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  1. Prediction of peak pressure from clinical and radiological measurements in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guldemond, Nick A; Leffers, Pieter; Walenkamp, Geert HIM; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Sanders, Antal P; Nieman, Fred HM; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W

    2008-01-01

    Background Various structural and functional factors of foot function have been associated with high local plantar pressures. The therapist focuses on these features which are thought to be responsible for plantar ulceration in patients with diabetes. Risk assessment of the diabetic foot would be made easier if locally elevated plantar pressure could be indicated with a minimum set of clinical measures. Methods Ninety three patients were evaluated through vascular, orthopaedic, neurological and radiological assessment. A pressure platform was used to quantify the barefoot peak pressure for six forefoot regions: big toe (BT) and metatarsals one (MT-1) to five (MT-5). Stepwise regression modelling was performed to determine which set of the clinical and radiological measures explained most variability in local barefoot plantar peak pressure in each of the six forefoot regions. Comprehensive models were computed with independent variables from the clinical and radiological measurements. The difference between the actual plantar pressure and the predicted value was examined through Bland-Altman analysis. Results Forefoot pressures were significant higher in patients with neuropathy, compared to patients without neuropathy for the whole forefoot, the MT-1 region and the MT-5 region (respectively 138 kPa, 173 kPa and 88 kPa higher: mean difference). The clinical models explained up to 39 percent of the variance in local peak pressures. Callus formation and toe deformity were identified as relevant clinical predictors for all forefoot regions. Regression models with radiological variables explained about 26 percent of the variance in local peak pressures. For most regions the combination of clinical and radiological variables resulted in a higher explained variance. The Bland and Altman analysis showed a major discrepancy between the predicted and the actual peak pressure values. Conclusion At best, clinical and radiological measurements could only explain about 34

  2. Comparing a Supine Radiologic Versus Standing Clinical Measurement of Kyphosis in Older Women: The Fracture Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kado, Deborah M.; Christianson, Lisa; Palermo, Lisa; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Cummings, Steven R.; Greendale, Gail A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design A study of agreement between different measures of kyphosis, a clinical standing measure (Debrunner kyphometer; Protek AG, Bern, Switzerland) versus a supine radiologic measure (Cobb angle). Objectives To determine whether a supine radiologic measure of kyphosis in older women is a reasonable estimate of clinical kyphosis determined in the standing position, and to investigate a computerized assessment of the Cobb angle. Summary of Background Data Few studies have investigated kyphosis measurement agreement involving older adults. Methods Using data from the Fracture Intervention Trial, we randomly selected 120 women, aged 55– 80 years, who had a Debrunner kyphometer measure of kyphosis and supine lateral spine radiographs from which we measured the Cobb angle (either manually or by digitization). We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) from repeated measures analysis of variance to assess the agreement among the: (1) manual Cobb angle and Debrunner kyphometer, (2) digitized Cobb angle and Debrunner kyphometer, and (3) manual and digitized Cobb angle. Results The mean of both the manual and digitized Cobb angle was 45° (range 18°– 83°), and the mean Debrunner kyphometer reading was 48° (range 17°– 83°). The ICC between either of the 2 measures of the Cobb angle and Debrunner measurement was 0.68, indicating reasonable agreement. The ICC between the manual and digitized Cobb angle was 0.99, indicating excellent agreement. Conclusions There is reasonable agreement between a supine radiologic and standing clinical measurement of kyphosis in older women. PMID:16481959

  3. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anurag; Batra, Bipin; Sood, AK; Ramakantan, Ravi; Bhargava, Satish K; Chidambaranathan, N; Indrajit, IK

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed “key-list” that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as “manned” or “unmanned” stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations. PMID:20607015

  4. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia. Clinical and radiological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Claudia Mauro; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2011-05-01

    Lipoid pneumonia results from the pulmonary accumulation of endogenous or exogenous lipids. Host tissue reactions to the inhaled substances differ according to their chemical characteristics. Symptoms can vary significantly among individuals, ranging from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening disease. Acute, sometimes fatal, cases can occur, but the disease is usually indolent. Possible complications include superinfection by nontuberculous mycobacteria, pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory insufficiency, cor pulmonale, and hypercalcemia. The radiological findings are nonspecific, and the disease presents with variable patterns and distribution. For this reason, lipoid pneumonia may mimic many other diseases. The diagnosis of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is based on a history of exposure to oil, characteristic radiological findings, and the presence of lipid-laden macrophages on sputum or BAL analysis. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the best imaging modality for the diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. The most characteristic CT finding in LP is the presence of negative attenuation values within areas of consolidation. There are currently no studies in the literature that define the best therapeutic option. However, there is a consensus that the key measure is identifying and discontinuing exposure to the offending agent. Treatment in patients without clinical symptoms remains controversial, but in patients with diffuse pulmonary damage, aggressive therapies have been reported. They include whole lung lavage, systemic corticosteroids, and thoracoscopy with surgical debridement. PMID:21185165

  5. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr.

    2002-10-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration.

  6. Clinical relevance of radiologic examination of the skeleton and bone density measurements in osteoporosis of old age

    SciTech Connect

    Kuester, W.; Seidl, G.; Linkesch, W.; Kotscher, E.; Kovarik, J.; Willvonseder, R.; Kovarik, J.; Willvonseder, R.; Dorda, W.

    1981-10-01

    For the diagnosis of primary osteoporosis, various semiquantitative radiologic methods were compared in 149 unselected patients, aged over 50 years. Crush fracture syndrome (CFS), lumbar spine index (LSI), and Singh Index (SI) were assessed by three radiologists and after reevaluation, the intra- and interobserver errors were calculated. The reliability of the subjective grading was improved by joint and repeated reading of the radiographs. Additionally, the peripheral trabecular bone content was measured by photon absorption densitometry (PAD). To test the value of the various semiquantitative methods. LSI, Si, and PAD have been compared with sex-matching before and after separation into age in decades in CFS-positive and CFS-negative patients. In an attempt to differentiate osteoporotics and non-osteoporotics by CFS, our results indicate that CFS-positive and CFS-negative males cannot be separated by LSI, Si, and PAD, whereas in females these methods can discriminate irrespective of the age in decades. However, in age related groups, only SI can discriminate significantly between CFS-positive and CFS-negative females. Correlation of the semiquantitative methods, regardless of the diagnosis of a CFS, revealed a significant correlation-between SI and PAD, but no correlation between LSI and SI, and LSI and PAD, respectively.

  7. Joubert syndrome: the clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Ekrem; Cullu, Nesat; Karakas, Omer; Calik, Mustafa; Boyaci, Fatima Nurefsan; Yildiz, Sema; Cece, Hasan; Akal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare disease characterised by clinical and radiological findings. Among the classic clinical findings of JS are hypotonia, ataxia, mental-motor retardation, respiratory and opthalmological findings. The paediatric cases included in the study comprised nine patients. There was familial consanguinty in seven cases. Clinically, all cases had mental-motor retardation and hypotonia. Episodic hyperpnoea attacks were observed in one case. Facial dysmorphism was the most common additional systemic anomaly and four cases had additional opthalmic findings. Brain MRI examination revealed that all cases had molar tooth sign, bat-wing appearance and vermian cleft. The majority of cases also had vermian hypoplasia. Cerebellar folial disorganisation was observed in approxiamtely half of the cases. Three cases had corpus callosum anomaly and atretic occipital encephalocoele. No pathology was determined in other organs. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiological findings of 9 patients diagnosed with Joubert syndrome. PMID:24605724

  8. Hand dose measurements in interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Felmlee, J.P.; McGough, P.F.; Morin, R.L.; Classic, K.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of radiation dose to the hand were conducted using TLD ring badges for individual interventional radiology cases. Results from over 30 examinations (including transhepatic cholangiograms and biliary and nephrostomy procedures) conducted by four radiologists using identical equipment show an average hand dose of 1.5 mGy (150 mrad) per procedure. Hand dose varied inversely with distance from the patient. Due to variable hand positions during clinical examinations, fluoroscopic time was not found to be a good indicator of hand dose.

  9. Hand dose measurements in interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Felmlee, J P; McGough, P F; Morin, R L; Classic, K L

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of radiation dose to the hand were conducted using TLD ring badges for individual interventional radiology cases. Results from over 30 examinations (including transhepatic cholangiograms and biliary and nephrostomy procedures) conducted by four radiologists using identical equipment show an average hand dose of 1.5 mGy (150 mrad) per procedure. Hand dose varied inversely with distance from the patient. Due to variable hand positions during clinical examinations, fluoroscopic time was not found to be a good indicator of hand dose. PMID:1989948

  10. Pediatric Stroke: Clinical Findings and Radiological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Giuseppe; Catalucci, Alessia; Conti, Laura; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Paonessa, Amalia; Gallucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on radiological approach in pediatric stroke including both ischemic stroke (Arterial Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis) and hemorrhagic stroke. Etiopathology and main clinical findings are examined as well. Magnetic Resonance Imaging could be considered as the first-choice diagnostic exam, offering a complete diagnostic set of information both in the discrimination between ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and in the identification of underlying causes. In addition, Magnetic Resonance vascular techniques supply further information about cerebral arterial and venous circulation. Computed Tomography, for its limits and radiation exposure, should be used only when Magnetic Resonance is not available and on unstable patients. PMID:21603166

  11. Chiari I malformations: clinical and radiologic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Elster, A D; Chen, M Y

    1992-05-01

    Clinical findings and magnetic resonance (MR) images in 68 patients with Chiari I malformations were retrospectively analyzed to identify those radiologic features that correlated best with clinical symptoms. A statistically significant (P = .03) female predominance of the malformation was observed, with a female: male ratio of approximately 3:2. Associated skeletal anomalies were seen in 24% of patients. Syringomyelia was detected in 40% of patients, most commonly between the C-4 and C-6 levels. Of the 25 patients who presented with spinal symptoms, 23 (92%) proved to have a syrinx at MR imaging. When the syrinx extended into the medulla (n = 3), however, brain stem symptoms predominated. Patients with objective brain stem or cerebellar signs had the largest mean tonsillar herniations. Patients with tonsillar herniations greater than 12 mm were invariably symptomatic, but approximately 30% of patients with tonsils herniating 5-10 mm below the foramen magnum were asymptomatic at MR imaging. "Incidental" Chiari I malformations are thus much more common than previously recognized, and careful clinical assessment remains the cornerstone for proper diagnosis and management. PMID:1561334

  12. Measuring radiology's value in time saved.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-10-01

    Because radiology has historically not measured its added value to patient care and thus not communicated it in easily understood terms to all stakeholders, the specialty must correct this to prepare for the eventual transition from the current fee-for-service payment schedule to new value-based reimbursement systems. Given the increasing risk for marginalization, radiologists need to engage clinicians and managers to map the processes and associated costs of episodes of patient care to identify areas for providing and improving integrated diagnostic information and to measure the value thereof. In such time-driven, activity-based costing practices, radiologists should highlight how proper investments in the information generated by imaging and how radiologists' associated consultative and coordination of services can save greater resources downstream, especially in the nonrenewable resource of physician time, an increasingly scarce health care resource. Using physician time in the most efficient way will be a key element for decreasing health care costs at the aggregate level. Therefore, expressing radiology's contribution in terms of downstream physician time saved is a metric that can be easily understood by all stakeholders. In a conceptual framework centered on value, the specialty of radiology must focus more on its most important product, actionable information, rather than on imaging technologies themselves. Information, unlike imaging technologies, does not depreciate with time but rather increases in value the more it is used. PMID:23025865

  13. [Caudal regression sequence: clinical-radiological case].

