso, A; Nosari, A; Cudillo, L; Montillo, M; Cenacchi, A; Pacilli, L; Fabbiano, F; Del Favero, A

    1997-11-01

    A retrospective study of 37 patients with haematological malignancy (21 acute myeloid leukaemia, 11 acute lymphoid leukaemia, two lymphoma, two hairy cell leukaemia, one Hodgkin's disease) and histologically documented mucormycosis was conducted to evaluate the clinical characteristics and ascertain the factors which influenced the outcome from mycotic infection. Patients were admitted to 18 haematology divisions in tertiary care or university hospitals in Italy between 1987 and 1995. Fever, thoracic pain, dyspnoea and cough were the most frequent presenting symptoms. At the onset, 89% patients were neutropenic (neutrophil counts < 0.5 x 10(9)/l) with a median duration of previous neutropenia of 14 d (range 6-60). The most frequent sites of infection were lungs (81%), CNS (27%), sinus (16%), liver (16%) and orbital space (10%). Only three patients were asymptomatic. A correct in vivo diagnosis was made in only 13 (35%) patients. When performed, thoracic and cranial CT scan were the most useful diagnostic investigations. Despite the fact that 26 febrile patients were treated with empirical antifungal treatment, 28 of the 37 patients (76%) died from fungal infection at a median time of 17 d from the onset of clinical symptoms. Nine patients were cured by antifungal therapy plus, in five cases, radical surgery procedures. An analysis of factors influencing outcome demonstrated that the resolution of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and prolonged treatment with amphotericin B and, if feasible, radical surgical debridement treatment, were significantly correlated with recovery from infection. Mucormycosis, a rare filamentous fungal infection that occurs most frequently in neutropenic acute leukaemia patients, is characterized by a high mortality rate. Extensive and aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are essential to improve the prognosis in these patients. PMID:9375750

  13. The chemistry of urinary stones around 1800: A first in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriel Richet

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of urinary stones around 1800: A first in clinical chemistry. At the end of the 18th century, as soon as modern chemistry was created, dedicated physicians tried to apply it to medicine. A rewarding field was that of urinary lithiasis. Stones offered a sufficient amount of a relatively pure chemical present in the body. Indeed, urine and the

  14. Haematology and neurology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Austin; Hannah Cohen; Nick Losseff

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to update the reader on advances in the understanding of haematological conditions that may arise in neurological practice. Thrombophilia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, sickle cell and clonal disorders associated with neuropathy are discussed.

  15. Contributions of Analytical Chemistry to the Clinical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogerboe, Kristen J.

    1988-01-01

    Highlights several analytical techniques that are being used in state-of-the-art clinical labs. Illustrates how other advances in instrumentation may contribute to clinical chemistry in the future. Topics include: biosensors, polarization spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, fluorescence, photothermal deflection, and chromatography in clinical

  16. The early days of atomic absorption spectrometry in clinical chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, J. B.

    1999-12-01

    An account is given of the first applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in clinical chemistry. These include the determination of calcium and magnesium in blood serum and of these elements, together with a range of heavy metals, in urine.

  17. Quality Assessment of Interpretative Commenting in Clinical Chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ee Mun Lim; Ken A. Sikaris; Janice Gill; John Calleja; Peter E. Hickman; John Beilby; Samuel D. Vasikaran

    Background: Clinical interpretation of laboratory re- sults is an integral part of clinical chemistry. However, the performance goals for assessing interpretative com- menting in this discipline have not been as well estab- lished as for the quality of analytical requirements. Methods: We present a review of the 10 case reports circulated in the 2002 Patient Report Comments Pro- gram by

  18. 21 CFR 862.2170 - Micro chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Micro chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2170...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...Laboratory Instruments § 862.2170 Micro chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 862.2170 - Micro chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Micro chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2170...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...Laboratory Instruments § 862.2170 Micro chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  20. Recommendations for the management of the haematological and onco-haematological aspects of Gaucher disease1

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Berger, Marc; Droogenbroeck, Jan Van; de Fost, Maaike; Janic, Dragana; Marinakis, Theodore; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Villarubia, Jesús; Zhukovskaya, Elena; Hollak, Carla

    2007-01-01

    Current knowledge of the haematological and onco-haematological complications of type 1 Gaucher disease has been reviewed with the aim of identifying best clinical practice for treatment and disease management. It was concluded that: (i) Awareness of typical patterns of cytopenia can help clinicians distinguish haematological co-morbidities. (ii) Red blood cell studies and complete iron metabolism evaluation at baseline are recommended. (iii) Haemoglobin levels defining anaemia should be raised and used in Gaucher disease treatment and monitoring. (iv) Surgeons should be aware of potential bleeding complications during surgery in Gaucher patients. The higher incidence of multiple myeloma in Gaucher disease suggests that Gaucher patients should have their immunoglobulin profile determined at diagnosis and monitored every 2 years (patients <50 years) or every year (patients >50 years). If monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is found, general MGUS guidelines should be followed. Future studies should focus on the utility of early treatment to prevent immunoglobulin abnormalities and multiple myeloma. PMID:17655728

  1. Investigation of biochemical and haematological side-effects of cefquinome in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Maden, M; Tra?, B; Ba?, A L; Elmas, M; Yazar, E; Birdane, F M

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of cefquinome, a 4th generation cephalosporin, on clinical, biochemical, haematological, and blood gas variables were investigated. Five healthy dogs were injected with cefquinome (1 mg/kg body weight, IM, daily) for 14 days. Negative effects of cefquinome on clinical, biochemical, and haematological variables were not observed, but it did change some blood gas variables. PMID:11205999

  2. Pharmacology: Investigation of biochemical and haematological side?effects of cefquinome in healthy dogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Maden; B. Tra?; A. L. Ba?; M. Elmas; E. Yazar; F. M. Birdane

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of cefquinome, a 4 generation cephalosporin, on clinical, biochemical, haemato?logical, and blood gas variables were investigated. Five healthy dogs were injected with cefquinome (1 mg\\/kg body weight, IM, daily) for 14 days. Negative effects of cefquinome on clinical, biochemical, and haematological variables were not observed, but it did change some blood gas variables.

  3. Impact of reference materials on accuracy in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlo Franzini; Ferruccio Ceriotti

    1998-01-01

    The analytical accuracy of the results of routine clinical chemistry measurements is contributed by a two-steps mechanism, involving transferring trueness from a higher metrological and monitoring the time-stability of trueness itself. In both operations, different materials are used: however, accuracy in the routine assay of genuine patient samples has to be the end product of this overall process. To such

  4. Clinical chemistry reference intervals for healthy elderly subjects13

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip J Garry; William C Hunt; Dorothy J VanderJagt; Robert L Rhyne

    In 1979, 304 healthy elderly individuals in New Mexico were recruited for a longitudinal study ofnutrition and aging. Repeat measurements on a yearly basis of commonly requested clinical chemistry analytes allowed the calculation of reference intervals, between and within-subject variance components, and percentiles for change in concentration between two yearly measurements. The latter was furtherdivided into analytical and biological variance

  5. (Short overview of the Mexican Society of Clinical Chemistry meetings)

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, C.

    1991-01-01

    Organized and chaired session on instrument evaluation at the XIV Congreso Nacional De Quimica Clinica which is the National Meeting of the Mexican Society of Clinical Chemistry. In addition, I presented a paper on calibration at a Congress workshop and spoke on the impact of technology in a symposium on quality control.

  6. Strategies to promote rational clinical chemistry test utilization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Thomas Hindmarsh; Andrew W. Lyon

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To critically review the elements of laboratory services that result in inappropriate ordering of clinical chemistry tests and the efficacy of corrective interventions.Methods and Results: In our experience, inappropriate use of laboratory services derives from multiple factors, including the use of multitest profiles, organ- or disease-specific test panels, indiscriminate ordering, standing orders, excessive reporting delays, poor audit trails of

  7. Automated haematology analysis to diagnose malaria.

    PubMed

    Campuzano-Zuluaga, Germán; Hänscheid, Thomas; Grobusch, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    For more than a decade, flow cytometry-based automated haematology analysers have been studied for malaria diagnosis. Although current haematology analysers are not specifically designed to detect malaria-related abnormalities, most studies have found sensitivities that comply with WHO malaria-diagnostic guidelines, i.e. ? 95% in samples with > 100 parasites/?l. Establishing a correct and early malaria diagnosis is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment and to minimizing adverse outcomes. Expert light microscopy remains the 'gold standard' for malaria diagnosis in most clinical settings. However, it requires an explicit request from clinicians and has variable accuracy. Malaria diagnosis with flow cytometry-based haematology analysers could become an important adjuvant diagnostic tool in the routine laboratory work-up of febrile patients in or returning from malaria-endemic regions. Haematology analysers so far studied for malaria diagnosis are the Cell-Dyn®, Coulter® GEN·S and LH 750, and the Sysmex XE-2100® analysers. For Cell-Dyn analysers, abnormal depolarization events mainly in the lobularity/granularity and other scatter-plots, and various reticulocyte abnormalities have shown overall sensitivities and specificities of 49% to 97% and 61% to 100%, respectively. For the Coulter analysers, a 'malaria factor' using the monocyte and lymphocyte size standard deviations obtained by impedance detection has shown overall sensitivities and specificities of 82% to 98% and 72% to 94%, respectively. For the XE-2100, abnormal patterns in the DIFF, WBC/BASO, and RET-EXT scatter-plots, and pseudoeosinophilia and other abnormal haematological variables have been described, and multivariate diagnostic models have been designed with overall sensitivities and specificities of 86% to 97% and 81% to 98%, respectively. The accuracy for malaria diagnosis may vary according to species, parasite load, immunity and clinical context where the method is applied. Future developments in new haematology analysers such as considerably simplified, robust and inexpensive devices for malaria detection fitted with an automatically generated alert could improve the detection capacity of these instruments and potentially expand their clinical utility in malaria diagnosis. PMID:21118557

  8. Country report: Clinical chemistry in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Satyawirawan, F S; Silman, E

    1999-01-01

    Seven hundred clinical laboratories in all over 27 provinces in Indonesia participated the Indonesian External Quality Assurance Scheme (Program Nasional Pemantapan Kualitas Laboratorium Kesehatan bidang Kimia Klinik). Among those laboratories, the government laboratory account for 288 (41%), and the rest 412 (59%) are private laboratories. Automatic analyzer was used by approximately 22% of the participating laboratories. Seventeen analytes were included in the program: bilirubin, cholesterol, creatinine, glucose, total protein, urea, uric acid, triglycerides, AST, ALT, calcium, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-GT, sodium, potassium, and chloride. Using WHO scoring system, median overall VIS of 128 was obtained. It means that the all over performance was fairly good . Bilirubin got the best median VIS (33). Sodium (median VIS 177), potassium (162) and chloride (209) got the worst VIS compared to the other parameters. PMID:10926252

  9. April 27, 2011 NOTIFICATION Clinical Chemistry (Monthly) Program (BC5L/50)

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    April 27, 2011 NOTIFICATION Clinical Chemistry (Monthly) Program (BC5L/50) Cycle 10 Sample Dates Clinical Chemistry (Monthly) Program (Cycle 10)) ­ lot #210900, are different than those noted on the Order

  10. Colloidal oatmeal: history, chemistry and clinical properties.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Ellen S; Wallo, Warren

    2007-02-01

    Oatmeal has been used for centuries as a soothing agent to relieve itch and irritation associated with various xerotic dermatoses. In 1945, a ready to use colloidal oatmeal, produced by finely grinding the oat and boiling it to extract the colloidal material, became available. Today, colloidal oatmeal is available in various dosage forms from powders for the bath to shampoos, shaving gels, and moisturizing creams. Currently, the use of colloidal oatmeal as a skin protectant is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) according to the Over-The-Counter Final Monograph for Skin Protectant Drug Products issued in June 2003. Its preparation is also standardized by the United States Pharmacopeia. The many clinical properties of colloidal oatmeal derive from its chemical polymorphism. The high concentration in starches and beta-glucan is responsible for the protective and water-holding functions of oat. The presence of different types of phenols confers antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Some of the oat phenols are also strong ultraviolet absorbers. The cleansing activity of oat is mostly due to saponins. Its many functional properties make colloidal oatmeal a cleanser, moisturizer, buffer, as well as a soothing and protective anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:17373175

  11. [Toward pertinent analytical objectives for haematological parameters].

    PubMed

    Iobagiu, Cristina; Nehar, Diane; Denis, Isabelle; de Saint-Trivier, Aurélie; Boyer, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Usually, the blood cell counting activity in haematology laboratory uses the comparison of IQC values to the target values proposed by the manufacturer. We intended to improve the monitoring of the proper functioning of our analytical measure system for 17 main haematologic parameters. To set the allowable critical limits of IQC, we propose our reflection based on several elements: benchmark and expert recommendation, clinical requirements, statistical indicators of the laboratory calculated using IQC values (3 levels, 2 different lots, 2 haematology analysers and 2 passage modes) and the EEQ values, during four months. We exploited the reports obtained from the middleware (our own IQC values), and the interlaboratory comparison reports (obtained from SNCS and EuroCell websites) and we compared our performances to the Ricos objectives, to set clearly argued allowable limits for IQC values. Finally, the allowable limits correspond to the imprecision limits stated by Ricos for 14 parameters (desirable for 11 parametres and minimal for 3 parameters) and personalized limits (more exigent than desirable Ricos limits) for 3 parameters of blood cell counting. PMID:25486666

  12. Development and diffusion of automated clinical chemistry analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, H.; Fineberg, H. V.

    1984-08-01

    The development and diffusion of automated clinical chemistry analyzers are described as an example of the process of technological change in medicine. This involves an elaboration and refinement of the conceptual framework, a historical description of development and use of three classes of analyzer, an investigation of user innovation, and the use of survey data to study patterns of diffusion. The emerging theory of development and diffusion differs from traditional theory in significant respects, assigning a more prominent and active role to the user in development, and characterizing development and diffusion as incremental and iterative rather than discrete and sequential.

  13. Dimethyl sulfoxide: history, chemistry, and clinical utility in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Kara; Capriotti, Joseph A

    2012-09-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide is a colorless liquid derived as a by-product from wood pulp in the production of paper. This colorless liquid found immediate application as a polar, aprotic solvent miscible with water and able to dissolve an enormous catalog of polar and nonpolar small molecules. It is presently scarcely used in dermatology, but given its useful properties as a penetration-enhancing solvent excipient and active anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical agent, dimethyl sulfoxide has the potential to be used in a much broader capacity. The authors review the history, chemistry, and clinical utility of dimethyl sulfoxide as it pertains to dermatology. PMID:23050031

  14. EFFECT OF CYPERMETHRIN ON CLINICO-HAEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN RABBITS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. KAMAL SHAH; A. KHAN; F. RIZVI; M. SIDDIQUE

    The aim of this study was to know the clinical and haematological changes in female rabbits following the treatment with cypermethrin (CY). In this study, 24 female rabbits were divided randomly into four equal groups A, B, C and D. Groups A, B and C were injected intraperitoneally CY @ 25, 50 and 75 mg\\/Kg b. wt., respectively, while the

  15. Normal haematology of the houbara bustard ( Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Samour; J. C. Howlett; M. G. Hart; T. A. Bailey; J. Naldo; M. A. D'Aloia

    1994-01-01

    Blood samples were collected from 14 male and 20 female clinically normal captive houbara bustards (Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii). Standard haematology assays were carried out to establish normal reference values for the species. No significant statistical differences were observed between males and females. The results obtained are compared with similar studies conducted in the great bustard (Otis tarda).

  16. Clinical utility of Aspergillus galactomannan and PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Heng, Siow-Chin; Chen, Sharon C-A; Morrissey, C Orla; Thursky, Karin; Manser, Renee L; De Silva, Harini D; Halliday, Catriona L; Seymour, John F; Nation, Roger L; Kong, David C M; Slavin, Monica A

    2014-07-01

    Interpretation of Aspergillus galactomannan (GM) and PCR results in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with haematological malignancies requires clarification. A total of 116 patients underwent BAL for investigation of new lung infiltrates: 40% were neutropenic, 68% and 36% were receiving mould-active antifungal agents and ?-lactam antibiotics. The diagnosis of proven IPA (n = 3), probable IPA (n = 15), and possible invasive fungal disease (IFD, n = 50) was made without inclusion of GM results. BAL GM (at cut-off of 0.8) had lower diagnostic sensitivity for IPA than PCR (61% versus 78%) but higher specificity (93% versus 79%). Both tests had excellent negative predictive values (85-90%), supporting their utility in excluding IPA. The use of BAL GM and PCR results increased the certainty of Aspergillus aetiology in 7 probable IPA cases where fungal hyphae were detected in respiratory samples by microscopy, and upgraded 24 patients from possible IFD to probable IPA. Use of BAL GM and PCR improves the diagnosis of IPA. PMID:24768294

  17. The Potential Role of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors in Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Sherif S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aurora kinases play an important role in the control of the cell cycle and have been implicated in tumourigenesis in a number of cancers. Among the haematological malignancies, overexpression of Aurora kinases has been reported in acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, multiple myeloma, aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. A large number of Aurora kinase inhibitors are currently in different stages of clinical development. In addition to varying in their selectivity for the different Aurora kinases, some also have activity directed at other cellular kinases involved in important molecular pathways in cancer cells. This review summarizes the biology of Aurora kinases and discusses why they may be good therapeutic targets in different haematological cancers. We describe preclinical data that has served as the rationale for investigating Aurora kinase inhibitors in different haematological malignancies, and summarize published results from early phase clinical trials. While the anti-tumour effects of Aurora kinase inhibitors appear promising, we highlight important issues for future clinical research and suggest that the optimal use of these inhibitors is likely to be in combination with cytotoxic agents already in use for the treatment of various haematological cancers. PMID:21980926

  18. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT Instructional Model to Teach Clinically Relevant Medicinal Chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naser Z. Alsharif; Kimberly A. Galt; Ahmed Mehanna; Alaba M. Ogunbadeniyi

    The relevance of medicinal chemistry to pharmacy practice has been questioned by many pharmacy educators as more emphasis has been placed on linking clinical knowledge and practice to pharmacy student educational outcomes. Faculty teaching in medicinal chemistry and other biomedical and pharmaceutical science courses have embraced this challenge. Various teaching methods and ap- proaches within medicinal chemistry that emphasize application

  19. Haematological and biochemical changes in experimental Trypanosoma evansi infection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sivajothi, S; Rayulu, V C; Sudhakara Reddy, B

    2015-06-01

    New Zealand white rabbits (N = 4) were challenged with the local strain of Trypanosoma evansi. Each rabbit was infected with 5 × 10(5) trypanosomes subcutaneously. The infection was characterized by intermittent pyrexia, undulating parasitaemia, anorexia and emaciation. The infected rabbits were examined daily for development of clinical signs and infection status by wet blood-films made from the ear veins. Thick and thin blood smears were also examined daily until the end of the experiment for description of blood cells. Differential leukocyte count (DLC) was also done. The parasite was observed in the blood during the acute phase only. Leukocytosis in the acute phase followed by leukopenia during the chronic phase was recognized. Haematological studies revealed reduced TEC, Hb and PCV. The main changes in the erythrocytes were macrocytes, hypochromic cells, Howell-Jolly bodies, target cells, stomatocytes and burr cells. Serum chemistry revealed hypoproteinemia, hypocholesterolaemia, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, elevated creatinine, BUN, increased AST and ALT. PMID:26064003

  20. Gaucher disease: haematological presentations and complications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alison S; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, required for the degradation of glycosphingolipids. Clinical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, bone disease and a bleeding diathesis, frequently resulting in presentation to haematologists. Historically managed by splenectomy, transfusions and orthopaedic surgery, the development of specific therapy in the form of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy in the 1990s has resulted in dramatic improvements in haematological and visceral disease. Recognition of complications, including multiple myeloma and Parkinson disease, has challenged the traditional macrophage-centric view of the pathophysiology of this disorder. The pathways by which enzyme deficiency results in the clinical manifestations of this disorder are poorly understood; altered inflammatory cytokine profiles, bioactive sphingolipid derivatives and alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment have been implicated. Further elucidating these pathways will serve to advance our understanding not only of GD, but of associated disorders. PMID:24588457

  1. [Haematological diseases with primary otorhinolaryngological manifestation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tomity, I T; Sütö, M; Nagymajtényi, E; Martinovits, J

    1977-11-01

    There are reports of 10 haematological diseases with primary oto-rhino-laryngological manifestation. The clinical diagnoses were confirmed by laboratory results. The actual diseases were primarily hidden by a tonsillitis, bleeding of the nose after an eye-operation, by an extreme dyspnoe, or by a tumor-like change in the larynx. The authors stress the general necessity of immediate laboratory examinations in dept. of oto-rhinolaryngology. PMID:145533

  2. [Immuno-haematology and blood bank inventory and issue management].

    PubMed

    Madre, F; Benoist, F; Chandesris, C; Nicola, N

    2010-12-01

    Blood bank management must ensure the correct blood product issuance in the right time. For this purpose, patient clinical and immuno-haematological data have to be taken into consideration. Inventory composition, by blood group and phenotype, blood product providing possibilities and transport delays are determining factors. Finally, a good management relies also on the use of consensually written procedures and the monitoring of pertinent indicators. PMID:21067950

  3. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  4. Clinical, haematological and biochemical alterations in heat intolerance (panting) syndrome in Egyptian cattle following natural foot-and-mouth disease (FMD).

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed M; Abdel-Hamid, Omnia M

    2010-08-01

    Clinical signs of heat intolerance (panting) syndrome were observed in Holstein cows in a private farm in Egypt. There were heat intolerance (fever), panting, profuse salivation, hirsutism, lameness and reduced milk production. Blood and serum samples were collected from ten diseased cows and five apparently healthy cows as control. Serological tests confirmed the presence of non-structural protein of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) infection. There were significant reductions in the total red blood cell count with increased leucocytic and lymphocytic counts in diseased group compared to control. The serum Na, Cl, Ca, Mg, Zn and Fe were significantly reduced but P was increased in diseased animals compared to control. The total protein, albumin, cholesterol and cortisol were significantly reduced but the glucose and malonaldehyde were significantly increased in diseased cows. This was the first report in Egypt to describe the clinical and haemato-biochemical changes in panting syndrome following FMD. PMID:20229223

  5. Matrix-assisted laser desorption\\/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laure F. Marvin; Matthew A. Roberts; Laurent B. Fay

    2003-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption\\/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-Tof-MS) has recently become a popular and versatile method to analyze macromolecules from biological origin. In this paper, we will review the application of MALDI-Tof-MS in clinical chemistry and biology. MALDI-Tof-MS is used in clinical chemistry, e.g. disease markers can be identified with MALDI-MS analysis in combination with 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis separations

  6. The history of International Congresses of Clinical Chemistry, 1954-1996.

    PubMed

    Broughton, P M

    1997-07-01

    Between 1954 and 1996 a total of 16 International Congresses of Clinical Chemistry were held. Their main features are reviewed: their size and location; organisation and costs; the awards made to eminent clinical chemists; the publication of congress proceedings; the scientific content of congresses; and the role of industry. These have all changed over this period in a way which reflects the development of clinical chemistry. Although these congresses are becoming increasingly expensive, and cannot satisfy the needs of everyone, they are unique in providing a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the subject and enabling clinical chemists from different countries to meet and exchange ideas and experiences. PMID:9263736

  7. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  8. Current and future use of "dried blood spot" analyses in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sylvain; Delaby, Constance; Vialaret, Jérôme; Ducos, Jacques; Hirtz, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of blood spotted and dried on a matrix (i.e., "dried blood spot" or DBS) has been used since the 1960s in clinical chemistry; mostly for neonatal screening. Since then, many clinical analytes, including nucleic acids, small molecules and lipids, have been successfully measured using DBS. Although this pre-analytical approach represents an interesting alternative to classical venous blood sampling, its routine use is limited. Here, we review the application of DBS technology in clinical chemistry, and evaluate its future role supported by new analytical methods such as mass spectrometry. PMID:23740687

  9. Multivariate approach to quality control in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry Dechert; Kenneth E. Case

    1998-01-01

    When monitoring analyzer performance in the clinical setting, laboratories are required to test multiple con- centrations of control material on a daily basis. Because of the nature of laboratory testing, there is the potential for correlation between the concentrations of control material being monitored. Although traditional clinical quality-control approaches make an underlying as- sumption of independence with respect to the

  10. ROC Curves in Clinical Chemistry: Uses, Misuses, and Possible Solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy A. Obuchowski; Michael L. Lieber; Frank H. Wians

    2004-01-01

    Background: ROC curves have become the standard for describing and comparing the accuracy of diagnostic tests. Not surprisingly, ROC curves are used often by clinical chemists. Our aims were to observe how the accuracy of clinical laboratory diagnostic tests are as- sessed, compared, and reported in the literature; to identify common problems with the use of ROC curves; and to

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption\\/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laure F. Marvin; Matthew A. Roberts; Laurent B. Fay

    Abstract Matrix-assisted laser desorption\\/ionization time-of-flight mass,spectrometry,(MALDI-Tof-MS) has recently become,a popular and versatile method to analyze macromolecules from biological origin. In this paper, we will review the application of MALDI-Tof-MS in clinical chemistry and biology. MALDI-Tof-MS is used in clinical chemistry, e.g. disease markers can be identified with MALDI-MS analysis in combination,with 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis separations thanks to either

  12. History of clinical chemistry in a children's hospital (1914-1964).

    PubMed

    Meites, S

    2000-07-01

    The historical development of a charitable children's hospital and the evolution of its clinical laboratory are presented. With the appearance of practical quantitative blood chemistry tests in the period between the two World Wars, applications to pediatrics were hampered by the need for ultramicro procedures then unavailable and for improved skin-puncture blood sampling. World War II brought economic demands that forced the hospital to privatize its beds and to charge fee-for-services. In turn, this brought added income, allowing the hiring or subsidizing of a professional staff, including the clinical chemist. The development of ultramicro blood chemistry followed, along with improved skin-puncture technology. PMID:10894850

  13. Clinical chemistry and molecular biology of homocysteine metabolism: An update

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven E. S. Miner; Jovan Evrovski; David E. C. Cole

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To summarize recent developments in our understanding of homocysteine as a clinically relevant and independent predictor of vaso-occlusive disease (including atherosclerosis and thromboembolism), as an early indicator of folate or cobalamin deficiency, and as a key factor in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects.Methods and Results: To determine total homocysteine, plasma or serum must be separated shortly after collection

  14. Tandem mass spectrometry in the clinical chemistry laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent C. Dooley

    2003-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry is becoming an increasingly important analytical technology in the clinical laboratory environment. Applications in toxicology and therapeutic drug monitoring have opened the door for tandem mass spectrometry and now we are seeing a vast array of new applications being developed. It has been the combination of tandem mass spectrometry with sample introduction techniques employing atomospheric pressure ionization

  15. Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology, a peer-reviewed online journal and database provided by Infobiogen, is "devoted to genes, cytogenetics, and clinical entities in cancer, and cancer-prone diseases." Users can search the materials by genes, leukaemias, solid tumors, cancer prone diseases, and chromosomes. Researchers can find links to scientific societies and meetings. Students can explore educational materials on Mendelian and non-Mendelian Inheritance, chromosomes, population genetics, and additional human genetics topics. The website also offers reviews and case reports.

  16. A Model for an Uncertainty Budget for Preanalytical Variables in Clinical Chemistry Analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marit Rynning; Tore Wentzel-Larsen; Bjørn J. Bolann

    2007-01-01

    Background: We sought a practical method to calculate preanalytical uncertainties. In clinical chemistry mea- surements, the combined preanalytical uncertainty is a function of the magnitude and probability distribution of the different uncertainty sources and the number of such sources. Methods: Results from an optimal practice for handling of the blood samples (termed the standard method) were compared with alternative methods

  17. Applications of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in clinical chemistry and toxicology: a review

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the field of toxicology and clinical chemistry have initially been performed using NMR, the use of liquid1 Applications of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in clinical chemistry and toxicology: a review Aurélie Rouxa , Dominique Lisonb , Christophe Junota* and Jean

  18. Frequency and relationships of clinical chemistry and liver and kidney histopathology findings in 13-week toxicity studies in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Travlos; R. W. Morris; M. R. Elwell; A. Duke; S. Rosenblum; M. B. Thompson

    1996-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of eight commonly used clinical chemistry end points and histopathology to detect potential toxic effects in liver and kidney were evaluated for a series of 61 13-week rat toxicity studies conducted for the National Toxicology Program. The data consisted of 1-, 2- to 3-, and 13-week clinical chemistry measurements and 13-week histopathological assessments of liver and kidney.

  19. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for many haematological

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    haematological malignancies. However, the development of graft-versus- host disease (GVHD) limits the success, haematopoietic graft source and GVHD pro- phylaxis approaches. Steroids are the first line of treat- ment-HSCT -- is now known to have a characteristic clinical presentation, which resembles autoimmune vascular diseases

  20. Normal haematological values of European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from an English rehabilitation centre.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J C M; Norcott, M R; Frost, L M; Cusdin, P

    2002-11-01

    Blood samples were taken from 29 male and 21 female clinically normal European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) that had been overwintered in an English rehabilitation centre, and the mean (sd) and ranges of their haematological values were determined. The mean cellular volume and lymphocyte counts of the female hedgehogs were slightly but significantly higher than those of the male hedgehogs. PMID:12452356

  1. Methods for ligand-receptor assays in clinical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.G.; Sestili, M.A.

    1980-04-01

    This is intended to be a practical review for the clinical chemist of the laboratory procedures most commonly used to quantitate hormone receptors in various cellular fractions. These procedures include use of charcoal adsorption and hydroxylapatite for intracellular receptors and of centrifugation and filtration for membrane receptors. We discuss the use of the Scatchard analysis to establish the steroid-receptor affinity and the quantity of steroid-receptor binding sites. Both pre- and post-labeled sucrose density gradient methods are outlined. One section is devoted to the direct and indirect methods used in nuclear ''exchange'' assays. Basic theory underlying each assay is presented, but, more importantly, we assess the advantages and disadvantages of each procedure. On the basis of this information, one may decide which assay is best suited for a particular laboratory and (or) specimen.

  2. Mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry: the case of newborn screening.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo

    2014-12-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) program is a complex and organized system consisting of family and personnel education, biochemical tests, confirmatory biochemical and genetic tests, diagnosis, therapy, and patient follow up. The program identifies treatable metabolic disorders possibly when asymptomatic by using dried blood spot (DBS). During the last 20 years tandem mass spectrometry (TMS) has become the leading technology in NBS programs demonstrating to be versatile, sensitive and specific. There is consistent evidence of benefits from NBS for many disorders detected by TMS as well as for congenital hypothyroidism, cystic fibrosis, congenital adrenal hyperplasia by immune-enzymatic methods. Real time PCR tests have more recently been proposed for the detection of some severe combined immunodeficiences (SCID) along with the use of TMS for ADA and PNP SCID; a first evaluation of their cost-benefit ratio is still ongoing. Avoiding false negative results by using specific biomarkers and reducing the false positive rate by using second tier tests, is fundamental for a successful NBS program. The fully integration of NBS and diagnostic laboratories with clinical service is crucial to have the best effectiveness in a comprehensive NBS system. PMID:24844843

  3. Allergen specific immunotherapy has no influence on standard chemistry and hematology laboratory parameters in clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A set of standard clinical chemistry and hematology parameters are usually measured during clinical studies. The major outcome of these standard tests is to control that the drug investigated does not lead to pathophysiological changes in respective organs or blood. In some cases based on scientific rationale such tests may not be needed. In this paper we report on a standard set of clinical chemistry and hematology laboratory parameters measured before and after treatment in three different immunotherapy studies, representing different routes of administration and different formulations. Methods Thirteen hematological laboratory parameters and eight clinical chemistry parameters were evaluated from three double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, multi-centre, phase III studies. The three studies include one with sublingual immunotherapy (n?=?185), one subcutaneous immunotherapy trial with an aluminium hydroxide-adsorbed recombinant hypoallergenic Bet v1-FV (n?=?211) and one with pre-seasonal subcutaneous immunotherapy with a 6-grass pollen allergoid (n?=?154). Results Allergen specific immunotherapy with both administration forms and formulations respectively did not show any influence on any of the 21 laboratory parameters analyzed. Few patients had a change in laboratory parameters from within normal range at baseline to either below or above at end-of-treatment. No differences between active and placebo were seen with respect to number of patients with such a change. Conclusions This study with different preparations and routes of application indicates that the value of repeated measurements of standard clinical chemistry and hematology parameters during allergen immunotherapy should be discussed further. PMID:24955235

  4. mTOR Inhibitors and Their Potential Role in Therapy in Leukemia and Other Haematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Teachey, David T.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Brown, Valerie I.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that functions as a key regulator of cell growth, protein synthesis, and cell-cycle progression through interactions with a number of signaling pathways, including PI3K/AKT, ras, TCL1, and BCR/ABL. Many haematologic malignancies have aberrant activation of the mTOR and related signaling pathways. Accordingly, mTOR inhibitors, a class of signal transduction inhibitors that were originally developed as immunosuppressive agents, are being investigated in preclinical models and clinical trials for a number of haematologic malignancies. Sirolimus and second generation mTOR inhibitors such as temsirolimus and everolimus, are safe and relatively well-tolerated, making them potentially attractive as single agents or in combination with conventional cytotoxics and other targeted therapies. Promising early clinical data suggests activity of mTOR inhibitors in a number of haematologic diseases, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This review describes the rationale for using mTOR inhibitors in a variety of haematologic diseases with a focus on their use in leukemia. PMID:19344392

  5. Where are we at with point-of-care testing in haematology?

    PubMed

    Briggs, Carol; Kimber, Simon; Green, Laura

    2012-09-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) in haematology has continued to grow in popularity and uptake throughout the world. The increasing demand to reduce the turnaround time of test results, coupled with rapid improvements in technology, have led to the development of several devices that are designed for use in different clinical settings, with the hope of improving patient care. The most used POCT in haematology is measurement of haemoglobin concentration. Other POCT devices (used primarily in developing countries) for malaria screening and CD4+ T-lymphocytes for quantification of human-immunodeficiency-virus are becoming the cornerstone for the diagnosis and management of these disorders. New devices are also available for red cell indices, white blood cell count and platelets. In this review clinical studies that validate the use of such devices will be discussed, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of POCT in haematology. A disadvantage of POCT is a lack of training, poor standardization in obtaining blood samples and insufficient internal/external quality assessment. As there is every reason to expect that POCT use will increase in all pathology disciplines, including haematology, it is imperative that systems are put in place to oversee these issues. PMID:22765160

  6. Identification of Metabolites, Clinical Chemistry Markers and Transcripts Associated with Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Buness, Andreas; Roth, Adrian; Herrmann, Annika; Schmitz, Oliver; Kamp, Hennicke; Busch, Kristina; Suter, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate pre-clinical and clinical biomarkers of hepatotoxicity facilitate the drug development process and the safety monitoring in clinical studies. We selected eight known model compounds to be administered to male Wistar rats to identify biomarkers of drug induced liver injury (DILI) using transcriptomics, metabolite profiling (metabolomics) and conventional endpoints. We specifically explored early biomarkers in serum and liver tissue associated with histopathologically evident acute hepatotoxicity. A tailored data analysis strategy was implemented to better differentiate animals with no treatment-related findings in the liver from animals showing evident hepatotoxicity as assessed by histopathological analysis. From the large number of assessed parameters, our data analysis strategy allowed us to identify five metabolites in serum and five in liver tissue, 58 transcripts in liver tissue and seven clinical chemistry markers in serum that were significantly associated with acute hepatotoxicity. The identified markers comprised metabolites such as taurocholic acid and putrescine (measured as sum parameter together with agmatine), classical clinical chemistry markers like AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT (alanine aminotransferase), and bilirubin, as well as gene transcripts like Igfbp1 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1) and Egr1 (early growth response protein 1). The response pattern of the identified biomarkers was concordant across all types of parameters and sample matrices. Our results suggest that a combination of several of these biomarkers could significantly improve the robustness and accuracy of an early diagnosis of hepatotoxicity. PMID:24836604

  7. Intestinal helminths induce haematological changes in dogs from Jabalpur, India.

    PubMed

    Qadir, S; Dixit, A K; Dixit, P; Sharma, R L

    2011-12-01

    The effect of canine intestinal helminths on the haematological profile of 200 dogs, of both sexes and variable age, visiting university veterinary clinics for routine examination was investigated. The dogs were assigned to parasitized (n = 39) and non-parasitized (n = 161) groups of animals. Coprological examination revealed a 19.5% prevalence of different species of the helminths. Of these animals, 10.25% had mixed infections with Ancylostoma caninum, Toxascaris spp. and Dipylidium caninum. The intensity of A. caninum infection was the highest, with mean egg counts of 951.43 (standard error 88.66), followed by Toxascaris 283.33 (standard error 116.81) and D. caninum. The parasitized animals had significantly lower levels of haemoglobin, packed cell volume and total erythrocyte counts than non-parasitized animals (P < 0.01). Values of other parameters, except for lymphocytes and eosinophils, were not different between the two groups. Analyses of the haematological profile revealed normocytic hypochromic anaemia in the parasitized group of animals. PMID:21110909

  8. Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    K-12 Outreach,

    Chemistry is the scientific study of matter and its interaction with other matter and with energy. It is the branch of natural science that deals with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions.

  9. Effect of malarial infection on haematological parameters in population near Thailand-Myanmar border

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria is a major mosquito-borne public health problem in Thailand with varied haematological consequences. The study sought to elucidate the haematological changes in people who suspected malaria infection and their possible predictive values of malaria infection. Methods Haematological parameters of 4,985 patients, including 703 malaria-infected and 4,282 non-malaria infected, who admitted at Phop Phra Hospital, Tak Province, an area of malaria endemic transmission in Thailand during 2009 were evaluated. Results The following parameters were significantly lower in malaria-infected patients; red blood cells (RBCs) count, haemoglobin (Hb), platelets count, white blood cells (WBCs) count, neutrophil, monocyte, lymphocyte and eosinophil counts, while mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), Mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and monocyte-lymphocyte ratio (MLR) were higher in comparison to non-malaria infected patients. Patients with platelet counts?haematological parameters with low platelet, WBCs, and lymphocyte counts being the most important predictors of malaria infection. When used in combination with other clinical and microscopy methods, these parameters could improve malaria diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24898891

  10. Cancer stem cells in haematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Golab, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    At least several types of human haematological malignancies can now be seen as ‘stem-cell diseases’. The best-studied in this context is acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It has been shown that these diseases are driven by a pool of ‘leukaemia stem cells (LSC)’, which remain in the quiescent state, have the capacity to survive and self-renew, and are responsible for the recurrence of cancer after classical chemotherapy. It has been understood that LSC must be eliminated in order to cure patients suffering from haematological cancers. Recent advances in LSC research have allowed for description of LSC phenotype and identification of potential targets for anti-LSC therapies. This concise review summarises the current view on LSC biology and targeted approaches against LSC. PMID:25691816

  11. Cancer stem cells in haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Zagozdzon, Radoslaw; Golab, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    At least several types of human haematological malignancies can now be seen as 'stem-cell diseases'. The best-studied in this context is acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It has been shown that these diseases are driven by a pool of 'leukaemia stem cells (LSC)', which remain in the quiescent state, have the capacity to survive and self-renew, and are responsible for the recurrence of cancer after classical chemotherapy. It has been understood that LSC must be eliminated in order to cure patients suffering from haematological cancers. Recent advances in LSC research have allowed for description of LSC phenotype and identification of potential targets for anti-LSC therapies. This concise review summarises the current view on LSC biology and targeted approaches against LSC. PMID:25691816

  12. Autoverification in a core clinical chemistry laboratory at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Davis, Scott R.; Drees, Denny; Morris, Cory; Kulhavy, Jeff; Crone, Cheri; Bebber, Tami; Clark, Iwa; Nelson, David L.; Teul, Sharon; Voss, Dena; Aman, Dean; Fahnle, Julie; Blau, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autoverification is a process of using computer-based rules to verify clinical laboratory test results without manual intervention. To date, there is little published data on the use of autoverification over the course of years in a clinical laboratory. We describe the evolution and application of autoverification in an academic medical center clinical chemistry core laboratory. Subjects and Methods: At the institution of the study, autoverification developed from rudimentary rules in the laboratory information system (LIS) to extensive and sophisticated rules mostly in middleware software. Rules incorporated decisions based on instrument error flags, interference indices, analytical measurement ranges (AMRs), delta checks, dilution protocols, results suggestive of compromised or contaminated specimens, and ‘absurd’ (physiologically improbable) values. Results: The autoverification rate for tests performed in the core clinical chemistry laboratory has increased over the course of 13 years from 40% to the current overall rate of 99.5%. A high percentage of critical values now autoverify. The highest rates of autoverification occurred with the most frequently ordered tests such as the basic metabolic panel (sodium, potassium, chloride, carbon dioxide, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, glucose; 99.6%), albumin (99.8%), and alanine aminotransferase (99.7%). The lowest rates of autoverification occurred with some therapeutic drug levels (gentamicin, lithium, and methotrexate) and with serum free light chains (kappa/lambda), mostly due to need for offline dilution and manual filing of results. Rules also caught very rare occurrences such as plasma albumin exceeding total protein (usually indicative of an error such as short sample or bubble that evaded detection) and marked discrepancy between total bilirubin and the spectrophotometric icteric index (usually due to interference of the bilirubin assay by immunoglobulin (Ig) M monoclonal gammopathy). Conclusions: Our results suggest that a high rate of autoverification is possible with modern clinical chemistry analyzers. The ability to autoverify a high percentage of results increases productivity and allows clinical laboratory staff to focus attention on the small number of specimens and results that require manual review and investigation. PMID:24843824

  13. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensing: applications to clinical chemistry and cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Thompson, Richard B.

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of fluorescence lifetimes, rather than intensity or intensity ratios, offer many advantages in clinical chemistry and imaging. However, measurements of time-resolved fluorescence are normally associated with complex laser light sources and instrumentation. In this lecture, we show how emerging technology is enabling the design and use of simple instrumentation for time-resolved fluorescence. In particular, it is now possible to imagine lifetime-based measurements of blood gases and blood glucose, and lifetime imaging of calcium and other ions in microscopic samples.

  14. Baseline hematology and clinical chemistry results from captive-raised trumpeter swans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Rininger, D.L.; Ets, M.K.; Sladen, William J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Results from hematology and clinical chemistry tests are presented for healthy captive-raised Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) to help establish baseline data. Blood samples were obtained from 14 cygnets between the ages of three to four and seven to eight months that were the subjects of a study to teach migration routes to swans. Males and females differed significantly in asparatate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total protein. Age categories differed significantly in hematocrit, white blood cell counts, alkaline phosphatase, aspar-rate aminotransferase, glucose, cholesterol and uric acid. There were no significant differences among age categories in values of alanine aminotransferase, calcium, triglycerides and total protein.

  15. Haematological and Immunological Data Data set n Input

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    Haematological and Immunological Data Data set n Input 1 WBC 2 Hgb Haematology 3 MCV 4 Plat 5 Lymph 6 Neut 1 PanT% 2 CD4% Immunology 3 CD8% 4 PanT 5 CD4 6 CD8 slide­1 #12; Data Type Data set KS+ (class 1) KS-- (class 3) Haematology Training 24 82 Test 4 10 Immunology Training 24 81 Test 4 10 KS

  16. A prospective, cohort, multicentre study of candidaemia in hospitalized adult patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gamaletsou, M N; Walsh, T J; Zaoutis, T; Pagoni, M; Kotsopoulou, M; Voulgarelis, M; Panayiotidis, P; Vassilakopoulos, T; Angelopoulou, M K; Marangos, M; Spyridonidis, A; Kofteridis, D; Pouli, A; Sotiropoulos, D; Matsouka, P; Argyropoulou, A; Perloretzou, S; Leckerman, K; Manaka, A; Oikonomopoulos, P; Daikos, G; Petrikkos, G; Sipsas, N V

    2014-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a life-threatening infection in patients with haematological malignancies. The objective of our study was to determine the incidence, microbiological characteristics and clinical outcome of candidaemia among hospitalized adult patients with haematological malignancies. This is a population-based, prospective, multicentre study of patients ? 18 years admitted to haematology and/or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation units of nine tertiary care Greek hospitals from January 2009 through to February 2012. Within this cohort, we conducted a nested case-control study to determine the risk factors for candidaemia. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of 28-day mortality. Candidaemia was detected in 40 of 27,864 patients with haematological malignancies vs. 967 of 1,158,018 non-haematology patients for an incidence of 1.4 cases/1000 admissions vs. 0.83/1000 respectively (p <0.001). Candidaemia was caused predominantly (35/40, 87.5%) by non-Candida albicans species, particularly Candida parapsilosis (20/40, 50%). In vitro resistance to at least one antifungal agent was observed in 27% of Candida isolates. Twenty-one patients (53%) developed breakthrough candidaemia while receiving antifungal agents. Central venous catheters, hypogammaglobulinaemia and a high APACHE II score were independent risk factors for the development of candidaemia. Crude mortality at day 28 was greater in those with candidaemia than in control cases (18/40 (45%) vs. 9/80 (11%); p <0.0001). In conclusion, despite antifungal prophylaxis, candidaemia is a relatively frequent infection associated with high mortality caused by non-C. albicans spp., especially C. parapsilosis. Central venous catheters and hypogammaglobulinaemia are independent risk factors for candidaemia that provide potential targets for improving the outcome. PMID:23889746

  17. A history of HbA1c through Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gillery, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    HbA(1c) was discovered in the late 1960s and its use as marker of glycemic control has gradually increased over the course of the last four decades. Recognized as the gold standard of diabetic survey, this parameter was successfully implemented in clinical practice in the 1970s and 1980s and internationally standardized in the 1990s and 2000s. The use of standardized and well-controlled methods, with well-defined performance criteria, has recently opened new directions for HbA(1c) use in patient care, e.g., for diabetes diagnosis. Many reports devoted to HbA1c have been published in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) journal. This review reminds the major steps of HbA(1c) history, with a special emphasis on the contribution of CCLM in this field. PMID:22992284

  18. Age-related haematology changes in captive-reared kori bustards ( Ardeotis kori )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Howlett; J. H. Samour; T. A. Bailey; J. L. Naldo

    1998-01-01

    Blood samples were collected from clinically normal, captive-reared, chick and juvenile kori bustards (Ardeotis kori), at regular intervals, over a 15-month period. Full routine haematological analyses were carried out to establish reference\\u000a values for growing individuals of this species and to assess age-related changes. The results of this study showed significant\\u000a age-related differences in haematrocrit, haemoglobin and red blood cell

  19. Normal haematology and age-related findings in the rufous-crested bustard ( Eupodotis ruficrista )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. D'Aloia; J. C. Howlett; J. H. Samour; T. A. Bailey; J. Naldo

    1995-01-01

    Blood samples were collected from six juvenile (age 4–6 months) and 14 adult (two years and more) clinically normal captive rufous-crested bustards (Eupodotis ruficrista). Standard haematology assays were carried out to establish normal reference values for the species and to investigate any age-related differences. Compared with adults, juveniles showed low haemoglobin levels, mean cell haemoglobin and mean cell haemoglobin concentrations

  20. The impact of co-infections on the haematological profile of East African Short-horn Zebu calves.

    PubMed

    Van Wyk, Ilana Conradie; Goddard, Amelia; de C Bronsvoort, B Mark; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Handel, Ian G; Hanotte, Olivier; Jennings, Amy; Lesosky, Maia; Kiara, Henry; Thumbi, Sam M; Toye, Phil; Woolhouse, Mark W; Penzhorn, Banie L

    2014-03-01

    The cumulative effect of co-infections between pathogen pairs on the haematological response of East African Short-horn Zebu calves is described. Using a longitudinal study design a stratified clustered random sample of newborn calves were recruited into the Infectious Diseases of East African Livestock (IDEAL) study and monitored at 5-weekly intervals until 51 weeks of age. At each visit samples were collected and analysed to determine the infection status of each calf as well as their haematological response. The haematological parameters investigated included packed cell volume (PCV), white blood cell count (WBC) and platelet count (Plt). The pathogens of interest included tick-borne protozoa and rickettsias, trypanosomes and intestinal parasites. Generalized additive mixed-effect models were used to model the infectious status of pathogens against each haematological parameter, including significant interactions between pathogens. These models were further used to predict the cumulative effect of co-infecting pathogen pairs on each haematological parameter. The most significant decrease in PCV was found with co-infections of trypanosomes and strongyles. Strongyle infections also resulted in a significant decrease in WBC at a high infectious load. Trypanosomes were the major cause of thrombocytopenia. Platelet counts were also affected by interactions between tick-borne pathogens. Interactions between concomitant pathogens were found to complicate the prognosis and clinical presentation of infected calves and should be taken into consideration in any study that investigates disease under field conditions. PMID:24553080

  1. An improved automated immunoassay for C-reactive protein on the Dimension® clinical chemistry system

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tie Q.; Kramer, Steve; Chu, Victor P.; Hudson, Dave; Kilgore, Daniel; Salyer, Sue; Parker, Grace; Eyberger, Amy; Arentzen, Rene; Koiv, Heikki

    2000-01-01

    Recent clinical data indicate that the measurement of the concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) requires a higher sensitivity and wider dynamic range than most of the current methods can offer. Our goal was to develop a totally automated and highly sensitive CRP assay with an extended range on the Dimension® clinical chemistry system based on particle-enhanced turbidimetric-immunoassay (PETIA) technology. The improved method was optimized and compared to the Binding Site's radial immunodiffusion assay using disease state specimens to minimize interference. Assay performance was assessed on the Dimension® system in a 12-instrument inter-laboratory comparison study. A split-sample comparison (n = 622) was performed between the improved CRP method on the Dimension® system and the N Latex CRP mono method on the Behring Nephelometer, using a number of reagent and calibrator lots on multiple instruments. The method was also referenced to the standard material, CRM470, provided by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC). The improved CRP method was linear to 265.1mg/l with a detection limit between 0.2 and 0.5mg/l. The method detects antigen excess from the upper assay limit to 2000mg/l, thereby allowing users to retest the sample with dilution. Calibration was stable for 60 days. The within-run reproducibility (CV) was less than 5.1% and total reproducibility ranged from 1.1 to 6.7% between 3.3 and 265.4mg/l CRP. Linear regression analysis of the results on the improved Dimension® method (DM) versus the Behring Nephelometer (BN) yielded the following equation: DM = 0.99 × BN ? 0.37; r = 0.992. Minimal interference was observed from sera of patients with elevated IgM, IgG and IgA. The recovery of the IFCC standard was within 100 ± 7 % across multiple lots of reagent and calibrator. The improved CRP method provided a sensitive, accurate and rapid approach to quantify CRP in serum and plasma on the Dimension® clinical chemistry system. The ability to detect antigen excess eliminated reporting falsely low results caused by the ‘prozone effect’. PMID:18924698

  2. 77 FR 9947 - Guidance for Industry: Early Clinical Trials With Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ...Trials With Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control Information...Trials With Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control Information...Trials With Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control...

  3. 75 FR 63188 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Early Clinical Trials With Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ...Trials With Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control Information...Trials with Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control Information...Trials with Live Biotherapeutic Products: Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control...

  4. Haematological and morphological responses of broiler chicks to hypoxia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Maxwell; S. Spence; G. W. Robertson; M. A. Mitchell

    1990-01-01

    Broiler chicks were subjected to experimentally?induced hypoxia and the haematology, together with the histopathology and ultrastructure of heart, liver, lung and kidney and the ultracytochemistry of heart tissues were examined. The haemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume and red blood cell counts were significantly increased compared with controls. The results resembled the haematology of similar aged broilers with an ascitic syndrome

  5. Clinical chemistry profiles in injection heroin users from Coastal Region, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the co-burden of injection drug use and HIV is increasing in Africa, little is known about the laboratory markers of injection drug use and anti-retroviral treatment (ART) in Kenyan injection drug users. This study, therefore, aimed at determining the clinical chemistry profiles and identifying the key laboratory markers of HIV infection during ART in injection heroin users (IHUs). Methods Clinical chemistry measurements were performed on serum samples collected from HIV-1 infected ART-experienced (n?=?22), naive (n?=?16) and HIV-1 negative (n?=?23) IHUs, and healthy controls (n?=?15) from Mombasa, coastal Kenya. Results HIV uninfected IHUs had lower alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (P?=?0.023) as ART-exposed IHUs exhibited lower albumin (P?=?0.014) and higher AST to platelet index (APRI) (P?

  6. Haematological cancer and quality of life: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Allart-Vorelli, P; Porro, B; Baguet, F; Michel, A; Cousson-Gélie, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the impact of haematological cancers on quality of life (QoL). A review of the international literature was conducted from the databases ‘PsycInfo' and 'Medline' using the keywords: 'haematological cancer', 'quality of life', 'physical', 'psychological', 'social', 'vocational', 'professional', 'economic', 'cognitive', and 'sexual'. Twenty-one reliable studies were analysed. Among these studies, 12 showed that haematological cancer altered overall QoL, 8 papers found a deterioration of physical dimension, 8 papers reported on functional and role dimensions, 11 papers reported on the psychological component and 9 on the social component. Moreover, one study and two manuscripts, respectively, reported deteriorated sexual and cognitive dimensions. Our review demonstrates that the different dimensions of QoL are deteriorated by haematological malignancies and, probably, by the side effects of treatment. PMID:25909835

  7. A new frontier in haematology - combining pharmacokinetic with pharmacodynamic factors to improve choice and dose of drug.

    PubMed

    Arpon, David Rey; Gandhi, Maher K; Martin, Jennifer H

    2014-08-01

    The issue of tailored dosing adjusted according to a range of patient-specific factors other than bodyweight or body surface area is of large and increasing clinical and financial concern. Even if it is known that dosing alterations are likely to be required for parameters such as body composition, gender and pharmacogenetics, the amount of dosing change is unknown. Thus, pharmacokinetically guided dosing is making a resurgence, particularly in areas of medicine where there are cost constraints or safety issues, such as in haematology medications. However, the evidence to support the behaviour is minimal, particularly when long-term outcomes are considered. In haematology, there are particular issues around efficacy, toxicity and overall cost. Newer targeted agents, such as the monoclonal antibody rituximab and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib, whilst clearly being highly effective, are dosed on a milligram per square metre (rituximab) or fixed dose basis (imatinib), regardless of body composition, tumour aspects or comorbidity. This review questions this practice and raises important clinical issues; specifically, the clinical potential for combined pharmacokinetically and pharmacodynamically guided dosing of new targeted agents in haematological malignancies. This pharmacokinetically and pharmacodynamically guided dosing is an emerging area of clinical pharmacology, driven predominantly by toxicity, efficacy and cost issues, but also because reasonable outcomes are being noted with more appropriately dosed older medications adjusted for patient-specific factors. Clinical trials to investigate the optimization of rituximab dose scheduling are required. PMID:24433338

  8. Characterization of Rheumatoid Arthritis Subtypes Using Symptom Profiles, Clinical Chemistry and Metabolomics Measurements

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooij, Anita J.; Reijmers, Theo H.; Schroën, Yan; Wang, Mei; Xu, Zhiliang; Wang, Xinchang; Kong, Hongwei; Xu, Guowang; Hankemeier, Thomas; Meulman, Jacqueline J.; van der Greef, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim is to characterize subgroups or phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using a systems biology approach. The discovery of subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis patients is an essential research area for the improvement of response to therapy and the development of personalized medicine strategies. Methods In this study, 39 RA patients are phenotyped using clinical chemistry measurements, urine and plasma metabolomics analysis and symptom profiles. In addition, a Chinese medicine expert classified each RA patient as a Cold or Heat type according to Chinese medicine theory. Multivariate data analysis techniques are employed to detect and validate biochemical and symptom relationships with the classification. Results The questionnaire items ‘Red joints’, ‘Swollen joints’, ‘Warm joints’ suggest differences in the level of inflammation between the groups although c-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RHF) levels were equal. Multivariate analysis of the urine metabolomics data revealed that the levels of 11 acylcarnitines were lower in the Cold RA than in the Heat RA patients, suggesting differences in muscle breakdown. Additionally, higher dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels in Heat patients compared to Cold patients were found suggesting that the Cold RA group has a more suppressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. Conclusion Significant and relevant biochemical differences are found between Cold and Heat RA patients. Differences in immune function, HPA axis involvement and muscle breakdown point towards opportunities to tailor disease management strategies to each of the subgroups RA patient. PMID:22984493

  9. Comparison of Performance, Clinical Chemistry, and Carcass Characteristics of Finishing Lambs Treated with Recombinant Ovine or Bovine Somatotropins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. McLaughlin; H. B. Hedrickt; J. J. Veenhuizen; R. L. Hintz; G. F. Hartnell; T. R. Kasser; C. A. Baile

    2010-01-01

    The variation in growth and carcass composition responses of lambs to somatotropin ( S T ) treatment may depend on the source of ST used as well as on other experimental conditions. In the present experiment, growth, carcass composition, and clinical chemistry responses to recombinantly produced ovine ST (oST) and two bovine ST (N- methionyl-bST(M-bST1 and N-alanyl-bST(A-bST1 were compared. Lambs

  10. Clinical pharmacology in normal volunteers of praziquantel, a new drug against schistosomes and cestodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Leopold; W. Ungethiim; E. Groll; H. W. Diekmann; H. Nowak; D. H. G. Wegner

    1978-01-01

    The tolerance of Praziquantel (2-cyclohexylcarbonyl-1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 11b-hexahydro-2H-pyrazino-[2, 1-a]isoquinoline-4-one) in oral doses of 1×20 mg\\/kg, 1×50 mg\\/kg, 3×10 mg\\/kg and 3×25 mg\\/kg body weight (t=4 h) was tested in a complex study involving 36 healthy volunteers. In addition to the usual assessment of clinical chemistry, haematology, coagulation physiology, urinalysis, clinico-physiological examination including EEG, and medical examination, clinico-psychological parameters

  11. Development and analytical performance of an automated screening method for cannabinoids on the Dimension clinical chemistry system.

    PubMed

    Obzansky, D M; Gorman, E G; Kramer, S P; Masulli, I S; Nuzzaci, E A; Skogen, W F

    1997-01-01

    A fully automated, random access method for the determination of cannabinoids (UTHC) was developed for the Dimension AR and XL clinical chemistry systems. The method utilizes Abuscreen ONLINE reagents and a multianalyte liquid calibrator containing 11-nor-Delta(9)-THC-9-carboxylic acid. Within-run and total reproducibility, determined using NCCLS protocol EP5- T2, was less than 0.6% and 1.6% CV, respectively, at all concentrations. Calibration stability was retained for at least 30 days. An extensive evaluation of non-structurally related drugs and various physiological substances indicated lack of interference in the method. No sample carry-over was observed following a specimen containing 1886 ng/ml 11-nor-Delta(9)-THC-9-carboxylic acid. A 99.1% agreement (N = 445 samples) was found between an EMIT based method on the aca discrete clinical analyser and the Dimension UTHC method.Dimension clinical chemistry system and aca discrete clinical analyser are registered trademarks of Dade International. PMID:18924804

  12. Development and analytical performance of an automated screening method for cannabinoids on the Dimension clinical chemistry system

    PubMed Central

    Obzansky, D. M.; Gorman, E. G.; Kramer, S. P.; Masulli, I. S.; Nuzzaci, E. A.; Skogen, W. F.

    1997-01-01

    A fully automated, random access method for the determination of cannabinoids (UTHC) was developed for the Dimension AR and XL clinical chemistry systems. The method utilizes Abuscreen ONLINE reagents and a multianalyte liquid calibrator containing 11-nor-?9-THC-9-carboxylic acid. Within-run and total reproducibility, determined using NCCLS protocol EP5- T2, was less than 0.6% and 1.6% CV, respectively, at all concentrations. Calibration stability was retained for at least 30 days. An extensive evaluation of non-structurally related drugs and various physiological substances indicated lack of interference in the method. No sample carry-over was observed following a specimen containing 1886 ng/ml 11-nor-?9-THC-9-carboxylic acid. A 99.1% agreement (N = 445 samples) was found between an EMIT based method on the aca discrete clinical analyser and the Dimension UTHC method. Dimension clinical chemistry system and aca discrete clinical analyser are registered trademarks of Dade International. PMID:18924804

  13. Haematological Reference Intervals in a Multiethnic Population

    PubMed Central

    Ambayya, Angeli; Su, Anselm Ting; Osman, Nadila Haryani; Nik-Samsudin, Nik Rosnita; Khalid, Khadijah; Chang, Kian Meng; Sathar, Jameela; Rajasuriar, Jay Suriar; Yegappan, Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Similar to other populations, full blood count reference (FBC) intervals in Malaysia are generally derived from non-Malaysian subjects. However, numerous studies have shown significant differences between and within populations supporting the need for population specific intervals. Methods Two thousand seven hundred twenty five apparently healthy adults comprising all ages, both genders and three principal races were recruited through voluntary participation. FBC was performed on two analysers, Sysmex XE-5000 and Unicel DxH 800, in addition to blood smears and haemoglobin analysis. Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor and C-reactive protein assays were performed in selected subjects. All parameters of qualified subjects were tested for normality followed by determination of reference intervals, measures of central tendency and dispersion along with point estimates for each subgroup. Results Complete data was available in 2440 subjects of whom 56% (907 women and 469 men) were included in reference interval calculation. Compared to other populations there were significant differences for haemoglobin, red blood cell count, platelet count and haematocrit in Malaysians. There were differences between men and women, and between younger and older men; unlike in other populations, haemoglobin was similar in younger and older women. However ethnicity and smoking had little impact. 70% of anemia in premenopausal women, 24% in postmenopausal women and 20% of males is attributable to iron deficiency. There was excellent correlation between Sysmex XE-5000 and Unicel DxH 800. Conclusion Our data confirms the importance of population specific haematological parameters and supports the need for local guidelines rather than adoption of generalised reference intervals and cut-offs. PMID:24642526

  14. Haematological evaluation of naphthalene intoxication in the tropical arcid blood clam Anadara granosa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. T. Eapen; B. Patel

    1989-01-01

    In vertebrates haematological parameters are of considerable importance in the diagnosis of pathological disorders due to pollutants. Similar haematological studies in invertebrates are lacking. This is partly because a very few species have erythrocytes; arcid clams, however, are unique in having erythrocytes. Our experiments were designed therefore to evaluate the effect of naphthalene (N) on haematological parameters in the tropical

  15. Infrared analysis in clinical chemistry: its use in the laboratory and in non-invasive near patient testing.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J F; Vadgama, P

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory based NIR analysers have been available for some time. The recent development of more portable equipment such as the commercially available Futrex-9000 NIR transmittance blood chemistry analyser, which can be used to analyse relatively opaque samples for a mixture of components, shows promise but requires further evaluation for routine clinical use. NIR equipment for general use has only recently become available and is therefore relatively expensive. However, as the development of new applications occurs the instrumentation will become more widely used, which will inevitably result in reduced capital cost. The advantages of NIR systems are speed, portability, lack of consumables, dry chemistry, non-invasive, modest running costs, virtually no moving parts and almost infinite applications in clinical biochemical analysis. It is likely that the first applications of NIR will be where there is a requirement for multiple assays such as glucose, urea and bilirubin and where sample size is a limitation. Thus non-invasive near patient testing may become common in the future in settings such as neonatal units, renal units, diabetic clinics and intensive care units. PMID:9158817

  16. A contribution for the definition of serum chemistry values in captive adults Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Silva, F M O; Vergara-Parente, J E; Gomes, J K N; Teixeira, M N; Lima, R P

    2007-04-01

    Serum chemistry analyses represents a fundamental tool for the diagnosis and understanding of diseases in marine mammals. Although several studies are being conducted within the field of clinical pathology, haematological and serum chemistry data for Antillean manatees are deficient. The purpose of this study was to determine serum chemistry values for captive Antillean manatees within the CMA/Ibama facility in Brazil. Serum samples were obtained from five captive adult Antillean manatees fed with seagrass and analysed for aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, urea, creatinine, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, total protein, albumin, globulin, phosphate, chloride, calcium and uric acid. Blood chemistry parameters were determined using a semi-automatic analyzer. Maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviations were calculated for each serum chemistry parameter. Differences on the values of males and females were verified using an unpaired Student's t-test. All the parameters analysed were similar between sexes, with exception of AP, which was higher in females (191.43 +/- 31.86 U/l). Alanine aminotransferase and uric acid values for Trichechus manatus manatus are reported for the first time in this paper. This study is the first to report serum chemistry parameter values for long-term captive male and female Antillean manatees. Therefore, the lower values of albumin, phosphate, chloride, cholesterol and triglycerides obtained here highlight the importance of clinical pathology during health monitoring of captive marine mammals. PMID:17381673

  17. Histopathology and serum clinical chemistry evaluation of broilers with femoral head separation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head disarticulation (FHD) and necrosis is a sporadic leg problem of unknown etiology in broiler breeders. To determine the underlying physiology of FHD, the blood chemistry and the histopathology of the femoral heads of the affected chickens were compared with their age matched controls. Ch...

  18. Learning Nuclear Chemistry through Practice: A High School Student Project Using PET in a Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liguori, Lucia; Adamsen, Tom Christian Holm

    2013-01-01

    Practical experience is vital for promoting interest in science. Several aspects of chemistry are rarely taught in the secondary school curriculum, especially nuclear and radiochemistry. Therefore, we introduced radiochemistry to secondary school students through positron emission tomography (PET) associated with computer tomography (CT). PET-CT…

  19. Original article Cardio-respiratory, haematological and biochemical

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    period for their cardio-respiratory and metabolic adjustment to strenuous exercise, training and detrainOriginal article Cardio-respiratory, haematological and biochemical parameter adjustments to exercise: effect of a probiotic in horses during training T Art D Votion, K McEntee H Amory, A Linden, R

  20. [Management of treatment-induced pain in paediatric haematology].

    PubMed

    Ben Hamadi, Donia; Calvet, Clémence

    2015-01-01

    Invasive procedures are frequent and painful in children treated in paediatric haematology. It is therefore essential to take into consideration and anticipate the pain induced by these procedures. The caregiver has various effective methods of providing a high quality care management. PMID:26183097

  1. Primary immunodeficiencies predisposed to Epstein-Barr virus-driven haematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Parvaneh, Nima; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Borkhardt, Arndt

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, maintains lifelong subclinical persistent infections in humans. In the circulation, EBV primarily infects the B cells, and protective immunity is mediated by EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. However, EBV has been linked to several devastating diseases, such as haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and lymphoproliferative diseases in the immunocompromised host. Some types of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are characterized by the development of EBV-associated complications as their predominant clinical feature. The study of such genetic diseases presents an ideal opportunity for a better understanding of the biology of the immune responses against EBV. Here, we summarize the range of PIDs that are predisposed to EBV-associated haematological diseases, describing their clinical picture and pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:23758097

  2. Tales from the Jazz ASH: highlights from the 2013 American Society of Haematology meeting

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The 55th annual ASH meeting was held in pleasant New Orleans and was the largest in its history, with 22,495 participants coming from 113 nations. A ‘bench-to-bedside and back’ attitude characterises haematology probably more than any other discipline in medicine and, as usual, this was reflected in the extremely wide breadth of the topics covered, including the last results from clinical trials and cutting-edge advancements in basic science. This year, the balance was arguably skewed: few truly clinical practice-changing results were presented. On the other hand, a great number of basic and translational studies significantly increased our understanding of the biology of numerous malignancies and heralded the coming of age of disruptive technologies. Namely, above all, next generation sequencing and T cell engineering-based cell therapy. PMID:24678345

  3. A panel of cancer-testis genes exhibiting broad-spectrum expression in haematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liggins, Amanda P.; Lim, Seah H.; Soilleux, Elizabeth J.; Pulford, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens/genes show restricted expression in normal tissues but widespread expression in many tumour types. This, coupled with their ability to induce cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses, makes them attractive vaccine candidates. Following our identification of PASD1, we have used RT-PCR to analyse the mRNA expression profile of a large panel of CT genes in cell lines derived from haematological malignancies, and have studied Sp17 protein expression in the same cell lines and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) biopsies. Our extensive analysis revealed multiple CT transcripts exhibiting widespread expression across cell lines derived from 21 B- and 4 T-cell malignancies. The broadest mRNA expression profiles were observed for the following eight CT genes: Sp17 (25/25), PRAME (25/25), CSAGE (24/25), PASD1 (22/25), CAGE/DDX53 (19/25), CTAGE1 (19/25), HAGE/DDX43 (16/25) and PLU-1/JARID1B (15/25). Cell lines derived from more aggressive lymphoma subtypes generally expressed CT transcripts at higher frequency. Sp17 protein was detected in a number of cell lines and in six of eleven (54.5%) DLBCL biopsies. Analysis of Sp17 protein expression, by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, broadens the scope of this CT antigen as a potentially relevant clinical target in haematological malignancies. Further studies of protein expression are now needed to validate these antigens as vaccine candidates. PMID:20726502

  4. Iron requirements based upon iron absorption tests are poorly predicted by haematological indices in patients with inactive inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lomer, Miranda CE; Cook, William B; Jan-Mohamed, Hamid Jan B; Hutchinson, Carol; Liu, Ding Yong; Hider, Robert C; Powell, Jonathan J

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Traditional clinical markers of iron status can be skewed in the presence of inflammation meaning that a patient’s iron status can be misinterpreted. Additionally, iron absorption is known to be down-regulated in patients with active IBD. However, whether this is the case for quiescent or mildly active disease has not been formally assessed. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between iron absorption, iron requirements and standard haematological indices in IBD patients without active disease. Twenty nine patients with quiescent or mildly active IBD and 28 control subjects undertook an iron absorption test which measured sequential rises in serum iron over four hours following ingestion of 200 mg ferrous sulphate. At baseline, serum iron, transferrin saturation, non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI), ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor were all measured. Thereafter (30-240 minutes) only serum iron and NTBI were measured. Iron absorption did not differ between the two groups (P=0.9; RM-ANOVA). In control subjects baseline haematological parameters predicted iron absorption (i.e. iron requirements) but this was not the case for patients with IBD. Iron absorption is normal in quiescent or mildly active IBD patients but standard haematological parameters do not accurately predict iron requirements. PMID:22152498

  5. Haematological Safety of Perinatal Zidovudine in Pregnant HIV-1–Infected Women in Thailand: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Nelly; Lallemant, Marc; Jourdain, Gonzague; Techapalokul, Somnuek; Tunthanathip, Preecha; Suphanich, Surachet; Chanpoo, Truengta; Traisathit, Patrinee; McIntosh, Kenneth; Coeur, Sophie Le

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To respond to the primary safety objective of the Perinatal HIV Prevention Trial 1 (PHPT-1) by studying the evolution of haematological parameters according to zidovudine exposure duration in HIV-1?infected pregnant women. Design: Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of different durations of zidovudine prophylaxis. Setting: 27 hospitals in Thailand. Participants: 1,436 HIV-infected pregnant women in PHPT-1. Intervention: Zidovudine prophylaxis initiation at 28 or 35 wk gestation. Outcome measures: Haemoglobin level, leucocytes, total lymphocyte counts, and absolute neutrophil counts were measured at 26, 32, and 35 wk and at delivery. The evolution of haematological parameters was estimated between 26 and 35 wk (zidovudine/placebo) and between 35 wk and delivery to compare a long versus short zidovudine exposure. For each parameter, linear mixed models were adjusted on baseline sociodemographic variables, HIV clinical stage, CD4 count, and viral load. Results: Between 26 and 35 wk, haemoglobin, leucocytes, and absolute neutrophil counts decreased in zidovudine-exposed compared to unexposed women (mean difference [95% CI] ?0.4 [?0.5 to ?0.3], ?423 [?703 to ?142], ?485 [?757 to ?213], respectively). However, between 35 wk and delivery, the haematological parameters increased faster in women exposed to long rather than short durations of zidovudine (0.1 [0.0 to 0.1]; 105 [18 to 191]; 147 [59 to 234], respectively). At delivery, the differences were not statistically significant, except for mean haemoglobin level, which remained slightly lower in the long zidovudine treatment group (difference: 0.2 g/dl). Zidovudine had no negative impact on the absolute lymphocyte counts. Conclusion: Zidovudine initiated at 28 wk gestation rather than 35 wk had a transient negative impact on the evolution of haematological parameters, which was largely reversed by delivery despite continuation of zidovudine. This result provides reassurance about the safety of early initiation of zidovudine prophylaxis during pregnancy to maximize prevention of perinatal HIV. PMID:17476315

  6. PreliminaryEvaluationof an Experimental ClinicalChemistryAnalyzerDevelopedfor Space Medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Smith-Cronin; Gary A. Graham

    chemistry as part of a medical-care systemat NASA's planned spacestationFreedom.We report theperformance ofthe experimental analyzer,calleda medical development unit(MDU), for selectedanalytes in a laboratory setting in preparation for a preliminary clinicaltrialat patients'bed- sidesinan intensive-care unit.Within-run CVs ranged from 0.7% for sodiumto 7.1% for phosphorus; day-to-dayCvs rangedfrom1.0% forchloride to 23.4%forcalcium.Corre- lationofpatients' bloodsampleanalyses compared wellwith those by Ektachem E700 and other high-volume central

  7. [Studies on preanalytical phase errors in clinical chemistry in the Japanese clinical laboratory--now and the future].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Akio; Kizawa, Senji

    2007-05-01

    The Sampling Conference for the prevention of preanalytical phase errors was first held at Fukushima in 1987. Since then, The Sampling Conference has been held in several areas in Japan. For the same purpose, we started the Tokai Sampling Conference in the Tokai area including Aichi, Shizuoka, Gifu and Mie prefectures in 1990, and discussed clinical errors in laboratory measurements caused by physiological variations in age, sex and the season, influence of food, exercise, posture and medication, effects of anticoagulants, sample storage conditions and so on. We have studied many preanalytical errors at these conferences. Moreover, additional problems have been revealed at the conferences. Safety and risk management to avoid needle sticks and Vacutainer-induced infections have been discussed, and this information is thought to be important not only for laboratory workers but also for patients. PMID:17593695

  8. A brief history of lipid and lipoprotein measurements and their contribution to clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Judith R; Warnick, G Russell; Cooper, Gerald R

    2006-07-23

    The study of modern lipid chemistry began in the 17th and 18th centuries with early observations by Robert Boyle, Poulletier de la Salle, Antoine François de Fourcroy and others. The 19th century chemist, Chevreul, identified several fatty acids, suggested the name 'cholesterine' for the fatty substance in gallstones, coined the word 'glycerine', and showed that fats were comprised of glycerol and fatty acids. The 20th century brought many advances in the understanding of lipoprotein structure and function, and explored relationships between lipoproteins and disease states. The development of the ultracentrifuge and other lipoprotein separation techniques, and reagents for accurate, standardized quantitative measurement have steadily increased our understanding of the important role of lipoprotein metabolism in both healthy and disease states. PMID:16740255

  9. Haematological parameters as bioindicators of insecticide exposure in teleosts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narendra Nath Singh; Anil Kumar Srivastava

    2010-01-01

    Haematological parameters, such as erythrocyte and leucocyte count, erythrocyte indices and thrombocyte number vis-a-vis coagulation\\u000a of blood has been considered bioindicators of toxicosis in fish following exposure to organochlorine, organophosphate, carbamate\\u000a and pyrethroid insecticides. This review deals with the effects of insecticides on the morphology of red blood cells, total\\u000a erythrocyte count, haemoglobin content, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular

  10. A Competency-Based Clinical Chemistry Course for the Associate Degree Medical Laboratory Technician Graduate in a Medical Technology Baccalaureate Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buccelli, Pamela

    Presented is a project that developed a competency-based clinical chemistry course for associate degree medical laboratory technicians (MLT) in a medical technology (MT) baccalaureate program. Content of the course was based upon competencies expected of medical technologists at career-entry as defined in the statements adopted in 1976 by the…

  11. RefVal: a program implementing the recommendations of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry on the statistical treatment of reference values

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helge Erik Solberg

    1995-01-01

    RefVal is a computer program that implements the recommendations of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry on the statistical treatment of reference values. The program performs the following main tasks: graphical display of the distribution of reference values, identification or elimination of outliers, testing of the fit of the distribution to Gaussian shape (coefficients of skewness and kurtosis, Anderson-Darling's test,