    PubMed

    Zepeda T, Juan; García M, Mirna; Morales S, Jorge; Pantoja H, Miguel A; Espinoza G, Aníbal

    2015-01-01

    Caudal regression syndrome is an uncommon congenital malformation that includes a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Characterised by caudal musculoskeletal compromise, it can be associated to neurological, gastrointestinal, renal and genitourinary defects. Although the specific aetiology has not been clarified, it has been associated with the presence of maternal diabetes and mutations in homeobox gene HBLX9. Its diagnosis is based on a good prenatal ultrasound detection, detailed physical examination, and post-natal imaging study using radiography and magnetic resonance. Caudal regression syndrome requires multidisciplinary management, and it seems that good metabolic control of gestational diabetes constitutes the best preventive measure available. We present the clinical case and images of a male term newborn, born to a pregestational diabetic mother with poor metabolic control and a prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of lumbar spine, iliac bones and lower limbs malformation. Born in good conditions, the diagnosis was confirmed using X-rays and magnetic resonance. PMID:26455704

  14. Validation, clinical trial, and evaluation of a radiology expert system.

    PubMed

    Kahn, C E

    1991-10-01

    The PHOENIX Radiology Consultant is a rule-based expert system which assists physicians in planning radiological work-up strategies. This article describes the methods used to create and validate the system's knowledge base. The feasibility and acceptability of PHOENIX were tested for two years in a clinical trial. During this period, the system was used 1,421 times, an average of 13.7 times per week, primarily by medical students and nonradiologist physicians. Much of the system's use occurred at night and on weekends, when the radiology department was not fully staffed. Several physicians were enlisted to further evaluate the utility of the system. The results of their evaluation indicate that an expert system that helps physicians select diagnostic-imaging studies can serve as a useful and informative component of a radiology information system, and is particularly useful for medical students and physicians in training. PMID:1762580

  15. Diffuse Infiltrative Lesion of the Breast: Clinical and Radiologic Features

    PubMed Central

    An, Yeong Yi; Cha, Eun Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Chang Suk; Jung, Na Young; Whang, In Yong; Yoon, Soo Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the clinical and radiologic features of a variety of diffuse, infiltrative breast lesions, as well to review the relevant literature. Radiologists must be familiar with the various conditions that can diffusely involve the breast, including normal physiologic changes, benign disease and malignant neoplasm. PMID:21228947

  16. Integrating Preclinical and Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodus, Nelson L.; Brand, John W.

    1988-01-01

    A program providing second-year dental students with early experience in direct patient contact in an oral diagnosis/oral radiology clinic was well received by both students and faculty and was found to develop desirable skills and qualities in the students participating. (MSE)

  17. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox: an educational and clinical tool for radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Emerson E; Kendrick, Michael; Strickland, Colin; Dodd, Gerald D

    2013-07-01

    Tablet computing and mobile resources are the hot topics in technology today, with that interest spilling into the medical field. To improve resident education, a fully configured iPad, referred to as the "Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox," was created and implemented at the University of Colorado. The goal was to create a portable device with comprehensive educational, clinical, and communication tools that would contain all necessary resources for an entire 4-year radiology residency. The device was distributed to a total of 34 radiology residents (8 first-year residents, 8 second-year residents, 9 third-year residents, and 9 fourth-year residents). This article describes the process used to develop and deploy the device, provides a distillation of useful applications and resources decided upon after extensive evaluation, and assesses the impact this device had on resident education. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox is a cost-effective, portable, educational instrument that has increased studying efficiency; improved access to study materials such as books, radiology cases, lectures, and web-based resources; and increased interactivity in educational conferences and lectures through the use of audience-response software, with questions geared toward the new ABR board format. This preconfigured tablet fully embraces the technology shift into mobile computing and represents a paradigm shift in educational strategy. PMID:23647869

  18. Clinical and radiological findings of a bilateral coronoid hyperplasia case

    PubMed Central

    Torenek, Kubra; Duman, Suayip Burak; Bayrakdar, Ibrahim Sevki; Miloglu, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Coronoid hyperplasia (CH) is an infrequent condition that can be defined as an abnormal bony elongation of histologically normal bone. Progressive and painless difficulty in opening the mouth is the main clinical finding of CH. In this case report, the clinical and radiological findings for a 23-year-old male patient with bilateral CH are presented. When plain radiographies are not sufficient for diagnosis and evaluation of the CH, cone-beam computed tomography can be used. PMID:25713499

  19. Chondrosarcoma in Childhood: The Radiologic and Clinical Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Susan M.; Patel, Tanvi; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Less than 10% of chondrosarcomas occur in children. In addition, as little as 0.5% of low-grade chondrosarcomas arise secondarily from benign chondroid lesions. The presence of focal pain is often used to crudely distinguish a chondrosarcoma (which is usually managed with wide surgical excision), from a benign chondroid lesion (which can be followed by clinical exams and imaging surveillance). Given the difficulty of localizing pain in the pediatric population, initial radiology findings and short-interval follow-up, both imaging and clinical, are critical to accurately differentiate a chondrosarcoma from a benign chondroid lesion. To our knowledge, no case in the literature discusses a chondrosarcoma possibly arising secondarily from an enchondroma in a pediatric patient. We present a clinicopathologic and radiology review of conventional chondrosarcomas. We also attempt to further the understanding of how to manage a chondroid lesion in the pediatric patient with only vague or bilateral complaints of pain. PMID:23365701

  20. Chondrosarcoma in childhood: the radiologic and clinical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Susan M; Patel, Tanvi; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D

    2012-12-01

    Less than 10% of chondrosarcomas occur in children. In addition, as little as 0.5% of low-grade chondrosarcomas arise secondarily from benign chondroid lesions. The presence of focal pain is often used to crudely distinguish a chondrosarcoma (which is usually managed with wide surgical excision), from a benign chondroid lesion (which can be followed by clinical exams and imaging surveillance). Given the difficulty of localizing pain in the pediatric population, initial radiology findings and short-interval follow-up, both imaging and clinical, are critical to accurately differentiate a chondrosarcoma from a benign chondroid lesion. To our knowledge, no case in the literature discusses a chondrosarcoma possibly arising secondarily from an enchondroma in a pediatric patient. We present a clinicopathologic and radiology review of conventional chondrosarcomas. We also attempt to further the understanding of how to manage a chondroid lesion in the pediatric patient with only vague or bilateral complaints of pain. PMID:23365701

  1. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  2. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  3. Nonurgent aortic disease: clinical-radiological diagnosis of aortitis.

    PubMed

    Cabero Moyano, J; Andreu Magarolas, M; Castañer González, E; Gallardo Cistaré, X; Belmonte Castan, E

    2013-01-01

    Aortitis is a pathological term designating inflammation of the aortic wall, regardless of its cause. The clinical presentation of aortitis is nonspecific and variable. Symptoms include abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss; acute phase reactants may also be elevated. Aortitis can be caused by a wide spectrum of entities, including from infectious processes to autoimmune diseases (Takayasu arteritis and giant cell arteritis are among the most common of these causing aortitis), and the prognosis and treatment of these entities vary widely. Various imaging techniques can be used to evaluate the lumen and wall of the aorta (such as multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, or PET-CT). This review focuses on the most common diseases that cause aortitis and on the clinical and radiological findings that are most useful for diagnosing and treating this condition appropriately. PMID:23891316

  4. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin. PMID:26446909

  5. [Modern clinical and radiological approach to diagnostics of odontogenic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Khomutova, E Yu; Ignat'ev, Yu T; Demyanchuk, A N; Demyanchuk, A B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the maxillary sinuses affect up to 70% of the adult population. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis represents 13-86% of the inflammatory processes of maxillofacial area, with the incidence range being explained rather by varying diagnosis criteria than the true incidence difference of odontogenic lesions. The aim of the study was to summarize the clinical and radiological characteristics of odontogenic sinusitis according to patients records in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery of Omsk Clinical Hospital No11 and the oral surgery department of BUZ GKSP No1 in 2009-2014. A total of 948 records of patient (aged 17 to 68 years) with maxillary sinusitis were identified. X-ray examinations were performed by CT PISASSO TRIO ("KoYo", South Korea) and MSCT Brillians 6 and Brillians 64 ((Philips HealthCare), Netherlands). Images were obtained in axial projection with slice thickness of 0.2-0.6 mm with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) in a variety of direct and oblique projections. Altogether 664 patients were diagnosed with foreign bodies in the maxillary sinuses (filling material in 569 cases, roots or root fragments? implants, rubber drains, fragments of endodontic instruments in 95 cases). In 284 persons odontogenic cysts were found. Almost every fifth case was complicated by mycotic infection. Analysis of the results showed that only a multidisciplinary approach including dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, otolaryngologists and radiologists, as well as dental volumetric tomography or multislice CT can ensure the correct clinical and radiological approaches to determine the tactics of treatment in patients with sinusitis, reduce the incidence of relapses and chronic inflammatory processes in the maxillary sinuses. PMID:26953424