  12. Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Huret, Jean-Loup; Ahmad, Mohammad; Arsaban, Mélanie; Bernheim, Alain; Cigna, Jérémy; Desangles, François; Guignard, Jean-Christophe; Jacquemot-Perbal, Marie-Christine; Labarussias, Maureen; Leberre, Vanessa; Malo, Anne; Morel-Pair, Catherine; Mossafa, Hossein; Potier, Jean-Claude; Texier, Guillaume; Viguié, Franck; Yau Chun Wan-Senon, Sylvie; Zasadzinski, Alain; Dessen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology (http://AtlasGeneticsOncology.org) is a peer-reviewed internet journal/encyclopaedia/database focused on genes implicated in cancer, cytogenetics and clinical entities in cancer and cancer-prone hereditary diseases. The main goal of the Atlas is to provide review articles that describe complementary topics, namely, genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and a large iconography. This description, which was historically based on karyotypic abnormalities and in situ hybridization (fluorescence in situ hybridization) techniques, now benefits from comparative genomic hybridization and massive sequencing, uncovering a tremendous amount of genetic rearrangements. As the Atlas combines different types of information (genes, genetic abnormalities, histopathology, clinical diagnoses and external links), its content is currently unique. The Atlas is a cognitive tool for fundamental and clinical research and has developed into an encyclopaedic work. In clinical practice, it contributes to the cytogenetic diagnosis and may guide treatment decision making, particularly regarding rare diseases (because they are numerous and are frequently encountered). Readers as well as the authors of the Atlas are researchers and/or clinicians. PMID:23161685

  13. Algorithm for pre-emptive glycopeptide treatment in patients with haematologic malignancies and an Enterococcus faecium bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nowadays Enterococcus faecium has become one of the most emerging and challenging nosocomial pathogens. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors in haematology patients who are at risk of an Enterococcus faecium bloodstream infection (BSI) and should be considered for pre-emptive glycopeptide treatment. With these identified risk factors a prediction model can be developed for clinical use. Methods Retrospectively clinical and microbiological data in 33 patients with an E. faecium BSI were compared to 66 control patients during a 5-year period at the haematology ward. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore the independent risk factors and a prediction model was developed to determine the risk of an E. faecium BSI. Results E. faecium BSIs were found to be associated with high mortality rates. Independent risk factors for E. faecium BSI were colonization with E. faecium 30 days prior to blood culture (OR 5.71; CI 1.7-18.7), combination of neutropenia and abdominal focus (4.37; 1.4-13.4), age?>?58 years (4.01; 1.3-12.5), hospital stay prior to blood culture?>?14 days (3.55; 0.98-12.9) and CRP (C-reactive protein) level >125 mg/L (4.37; 1.1-10.2). Conclusion Using data from this study, risk stratification for the development of an E. faecium BSI in patients with haematological malignancies is possible. Pre-emptive treatment should be considered in those patients who are at high risk. Using a prediction model as designed in this study, antibiotic stewardship in terms of prudent use of glycopeptides can be improved and might be helpful in controlling further spread of VRE (vancomycin resistant enterococci). PMID:24025668

  14. Progress in the Discovery of Treatments for C. difficile Infection: A Clinical and Medicinal Chemistry Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Lissa S.; Owusu, Yaw B.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Sun, Dianqing

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes C. difficile infection, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in developed countries has become increasingly high due to the emergence of newer epidemic strains, a growing elderly population, extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and limited therapies for this diarrheal disease. Because treatment options currently available for C. difficile infection have some drawbacks, including cost, promotion of resistance, and selectivity problems, new agents are urgently needed to address these challenges. This review article focuses on two parts: the first part summarizes current clinical treatment strategies and agents under clinical development for C. difficile infection; the second part reviews newly reported anti-difficile agents that have been evaluated or reevaluated in the last five years and are in the early stages of drug discovery and development. Antibiotics are divided into natural product inspired and synthetic small molecule compounds that may have the potential to be more efficacious than currently approved treatments. This includes potency, selectivity, reduced cytotoxicity, and novel modes of action to prevent resistance. PMID:24236721

  15. Coordination Chemistry May Explain Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Response of Vanadyl Sulfate in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Katherine; Godzala, Michael E.; Chi, Lai-Har; Most, Mathew; Kaszynski, Peter; Crans, Debbie C.; Goldfine, Allison B.; Kostyniak, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium, abbreviated V, is an early transition metal that readily forms coordination complexes with a variety of biological products such as proteins, metabolites, membranes and other structures. The formation of coordination complexes stabilizes metal ions, which in turn impacts the biodistribution of the metal. To understand the biodistribution of V, V in oxidation state IV in the form of vanadyl sulfate (25, 50, 100 mg V daily) was given orally for 6 weeks to 16 persons with type 2 diabetes. Elemental V was determined using Graphite Furnas Atomic Absorption Spectrometry against known concentrations of V in serum, blood or urine. Peak serum V levels were 15.4±6.5, 81.7±40 and 319±268 ng/ml respectively, and mean peak serum V was positively correlated with dose administered (r=0.992, p=0.079), although large inter-individual variability was found. Total serum V concentration distribution fit a one compartment open model with a first order rate constant for excretion with mean half times of 4.7±1.6 days and 4.6±2.5 days for the 50 and 100 mg V dose groups respectively. At steady state, 24 hour urinary V output was 0.18±0.24 and 0.97±0.84 mg in the 50 and 100 mg V groups respectively, consistent with absorption of 1 percent or less of the administered dose. Peak V in blood and serum were positively correlated (r=0.971, p<0.0005). The serum to blood V ratio for the patients receiving 100 mg V was 1.7±0.45. Regression analysis showed that glycohemoglobin was a negative predictor of the natural log (ln) peak serum V (R2=0.40, p=0.009) and a positive predictor of the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp results at high insulin values (R2=0.39, p=0.010). Insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was not significantly correlated with ln peak serum V. Globulin and glycohemoglobin levels taken together were negative predictors of fasting blood glucose (R2=0.49, p=0.013). Although V accumulation in serum was dose-dependent, no correlation between total serum V concentation and the insulin-like response was found in this first attempt to correlate anti-diabetic activity with total serum V. This study suggests that V pools other than total serum V are likely related to the insulin-like effect of this metal. These results, obtained in diabetic patients, document the need for consideration of the coordination chemistry of metabolites and proteins with vanadium in anti-diabetic vanadium complexes. PMID:23982218

  16. Pediatric lupus: varied haematological picture and presentation.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Neha; Chandra, Jagdish; Dhingra, Bhavna; Singh, V

    2015-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem, autoimmune disease characterized by periods of increased disease activity caused by inflammation of blood vessels and connective tissue. Pediatric patients with SLE have a more severe clinical course when compared with adults. Patients commonly present with rash, fever, and arthritis, although the presentation may be unpredictable. Hematological findings are more predominant in children than adults. Thirty-nine percent of children with SLE will develop hematological abnormalities, one of the American Rheumatic Association criteria for classifying the disease. In our case series we found varied hematological picture and presentation. We present here four case reports of SLE cases with interesting hematological features. Our first case is a 13 month old female child who was initially diagnosed as Evans syndrome and 2 years later diagnosed as SLE. Second case is a 3 year old male child who had SLE with warm antibody AIHA. Third case is a 6 year old female child who presented with AIHA and was diagnosed with SLE 6 years later. Fourth case is a 6 year old female child diagnosed as SLE with aplastic anemia. Hematological findings should be carefully assessed and treated in order to decrease disease related morbidity. PMID:25548448

  17. Coordination chemistry may explain pharmacokinetics and clinical response of vanadyl sulfate in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Willsky, Gail R; Halvorsen, Katherine; Godzala, Michael E; Chi, Lai-Har; Most, Mathew J; Kaszynski, Peter; Crans, Debbie C; Goldfine, Allison B; Kostyniak, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Vanadium, abbreviated V, is an early transition metal that readily forms coordination complexes with a variety of biological products such as proteins, metabolites, membranes and other structures. The formation of coordination complexes stabilizes metal ions, which in turn impacts the biodistribution of the metal. To understand the biodistribution of V, V in oxidation state iv in the form of vanadyl sulfate (25, 50, 100 mg V daily) was given orally for 6 weeks to 16 persons with type 2 diabetes. Elemental V was determined using Graphite Furnas Atomic Absorption Spectrometry against known concentrations of V in serum, blood or urine. Peak serum V levels were 15.4 ± 6.5, 81.7 ± 40 and 319 ± 268 ng ml(-1) respectively, and mean peak serum V was positively correlated with dose administered (r = 0.992, p = 0.079), although large inter-individual variability was found. Total serum V concentration distribution fit a one compartment open model with a first order rate constant for excretion with mean half times of 4.7 ± 1.6 days and 4.6 ± 2.5 days for the 50 and 100 mg V dose groups respectively. At steady state, 24 hour urinary V output was 0.18 ± 0.24 and 0.97 ± 0.84 mg in the 50 and 100 mg V groups respectively, consistent with absorption of 1 percent or less of the administered dose. Peak V in blood and serum were positively correlated (r = 0.971, p < 0.0005). The serum to blood V ratio for the patients receiving 100 mg V was 1.7 ± 0.45. Regression analysis showed that glycohemoglobin was a negative predictor of the natural log(ln) peak serum V (R(2) = 0.40, p = 0.009) and a positive predictor of the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp results at high insulin values (R(2) = 0.39, p = 0.010). Insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was not significantly correlated with ln peak serum V. Globulin and glycohemoglobin levels taken together were negative predictors of fasting blood glucose (R(2) = 0.49, p = 0.013). Although V accumulation in serum was dose-dependent, no correlation between total serum V concentration and the insulin-like response was found in this first attempt to correlate anti-diabetic activity with total serum V. This study suggests that V pools other than total serum V are likely related to the insulin-like effect of this metal. These results, obtained in diabetic patients, document the need for consideration of the coordination chemistry of metabolites and proteins with vanadium in anti-diabetic vanadium complexes. PMID:23982218

  18. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry standardization project for the measurement of lipoprotein(a). Phase I. Evaluation of the analytical performance of lipoprotein(a) assay systems and commercial calibrators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jillian R. Tate; Nader Rifai; Kare Berg; Remy Couderc; Francesco Dati; Gert M. Kostner; Ikunosuke Sakurabayashi; Armin Steinmetz

    A secondary reference material for lipoprotein(a) is required to standardize the measurement of lipopro- tein(a) in clinical laboratories worldwide. Towards this aim, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry Working Group for the Standardization of Lipopro- tein(a) Assays has initiated a standardization project involving a total of 33 diagnostic company and clinical chemistry laboratories from 12 countries. In Phase 1, the

  19. Transition of care from paediatric to adult services in haematology

    PubMed Central

    Bolton?Maggs, Paula H B

    2007-01-01

    The need for adequate preparation for transition for young people with health care needs who require long term follow?up in the adult sector has long been recognised and is a required part of the national service framework for children. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the Royal College of Nursing have endorsed this need for improvement in services for adolescents. In 2006 the Department of Health launched guidelines with a wealth of recommendations. Despite these initiatives only slow progress has been made (usually by enthusiasts) and much work is needed to develop good programmes in many specialties, including non?malignant haematology. PMID:17715443

  20. Evaluation of Analytical Errors in a Clinical Chemistry Laboratory: A 3 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sakyi, AS; Laing, EF; Ephraim, RK; Asibey, OF; Sadique, OK

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proficient laboratory service is the cornerstone of modern healthcare systems and has an impact on over 70% of medical decisions on admission, discharge, and medications. In recent years, there is an increasing awareness of the importance of errors in laboratory practice and their possible negative impact on patient outcomes. Aim: We retrospectively analyzed data spanning a period of 3 years on analytical errors observed in our laboratory. The data covered errors over the whole testing cycle including pre-, intra-, and post-analytical phases and discussed strategies pertinent to our settings to minimize their occurrence. Materials and Methods: We described the occurrence of pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors observed at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital clinical biochemistry laboratory during a 3-year period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. Data were analyzed with Graph Pad Prism 5(GraphPad Software Inc. CA USA). Results: A total of 589,510 tests was performed on 188,503 outpatients and hospitalized patients. The overall error rate for the 3 years was 4.7% (27,520/58,950). Pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors contributed 3.7% (2210/58,950), 0.1% (108/58,950), and 0.9% (512/58,950), respectively. The number of tests reduced significantly over the 3-year period, but this did not correspond with a reduction in the overall error rate (P = 0.90) along with the years. Conclusion: Analytical errors are embedded within our total process setup especially pre-analytical and post-analytical phases. Strategic measures including quality assessment programs for staff involved in pre-analytical processes should be intensified. PMID:25745569

  1. CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

  2. Application of sigma metrics for the assessment of quality control in clinical chemistry laboratory in Ghana: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Afrifa, Justice; Gyekye, Seth A.; Owiredu, William K. B. A.; Ephraim, Richard K. D.; Essien-Baidoo, Samuel; Amoah, Samuel; Simpong, David L.; Arthur, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sigma metrics provide a uniquely defined scale with which we can assess the performance of a laboratory. The objective of this study was to assess the internal quality control (QC) in the clinical chemistry laboratory of the University of Cape Cost Hospital (UCC) using the six sigma metrics application. Materials and Methods: We used commercial control serum [normal (L1) and pathological (L2)] for validation of quality control. Metabolites (glucose, urea, and creatinine), lipids [triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)], enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (AST)], electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) and total protein were assessed. Between-day imprecision (CVs), inaccuracy (Bias) and sigma values were calculated for each control level. Results: Apart from sodium (2.40%, 3.83%), chloride (2.52% and 2.51%) for both L1 and L2 respectively, and glucose (4.82%), cholesterol (4.86%) for L2, CVs for all other parameters (both L1 and L2) were >5%. Four parameters (HDL-C, urea, creatinine and potassium) achieved sigma levels >1 for both controls. Chloride and sodium achieved sigma levels >1 for L1 but <1 for L2. In contrast, cholesterol, total protein and AST achieved sigma levels <1 for L1 but >1 for L2. Glucose and ALP achieved a sigma level >1 for both control levels whereas TG achieved a sigma level >2 for both control levels. Conclusion: Unsatisfactory sigma levels (<3) where achieved for all parameters using both control levels, this shows instability and low consistency of results. There is the need for detailed assessment of the analytical procedures and the strengthening of the laboratory control systems in order to achieve effective six sigma levels for the laboratory. PMID:25657495

  3. Evaluation of the BD Vacutainer® RST blood collection tube for routine chemistry analytes: clinical significance of differences and stability study

    PubMed Central

    Kocijancic, Marija; Cargonja, Jelena; Delic-Knezevic, Alma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Preanalytical variables account for most of laboratory errors. There is a wide range of factors that affect the reliability of laboratory report. Most convenient sample type for routine laboratory analysis is serum. BD Vacutainer® Rapid Serum Tube (RST) (Becton, Dickinson and Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) blood collection tube provides rapid clotting time allowing fast serum separation. Our aim was to evaluate the comparability of routine chemistry parameters in BD Vacutainer® RST blood collection tube in reference with the BD Vacutainer® Serum Separating Tubes II Advance Tube (SST) (Becton, Dickinson and Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA). Materials and methods: Blood specimens were collected from 90 participants for evaluation on its results, clotting time and stability study of six routine biochemistry parameters: glucose (Glu), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), calcium (Ca), lactate dehidrogenase (LD) and potassium (K) measured with Olympus AU2700 analyzer (Beckman Coulter, Tokyo, Japan). The significance of the differences between samples was assessed by paired t-test or Wilcoxon Matched-Pairs Rank test after checking for normality. Results: Clotting process was significantly shorter in the RSTs compared to SSTs (2.49 min vs. 19.47 min, respectively; P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference between the RST and SST II tubes for glucose, calcium and LD (P < 0.001). Differences for glucose and LD were also clinically significant. Analyte stability studies showed that all analytes were stable for 24 h at 4 °C. Conclusions: Most results (except LD and glucose) from RST are comparable with those from SST. In addition, RST tube provides shorter clotting time. PMID:25351355

  4. Biosensors in clinical chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul D'Orazio

    2003-01-01

    Biosensors are analytical devices composed of a recognition element of biological origin and a physico-chemical transducer. The biological element is capable of sensing the presence, activity or concentration of a chemical analyte in solution. The sensing takes place either as a binding event or a biocatalytical event. These interactions produce a measurable change in a solution property, which the transducer

  5. Haematological changes associated with miliary tuberculosis of the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Lombard, E H; Mansvelt, E P

    1993-04-01

    The peripheral blood and bone marrow findings in 25 patients found to have tuberculous granulomata on bone marrow examination were examined to determine whether specific haematological findings are associated with tuberculous infiltration of the bone marrow. All the patients had one abnormality or more on their full blood count. The presence of a peripheral lymphopaenia was the single factor common to all 25 patients studied. The peripheral lymphopaenia was only associated with bone marrow lymphopaenia in 14% of patients. Other findings of note were an association of peripheral monocytopaenia and absence of giant cells in the granulomata, and decreased iron stores in almost a third of the total number of patients. The relevance of the lymphopaenia, monocytopaenia and decreased iron stores are discussed and we propose that the absence of a peripheral lymphopaenia makes it very unlikely that there will be tuberculous localization in the bone marrow. PMID:8324206

  6. Chemistry 321 Organic Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Diane

    Chemistry 321 Organic Chemistry Fall 2010 MWF 1:00-2:00 Reichardt Bldg 202 Instructor: Thomas Dept.) Office Hours: By appointment Required Materials: Organic Chemistry 7th Ed., J. McMurry, Brooks/Cole OWL card RF classroom clicker Recommended: Study Guide & Solutions Manual for Org Chemistry HGS

  7. CHEMISTRY 11500 General Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    CHEMISTRY 11500 General Chemistry Spring 2014 Professor Dr. John J. Nash; BRWN 4103C; phone: 494.edu (Lab) Required Course Materials Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6th Ed., by M. S. Silberberg, McGraw-Hill, 2012. Chemistry 11500 Laboratory Manual, 2013-2014, Hayden-McNeil Publishing, Inc

  8. Haematology and red cell enzymes of the Australian orange-bellied parrot, Neophema chrysogaster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. D. Melrose; P. B. Brown; M. C. Holdsworth; S. L. Bryant

    1995-01-01

    The haematology, red cell enzymes, and haemoglobin electrophoresis of twelve captive bred Australian orange-bellied parrots (Neophema chrysogaster) were studied. The means of the haematological parameters were: haemoglobin 15.3 g\\/dl, PCV 54%, red cell count 3.4 × 1012\\/l, MCV 138.0 fl, MCH 44.7 pg, leucocyte count 7.2 × 109\\/l, heterophils 61%, lymphocytes 24%, monocytes 6.3%, eosinophils 0.7% and basophils 6.8%. The

  9. An Audit of Clinic Consultation Times in a Cancer Centre: Implications for National Manpower Planning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Benson; N. G. Burnet; M. V. Williams; L. T. Tan

    2001-01-01

    A departmental audit was conducted to assess the frequency, extent and causes of late completion of oncology clinics. Data were collected prospectively from clinical, medical, haematological and multidisciplinary oncology clinics. The data recorded included: clinic start and finish times, number of patients seen, type of consultation, number of doctors in each clinic, time spent by the doctor with the patient,

  10. Haematological evaluation of patients bitten by the jararaca, Bothrops jararaca, in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Marcelo L; Sano-Martins, Ida S; Fan, Hui W; Cardoso, João L C; Theakston, R David G; Warrell, David A

    2008-06-15

    Complete blood counts are used frequently by physicians to assess and manage the development of complications of diseases. We studied 100 patients bitten by Bothrops jararaca snakes, and correlated their haematological values with the severity of envenoming and the development of complications. Patients who developed both local and systemic bleeding showed a greater drop in packed cell volume, red blood cell (RBC) count and haemoglobin concentration than those with who did not bleed. No morphological changes in RBCs were seen in blood films. Total white blood cell (WBC) counts were significantly higher in the clinically "more severe" group than in the "less severe" group on admission. Neutrophilic leucocytosis with left shift was present on admission, concurrently with a decrease in eosinophil and lymphocyte counts. These changes tend to become more marked 6h after antivenom therapy, and are greatest in "more severe" envenoming. Thrombocytopenia on admission is positively associated with the development of systemic bleeding and the severity of envenoming. Thrombocytopenia may also be a useful prognostic indicator for the development of local complications, such as necrosis. The intensity of neutrophilia and eosinopenia might be used to follow the progression of necrosis in victims of snake bite. PMID:18471839

  11. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science

    E-print Network

    Levine, Alex J.

    ..............................................................................................................................................................11 Physical Chemistry ConcentrationDepartment of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science ...........................................................................................................................................4 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office

  12. Comparison of some haematological parameters between three bird Comparison of some haematological parameters between three bird species from the species from the Columbidae Columbidae family - family - short communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lubomir Lashev; Huben Hubenov; Yordan Nikolov; Valentina Lasheva; Radoslav Mihailov

    Investigations into some haematological values in birds from three Columbidae species e.g. pigeons, (Columba livia domestica), collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto) and African collared doves, (Streptopelia roseogrisea) have been performed. In all three species, high haemoglobin concentrations, and respectively high red blood cell counts were observed. In S. decaocto the red blood cell count was extremely high, corresponding to the high

  13. Peromyscus leucopus mice: a potential animal model for haematological studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Ueda, Yasutaka; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Chen, Jichun; Young, Neal S

    2014-10-01

    Peromyscus leucopus mice share physical similarities with laboratory mice Mus musculus (MM) but have higher agility and longer lifespan. We compared domesticated P. leucopus linville (PLL) and M. musculus C57BL/6 (MMB6) mice for cellular composition of peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM) and spleen. PLL mice had significantly fewer platelets and significantly more monocytes in the blood, and notably fewer megakaryocytes in the BM. Spleens of PLL mice were significantly smaller, with 50% fewer cells and reduced 'red pulp'. There was no obvious haematological change in PLL mice between 2-8 and 16-26 months of age, except for a significant increase in blood monocytes. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content showed no change with age but differed significantly between different cell types. Treating two to eight month-old PLL mice with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine in drinking water for three months did not affect cellular ROS content, but increased blood leucocytes especially the concentration of monocytes. The low platelets, low megakaryocytes, high monocytes and low splenic erythropoiesis in PLL mice resemble human measurements better than the values seen in MMB6. PMID:25116892

  14. Haematological and biochemical profile of growing Yankasa rams fed sorghum stover supplemented with graded levels of dried poultry droppings based diets.

    PubMed

    Bello, Abdul Waheed Adeyemi; Tsado, Daniel Nma

    2013-12-15

    This study was designed to determine the haematological and biochemical profiles of growing Yankasa rams fed sorghum stover supplemented with Sun-Dried Poultry Droppings diets (SDPD). Poultry dropping is a good source of protein supplement. Its high nitrogen content suggests feeding it to ruminant would be an excellent avenue to convert nutrients in the waste into animal products. But a major challenge for it utilization is the danger of pathogenic organisms. Sun-drying of the droppings can render the waste free of pathogens. Thirty growing Yankasa rams aged 9-12 months, weighing 11.5-15.5 kg were randomly divided into five groups (3 in each) and assigned to five experimental diets T1-T5 which contained 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% SDPD. Blood samples were analyzed for haematological and biochemical parameters. Results showed that White Blood Cell (WBC), Haemoglobin (Hb) and Packed Cell Volume (PCV) were significantly influenced by Dried Poultry Droppings based diets (DPD). Their values were WBC, 10.6, 12.9, 9.5, 7.0 and 10.7 L(-1), Hb, 8.6, 9.3, 8.6, 8.4 and 9.7 g dL(-1) and PCV, 22.9, 29.4, 27.1, 23.6 and 21.5%, respectively. Additionally, urea, sodium and total protein were significantly influenced by treatment diet. Their values were urea, 6.1, 6.3, 6.8, 6.9 and 8.1 mg dL(-1), sodium, 102.9, 128.8, 129.2, 130.7 and 130.7 mmol L(-1). total protein, 6.3, 6.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 7.1 g dL(-1). Most haematological and biochemical values obtained were within the normal range for sheep. SDPS diet can satisfactorily supplement sorghum stover without any deleterious effect on the blood chemistry and haematological profile of growing Yankasa rams. PMID:24517007

  15. Basic haematological values in carnivores--II. The Felidae.

    PubMed

    Pospísil, J; Kase, F; Váhala, J

    1987-01-01

    1. Basic haematological values in 34 animals of eight carnivorous species are reported. 2. In four Northern lynxs (Lynx lynx lynx), two male and two female animals, the mean values are given: erythrocyte counts 8.51 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.392/l, haemoglobin content 148.0 g/l and leukocyte count 7.92 X 10(9)/l. 3. In six male pumas (Puma concolor missolensis) the mean values estimated are: erythrocyte count 9.35 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.43/l, haemoglobin content 163.9 g/l and leukocyte count 7.73 X 10(9)/l. Individual values in one female puma are also given. 4. In six jaguars (Panthera onca), three male and three female animals, the mean values are given: erythrocyte count 8.27 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.37/l, haemoglobin content 137.1 g/l and leukocyte count 15.15 X 10(9)/l. 5. Only individual values are reported in one clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), in one leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor), in one Corbett's tiger (Panthera tigris Corbetti) and in one Altaic tiger (Panthera tigris Altaica). 6. In four lions (Panthera leo leo), two male and two female animals, the mean estimated values are: erythrocyte count 10.14 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.462/l, haemoglobin content 159.0 g/l and leukocyte count 11.05 X 10(9)/l. In six female cheetahs (Acinonox jubatus jubatus) the mean values estimated are: erythrocyte count 7.86 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.373/l, haemoglobin content 142.8 g/l and leukocyte count 8.65 X 10(9)/l. For three male cheetahs only individual values are reported. 8. All results achieved are compared with those abstracted from the literature and discussed. PMID:2886279

  16. Haematological and Biochemical Values or the Blood and Blood Serum of Captive Northern White Rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum cottoni)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Váhala; V. Kaše; O. A. Ryder

    1994-01-01

    Va h a I a 1., F. K d e and O. A. R Y d e r: Haematological and Biochemical Values of the Blood and Blood Serum of Captive Northern White Rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum cottoni). Acta vet. Brno, 63,1994: 99-102. Haematological and biochemical blood and blood serum values obtained from 7 northern white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) kept in

  17. Support vector machine versus logistic regression modeling for prediction of hospital mortality in critically ill patients with haematological malignancies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Verplancke; S Van Looy; D Benoit; S Vansteelandt; P Depuydt; F De Turck; J Decruyenaere

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several models for mortality prediction have been constructed for critically ill patients with haematological malignancies in recent years. These models have proven to be equally or more accurate in predicting hospital mortality in patients with haematological malignancies than ICU severity of illness scores such as the APACHE II or SAPS II 1. The objective of this study is to

  18. The prevention and management of infections due to multidrug resistant organisms in haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, Jason A; Worth, Leon J; Thursky, Karin A; Slavin, Monica A

    2015-02-01

    Infections due to resistant and multidrug resistant (MDR) organisms in haematology patients and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients are an increasingly complex problem of global concern. We outline the burden of illness and epidemiology of resistant organisms such as gram-negative pathogens, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), and Clostridium difficile in haematology cohorts. Intervention strategies aimed at reducing the impact of these organisms are reviewed: infection prevention programmes, screening and fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. The role of newer therapies (e.g. linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline) for treatment of resistant and MDR organisms in haematology populations is evaluated, in addition to the mobilization of older agents (e.g. colistin, pristinamycin and fosfomycin) and the potential benefit of combination regimens. PMID:24341410

  19. Variation in haematological parameters in children less than five years of age with asymptomatic Plasmodium infection: implication for malaria field studies

    PubMed Central

    Gansane, Adama; Ouedraogo, Issa Nebie; Henry, Noelie Bere; Soulama, Issiaka; Ouedraogo, Esperance; Yaro, Jean-Baptiste; Diarra, Amidou; Benjamin, Sombie; Konate, Amadou Tidiani; Tiono, Alfred; Sirima, Sodiomon Bienvenu

    2013-01-01

    During the season of high malaria transmission, most children are infected by Plasmodium, which targets red blood cells (RBCs), affecting haematological parameters. To describe these variations, we examined the haematological profiles of two groups of children living in a malaria-endemic area. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the peak of the malaria transmission season in a rural area of Burkina Faso. After informed consent and clinical examination, blood samples were obtained from the participants for malaria diagnosis and a full blood count. Of the 414 children included in the analysis, 192 were not infected with Plasmodium, whereas 222 were asymptomatic carriers of Plasmodium infection. The mean age of the infected children was 41.8 months (range of 26.4-57.2) compared to 38.8 months (range of 22.4-55.2) for the control group (p = 0.06). The asymptomatic infected children tended to have a significantly lower mean haemoglobin level (10.8 g/dL vs. 10.4 g/dL; p < 0.001), mean lymphocyte count (4592/µL vs. 5141/µL; p = 0.004), mean platelet count (266 x 103/µL vs. 385 x 103/µL; p < 0.001) and mean RBC count (4.388 x 106/µL vs. 4.158 x 106/µL; p < 0.001) and a higher mean monocyte count (1403/µL vs. 1192/µL; p < 0.001) compared to the control group. Special attention should be applied when interpreting haematological parameters and evaluating immune responses in asymptomatic infected children living in malaria-endemic areas and enrolled in vaccine trials. PMID:23903982

  20. Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia (DC.) Hell., Echinacea pallida (Nutt.) Nutt.,Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench): a review of their chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Joanne; Anderson, Linda A; Gibbons, Simon; Phillipson, J David

    2005-08-01

    This paper reviews the chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties of Echinacea species used medicinally. The Echinacea species Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida and Echinacea purpurea have a long history of medicinal use for a variety of conditions, particularly infections, and today echinacea products are among the best-selling herbal preparations in several developed countries. Modern interest in echinacea is focused on its immunomodulatory effects, particularly in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. The chemistry of Echinacea species is well documented, and several groups of constituents, including alkamides and caffeic acid derivatives, are considered important for activity. There are, however, differences in the constituent profile of the three species. Commercial echinacea samples and marketed echinacea products may contain one or more of the three species, and analysis of samples of raw material and products has shown that some do not meet recognized standards for pharmaceutical quality. Evidence from preclinical studies supports some of the traditional and modern uses for echinacea, particularly the reputed immunostimulant (or immunomodulatory) properties. Several, but not all, clinical trials of echinacea preparations have reported effects superior to those of placebo in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. However, evidence of efficacy is not definitive as studies have included different patient groups and tested various different preparations and dosage regimens of echinacea. On the basis of the available limited safety data, echinacea appears to be well tolerated. However, further investigation and surveillance are required to establish the safety profiles of different echinacea preparations. Safety issues include the possibility of allergic reactions, the use of echinacea by patients with autoimmune diseases and the potential for echinacea preparations to interact with conventional medicines. PMID:16102249

  1. Chemistry Symposium April 27, 2013

    E-print Network

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Chemistry Symposium April 27, 2013 Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Centre Khushalani Materials chemistry of oxides: formation and function 11.20-11.40 R. Chandrasekar Light cocrystal: From chemistry to pre-clinical 12.00 -12.20 A. Sri Rama Koti Mechanical stability of proteins

  2. 21 CFR 862.2310 - Clinical sample concentrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2310 Clinical sample concentrator. (a) Identification. A clinical sample...

  3. 21 CFR 862.2310 - Clinical sample concentrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2310 Clinical sample concentrator. (a) Identification. A clinical sample...

  4. 21 CFR 862.2310 - Clinical sample concentrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2310 Clinical sample concentrator. (a) Identification. A clinical sample...

  5. Haematological and serum biochemical responses of chickens to hydric stress.

    PubMed

    Chikumba, N; Swatson, H; Chimonyo, M

    2013-09-01

    Dehydration can be extremely damaging to the performance and welfare of indigenous chickens. The effect of water restriction on haematological and biochemical parameters was compared in Naked Neck (NNK) and Ovambo (OVB) chickens. A total of 54 8-week-old pullets each of NNK and OVB chickens with an initial average weight of 641 ± 10 g/bird were randomly assigned to three water intake treatments with three replications, each having six birds. The water restriction treatments were ad libitum, 70% and 40% of ad libitum intake. Nine experimental pens with a floor space of 3.3 m2 per strain were used. Feed was provided ad libitum. Packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte count (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and total leucocyte count (WBC), and biochemical parameters (uric acid (UA)), creatinine (CREAT), total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), globulin (GLOB), triglyceride (TGA), total cholesterol (TC), high- (HDLC) and low- (LDLC) density lipoprotein cholesterol and activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate transaminase (AST) were determined from blood collected after 60 days of water restriction. PCV was higher (P < 0.05) in NNK than OVB chickens offered water ad libitum, but similar in birds offered 70% and 40% of ad libitum. There were no differences in RBC and MCV values between strains, but MCV was higher in birds on 40% than 70% of ad libitum water intake, irrespective of strain. Naked neck chickens had higher (P < 0.05) WBC values than OVB at 40% restriction level, but lower WBC than OVB at 70% water restriction level. UA, CREAT, TGA, TC, LDLC, TP and GLOB increased (P < 0.05) with each increment in water restriction, but the increase in CREAT and TC was more pronounced in OVB than NNK chickens. The opposite was observed for UA. ALT activity indicated that liver function was not affected by water restriction. It was concluded that the two strains can withstand up to 40% of ad libitum water restriction, but NNK tolerated water stress better than OVB chickens. PMID:23764254

  6. Chemistry 417 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Chemistry 417 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY Fall, 2008 Lecture: 13:00 Tuesday and Thursday 331 Senning tba 174 Klamath Required Texts: Chemistry 417: Physical Chemistry Laboratory - University.b.: This text is also used in Chemistry 429 Applied Mathematics for Physical Chemistry by James R. Barrante

  7. Predictors of sudden death and death from pump failure in congestive heart failure are different. Analysis of 24 h Holter monitoring, clinical variables, blood chemistry, exercise test and radionuclide angiography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bente Kühn Madsen; Verner Rasmussen; Jørgen Fischer Hansen

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and ninety consecutive patients discharged with congestive heart failure were examined with clinical evaluation, blood chemistry, 24 h Holter monitoring, exercise test and radionuclide angiography. Median left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.30, 46% were in New York Heart Association class II and 44% in III. Total mortality after 1 year was 21%, after 2 years 32%. Of 60

  8. History of NIST's contributions to development of standard reference materials and reference and definitive methods for clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R; Bowers, G N; Melville, R S

    1995-09-01

    The issuance of cholesterol as a Standard Reference Material (SRM) in 1967 started the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST; then named the National Bureau of Standards) on a major effort to help clinical laboratories establish and improve the quality of measurements they make. NIST now issues three kinds of SRMs for that purpose: analyte samples of certified purity as primary standards, serum samples having certified analyte concentrations as accuracy controls, and materials certified for calibrating instruments. In working with clinical laboratory scientists to establish Reference Methods (RMs) for measuring the analytes, NIST developed Definitive Methods (DMs) to use for evaluating RM accuracy and then used the DMs for assigning analyte values to its SRMs. The development of SRMs and DMs is discussed. PMID:7656442

  9. Haematological evaluation of patients bitten by the jararaca, Bothrops jararaca, in Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcelo L. Santoro; Ida S. Sano-Martins; Hui W. Fan; João L. C. Cardoso; R. David G. Theakston; David A. Warrell

    2008-01-01

    Complete blood counts are used frequently by physicians to assess and manage the development of complications of diseases. We studied 100 patients bitten by Bothrops jararaca snakes, and correlated their haematological values with the severity of envenoming and the development of complications. Patients who developed both local and systemic bleeding showed a greater drop in packed cell volume, red blood

  10. STUDY OF EFFECTS ON HAEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF RABBITS INTRATRACHEALLY EXPOSED TO COAL FLY ASH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. O. Ogugbuaja; P. A. Onyeyili; E. A. Moses

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the inorganic constituents of coal on the haematological parameters of rabbits. Coal obtained from mines in Enugu, Nigeria was ashed at temperature of 900°C and the ash was fractionated to obtain a size range of 4–5 ?m mean particle diameter. Rabbits were exposed to 50, 100 and 200 mg per kilogram

  11. Haematological response of curimbas Prochilodus lineatus, naturally infected with Neoechinorhynchus curemai.

    PubMed

    Belo, M A A; Souza, D G F; Faria, V P; Prado, E J R; Moraes, F R; Onaka, E M

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the haematological response of curimbas Prochilodus lineatus, naturally infected with Neoechinorhynchus curemai (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae). Thirty-seven fish were captured in October 2010 from the Mogi Guaçu River, Porto Ferreira, SP, Brazil. Infected fish presented increased mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, and lower thrombocyte and higher monocyte counts than uninfected fish. PMID:23557315

  12. Evaluation of the Sysmex pocH-1001 haematology analyser in an outdoor oncology service.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, I; Vanden Bempt, I; Malfait, R; Van Den Bossche, J

    2010-01-01

    Since rapid blood count analysis as near patient testing is expanding, we evaluated the use of a Sysmex pocH-100i compact haematology analyser in an outdoor oncology setting according to the recently published International Council for Standardization in Haematology (ICSH) guidelines. In total, 838 blood samples from oncology patients were analysed by pocH-100i and re-analysed by a high-throughput haematology analyser for comparison (Abbott CD-4000 or Sysmex XE-2100) to evaluate in use imprecision, comparability and vote-outs. Imprecision was less than 5%, except for platelet enumeration in the low range (within-run imprecision 7%). Good comparability was found even for platelet enumeration in the low range (r2 = 0.82). Vote-outs were found in 10.6% of examined samples. In conclusion, the Sysmex pocH-100i demonstrates good imprecision conform with former publications, produces reliable results in normal and in lower ranges comparable to the results of high throughput haematology analysers. In a well controlled management plan the Sysmex pocH-100i is suitable for near patient testing in oncology. PMID:20954464

  13. Variation in survival of adult patients with haematological malignancies in Europe since 1978

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Carli; J. W. W. Coebergh; A. Verdecchia

    1998-01-01

    Data on 73070 patients for seven major haematological malignancies diagnosed in Europe between 1985 and 1989 from 39 population-based cancer registries in 17 countries are included in the EUROCARE database. Relative survival was analysed by country and age between 1985 and 1989 and time trends were analysed from 1978–1989 for 13 countries which collaborated in EUROCARE for this entire period.