  6. Clinical and Radiologic Disease in Smokers With Normal Spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Elizabeth A.; Lynch, David A.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Austin, John H. M.; Grenier, Philippe A.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Bailey, William C.; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Casaburi, Richard H.; Friedman, Paul; Van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Hokanson, John E.; Bowler, Russell P.; Beaty, Terri H.; Washko, George R.; Han, MeiLan K.; Kim, Victor; Kim, Song Soo; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Washington, Lacey; McEvoy, Charlene E.; Tanner, Clint; Mannino, David M.; Make, Barry J.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Airflow obstruction on spirometry is universally used to define chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and current or former smokers without airflow obstruction may assume that they are disease free. OBJECTIVE To identify clinical and radiologic evidence of smoking-related disease in a cohort of current and former smokers who did not meet spirometric criteria for COPD, for whom we adopted the discarded label of Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 0. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Individuals from the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cross-sectional observational study completed spirometry, chest computed tomography (CT) scans, a 6-minute walk, and questionnaires. Participants were recruited from local communities at 21 sites across the United States. The GOLD 0 group (n = 4388) (ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration [FEV1] to forced vital capacity >0.7 and FEV1 ≥80% predicted) from the COPDGene study was compared with a GOLD 1 group (n = 794), COPD groups (n = 3690), and a group of never smokers (n = 108). Recruitment began in January 2008 and ended in July 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Physical function impairments, respiratory symptoms, CT abnormalities, use of respiratory medications, and reduced respiratory-specific quality of life. RESULTS One or more respiratory-related impairments were found in 54.1% (2375 of 4388) of the GOLD 0 group. The GOLD 0 group had worse quality of life (mean [SD] St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire total score, 17.0 [18.0] vs 3.8 [6.8] for the never smokers; P < .001) and a lower 6-minute walk distance, and 42.3% (127 of 300) of the GOLD 0 group had CT evidence of emphysema or airway thickening. The FEV1 percent predicted distribution and mean for the GOLD 0 group were lower but still within the normal range for the population. Current smoking was associated with more respiratory symptoms, but former smokers had greater emphysema and gas trapping

  7. [Anterior cervical fusion with tantalum interbody implants. Clinical and radiological results in a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Vicario, C; Lopez-Oliva, F; Sánchez-Lorente, T; Zimmermann, M; Asenjo-Siguero, J J; Ladero, F; Ibarzábal, A

    2006-04-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical technique in the treatment of cervical disc disease. Tantalum cages have been recently introduced in spine surgery for interbody fusion because of the advantages of their mechanical properties. We present the results of a prospective clinical and radiological study on 24 consecutive patients who underwent an ACDF with tantalum cages. Clinical evaluation was assessed preoperatively and after surgery by a questionnaire that included a Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Zung Depression Scale. Results were classified by Odom's criteria. Radiological evaluation included flexion-extension X-rays, and changes in distance between spinous processes and Cobb angle were measured. Postoperatively patients were reviewed 3 and 12 months after surgery. A statistical significative improvement in all clinical data was reported. According to Odom's criteria in 75% of patients the results were considered like excellent or good. Only one case of radiological and clinical pseudoarthrosis was confirmed. No significative differences were reported 3 and 12 months after surgery. Tantalum cages are a very promising and usefull alternative among implants available for ACDF. Compatibility with MRI postoperative studies and the unnecessariness of autograft are some of their advantages. PMID:16721480

  8. Chordoid glioma: a rare radiologically, histologically, and clinically mystifying lesion.

    PubMed

    Bongetta, Daniele; Risso, Andrea; Morbini, Patrizia; Butti, Giorgio; Gaetani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Chordoid glioma (CG) is a rare central nervous system neoplasm (WHO grade II) of uncertain origin whose typical localization is in the anterior part of the third ventricle. Its clinical, radiological, and histological features may vary and furthermore mimic other kind of benign lesions usually associated with a better outcome. We report a case of a 43-year-old female who underwent gross total removal of a lesion of the third ventricle causing hydrocephalus. The imaging studies and the intraoperative examination led at first to a hypothesis of meningioma. Early surgical and neurological outcomes were good. The patient underwent multiple complications related to hypothalamic dysfunctions and thrombohemorragic issues and eventually died because of systemic infections. Definitive examination was of chordoid glioma of the third ventricle. Reviewing literature, we evaluated possible pitfalls in radiological and histological diagnosis as well as in surgical and medical treatment of CGs. Despite their benign presentation, a high incidence of multiple possible severe complications is reported. Early alertness and combined treatment strategies could improve overall CGs treatment strategies. PMID:26018908

  9. Radiological dosimetry measurements in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, M.; Santos, F.

    2016-07-01

    The main cause of human exposure to artificial radiation corresponds to medical applications, so it is essential to reduce the dose to patients, workers and consequently the entire population [1]. Although there is no dose limit for patients, is necessary to reduce it to a minimum possible while still getting all the necessary diagnostic information, taking economic and social factors into account [2]. Based on this proposal, agencies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency has been dedicated to providing guidelines levels, whose function is to serve as standards for the optimization of the medical exposure [3]. This research was created as a preliminary survey with the claim of eventually determine the guidance levels in Costa Rica for three different studies of general radiology: Lumbar Spine-AP, Chest - PA and Thoracic Spine - AP (for screens with speeds of 400 and 800), and cranio-caudal study in mammography, applied to Costa Rica's adult population, perform properly in the institutions of Caja Costarricense del Seguro Social (CCSS).

  10. Clinical and Radiological Presentations of Late-Onset Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hmamouchi, Ihsane; Bahiri, Rachid; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2011-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed considerable progress in the diagnosis and treatment of spondyloarthritis (SpA). Tools are now available for establishing the diagnosis at an early stage, when appropriate treatment may be able to control the inflammatory process, limit the functional impairments, and improve quality of life. Late-onset SpA after the age of 50 years is uncommon. All the spondyloarthritis subgroups are represented in the elderly. Thus, late onset spondyloarthritis is underdiagnosed in favour of other inflammatory disorders that are more frequently observed in the elderly because the clinical or radiological presentations of late-onset spondyloarthritis are modified in the elderly. They deserve further attention because age population is increasing and new criteria for axial SpA including sacroiliitis detected by MRI may help the clinician with diagnosis. Specific studies evaluating the benefit/risk ratio of TNFα-blocking agents in late onset SpA patients are required. PMID:23509636

  11. Radiological Disaster Simulators for Field and Aerial Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr

    2002-11-01

    Simulators have been developed to dramatically improve the fidelity of play for field monitors and aircraft participating in radiological disaster drills and exercises. Simulated radiological measurements for the current Global Positioning System (GPS) location are derived from realistic models of radiological consequences for accidents and malicious acts. The aerial version outputs analog pulses corresponding to the signal that would be produced by various NaI (Tl) detectors at that location. The field monitor version reports the reading for any make/model of survey instrument selected. Position simulation modes are included in the aerial and field versions. The aerial version can generate a flight path based on input parameters or import an externally generated sequence of latitude and longitude coordinates. The field version utilizes a map-based point and click/drag interface to generate individual or a sequence of evenly spaced instrument measurements.

  12. Radiological findings and the clinical importance of megacalycosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzis, Christos; Patris, Emmanuel; Deligeorgiou, Evangelia; Sountoulides, Petros; Bantis, Athanasios; Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the radiological findings and the clinical importance of megacalycosis. Materials and methods On the basis of a case report and literature review, diagnostic criteria and clinical significance of megacalycosis are presented. Result Megacalycosis is mostly asymptomatic and is usually discovered either accidentally or as a result of its complications, such as stone formation, flank pain, hematuria, infection, and fever. The renal pelvis, infundibulum, and ureter are not dilated. Calyces have a semilunar configuration rather than the conventional triangular or conical form. The tip of each pyramid is flat, and the calyces possess neither fornix nor papillae impressions. The number of calyces is increased compared to the healthy condition, typically from 20–25. The renal parenchyma has a normal width but with a slight narrowing of the renal medulla. The kidney exhibits normal function, in particular with respect to its ability to concentrate the urine. Conclusion Megacalycosis is a rare, usually unilateral dilatation of the kidney calyces in the presence of a normal, undilated renal pelvis and ureter. Its pathological significance lies in the occurrence of complications. PMID:26528455

  13. Performance evaluation of diagnostic radiology dosimeters in clinical and calibration x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, Costantine John; Boziari, Argyro; Manetou, Aggeliki

    2010-05-01

    Diagnostic radiology dosimeters should comply with International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61674 standard in order to perform measurements with sufficient accuracy and reliability. The calibration of a dosimeter is performed under, and pertains to, reference conditions. However, in most cases, dosimeters are used for clinical measurements under non-reference conditions. The performance, in terms of accuracy of dose measurements, of six commercial diagnostic radiology dosimeters was tested at reference calibration and at clinical non-reference conditions. The results showed that all dosimeters being tested exhibited limits of variation within the +/-5% IEC limits. Depending on the detector's physical and operational properties, the dosimeters' energy dependence of response values varied from -4.7% to +4.2%. To address this variation of response, calibration at three radiation qualities (RQR 3, RQR 5, and RQR 9), at least, is recommended. Different irradiation conditions such as air kerma rate, x-ray tube design, x-ray system, and dosimeter operational modes affect the dosimeters' response by less than 3%. A dosimeter that complies with IEC standards and operates according to its specifications could be used at typical clinical irradiation conditions taking into account only corrections for the energy dependence of response. In this case, the error in dose accuracy is expected to be less than 3%. PMID:20386200

  14. Intraorbital foreign body: clinical presentation, radiological appearance and management.

    PubMed

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Al-Senawi, Rana; Ganesh, Anuradha; Al-Zuhaibi, Sana; Al-Dhuhli, Humoud

    2008-03-01

    Intraorbital foreign bodies usually occur after a high velocity injury such as gunshot or industrial accidents; more rarely they occur following trivial trauma. A retained foreign body can give rise to serious complications, the most devastating of which is loss of the eye. This retrospective, interventional case report reviews the clinical features, radiological appearance and surgical management of two patients who presented at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman with intraorbital foreign bodies. Details of ocular history, preoperative ocular examination findings including visual acuity, surgical procedure and subsequent management were noted. The two patients, aged 10 years and 9 years old respectively, sustained orbital trauma with sharp objects. Both patients were found to have intraorbital foreign bodies that were documented clearly by computed tomography (CT) scans of the orbit. The first patient presented straight after injury, had no ocular involvement, underwent immediate surgical exploration and ended up with full recovery. The second patient presented to us after a delay of 4 days, and was found to have endophthalmitis. This patient ultimately lost all visual function in the affected eye. A CT scan is the modality of choice for orbital foreign body detection and localization. Early surgical exploration and foreign body extraction greatly influence the visual prognosis and final outcome. PMID:21654960

  15. Clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular characteristics of paediatric epithelioid glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Broniscer, Alberto; Tatevossian, Ruth G.; Sabin, Noah D.; Klimo, Paul; Dalton, James; Lee, Ryan; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Aims A few case series in adults have described the characteristics of epithelioid glioblastoma (e-GB), one of the rarest variants of this cancer. We evaluated clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular characteristics in the largest series to date of paediatric e-GB. Methods Review of clinical characteristics and therapy, imaging studies, and histology was performed in patients younger than 22 years with e-GB seen at our institution over 15 years. Sequencing of hotspot mutations and FISH of relevant genes were undertaken. Results Median age at diagnosis of six patients was 7.6 years. Tumours originated in the cerebral cortex (n=2) or diencephalon (n=4). Three patients presented with acute, massive haemorrhage and three had leptomeningeal dissemination at diagnosis. Paediatric e-GB had the typical histological characteristics seen in adult tumours. Universal immunoreactivity for INI1 and lack of diverse protein expression were seen in all cases. One tumour had a chromosome 22q loss. Three tumours (50%) harboured a BRAF: p.V600E. One thalamic tumour had an H3F3A p.K27M. All patients received radiation therapy with (n=3) or without chemotherapy (n=3). All patients experienced tumour progression with a median survival of 169 days. One patient with non-metastatic disease had early leptomeningeal progression. Two patients had symptomatic tumour spread outside the central nervous system (CNS) through a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. One additional patient had widespread metastases outside the CNS identified at autopsy. Conclusions Paediatric e-GBs are rare cancers with an aggressive behaviour that share histological and genetic characteristics with their adult counterparts. BRAF inhibition is a potential treatment for these tumours. PMID:24127995

  16. [Radiologic medical desktop conferences--clinical evaluation of the KAMEDIN teleradiology system in routine practice of a radiologic institute].

    PubMed

    Bolte, R; Lehmann, K J; Walz, M; Loose, R; Lütgemeier, J; Seibert, F; Busch, C; Schinkmann, M; Georgi, M

    1996-07-01

    KAMEDIN is a teleradiology project of "Deutsche Telekom". ISDN based image transfer, visualisation and online-presentation of digital radiological images is performed. In this study the suitability of the KAMEDIN-system has been tested in a clinical environment. The software has been adapted to the requirements of radiological image visualisation. During 6 months over 50 conferences took place with an average of 36 CT-slices per patient. The amount of time was approximately 10 min for conference preparation, 20 min for image transfer and 8 min for conferencing. Software problems occurred and were solved. Image quality on the monitor as well as online presentation including "simultaneous cursors" showed high performance and achieved high acceptance by the clinicians. Thus KAMEDIN is a useful teleradiology system, especially if the system is adapted to the requirements of radiology departments. PMID:8924455

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and histological, clinical, radiological correlation.

    PubMed

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita; Bonomini, Francesca; Peroni, Michele; Cocchi, Marco Angelo; Hirtler, Lena; Bonardelli, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    To date, the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) still remains unclear. As such, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes of the aortic structure during AAA. We analysed the microscopic frame of vessels sections, starting from the primum movens leading to abnormal dilatation. AAA samples were collected and processed through various staining methods (Verhoeff-Van Gieson, Masson Goldner, Sirius Red). Subsequently, the vessel morphology and collagenic web of the tunica media and adventitia were determined and the amount of type I and type III collagen was measured. We also applied immune-histochemistry markers for CD34 and PGP 9.5 in order to identify vascular and nerve structures in the aorta. Immune-positivity quantification was used to calculate the percentage of the stained area. We found increasing deposition of type I collagen and reduced type III collagen in both tunica media and adventitia of AAA. The total amount of vasa vasorum, marked with CD34, and nerva vasorum, marked with PGP 9.5, was also higher in AAA samples. Cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking) and radiological data (maximum aneurism diameter, intra-luminal thrombus, aortic wall calcification) increased these changes. These results suggest that the tunica adventitia may have a central role in the pathogenesis of AAA as clearly there are major changes characterized by rooted inflammatory infiltration. The presence of immune components could explain these modifications within the framework of the aorta. PMID:26858185

  18. Overview and future direction for x-radiology measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Graber, H.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides a general overview of methodology and associated imaging measurement requirements required by current published codes and standards and also an insight as to the considerations being addressed in development of new standards. Beginning in the mid 1980`s and continuing into the 1990`s, the use of electronic imaging has increased significantly. As a result, those involved in developing new standards had difficulty with terminology since the term ``radiographic`` was commonly used, however, depending on its use, could have a completely different technical meaning. As a result, ASTM initiated a new term ``Radiology`` for industrial imaging applications. The new term radiology more appropriately addresses both electronic imaging and film imaging and is technically correct. As a result of the increased use of electronic imaging technology, it presents a challenge to address the problems unique to electronic imaging and how these problems are resolved through new code and standard requirements.

  19. Citizenship in radiology: defining a concept and proposing its measure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Herrington, William T; Donner, E Michael; Bluth, Edward I

    2013-06-01

    Merely suggesting that radiologists answer the call to bolster and secure the future of their own specialty has not resulted in increased activism. Therefore, the ACR Commission on Human Resources has developed a definition for the concept of citizenship in radiology and explicit descriptions of the activities associated with it. Furthermore, the authors introduce a methodology for the measurement and valuation of individual radiologists' contributions to group practices and to the specialty as a whole. These measures can in turn be used to promote, acknowledge, recognize, and incentivize citizenship activity among radiologists at the local, regional, and national levels. PMID:23583084

  20. Clinical routine operation of a filmless radiology department: three years experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Hans M.; Paertan, Gerald; Hruby, Walter

    1995-05-01

    This paper communicates the operational implementation of filmless digital radiology in clinical routine, its feasibility and its effect on the radiology profession, based on the three years clinical experience from the filmless digital radiology department of the Danube Hospital, a major teaching hospital in Vienna, Austria, with currently 850 acute-care beds. Since April 1992 all radiological modalities are reported from the monitors of 16 reporting consoles in the radiology department. Images and reports are distributed by the hospital-wide network (Sienet, Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen), and can be viewed on 60 display consoles throughout the hospital. Filmless radiology primarily is an efficient hospital-wide infrastructure to deliver radiological services along with other medical information, providing safe and fast access to this information anytime and anywhere, necessary for the conduct of the diagnostic and therapeutic task of patient care. In a comparative study of the Danube Hospital with the film based Rudolfstiftung Hospital in Vienna, we found a significant decrease of the mean patient length of hospital stay (1.99 to 3.72 days) that partially might be attributed to the implementation of filmless radiology.

  1. Radiology Quality Measure Compliance Reporting: an Automated Approach.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Marc; Schonlau, Duane

    2016-06-01

    As part of its ongoing effort to improve healthcare quality, the Center of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has transitioned from monetary rewards to reimbursement penalties for noncompliance or nonparticipation with its quality measurement initiatives. More specifically, eligible providers who bill for CMS patient care, such as radiologists, will face a 2 % negative payment adjustment, if they fail to report adequate participation and compliance with sufficient CMS quality measures in 2015. Although several methods exist to report participation and compliance, each method requires the gathering of relevant studies and assessing the reports for compliance. To aid in this data gathering and to prevent reduced reimbursements, radiology groups should consider implementing automated processes to monitor compliance with these quality measure standards. This article describes one method of creating an automated report scanner, utilizing an open source interface engine called Mirth Connect, that may facilitate the data gathering and monitoring related to reporting compliance with CMS standard #195 Stenosis measurement in Ultrasound Carotid Imaging Reports. The process described in this article is currently utilized by a large multi-institutional radiology group to assess for report compliance and offers the user near real time surveillance of compliance with the quality measure. PMID:26510752

  2. Clinical and Radiological Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Kjeldsen, Anette D.

    2006-02-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and to assess the quality of life after treatment. A clinical follow-up was undertaken after 67 months (mean) in 35 consecutive patients with 106 PAVMs. Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO{sub 2} and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment and subjective effect of treatment on physical and social functioning. A significant rise in oxygenation of the blood after embolization was measured. In 77% of the patients symptoms improved, and 71% felt better performance. In eight patients, one of the PAVMs was found insufficiently embolized or recanalized at follow-up angiography and therefore were re-embolized. Endovascular embolization for PAVMs is effective. Clinical parameters and quality of life improved significantly. Regular clinical controls after therapy are necessary to discover insufficiently embolized, recanalized or new PAVMs.

  3. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  4. Natural Language Processing Technologies in Radiology Research and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tianrun; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Yu, Sheng; Kelil, Tatiana; Ripley, Beth; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The migration of imaging reports to electronic medical record systems holds great potential in terms of advancing radiology research and practice by leveraging the large volume of data continuously being updated, integrated, and shared. However, there are significant challenges as well, largely due to the heterogeneity of how these data are formatted. Indeed, although there is movement toward structured reporting in radiology (ie, hierarchically itemized reporting with use of standardized terminology), the majority of radiology reports remain unstructured and use free-form language. To effectively "mine" these large datasets for hypothesis testing, a robust strategy for extracting the necessary information is needed. Manual extraction of information is a time-consuming and often unmanageable task. "Intelligent" search engines that instead rely on natural language processing (NLP), a computer-based approach to analyzing free-form text or speech, can be used to automate this data mining task. The overall goal of NLP is to translate natural human language into a structured format (ie, a fixed collection of elements), each with a standardized set of choices for its value, that is easily manipulated by computer programs to (among other things) order into subcategories or query for the presence or absence of a finding. The authors review the fundamentals of NLP and describe various techniques that constitute NLP in radiology, along with some key applications. PMID:26761536

  5. Joint Probability Models of Radiology Images and Clinical Annotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Corey Wells

    2009-01-01

    Radiology data, in the form of images and reports, is growing at a high rate due to the introduction of new imaging modalities, new uses of existing modalities, and the growing importance of objective image information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. This increase has resulted in an enormous set of image data that is richly annotated…

  6. Clinical diagnostic radiology and radiation therapy. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Radiologic methods in cancer diagnosis; Radiotherapy methods in cancer treatment; Radiotherapy of specific body sites; Radiation injury and pathology; Radiation dosimetry and dose fractionation studies; Broad cancer radiotherapy programs.