  14. Studies on an ascitic syndrome in young broilers 1. haematology and pathology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Maxwell; G. W. Robertson; S. Spence

    1986-01-01

    In the present investigation, the haematology and pathology of young broiler chicks with an ascitic syndrome were examined.Gross changes included cardiomegaly, ascites, congested lungs, shrunken livers, enlarged kidneys, dark breast muscle and congested intestines. Many blood parameters were significantly raised including the packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb), red (Rbc) and white blood cell (Wbc) counts. The heterophils and monocytes

  15. Haematological factors associated with proliferative retinopathy in homozygous sickle cell disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Hayes; P. I. Condon; G. R. Serjeant

    1981-01-01

    Haematological indices were investigated in 261 patients with homozygous sickle cell disease, 29 of whom had developed proliferative sickle retinopathy (PSR). After allowing for age-related effects, male patients with high Hb (> 9 g\\/dl) and low HbF (< 5%) levels appeared to constitute a high risk group for PSR. This relationship was not evident in females, PSR being observed in

  16. Itraconazole for prophylaxis of systemic mycoses in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bonnie; G. Just-Nübling; L. Bergmann; P. M. Shah; W. Stille; D. Hoelzer

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of oral itraconazole 2 x 200 mg capsules daily for prevention of systemic mycoses was investigated in granulocytopenic patients with haematological malignancies. Of 241 patients, 197 were evaluable for prophylactic efficacy, and 214 for adverse events. Patients with similar characteristics receiving oral amphotencin B as antifungal prophylaxis, observed over 15 months before introduction of itraconazole, served as control

  17. Prevention of doxorubicin-induced myocardial and haematological toxicities in rats by the iron chelator desferrioxamine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. AI-Harbil; Naji M. Al-Gharably; Othman A. AI-Shabanahl; Abdullah M. Al-Bekairi; Abdel Moneim M. Osman; Hassan N. Tawfik

    1992-01-01

    Biochemical and histopathological evaluations of the protective effects of the iron-chelator desferrioxamine against the cardiac and haematological toxicities of doxorubicin in normal rats were carried out. A single dose of doxorubicin (15 mg\\/kg, i. v.) caused myocardial damage that manifested biochemically as an elevation of serum cardiac enzyme [glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK)] and

  18. Haematological and biochemical reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Establishment of haematological and biochemical reference intervals is important to assess health of animals on individual and population level. Reference intervals for 13 haematological and 34 biochemical variables were established based on 88 apparently healthy free-ranging brown bears (39 males and 49 females) in Sweden. The animals were chemically immobilised by darting from a helicopter with a combination of medetomidine, tiletamine and zolazepam in April and May 2006–2012 in the county of Dalarna, Sweden. Venous blood samples were collected during anaesthesia for radio collaring and marking for ecological studies. For each of the variables, the reference interval was described based on the 95% confidence interval, and differences due to host characteristics sex and age were included if detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears in Sweden. Results The following variables were not affected by host characteristics: red blood cell, white blood cell, monocyte and platelet count, alanine transaminase, amylase, bilirubin, free fatty acids, glucose, calcium, chloride, potassium, and cortisol. Age differences were seen for the majority of the haematological variables, whereas sex influenced only mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, aspartate aminotransferase, lipase, lactate dehydrogenase, ?-globulin, bile acids, triglycerides and sodium. Conclusions The biochemical and haematological reference intervals provided and the differences due to host factors age and gender can be useful for evaluation of health status in free-ranging European brown bears. PMID:25139149

  19. Introduction to the updated Australian and New Zealand consensus guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in the haematology/oncology setting, 2014.

    PubMed

    Slavin, M A; Thursky, K A; Worth, L J; Chang, C C; Morrissey, C O; Blyth, C C; Chen, S C; Szer, J

    2014-12-01

    This article introduces the second revision of the Australian and?New?Zealand consensus guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in the haematology/oncology setting. The current update occurs within the context of a growing population at risk of invasive fungal disease, improved understanding of risk factors, availability of new diagnostic tests, a much-expanded evidence base and changing clinical paradigms. Here, we provide an overview of the history and purpose of the guidelines, including changes in scope since the last clinical update was published in 2008. The process for development, and for enabling review of draft recommendations by end-users and other relevant stakeholders, is described. The approach to assigning levels of evidence and grades of recommendation is also provided, along with a comparison to international grading systems. PMID:25482739

  20. Overview of psittacine blood analysis and comparative retrospective study of clinical diagnosis, hematology and blood chemistry in selected psittacine species.

    PubMed

    Capitelli, Raffaella; Crosta, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Part 1 presents a comprehensive overview of the differences between mammals on sampling methods, processing, testing, and interpretation of data, with special attention to the meaning of pathologic and normal, and the differences among species and diseases. Part 2 critically analyzes 150 different hematologic and biochemical profiles obtained over 5 years from 150 psittacine birds belonging to 29 different species, brought to our clinic and/or examined in other locations, with confirmed or strongly suspected diseases. The results are grouped according to the various pathologies observed with respect to species and the degree of variation from the reference range of each species. PMID:23347540

  1. Prediction of the hematocrit of dried blood spots via potassium measurement on a routine clinical chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Capiau, Sara; Stove, Veronique V; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2013-01-01

    The potential of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling as an alternative for classical venous sampling is increasingly recognized, with multiple applications in, e.g., therapeutic drug monitoring and toxicology. Although DBS sampling has many advantages, it is associated with several issues, the hematocrit (Hct) issue being the most widely discussed challenge, given its possible strong impact on DBS-based quantitation. Hitherto, no approaches allow Hct prediction from nonvolumetrically applied DBS. Following a simple and rapid extraction protocol, K(+) levels from 3 mm DBS punches were measured via indirect potentiometry, using the Roche Cobas 8000 routine chemistry analyzer. The extracts' K(+) concentrations were used to calculate the approximate Hct of the blood used to generate DBS. A linear calibration line was established, with a Hct range of 0.19 to 0.63 (lower limit of quantification, LLOQ, to upper limit of quantification, ULOQ). The procedure was fully validated; the bias and imprecision of quality controls (QCs) at three Hct levels and at the LLOQ and ULOQ was less than 5 and 12%, respectively. In addition, the influence of storage (pre- and postextraction), volume spotted, and punch homogeneity was evaluated. Application on DBS from patient samples (n = 111), followed by Bland and Altman, Passing and Bablok, and Deming regression analysis, demonstrated a good correlation between the "predicted Hct" and the "actual Hct". After correcting for the observed bias, limits of agreement of ±0.049 were established. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated assay reproducibility. In conclusion, potassium levels in extracts from 3 mm DBS punches can be used to get a good prediction of the Hct, one of the most important "unknowns" in DBS analysis. PMID:23190205

  2. A chronic oral exposure of pigs with deoxynivalenol partially prevents the acute effects of lipopolysaccharides on hepatic histopathology and blood clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Cassandra; Reinhardt, Nicole; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Nossol, Constanze; Kahlert, Stefan; Panther, Patricia; Kluess, Jeannette; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kuester, Doerthe; Brosig, Bianca; Kersten, Susanne; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-12-17

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a cell wall component of gram-negative bacteria, and deoxynivalenol (DON), a prevalent Fusarium-derived contaminant of cereal grains, are each reported to have detrimental effects on the liver. A potentiating toxic effect of the combined exposure was reported previously in a mouse model and hepatocytes in vitro, but not in swine as the most DON-susceptible species. Thus, pigs were fed either a control diet (CON) or a Fusarium contaminated diet (DON, 3.1mg DON/kg diet) for 37 days. At day 37 control pigs were infused for 1h either with physiological saline (CON_CON), 100?g/kg BW DON (CON_DON), 7.5?g/kg BW LPS (CON_LPS), or both toxins (CON_DON/LPS) and Fusarium-pigs with saline (DON_CON) or 7.5?g/kg BW LPS (DON_LPS). Blood samples were taken before and after infusion (-30, +30, +60, +120, and +180min) for clinical blood chemistry. Pigs were sacrificed at +195min and liver histopathology was performed. LPS resulted in higher relative liver weight (p<0.05), portal, periportal and acinar inflammation (p<0.05), haemorrhage (p<0.01) and pathological bilirubin levels (CON_CON 1.0?mol/L vs. CON_LPS 5.4?mol/L, CON_DON/LPS 8.3?mol/L; p<0.001). DON feeding alleviated effects of LPS infusion on histopathology and blood chemistry to control levels, whereas DON infusion alone had no impact. PMID:23123154

  3. The immunopathology of siliconosis. History, clinical presentation, and relation to silicosis and the chemistry of silicon and silicone.

    PubMed

    Shanklin, D R; Smalley, D L

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence confirms the fundamental involvement of the human immune system in the reaction to implantation of silicone-based medical devices. An as yet-to-be particularized epitope of many complex substances sharing siloxane structures is presented through the MHC-II apparatus with development and retention of T cell memory. This memory can be tested for in practical terms using one or more forms of silica, which links the immuno-histopathology and autoimmune attributes of "silicosis" with those of "siliconosis." The lesions of siliconosis are typical of those for persistent antigens and delayed, cell mediated hypersensitivity. The basic descriptive pathology of the reaction to silicone has been known since soon after introduction of silicones in medical procedures, with the exception of some details related to the more recent discoveries on the role of cytokines in the immunopathic process. The clinical consequences of siliconosis are common and can be severe in some individuals implanted with silicone devices. PMID:9951648

  4. Chemistry 675 Advanced Organic Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Robert

    Fall 2014 Chemistry 675 Advanced Organic Chemistry MWF 10:35-11:30 AM 200 LSB Professor John D Description: CHE675 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course focused on physical organic chemistry, which in my office (CST 4-006) or my mailbox in the chemistry office (CST 1-014). Late problem sets will have

  5. Bachelor of Science Clinical Laboratory Science

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    -- Professional Year 1 CLS 3020 Hematology Lecture/Lab: 4 cr. CLS 3280 Clinical Chemistry Lecture/Lab: 4 cr. CLS Program Total Credits: 63 CLS 4000 Clinical Hematology: 5 cr. CLS 4010 Clinical Chemistry: 3 cr. CLS 4020

  6. A Chemical Proteomics Approach for the Search of Pharmacological Targets of the Antimalarial Clinical Candidate Albitiazolium in Plasmodium falciparum Using Photocrosslinking and Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Penarete-Vargas, Diana Marcela; Boisson, Anaïs; Urbach, Serge; Chantelauze, Hervé; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Fraisse, Laurent; Vial, Henri J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for severe malaria which is one of the most prevalent and deadly infectious diseases in the world. The antimalarial therapeutic arsenal is hampered by the onset of resistance to all known pharmacological classes of compounds, so new drugs with novel mechanisms of action are critically needed. Albitiazolium is a clinical antimalarial candidate from a series of choline analogs designed to inhibit plasmodial phospholipid metabolism. Here we developed an original chemical proteomic approach to identify parasite proteins targeted by albitiazolium during their native interaction in living parasites. We designed a bifunctional albitiazolium-derived compound (photoactivable and clickable) to covalently crosslink drug–interacting parasite proteins in situ followed by their isolation via click chemistry reactions. Mass spectrometry analysis of drug–interacting proteins and subsequent clustering on gene ontology terms revealed parasite proteins involved in lipid metabolic activities and, interestingly, also in lipid binding, transport, and vesicular transport functions. In accordance with this, the albitiazolium-derivative was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and trans-Golgi network of P. falciparum. Importantly, during competitive assays with albitiazolium, the binding of choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase (the enzyme involved in the last step of phosphatidylcholine synthesis) was substantially displaced, thus confirming the efficiency of this strategy for searching albitiazolium targets. PMID:25470252

  7. Glyburide: a second-generation sulfonylurea hypoglycemic agent. History, chemistry, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, clinical use and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Feldman, J M

    1985-01-01

    Glyburide, a second-generation hypoglycemic sulfonylurea, is 200 times as potent as tolbutamide. This increase is due to greater intrinsic hypoglycemic potency of the molecule rather than to a prolonged biologic half-life. Glyburide is inactivated by the liver to 4-trans-hydroxyglyburide and 3-cis-hydroxyglyburide; 50% of these compounds is excreted in the urine and 50% in the bile. Although the serum concentration of glyburide can be measured by radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography, the importance of its serum concentration in the reduction of hyperglycemia is not yet established. Glyburide has a therapeutic effectiveness comparable to that of the first-generation sulfonylurea chlorpropamide; however, it has a lower frequency of adverse effects. To date it has a low frequency of clinically significant interactions with other drugs. Glyburide should not be prescribed for patients with liver disease or significant renal disease. Because glyburide is a potent hypoglycemic agent, it should be prescribed in small initial doses, particularly for elderly patients with diabetes. At the present time there is no definite evidence that it modifies the increased risk of cardiovascular disease of diabetic patients. Although glyburide is a potent stimulator of pancreatic insulin secretion after short-term administration, an additional mechanism of action during long-term administration is to decrease the resistance of muscle and liver to the action of insulin. It is a useful medication for patients with type II diabetes whose hyperglycemia is not adequately reduced by dietary management and exercise. It can be used as the initial drug in these patients or as the replacement drug for those with primary or secondary failure during therapy with first-generation sulfonylureas. PMID:3923453

  8. for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    and Petroleum Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Pulp and Paper Chemistry, RHANDBOOK for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Fall 2010 #12;#12;TABLE OF CONTENTS A Career in Chemistry - What It Means ___________________________________________ 4 What do

  9. Molecular epidemiology of catheter-related bloodstream infections caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci in haematological patients with neutropenia.

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Premru, M.; Cernelc, P.

    2004-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) is common in haematological patients with febrile neutropenia. As the clinical signs of CRBSI are usually scarce and it is difficult to differentiate from blood culture contamination, we tried to confirm CRBSI by molecular typing of CNS isolated from paired blood cultures (one from a peripheral vein and another from the central venous catheter hub). Blood cultures were positive in 59 (36%) out of 163 patients. CNS were isolated in 24 (40%) patients; in 14 from paired blood cultures (28 isolates) and in 10 from a single blood culture. CNS from paired blood cultures were identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined and bacteria were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of bacterial genomic DNA. In 13 patients, the antibiotic susceptibility of isolates was identical. The PFGE patterns from paired blood cultures were identical or closely related in 10 patients, thus confirming the presence of CRBSI. In the remaining four patients they were unrelated, and suggested a mixed infection or contamination. Since CNS isolates from three patients had identical PFGE patterns, they were probably nosocomially spread amongst them. PMID:15473156

  10. Epidemiology and sites of involvement of invasive fungal infections in patients with haematological malignancies: a 20-year autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Russell E; Cahyame-Zuniga, Lizebeth; Leventakos, Konstantinos; Chamilos, Georgios; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Tamboli, Pheroze; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Bodey, Gerald P; Luna, Mario; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-11-01

    Autopsy studies remain an essential tool for understanding the patterns of fungal disease not detected ante mortem with current diagnostic approaches. We collected data concerning the microbiological trends, patient clinical characteristics and sites of involvement for invasive fungal infections (IFIs) identified at autopsy in a single large cancer treatment centre over a 20-year period (1989-2008). The autopsy rate and IFI prevalence both declined significantly during the study period. The prevalence of Aspergillus spp. decreased significantly from the first 15 years of the study (from 0.12 to 0.14 cases per 100 autopsies to 0.07 in 2004-2008; P = 0.04), with only Mucorales accounting for a greater proportion of IFIs over the duration of the study period (0.06 to 0.2 cases per 100 autopsies, P = 0.04). After 2003, moulds accounted for the majority of infections identified at autopsy in the spleen, kidney, heart and gastrointestinal tract. Despite a trend of decreasing prevalence from 1989 to 2004, invasive candidiasis increased in prevalence during later periods 2004-2008 (0.02-0.05 per 100 autopsies) with decreasing kidney, heart and spleen involvement. Despite a declining autopsy rate, these data suggest a decreasing prevalence overall of IFIs with changing patterns of dissemination in patients with haematological malignancies. PMID:23551865

  11. Occupational exposures and haematological abnormalities among ordnance factory workers: a case control study.

    PubMed

    West, R R; Stafford, D A

    1997-07-01

    The lifetime exposures to an extensive list of chemical and other potentially toxic hazards were estimated for all available employees at an ordnance factory by questionnaire-based interview. Exposure histories of 32 (of 33) previously diagnosed as haematologically abnormal (cases) were compared with 322 (of 345) normals (controls). Among 'ordnance factory chemicals', modestly increased odds ratios were observed for men for acetic anhydride (2.8), stearic acid (2.8), and possibly for resorcinol (2.9), TNT (2.4) and hydroxy terminated polybutadene (HTPB) (2.4). Increased odds ratios were also observed in exposures not directly related to ordnance manufacture, including mineral acids, welding fumes, exhaust gases and insecticides. While, small numbers in the case group limit the statistical significance of reported odds ratios, one should be cautious about committing a type II error. These findings may partly explain the previously reported unusual prevalence of haematological abnormalities within the factory. PMID:9301689

  12. Effects of lichen extracts on haematological parameters of rats with experimental insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Colak, Suat; Geyiko?lu, Fatime; Aslan, Ali; Deniz, Gül?ah Y?ld?z

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the world is steadily increasing. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of diabetic complications, including diabetic haematological changes. Lichens are used as food supplements and are also used as possible natural antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer agents. We hypothesized that antioxidant activity of lichens may decrease hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress and prevent the development of diabetic complications, including abnormality in haematological condition. Therefore, the effects of Cetraria islandica water extract (CIWE) and Pseudevernia furfuracea water extract (PFWE) on the haematological parameters of rats with type 1 DM were investigated for the first time in the present study. Control Sprague-Dawley or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were either untreated or treated with water lichen extracts (5-500 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day) for 2 weeks, starting at 72 h after STZ injection. On day 14, animals were anaesthetized and haematological and metabolic parameters were determined between control and experimental groups. In addition, the total oxidative stress (TOS), a specific indicator of oxidative stress, and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured by biochemical studies. In diabetic rats, CIWE of 250-500 mg/kg bw dose showed more prominent results when compared with doses of PFWE for TAC. The results obtained in the present study suggested that the antioxidant activities of lichens might be the possible reason behind the observed antihaematological status. However, the protective effect of lichen extracts were inadequate on diabetes-induced microcytic hypochromic anaemia. In addition, the extracts have no effect on metabolic complications. Our experimental data showed that high doses of CIWE and PFWE alone have no detrimental effect on blood cells and TOS status of plasma. Hence, they are safe and suitable for different administration routes. PMID:23114377

  13. Haematological Changes During Normal Pregnancy in New Zealand White Rabbits: A Longitudinal Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-C. KIM; H.-I. YUN; S.-W. CHA; K.-H. KIM; W. S. KOH; M.-K. CHUNG

    2002-01-01

    :   The present study was undertaken to investigate changes in haematology parameters over the course of normal pregnancy in\\u000a New Zealand White rabbits. Blood samples were collected on gestational days (GD) 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28. Red blood\\u000a cell counts and haemoglobin concentrations on GD 20–28 were lower than those of normal non-pregnant rabbits. These values

  14. 21 CFR 862.2680 - Microtitrator for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2680 Microtitrator for clinical use. (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 862.2560 - Fluorometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2560 Fluorometer for clinical use. (a)...

  16. 21 CFR 862.2560 - Fluorometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2560 Fluorometer for clinical use. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 862.2730 - Osmometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2730 Osmometer for clinical use. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 862.2560 - Fluorometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2560 Fluorometer for clinical use. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 862.2680 - Microtitrator for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2680 Microtitrator for clinical use. (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 862.2730 - Osmometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2730 Osmometer for clinical use. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 862.2680 - Microtitrator for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2680 Microtitrator for clinical use. (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 862.2800 - Refractometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2800 Refractometer for clinical use. (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 862.2730 - Osmometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2730 Osmometer for clinical use. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 862.2730 - Osmometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2730 Osmometer for clinical use. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 862.2800 - Refractometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2800 Refractometer for clinical use. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 862.2310 - Clinical sample concentrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2310 Clinical sample...

  7. 21 CFR 862.2310 - Clinical sample concentrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2310 Clinical sample...

  8. Rise of the mutants: report from the 19th conference of the European Haematology Association, Milan, 12–15 June 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2014-01-01

    At the 19th conference of the European Haematology Association in Milan, we saw the true and dramatic changes brought about by the integration of extensive genomic information in clinical practice, and the dilemmas that accompany such a rapid increase in knowledge. Each disease is sliced more and more into smaller pieces, each with its own better-determined outcome and treatment. We also observed the rise of mutant-specific epigenetic agents, which benefit from knowing the underlying genetic abnormality to specifically assign an epigenetic drug where it is needed. In contrast to the ‘one mutation, one drug’ approach, others are pursuing the search for drugs targeting pathways fundamental for the survival of all or most cancer cells, sometimes looking at more ‘exotic’ pathways like neddylation or nuclear export. PMID:25183998

  9. Incidence of haematological malignancies by ethnic group in England, 2001-7.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Megan H; Sayeed, Shameq; Barnes, Isobel; Finlayson, Alexander; Ali, Raghib

    2013-11-01

    The aetiology of most haematological malignancies is largely unknown. Studies of migrant populations can provide insights into the relative importance of genetic and environmental risk factors for these diseases. This study compares incidence rates in British Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Black Africans, Black Caribbeans, Chinese and Whites in England from 2001 to 2007. We analysed 134,302 haematological cancer registrations with ethnicity obtained by linkage to the Hospital Episodes Statistics database. Mid-year population estimates from 2001 to 2007 were used. Incidence rate ratios adjusted for age, sex and income were calculated, comparing the six ethnic groups to Whites and to each other. Whites had the highest rates for most subtypes. However, Blacks experienced more than double the incidence of plasma cell and mature T-cell neoplasms compared to other ethnic groups. There were also significant differences in incidence between Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis for Hodgkin lymphoma and mature B-cell neoplasms and between Black African and Black Caribbeans for mature B-cell and other lymphoid neoplasms (all P < 0.001). Our results show that the risk of haematological cancers varies greatly by ethnic group, including within those groups that have traditionally been grouped together (South Asians and Blacks) with many of these differences not explicable by known risk factors. PMID:24033296

  10. The influence of administering "effective microorganisms" to pullets on chosen haematological and biochemical blood indexes.

    PubMed

    Sokó?, R; Michalczyk, M; Spodniewska, A; Barski, D

    2009-01-01

    "Effective Microorganisms" (EM)--a mixture of lactic acid bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria, yeasts and fungi are used mainly in agriculture and organic waste treatment. Recently, they have also been added to water and feed for animals, as well as to processing their excrements into compost and to eliminate the stench. The objective of the present study was to assess the influence of a 14-day administration of an EM solution in drinking water to layer hens on chosen haematological and biochemical indexes. The research was carried out on 120 hens divided into two equal groups. The birds in the experimental group were given drinking water with dissolved EM (5% solution), and those in the control group--water without the preparation. On the 64th day of the aviculture, the hens were weighted and their blood was taken from the wing vein for haematological and biochemical examinations. Administering EM with water to hens did not influence significantly their body weight nor chosen haematological and biochemical indexes. A significant increase was found only in the number of platelets, the level of albumins, the content of total cholesterol and the LDH activity, however, a decrease in the ALT activity was observed. PMID:20169927

  11. Haematological analysis conducted at the departure of the Tour de France 2001.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N; Schattenberg, L; Zorzoli, M; Mangin, P; Saugy, M

    2005-04-01

    Since the introduction of blood analysis performed before major cycling events in 1997, there have been discussions concerning the quality of the results. The aim of our study therefore was to measure blood samples and compare the results obtained on the field with those obtained in the laboratory. For this it was necessary to have blood samples analysed with different instruments to determine the exactness of the results and evaluate the performances of these instruments in order to validate the haematological testing used to reveal athletes abusing recombinant erythropoietin. We report on the haematological analysis of 177 professional cyclists who took part in the Tour de France 2001. All the blood samples were withdrawn in the morning between 7 and 9 am in Dunkerque (France) and were analysed immediately with a transportable analyser. Then the samples were flown to Lausanne (Switzerland) and were reanalysed in two independent ISO 17 025 accredited laboratories with three different analysers. The results confirmed that the most effective haematological follow-up should be performed under standardized pre-analytical conditions and with identical analysers of the same manufacturer to avoid too many variations notably on the haematocrit level and the reticulocyte count. Furthermore, this study suggests that analyses performed on the site are good and could enable the federations to perform a urinary test to detect rhEPO abuse right after the blood analysis. This time saving is essential to fight efficiently recombinant erythropoietin doping, because the half life of the hormone is very short. PMID:15776340

  12. Fertility preservation in patients with haematological disorders: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Suneeta; Morse, Christopher B; Sammel, Mary D; Kim, Jayeon; Mersereau, Jennifer E; Efymow, Brenda; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the factors associated with utilization of fertility preservation and the differences in treatments and outcomes by prior chemotherapy exposure in patients with haematological diseases. This study included all 67 women with haematological diseases seen for fertility preservation consultation at two university hospitals between 2006 and 2011. Of the total, 49% had lymphoma, 33% had leukaemia, 7% had myelodysplastic syndrome and 4% had aplastic anaemia; 46% had prior chemotherapy; and 33% were planning for bone marrow transplantation, 33% pursued ovarian stimulation and 7% used ovarian tissue banking; and 48% of patients did not pursue fertility preservation treatment. All five cycle cancellations were in the post-chemotherapy group: three patients with leukaemia and two with lymphoma. Patients with prior chemotherapy had lower baseline antral follicle count (10 versus 22) and received more gonadotrophins to achieve similar peak oestradiol concentrations, with no difference in oocyte yield (10.5 versus 10) after adjustment for age. Embryo yield was similar between those who had prior chemotherapy and those who had not. Half of the patients with haematological diseases who present for fertility preservation have been exposed to chemotherapy. While ovarian reserve is likely impaired in this group, oocyte yield may be acceptable. PMID:24140311

  13. Saprochaete capitata as an emerging fungus among patients with haematological malignencies.

    PubMed

    Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Atalay, Mustafa Altay; Metan, Gökhan; Cevahir, Fatma; Koç, Nedret; Eser, Bülent; Çetin, Mustafa; Kaynar, Leyla; Alp, Emine

    2015-08-01

    Saprochaete capitata is a very rare pathogen that causes invasive disease particularly in patients with haematological malignancies. We recognised a clustering of S. capitata fungaemia in recent years. So, we report our 6-year surveillance study of fungaemia among patients with haematological malignancies and haematopoietic stem cell transplant. We performed a retrospective and observational study. Hospitalised patients aged >18 years with haematological malignancies were included in the study. A total of 51 fungaemia episodes of 47 patients were analysed. The characteristics of fungaemia in patients with S. capitata compared to patients with candidemia. Median duration of neutropenia was 21.5 days in patients with S. capitata fungaemia, whereas this duration was significantly shorter in patients with candidemia (8 days). Interval between first and last positive culture was significantly longer in patients with S. capitata fungaemia (P < 0.05). Previous use of caspofungin was significantly more common in patients with S. capitata fungaemia. Thirty-day mortality was found 40% for patients with candidemia, whereas it was 39% for patients with S. capitata. In conclusion, despite its limitations this study showed that a novel and more resistant yeast-like pathogen become prevalent due to use of caspofungin in patients with long-lasting neutropenia which was the most noteworthy finding of this 6-year surveillance study. PMID:26155743

  14. CHEMISTRY 521 GRADUATE PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 521 GRADUATE PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Fall Term, 1999 INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION Instructor: Dr@alpha.nlu.edu URL: http://www.nlu.edu/chemistry/findley/findley.html COURSE Content: A review of selected topics in Physical Chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: Introduction to quantum mechanics. Topics covered include

  15. CHEMISTRY 320 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 320 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I Fall 2009 9:00 am - 10:30 am, MW CNSB 211 INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION of the physical principles of chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 320 presents chemical principles from" or better in CHEM 108; PHYS 208; MATH 132. Text: Physical Chemistry, P. Atkins and J. de Paula, 8th ed. (W

  16. Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)

    E-print Network

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S. Dibble Professor of Chemistry 421 Jahn Laboratory Syracuse, NY 13210 Phone: (315) 470-6596 Fax: (315) 470 Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change

  17. CHEMISTRY 322 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 322 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II Spring 2010 10:00 am - 11:30 am, MW CNSB 211 INSTRUCTOR interpretations of the physical principles of chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 322, which is a continuation of CHEM 320, focuses of the quantum theoretical foundations of modern chemistry. Topics covered include

  18. Chemistry 419 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Chemistry 419 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY Spring, 2008 Lecture/Discussion 1:00 Tuesday, Brittney Young Required Text: Chemistry 419 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory - University Bookstore. Students are required to perform seven laboratories from among those offered this quarter. The first week

  19. Oncogene expression in primary myelodysplasia: correlation with haematological, karyotypic, and clinical progression.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, R. M.; Pringle, J. H.; Knight, S. C.; Lauder, I.; Potter, A.; Jagger, C.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To see if the relative expressions of proto-oncogenes that are increased in acute myeloid leukaemia are raised in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and to see if they increase with progression to leukaemia. To note if there is a correlation between morphology, karyotype, and these proto-oncogene expressions and if any one proto-oncogene can predict prognosis. METHOD: Bone marrow from 130 patients was analysed at six monthly intervals over two years for relative mRNA expression of seven oncogenes, karyotype, and morphology. The technique used slot blot hybridisation and densitometric analysis. The results were compared with 14 surgical controls and 30 people with vitamin deficiency anaemia. RESULTS: Six of seven oncogenes showed increased expression which progressed with time, but did not correlate with morphological or karyotypic changes. Expression of four of the seven oncogenes was increased in megaloblastic and iron deficiency anaemia. C-mos showed differences among the five morphological subgroups; it correlated with abnormal location (p = 0.025) and seemed to influence prognosis. CONCLUSION: Increased proto-oncogenes reflect the overall marrow perturbation in MDS. C-mos may reflect persistence of monocyte pathway which confirms marrow stability. PMID:1577972

  20. Overview of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bishton, Mark J.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Dickinson, Michael; Harrison, Simon; Prince, H. Miles

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) can induce hyperacetylation of both histone and non-histone target resulting in epigenetic reprogramming and altered activity, stability and localisation of non-histone proteins to ultimately mediate diverse biological effects on cancer cells and their microenvironment. Clinical trials have demonstrated single agent HDACi to have activity in hematological malignancies, in particular T-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. Combination strategies with standard therapies based on pre-clinical data are being employed with significant success due to their excellent side effect profile. Correlative studies will provide valuable information on the sub-groups of patients more likely to respond or be resistant to HDACi therapy, while long-term monitoring for toxicities is also needed.

  1. Green Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    This special feature page from the American Chemical Society (ACS) showcases the up-and-coming field of "green chemistry," that is, the development of chemical products and processes that eliminate or reduce the use and generation of hazardous substances. A list of principles behind green chemistry, a searchable bibliography of green chemistry references, green chemistry links (including conferences), and an online preview of the ACS-published book Real-World Cases in Green Chemistry are all found at the site. Five video clips on green chemistry from the standpoint of academia, industry, and small business are also featured (Windows Media Player). This page comes from ACS's Green Chemistry Project, a three-year educational project to develop and disseminate green chemistry educational materials for graduate and undergraduate chemistry students. Check back often for updates.

  2. Program of Study For a Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Sciences MLSP 201 Clinical Hematology I 3

    E-print Network

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Diagnostic Serology 1 LABM 201 Clinical Chemistry I 2 LABM 202 Clinical Chemistry II 2 LABM 210 Cytology Clinical Chemistry and Endocrinology 4 LABM 230 Clinical Hematology and Special Procedures 4 LABM 240

  3. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Image credit: CDC/Flickr) Read the article Evaluating Ebola Survival Time The Ebola virus can survive on plastic, stainless steel, and Tyvek materials—which is used for Ebola suits—for up to 2 weeks. (Image © nopparit/ ...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental chemistry is applied to estimating the exposure of ecosystems and humans to various chemical environmental stressors. Among the stressors of concern are mercury, pesticides, and arsenic. Advanced analytical chemistry techniques are used to measure these stressors ...

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  7. Forensic Chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Bell

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is

  8. Biochemistry chemistry &

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    Biochemistry chemistry & A n A ly t i c A l B i o l o g i c A l i n o r g A n i c o r g A n i c P h of South Carolina..........................1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry....2 The Graduate Program in Chemistry and Biochemistry.........................................................3 Ph

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  10. Chemistry Links

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Charnine, Michael

    This compiled site contains titles and links to over 40 sites, journal articles, course and tutorial materials, simulations, batteries, and other resources. Definitions of chemistry, theoretical chemistry, organic, physical and nuclear chemistry are integrated with the links to outside materials. A number of useful keywords are included to help users navigate the materials.

  11. Detection of (1?3)-?-D-glucan in same-day urine and serum samples obtained from patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Raggam, Reinhard B; Fischbach, Lara M L; Prattes, Juergen; Duettmann, Wiebke; Eigl, Susanne; Reischies, Frederike; Wölfler, Albert; Rabensteiner, Jasmin; Prueller, Florian; Krause, Robert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Serum 1,3-beta-d-glucan (BDG) testing is an established diagnostic marker for invasive fungal infections (IFI) among patients with haematological malignancies. In contrast limited data exist regarding the application of urine BDG testing. Same-day midstream urine and serum screening samples were collected in adult patients with underlying haematological malignancies. A total of 80 urine samples from 46 patients were investigated: Twenty-six had positive corresponding serum BDG >120 pg ml(-1) , 27 intermediate (60-80 pg ml(-1) ), and 27 negative serum BDG (<25 pg ml(-1) ). A significant positive correlation between BDG in serum and urine samples was observed (P = 0.025; r = 0.252). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value (compared with same-day serum results) were: 42%, 76%, 46%, 73% when using an 80 pg ml(-1) urine cut-off, and 35%, 96%, 82%, 75% for a 250 pg ml(-1) cut-off. Urine BDG seemed to be higher in samples obtained from patients with probable IFI (n = 13, median 145, IQR 22-253) compared to those from patients without IFI (n = 56, median 24, IQR 15-88) but the difference was not significant (P = 0.069). Overall correlation of same-day urine BDG and serum BDG was moderate. However, urine BDG testing may warrant further investigation in larger studies, as high-positive urine results correlated with high-positive corresponding serum levels and clinical performance was comparable to serum BDG. PMID:25959065

  12. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  13. Computational Chemistry for Chemistry Educators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Shodor Computational Science Institute

    This is a 15-session course on the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational chemistry. By using the same computational tools as research computational chemists, educators will have the opportunity to study chemistry in a manner very different than traditional teaching and education in chemistry.

  14. Infection by Brazilian and Dutch swine hepatitis E virus strains induces haematological changes in Macaca fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been described as an emerging pathogen in Brazil and seems to be widely disseminated among swine herds. An autochthonous human case of acute hepatitis E was recently reported. To obtain a better understanding of the phenotypic profiles of both human and swine HEV strains, a experimental study was conducted using the animal model, Macaca fascicularis. Methods Six cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were inoculated intravenously with swine HEV genotype 3 that was isolated from naturally and experimentally infected pigs in Brazil and the Netherlands. Two other monkeys were inoculated with HEV genotype 3 that was recovered from Brazilian and Argentinean patients with locally acquired acute and fulminant hepatitis E. The haematological, biochemical, and virological parameters of all animals were monitored for 67 days. Results Subclinical hepatitis was observed in all monkeys after inoculation with HEV genotype 3 that was recovered from the infected swine and human patients. HEV RNA was detected in the serum and/or faeces of 6 out of the 8 cynomolgus monkeys between 5 and 53 days after inoculation. The mild inflammation of liver tissues and elevations of discrete liver enzymes were observed. Seroconversions to anti-HEV IgM and/or IgG were detected in 7 animals. Reactivities to anti-HEV IgA were also detected in the salivary samples of 3 animals. Interestingly, all of the infected monkeys showed severe lymphopenia and a trend toward monocytosis, which coincided with elevations in alanine aminotransferase and antibody titres. Conclusions The ability of HEV to cross the species barrier was confirmed for both the swine (Brazilian and Dutch) and human (Argentinean) strains, thus reinforcing the zoonotic risk of hepatitis E in South America. Cynomolgus monkeys that were infected with HEV genotype 3 developed subclinical hepatitis that was associated with haematological changes. Haematological approaches should be considered in future studies of HEV infection. PMID:24148233

  15. 148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Dresden, Gregory

    ,organometalliccatalyticprocesses,andsolid statechemistry.Uffelman. Spring 2008 and alternate years Chemistry 365 (3)--Advanced Physical Chemistry148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: Chemistry 242,syntheticmethodology,mod- ernsyntheticreactions,protectinggroups,naturalprod- uctssynthesis,andcombinatorialchemistry.France. Spring Chemistry

  16. Physiological Response of Rabbit Bucks to Dietary Fumonisin: Performance, Haematology and Serum Biochemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel O. Ewuola; Francis A. Gbore; Jacob T. Ogunlade; Ranajit Bandyopadhyay; John Niezen; Gabriel N. Egbunike

    2008-01-01

    Maize grains contaminated with fumonisin, a metabolite of Fusarium\\u000a verticillioides was incorporated into matured male rabbits’ diet to evaluate its effects on performance, haematology and serum biochemistry\\u000a in rabbits. Thirty individually caged crossbred adult rabbit bucks averaging 1.36 ± 0.01 kg (about 22–24-week-old) were randomly\\u000a allotted to three treatment diets comprising a control diet (containing 0.35 ± 0.02 mg fumonisin\\/kg) and two test diets containing\\u000a 12.30 ± 0.16 and

  17. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to persistent or recurrent fevers of unknown origin in adult stem cell transplantation and haematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, C O; Bardy, P G; Slavin, M A; Ananda-Rajah, M R; Chen, S C; Kirsa, S W; Ritchie, D S; Upton, A

    2008-06-01

    Persistent or recurrent fevers of unknown origin (PFUO) in neutropenic patients on broad-spectrum antibiotics have traditionally been treated with empirical antifungal therapy (EAFT). The lack of survival benefit seen with the use of amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmB-D) as EAFT has been attributed to its toxicities. More recently, newer, less toxic and more expensive antifungal agents such as the lipid formulations of AmB, the newer azoles (fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole) and caspofungin have been analysed in a number of EAFT trials. Compared with AmB-D the newer agents have superior safety but are of equivalent efficacy. This lack of survival advantage is related to the fact that the trigger for commencement of EAFT is late and non-specific. Thus, alternative approaches are required. New sensitive serological and molecular tests for the detection of Aspergillus antigens and genomic DNA have been developed and evaluated in accuracy studies. These tests have been incorporated into management strategies (i.e. pre-emptive strategies) to direct antifungal therapy. The pre-emptive approach has been shown to be safe and feasible but its impact on clinically important patient outcomes such as survival is less clear. Other advances include the introduction of effective, non-toxic mould-active antifungal prophylaxis and patient risk-group stratification. In this paper we provide new evidence-based algorithms for the diagnosis and treatment of PFUO in adult patients undergoing stem cell transplantation and chemotherapy for haematological malignancy which incorporate these newer diagnostic tests and are directed by the risk category of the patient and type of antifungal prophylaxis the patient is receiving. PMID:18588521

  18. INFLUENCE OF D-Nil plus (A POLYHERBAL DRUG) ON HAEMATOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN DIABETIC INDUCED RATS

    PubMed Central

    Vanithamani, J.; Selvi, V.; Krishnaswamy, B. G.