  7. My approach to interstitial lung disease using clinical, radiological and histopathological patterns

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K O

    2009-01-01

    The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting. The pathology is often inflammatory and always requires clinical and radiological context for a relevant and clinically useful histopathological diagnosis. A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a “map” for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation. PMID:19398592

  8. Can clinical and radiological findings predict surgery for lumbar disc herniation? A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew P.; Harrop, James; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Objective or clinical question: What clinical and radiological findings in patients with lumbar-herniated nucleus pulposus can serve as predictors of surgical intervention? Methods: Articles published between January 1975 and August 2011 were systematically reviewed using Pubmed, Cochrane, National Guideline Clearinghouse Databases, and bibliographies of key articles. Each article was subject to quality rating and was analyzed by two independent reviewers. Results: From 123 citations, 21 underwent full-text review. Four studies met inclusion criteria. Only baseline disability as measured by the Roland Disability Index (RDI) or the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was consistently associated with a greater likelihood of having discectomy surgery across multiple studies. With the current literature, we were not able to find an association between surgery and several characteristics including smoking status, body mass index, neurological deficit, positive straight leg testing, and level of herniation. Conclusions: From the limited data available, it appears that individual radiographic and clinical features are not able to predict the likelihood of surgical intervention. Higher baseline disability measurements (Oswestry and Roland) did correlate, however, with surgical treatment. PMID:23236305

  9. Radiology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan; Wallace, Roxanne; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Hip and groin pain are a common complaint among athletes of all ages, and may result from an acute injury or from chronic, repetitive trauma. Hip injuries can be intraarticular, extraarticular, or both. Labral abnormalities may occur in asymptomatic patients as well as in those with incapacitating symptoms and signs. Athletic hip injury leading to disabling intraarticular hip pain most commonly involves labral tear. The extraarticular causes are usually the result of overuse activity, leading to inflammation, tendonitis, or bursitis. In clinical practice, the term athletic pubalgia is used to describe exertional pubic or groin pain. PMID:21419955

  10. Biomimetic hydroxyapatite used in the treatment of periodontal intrabony pockets: clinical and radiological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Giudice, Amerigo; Pileggi, Settimia; Scordamaglia, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Tatullo, Marco; Fortunato, Leonzio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim Hydroxyapatite (PA) has a chemical composition and physical structure very similar to natural bone and therefore it has been considered to be the ideal biomaterial able to ensure a biomimetic scaffold to use in bone tissue engineering. The aim of this study is to clinically test hydroxyapatite used as osteoconductive biomaterial in the treatment of periodontal bone defects. Clinical and radiological evaluations were conducted at 6, 12 and 18 months after the surgery. Materials and methods Forty patients with 2- and 3-wall intrabony pockets were enrolled in this study. PPD, CAL, radiographic depth (RD) and angular defects were preoperatively measured. After surgery, patients were re-evaluated every 6 months for 18 months. Statistical analyses were also performed to investigate any differences between preoperative and postoperative measurements. Results Paired t-test samples conducted on the data obtained at baseline and 18 months after, showed significant (p<0.01) differences in each measurement performed. The role of preoperative RD was demonstrated to be a significant key factor (p<0.01). A relevant correlation between preoperative PPD and CAL gain was also found. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, the absence of anatomical variables, except the morphology of the bone defect, emphasizes the importance of the proper surgical approach and the graft material used. PMID:27486507

  11. Clinical compliance of viewing conditions in radiology reporting environments against current guidelines and standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, S.; Rainford, L.; Butler, M. L.

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the importance of environmental conditions in the radiology reporting environment, with many indicating that incorrect parameters could lead to error and misinterpretation. Literature is available with recommendations as to the levels that should be achieved in clinical practice, but evidence of adherence to these guidelines in radiology reporting environments is absent. This study audited the reporting environments of four teleradiologist and eight hospital based radiology reporting areas. This audit aimed to quantify adherence to guidelines and identify differences in the locations with respect to layout and design, monitor distance and angle as well as the ambient factors of the reporting environments. In line with international recommendations, an audit tool was designed to enquire in relation to the layout and design of reporting environments, monitor angle and distances used by radiologists when reporting, as well as the ambient factors such as noise, light and temperature. The review of conditions were carried out by the same independent auditor for consistency. The results obtained were compared against international standards and current research. Each radiology environment was given an overall compliance score to establish whether or not their environments were in line with recommended guidelines. Poor compliance to international recommendations and standards among radiology reporting environments was identified. Teleradiology reporting environments demonstrated greater compliance than hospital environments. The findings of this study identified a need for greater awareness of environmental and perceptual issues in the clinical setting. Further work involving a larger number of clinical centres is recommended.

  12. Radiologic and Clinical Bronchiectasis Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moua, Teng; Zand, Ladan; Hartman, Robert P.; Hartman, Thomas E.; Qin, Dingxin; Peikert, Tobias; Qian, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystin 1 and 2, the protein abnormalities associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), are also found in airway cilia and smooth muscle cells. There is evidence of increased radiologic bronchiectasis associated with ADPKD, though the clinical and functional implications of this association are unknown. We hypothesized an increased prevalence of both radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis is associated with APDKD as compared to non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) controls. Materials and Methods A retrospective case-control study was performed at our institution involving consecutive ADPKD and non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients seen over a 13 year period with both chest CT and PFT. CTs were independently reviewed by two blinded thoracic radiologists. Manually collected clinical data included symptoms, smoker status, transplant history, and PFT findings. Results Ninety-two ADPKD and 95 non-ADPKD CKD control patients were compared. Increased prevalence of radiologic bronchiectasis, predominantly mild lower lobe disease, was found in ADPKD patients compared to CKD control (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.032, OR 2.49 (CI 1.1–5.8)). After adjustment for covariates, ADPKD was associated with increased risk of radiologic bronchiectasis (OR 2.78 (CI 1.16–7.12)). Symptomatic bronchiectasis occurred in approximately a third of ADPKD patients with radiologic disease. Smoking was associated with increased radiologic bronchiectasis in ADPKD patients (OR 3.59, CI 1.23–12.1). Conclusions Radiological bronchiectasis is increased in patients with ADPKD particularly those with smoking history as compared to non-ADPKD CKD controls. A third of such patients have symptomatic disease. Bronchiectasis should be considered in the differential in ADPKD patients with respiratory symptoms and smoking history. PMID:24747723

  13. Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria; Souhami, Luis; Gois Manso, Paulo; Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina; Araujo Segreto, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  14. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Clinical, radiological, and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Madeleine; Lynch, Danielle; Bernier, Francois; Parboosingh, Jillian; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine; Calder, Alistair; Itasaki, Nobue; Wakeling, Emma; Scott, Richard; Lees, Melissa; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Blyth, Moira; Morton, Jenny; Shears, Debbie; Kini, Usha; Homfray, Tessa; Clarke, Angus; Barnicoat, Angela; Wallis, Colin; Hewitson, Rebecca; Offiah, Amaka; Saunders, Michael; Langton-Hewer, Simon; Hilliard, Tom; Davis, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition comprising branchial arch-derivative malformations with striking rib-gaps. Affected patients often have respiratory difficulties, associated with upper airway obstruction, reduced thoracic capacity, and scoliosis. We describe a series of 12 sporadic and 4 familial patients including 13 infants/children and 3 adults. Severe micrognathia and reduced numbers of ribs with gaps are consistent findings. Cleft palate, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, tracheostomy requirement, and scoliosis are common. Additional malformations such as horseshoe kidney, hypospadias, and septal heart defect may occur. Microcephaly and significant developmental delay are present in a small minority of patients. Key radiological findings are of a narrow thorax, multiple posterior rib gaps and abnormal costo-transverse articulation. A novel finding in 2 patients is bilateral accessory ossicles arising from the hyoid bone. Recently, specific mutations in SNRPB, which encodes components of the major spliceosome, have been found to cause CCMS. These mutations cluster in an alternatively spliced regulatory exon and result in altered SNRPB expression. DNA was available from 14 patients and SNRPB mutations were identified in 12 (4 previously reported). Eleven had recurrent mutations previously described in patients with CCMS and one had a novel mutation in the alternative exon. These results confirm the specificity of SNRPB mutations in CCMS and provide further evidence for the role of spliceosomal proteins in craniofacial and thoracic development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971886

  15. Hashimoto encephalopathy: A study of the clinical profile, radiological and electrophysiological correlation in a Tertiary Care Center in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pattanagere Manjunatha Suryanarayana; Javali, Mahendra; Mahale, Rohan; Madhusudhan, Byadarahalli Kempegowda; Majeed, Anas Abdul; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is a poorly understood and often misdiagnosed entity with variable clinical spectrum. There are many uncertainties that still remain about this condition and the pathological significance of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody. Objective: To characterize the clinical, laboratory and radiologic findings in patients with HE. Design: Retrospective analysis of clinical features and diagnostic test data. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical features, laboratory, radiologic, electroencephalography (EEG) findings associated with HE and therapeutic outcome. Results: Thirteen consecutive patients were identified as having HE. The median age at onset was 48.5 years (range, 19–62 years). There was a female preponderance (76.9%). Clinical manifestations were cognitive impairment and behavioral changes in 10 (76.9%), sleep disturbance in 9 (69.2%), seizures in 6 (46.1%), headache in 4 (30.8%), psychosis or paranoia in 5 (38.5%), transient symptoms in 6 (46.1%), myoclonus in 4 (30.8%), ataxia or gait disorder in 4 (30.8%). The most frequent laboratory abnormalities were increased TPO (n = 13) in all cases, increased thyroid stimulating hormone levels (n = 6), and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 5). The cerebrospinal fluid protein level was elevated in 8 of 9 patients (88.8%). Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were present in 2 patients (15.4%). EEG changes were seen in 7 patients (53.8%). All but two patients showed significant therapeutic benefit with steroids. Conclusions: HE has a wide range of clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings. All patients with an unexplained encephalopathy should be screened for this condition as treatment response is excellent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single center clinical series of HE from the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26167010

  16. Extracting numeric measurements and temporal coordinates from Japanese radiological reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takeshi; Onogi, Yuzo

    2004-04-01

    Medical records are written mainly, in natural language. The focus of this study is narrative radiological reports written in natural Japanese. These reports cannot be used for advanced retrieval, data mining, and so on, unless they are stored, using a structured format such as DICOM-SR. The goal is to structure narrative reports progressively, using natural language processing (NLP). Structure has many different levels, for example, DICOM-SR has three established levels -- basic text, enhanced and comprehensive. At the enhanced level, it is necessary to use numerical measurements and spatial & temporal coordinates. In this study, the wording used in the reports was first standardized, dictionaries were organized, and morphological analysis performed. Next, numerical measurements and temporal coordinates were extracted, and the objects to which they referred, analyzed. 10,000 CT and MR reports were separated into 82,122 sentences, and 34,269 of the 36,444 numerical descriptions were tagged. Periods, slashes, hyphens, and parentheses are ambiguously used in the description of enumerated lists, dates, image numbers, and anatomical names, as well as at the end of sentences; to resolve this ambiguity, descriptions were processed, according to the order -- date, size, unit, enumerated list, and abbreviation -- then, the tagged reports were separated into sentences.

  17. Castleman Disease of the Thorax: Clinical, Radiologic, and Pathologic Correlation: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, Seth J; Auerbach, Aaron; Franks, Teri J; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Castleman disease is a complex lymphoproliferative disease pathologically divided into two subtypes, the hyaline vascular variant (HVV) and the plasma cell variant (PCV). The HVV is the most common, is thought to represent a benign neoplasm of lymph node stromal cells, and is treated with surgical resection. It is most commonly found in the mediastinum, where it classically appears as a unicentric, avidly enhancing mass at computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging. This appearance can mimic other avidly enhancing mediastinal masses, and location, clinical history, laboratory data, and nuclear medicine single photon emission CT (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies can help narrow the differential diagnosis. Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), which in the majority of cases is composed of the PCV, is an aggressive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with human herpesvirus infection, interleukin 6 dysregulation, and other systemic disorders. While it can be difficult to differentiate MCD from lymphoma, the presence of avidly enhancing lymph nodes can suggest the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical, immunologic, and pathologic findings associated with both unicentric Castleman disease and MCD and discuss how the imaging findings correlate with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:27618318

  18. [CADASIL: a case with clinical, radiological, histological and genetic diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Posada, I J; García-Morales, I; Martínez, M A; Hoenicka, J; Bermejo, F

    2003-05-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a rare inherited cerebrovascular disease. The onset of clinical symptoms occurs with migraine with aura, transient ischemic attacks, recurrent subcortical ischemic infarcts, neuropsychiatric changes reaching subcortical dementia. Brain magnetic resonance images show multiple deep cerebral infarcts in white matter and basal ganglia and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Neuropathologic hallmark consists of deposition of small electron dense granular patches related to the basement membrane of vascular smooth muscle cells with degeneration of smooth muscle cells and media and luminal obliteration. Recently, the genetic characteristics of this disorder have been reported. Missense mutations in notch3 gene localized in chromosome 19 are involved in its pathogenesis. Only three families from Spain have been reported. Here we describe a patient with typical clinical symptoms, neuroimaging and pathology of CADASIL. C406T (Arg110Cys) mutation in notch3 gene was found. We comment on the clinical symptoms of different members of the patient's family. PMID:12721871

  19. Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia/Fibrosis: Clinical Manifestations, Histologic and Radiologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choon Sik; Jeon, Jin Woo; Park, Sung Woo; Lim, Gune-Il; Jeong, Seong Hwan; Uh, Soo-Taek; Park, Jai Soung; Choi, Deuk Lin; Jin, So Young; Kang, Chang Hee

    1996-01-01

    Objectives Customarily used classification of IPF did not satisfy a sizable group of patients with IPF that in the past had been lumped with UIP and now currently has begun to be recognized as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis (NIP). There are few reports about the clinical features of NIP. Methods The pathologic slides of 66 patients having open lung biopsy (OLB) for the differential diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILD) from 1984 to 1995 were reviewed. Seven cases were confirmed as NIP. The clinical record, pulmonay function tests (PFT), chest PA and HRCT were reviewed and analysed retrospectively. Results Six patients with NIP were female. The median age was 56 years. Mean duration of symptoms was 4 months. Five patients had systemic flu-like symptoms. the most common respiratory symptom was gradual dyspnea Two patients revealed a mild degree of anemia Four cases had leukocytois of more than 10,000/mm3. ESR and CRP O.K. elevated in all measured cases. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was positive in three of six patients and ds-DNA antibody was positive in one of six patients Restrictive pattern of PFT was predominant. Diffusion capacity of carbonmonoxide (DLCO) decreased markedly. In bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), total cell counts elevated about three times of normal value. On differntial counts of BAL cells, lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils were higher than those of normal controls. The prominent finding of chest radiology was bilaterally patchy opacifications in parenchyme of lower lung zones. On HRCT, bilaterally patchy areas of ground-glass attenuation and/or areas of alveolar consolidation were commonly shown. The number of pathologic type was one case of group I, four cases of group II and two cases of group III. The average period from diagnosis to the last follow-up was 24.8 months. Five patients were clinically recovered to the previously well-being state. Conclusion Patients with NIP had different clinical features from UIP, AIP

  20. Clinical and Radiologic Characteristics of Inferior Rectus Muscle Sheath Entrapment in Orbital Blowout Fracture.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Tavakoli, Mehdi; Khosravifard, Keivan; Yazdani, Shahin

    2015-10-01

    Blowout fracture is a common condition in the oculoplastics clinic. One of the indications for its repair is entrapment of the inferior rectus muscle within the fracture site. Herein, the authors present 3 patients of inferior rectus muscle sheath entrapment without entrapment of the muscle itself. The outcome of treatment was excellent in all patients. The aim of this report is to present the special clinical and radiologic findings in such patients. PMID:26413961

  1. Clinical-Radiological Correlation of Retained Silicone Sponge Presenting as Orbital Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Tal J.; Clemett, John; Birnbach, Charles D.; LauKaitis, Steven J.; Sires, Bryan S.

    2016-01-01

    A 32-year-old female who underwent scleral buckle removal presented 5 weeks postoperatively with a red, fluctuant subconjunctival mass. CT scan identified an irregularly bordered, hypoattenuated lesion next to the globe with the density of air. Ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgeons were consulted to evaluate orbital cellulitis with intraorbital gas, at which point it was deemed that the hypoattenuated mass was likely a retained sponge element based on its radiological features. Additional surgical exploration identified the retained silicone sponge. This clinical photographic-radiological correlation of retained silicone sponges presenting as orbital inflammation reminds surgeons to meticulously explant buckle material. PMID:27413562

  2. Clinical-Radiological Correlation of Retained Silicone Sponge Presenting as Orbital Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Tal J; Clemett, John; Birnbach, Charles D; LauKaitis, Steven J; Sires, Bryan S

    2016-01-01

    A 32-year-old female who underwent scleral buckle removal presented 5 weeks postoperatively with a red, fluctuant subconjunctival mass. CT scan identified an irregularly bordered, hypoattenuated lesion next to the globe with the density of air. Ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgeons were consulted to evaluate orbital cellulitis with intraorbital gas, at which point it was deemed that the hypoattenuated mass was likely a retained sponge element based on its radiological features. Additional surgical exploration identified the retained silicone sponge. This clinical photographic-radiological correlation of retained silicone sponges presenting as orbital inflammation reminds surgeons to meticulously explant buckle material. PMID:27413562

  3. Pineal cyst: a review of clinical and radiological features.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Kim, Won; Spasic, Marko; Voth, Brittany; Yew, Andrew; Yang, Isaac

    2011-07-01

    Pineal cysts (PCs) are benign and often asymptomatic lesions of the pineal region that are typically small and do not change in size over time. PCs appear as small, well circumscribed, unilocular masses that either reside within or completely replace the pineal gland. This article reviews and discusses the characteristic features of PCs-clinical, histological, and identifiable by various imaging modalities-which assist clinicians in narrowing the differential diagnosis for pineal lesions. PMID:21801982

  4. Magnetoencephalography: Fundamentals and Established and Emerging Clinical Applications in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography is a noninvasive, fast, and patient friendly technique for recording brain activity. It is increasingly available and is regarded as one of the most modern imaging tools available to radiologists. The dominant clinical use of this technology currently centers on two, partly overlapping areas, namely, localizing the regions from which epileptic seizures originate, and identifying regions of normal brain function in patients preparing to undergo brain surgery. As a consequence, many radiologists may not yet be familiar with this technique. This review provides an introduction to magnetoencephalography, discusses relevant analytical techniques, and presents recent developments in established and emerging clinical applications such as pervasive developmental disorders. Although the role of magnetoencephalography in diagnosis, prognosis, and patient treatment is still limited, it is argued that this technology is exquisitely capable of contributing indispensable information about brain dynamics not easily obtained with other modalities. This, it is believed, will make this technology an important clinical tool for a wide range of disorders in the future. PMID:24967282

  5. Liliequist membrane: radiological evaluation, clinical and therapeutic implications*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Daniel Aguiar; Castro, Fábio Luiz Onuki; Yared, James Henrique; Lucas Júnior, Ademar; Ferreira Filho, Luiz Alves; Ferreira, Nelson Fortes Paes Diniz

    2014-01-01

    In a simplistic and succinct way, Liliequist membrane may be understood as a projection formed by an arachnoid membrane extending from the dorsum sellae to the mammillary bodies. In spite of being well known to neurosurgeons, many radiologists neither know this anatomical structure nor give importance to its study. The imaging evaluation of this membrane is feasible and may be interesting for a better preoperative planning; postoperative evaluation of third ventriculostomies; and understanding of suprasellar arachnoid cysts and perimesencephalic hemorrhage. The present article illustrates the anatomy of the membrane, with emphasis on imaging findings, besides describing its possible clinical and surgical implications. PMID:25741076

  6. [Familial cerebellar ataxia: clinical, radiological and electrophysiological findings].

    PubMed

    Gajkowski, K; Rysz, A; Walecki, J; Bojakowski, J

    1988-01-01

    A family with cerebellar ataxia of late onset occurring in four generations was observed. Neurological abnormalities included signs of cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract damage and damage to the peripheral motor neuron. Computerized tomography demonstrated in five out of six studied patients an image suggesting olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebellar structures, brainstem and cerebral hemispheres evidence of atrophy was detected. No correlation was demonstrated between the intensity of the clinical signs and the progression of changes in CT image. Electrophysiological investigations demonstrated changes compatible with damage to the motor and sensory fibres in the peripheral nerves and signs suggesting damage to the spinal motor neurons and pyramidal tract. These observations confirm the multilevel development of the process. The use of similar diagnostic methods will permit a more accurate classification of cerebellar ataxia and obtaining of better information for prognostication of individual cases. PMID:3164096

  7. The cervical spine in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a clinical, radiological and immunogenetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P; Cremonesi, T; Mantovani, W; Battistel, B; Rossi, F; Capozzoli, N; Baricchi, R; Portioli, I

    1992-01-01

    The radiological changes of the cervical spine were evaluated in 57 patients with psoriatic arthritis and were correlated with clinical, radiological, and immunogenetic features of the disease. Forty patients (70%) showed radiological evidence of the cervical spine being affected by the disease. Two patterns of cervical spine abnormalities were noted. Fifteen patients (26%) had erosive and/or subluxing cervical rheumatoid like lesions; 25 patients (44%) had a more frequently reported pattern similar to ankylosing spondylitis. Although subaxial subluxations were the most frequently observed cervical abnormalities (53%) in the inflammatory subgroup, none of the patients studied had cord compression. Ankylosing cervical spine disease was the only form of axial involvement in nine (36%) of 25 patients with the ankylosing form of psoriatic arthritis. All of these patients had peripheral disease and were B27 negative. Predictors of cervical spine disease patterns were considered using clinical, demographic, and radiological features and HLA antigens. The results of a multivariate analysis showed that the best predictors of inflammatory cervical spine disease are the presence of HLA-B39 and HLA-DR4 antigens, radiocarpal erosions, and the absence of the HLA-DR5 antigen. PMID:1540041