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder, is characterized by hyperglycemia and altered metabolism. The administration of D-Nil plus (a polyherbal drug) showed effective treatment for alloxan induced diabetes in rats. In diabetic rats, haematological profiles namely RBC, WBC, platlet count and haemoglobin were decreased whereas ESR was increased. Similarly biochemical parameters creatinine, urea and protein were decreased but cholesterol level was increased. After the treatment with D-Nil plus, haematological parameters and biochemical parameters were reversed. The results suggest that the D-Nil plus can be used for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22557203

  19. Effect of artesunate plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine on haematological recovery and anaemia, in Kenyan children with uncomplicated, Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Obonyo, C O; Taylor, W; Ekvall, H; Kaneko, A; Ter Kuile, F; Olliaro, P; Bjorkman, A; Oloo, A J

    2007-06-01

    Malaria-associated anaemia is a major public-health problem. Although the treatment of uncomplicated, Plasmodium falciparum malaria aims to clear the parasites, relieve the symptoms and permit haematological recovery, data on the impact of antimalarial treatment on haematological recovery are few. Haematological recovery and the prevalence of anaemia were therefore evaluated in 600 Kenyan children with uncomplicated malaria who were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups. The children were given sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) on day 0, SP plus artesunate on day 0 (AS1), or SP on day 0 and artesunate on each of days 0-2 (AS3). Haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were measured on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28, with haematological recovery defined as a day-28 Hb concentration of at least 11 g/dl. Only 96 (18%) of the 543 children who were anaemic (i.e. with <11.0 g Hb/dl) at enrolment achieved haematological recovery. The prevalence of anaemia fell from 91% on day 0 to 74% (252/340) by day 28 (P=0.065). Compared with SP alone, neither artesunate regimen resulted in higher Hb concentrations on day 28 (with means of 10.2, 9.9 and 10.2 g/dl for AS3, AS1 and SP, respectively; P=0.254), a higher frequency of haematological recovery (19%, 14% and 20% for AS3, AS1 and SP, respectively; P=0.301) or a greater reduction in the prevalence of anaemia (prevalences in the AS3, AS1 and SP arms falling from 90%, 89% and 93%, respectively, on day 0, to corresponding values of 71%, 82% and 69% on day 28; P=0.40). In fact, between days 0 and 7, the children in the AS3 arm showed a larger drop in mean Hb than the children in the other two treatment arms. In general, haematological recovery was most likely in older children who had mild anaemia at presentation and were parasitologically cured. Overall, the frequencies of haematological recovery were modest and not influenced by the artesunate treatments. Other factors contributing to anaemia need to be explored more fully. PMID:17524243

  20. The Kjeldahl method as a primary reference procedure for total protein in certified reference materials used in clinical chemistry. II. Selection of direct Kjeldahl analysis and its preliminary performance parameters.

    PubMed

    Vinklárková, Bára; Chromý, Vratislav; Šprongl, Lud?k; Bittová, Miroslava; Rikanová, Milena; Ohnútková, Ivana; Žaludová, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    To select a Kjeldahl procedure suitable for the determination of total protein in reference materials used in laboratory medicine, we reviewed in our previous article Kjeldahl methods adopted by clinical chemistry and found an indirect two-step analysis by total Kjeldahl nitrogen corrected for its nonprotein nitrogen and a direct analysis made on isolated protein precipitates. In this article, we compare both procedures on various reference materials. An indirect Kjeldahl method gave falsely lower results than a direct analysis. Preliminary performance parameters qualify the direct Kjeldahl analysis as a suitable primary reference procedure for the certification of total protein in reference laboratories. PMID:25558773

  1. Prospective study of hepatic, renal, and haematological surveillance in hazardous materials firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Kales, S; Polyhronopoulos, G; Aldrich, J; Mendoza, P; Suh, J; Christiani, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate possible health effects related to work with hazardous materials as measured by end organ effect markers in a large cohort over about 2 years, and in a subcohort over 5 years.?METHODS—Hepatic, renal, and haematological variables were analysed from 1996-98 in hazardous materials firefighters including 288 hazardous materials technicians (81%) and 68 support workers (19%). The same end organ effect markers in a subcohort of the technicians were also analysed (n=35) from 1993-98. Support workers were considered as controls because they are also firefighters, but had a low potential exposure to hazardous materials.?RESULTS—During the study period, no serious injuries or exposures were reported. For the end organ effect markers studied, no significant differences were found between technicians and support workers at either year 1 or year 3. After adjustment for a change in laboratory, no significant longitudinal changes were found within groups for any of the markers except for creatinine which decreased for both technicians (p<0.001) and controls (p<0.01).?CONCLUSIONS—Health effects related to work are infrequent among hazardous materials technicians. Haematological, hepatic, and renal testing is not required on an annual basis and has limited use in detecting health effects in hazardous materials technicians.???Keywords: hazardous materials; firefighters; medical surveillance PMID:11160986

  2. Age-related changes in the haematology of female F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Turton, J A; Hawkey, C M; Hart, M G; Gwynne, J; Hicks, R M

    1989-10-01

    As little comprehensive baseline data are available on age-related haematological changes in genetically-defined rat strains, the haematology of female F344 rats is described in animals sampled at 2, 4, 8, 20, 66 and 121 weeks of age. Values for Hb, RBC and PCV increased from 2 weeks of age to reach adult levels at 8 weeks, whereas MCV, MCH and reticulocyte counts were high initially but decreased to reach the adult range at 8 weeks. Between 66 and 121 weeks, reticulocyte counts were significantly increased and values for MCHC significantly decreased. Lymphocytes were the predominant white cell type in each age group. The absolute numbers of neutrophils and lymphocytes showed slight variations between 2 and 66 weeks and both cell types increased significantly between 66 and 121 weeks. Platelet counts showed no overall age-related trends. Fibrinogen values increased from 2 weeks of age to reach the adult level at 8 weeks. One animal of the 14 sampled at 121 weeks showed changes in the blood, liver and spleen consistent with a diagnosis of lymphoid leukaemia. PMID:2811267

  3. Doing Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brooks, David W.

    This website includes over 150 chemistry experiments in the following areas: Atomic Structure, Bonding, Chemical Reactions, Colligative Properties, Condensed States, Electrochemistry, Equilibrium Gases, Instrumentation, Limiting Reactant and more.

  4. 21 CFR 862.2485 - Electrophoresis apparatus for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2485 Electrophoresis apparatus...

  5. Haematological malignancies in childhood in Croatia: Investigating the theories of depleted uranium, chemical plant damage and ‘population mixing’

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Labar; I. Rudan; D. Ivankovic; Z. Biloglav; M. Mrsic; M. Strnad; A. Fucic; A. Znaor; T. Bradic; H. Campbell

    2004-01-01

    Some of potential causes proposed to explain the reported increase of haematological malignancies in childhood during or after the war period in several countries include depleted uranium, chemical pollution and population mixing theory. The aim of this study was to define the population of Croatian children aged 0–14 years who were potentially exposed to each of those risks during the

  6. Effects of Oral Exposure of Acrylamide on Plasma Levels of Thyroid Hormones and Haematological Parameters in the Swiss Albino Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Asha Sharma; Jyotsna Jain

    Effects of acrylamide on thyroid hormone levels and haematological parameters in Swiss albino mice were investigated by exposing them with 3 dose levels set below LD50. Mortality in animals was nil with a significant decrease in the mean body weight gain. The various toxic morphological effects noted were sluggish appearance, bizarre behaviour, stunted growth, reduced limb movements, diminished food and

  7. Allogeneic and autologous transplantation for haematological diseases, solid tumours and immune disorders: current practice in Europe 2009

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Ljungman; M. Bregni; M. Brune; J. Cornelissen; T. J. M. de Witte; G. Dini; H. Einsele; H. B. Gaspar; A. Gratwohl; J. Passweg; C. Peters; V. Rocha; R. Saccardi; H. Schouten; A. Sureda; A. Tichelli; A. Velardi; D. Niederwieser

    2010-01-01

    The European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation regularly publishes special reports on the current practice of haematopoietic SCT for haematological diseases, solid tumours and immune disorders in Europe. Major changes have occurred since the first report was published. HSCT today includes grafting with allogeneic and autologous stem cells derived from BM, peripheral blood and cord blood. With reduced-intensity conditioning

  8. Lamivudine treatment failure in preventing fatal outcome of de novo severe acute hepatitis B in patients with haematological diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enzo Petrelli; Maria Balducci; Carlo Pieretti; Marco B. Luigi Rocchi; Massimo Clementi; Aldo Manzin

    2001-01-01

    Background: Patients with malignant haematological diseases administered or no longer receiving immunosuppressive therapy are at high risk of reactivation or de novo hepatitis B infection and fulminant hepatitis. Despite promising results in the treatment of chronic hepatitis and its use in selected patients with acute hepatitis B, there is no consensus on lamivudine treatment in severe acute hepatitis portending a

  9. [Real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of human adenoviruses in patients with haematological malignancies and symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection].

    PubMed

    Rynans, Sylwia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Krenke, Rafa?; Grabczak, Magdalena; Ko?kowska-Le?niak, Agnieszka; Przybylski, Maciej; Sulowsk, Agata; Chazan, Ryszarda; Warzocha, Krzysztof; M?ynarczyk, Grazyna

    2011-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are one of the im-portant infectious etiological factors that affect immunocompromised patients. Because of the large number of HAdV serotypes and their genomic variations, they present a lot of difficulty in laboratory diagnostics. The recent introduction of real-time PCR (qPCR)-based assays has opened new ways to rapid, specific, and highly sensitive HAdV detection. For detection and quantification of HAdV DNA we retrospectively tested serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples obtained from a cohort of 60 adult patients with haematological malignancies presenting clinical and radiological symptoms of lower respiratory tract infections. Human adenoviruses DNA was detected by qPCR method, using primers targeting a conserved region of the adenoviral hexon gene and a specific TaqMan probe. Adenovirus infection occurred with a high incidence in our study group patients. Using qPCR we found that a 21,7% and 15,0% of patients had adenoviral DNA in BALF and serum samples, respectively. The high level of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy provided by real-time PCR assay are favorable for the use in the detection of adenoviral DNA in clinical specimens, especially in immunocompromised patients. PMID:21913485

  10. Haematological and biochemical reference intervals for three species of hydrophiine sea snakes (Hydrophis curtus, H. elegans and H. peronii) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Amber K; Flint, Mark; Hulse, Lyndal; Hanger, Jon; Mills, Paul C

    2015-06-01

    This study presents the first set of comprehensive reference intervals (RIs) for plasma biochemistry and haematology for three species of sea snakes common to the Indo-Pacific waters of Australia. In total 98 snakes, composed of Hydrophis curtus (n=?60), H. elegans (n?=?27) and H. peronii (n?=?11), were captured, clinically examined and had venous blood samples collected. All snakes were deemed healthy and in good to excellent body condition with snout to vent lengths of 40.7-73.9?cm (H. curtus), 68.9-131.4?cm (H. elegans) and 55.0-83.0?cm (H. peronii), respectively. Lymphocyte numbers, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels were species-dependent. All other parameters are presented as a single range for the three species. Gender ratio was evenly distributed for H. curtus and H. elegans, but 8/11 (73%) of H. peronii were males. No significant differences were detected between males and females for any of the measured blood parameters. Lymph contamination was considered and accounted for. Although only three species of sea snakes are represented in this study, the RIs generated may be useful in the clinical assessment of other sea snake species. PMID:25933825

  11. Chem 681 Quantum Chemistry Chemistry 681

    E-print Network

    Chem 681 Quantum Chemistry Chemistry 681 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry Fall 2003 Course outline-consistent field (Hartree-Fock) theory. G.S. Ezra 1 Cornell University #12;Chem 681 Quantum Chemistry 8. Molecules

  12. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  13. Haematology and serum biochemistry of golden eagle ( Aquila chrysaetos) in Iran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Nazifi; A. Nabinejad; M. Sepehrimanesh; S. L. Poorbaghi; F. Farshneshani; M. Rahsepar

    2008-01-01

    Haematological and serum biochemical values were estimated in blood samples collected from 21 apparently adult golden eagles\\u000a (Aquila chrysaetos) of both sexes. The mean values of red blood cells, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, white blood cells, heterophils, lymphocytes,\\u000a monocytes and eosinophils were 1.63?±?0.11?×?1012\\/l, 0.47?±?0.009 l\\/l, 91.73?±?1.52 g\\/l, 24.31?±?1.97?×?109\\/l, 4.40?±?0.22?×?109\\/l, 16.81?±?0.65?×?109\\/l, 0.99?±?0.19?×?109\\/l and 2.10?±?0.30?×?109\\/l, respectively. The leucocytes had 69.14%, 4.09%, 18.12% and 8.65%

  14. First-dose pharmacokinetics of aminoglycosides in critically ill haematological malignancy patients.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Laura M; Tverdek, Frank P; Hernandez, Mike; Bruno, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the volume of distribution (Vd) (L/kg) of intravenous aminoglycosides (AGs) in critically ill haematological malignancy patients. Secondary objectives were to determine the body weight (actual, ideal, adjusted or lean) that yields the most precise estimate of Vd when normalised in L/kg as well as the frequency that current first-dose strategies result in post-distributional peak concentrations (C(peak)) within the target range (tobramycin 16-24 mg/L; amikacin 32-48 mg/L). In total, 58 AG doses were included (tobramycin, n = 34; amikacin, n = 24). Median Vd was 0.38 L/kg normalised per the most precise dose weight, which was actual body weight (ABW). The median dose was 445 mg (5.8 mg/kg ABW) for tobramycin and 1200 mg (13.8 mg/kg ABW) for amikacin. Target C(peak) (tobramycin 20mg/L; amikacin 40 mg/L) was achieved in only 25% of all AG episodes, with 4% exceeding the target and 71% falling below the target. Twenty-four organisms were isolated in the study sample; target C(peak) achievement (tobramycin 20 mg/L; amikacin 40 mg/L) would yield a peak:minimum inhibitory concentration of 10 in 75% and 52% of organisms, respectively. In conclusion, an increased Vd of AGs was identified in this critically ill haematological malignancy patient sample, and current dosing yielded a suboptimal C(peak) in the majority of patients. PMID:25455848

  15. Haematology and Serum Biochemistry Parameters and Variations in the Eurasian Beaver (Castor fiber)

    PubMed Central

    Girling, Simon J.; Campbell-Palmer, Roisin; Pizzi, Romain; Fraser, Mary A.; Cracknell, Jonathan; Arnemo, Jon; Rosell, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Haematology parameters (N = 24) and serum biochemistry parameters (N = 35) were determined for wild Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber), between 6 months – 12 years old. Of the population tested in this study, N = 18 Eurasian beavers were from Norway and N = 17 originating from Bavaria but now living extensively in a reserve in England. All blood samples were collected from beavers via the ventral tail vein. All beavers were chemically restrained using inhalant isoflurane in 100% oxygen prior to blood sampling. Results were determined for haematological and serum biochemical parameters for the species and were compared between the two different populations with differences in means estimated and significant differences being noted. Standard blood parameters for the Eurasian beaver were determined and their ranges characterised using percentiles. Whilst the majority of blood parameters between the two populations showed no significant variation, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin and white blood cell counts showed significantly greater values (p<0.01) in the Bavarian origin population than the Norwegian; neutrophil counts, alpha 2 globulins, cholesterol, sodium: potassium ratios and phosphorus levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Bavarian versus Norwegian; and potassium, bile acids, gamma globulins, urea, creatinine and total calcium values levels showed significantly (p<0.05) greater values in Norwegian versus Bavarian relict populations. No significant differences were noted between male and female beavers or between sexually immature (<3 years old) and sexually mature (?3 years old) beavers in the animals sampled. With Eurasian beaver reintroduction encouraged by legislation throughout Europe, knowledge of baseline blood values for the species and any variations therein is essential when assessing their health and welfare and the success or failure of any reintroduction program. This is the first study to produce base-line blood values and their variations for the Eurasian beaver. PMID:26066344

  16. Cooperative Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Allan A. Gahr

    2003-02-01

    Concept mapping in the organic chemistry laboratory can supplant cookbook activities with higher cognitive exercises. The common thread of most organic lab experiments is the synthesis, isolation, purification, and characterization of a carbon compound. T

  17. Radioanalytical Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hardy, James K.

    This website provides a course on the use of radionuclides in analytical chemistry. Types of radioactive decay are discussed as well as the techniques of scintillation counting, neutron activation analysis, and gamma spectroscopy.

  18. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  19. Green Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-03-02

    Learn about a study in which participants discovered contaminants in their homes, and how green chemistry may provide alternatives to such everyday toxins, in this video adapted from Contaminated Without Consent.

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  1. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  2. Putative clinical piroplasmosis in a Burchell's zebra (Equus quagga burchelli).

    PubMed

    Lampen, F; Bhoora, R; Collins, N E; Penzhorn, B L

    2009-12-01

    A 10-year-old tame zebra gelding was presented after suffering from lethargy, nervousness, reported anaemia and icterus as well as a decreased appetite. These symptoms were seen over some months, with changing severity. The animal was immobilised, treated, and blood specimens were submitted for haematology and biochemistry. This report describes molecular characterisation of Theileria equi recovered from this animal, as well as the clinical findings, treatment and historical relevance of piroplasmosis in zebra in southern Africa. PMID:20458869

  3. Reference intervals for eight enzymes in blood of adult females and males measured in accordance with the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry reference system at 37 degrees C: part of the Nordic Reference Interval Project.

    PubMed

    Strømme, J H; Rustad, P; Steensland, H; Theodorsen, L; Urdal, P

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Nordic Reference Interval Project we present reference intervals for alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GT), amylase (AMY) and pancreatic type of AMY in blood of adult males and females. A total of 3036 reference persons, all of whom considered themselves to be in good health, were recruited by 102 Nordic clinical biochemical laboratories. Exclusions were undertaken on the basis of predefined biochemical and clinical criteria. Enzyme activities in serum and plasma were measured in the different laboratories using various commercially available routine measurement systems at 37 degrees C. Only results obtained with the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) compatible measuring systems were selected for estimation of the enzyme reference intervals. The final number of results on each enzyme varied from 459 (LD) to 2300 (ALT). The 2.5 and 97.5 percentile reference limits were calculated by a non-parametric method in accordance with the IFCC recommendations, using the Refval 4.0 data program. Statistical partitioning testing was undertaken to decide whether the reference intervals ought to be partitioned according to gender and/or age. For most of the enzymes, but not for all, the upper reference limits were found to be higher than those that have been in general use until now. PMID:15223701

  4. The effect of the combination of acids and tannin in diet on the performance and selected biochemical, haematological and antioxidant enzyme parameters in grower pigs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The abolition of in-feed antibiotics or chemotherapeutics as growth promoters have stimulated the swine industry to look for alternatives such as organic acids, botanicals, probiotics and tannin. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of a combination of acids and tannin with diet with organic acids and diet without growth promoters on the growth performance and selected biochemical, haematological and antioxidant enzyme parameters in grower pigs. Tannin is more natural and cheaper but possibly with the same effectiveness as organic acids with regard to growth performance. Methods Thirty-six 7 week old grower pigs, divided into three equal groups, were used in a three week feeding trial. Group I was fed basal diet, group II basal diet with added organic acids and group III basal diet with added organic and inorganic acids and tannin. Pigs were weighed before and after feeding and observed daily. Blood was collected before and after the feeding trial for the determination of selected biochemical, haematological and antioxidant enzyme parameters. One-way ANOVA was used to assess any diet related changes of all the parameters. Paired t-test was used to evaluate changes of blood parameters individually in each group of growers before and after feeding. Results No clinical health problems related to diet were noted during the three week feeding trial. The average daily gain (ADG) and selected blood parameters were not affected by the addition to basal diet of either acids and tannin or of organic acids alone. Selected blood parameters remained within the reference range before and after the feeding trial, with the exception of total serum proteins that were below the lower value of reference range at both times. The significant changes (paired t-test) observed in individual groups before and after the feeding trial are related to the growth of pigs. Conclusion Diet with acids and tannin did not improve the growth performance of grower pigs but had no deleterious effects on selected blood parameters. The possibility of beneficial effects of adding acids and tannin in diets on growth performance over a longer period, however, could not be excluded. PMID:20205921

  5. The Effect of Cement Dust Exposure on Haematological Parameters of Cement Factory workers in Nalagonda, Andhra Pradesh.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguloth, Mohan Rao.; Sambanaik, A.; srinivasnaik, L.; Mude, Jagadishnaik.

    2012-10-01

    This study was measured on haematological parameters in workers exposed to cement dust in order to test the the hypothesis and to identify a simple, readily available, cost effective screening test that could help in identifying the presence of disease, its severity, that Cement dust exposure may perturb these functions related to their workplace.Assesment of haematological parameters were performed in 100exposed workers occupationally exposed to cement dust and 50 matched unexposed controls with ages ranging from 20-35, 35-50, 50-65 years. The blood samples were taken from them and percentage of hemoglobin, Lymphocytes / monocytes count were analysed.The hemoglobin percentage of exposed workers were significantly lower(P<0.05).Lymphocytes/Monocytes counts of exposed workers was insignificant (P<0.05).These results suggest that long term occupational exposure to cement dust may perturb haemopoietic function.

  6. Epidemiology of invasive fungal diseases among patients with haematological disorders in the Asia-Pacific: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, L Y; Lee, D G; Yeh, S P; Bhurani, D; Khanh, B Q; Low, C Y; Norasetthada, L; Chan, T; Kwong, Y L; Vaid, A K; Alejandria, I; Mendoza, M; Chen, C Y; Johnson, A; Tan, T Y

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a 2-year multicentre prospective observational study to determine the epidemiology of and mortality associated with invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) among patients with haematological disorders in Asia. Eleven institutions from 8 countries/regions participated, with 412 subjects (28.2% possible, 38.3% probable and 33.5% proven IFDs) recruited. The epidemiology of IFDs in participating institutions was similar to Western centres, with Aspergillus spp. (65.9%) or Candida spp. (26.7%) causing the majority of probable and proven IFDs. The overall 30-day mortality was 22.1%. Progressive haematological disorder (odds ratio [OR] 5.192), invasive candidiasis (OR 3.679), and chronic renal disease (OR 6.677) were independently associated with mortality. PMID:25749561

  7. CHEMISTRY 108-01 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 108-01 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II Fall Term, 2002 10:00 - 10:50 am, MWThF CNSB 243 INSTRUCTOR-1835 Email: findley@ulm.edu URL: www.ulm.edu/chemistry/findley COURSE Content: Principles of modern chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 108 is the second semester of a fundamental introduction to chemistry

  8. CHEMISTRY 107-01 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 107-01 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I Spring 2002 8:00 am - 8:50 am, MTuWTh Rm. CNSB 243 INSTRUCTOR-1835 Email: chfindley@ulm.edu URL: http://www.ulm.edu/chemistry/findley COURSE Content: Principles of modern chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 107 is the first semester of a fundamental introduction to chemistry

  9. Chem 681 Quantum Chemistry Chemistry 681

    E-print Network

    ]. The physical chemistry text by McQuarrie & Simon [3] (used in Chem 390) also has relevant material. The third] McQuarrie and Simon, Physical Chemistry (University Science Books). [4] R.P. Feynman, R.B. LeightonChem 681 Quantum Chemistry Chemistry 681 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry Fall 2003 BIBLIOGRAPHY

  10. CHEMISTRY 321 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 321 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I Fall 2009 2:00 - 5:00 pm, F CNSB 142 INSTRUCTOR techniques of physical chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: Physical Chemistry Laboratory introduces the student analysis software and IEEE-488 electronic devices. The focus for Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

  11. CHEMISTRY 323 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 323 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II Spring 2010 2:00 - 5:00 pm, F CNSB 142 INSTRUCTOR techniques of physical chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: Physical Chemistry Laboratory introduces the student analysis software and IEEE-488 electronic devices. The focus for Physical Chemistry Laboratory II

  12. Chemistry Now

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-17

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently teamed up with NBC and the National Science Teachers Association to celebrate the International Year of Chemistry. Their big joint project was to create Chemistry Now, a weekly online video series that uncovers and explains the science of common, physical objects. There are over two dozen short films here that cover topics like the chemistry of salt, grapheme, safety glass, and the common cheeseburger. All of the videos are lively and interesting, and they can be used in a wide range of classroom settings to provide visual and audio reinforcement of topics that might be addressed in course lectures and other activities. The videos are completely free and the site includes links to other organizations that have created similar videos.

  13. Chemistry & Industry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    Chemistry and Industry Magazine, a bimonthly product of the Society of Chemical Industry, provides selected full-text articles from the print magazine in the areas of news, commentary, features, latest results from chemical literature, and highlights from the latest European patents. In addition, there is a searchable and browsable archive of past issues, a daily news section, and searchable jobs and meetings databases. The Society of Chemical Industry is "an international association of about 6000 members aimed at furthering applied chemistry." One of the highlights of its web site is its publication section, where, under "electronic publications," readers can find updated daily news, jobs and meetings listings on chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and the environment.

  14. Impact of HPAI H5N1 infection on select blood chemistry and gas ranges in layers, broilers and turkeys using the i-STAT Clinical Analyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of poultry with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 typically results in mortality within six days of inoculation. However, the exact mechanisms that induce death are unknown, even as birds may die in the absence of overt clinical signs of disease. In human and many veterinary ...

  15. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Telfairia occidentalis Leaf on the Performance and Haematological Indices of Starter Broilers

    PubMed Central

    P. N., Onu

    2012-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of aqueous extract of Telfairia occidentalis (Fluted Pumpkin) leaf on the performance and haematological indices of starter broilers. A total of 200, 8-day-old broiler chicks were randomly allotted to five (5) treatments, each with 4 replicate groups containing 10 chicks and fed with standard starter broiler diets. Telfaria occidentalis leaves extract (FPLE) was added at 0, 40, 80, 120, and 160?mL/litre of drinking water. Growth performance and haematological indices were evaluated. Results showed that there was significant (P < 0.05) difference in weight gain, feed conversion, and protein efficiency ratios of the birds among the treatments. Birds fed 80?ml FPLE/litre of water had significantly the highest weight gain and the best feed conversion and protein efficiency ratios. There was no significant (P > 0.05) variations in the feed and water intakes of the birds. Results also show no significant (P > 0.05) difference in haematological indices of birds among the treatments. The results of this study indicate that, for enhanced weight gain and feed conversion efficiency, birds should be fed 80?mL FPLE/litre of water. PMID:23738128

  16. Outbreak of Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in the Haematology Unit of a South African Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mudau, Maanda; Jacobson, Rachael; Minenza, Nadia; Kuonza, Lazarus; Morris, Vida; Engelbrecht, Heather; Nicol, Mark P.; Bamford, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe an outbreak of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections (MRPA-BSI) that occurred in the haematology ward of a tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, and determine risk factors for acquisition of MRPA-BSI. Methods The outbreak investigation included a search for additional cases, review of patient records, environmental and staff screening, molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Multi-locus sequencing (MLST) and a retrospective case-control study. Results Ten MRPA-BSI cases occurred in the haematology ward between January 2010 and January 2011. The case fatality rate was 80%. Staff screening specimens were negative for MRPA and an environmental source was not identified. PFGE showed that 9/10 isolates were related. MLST showed that 3 of these 9 isolates belonged to Sequence type (ST) 233 while the unrelated isolate belonged to ST260. Conclusion We have described an outbreak of MRPA-BSI occurring over an extended period of time among neutropenic haematology patients. Molecular typing confirms that the outbreak was predominantly due to a single strain. The source of the outbreak was not identified, but the outbreak appears to have been controlled following intensive infection control measures. PMID:23516393

  17. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  18. 77 FR 60440 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...studies, and chemistry/ manufacturing information) that supports initial clinical trials in humans. Presenters will discuss the role of clinical pharmacology in early clinical studies and how this information is used in the design of...

  19. 78 FR 63988 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...studies, and chemistry/ manufacturing information) that supports initial clinical trials in humans. Presenters will discuss the role of clinical pharmacology in early clinical studies and how this information is used in the design of...

  20. Changes in haematological profile of common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) induced by transit to pheasantry.

    PubMed

    Voslarova, E; Bedanova, I; Vecerek, V; Pistekova, V; Chloupek, P; Suchy, P

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess haematological changes in hand-reared pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) transported from intensive housing facilities to a pheasantry. Selected haematological parameters were monitored in a group of 100 pheasants (50 males and 50 females) aged of 9 weeks that were transported for 4 hours by a covered lorry in crates, with a total body weight of 12 +/- 0.5 kg per crate (Group C12 - floor space: 290 cm2/kg) and with a total body weight of 18 +/- 0.5 kg per crate (Group C18 - floor space: 195 cm2/kg). Blood samples were taken from 10 randomly selected males and 10 females before transport (CON group) and 20 hours after transport (C12 and C18 groups). Examinations consisted in determining the total erythrocyte and leukocyte counts, haematocrit values, haemoglobin levels and differential leukocyte counts, whereby the proportions of heterophil, basophil and eosinophil granulocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes of the total leukocytes were computed. The changes in the parameters of red blood cell count were manifested by an increase (P < 0.01) in the haemoglobin level, MCH (mean cell haemoglobin) and MCHC (mean cell haemoglobin concentration) values and a decrease (P < 0.01) in the total erythrocyte count and haematocrit level in both C12 and C18 pheasants, when compared with the control group of non-transported pheasants. C18 pheasants exhibited also a significant increase (P < 0.05) in MCV (mean cell value) value. When analyzing differential leukocyte counts, C18 pheasants showed a decrease (P < 0.01) in heterophil counts and H/L ratio, whereas values in C12 pheasants did not differ from the non-transported control group. Individual counts of lymphocytes were decreased (P < 0.05) in C12 pheasants, whereas basophil counts were increased (P < 0.01) in both C12 and C18 pheasants. Total leukocyte count was decreased (P < 0.01) in C12 and C18 pheasants. In conclusion, the specific requirements of pheasants, as primarily wild animals, for the density in crates should be respected during transportation and they should be transported at lower densities than other poultry species, at least 290 cm2/kg live weight should be provided. PMID:17078531

  1. Multivitamin supplementation improves haematologic status in children born to HIV-positive women in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enju; Duggan, Christopher; Manji, Karim P; Kupka, Roland; Aboud, Said; Bosch, Ronald J; Kisenge, Rodrick R; Okuma, James; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anaemia is prevalent among children born to HIV-positive women, and it is associated with adverse effects on cognitive and motor development, growth, and increased risks of morbidity and mortality. Objective To examine the effect of daily multivitamin supplementation on haematologic status and mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV through breastfeeding. Methods A total of 2387 infants born to HIV-positive women from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, and provided a daily oral supplement of multivitamins (vitamin B complex, C and E) or placebo at age 6 weeks for 24 months. Among them, 2008 infants provided blood samples and had haemoglobin concentrations measured at baseline and during a follow-up period. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin concentrations<11 g/dL and severe anaemia<8.5 g/dL. Results Haemoglobin concentrations among children in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the placebo group at 12 (9.77 vs. 9.64 g/dL, p=0.03), 18 (9.76 vs. 9.57 g/dL, p=0.004), and 24 months (9.93 vs. 9.75 g/dL, p=0.02) of follow-up. Compared to those in the placebo group, children in the treatment group had a 12% lower risk of anaemia (hazard ratio (HR): 0.88; 95% CI: 0.79–0.99; p=0.03). The treatment was associated with a 28% reduced risk of severe anaemia among children born to women without anaemia (HR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.56–0.92; p=0.008), but not among those born to women with anaemia (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.79–1.54; p=0.57; p for interaction=0.007). One thousand seven hundred fifty three infants who tested HIV-negative at baseline and had HIV testing during follow-up were included in the analysis for MTCT of HIV. No association was found between multivitamin supplements and MTCT of HIV. Conclusions Multivitamin supplements improve haematologic status among children born to HIV-positive women. Further trials focusing on anaemia among HIV-exposed children are warranted in the context of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:23948440

  2. Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II

    E-print Network

    Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II for Prehealth Professionals Unique number: 52365 Spring 2013 M students can access the information. #12;Required Text: Brown, Foote, Iverson, & Anslyn Organic Chemistry

  3. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  4. Nuclear Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page, from the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Chemistry Fundamentals program and the Shodor Education Foundation, discusses five different types of radioactive decay: alpha, beta negative, gamma, positron emission, and electron capture. After examining the numerous equations, students can test their dating skills by solving three practice problems. Solutions are included.

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  7. Green Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2010-02-12

    This audio segment from PRI's The World Science Podcast explores the science of Green Chemistry. Hear about companies that are developing greener chemicals, and learn why they are fast becoming an attractive alternative for the multi-billion dollar chemical industry.

  8. Countertop Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chemistry activities and demonstrations that use common household items and kitchen chemicals. There are activities appropriate for students in elementary school, middle school, and high school. The activities were designed and tested by the Science House, the science and mathematics learning outreach program of North Carolina State University.

  9. Chemistry Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of resource features demonstrations, laboratory investigations, teaching tips, worksheets and other chemistry-related activities. Materials include investigations of mols, nuclear energy, the periodic table, weight and mass, elements, calculations, equations, pH, atomic weight, half-lives, and reactions.

  10. Analytical Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hardy, James K.

    This site features lecture notes for first and second level courses in analytical chemistry. Topics include titrations, gravimetry, kinetics and electrochemistry (redox). Potentiometry, coulometry, voltammetry, spectroscopic and separation methods are presented as well, and are illustrated with QuickTime animations.

  11. Common Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS)

    A web resource that contains Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Numbers for approximately 7,800 chemicals of widespread general public interest. Common Chemistry is helpful to non-chemists who know either a name or CAS Registry Number® of a common chemical and want to pair both pieces of information.

  12. Atmospheric Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This set of links provides access to resources on atmospheric chemistry, especially acid deposition, air pollution, and air quality. The sites include personal and government pages, universities and research groups, non-governmental organizations and meetings, and products and services. There are also links to related search topics.

  13. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  14. Fall 2011 Chemistry 676

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Fall 2011 Chemistry 676 "Introduction to organic synthesis: Methodology" T chemistry, olefination reactions, cross coupling chemistry, and modern transition metal are due by 1200 (noon) in my office (CST 3-008) or my mailbox in the chemistry

  15. Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians

    MedlinePLUS

    ... laboratory technology includes courses in chemistry, biology, microbiology, mathematics, and statistics, as well as courses in clinical ... sciences should take courses in chemistry, biology, and mathematics. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations Some states require laboratory ...

  16. Infection control issues in patients with haematological malignancies in the era of multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, Markus; Arnold, Renate; Gastmeier, Petra

    2014-12-01

    Drug-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria are now increasingly identified as a cause of infections in immunocompromised hosts. Bacteria identified include the multidrug-resistant (MDR) and even pandrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae spp. The threat from MDR pathogens has been well-documented in the past decade with warnings about the consequences of inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs. Resistant bacteria can substantially complicate the treatment of infections in critically ill patients and can have a substantial effect on mortality. Inappropriate antimicrobial treatment can affect morbidity, mortality, and overall health-care costs. Evidence-based data for prevention and control of MDR pathogen infections in haematology are scarce. Although not yet established a bundle of infection control and prevention measures with an anti-infective stewardship programme is an important strategy in infection control, diagnosis, and antibiotic selection with optimum regimens to ensure a successful outcome for patients. PMID:25456379

  17. Automated counting of cells in cerebrospinal fluid using the CellDyn-4000 haematology analyser.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L; Janssen, Willy C M

    2002-11-01

    Counting of cells in cerebrospinal fluid is currently performed manually. Because of the inherent analytical and economical disadvantages, we attempted to introduce a fully automated method. Therefore, we validated the Abbott CellDyn-4000 haematology analyser for counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid. The analyser was used in its standard configuration with the simple precaution of a preceding blank sample. As for leukocyte counting the analyser yielded high precision (CV approximately 5% above the upper reference limit), good linearity, low limit of detection (2/microl) and excellent correlation (r > 0.99) with the counting chamber method. The differential leukocyte count was equally accurate and precise, even in the low concentration range. Performance of the erythrocyte count was impaired by its high limit of detection (6/nl) and it appeared satisfactory only for detecting blood admixture due to traumatic puncture. The specificity of the analyser is excellent, since it correctly classified non-viable leukocytes and excluded yeast cells from the leukocyte count in a patient with cryptococcal meningitis. We conclude that the CellDyn-4000 is well suited for quickly and reliably counting leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid. Developing some software modifications might make the analyser useful also for performing erythrocyte counting in cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:12521237

  18. Chronic diclofenac (DCF) exposure alters both enzymatic and haematological profile of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Ajima, Malachy N O; Ogo, Ogo A; Audu, Bala S; Ugwoegbu, Kyrian C

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Pharmaceuticals are used extensively in human and veterinary medicine to eradicate or prevent diseases. The residues of these drugs have been detected in aquatic ecosystem; nevertheless, their toxicological effects on Clarias gariepinus have not been critically investigated. In this study, the toxic effects of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug, were studied in C. gariepinus by acute and chronic static renewable bioassay. The 96?h LC50 of DCF to C. gariepinus was 25.12?mg/L. Exposure to acute toxicity resulted in abnormal behavior and mortality of some fish. Compared with the control, chronic exposure of the fish to concentration (1.57, 3.14 and 6.28?mg/L) showed significantly higher mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and white blood cell (WBC), with significantly lower haemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit, red blood cell (RBC) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) with increase in the concentration of the drug. Furthermore, the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glucose values significantly increased while protein levels were reduced (p?haematological changes in the fish and recommends that these parameters be used as potential biomarkers for assessing residual pharmaceuticals available in aquatic ecosystem. PMID:25367777

  19. Evaluation of the Vega haematology analyser in a university hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Corberand, J X; Segonds, C; Fontanilles, A M; Cambus, J P; Fillola, G; Laharrague, P

    1999-02-01

    The performance of the ABX Vega haematology analyser was compared with that of the Sysmex NE-8000, with specific attention to flagging performance and ergonomics. Eight hundred routine samples underwent precision and interinstrument variability studies and 168 samples corresponding to various blood disorders were studied meanwhile. Results from the two instruments gave excellent correlation (r > 0.900) for most parameters except MCHC (r = 0.114), basophil and monocyte percentages (r = 0.617 and 0.552, respectively). The reproducibility, repeatability, linearity, carry-over and stability of the Vega were satisfactory; 'flagging' occurred in 31% of routine samples with sensitivity 88.8%, specificity 41.3% and positive predictive value 85.7%. Various flags appeared in 91% (42/46) of cases where blast cells were microscopically identified. In the four remaining cases, CBC anomalies would themselves have justified microscopic examination of a smear. On 'CBC only' mode reagent consumption was significantly reduced. In the laboratory the analyser was best appreciated for its user-friendliness. PMID:10197256

  20. Effect of aerobic exercise on premenstrual symptoms, haematological and hormonal parameters in young women.

    PubMed

    El-Lithy, A; El-Mazny, A; Sabbour, A; El-Deeb, A

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aerobic exercise on premenstrual symptoms, haematological and hormonal parameters in young women. A total of 30 participants aged 16-20 years and complaining of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) were randomly assigned into two groups: a control group received vitamin B6 and Ca supplements once daily and a study group received the same medical treatment and participated in treadmill training three times per week for 3 months. A premenstrual syndrome questionnaire (MSQ), complete blood picture and hormone assays were performed for the assessment of all participants at the start and after the end of the treatment course. The study group showed a significant decrease in all post-treatment subscale symptoms, scores and total score. Haemoglobin, haematocrit, red cell count and platelet count were significantly increased, while mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and white blood cell count showed no significant differences. There was also a significant decrease in prolactin, oestradiol and progesterone levels. In conclusion, aerobic exercise increases haemoglobin, haematocrit, red cell count and platelet count, and decreases levels of prolactin, oestradiol and progesterone, resulting in improvement of fatigue, impaired concentration, confusion and most premenstrual symptoms. PMID:25279689

  1. Effect of Intensity of Cigarette Smoking on Haematological and Lipid Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Anandhi; P, Ganesh Kumar; A, Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Smoking is the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death and major tobacco related diseases like cancer costs India more than Rs.308.33 billion per year. Cigarette smoking increases the total peripheral blood leukocyte count but its effect on other haematological parameters is largely unexplored.. Objective: To study the effect of smoking and its intensity on hematological and lipid parameters. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study included 40 cigarette smokers and 40 non-smokers in the age range of 25 and 40 years at SRM Medical College, Kattangulathur, Tamilnadu, India. In this study the volunteers were otherwise healthy and the smokers were enquired about their intensity of smoking using smoking index. Common hematological and lipid parameters were measured in all subjects. Comparison of smoking status and its intensity among the study subjects were analysed using t-test and ANOVA.. Results: There is a significant increase in levels of haemoglobin, hematocrit, total leukocyte count, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein (LDL), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and reduced levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) among the smokers. Heavy smokers showed significant dyslipidemia,increase in red blood cell count, total leukocyte count and neutrophil count. Conclusion: Increase in hemoglobin, hematocrit, total leucocyte count and dyslipidemia were found significant among smokers and in heavy smokers there is dyslipidemia with increased RBC count, total leukocyte count with specific increase in neutrophils. As per the existing literature, these changes may lead to future fatal cardiac diseases among the smokers. PMID:25177557

  2. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for...