  8. Epidermoids involving the temporal bone: clinical, radiological and pathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Nager, G T

    1975-12-01

    Epidermoids or congenital cholesteatomas arise from aberrant epithelial remnants and are, therefore, considerd blastomatous malformations. Their predilective sites are the intracranial cavity, the diploe of the skull and the spinal canal. In the base of the skull the temporal bone is the most frequent site. Epidermoids account for about 0.2-1.5 percent of all intracranial tumors. The majority originate in the cerebello-pontine angle where they account for 6-7 percent of all tumors. Their age incidence reveals a great scatter from birth to 80 years. The majority are recognized during the third and fourth decades with the onset of clinical symptoms occurring much earlier. They affect males more frequently than females. Their delicate capsule with a whitish mother-of-pearl sheen lends them a typical appearance. Epidermoids are generally slow growing lesions which may remain asymptomatic for years. The irritative effect of their content, however, can produce symptoms of dysfunction and intense inflammation. Malignant changes occur infrequently. Diploic epidermoids are easily recognized, whereas, intradural epidermoids are more difficult to identify. Epidermoids may arise in the vicinity, on the outer aspect or within the temporal bone. Epidermoids originating in any of these locations have certain characteristic features which may arouse suspicion of their presence. Examples of an epidermoid with origin in the typical locations within the temporal bone and cerebello-pontine angle are discussed to portray their individual characteristics. PMID:1207346

  9. Non-compressive myelopathy: clinical and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, S; Syal, P; Singh, P; Lal, V; Khandelwal, N; Das, C P

    1999-12-01

    Fifty seven patients (42 males and 15 females) with non-compressive myelopathy were studied from 1997 to 1999. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) was the commonest (31) followed by Vit B12 deficiency myelopathy (8), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (5), hereditary spastic paraplegia (3), tropical spastic paraplegia (2), subacute necrotising myelitis (1), radiation myelitis (1), syphilitic myelitis (1) and herpes zoster myelitis (1). 4 cases remained unclassified. In the ATM group, mean age was 30.35 years, antecedent event was observed in 41.9% case, 25 cases had symmetrical involvement and most of the cases had severe deficit at onset. CSF study carried out in 23 patients of ATM revealed rise in proteins (mean 147.95mg%, range 20-1200 mg/dL) and pleocytosis (mean 20.78/cumm, range 0-200 mm3). Oligoclonal band (OCB) was present in 28% of cases of ATM. The most common abnormality detected was a multisegment hyperintense lesion on T2W images, that occupied the central area on cross section. In 6 patients hyperintense signal was eccentric in location. MRI was normal in 4 cases of ATM. Thus ATM is the leading cause of non-compressive myelopathy. Clinical features combined with MRI findings are helpful in defining the cause of ATM. PMID:10625902

  10. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Response to 'Patient dose measurements in radiological practices'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Wambersie, A.

    2006-06-01

    A lack of suitable dosimetric quantities for application in diagnostic radiology is noted by Dr Moores. It is concluded by Dr Moores that it is not possible to adhere to the basic principles of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) regarding patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology due to the extremely wide variety of quantities and units employed. The conclusion of the ICRU on similar observations, however, was that there is a need for harmonization of quantities and terminology for dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology and they established a Report Committee with the aim of formulating an ICRU report on 'dosimetric procedures in diagnostic radiology'. The report produced by this committee entitled 'Patient dosimetry for x rays used in medical imaging' was accepted for publication in December 2005 and is currently at press, and may serve to improve the current situation with regard to patient dose measurement in diagnostic and interventional radiology.

  11. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients.

    PubMed

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image. PMID:27322924

  12. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients.

    PubMed

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image. PMID:27483175

  13. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics in eclamptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Aracki-Trenkić, Aleksandra; Stojanov, Dragan; Trenkić, Milan; Radovanović, Zoran; Ignjatović, Jelena; Ristić, Saša; Trenkić-Bozinović, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an obstetric emergency frequently occurring in a pregnant or puerperal woman, manifested with an acute headache, consciousness impairment, seizures, and visual deficits and is associated with white matter changes predominantly affecting the posterior parietal and occipital lobes of the brain. Apart from the above-described typical location of the changes, the most common atypical location involves the brain stem and basal ganglia. Since magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive and specific imaging technique compared to computerized tomography, establishing the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with PRES is based mainly on MRI findings. It is particularly important not to exclude PRES as a possible diagnosis when we have the appropriate clinical presentation accompanied by the atypical radiological findings, since this clinical-radiological syndrome can often be manifested with an atypical MRI image.

  14. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: the approach adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, K; Järvinen, H; Butler, P; McLean, I D; Pentecost, M; Rickard, M; Abdullah, B

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  15. Dentigerous Cyst or Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor: Clinical Radiological and Histopathological Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Shivesh; Goyal, Ashima; Rattan, Vidya; Vaiphei, Kim; Kaur Bhatia, Sarabjot

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a well-recognised slow growing benign tumor derived from complex system of dental lamina or its remnants. This lesion is categorised into three variants of which the more common variant is follicular type which is often mistaken for dentigerous cyst. We present a case of AOT in a 14-year-old male who was misdiagnosed as dentigerous cyst. Clinical radiological and therapeutic characteristics of the case are commented on in detail. PMID:25097553

  16. Clinical, Bronchographic, Radiological, and Physiological Observations in Ten Cases of Asbestosis

    PubMed Central

    Leathart, G. L.

    1960-01-01

    Ten cases of asbestosis (eight male, two female), aged 45-65 years have been kept under observation for periods of up to eight years. Bronchiectasis was demonstrated bronchographically in six cases. Clubbing of the fingers and coarse crepitations appeared to be signs of bronchiectasis rather than of uncomplicated asbestosis. It is suggested that the prevalence of bronchiectasis is higher than has been reported previously because the patients survived longer. The radiological findings are tabulated and compared with previous descriptions. In these subjects there was no relationship between radiological and clinical state. Nine patients eventually showed clinical deterioration and it often proceeded rapidly. The radiograph however, usually remained unaltered. Pulmonary function tests, including diffusing capacity, arterial blood analysis and estimation of mechanical properties of the lung, were carried out in these 10 cases, and in 11 asbestos workers (aged 35-64 years) without radiological abnormality. The steady state diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (Dco) at rest was lower in asbestosis than in the control subjects. The pulmonary compliance was remarkably low in asbestosis and related fairly closely to the vital capacity. The maximum voluntary ventilation was also low and was related to increased pulmonary resistance but it cannot be said whether this is in the airways or in the lung tissue. Indirect evidence of inequalities of ventilation/perfusion ratio was obtained in most cases. There is no convincing evidence that pulmonary fibrosis occurs without radiological abnormality, but a defect of diffusion may occur. There is no test of pulmonary function which is diagnostic, but a low pulmonary compliance, especially if combined with a low diffusing capacity, is confirmatory. It is suggested that the demonstration of a progressive decline in vital capacity, or in diffusing capacity, may enable a diagnosis of asbestosis to be made before radiological

  17. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Jong, W. L.; Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of tests based on radiologic measurements of dogs and cats: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Nelson, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review of diagnostic tests based on radiologic measurements of structures in dogs and cats was done in order to reach generalizable conclusions about the value of making such measurements. Literature search was done using the ISI Web of Knowledge(SM) for studies in the subject category Veterinary sciences. Studies were eligible for inclusion that employed length, angle, area or volume measurements from radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT or MR images of dogs or cats as a diagnostic test for a naturally occurring condition, compared the results of imaging with a reference standard, included at least 10 subjects, and sufficient data that a 2 × 2 table of results could be constructed. Quality of studies was assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. Twenty-six studies were found describing 40 tests that satisfied the inclusion criteria. Tests were radiographic in 22 (55%) instances and ultrasonographic in 18 (45%). Quality of studies was generally low, with a risk of bias in patient selection in 92% studies, performance of the index test in 73% studies, and patient flow in 42% studies. Median (range) number of subjects was 64 (20-305), sensitivity was 77% (38-99%), specificity was 82% (50-99%), positive likelihood ratio was 4.1 (1-103), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.29 (0.01-1). Two studies that compared accuracy of radiographic measurements to subjective image interpretation alone found no difference. Evidence is weak that radiologic measurements of structures in dogs and cats are useful for diagnosis, hence measurements should not be emphasized as a basis for diagnosis in either teaching or clinical imaging reports. PMID:25339347

  19. Clinical, physiological, and radiological features of asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshio; Tada, Yuji; Kawata, Naoko; Matsuura, Yukiko; Ikari, Jun; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) is associated with rapid decline in lung function, poorer health-related quality-of-life outcomes, and frequent exacerbations, compared to COPD alone. Although the numbers of patients with ACOS have increased, there is little established evidence regarding diagnostic criteria and treatment options. Thus, the aim of our study was to clarify the clinical, physiological, and radiological features of patients with ACOS. Methods We examined a total of 100 patients with COPD and 40 patients with ACOS, who were selected based on clinical criteria. All patients underwent baseline testing, including a COPD assessment test, pulmonary function tests, and multidetector row computed tomography imaging. Percentage of low attenuation volume, percentage of wall area, and percentage of total cross-sectional area of pulmonary vessels less than 5 mm2 (%CSA <5) were determined using multidetector row computed tomography. ACOS patients were administered a fixed dose of budesonide/formoterol (160/4.5 μg, two inhalations; twice daily) for 12 weeks, after which the ACOS patients underwent multidetector row computed tomography to measure the same parameters. Results At baseline, the ACOS patients and COPD patients had a similar degree of airflow limitation, vital capacity, and residual volume. ACOS patients had higher COPD assessment test scores, percentage of wall area, and %CSA <5 than COPD patients. Compared to baseline, budesonide/formoterol treatment significantly increased the forced expiratory volume in 1 second and decreased the degree of airway wall thickness (percentage of wall area) as well as pulmonary microvascular density (%CSA <5) in ACOS patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that ACOS is characterized by an airway lesion–dominant phenotype, in contrast to COPD. Higher %CSA <5 might be a characteristic feature of ACOS. PMID:26028967

  20. Bridging the gap between basic and clinical sciences: A description of a radiological anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anna; Staśkiewicz, Grzegorz J; Lisiecka, Justyna; Pietrzyk, Łukasz; Czekajlo, Michael; Arancibia, Carlos U; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Torres, Kamil