  3. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for...

  4. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for...

  5. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for...

  6. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2230 Chromatographic separation...

  7. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer,...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption...

  9. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2230 Chromatographic separation...

  10. Resin Chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Pilato

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a During the ensuing years since the last phenolic resins book was published, many new and remarkable developments have occurred\\u000a in the realm of phenolic chemistry and are given in this chapter.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a A critical examination of the first step or addition step (methylolation) in the preparation of resoles is described and how\\u000a it can be controlled and compared with the typical

  11. 21 CFR 862.2800 - Refractometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2800 Refractometer for clinical...

  12. 21 CFR 862.2560 - Fluorometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2560 Fluorometer for clinical...

  13. Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2010)

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    2010-01-01

    1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2010) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye: M-W 4:00-5:00, and by appointment Credits: 3 Text: (Required) Shriver & Atkins, "Inorganic Chemistry. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

  14. CHEMISTRY 3022-63067 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 3022-63067 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II Spring 2014 8:00 am - 8:50 am, MWF CNSB 211 INSTRUCTOR interpretations of the physical principles of chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 3022 presents chemical principles: Physical Chemistry, R. Stephen Berry, Stuart A. Rice and John Ross, 2nd ed. (Oxford Univ. Press, New York

  15. CHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    CHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Laya Kesner, HEB - 002 H ST 205 11:50 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Teaching Assistant: Chem 1010-002 Michelle Taliaferro, michelle@chemistry; 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Textbook: Chemistry for Changing Times, 10th Edition, Hill & Kolb, Prentice

  16. Chemistry 211 General Chemistry Laboratory II

    E-print Network

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Chemistry 211 General Chemistry Laboratory II Fall 2014 Instructor Dr. Michelle Greene Office: Neckers 295 Office Hours: by appointment Phone: TBA E-mail: mgreene@chem.siu.edu Text Chemistry 211 University Carbondale) Course Description "General Chemistry Laboratory II" is an introductory level

  17. CHEMISTRY 162 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II SPRING 2008

    E-print Network

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    1 of 10 CHEMISTRY 162 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II SPRING 2008 Lead Instructor Professor Mark S. Cracolice survey of chemistry. We follow the standard curriculum in the United States, as suggested by the American an introduction to the principles of physical and inorganic chemistry appropriate for the level of knowledge

  18. CHEMISTRY 3020-43256 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 3020-43256 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I Fall 2013 8:00 am - 8:50 am, MWF SUGAR 259 INSTRUCTOR interpretations of the physical principles of chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 3020 presents chemical principles foundations of modern chemistry. Topics covered include: introduction to quantum theory, atomic structure

  19. SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Lectures: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8:35 AM-9 Chemistry" by Janice Gorzynski Smith, McGraw Hill, 3rd Edition, 2010 [2nd Edition will suffice]. The ebook · Highly Recommended Equipment: Turning Point Clicker · Highly Recommended: (1) "Organic Chemistry I

  20. CHEMISTRY 3020-42232 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 3020-42232 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I Fall 2011 8:00 am - 8:50 am, MWF CNSB 211 INSTRUCTOR interpretations of the physical principles of chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 3020 presents chemical principles.) REQUIREMENTS Prerequisites: "C" or better in CHEM 1008; PHYS 2008; MATH 1032. Text: Physical Chemistry, P

  1. CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Chem 315 (Honors Organic Chemistry)

    E-print Network

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Chem 315 (Honors Organic Chemistry) Fall 2014 Important Registration Information Admission to Honors Organic Chemistry (Fall 2014) is restricted to the following students: Students who received an A in both semesters of General Chemistry (159 and 160 OR 161 and 162 OR 163

  2. CHEMISTRY 3022-62169 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 3022-62169 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II Spring 2012 8:00 am - 8:50 am, MWF CNSB 211 INSTRUCTOR interpretations of the physical principles of chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: CHEM 3022, which is a continuation of CHEM 3020, focuses of the quantum theoretical foundations of modern chemistry. Topics covered include

  3. Chemistry 224 Fall 2008 Honors General Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Chemistry 224 Fall 2008 Honors General Chemistry Dr. Greg Williams Office hours: Onyx 182 Tu and Th 110 Required Materials: Textbook General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications by R. Petrucci Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry and one year of high school physics are the minimum

  4. CHEMISTRY CONNECTION Northwestern University Department of Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    CHEMISTRY CONNECTION Northwestern University Department of Chemistry In this Issue Faculty News 2. The team, representing four departments and schools at Northwestern (Chemistry, Kellogg/ Business, Law is stored in motor vehicle gas tanks. Omar Farha, Chemistry Research Associate Professor, along with Chris

  5. Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry

    E-print Network

    John Grey Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Email: jkgrey of Physical Chemistry C (2010) ACS ASAP. 2. "Resonance Raman Spectroscopic- and Photocurrent Imaging of Polythiophene/Fullerene Solar Cells" Y.Gao, T.P. Martin, A.K. Thomas, J.K. Grey. Journal of Physical Chemistry

  6. Retrospective study of clinical and hematological aspects associated with dogs naturally infected by Hepatozoon canis in Ludhiana, Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Sushma; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Singla, Lachhman Das

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical and hematological aspects of dogs naturally infected with Hepatozoon canis (H. canis) presented at the Small Animal Clinics of Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana. Methods Blood films of 34 naturally infected dogs were examined for haematological alterations and parasitaemia. Signalment and clinical signs were recorded from the animals. Clinical histories were filled out during the consultation. Results Of the 34 positive dogs by Giemsa stained peripheral blood films, 88.23% presented parasitaemia by H. canis only, while 11.77% had the combination of H. canis, Babesia sp. and Ehrlichia sp. Young male dogs less than one-year-old, of non-descript breed, were the most commonly affected. And 26.47% were presented with anorexia/inappetence as the only clinical symptom. Other clinical symptoms were mild to moderate fever, pale mucosae and lethargy; a few were also showing the signs of vomiting and diarrhoea. Haematological alterations showed mainly normochromic-normocytic anaemia, leukocytosis and neutrophilia. Conclusions The findings of this study substantiate that H. canis caused clinical and haematological alterations of the varied intensity in dogs, even with low parasitaemia, should be taken into consideration. PMID:23730562

  7. Cytogenetic, immunological, and haematological effects in workers in an ethylene oxide manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Van Sittert, N J; de Jong, G; Clare, M G; Davies, R; Dean, B J; Wren, L J; Wright, A S

    1985-01-01

    Samples of blood were collected from a group of plant workers engaged in the manufacture of ethylene oxide (EO) for periods of up to 14 years and also from a group of control personnel matched by age and smoking habits. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for cytogenetic analysis. Selected immune and haematological parameters were also investigated. The results of these studies showed no statistically significant difference between the group of plant workers and the control group in respect of any of the biological parameters investigated in this study. Nevertheless, duration of employment in EO manufacturing was positively correlated (p less than 0.05) with the frequency of chromosome breaks and with the percentage of neutrophils in a differential white blood cell count and negatively correlated (p less than 0.05) with the percentage of lymphocytes. As the values of these parameters remained within the normal limits of control populations, the correlations were considered to have no significance for health. Atmospheric concentrations of EO were determined using personnel air samplers and were generally below the detection limit (less than 0.05 ppm) during stable plant operations, although transient concentrations of up to 8 ppm were occasionally recorded. The amount of alkylation (2-hydroxyethyl groups) of the Nt atom of histidinyl residues in haemoglobin was also measured in an attempt to gauge recent individual exposures to EO. Variable but, in most instances, readily measurable amounts of Nt-(2'-hydroxyethyl)-L-histidine (Nt represents the N3 atom of histidine) were found in the haemoglobin of plant workers and in the control group who had not knowingly been exposed to an exogenous source of EO. There was no statistically significant difference between the results obtained in the control group and in the group of plant workers. PMID:3965011

  8. A case/control study of adult haematological malignancies in relation to overhead powerlines.

    PubMed Central

    Youngson, J. H.; Clayden, A. D.; Myers, A.; Cartwright, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    A population based case control study of adult haematological malignancy and distance from, and magnetic fields associated with, overhead (OH) power lines has been carried out in the North West and Yorkshire regions of England. Three-thousand, one hundred and forty-four cases with histologically proven disease were entered into the study. One control per case, matched for age, sex, year of diagnosis and health district of residence, was selected from hospital discharges. Seven per cent of cases and controls lived near to OH power lines as defined by the study protocol. The measure of exposure used was the calculated magnetic field strength at each of these addresses due to maximum load currents carried by OH power lines in the 5 years preceding diagnosis. The odds ratio (OR) for living within 50 m of an OH line was 1.29 with a 95% Confidence Interval (CI) of 0.99-1.68 but a chi 2 test for trend with distance was not statistically significant. The analysis of calculated magnetic fields, did not produce any statistically odds ratios. The OR for magnetic fields greater than or equal to 0.1 mG was 1.03 (95% CI 0.81 1.32). Analysis of magnetic fields greater than or equal to 3.0 mG gave an OR of 1.87 (95% CI 0.79 4.42), but this result is based on small numbers. No evidence was found for confounding by the type of dwelling which was used as a partial surrogate for socio-economic status. PMID:2069855

  9. Effect of recombinant human interleukin-3 on haematological recovery from chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Tepler, I; Elias, A; Kalish, L; Shulman, L; Strauss, G; Skarin, A; Lynch, T; Levitt, D; Resta, D; Demetri, G

    1994-08-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with ICE chemotherapy (ifosfamide 2000 mg/m2, days 1-3; carboplatin 300 mg/m2, day 1; etoposide 75 mg/m2, days 1-3) intravenously (i.v.) during the first 3 d of a maximum of four 28 d treatment cycles. Interleukin-3 (IL-3) was administered in cycles 2 and 4 as a daily subcutaneous (s.c.) injection on days 5-18. Cohorts of three patients were treated at dosage levels of 0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 and 15.0 micrograms/kg/d. At 15.0 micrograms/kg/d a 'flu-like' syndrome of myalgias, arthralgias and fatigue was considered dose-limiting. Other toxicities were headache, fever, urticaria, arrhythmia, chills and flushing. Subsequently, nine patients were added to the group receiving 10 micrograms/kg/d. 27 patients received IL-3 after their second course of ICE. At 10 and 15 micrograms/kg/d, IL-3 in cycle 2 was associated with enhanced haematological recovery. Depth of neutrophil nadir and days of neutropenia (ANC < 0.5 x 10(9)/l) were reduced in 9/13 patients and in 8/11 patients, respectively. No effect was seen on platelet nadir or days of thrombocytopenia. IL-3 was well tolerated up to 10 micrograms/kg/d when given as a daily s.c. injection. Results suggest IL-3 as a potential adjunct to chemotherapy, and further studies to explore administration of IL-3 in combination with other cytokines in this setting are warranted. PMID:7986706

  10. Pre-adaptation, adaptation and de-adaptation to high altitude in humans: cardio-ventilatory and haematological changes.

    PubMed

    Savourey, G; Garcia, N; Besnard, Y; Guinet, A; Hanniquet, A M; Bittel, J

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was first to investigate cardio-ventilatory and haematological responses induced by intermittent acclimation and second to study de-adaptation from high altitude observed after descent. To achieve these objectives nine subjects were submitted to intermittent acclimation in a low barometric chamber (8 h daily for 5 days, day 1 at 4500 m, day 5 at 8500 m) before an expedition to the Himalayas. Cardio-ventilatory changes were measured during a hypobaric poikilocapnic hypoxic test (4500 m, barometric pressure = 589 hPa) and haematological changes were studied at sea level. These measurements were performed before and after acclimation, after return to sea level, but also 1 and 2 months after the expedition. In addition, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaO2, PaCO2) and arterial erythropoietin concentration [EPO] were measured at rest during the hypoxic test. Results suggested the pre-adaptation protocol was efficient since an increased PaO2 (+12%, P < 0.05), a smaller difference in alveolo-arterial PO2 ( -63%, P < 0.05) and a lower PaCO2 ( -11%, P < 0.05), subsequent to ventilatory changes, were observed after acclimation with a significant increase in reticulocytes and in sea level [EPO] (+44% and +62% respectively, P < 0.05). De-adaptation was characterized by a loss of these cardio-ventilatory changes 1 month after descent, whereas the haematological changes (increased red blood cells and packed cell volume, P < 0.05) persisted for 1 month before disappearing 2 months after descent. This study would also suggest that acute hypoxia performed after a sojourn at high altitude could induce significantly depressed EPO responses (P < 0.05). PMID:8817123

  11. Routine versus clinically driven laboratory monitoring of HIV antiretroviral therapy in Africa (DART): a randomised non-inferiority trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2010-01-01

    Methods In this open, non-inferiority trial in three centres in Uganda and one in Zimbabwe, 3321 symptomatic, ART- naive, HIV-infected adults with CD4 counts less than 200 cells per ?L starting ART were randomly assigned to laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM; n=1659) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM; n=1662) by a computer- generated list. Haematology, biochemistry, and CD4-cell counts were done

  12. Azulene Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The month's featured molecules come from the paper An Azulene-Based Discovery Experiment: Challenging Students To Watch for the "False Assumption" by Charles Garner illustrating some of the chemistry of a substituted azulene. Azulene is a structural isomer of naphthalene and differs from it in several important ways, the most obvious being azulene's intense blue color, which arises from the S0 ? S2 transition. Another unusual feature of this molecule is that its fluorescence arises from the reverse of this transition rather than from S1 ? S0.

  13. Interstellar chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature. PMID:16894148

  14. Chemistry References

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kim

    2007-08-08

    This site highlights chemistry resources that we consider essentiala fabulous periodic table, a database of chemical compounds, a set of demonstrations of chemical reactions that are just plain spectacular, and, dont forget, laboratory safety. Articles from the web sites Whats That Stuff? and Science News for Kids can be used as supplemental reading all through the year. This site explains the history and characteristics of over 20 substances, such as sunscreen, Cheese Whiz, baseballs, fluoride, new car smell, ink, lipstick, bug spray, and licorice. The individual articles are nontechnical for the most part and are presented in a fun way that readers will enjoy. Also, if a ...

  15. Is admission screening for Pseudomonas aeruginosa useful in haematologic patients? A prospective study with 1310 patients.

    PubMed

    Sidler, J A; Frei, R; Tschudin-Sutter, S; Dangel, M; Battegay, M; Weisser, M; Passweg, J; Widmer, A F

    2015-06-01

    Screening for Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recommended to guide empirical antimicrobial therapy in patients on high-risk units. However, evidence for this approach is scarce. We therefore screened 1310 patients with severe haematologic diseases for P. aeruginosa colonization at admission: 108 (8.2%) were positive, but only nine (0.7%; six with the same clone as in the screening isolate) subsequently developed a P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection (positive predictive value of screening, 8.6%; negative predictive value of screening, 99.5%). Routine screening for P. aeruginosa at admission did not sufficiently predict subsequent bloodstream infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:25680312

  16. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Gregg, Richard; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether alternative agents (e.g. artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, thrombopoietin mimetics) are as effective and safe as the use of platelet transfusions for the prevention of bleeding (prophylactic platelet transfusion) in patients with haematological disorders who are undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Antifibrinolytics (lysine analogues) will not be included in this review because they have been the focus of another Cochrane review (Wardrop 2013). PMID:25722650

  17. Clinical presentation of coeliac disease in adult gastroenterological practice

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, S; Collins, B J; Bell, P M; Love, A H G

    1985-01-01

    Clinical features, complications and results of investigations are analysed in 50 patients diagnosed by jejunal biopsy as having coeliac disease at the Adult Gastroenterology Unit, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, between 1969 and 1983. Only one patient was entirely asymptomatic, but 22% had no disturbance of bowel habit, and 50% had not lost weight. There were relatively few physical abnormalities on clinical examination. Screening tests using standard haematological and biochemical methods were positive only in between 8% and 52% of patients. More specific tests for malabsorption were positive in between 54% and 84% of patients. Jejunal biopsy remains the definitive procedure to identify patients with coeliac disease. PMID:4095802

  18. Influence of Ascorbic Acid Supplementation on the Haematological and Clinical Biochemistry Parameters of Male Rabbits Exposed to Aflatoxin B1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. Yousef; M. H. Salem; K. I. Kamel; G. A. Hassan

    2003-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of L?ascorbic acid (AA) in alleviating the toxicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in male New?Zealand white rabbits. Five rabbits (6 months of age and mean body weight 3.12 kg) per group were assigned to 1 of 6 treatment groups: 0 mg AA and 0 mg AFB1\\/kg BW (control); 20 mg AA\\/kg BW;

  19. Comparative Haematological Screening of Urban and Rural Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinics in Lagos and Its Environs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abidoye, R. O.; Olukoya, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Compared blood screening data for 200 urban and rural pregnant women in Nigeria. Found that rural subjects had a greater incidence of moderate anemia than did urban subjects, and corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations fell with increased gestational age. No relationship was found between hemoglobin counts and nutrition habits. (HTH)

  20. Primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients with hematologic malignancies. Recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Cornely, Oliver A.; Böhme, Angelika; Buchheidt, Dieter; Einsele, Hermann; Heinz, Werner J.; Karthaus, Meinolf; Krause, Stefan W.; Krüger, William; Maschmeyer, Georg; Penack, Olaf; Ritter, Jörg; Ruhnke, Markus; Sandherr, Michael; Sieniawski, Michal; Vehreschild, Jörg-Janne; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Ullmann, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    There is no widely accepted standard for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. The Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology assigned a committee of hematologists and infectious disease specialists to develop recommendations. Literature data bases were systematically searched for clinical trials on antifungal prophylaxis. The studies identified were shared within the committee. Data were extracted by two of the authors (OAC and MSi). The consensus process was conducted by email communication. Finally, a review committee discussed the proposed recommendations. After consensus was established the recommendations were finalized. A total of 86 trials were identified including 16,922 patients. Only a few trials yielded significant differences in efficacy. Fluconazole 400 mg/d improved the incidence rates of invasive fungal infections and attributable mortality in allogeneic stem cell recipients. Posaconazole 600 mg/d reduced the incidence of IFI and attributable mortality in allogeneic stem cell recipients with severe graft versus host disease, and in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome additionally reduced overall mortality. Aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B reduced the incidence rate of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Posaconazole 600 mg/d is recommended in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome or undergoing allogeneic stem cell recipients with graft versus host disease for the prevention of invasive fungal infections and attributable mortality (Level A I). Fluconazole 400 mg/d is recommended in allogeneic stem cell recipients until development of graft versus host disease only (Level A I). Aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B is recommended during prolonged neutropenia (Level B II). PMID:19066334

  1. Syllabus Chemistry 1225

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    Syllabus Chemistry 1225 Summer 2013 Instructor: David Thomas: You must obtain a copy of the Chemistry 1225 lab manual Experiments in General Chemistry Featuring MeasureNet® from the University Bookstore, 2nd

  2. Computational Chemistry List

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Computational Chemistry List (CCL) was established as an independent electronic forum for chemistry researchers and educators from around the world. The discussions cover all aspects of computational chemistry.

  3. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  4. Risk Factors and Scoring System for Predicting Bacterial Resistance to Cefepime as Used Empirically in Haematology Wards

    PubMed Central

    El Maaroufi, Hicham; Goubard, Agathe; Redjoul, Rabah; Legrand, Patrick; Pautas, Cécile; Mikdame, Mohamed; Doghmi, Kamal; Toma, Andréa; Maury, Sébastien; Schwarzinger, Michael; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Bacterial resistance is of growing concern in haematology wards. As the inappropriate administration of empirical antibacterial may alter survival, we studied risk factors for resistance to our usual empirical first-line antibacterial therapy, cefepime. Methods. We retrospectively studied 103 first episodes of bacteraemia recorded in our haematology department over 2.5 years. Risk factors for cefepime-resistance were identified by multivariate logistic regression with backward selection (P < 0.05). A scoring system for predicting cefepime-resistance was built on independent factor, with an internal validation by the bootstrap resampling technique. Results. 38 (37%) episodes were due to Gram-negative bacteria. Fifty (49%) were due to bacteria resistant to cefepime. Cefepime resistance was significantly associated with a decreased survival at day 30 (P < 0.05). Three risk factors were independently associated with cefepime-resistance: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; ?18 days since hospital admission; and receipt of any ?-lactam in the last month. Patients with ?2 of these risk factors had a probability of 86% (CI 95%, 25 to 100%) to carry a cefepime-resistant strain. Conclusion. Using our scoring system should reduce the indication of very broad antibacterial regimens in the empirical, first-line treatment of febrile hematology patients in more than 80% of the cases.

  5. Consensus guidelines for the treatment of yeast infections in the haematology, oncology and intensive care setting, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; Sorrell, T C; Chang, C C; Paige, E K; Bryant, P A; Slavin, M A

    2014-12-01

    Pathogenic yeast forms are commonly associated with invasive fungal disease in the immunocompromised host, including patients with haematological malignancies and patients of haemopoietic stem cell transplants. Yeasts include the Candida spp., Cryptococcus spp., Pneumocystis jirovecii and some lesser-known pathogens. Candida species remain the most common cause of invasive yeast infections (and the most common human pathogenic fungi). These guidelines present evidence-based recommendations for the antifungal management of established, invasive yeast infections in adult and paediatric patients in the haematology/oncology setting. Consideration is also given to the critically ill patient in intensive care units, including the neonatal intensive care unit. Evidence for 'pre-emptive' or 'diagnostic-driven antifungal therapy' is also discussed. For the purposes of this paper, invasive yeast diseases are categorised under the headings of invasive candidiasis, cryptococcosis and uncommon yeast infections. Specific recommendations for the management of Pneumocystis jirovecii are presented in an accompanying article (see consensus guidelines by Cooley et?al. appearing elsewhere in this supplement). PMID:25482743

  6. Tropospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental processes that control the chemical composition and cycles of the global troposphere and how these processes and properties affect the physical behavior of the atmosphere are examined. The long-term information needs for tropospheric chemistry are: to be able to predict tropospheric responses to perturbations, both natural and anthropogenic, of these cycles, and to provide the information required for the maintenance and effective future management of the atmospheric component of our global life support system. The processes controlling global tropospheric biogeochemical cycles include: the input of trace species into the troposphere, their long-range transport and distribution as affected by the mean wind and vertical venting, their chemical transformations, including gas to particle conversion, leading to the appearance of aerosols or aqueous phase reactions inside cloud droplets, and their removal from the troposphere via wet (precipitation) and dry deposition.

  7. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  8. Contribution of new diagnostic approaches to antifungal treatment plans in high-risk haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Einsele, H; Loeffler, J

    2008-05-01

    In high-risk patient cohorts, such as patients after solid-organ or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, or patients with acute leukaemia, early diagnosis of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) is essential, as delayed or missing diagnosis of IFI results in increasing rates of mortality. However, diagnosis of most IFIs, especially of invasive aspergillosis, is difficult because classic tests have low sensitivity and specificity, and radiology often provides non-specific and transient results. The limited sensitivity and specificity of conventional assays for the detection of IFI and the growing number of immunocompromised patients who are at risk for opportunistic fungal infections have led to the development of new assays. These methods include antigen detection systems, such as ELISAs, and different molecular methods (PCR assays). Serological tests, such as the detection of the carbohydrate galactomannan, are standardised and commercially available. However, they still need to be evaluated in large patient cohorts, especially children. The benefit of antibody detection remains unclear if patients are under immune suppression or are heavily colonised but not infected. A range of different PCR assays (conventional, nested, real-time) have been developed, targeting different gene regions (cytochrome P450, heat-shock proteins, 18S, 5.8S, 28S, internal transcribed spacer), including a variety of amplicon detection methods, such as gel electrophoresis, hybridisation with specific probes, ELISA and restriction fragment length polymorphism. These molecular assays provide high potential in terms of sensitivity and specificity, but vary widely in their feasibility and up to now have not been standardised. Taken together, new non-culture-based diagnostic assays are appropriate as simple and rapid screening tests with high sensitivities and quick turnaround times. Thus, they might help to reduce empirical antifungal therapy and might be valuable tools to allow early initiation and monitoring of pre-emptive antifungal therapy. In this review, we assess the performance of a variety of non-culture-based tests for the detection of IFI in high-risk haematological patients, with emphasis on the impact of the assays on different management strategies. PMID:18430128

  9. Chemistry Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 4 YEAR TYPICAL

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    Chemistry Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 4 YEAR TYPICAL PROGRAM OF STUDY 2013-2014 DEGREE OF SCIENCE & ENGINEERING Department of Chemistry | Office: Bannan 516 chemistry@seattleu.edu | www.seattleu.edu/scieng/chemistry

  10. A blood chemistry profile for lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant

    1999-01-01

    A blood chemistry profile for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush was developed by establishing baseline ranges for several clinical chemistry tests (glucose, total protein, amylase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, calcium, and magnesium). Measurements were made accurately and rapidly with a Kodak Ektachem DT60 Analyzer and the Ektachem DTSC Module. Blood serum was collected from both laboratory-reared lake trout (1978 and 1986 year-classes) and feral spawning trout from Lake Michigan and then analyzed in the laboratory. No clinically significant differences were found between samples analyzed fresh and those frozen for 1 or 6 weeks. The ranges in chemistry variables for feral lake trout were generally wider than those for laboratory-reared lake trout, and significant differences existed between male and female feral lake trout for several tests. Blood chemistry profiles also varied seasonally on fish sampled repeatedly.

  11. The distribution patterns of trace elements in the blood and organs in a rabbit experimental model of copper pollution and study of haematology and biochemistry parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi-Gang Shen; Hui Li; Yan-Yan Zhao; Qiu-Yan Zhang; Han-Wen Sun

    2005-01-01

    In a rabbit model of five copper overfeeding, we investigated the distribution pattern of trace elements of copper [Cu], zinc [Zn], chromium [Cr], manganese [Mn], and selenium [Se] in blood serum, red cell, and whole blood and in the organs: brain, gallbladder, liver, intestines, heart, kidney, lung, and spleen. Furthermore, their haematology and biochemistry parameters as well as feed consumption

  12. The effect of copper and zinc at neutral and acidic pH on the general haematology and osmoregulation of Oreochromis mossambicus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Nussey; J HJ van Vuren; H H du Preez

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of sublethal copper and zinc concentrations at a neutral and an acidic pH, on selected haematological parameters as well as on the total osmolality and electrolyte concentrations of Oreochromis mossambicus. In general, at neutral pH copper and zinc caused blood acidosis, increases in circulating white blood cell numbers, causing stimulation

  13. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and, in addition, of the pressure, temperature, and velocity. A near term goal of the experimental program should be to confirm the nonlinear effects of sulfur speciation, and if present, to provide an explanation for them. It is also desirable to examine if the particulate matter retains any sulfur. The recommendation is to examine the effects on SOx production of variations in fuel-bound sulfur and aromatic content (which may affect the amount of particulates formed). These experiments should help us to understand if there is a coupling between particulate formation and SO, concentration. Similarly, any coupling with NOx can be examined either by introducing NOx into the combustion air or by using fuel-bound nitrogen. Also of immediate urgency is the need to establish and validate a detailed mechanism for sulfur oxidation/aerosol formation, whose chemistry is concluded to be homogeneous, because there is not enough surface area for heterogeneous effects. It is envisaged that this work will involve both experimental and theoretical programs. The experimental work will require, in addition to the measurements described above, fundamental studies in devices such as flow reactors and shock tubes. Complementing this effort should be modeling and theoretical activities. One impediment to the successful modeling of sulfur oxidation is the lack of reliable data for thermodynamic and transport properties for several species, such as aqueous nitric acid, sulfur oxides, and sulfuric acid. Quantum mechanical calculations are recommended as a convenient means of deriving values for these properties. Such calculations would also help establish rate constants for several important reactions for which experimental measurements are inherently fraught with uncertainty. Efforts to implement sufficiently detailed chemistry into computational fluid dynamic codes should be continued. Zero- and one-dimensional flow models are also useful vehicles for elucidating the minimal set of species and reactions that must be included in two- and three-dimensional modeling studies.

  14. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-print Network

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    Chemistry and Chemical Biology AT RENSSELAER ONE WORD To Drive Discovery -- RENSSELAER What is the best Chemistry Ph.D. program for you? Choosing the right Ph.D. Chemistry program depends on many interests, we encourage you consider the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Rensselaer. WHY

  15. Epidemiology and outcome of candidaemia in patients with oncological and haematological malignancies: results from a population-based surveillance in Spain.

    PubMed

    Puig-Asensio, M; Ruiz-Camps, I; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Aguado, J M; Muñoz, P; Valerio, M; Delgado-Iribarren, A; Merino, P; Bereciartua, E; Fortún, J; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Almirante, B

    2015-05-01

    A prospective, population-based surveillance on candidaemia was implemented in five metropolitan areas of Spain from May 2010 to April 2011. We aimed to describe the distribution and susceptibility pattern of Candida species, and to evaluate risk factors for mortality in patients with oncological (solid tumours) and haematological malignancies. Adults (?16 years) with cancer were included in the present report. Impact of therapeutic strategies on 7- and 30-day mortality were analysed by logistic regression, adjusting for propensity score by inverse weighting probability of receiving early antifungal treatment and catheter removal. We included 238 (32.6%) patients (195 oncological, 43 haematological). Compared with oncological patients, haematological patients were more likely to have received chemotherapy (53.5% versus 17.4%, p < 0.001) or corticosteroids (41.9% versus 21%, p < 0.001), and have neutropenia (44.2% versus 1.5%, p < 0.001). Overall, 14.8% of patients developed breakthrough candidaemia. Non-albicans Candida species (71.1% versus 55.6%, p 0.056) and Candida tropicalis (22.2% versus 7.6%, p 0.011) were more frequent in haematological patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, 27.6% of Candida isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole. Resistance to echinocandins was negligible. Mortality at 7 and 30 days was 12.2% and 31.5%, respectively, and did not differ significantly between the patient groups. Prompt antifungal therapy together with catheter removal (?48 hours) was associated with lower mortality at 7 days (adjusted OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.42) and 30 days (adjusted OR 0.27; 95% CI 0.16-0.46). In conclusion, non-albicans species are emerging as the predominant isolates, particularly in haematological patients. Prompt, adequate antifungal treatment plus catheter removal may lead to a reduction in mortality. PMID:25703212

  16. ACS Green Chemistry Institute

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This special feature page from the American Chemical Society (ACS) showcases the up-and-coming field of "green chemistry," that is, the development of chemical products and processes that eliminate or reduce the use and generation of hazardous substances. A list of principles behind green chemistry, a searchable bibliography of green chemistry references, and green chemistry links (including conferences). This page comes from ACS's Green Chemistry Project, a three-year educational project to develop and disseminate green chemistry educational materials for graduate and undergraduate chemistry students.

  17. Tick-borne Diseases (Borreliosis, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis) in German and Austrian Dogs: Status quo and Review of Distribution, Transmission, Clinical Findings, Diagnostics and Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Pantchev, Nikola; Pluta, Silvia; Huisinga, Elke; Nather, Stephanie; Scheufelen, Miriam; Vrhovec, Majda Globokar; Schweinitz, Andrea; Hampel, Herwig; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2015-08-01

    Tick-borne diseases (TBD) in dogs have gained in significance in German and Austrian veterinary practices. The widespread European tick species Ixodes ricinus represents an important vector for spirochaetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato group and Rickettsiales such as Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The meadow or ornate dog tick (Dermacentor reticulatus) is an important vector for Babesia canis, as is the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) for Babesia vogeli in the Mediterranean region. The present work covers pathogen transmission by tick vectors, including the mechanisms and the minimum intervals required, in conjunction with possible non-vector-borne transmission routes. It also addresses the incubation periods, pathogenicity and clinical findings associated with each pathogen and genospecies and presents case examples. Current data on prevalence, annual fluctuations and distribution in various pre-selected dog populations (symptomatic versus asymptomatic) in both countries are depicted in maps. Reasons for changes in prevalence (especially of Borrelia) are discussed. Criteria and algorithms for clinical diagnosis and monitoring in dogs, including case history, direct detection (blood smears, molecular detection by species-specific PCR and sequencing) and indirect methods (whole-cell and peptide-based antibody tests), are presented, together with laboratory abnormalities (haematology, clinical chemistry, urine). The role of anti-C6 antibody concentration (ACAC) and its correlation with proteinuria and Lyme nephritis are assessed on the basis of new data. Consideration is also given to the importance of blood smears, PCR and serology in the case of anaplasmosis and babesiosis, and the diagnostic value of combining these methods. The relevance of molecular differentiation of Anaplasma species (A. phagocytophilum versus A. platys) and Babesia spp. (large versus small forms) in cases of serological cross-reaction is emphasized. A summary is given of methods for prophylaxis using acaricide products (collars, spot-on solutions and oral treatments in both countries), vaccination (Borrelia and Babesia vaccines) and imidocarb-based chemoprophylaxis for large Babesia. PMID:26152408

  18. Biosensors in clinical chemistry: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu; Ramasamy, Ramesh; Gopal, Niranjan; Kuzhandaivelu, V.

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors are small devices that employ biological/biochemical reactions for detecting target analytes. Basically, the device consists of a biocatalyst and a transducer. The biocatalyst may be a cell, tissue, enzyme or even an oligonucleotide. The transducers are mainly amperometric, potentiometric or optical. The classification of biosensors is based on (a) the nature of the recognition event or (b) the intimacy between the biocatalyst and the transducer. Bioaffinity and biocatalytic devices are examples for the former and the first, whereas second and third generation instruments are examples for the latter. Cell-based biosensors utilizing immobilized cells, tissues as also enzyme immunosensors and DNA biosensors find variegated uses in diagnostics. Enzyme nanoparticle-based biosensors make use of small particles in the nanometer scale and are currently making a mark in laboratory medicine. Nanotechnology can help in optimizing the diagnostic biochips, which would facilitate sensitive, rapid, accurate and precise bedside monitoring. Biosensors render themselves as capable diagnostic tools as they meet most of the above-mentioned criteria. PMID:24627875

  19. Delights of Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed by the University of Leeds, the Delights of Chemistry promotes the art of chemistry demonstrations. Users can find illustrations and explanations of forty chemistry experiments. Many animations of demonstrations including the magnesium lamp, thermite reaction, and the volcano reaction are available. The website is full of pictures of chemistry equipment and scientists at work. Through this site, students and educators are able to explore fun chemistry experiments without having to worry about the many hazards associated with working with chemicals.

  20. Legendre Functions Quantum Chemistry: Chemistry 180-345A

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Legendre Functions Quantum Chemistry: Chemistry 180-345A In class we showed that the the angular Fall 2003 #12;Quantum Chemistry -2- Chemistry 180-345A which is divergent at x = ±1 (i.e., at = 0 Chemistry -3- Chemistry 180-345A Hydrogen orbitals for l = 0, 1 Fall 2003 #12;Quantum Chemistry -4

  1. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  2. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  3. Blood Haematology, Serum Thyroid Hormones and Glutathione Peroxidase Status in Kacang Goats Fed Inorganic Iodine and Selenium Supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Aghwan, Z. A.; Sazili, A. Q.; Alimon, A. R.; Goh, Y. M.; Hilmi, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of selenium (Se), iodine (I), and a combination of both on the blood haematology, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) hormones and glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GSH-Px) activity were examined on twenty four (7 to 8 months old, 22±1.17 kg live weight) Kacang crossbred male goats. Animals were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments (6 animals in each group). Throughout 100 d of feeding trial, the animals of control group (CON) received a basal diet, while the other three groups were offered basal diet supplemented with 0.6 mg/kg diet DM Se (SS), or 0.6 mg/kg diet DM I (PI), or a combination of both Se and I, each at 0.6 mg/kg diet DM (SSPI). The haematological attributes which are haemoglobin (Hb), red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), mean cell volume (MCV), white blood cells (WBC), band neutrophils (B Neut), segmented neutrophils (S Neut), lymphocytes (Lymph), monocytes (Mono), eosinophils (Eosin) and basophils (Baso) were similar among the four treatment groups, while serum levels of Se and I increased significantly (p<0.05) in the supplemented groups. The combined dietary supplementation of Se and I (SSPI) significantly increased serum FT3 in the supplemented animals. Serum GSH-Px activity increased significantly in the animals of SS and SSPI groups. It is concluded that the dietary supplementation of inorganic Se and I at a level of 0.6 mg/kg DM increased serum Se and I concentration, FT3 hormone and GSH-Px activity of Kacang crossbred male goats. PMID:25049744

  4. Growth and haematological response of indigenous Venda chickens aged 8 to 13 weeks to varying dietary lysine to energy ratios.

    PubMed

    Alabi, O J; Ng'ambi, J W; Mbajiorgu, E F; Norris, D; Mabelebele, M

    2015-06-01

    The effect of feeding varying dietary lysine to energy levels on growth and haematological values of indigenous Venda chickens aged 8 - 13 weeks was evaluated. Four hundred and twenty Venda chickens (BW 362 ± 10 g) were allocated to four dietary treatments in a completely randomized design. Each treatment was replicated seven times, and each replicate had fifteen chickens. Four maize-soya beans-based diets were formulated. Each diet had similar CP (150 g/kg DM) and lysine (8 g lysine/kg DM) but varying energy levels (11, 12, 13 and 14 MJ ME/kg DM). The birds were reared in a deep litter house; feed and water were provided ad libitum. Data on growth and haematological values were collected and analysed using one-way analysis of variance. Duncan's test for multiple comparisons was used to test the significant difference between treatment means (p < 0.05). A quadratic equation was used to determine dietary lysine to energy ratios for optimum parameters which were significant difference. Results showed that dietary energy level influenced (p < 0.05) feed intake, feed conversion ratio, live weight, haemoglobin and pack cell volume values of chickens. Dry matter digestibility, metabolizable energy and nitrogen retention not influenced by dietary lysine to energy ratio. Also, white blood cell, red blood cell, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration in female Venda chickens aged 91 days were not influenced by dietary lysine to energy ratio. It is concluded that dietary lysine to energy ratios of 0.672, 0.646, 0.639 and 0.649 optimized feed intake, growth rate, FCR and live weight in indigenous female Venda chickens fed diets containing 8 g of lysine/kg DM, 150 g of CP/kg DM and 11 MJ of ME/kg DM. This has implications in diet formulation for indigenous female Venda chickens. PMID:25495676

  5. Micro-organisms Associated with Febrile Neutropenia in Patients with Haematological Malignancies in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Prakas Kumar; Maji, Suman Kumar; Dolai, Tuphan Kanti; De, Rajib; Dutta, Shyamali; Saha, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Maitreyee

    2015-03-01

    There is paucity of information from eastern India with regard to observed dominant micro-organisms causing febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with haematological malignancies. To identify the prevalence of pathogenic microorganisms associated with FN. A total number of 268 episodes of FN were analysed from September'2010 to October'2013. The blood samples were inoculated into brain heart infusion broth, glucose broth, Hicombi dual performance media (Himedia, LQ-12) at 37° C for 168 h and Bactec method was also performed for these samples. Blood agar, chocolate agar, MacConkey's agar and cystine lactose electrolyte deficient agar were used for isolation of the microorganisms. A total number of 78 (29.10 %) episodes revealed positive growths. Gram negative bacilli and Gram positive cocci were isolated in 61.53 and 34.61 % cases respectively. The eight commonest isolates were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14.10 %), methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-12.82 %), Acinetobacter sps (11.53 %), coagulase negative Staphylococcus (10.25 %), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.97 %), Escherichia coli (8.97 %), ESBL E. coli (6.41 %), methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA-6.41 %). Amongst other less common isolates were Citrobacter kosseri (3.84 %), Citrobacter freundii (2.56 %), Ralstonia paucula (2.56 %), Cedecia neteri (1.28 %), methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus (2.56 %). Candida spp. including two cases of Candida non-albicans was isolated in 3.84 % of cases. P. aeruginosa was the commonest pathogenic isolates in FN patients associated with haematological malignancies in this study. Gram negative bacteria were the commonest isolates in FN including significant numbers of rare opportunistic micro-organisms. PMID:25548444

  6. MChem (Single Honours Degrees) Chemistry with External Placement

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    with Mathematics MSci (Joint Honours Degree) Chemistry and Physics BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Chemistry Chemistry62 Chemistry MChem (Single Honours Degrees) Chemistry Chemistry with External Placement Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry and External Placement Materials Chemistry Materials

  7. TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    E-print Network

    Madlener, Klaus

    ............................................................................................44 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: Prof. Dr. M. Gerhards ....................................................................................................46 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: Prof. Dr. Dr. G. Niedner-Schatteburg...............................................................................48 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: PD Dr. C. Riehn ...........................................................................

  8. 21 CFR 862.2100 - Calculator/data processing module for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2100 Calculator/data processing module for clinical use....

  9. 21 CFR 862.2540 - Flame emission photometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2540 Flame emission photometer for clinical use. (a)...

  10. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  11. Igniting Chemistry in Fireworks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2004-01-29

    Students learn about the concepts of spectral chemistry, combustion, and the nature of fire through the use of visually rich fireworks resources. Optional resources address chemical reactions for those who want a more advanced chemistry lesson.

  12. An Introduction to Chemistry: Nuclear Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark Bishop

    This cost-free resource is a chapter from a textbook on introductory chemistry, developed for learners with little background in physics or chemistry. This chapter deals with the atomic nucleus and radiation, nuclear energy, and uses of radioactive substances. It is appropriate for teachers seeking additional content knowledge, high school physics and chemistry courses, and college-level preparatory chemistry. It builds a foundation to understand the physical forces in the nucleus (electrostatic force and strong force), and explains how chemical reactions differ from nuclear reactions. Graphs and diagrams depict what happens in radioactive decay. The section on chemical nuclear equations is straightforward and comprehensible for non-scientists. This collection is part of An Introduction to Chemistry, a set of resources developed by Mark Bishop which includes two textbooks, 15 animated tutorials, downloadable Power Point presentations for teachers, concept maps, and 3D molecular models.

  13. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH) Chemistry: ACS Certified

    E-print Network

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH) Chemistry: ACS Certified Total Credits Required: 128 Required of the following courses Course Credits CH 1110 University Chemistry I 4 Course Credits AND CH 4110 Pharmaceutical Chemistry I 3 CH 1111 University Chemistry Lab I 1 CH 4120 Pharmaceutical Chemistry II 3 OR CH 4320

  14. Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH) Chemistry: ACS Certified

    E-print Network

    Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH) Chemistry: ACS Certified Total Credits Required: 128 Required of the following courses Course Credits CH 1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 Course Credits CH 1151 University Chemistry Lab I AND 1 CH 4110 Pharmaceutical Chemistry I 3 CH 1153 University Chemistry I Recitation 1 CH

  15. B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK)

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Robert

    ) CHE 346: Physical Chemistry Lecture I (3) CHE 347: Physical ­ Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2) CHE 356: Physical Chemistry Lecture II (3) CHE 357: Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) AND CHE 335 (1) CHE 427: Intermediate Organic Chemistry (3) CHE 436: Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) CHE 467

  16. The Chemistry Hypermedia Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These materials and documents are typical of those presented in an undergraduate course in general chemistry, analytical chemistry, and analytical instrumentation. Resources for educators include Excel spreadsheet simulations for analytical and physical chemistry, prototype JavaScripts and PERL scripts, lists of web workshops and publications, and links to the most recent papers and presentations from the Chemistry Hypermedia Project. There are also tutorials for equilibrium practice problems and analytical spectroscopy.

  17. FACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE 2012/13 PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Forensic chemist Fundraiser Hazardous materials manager Laboratory technician Medical librarian://pharmacy.utoronto.ca/pharmchem Pharmaceutical Chemistry combines knowledge of the biological, medical, and physical sciences in the study Pharmacologist chemist Product tester Research assistant Teacher Chemotherapist Clinical chemist Laboratory

  18. Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    2011 SCHOOL OF Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Information for Candidates APPOINTMENT OF PROFESSOR OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING #12;#12;SCHOOL OF Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 3 Thank you for your 6-7 School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 8-9 Staff Profiles 10-11 Queen's and Northern

  19. CHEMISTRY 12500 Stephen Hoffmann

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    CHEMISTRY 12500 Fall 2014 Instructor Stephen Hoffmann Office = ARMS 1343 Phone = 765-494-5740 Email@purdue.edu Required Course Materials · Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6th Edition, by M. S. Silberberg, McGraw-Hill, 2014. [ISBN: 978-1-2593-79567] · Chemistry 12500 Laboratory Manual, Fall 2014

  20. CHEMISTRY 12600 Spring 2014

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    CHEMISTRY 12600 Spring 2014 Professor Professor Gabriela C. Weaver WTHR laboratory each week. Required Course Materials Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6th Ed., by M. S. Silberberg, McGraw-Hill, 2012. [ISBN: 978-0-07-340265-9] Chemistry 126 Laboratory

  1. Chemistry 171 Instructors

    E-print Network

    Chemistry 171 Fall 2004 Instructors Dr. George C. Schatz (lecturer) Nano 4018 (491-5657) schatz edition by Peter Atkins and Loretta Jones. General Chemistry Laboratory Manual, Stipes Publishing. Available through PLU (student chemistry group) or the Norris Center Bookstore: Laboratory notebook ­ must

  2. Chemistry & Biology Perspective

    E-print Network

    Williams, Loren

    Chemistry & Biology Perspective The Origin of RNA and ``My Grandfather's Axe'' Nicholas V. Hud,1,* Brian J. Cafferty,1 Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy,2 and Loren Dean Williams1 1School of Chemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA 2Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

  3. CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009 Gautam Bhattacharyya, 363 Hunter Labs, phone: 656-1356 gautamb. This course does NOT have a separate laboratory meeting time. Course Goals CH 450 is the Chemistry Capstone course intended for chemistry majors in their final year of study. The main objectives for this course

  4. Chemistry for a SUSTAINABLE

    E-print Network

    Selloni, Annabella

    Viewpointt Chemistry for a SUSTAINABLE FUTURE MIGUEL GARCIA-GARIBAY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ON SUSTAINABIL- ITY AND CHEMISTRY, MAY 30­JUNE 1, 2006, ARLINGTON, VA. VICKI H. GRASSIAN (CO-CHAIR) UNIVERSITY innovations do we need to achieve the goal of a sustainable future? Chemistry, a branch of science that deals

  5. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  6. Analytical chemistry instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    In nine sections, 48 chapters cover 1) analytical chemistry and the environment 2) environmental radiochemistry 3) automated instrumentation 4) advances in analytical mass spectrometry 5) fourier transform spectroscopy 6) analytical chemistry of plutonium 7) nuclear analytical chemistry 8) chemometrics and 9) nuclear fuel technology.

  7. Analytical chemistry instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, W.R. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 48 papers in these conference proceedings. The topics covered include: analytical chemistry and the environment; environmental radiochemistry; automated instrumentation; advances in analytical mass spectrometry; Fourier transform spectroscopy; analytical chemistry of plutonium; nuclear analytical chemistry; chemometrics; and nuclear fuel technology. (LEW)

  8. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  9. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  10. Chemistry For Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia J., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Desribes a chemistry course (taught in summer for graduate credit) for K-6 teachers to help promote teaching of chemistry as an experimental science at the elementary school level. Also describes another chemistry course for elementary school teachers, focusing on the laboratory component and experiments. (JN)

  11. Ethanol versus heparin locks for the prevention of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections: a randomized trial in adult haematology patients with Hickman devices.

    PubMed

    Worth, L J; Slavin, M A; Heath, S; Szer, J; Grigg, A P

    2014-09-01

    The effectiveness of ethanol locks for prevention of central venous catheter (CVC)-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in adult haematology patients has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study aimed to compare prospectively heparinized saline with 70% ethanol locks using 2 h dwell time in patients with tunnelled CVCs. In saline (N = 43) and ethanol (N = 42) groups, CLABSI rates were 6.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4-9.8] and 4.1 (95% CI: 1.9-7.7) per 1000 CVC days, respectively (P = 0.42). In the ethanol group, two exit-site infections and one tunnel/pocket infection were observed. Reduction in device-associated infection was not achieved with prophylactic 70% ethanol locks in patients with haematological malignancy and tunnelled CVCs. PMID:25063013

  12. Fixed-dose single administration of Pegfilgrastim vs daily Filgrastim in patients with haematological malignancies undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P B Staber; R Holub; W Linkesch; H Schmidt; P Neumeister

    2005-01-01

    Infectious complications are frequent events in patients undergoing high-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy with subsequent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). To evaluate whether a single subcutaneous injection of pegfilgrastim (6 mg) is as safe and effective as daily filgrastim (5 ?g\\/kg\\/day), 60 consecutive autologous stem cell transplantations performed for various haematological malignancies have been analysed. In total, 24 patients undergoing

  13. Influence of esterified-glucomannan on performance and organ morphology, serum biochemistry and haematology in broilers exposed to individual and combined mycotoxicosis (aflatoxin, ochratoxin and T-2 toxin)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. L. N. Raju; G. Devegowda

    2000-01-01

    1. A study was conducted to evaluate the individual and combined effects of aflatoxin B 1 (AF), ochratoxin A (OA) and T-2 toxin (T-2) on performance, organ morphology, serum biochemistry and haematology of broiler chickens and the efficacy of esterified-glucomannan (E-GM), a cell wall derivative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1026 in their counteraction. 2. Two dietary inclusion rates of AF (0

  14. Selected Haematological and Biochemical Parameters of Blood in Rats After Subchronic Administration of Vanadium and\\/or Magnesium in Drinking Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agnieszka ?cibior; Halina Zaporowska; Jaros?aw Ostrowski

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effect of selected vanadium and magnesium doses on certain haematological\\u000a and biochemical blood parameters in rats. Outbred 2-month-old, albino male Wistar rats received for a period of 6 weeks, as\\u000a a sole drinking liquid, the following water solutions: group II, sodium metavanadate (SMV) at a concentration of 0.125 mg\\u000a V\\/mL; group

  15. Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core

    E-print Network

    Napier, Terrence

    see above Path A 28 see above and the following: 21 (for concentration) CHM 343 1 Physical chemistry laboratory CHM 341 4 Physical chemistry I CHM 342 4 Physical chemistry II CHM 334 3 Advanced chemistry Advanced chemistry elective BS Chemistry - Analytical/Physical Concentration Course Number Number

  16. Haematological findings in healthy and sick African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CM Hawkey; MG Hart; JA Knight; JH Samour; DM Jones

    1982-01-01

    Full blood counts and fibrinogen estimations were carried out on 11 clinically normal, adult African grey parrots. Reference values derived from these tests were used to identify abnormalities in the blood counts of 11 sick parrots thought to be suffering from bacterial infections. All sick birds showed higher than normal heterophil counts, paralleled in some cases by lymphocytosis, monocytosis, thrombocytosis

  17. Protective role of propolis in chlorpyrifos-induced changes in the haematological parameters and the oxidative/antioxidative status of Cyprinus carpio carpio.

    PubMed

    Enis Yonar, M; Yonar, Serpil Mi?e; Ural, Mevlüt ?ener; Silici, Sibel; Dü?ükcan, Mustafa

    2012-08-01

    The protective effect of propolis on haematological parameters and antioxidant status were evaluated in the blood and various tissues of carp exposed to chlorpyrifos (CPF). The fish were exposed to sublethal concentrations of CPF (0.040 and 0.080 mg/L) for 10 days, and propolis (10 mg per kg of fish weight) was simultaneously administered. Samples of the blood and tissue (liver, kidney, and gill) were collected at the end of the experiment and analysed for their oxidant-antioxidant status, including the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. The samples were also measured for changes in the haematological parameters, such as the red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) counts, the haemoglobin concentration (Hb), the haematocrit (Ht) level, and the erythrocyte indices: the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The findings of this study demonstrated that CPF had a negative effect on the haematological parameters and the antioxidant enzyme activities of the fish; this toxic effect was neutralised by the administration of propolis. The present results suggest that propolis can be effective in the protection of CPF-induced toxicity in fish. PMID:22634289

  18. Effect of a Probiotic Containing Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis and Ferroin Solution on Growth Performance, Body Composition and Haematological Parameters in Kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum) Fry.

    PubMed

    Azarin, Hajar; Aramli, Mohammad Sadegh; Imanpour, Mohammad Reza; Rajabpour, Mina

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of BioPlus 2B, a probiotic containing Bacillus licheniformis and B. subtilis and Ferroin solution on growth performance, body composition and haematological parameters in kutum, Rutilus frisii kutum, fry. The fish were fed dry pellets containing various ratios of probiotics and Ferroin for 60 days after absorption of the yolk sac. At the end of the trial, growth indices (final weight, weight gain, specific growth rate, daily growth rate, food conversion ratio and condition factor), body composition (crude protein, crude lipid, ash and moisture) and haematological parameters [haematocrit (Hct), haemoglobin (Hb), red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils (NEUTR), lymphocytes (LYM), mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell haemoglobin (MCH) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC)] were assessed. Regarding body composition, total protein levels were higher, and ash, moisture and lipid levels were lower in fish receiving the probiotic and Ferroin treatments compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Fish receiving diets supplemented with probiotics and Ferroin solution showed significantly better growth than those fed the basal diet (control). RBC, Hct, Hb, MCV, MCH and LYM were all highest in fish fed probiotic (1.6 × 10(9) CFU/g dry pellet) + Ferroin solution (7 mg/kg dry pellet) + dry pellets. These results indicate that the combination of probiotic and Ferroin solution represents an effective dietary supplement for improving carcass quality, growth performance and haematological parameters in kutum fry. PMID:25431124

  19. Alcohol, Chemistry and You

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed by Kennesaw State University, ChemCases.com is a series of curriculum units that link responsible decision making in product development with chemical principles taught in college General Chemistry. Alcohol, Chemistry and You, by Dr. Bill Boggan, is the latest offering by the Web site, which "looks at the chemistry of beverage alcohol (ethyl alcohol) through the eyes of a General Chemistry student." The fourteen chapter lessons cover everything from what ethyl alcohol is to alcohol addiction, relating it to various principles learned in a general chemistry course.

  20. The Effect of Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol on Haematological and Biochemical Indicators and Histopathological Changes in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Modra, Helena; Blahova, Jana; Franc, Ales; Fictum, Petr; Sevcikova, Marie; Svobodova, Zdenka

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the Fusarium genus, is a major contaminant of cereal grains used in the production of fish feed. The effect of mycotoxin deoxynivalenol on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied using a commercial feed with the addition of DON in a dose of 2?mg/kg feed. The fish (n = 40) were exposed to the mycotoxin for 23 days. The trout were divided into two groups, control and experimental groups. Control groups were fed a commercial feed naturally contaminated with a low concentration of DON (225??g/kg feed); experimental groups were fed a commercial feed with the addition of DON (1964??g/kg feed). Plasma biochemical and haematological indices, biometric parameters, and histopathological changes were assessed at the end of the experiment. The experimental groups showed significantly lower values in MCH (P < 0.05). In biochemical indices, after 23-day exposure, a significant decrease in glucose, cholesterol (P < 0.05), and ammonia (P < 0.01) was recorded in the experimental group compared to the control group. Our assessment showed no significant changes in biometric parameters. The histopathological examination revealed disorders in the caudal kidney of the exposed fish. The obtained data show the sensitivity of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) to deoxynivalenol. PMID:24729967

  1. Dietary supplementation with chitin and chitosan on haematology and innate immune response in Epinephelus bruneus against Philasterides dicentrarchi.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Kim, Ju-Sang; Balasundaram, Chellam; Heo, Moon-Soo

    2012-05-01

    The present study investigated the effect of 1.0% chitin and chitosan supplementation diets on haematology and immune response in Kelp grouper, Epinephelus bruneus against protozoan parasite, Philasterides dicentrarchi. The red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), haemoglobin levels, lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils significantly increased in kelp grouper fed with chitin or chitosan enriched diets against P. dicentrarchi. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and thrombocytes did not significantly change against pathogen. The phagocytic activity, respiratory burst activity, complement activity, antiprotease activity, and ?2-macroglobulin were significantly enhanced in fish fed with 1% chitin and chitosan diet on weeks 2 and 4. The lysozyme activity, total protein, and myeloperoxidase activity significantly increased in fish fed with chitin or chitosan supplementation diet from weeks 1 to 4 against pathogen. The cumulative mortality was found low in fish fed with chitin and chitosan enriched diets than those of control against pathogen. The present study suggests that supplementation of 1.0% chitin or chitosan in diets positively enhances immune response and affords disease resistance in kelp grouper, E. bruneus against P. dicentrarchi infection. PMID:22475776

  2. The effect of mycotoxin deoxynivalenol on haematological and biochemical indicators and histopathological changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Matejova, Iveta; Modra, Helena; Blahova, Jana; Franc, Ales; Fictum, Petr; Sevcikova, Marie; Svobodova, Zdenka

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the Fusarium genus, is a major contaminant of cereal grains used in the production of fish feed. The effect of mycotoxin deoxynivalenol on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied using a commercial feed with the addition of DON in a dose of 2 mg/kg feed. The fish (n=40) were exposed to the mycotoxin for 23 days. The trout were divided into two groups, control and experimental groups. Control groups were fed a commercial feed naturally contaminated with a low concentration of DON (225? ?g/kg feed); experimental groups were fed a commercial feed with the addition of DON (1964? ?g/kg feed). Plasma biochemical and haematological indices, biometric parameters, and histopathological changes were assessed at the end of the experiment. The experimental groups showed significantly lower values in MCH (P<0.05). In biochemical indices, after 23-day exposure, a significant decrease in glucose, cholesterol (P<0.05), and ammonia (P<0.01) was recorded in the experimental group compared to the control group. Our assessment showed no significant changes in biometric parameters. The histopathological examination revealed disorders in the caudal kidney of the exposed fish. The obtained data show the sensitivity of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) to deoxynivalenol. PMID:24729967

  3. Toxicity of anthraquinones: differential effects of rumex seed extracts on rat organ weights and biochemical and haematological parameters.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rabigul; Mamat, Yultuz; Ismayil, Ilyar; Yan, Ming; Kadir, Mahsutjan; Abdugheny, Abdujilil; Rapkat, Haximjan; Niyaz, Mardan; Ali, Yusupjan; Abay, Sirapil

    2015-05-01

    The genus Rumex and related species such as Rheum and Polygonum are widely used as medicinal herbs and foods. They contain anthraquinones (AQ) such as emodin and chrysophanol as active ingredients, and there is concern about the toxicity of these compounds. This study evaluated the chronic effects of Rumex patientia seed aqueous and ethanolic extracts, in male and female rats separately, on organ weights and over 30 haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, immediately after 14-week administration and after a further period of 15?days without drug treatment. Adverse changes were associated with long-term AQ administration, and these focussed on the liver, lung and kidney, but after 15-day convalescence, most had reverted to normal. In general, male rats appeared to be more susceptible than female rats at similar doses. The water extract produced no irreversible changes, which may reflect the lower dose of the AQ constituents or the presence of different ancillary compounds, and supports the traditional method of extracting Rumex seeds with water. In conclusion, ethanolic extracts of R. patientia caused irreversible pathological changes at very high doses (4000mg/kg), but lower doses and aqueous extracts produced either non-significant or reversible changes. Long-term administration of high doses of AQ extracts over a long period of time should be avoided until further assurances can be given, and given other existing reports of reproductive toxicity, should be avoided altogether during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25753342

  4. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Diamond Blackfan anaemia: a report from the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry.

    PubMed

    Fagioli, Franca; Quarello, Paola; Zecca, Marco; Lanino, Edoardo; Corti, Paola; Favre, Claudio; Ripaldi, Mimmo; Ramenghi, Ugo; Locatelli, Franco; Prete, Arcangelo

    2014-06-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for patients with Diamond Blackfan anaemia (DBA). We report the transplantation outcome of 30 Italian DBA patients referred to the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology Registry between 1990 and 2012. This is one of the largest national registry cohorts of transplanted DBA patients. Most patients (83%) were allografted after 2000. A matched sibling donor was employed in 16 patients (53%), the remaining 14 patients (47%) were transplanted from matched unrelated donors. Twenty-eight of the 30 patients engrafted. One patient died at day +6 due to veno-occlusive disease without achieving neutrophil recovery and another patient remained transfusion-dependent despite the presence of a full donor chimerism. The 5-year overall survival and transplant-related mortality was 74·4% and 25·6%, respectively. Patients younger than 10 years as well as those transplanted after 2000 showed a significantly higher overall survival and a significantly lower risk of transplant-related mortality. No difference between donor type was observed. Our data suggest that allogeneic HSCT from a related or unrelated donor was a reasonable alternative to transfusion therapy in young and well chelated DBA patients. PMID:24611452

  5. Consensus guidelines for the use of empiric and diagnostic-driven antifungal treatment strategies in haematological malignancy, 2014.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, C O; Gilroy, N M; Macesic, N; Walker, P; Ananda-Rajah, M; May, M; Heath, C H; Grigg, A; Bardy, P G; Kwan, J; Kirsa, S W; Slavin, M; Gottlieb, T; Chen, S

    2014-12-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation or chemotherapy for haematological malignancy. Much of these adverse outcomes are due to the limited ability of traditional diagnostic tests (i.e. culture and histology) to make an early and accurate diagnosis. As persistent or recurrent fevers of unknown origin (PFUO) in neutropenic patients despite broad-spectrum antibiotics have been associated with the development of IFD, most centres have traditionally administered empiric antifungal therapy (EAFT) to patients with PFUO. However, use of an EAFT strategy has not been shown to have an overall survival benefit and is associated with excessive antifungal therapy use. As a result, the focus has shifted to developing more sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for early and more targeted antifungal treatment. These tests, including the galactomannan enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Aspergillus polymerase chain reaction (PCR), have enabled the development of diagnostic-driven antifungal treatment (DDAT) strategies, which have been shown to be safe and feasible, reducing antifungal usage. In addition, the development of effective antifungal prophylactic strategies has changed the landscape in terms of the incidence and types of IFD that clinicians have encountered. In this review, we examine the current role of EAFT and provide up-to-date data on the newer diagnostic tests and algorithms available for use in EAFT and DDAT strategies, within the context of patient risk and type of antifungal prophylaxis used. PMID:25482742

  6. Real-world costs of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantations for haematological diseases: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Blommestein, H M; Verelst, S G R; Huijgens, P C; Blijlevens, N M A; Cornelissen, J J; Uyl-de Groot, C A

    2012-12-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an expensive lifesaving procedure, which is increasingly performed in patients with haematological diseases. Developments in the protocol for SCT have resulted in cost estimates that require updating. We aimed to calculate actual costs for SCT and to identify major cost drivers by means of a daily practice cost study. We randomly selected 191 patients, treated at three university hospitals, who underwent an autologous (auto) SCT or allogeneic (allo) SCT in 2007, 2008 or 2009. Allo-SCT included sibling donors, matched unrelated donors (MUD) and umbilical cord blood (UCB). Resource use was collected from the hospital registration systems and medical files. The total costs included selection and harvesting of stem cells, transplantation and 1-year follow-up. The average costs per patient were 45,670 € for auto-SCT and 101,919 € for sibling allo-SCT. The costs of transplantations from unrelated donors were much higher: 171,478 € for allo-SCT-MUD and 254,689 € for allo-SCT-UCB. Hospital inpatient days together with laboratory and other activities were the main cost drivers across all types of SCT. Besides, donor search costs were a large cost component in allo-SCT-sib (18 %) and allo-SCT-MUD (12 %). Real-world costs were above routine reimbursement and appropriate financing is necessary to guarantee the continuation of SCT. The costs calculated in this study provide reliable up-to-date input for cost-effectiveness studies and budget revision. PMID:22864761

  7. The effects of naturally deoxynivalenol-contaminated oats on the clinical condition, blood parameters, performance and carcass composition of growing pigs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Bergsjø; W. Langseth; I. Nafstad; J. Høgset Jansen; H. J. S. Larsen

    1993-01-01

    A feeding trial with naturally deoxynivalenol (DON)-contaminated oats included in feed mixtures at graded levels was conducted in growing pigs. The DON concentrations were 0, 0.7, 1.7, and 3.5 mg\\/kg of complete feed mixture givenad libitum to different groups. The data recorded were feed consumption, body weight gain, slaughter weight, biochemical and haematological data including serum immunoglobulin A, clinical condition

  8. Our recommendations for avoiding exposure to fungi outside the hospital for patients with haematological cancers.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2014-06-01

    Despite several chemotherapeutic and preventative advances, opportunistic fungal infections remain common unintended consequences of cancer treatment. Currently, cancer patients spend most of their time between treatments at home, where they can inadvertently come across potential hazards from environmental and food sources. Therefore, infection prevention measures are of the utmost importance for these patients. Although clinicians closely observe patients throughout their treatment courses in the hospital, the focus of clinical visits is predominantly on cancer care, and clinicians seldom provide recommendations for prevention of such infections. Herein, we provide practical recommendations for busy clinicians to help them educate patients regarding potential sources of fungal infections outside the hospital. PMID:24446760

  9. B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY TRACK)

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Robert

    326: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2) CHE 474: Structural and Physical Biochemistry I (3) 2: Intermediate Organic Chemistry (3) CHE 436: Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) CHE 467: Introduction to PhysicalB.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY TRACK) Requirements include 21 credits

  10. Chemistry 365 Useful Information

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Chemistry 365 Quiz II Useful Information kB = 1. 380662 × 10-23 J/K h = 6. 6256 × 10-27 erg sec how your expression changes if you were to use HD instead of H2. March 20, 2002 #12;Chemistry 365 -2.11 * From, G. W. Castellan, Physical Chemistry What would the order be in the high temperature limit? Why? 4

  11. Middle School Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Middle school science resource from ACS. It includes activity-based lesson plans for teaching basic chemistry concepts that cover all the main concepts in middle school chemistry. Each lesson also contains integrated animations and video that a teacher can use to help explain student observations on the molecular level. Online professional development will also be available to introduce and familiarize teachers with the demonstrations, activities, and chemistry content in the site.

  12. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  13. The Chemistry of Cocaine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brahmadeo Dewprashad

    2010-01-01

    This case study on the chemistry of cocaine is in the form of a classroom discussion between a professor and her students about cocaine, its addictive properties, a search for an addiction treatment, and the chemistry involved in the synthesis of cocaine in its various forms. The case can be used to teach nucleophilic addition reactions, nucleophilic acyl substitution, and cocaine metabolism. In addition, it provides students with experience in locating, reading, and analyzing a research paper.  The case was designed for the second course in a two-course sequence in undergraduate organic chemistry, but it could be adapted for medicinal chemistry classes.

  14. The expanding role of robotics in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, K.; Schnipeslky, P.; Pardue, H. L.; Place, J.; Truchaud, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth description of the current applications of robotics in clinical laboratories. The trends and impact of the use of robotics in clinical chemistry in the forseeable future are also discussed. PMID:18924919

  15. BachelorofScience/BachelorofEducation Chemistry/ScienceEducation

    E-print Network

    Morris, Joy

    - Organic Chemistry II ___ 6. Chemistry 2740 - Physical Chemistry List B - Elective Chemistry - Contemporary Chemistry ___Chemistry 3410 - Analytical Chemistry II ___Chemistry 3730 - Advanced PhysicalBachelorofScience/BachelorofEducation Chemistry/ScienceEducation This is a planning guide

  16. Consensus guidelines for antifungal prophylaxis in haematological malignancy and haemopoietic stem cell transplantation, 2014.

    PubMed

    Fleming, S; Yannakou, C K; Haeusler, G M; Clark, J; Grigg, A; Heath, C H; Bajel, A; van Hal, S J; Chen, S C; Milliken, S T; Morrissey, C O; Tam, C S; Szer, J; Weinkove, R; Slavin, M A

    2014-12-01

    There is a strong argument for the use of antifungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients given the significant mortality associated with invasive fungal disease, the late identification of these infections, and the availability of safe and well-tolerated prophylactic medications. Clinical decisions about which patients should receive prophylaxis and choice of antifungal agent should be guided by risk stratification, knowledge of local fungal epidemiology, the efficacy and tolerability profile of available agents, and estimates such as number needed to treat and number needed to harm. There have been substantial changes in practice since the 2008 guidelines were published. These include the availability of new medications and/or formulations, and a focus on refining and simplifying patient risk stratification. Used in context, these guidelines aim to assist clinicians in providing optimal preventive care to this vulnerable patient demographic. PMID:25482741

  17. The Greek way to the Register: the establishment and operation of the Register for Clinical Chemists-Clinical Biochemists in Greece.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Demetrios; Karababa, Photini; Nikolou, Chara; Sarandakou, Angeliki; Panagiotakis, Othon; Ferderigou, Angeliki; Haliassos, Alexander; Makris, Konstantinos; Psarra, Katerina; Bairaktari, Eleni; Spyropoulou, Panagiota; Galiatsatos, Nikolaos; Trakas, Nikolaos; Seferiadis, Konstantin

    2011-12-01

    In Greece, there is no officially organized training in clinical chemistry for scientists. The Greek Society of Clinical Chemistry-Clinical Biochemistry (GSCC-CB), following the encouragement of the EC4/RC decided to organize a voluntary Register for specialists in clinical chemistry. The following criteria for registration were defined: 1) University degree in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, Medicine, Pharmacy or other relevant subject. 2) A total of 9 years of university studies and postgraduate specialization in clinical chemistry-clinical biochemistry. 3) A minimum of 4 years of postgraduate specialization in clinical chemistry-clinical biochemistry on the job. 4) The candidate must be practicing clinical chemistry-clinical biochemistry in a laboratory in a medical environment in Greece. The postgraduate specialization in clinical chemistry-clinical biochemistry includes the laboratory training and the theoretical education. The laboratory training is organized by the GSCC-CB according to the Professional Training Dossier. The theoretical education was organized in a series of 18 "Seminars" which was the content of the "Educational program" of the GSCC-CB. Successful completion of the Educational program leads to a Certificate of Competence. The Greek Register has gained equivalence with the EC4 Register and it has 218 members, more than 80 of whom are European clinical chemists. PMID:21875400

  18. Basic Chemistry Review

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Thomas Meixner

    This assignment reviews basic of chemistry for students who should have had 2 introductory semesters of basic chemistry prior to enrolling in the Fundamental of Water Quality course for which the assignment is used. Assignment reviews basic equation balancing and questions about valence and concentration conversion that students will confront regularly in any geochemistry course.

  19. Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication

    E-print Network

    Miranker, Andrew

    Chemistry & Biology Brief Communication A Peptidomimetic Approach to Targeting Pre Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520-8114, USA 2Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect Street, P., 1999). These amyloid plaques are composed primarily of fibers formed from islet amyloid polypep- tide

  20. Stratospheric chemistry and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Garcia, Maria M.

    1990-01-01

    A Chemical Tracer Model (CTM) that can use wind field data generated by the General Circulation Model (GCM) is developed to implement chemistry in the three dimensional GCM of the middle atmosphere. Initially, chemical tracers with simple first order losses such as N2O are used. Successive models are to incorporate more complex ozone chemistry.

  1. Chemistry 365 Useful Information

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Chemistry 365 Quiz II Useful Information kB = 1. 380662 × 10-16 erg/K h = 6. 6256 × 10-27 erg sec homonuclear diatomic molecules. Assume that the nuclei have spin 1. March 18, 1994 over... #12;Chemistry 365

  2. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

    E-print Network

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    , Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA, United Kingdom L. Sun Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas State2429 Full Paper Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics wileyonlinelibrary.com Macromol. Chem. Phys Wang, Luyi Sun, Zhanhu Guo* PP nanocomposites containing different carbon nanofillers (CNTs, CNFs, Gn

  3. Chemistry for Fuel Cells

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This presentation provides a basic introduction to the chemistry involved with fuel cell technology. The material covers chemical bonds, some basic atomic properties, the Noble Gas Theory and how the chemistry of fuel cells works.This document may be downloaded in Microsoft PowerPoint file format.

  4. Chemistry and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigston, David L.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between chemisty and biology in the science curriculum. Points out the differences in perception of the disciplines, which the physical scientists favoring reductionism. Suggests that biology departments offer a special course for chemistry students, just as the chemistry departments have done for biology students.…

  5. WATER CHEMISTRY ASSESSMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This section summarizes and evaluates the surfce water column chemistry assessment methods for USEPA/EMAP-SW, USGS-NAQA, USEPA-RBP, Oho EPA, and MDNR-MBSS. The basic objective of surface water column chemistry assessment is to characterize surface water quality by measuring a sui...

  6. Sawyer Environmental Chemistry Research

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    1 Sawyer Environmental Chemistry Research Laboratory Sawyer Environmental Research Center University of Maine #12;2 Mission Statement The Sawyer Environmental Chemistry Research Laboratory is a multi- disciplinary facility for environmental research and education at the University of Maine. The lab provides

  7. Environmental Chemistry Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an "everything" site for the teaching of environmental chemistry. The site contains some unique case studies, a list of textbooks, lab and modeling activities and other educational content. The content is still in development, but the material provided would be helpful in developing a unit or course on environmental chemistry.

  8. General Chemistry Online

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This educational site features: A searchable database of over 800 common compound names; Hyperlinked notes for first semester general chemistry; Interactive graphing, popup tables, and calculators; an index of self-guided tutorials, quizzes, and drills on specific topics; a searchable glossary; and a Chemistry Exam Survival Guide

  9. Immunophenotypic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid cell populations with the Cell-Dyn Sapphire haematology analyser: method feasibility and preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Adam, P; Sobek, O; Scott, C S; Dolezil, D; Kasik, J; Hajdukova, L; Adam, D

    2010-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples (n=50) from patients with neurological disease (bacterial infection, viral infection, neuroborreliosis and multiple sclerosis) were analysed to characterize cell populations by fluorescent immunocytometry with the CD-Sapphire haematology analyser. Reagent combinations applied to all CSF samples comprised CD3/CD19/HLA-DR and CD4/CD8, with some being further analysed using CD3/CD4, CD3/CD16 and CD3/CD25 protocols. Of the 50 samples, 11 were excluded because of high proportions of nonviable cells (n=2) or insufficient cell numbers (n=9). Apart from bacterial infection with granulocytosis, all diagnostic groups showed high proportions (51.4-77.0%) of CD3+ T cells. There was a modest association between T-cell and B-cell counts, but absolute B-cell numbers exceeded 5 cells/microl in only 7/39 cases (neuroborreliosis, n=6; bacterial meningitis, n=1). CD3/Ia antigen (activation) co-expression was low and only exceeded 5% in 7/39 samples with no diagnostic correlation. Primary CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets showed similar quantitative trends and CD4/CD8 co-analysis revealed the presence in all diagnostic groups (neuroborreliosis and multiple sclerosis in particular) of a CD4+CD8int fraction that was predominantly CD3+ and CD16- and had a morphological profile consistent with small lymphoid cells. Supplementary CD-Sapphire cellular immunological analysis of most CSF samples is feasible using the procedure detailed in this communication. PMID:19500178

  10. Haematological and biochemical changes in horses competing in a 3 Star horse trial and 3-day-event.

    PubMed

    Andrews, F M; Geiser, D R; White, S L; Williamson, L H; Maykuth, P L; Green, E M

    1995-11-01

    Haematological and biochemical changes in horses competing in the Endurance Test (Phase T and D) of an advanced Horse Trial (HT, n = 22) and the Endurance Test (Phases A-D) of an advanced (CCI) 3-day-event (TD, n = 11) over a similar course on the same day were studied. Environmental conditions during the event were cool (5.5-11.1 degrees C). Blood samples were collected from the horses in each group the evening prior to the Endurance Test, within 60 s after, and 10 min after, completion of Phase D (cross-country jumping). The following were determined in the blood samples and compared between the 2 groups of horses: packed cell volume (PCV), serum total protein [TP], serum albumin [ALB], plasma lactate [lactate], serum total calcium [TCa], plasma ionised calcium [Ca+2], serum inorganic phosphate [PO4], plasma pH, plasma sodium [Na], plasma potassium [K], serum chloride [Cl], serum urea nitrogen [SUN], serum creatinine [Cr] and serum glucose concentrations and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. The PCV and [Cr] were higher in the TD group and approached significance (P = 0.063 and P = 0.057, respectively). The [TP], [ALB], [Na], glucose concentration and CK, and AST were significantly higher and [Cl] and [PO4] were significantly lower in the TD group after exercise when compared to the HT group. It was deduced from these data that the horses competing in the 3-day-event experienced greater fluid and electrolyte losses, reduced glomerular filtration, higher glycogenolysis and had greater leakage of enzymes from working muscles during competition than horses competing in the horse trial. PMID:8933086

  11. Organic Chemistry Resources Worldwide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Van Aken, Koen

    1996-01-01

    Organic Chemistry Worldwide is an excellent organic chemistry metasite that is not to be missed. Geared toward synthetic organic chemists involved in academic or industrial research, Organic Chemistry Resources Worldwide has a mission to collect and independently annotate "all useful organic chemistry sites and to present them in an intuitive way." This extensive metasite is divided into sections on literature, laboratory resources, spectroscopy and spectrometry, nomenclature and teaching, and conferences and organizations. The Literature section contains links to over 75 journals (some restricted access), 14 free databases (and many more commercial), dissertation collections, reviews, guides, patents, and current awareness sources. Examples of resources for laboratory work include links to chemical product databases, laboratory safety bulletins (.pdf), products and services, etc. Highlights of the site are an in-depth section on mass spectrometry, with links to publications and databases, and a plethora of links to organic chemistry labs worldwide, from Armenia to Uruguay.

  12. 21 CFR 862.2260 - High pressure liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2260 High pressure liquid...

  13. 21 CFR 862.2320 - Beta or gamma counter for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2320 Beta or gamma counter for...

  14. 21 CFR 862.2100 - Calculator/data processing module for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2100 Calculator/data...

  15. 21 CFR 862.2260 - High pressure liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2260 High pressure liquid...

  16. 21 CFR 862.2250 - Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2250 Gas liquid chromatography...

  17. 21 CFR 862.2270 - Thin-layer chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2270 Thin-layer chromatography...

  18. 21 CFR 862.2320 - Beta or gamma counter for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2320 Beta or gamma counter for...

  19. 21 CFR 862.2270 - Thin-layer chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2270 Thin-layer chromatography...

  20. Dose-dependent changes in some haematological parameters during short-term administration of Hibiscus sabdariffa Calyx aqueous extract (Zobo) in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Adigun, M O; Ogundipe, O D; Anetor, J I; Odetunde, A O

    2006-03-01

    The extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa L. (MALVACEAE) is popularly consumed and assumed to have haematological benefits, but no scientific investigations are known in the literature to have been conducted to corroborate this claim. The present study was therefore conducted to evaluate the effects of Hibiscus Sabdariffa L. Calyx extract on some haematological parameters (Haemoglobin, haematocrit, total white blood cells and differentials) in rats, with a view to determining its medicinal usefulness in the treatment of anaemia. Proximate analysis on dry matter basis, and mineral clement analysis were carried out on dried calyx of Hibiscus Sabdariffa L. Different doses of aqueous extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa L calyx extract (200 - 1000 mg/ kg body wt.) were administered orally by intra Ocsophageal cannulation to four groups of six animals (rats) per group for 14 days. Venous blood samples were collected from each animal in all the groups including the control group on days 0 and 14 of the experiment for haematological investigations. Paired stat analysis of day 0 and day 14 results was done for each group using student's T-test. Proximate and mineral analysis of dry calyx confirmed the presence of some nutrients, e.g. protein, mineral elements (potassium) and Vitamin C in the calyx. After 14 days of the extract administration, significant elevations were observed in haematocrit (P = 0.03) and haemoglobin (P = 0.004) in the groups of animals given doses of 200 mg and 400 mg per kg (P < 0.05) while the groups given high doses revealed significant reductions (P 0.031) in the haematocrit but not in haemoglobin. This study suggests that, aqueous extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa L. calyx used in this experiment had beneficial effects on the red cells at low doses (200 mg-400 mg/kg) which may not be sustained at higher doses. However, the long-term effects and the possible mechanism (s) of action of the extract should be studied before a recommendation could be made. PMID:17209331

  1. Biochemical and haematological assessment of toxic effects of the leaf ethanol extract of Petroselinum crispum (Mill) Nyman ex A.W. Hill (Parsley) in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Petroselinum crispum, a bright green biennial shrub is widely used traditionally as a food additive and herbal remedies for many ailments. This study therefore aimed to assess the toxic effects of its leaf extract using some biochemical, haematological parameters. Methods The toxic effects were assessed by quantifying liver enzymes such as serum aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total serum protein and liver weight. Effects on haematological parameters were assessed by analysis of parked cell volume (PCV), red blood cell count (RBC), white blood cells (WBC) and haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. Histopathological studies were done on the liver and kidneys. Results The extract caused significant increase in serum activity of alanine amino transferase and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels at the dose of 1000 mg/kg. Other biochemical and haematological parameters were not affected at lower doses. Conversely, the liver weight was not affected after eight weeks of treatment at the dose levels studied. The organs obtained for pathological study, were structurally unchanged under histopathological evaluation at lower doses but inflammatory and necrotic features were observed at doses???1000 mg/kg. Conclusion The results indicate that the leaf ethanol extract of Petroselinum crispum was hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic at continued oral doses equal to or more than 1000 mg/kg, but no obvious toxicity when used at lower doses. Therefore, there should be caution in its administration to avoid overdosing and known interaction with some medications. In addition, the plant should be kept away from pets and domestic animals and should not be cultivated on soil irrigated with waste water due to their ability to bio-accumulate toxic metals. PMID:23557241

  2. Mortality, morbidity, and haematological results from a cohort of long-term workers involved in 1,3-butadiene monomer production.

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, S R; Tsai, S P; Snyder, P J; Ross, C E

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective mortality analysis and prospective morbidity and haematological analyses were performed for Shell Deer Park Manufacturing Complex (DPMC) male employees who worked in jobs with potential exposure to 1,3-butadiene from 1948 to 1989. 614 employees qualified for the mortality study (1948-89), 438 of those were still employed during the period of the morbidity study (1982-9), and 429 of those had haematological data available for analysis. Industrial hygiene data from 1979 to 1992 showed that most butadiene exposures did not exceed 10 ppm (eight-hour time weighted average (8 hour TWA)), and most were below 1 ppm, with an arithmetic mean of 3.5 ppm. 24 deaths occurred during the mortality study period. For all causes of death, the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 48 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 31-72), and the all cancer SMR was 34 (95% CI = 9-87). There were only two deaths due to lung cancer (SMR 42, 95% CI = 5-151) and none due to lymphohaematopoietic cancer (expected = 1.2). Morbidity (illness absence) events of six days or more for the 438 butadiene employees were compared with the rest of the complex. No cause of morbidity was in excess for this group; the all cause standardised morbidity ratio (SMbR) was 85 (95% CI = 77-93) and the all neoplasms SMbR was 51 (95% CI = 22-100). Haematological results for the 429 with laboratory data were compared with results for the rest of the complex. No significant differences occurred between the two groups and the distributions of results between butadiene and non-butadiene groups were virtually identical. These results suggest that butadiene exposures at concentrations common at DPMC in the past 10-20 years do not pose a health hazard to employees. PMID:8199682

  3. Survey of antifungal prophylaxis and fungal diagnostic tests employed in malignant haematology and haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    van Hal, S J; Gilroy, N M; Morrissey, C O; Worth, L J; Szer, J; Tam, C S; Chen, S C; Thursky, K A; Slavin, M A

    2014-12-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey developed to assess the current use of antifungal prophylaxis among haematology and infectious disease clinicians across Australia and New Zealand, and their alignment with existing consensus guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in the haematology/oncology setting (published 2008). Surveyed clinicians largely followed the current recommendations for prophylaxis in the setting of induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia, as well as autologous and low-risk allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In keeping with guideline recommendations, posaconazole was the agent used by most centres for high-risk allogeneic HSCT. However, its routine continuation for 75-100 days post-transplantation without de-escalation suggested use beyond those indications described in the 2008 guidelines, namely pre-engraftment neutropenia and graft-versus-host disease. Variations in practice were observed in other settings, such as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, reflecting the general lack of evidence for antifungal prophylaxis in these patient populations and changing perceptions of risk. With regard to the availability of testing in cases of suspected breakthrough IFD, 40% of centres did not have access to investigative bronchoscopy within 48?h of referral, and results of Aspergillus galactomannan (GM), fungal polymerase chain reaction and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) were not available within 48?h in 83%, 90% and 85% of centres respectively. The survey's findings will influence the recommendations provided in the updated 2014 consensus guidelines for the use of antifungal agents in the haematology/oncology setting. PMID:25482740

  4. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  5. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  6. Chemistry for Kids: Elementary School Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Spencer L.; Swenson, Karen T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a program in which six experiments in chemistry were used in an elementary school science program. Discusses the problems encountered in initiating the program, and some of the ways the problems were solved. Lists the six experiments, along with the reaction or process being studied, and the application of each. (TW)

  7. Chemistry for Kids: Summer Chemistry for Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hufford, Kevin D.

    1984-01-01

    A five-week course for fourth- and fifth-grade students (titled "Chemistry for Kids") was developed. Each class session consisted of a brief lecture, a demonstration, and one or more experiments. An outline of concepts fostered, instructional strategies, and procedures used is provided. (JN)

  8. Matthew F. Tuchler Associate Professor of Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Marsh, David

    of Chicago, 1989 Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana, 1995 PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS Chemistry 210 ­ Structure and Reactivity of Molecules Chemistry 261 ­ Physical Chemistry I: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistics Chemistry 262 ­ Physical Chemistry II: Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy Chemistry

  9. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  10. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  11. Surface Chemistry Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth explores the field of surface chemistry. First, the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry publicizes its members initiatives to "investigate the interaction of surfaces with fluids having molecular densities spanning the range from liquids to ultra-high vacuum" (1). Researchers can find out about upcoming meetings, awards, and membership opportunities. The second website presents Chalmers University of Technology's research activities in surfactants and microemulsions, environmental catalysis, fuels engineering, and metal working chemistry (2). Students and teachers can discover the basics of surface chemistry and its benefits to society. Next, University of Canterbury features its studies which "help in the development of portable devices in freshwater analysis, microelectrodes, chemically modified electrodes & biochips for sensors, nanoparticle assemblies for smart materials, [and] novel electrode material for catalysis of industrial processes" (3). Users can view posters detailing their research as well as articles describing the group's latest news and results. Fourth, the US Naval Research Lab describes its surface chemistry research interests, facilities, and its strengths (4). Individuals can find lists of the Lab's journal articles, reports, and technical papers. The fifth website, provided by the University of Virginia, addresses how the chemistry of aerogels makes them "attractive materials for use as catalysts, catalyst substrates, and adsorbents" (5). The website contains illustrations of the interaction between water and aerogel compounds. Sixth, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory presents its Ultra-high Vacuum (UHV) Surface Chemistry-High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) System capabilities to "study the molecular-level chemistry of adsorbates on metal oxide surfaces" (6 ). The website offers a concise overview of sample preparation, handling, and manipulation. Lastly, the University of Michigan provides links to in-depth discussions and informational images of the research projects of its four surface chemistry research groups (7). Researchers can find slide show presentations of the group's work, lists of its publications, and information on the individual researchers' education and work. [RME

  12. CHEMISTRY 213B: Introductory Physical Chemistry I. General Information

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    CHEMISTRY 213B: Introductory Physical Chemistry I. General Information Lectures: MWF 9:30 - 10 Chemistry. Supplementary Texts 1. P. A. Rock, Chemical Thermodynamics. 2. Gordon M. Barrow, Physical Chemistry. 3. R. Kubo, Thermodynamics (Physics orientation, advanced) Grades There will be approximately one

  13. Chemistry Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 2 YEAR TYPICAL

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    Chemistry Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 2 YEAR TYPICAL PROGRAM OF STUDY 2013-2014 DEGREE completed a full year of General Chemistry, Calculus and Physics. If you have already taken a full year of Organic Chemistry, then your Junior year will be devoted to completing Math and Physics requirements

  14. Chemistry 436/636 Fall 2011 Advanced Physical Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Raina, Ramesh

    Chemistry 436/636 Fall 2011 Advanced Physical Chemistry Instructor: Prof. J. Goodisman 3-014E Sci. 16, 5:15-7:15 PM Text: T. Engel and P. Reid, Physical Chemistry, 2nd Edition (Prentice-Hall, 2010) or any other comprehensive physical chemistry text. Engel & Reid is used in the undergraduate physical

  15. CHEMISTRY 243: Introductory Physical Chemistry II. General Information

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    CHEMISTRY 243: Introductory Physical Chemistry II. General Information Lectures: Monday & Wednesday, Inc., 2006) J.R. Barrante, Applied Mathematics for Physical Chemistry, 3rd edition (Pearson Education, Inc., 2004) Supplementary Texts 1. G. W. Castellan, Physical Chemistry 3rd edition (Benjamin Cummings

  16. Chemistry 1010 -090 (Online) Chemistry, Humanity, and Environment

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    Chemistry 1010 -090 (Online) Chemistry, Humanity, and Environment 1. Course Content The Online version of Chemistry 1010 (1010-090) supports the aims of the University of Utah General Education Mission Statement: The course has been designed for nonmajors and presupposes no background in chemistry. The course

  17. CHEMISTRY 3023-62170 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 3023-62170 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II Spring 2012 2:00 - 5:00 pm, W CNSB 211.ulm.edu/~findley COURSE Content: Modern experimental techniques of physical chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: Physical for Physical Chemistry Laboratory II is on spectroscopy. REQUIREMENTS Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHEM 3021

  18. CHEMISTRY 3021-42233 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 3021-42233 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I Fall 2011 2:00-2:50, W, CNSB 211 (Prelab) 3.ulm.edu/~findley COURSE Content: Modern experimental techniques of physical chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: Physical for Physical Chemistry Laboratory I is on thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. REQUIREMENTS Prerequisite: "C

  19. B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY TRACK)

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Robert

    326: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2) CHE 474: Structural and Physical Biochemistry I (3) 2: Organic Chemistry of Biological Molecules (3) CHE 436: Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) CHE 467: Introduction to Physical Chemistry Research Laboratory (3) CHE 546: Molecular Spectroscopy and Structure (1

  20. Materials Chemistry at SFU

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Materials Science group at Simon Fraser University (SFU) developed this website to address the group's primary research interests in material synthesis, molecular, electronics, and photonics. Visitors will find explanations covering sixteen research topics including chemical sensors, lithography, non-linear optics, and supramolecular chemistry. Under each topic heading, users will find links discussing the faculties' current goals, recent publications, and patents. The site also features links to the Pacific Centre for Advanced Materials and Microstructures; a collaborative effort between the Materials Science group at SFU and the physics and chemistry departments at the University of British Columbia. Anyone searching for the latest investigations in materials chemistry will find this website very informative.

  1. Green Chemistry Teaching Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) has created these excellent resources via the Green Chemistry Institute and the ACS Education Division. The goal of these materials is "to increase awareness and understanding of Green Chemistry principles, alternatives, practices, and benefits within traditional educational institutions and among practicing scientists." In the Online Resources section, visitors will find downloadable pocket guides to basic green chemistry principles, "Greener Education Materials for Chemists" from the University of Oregon, and more. Perhaps the best section of the site is Activities and Experiments, where visitors can look over activities like "Gassing Up Without Air Pollution" and "Cleaning Up With Atom Economy."

  2. The Chemistry of Cocaine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    This case study looks at cocaine, including its addictive properties and the chemistry involved in the synthesis of the drug in its different forms. The lesson can be used to teach nucleophilic addition reactions, nucleophilic acyl substitution, and cocaine metabolism. The material was designed for use in an undergraduate organic chemistry course but could also be used in medicinal chemistry coursework. The case study and teaching notes may be downloaded in PDF format. The site also includes a section for instructor feedback where general comments may be read and contributed.

  3. Current clinical efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections in urban Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania.

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Z.; Makwaya, C.; Minjas, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    Reported is the use of a 14-day WHO protocol, which takes into account the clinical, parasitological and haematological responses to antimalarial drugs, to determine the efficacy of chloroquine in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in young children (n = 200) in urban Dar es Salaam. Chloroquine failure was found in 43% of the children. Of these, 12.5% were considered to be early treatment failures and were given a single dose of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Fever subsided in all children treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and there were no parasitological failures. In addition, children treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine because of early treatment failure with chloroquine had better haematological recovery than the chloroquine-sensitive group. It is concluded that chloroquine can no longer be considered an effective therapy for P. falciparum malaria in young children in Dar es Salaam. PMID:10534897

  4. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-print Network

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry, robotics, structure-function relationships. Sylvia Draper, Professor in Chemistry. Her research spans

  5. Emergences of supramolecular chemistry: from supramolecular chemistry to supramolecular science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacques VicensQuentin Vicens; Quentin Vicens

    We describe the field of supramolecular chemistry as a consequence of the progress of chemistry from its premises to recent\\u000a achievements. Supramolecular chemistry has been claimed to be an emergent field of research taking its roots in chemistry.\\u000a According to the definitions of emergences related to hierarchy or more recently to scope, supramolecular chemistry is shown\\u000a to have bottom-up or

  6. Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    .Admin./Marketing Communication Bus.Admin./Public Admin. Chemical Engineering Chem. Eng./Comp. Sci. Chemistry Civil Engineering Cyber Forensics Data Science Design Methods Electrical Engineering Electrical & Computer Engineering

  7. Magnetism in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, R. W.; McFadyen, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the technical aspects of paramagnetism and an electrostatic model called Crystal Field Theory (CFT), very often used in the case of transition metal compounds. Suggests that this discussion be included as an option for college chemistry courses. (MLH)

  8. Chemistry with a Peel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; Larsen, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce natural product chemistry into high school classrooms. In the laboratory activities, students isolate and analyze the oil in orange peels. Students also perform a steam distillation and learn about terpenes. (DDR)

  9. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  10. Chemistry Societies Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Users gain access to the heart of CSN's site through the site gateway which leads them to CSN's information arcade, education arcade, societies, chembytes, and conferences and events. The information arcade provides links to experts and specialists, and chemistry societies. The education arcade contains a wealth of information for educators in the chemistry arena. Societies lists chemical and chemistry-related societies, divided alphabetically by country. Chembytes provides access to a variety of news, including recent findings and discoveries, business updates, and news from around the globe. Chembytes also features a continuing series which looks in-depth at a topic recently in the news. Currently featured is NASA's attempt to return to the moon. Conferences and Events is searchable and browseable and contains a submission form so visitors can list an event. CSN's site also includes Useful Links, a listing of sites categorized and reviewed by Chemsoc and Science Park, which links to four companies offering chemistry related resources on the web.

  11. General Chemistry Multimedia Problems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    General Chemistry Multimedia Problems ask students questions about experiments they see presented using videos and images. The questions asked apply concepts from different parts of an introductory course, encouraging students to decompartmentalize the material.

  12. Sequencing General Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    B.J. Yoblinski

    2003-03-01

    The material in the authors' general chemistry curriculum has been rearranged into a sequence thought to be more logical to students than the traditional sequence. This fresh approach does not radically change course content but rather produces a systemat

  13. Chemistry for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Sanae; Majoros, Bela

    1988-01-01

    Reports two methods for interesting children in chemistry. Describes a method for producing large soap bubbles and films for study. Examines the use of simple stories to explain common chemical concepts with example given. Lists titles of available stories. (ML)

  14. Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology

    E-print Network

    Rohs, Remo

    Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

  15. Chemistry and Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary program consisting of two courses. The first course deals with the chemistry of drugs and poisons; the second course focuses on fictional works in which these drugs and poisons are central to the plots. (SK)

  16. Learn Chemistry: Chemistry Resources for Teachers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Royal Society of Chemistry has created this most useful website to help teachers and students of chemistry learn about the field via interactive experiments, diagrams, animations, and so on. The site includes over 3,300 resources. Visitors can get started by using the Resource Type tab. Here they can browse through ten different headings, including Worksheet, Quiz, Tutorial, and Podcast. The Experiments area is quite wonderful, as it includes over 340 different experiments that can be conducted in the classroom. A few highlights in this area include "Challenging Medicines: Making Medicines," "The Salt Cellar Mystery," and "Which solution is which?" Overall, it's a tremendous site and one that visitors will want to share with friends.

  17. CHEMISTRY 324W ORGANIC LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Diane

    1 Fall 2010 CHEMISTRY 324W ORGANIC LABORATORY Course Information Title: Chemistry 324W, Organic for multiple chemistry classes) $5 key deposit fee (refunded at end of semester with return of key) Course a scientific paper consistent with the format of the Journal of Organic Chemistry, American Chemical Society. 7

  18. Secondary water chemistry at Oconee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. G. Sawochka; W. L. Pearl; M. J. Bell; S. S. Choi

    1984-01-01

    As part of EPRI Program RP704-1, chemistry and OTSG corrosion data for Oconee were evaluated. Utility collected chemistry information was augmented by data collected during short and long term NWT sampling and analysis campaigns. Chemistry generally was controlled within Duke Power specifications; however, significant variations were observed with time and between units. Improvements in feedwater chemistry appear achievable by routing

  19. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    The first hundred years of Nobel Prizes for Chemistry give a beautiful picture of the development of modern chemistry. The prizes cover the whole spectrum of the basic chemical sciences, from theoretical chemistry to biochemistry, and also a number of contributions to applied chemistry.

  20. WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    E-print Network

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY The Department of Chemistry invites applications for a probationary (tenure-track) faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in Inorganic Chemistry, externally funded research program, and to develop and teach innovative courses in chemistry

  1. Chem 793 Bibliography Chemistry 793

    E-print Network

    Chem 793 Bibliography Chemistry 793 QUANTUM MECHANICS I Fall 2000 BIBLIOGRAPHY The two volumes. Walter and G.E. Kimball, Quantum Chemistry (Wiley). [13] I. Levine, Quantum Chemistry (Allyn and Bacon). [14] G.C. Schatz and M. Ratner, Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry. [15] J. Simons and J. Nichols, Quantum

  2. Malathion-induced changes in the haematological profile, the immune response, and the oxidative/antioxidant status of Cyprinus carpio carpio: protective role of propolis.

    PubMed

    Yonar, Serpil Mi?e; Ural, Mevlüt ?ener; Silici, Sibel; Yonar, M Enis

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigated the potential ameliorative effects of propolis against malathion toxicity in the blood and various tissues of carp. The fish were exposed to sublethal concentrations of malathion (0.5 and 1 mg/L) for 10 days, and propolis (10 mg/kg of fish weight) was simultaneously administered. Blood and tissue (liver, kidney, and gill) samples were collected at the end of the experiment and analysed to determine the haematological profile (red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit level, and erythrocyte indices: mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration), immune response (white blood cell count, oxidative radical production, nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) activity, total plasma protein and total immunoglobulin levels, and the phagocytic activity), and oxidant/antioxidant status (malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities) of the fish. The findings of this study demonstrate that malathion has a negative effect on the haematological parameters, immune response, and antioxidant enzyme activities of the fish. However, the administration of propolis ameliorated the malathion-induced toxic effects. PMID:24480596

  3. The use of body condition and haematology to detect widespread threatening processes in sleepy lizards (Tiliqua rugosa) in two agricultural environments.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Anita K; Smee, Elizabeth; Godfrey, Stephanie S; Crowther, Mathew; Phalen, David

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural practices, including habitat alteration and application of agricultural chemicals, can impact wildlife resulting in their decline. Determining which of these practices are contributing to declines is essential if the declines are to be reversed. In this study, the health of two geographically separated sleepy lizard (Tiliqua rugosa) populations was compared between a rangeland environment and cropping environment using linear body size index (LBSI) and haematology. Animals in the cropping site were smaller, suggesting genetic differences as the result of geographical isolation. The animals in the cropping site had a lower LBSI and many were experiencing a regenerative anaemia. The anaemia was postulated to be the cause of the low LBSI. The anaemia appeared to be the result of haemolysis and was likely to be caused by exposure to agricultural chemicals applied in the cropping site but not the rangeland site. Elevated white blood cell counts in lizards in the rangeland site suggested that they were experiencing an inflammatory disease of possible ecological significance. Together, these results demonstrate the value of combining physical and haematological parameters when studying the impact of agricultural practices on wildlife. They also show that reptiles may be useful as sentinel species for livestock and humans. PMID:26064571

  4. Isodicentric (X)(q13) in haematological malignancies: presentation of five new cases, application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dierlamm, J; Michaux, L; Criel, A; Wlodarska, I; Zeller, W; Louwagie, A; Michaux, J L; Mecucci, C; Van den Berghe, H

    1995-12-01

    Idic(X)(q13) represents a rare but recurrent chromosomal abnormality in haematological malignancies. We present five new cases characterized by this particular aberration and review the literature on this subject. The patients were elderly females with a diagnosis of refractory anaemia (1/5), refractory anaemia with ringed sideroblasts (2/5), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (1/5), and Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloid leukaemia (1/5). Three out of the five patients demonstrated an increased proportion of bone marrow ringed sideroblasts. After a follow-up period of 30-57 months all patients but one are alive. Idic(X)(q13) always occurred as the sole chromosomal abnormality, either in one or in two copies. We confirmed the dicentric nature of the aberration by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphases as well as interphase nuclei using an X-chromosome-specific alpha-satellite probe, and performed chromosome painting to visualize possible additional chromosomal changes involving the X chromosomes. Our findings and the data of 17 previously published cases indicate that idic(X)(q13): (1) may play a significant pathogenetic role in haematological malignancies affecting exclusively females and deriving predominantly from early progenitor cells; (2) is frequently associated with a pathological iron accumulation; (3) indicates a variable prognosis. PMID:8547134

  5. The use of body condition and haematology to detect widespread threatening processes in sleepy lizards (Tiliqua rugosa) in two agricultural environments

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Anita K.; Smee, Elizabeth; Godfrey, Stephanie S.; Crowther, Mathew; Phalen, David

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural practices, including habitat alteration and application of agricultural chemicals, can impact wildlife resulting in their decline. Determining which of these practices are contributing to declines is essential if the declines are to be reversed. In this study, the health of two geographically separated sleepy lizard (Tiliqua rugosa) populations was compared between a rangeland environment and cropping environment using linear body size index (LBSI) and haematology. Animals in the cropping site were smaller, suggesting genetic differences as the result of geographical isolation. The animals in the cropping site had a lower LBSI and many were experiencing a regenerative anaemia. The anaemia was postulated to be the cause of the low LBSI. The anaemia appeared to be the result of haemolysis and was likely to be caused by exposure to agricultural chemicals applied in the cropping site but not the rangeland site. Elevated white blood cell counts in lizards in the rangeland site suggested that they were experiencing an inflammatory disease of possible ecological significance. Together, these results demonstrate the value of combining physical and haematological parameters when studying the impact of agricultural practices on wildlife. They also show that reptiles may be useful as sentinel species for livestock and humans.

  6. Chemistry, Color, and Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    2001-10-01

    Artists' colors have been intertwined with chemistry from antiquity, both in the extraction of them from raw materials and their production by the 'manufacturing chemists' of their day. In our own time, not only has chemistry made possible the enormous expension of the artist's palette, but also has provided methods to study it scientifically with a view to restoration, preservation, authentication, and understanding of works of art.

  7. Organic Chemistry Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ChemWeb's Organic Chemistry Forum bills itself as a "free online club for the organic chemistry community." Users will need to complete a simple online form to obtain membership and access the site. One highlight of this site is free full-text access to Tetrahedron Letters. This rapid publication journal appears weekly. Along with free access to Beilstein Abstracts, the site includes jobs, a conference diary, news, discussion groups, and more.

  8. Organic Chemistry Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    ChemWeb's Organic Chemistry Forum bills itself as a "free online club for the organic chemistry community." Users will need to complete a simple online form to obtain membership and access the site. One highlight of this site is free full-text access to Tetrahedron Letters. This rapid publication journal appears weekly. Along with free access to Beilstein Abstracts, the site includes jobs, a conference diary, news, discussion groups, and more.

  9. UCLA: Organic Chemistry Tutorials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hardinger, Steven

    Steven Hardinger at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA created these tutorials to assist students with the difficult concepts presented in introductory organic chemistry. Students can find tutorials dealing with acids and bases, carbocations, Lewis dot structures, and more. Within each tutorial, users can find links to a dictionary that adequately explain the unfamiliar terminology. The tutorials include example problems and exercises to challenge users.

  10. Acid-base chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, C.W.; Blewit, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The book is not a research compendium and there are no references to the literature. It is a teaching text covering the entire range of undergraduate subject matter dealing with acid-base chemistry (some of it remotely) as taught in inorganic, analytical, and organic chemistry courses. The excellent chapters VII through IX deal in detail with the quantitative aspects of aqueous acid-base equilibria (salt hydrolysis and buffer, titrations, polyprotic and amphoteric substances).

  11. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  12. Chemistry in space research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landel, R. F. (editor); Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    Chemistry in space is discussed together with aspects of chemistry in planetary atmospheres, the prebiological synthesis of organic compounds, and carbonaceous meteorites as possible sites of extraterrestrial life. Other subjects investigated include terrestrial and extraterrestrial stable organic molecules, thermally stable macromolecules, chemical aspects of ablation, low-temperature relaxations in amorphous polymers, and solid propellants. Liquid propellant rockets are also considered along with questions of spacecraft sterilization. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  13. Phase I clinical trial of oral rigosertib in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Raza, Azra; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Ren, Chen; Taft, David; Maniar, Manoj; Wilhelm, Francois; List, Alan F

    2013-08-01

    The multi-kinase inhibitor rigosertib (ON 01910.Na) induces mitotic arrest and apoptosis in myeloblasts, while sparing normal cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile, maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and clinical activity of an oral formulation of rigosertib in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). For pharmacokinetic studies, patients received rigosertib in single escalating weekly doses. To determine the MTD, patient cohorts received escalating doses of rigosertib twice daily for 14 d of a 21-d cycle. Overall, 37 patients were treated. Rigosertib exposure increased with escalating oral doses. Mean absolute oral bioavailability ranged from 13·9% (fed) to 34·8% (fasting) in 12 patients treated at the 560 mg b.i.d. dose level. Dose-limiting toxicity (grade 3 dysuria and shortness of breath) occurred at the 700 mg b.i.d. dose. Five patients experienced grade 3 non-haematological toxicity, including symptoms of urothelial inflammation, hypotension and syncope, fatigue and abdominal pain. Encouraging signs of clinical activity included two bone marrow complete remissions in refractory anaemia with excess blasts type 1 patients previously treated with azacitidine. In addition, four patients each achieved transfusion independence and haematological improvements. In conclusion, oral rigosertib is bioavailable and well tolerated, and has clinical activity in patients with MDS. PMID:23789936

  14. Sub-clinical diseases affecting performance in Standardbred trotters: diagnostic methods and predictive parameters.

    PubMed

    Richard, Eric A; Fortier, Guillaume D; Pitel, Pierre-Hugues; Dupuis, Marie-Capucine; Valette, Jean-Paul; Art, Tatiana; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Lekeux, Pierre M; Erck, Emmanuelle Van

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of sub-clinical diseases in poorly-performing Standardbred horses, compare their physiological response to exercise with control horses, and identify predictive parameters of poor-performance. Fifty horses underwent thorough clinical and ancillary examinations, including haematological and biochemical evaluation, Doppler echocardiography, standardised exercise tests (SETs) on both treadmill and racetrack, treadmill video-endoscopy and collection of respiratory fluids. Most of the poorly-performing horses exhibited many concomitant diseases. The most frequently diagnosed problems involved the lower and upper respiratory tract and the musculoskeletal system. Poor-performers had lower speeds at a blood lactate (LA) concentration of 4mmol/L (V(LA4)) and a heart rate (HR) of 200bpm (V(200)) on treadmill and racetrack, as well as lower values for haematological parameters, plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme and antioxidants, compared to control horses. Problems of the respiratory system were the most frequently diagnosed sub-clinical diseases affecting performance. SETs, together with some blood markers, may be useful as a non-specific diagnostic tool for early detection of diseases that may affect performance. PMID:19477143

  15. Updated May 2012 Chemistry Degree Requirements

    E-print Network

    Cina, Jeff

    (Majors) 399 342 343 Organic Chemistry Lab 337 338 339 Physical Chemistry 411 412 413 Physical Chemistry courses at the 400-level in Chemistry, Geology and Physics Option 2) One approved course at the 400-level Computational Chemistry CH 410 Physical Organic Chemistry I CH 410 Inorganic Chemistry CH 431 Bioinorganic

  16. Updated September 2012 Chemistry Degree Requirements

    E-print Network

    Cina, Jeff

    Chemistry (Majors) 341 342 343 Organic Chemistry Lab 337 348* 349* Physical Chemistry 411 412 413 Physical approved courses at the 400-level in Chemistry, Geology and Physics Option 2) One approved course Winter Spring Computational Chemistry CH 410 Physical Organic Chemistry I CH 410 Inorganic Chemistry CH

  17. Chemistry beyond positivism.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Werner W

    2003-05-01

    Chemistry is often thought to be quite factual, and therefore might be considered close to the "positivist" ideal of a value-free science. A closer look, however, reveals that the field is coupled to the invisible realm of values, meanings, and purpose in various ways, and chemists interact with that realm loosely and unevenly. Tacit knowledge is one important locus of such interactions. We are concerned in this essay with two questions. What is the nature of the knowledge when we are in the early stages of discovery? and In what ways does the hidden reality we are seeking affect our search for an understanding of it? The first question is partly answered by Polanyi's theory of tacit knowledge, while the second one leads us to realize the limitations of our language when discussing "reality"-or certain chemical experimental results. A strictly positivist approach is of little use, but so is the opposite, the complete disregard of facts. The contrast between positivism and non-formulable aspects of scientific reasoning amounts to a paradox that needs to be analyzed and can lead to a "connected" chemistry. This in turn resembles networks described by Schweber and is more concerned than the chemistry "as it is" with aspects such as the image of chemistry, the challenges chemists face as citizens, and chemistry in liberal education. PMID:12796119

  18. Technetium Chemistry in HLW

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia Yuanxian

    2005-06-06

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry.

  19. Splenectomy for haematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Jankulovski, N; Antovic, S; Kuzmanovska, B; Mitevski, A

    2014-01-01

    (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). Splenectomy is therapeutic for a large host of conditions. It is a consequence of expanding the list of disorders and liberalizing the indications for splenectomy in many diseases. Red blood cells disorders: autoimmune hemolytic anemia, hereditary spherocytosis, hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia are prone to splenectomy after failure of medical therapy. A variety of thrombocytopenic disorders are improved by splenectomy, and the most common indication for splenectomy is ITP (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura). Splenectomy is successful in reversing hypersplenism in a spectrum of disease called myeloproliferative disorders. Relief of symptoms from splenomegaly is also achieved, but it does not affect the inexorable course of the disorder. The role of splenectomy in white blood cells disorders (leukemias and lymphomas) is only palliative and facilitates chemotherapy. Splenectomy in patients with hemathologic disorders imparts a risk of fulminant and life threatening infection "overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis" that can be obviated by appropriate treatment. Although splenectomy for hemathologic disorders is only therapeutic and not curative, the relief of symptoms and for some disorders facilitation of chemotherapy leads to better quality of life and longer survival. Key words: Splenectomy, laparoscopic splenectomy, hemathologic dsorders, hereditary spherocytosis, idio-pathic thrombocytopenic purpura, ITP, myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma, overwhelming posts-plenectomy sepsis. PMID:24798604

  20. Body experience and mental representation of body image in patients with haematological malignancies and cancer as assessed with the Body Grid.

    PubMed

    Weber, C; Bronner, E; Thier, P; Schoeneich, F; Walter, O; Klapp, B F; Kingreen, D

    2001-12-01

    The domain of body image plays a central role in the quality of life of patients with haematological malignancies and metastasized cancer, since the disease itself as well as the enrolled therapies interfere with psychological and bodily well-being. We approached this highly subjective field by using the repertory grid technique and hypothesized that patients would display a restricted body image, focusing on functional aspects of the body. In all, 55 in-patients (27 men, 28 women, M age = 45.7 yrs, N = 46 with haematological malignancies, N = 9 with metastasized cancer), at the time of initial diagnosis, were included in the study and assessed with the Body Grid, an instrument specifically designed by us for the exploration of body image. The data were analysed by principal component analysis (PCA) and construct categorization. Further, 42 chronic tinnitus sufferers (20 male, 22 female, M age = 46.5 yrs) served as a comparison group. Based on the constructs elicited, six construct categories were formulated in the sense of a first attempt of a hierarchical model (emotion, control, activity, strength, function, appearance). The central constructs (373 construct pairs) were assigned to these categories by three inter-raters. The categories appeared in the following order of frequency: function (27.1%), emotion (20.4%), strength (20.1%), activity (15%), control (10.2%) and appearance (7.2%). PCA indicated that the patients mainly demonstrated a restricted view of their body. In the tinnitus group, the most frequent category proved to be activity (21.3%), closely followed by function (21.1%) and control (20.9%). The body image was also restricted (PCA). The restriction of body image, together with the specific construct choice, seen in the haematology and cancer patients reflects the existential threat of the disease and may serve as a coping strategy. The high percentage of emotional constructs may mirror the patients' need for further support. The distinct distribution of construct categories in the two different patient samples supports the applicability of the proposed preliminary model. PMID:11780798