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of medical imaging techniques pervade modern medicine, and the changing portability and performance of tools like ultrasound imaging have brought these medical imaging techniques into the everyday practice of many specialties outside of radiology. However, proper interpretation of ultrasonographic and computed tomographic images requires the practitioner to not only hone certain technical skills, but to command an excellent knowledge of sectional anatomy and an understanding of the pathophysiology of the examined areas as well. Yet throughout many medical curricula there is often a large gap between traditional anatomy coursework and clinical training in imaging techniques. The authors present a radiological anatomy course developed to teach sectional anatomy with particular emphasis on ultrasonography and computed tomography, while incorporating elements of medical simulation. To assess students' overall opinions about the course and to examine its impact on their self-perceived improvement in their knowledge of radiological anatomy, anonymous evaluation questionnaires were provided to the students. The questionnaires were prepared using standard survey methods. A five-point Likert scale was applied to evaluate agreement with statements regarding the learning experience. The majority of students considered the course very useful and beneficial in terms of improving three-dimensional and cross-sectional knowledge of anatomy, as well as for developing practical skills in ultrasonography and computed tomography. The authors found that a small-group, hands-on teaching model in radiological anatomy was perceived as useful both by the students and the clinical teachers involved in their clinical education. In addition, the model was introduced using relatively few resources and only two faculty members. Anat Sci Educ 9: 295-303. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26599321

  1. Evolution of the clinical review station for enterprise-wide multimedia radiology reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, William B.; Valtchinov, Vladimir I.; Davis, Scott D.; Lester, James; Khorasani, Ramin; Carrino, John A.; Benfield, Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Efforts to develop Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) for the last ten years have concentrated mainly on developing systems for primary interpretation of digital radiological images. Much less attention has been paid to the clinical aspects of the radiology process. Clinical radiology services are an important component of the overall care delivery process, providing information and consultation services to referring physicians, the customers of radiology, in a timely fashion to aid in care decisions. Information management systems (IMS) are playing an increasingly central role in the care delivery process. No suitable commercial PACS or IMS products were available that could effectively provide for the requirements of the clinicians. We endeavored to fill this void at our institution by developing a system to deliver images and text reports electronically on-demand to the referring physicians. This system has evolved substantially since initial deployment eight years ago. As new technologies become available they are evaluated and integrated as appropriate to improve system performance and manageability. Not surprisingly, the internet and World Wide Web (WWW) technology has had the greatest impact on system design in recent years. Additional features have been added over time to provide services for teleradiology, teaching, and research needs. We also discovered that these value-added services give us a competitive edge in attracting new business to our department. Commercial web-based products are now becoming available which do a satisfactory job of providing many of these clinical services. These products are evaluated for integration into our system as they mature. The result is a system that impacts positively on patient care.

  2. Clinical and radiological repercussions of plexiform neurofibroma in the pelvic region.

    PubMed

    Slaibi, Érica Bertolace; Daher, João Gabriel Lima; da Fonseca, Gustavo Guida Godinho; Daher, Carlos Magno; Geller, Mauro; Ribeiro, Márcia Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the case of a plexiform neurofibroma located in the pelvis, affecting the bladder, prostate and spine (lumbar/sacral), followed-up for three years and six months. Surgical removal was contraindicated and the patient underwent biannual clinical and radiological follow-up that did not demonstrate any tumor increase. The clinical manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1 are variable, and the medical team should be attentive to further investigations, considering possible unexpected rare findings. Large pelvic masses may correspond to plexiform neurofibromas, so the diagnostic hypothesis of neurofibromatosis should be taken into consideration. PMID:25741110

  3. Key Performance Indicators in Radiology: You Can't Manage What You Can't Measure.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Aran, Shima; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Thrall, James H; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is a fundamental component of every successful radiology operation. A radiology QA program must be able to efficiently and effectively monitor and respond to quality problems. However, as radiology QA has expanded into the depths of radiology operations, the task of defining and measuring quality has become more difficult. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are highly valuable data points and measurement tools that can be used to monitor and evaluate the quality of services provided by a radiology operation. As such, KPIs empower a radiology QA program to bridge normative understandings of health care quality with on-the-ground quality management. This review introduces the importance of KPIs in health care QA, a framework for structuring KPIs, a method to identify and tailor KPIs, and strategies to analyze and communicate KPI data that would drive process improvement. Adopting a KPI-driven QA program is both good for patient care and allows a radiology operation to demonstrate measurable value to other health care stakeholders. PMID:26323653

  4. Radiological protection in ion beam radiotherapy: practical guidance for clinical use of new technology.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Y; Tsujii, H; Hopewell, J W; Ortiz López, P; Cosset, J-M; Paganetti, H; Montelius, A; Schardt, D; Jones, B; Nakamura, T

    2016-06-01

    Recently introduced technologies in radiotherapy have significantly improved the clinical outcome for patients. Ion beam radiotherapy, involving proton and carbon ion beams, provides excellent dose distributions in targeted tumours, with reduced doses to the surrounding normal tissues. However, careful treatment planning is required in order to maximise the treatment efficiency and minimise the dose to normal tissues. Radiation exposure from secondary neutrons and photons, particle fragments, and photons from activated materials should also be considered for radiological protection of the patient and medical staff. Appropriate maintenance is needed for the equipment and air in the treatment room, which may be activated by the particle beam and its secondary radiation. This new treatment requires complex procedures and careful adjustment of parameters for each patient. Therefore, education and training for the personnel involved in the procedure are essential for both effective treatment and patient protection. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has provided recommendations for radiological protection in ion beam radiotherapy in Publication 127 Medical staff should be aware of the possible risks resulting from inappropriate use and control of the equipment. They should also consider the necessary procedures for patient protection when new technologies are introduced into clinical practice. PMID:26980799

  5. Decision support systems for clinical radiological practice — towards the next generation

    PubMed Central

    Stivaros, S M; Gledson, A; Nenadic, G; Zeng, X-J; Keane, J; Jackson, A

    2010-01-01

    The huge amount of information that needs to be assimilated in order to keep pace with the continued advances in modern medical practice can form an insurmountable obstacle to the individual clinician. Within radiology, the recent development of quantitative imaging techniques, such as perfusion imaging, and the development of imaging-based biomarkers in modern therapeutic assessment has highlighted the need for computer systems to provide the radiological community with support for academic as well as clinical/translational applications. This article provides an overview of the underlying design and functionality of radiological decision support systems with examples tracing the development and evolution of such systems over the past 40 years. More importantly, we discuss the specific design, performance and usage characteristics that previous systems have highlighted as being necessary for clinical uptake and routine use. Additionally, we have identified particular failings in our current methodologies for data dissemination within the medical domain that must be overcome if the next generation of decision support systems is to be implemented successfully. PMID:20965900

  6. A Clinical Update and Radiologic Review of Pediatric Orbital and Ocular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ajay A.; Naheedy, John H.; Chen, James Y.-Y.; Robbins, Shira L.; Ramkumar, Hema L.

    2013-01-01

    While pediatric orbital tumors are most often managed in tertiary care centers, clinicians should be aware of the signs of intraocular and orbital neoplasms. In the pediatric population, a delay in diagnosis of orbital and intraocular lesions, even if benign, can lead to vision loss and deformity. Intraocular lesions reviewed are retinoblastoma, medulloepithelioma, and retinal astrocytic hamartoma. Orbital neoplasms reviewed are rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma metastases, optic pathway glioma, plexiform neurofibroma, leukemia, lymphoprolipherative disease, orbital inflammatory syndrome, dermoid and epidermoid inclusion cysts, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Vascular lesions reviewed are infantile hemangioma and venous lymphatic malformation. In conjunction with clinical examination, high-resolution ophthalmic imaging and radiologic imaging play an important role in making a diagnosis and differentiating between benign and likely malignant processes. The radiologic imaging characteristics of these lesions will be discussed to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment. The current treatment modalities and management of tumors will also be reviewed. PMID:23577029

  7. Virtual anthropology: useful radiological tools for age assessment in clinical forensic medicine and thanatology.

    PubMed

    Dedouit, Fabrice; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Savall, Frédéric; Rousseau, Hervé; Crubézy, Eric; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Virtual anthropology consists of the introduction of modern slice imaging to biological and forensic anthropology. Thanks to this non-invasive scientific revolution, some classifications and staging systems, first based on dry bone analysis, can be applied to cadavers with no need for specific preparation, as well as to living persons. Estimation of bone and dental age is one of the possibilities offered by radiology. Biological age can be estimated in clinical forensic medicine as well as in living persons. Virtual anthropology may also help the forensic pathologist to estimate a deceased person's age at death, which together with sex, geographical origin and stature, is one of the important features determining a biological profile used in reconstructive identification. For this forensic purpose, the radiological tools used are multislice computed tomography and, more recently, X-ray free imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound investigations. We present and discuss the value of these investigations for age estimation in anthropology. PMID:25735613

  8. Clinical and Radiological Comparison of Semirigid (WavefleX) and Rigid System for the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Keun; Lim, Hyunkeun; Oh, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Spinal fusion operation is an effective treatment in the spinal pathology, but it could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumented and adjacent segments. This retrospective study compared the radiological and clinical outcomes of patients undergoing lumbar fusion with semirigid rods versus rigid rods system. Methods Using transpedicular fixation and posterior lumbar interbody fusion at the level of L4/L5, 20 patients were treated with semirigid rods (WavefleX, SR group), and 20 patients with rigid rods (titanium, RR group). Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated, including visual analog score for lower back pain and leg pain, Prolo functional and economic scores, statues of implanted instruments, fusion rate, and complications during 24-month follow-up. Results Clinical scores were significantly improved until postoperative 24-month follow-up as compared with preoperative scores in both groups (p<0.05), with similar levels of improvement observed at the same time points postoperatively between the 2 groups. Prolo economic scores were significantly improved in SR group compared to RR until 12 months, but this improvement became similar after 18 months. The overall fusion rate was 94.1% until the 24-month follow-up for both groups. No significant complication was observed in both groups. Conclusion The results of the present study indicate that semirigid rods system with posterior lumbar interbody fusion showed similar clinical and radiological result with rigid rods system until 2 years after instrumentation. The WavefleX rods system, as a semirigid rods with unique characteristics, may be an effective alternative treatment for patients in lumbar fusion. PMID:27437014

  9. Shoulder Structure and Function Following the Modified Latarjet Procedure: A Clinical and Radiological Review

    PubMed Central

    Garewal, Devinder; Evans, Mathew; Taylor, David; Hoy, Gregory A.; Barwood, Shane; Connell, David

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of the modified Latarjet procedure for traumatic, antero-inferior glenohumeral joint instability. Methods Case series were used with a mean follow-up of 21.3 months for clinical and radiological review and 47.2 months for recurrent instability. Shoulder function was evaluated by clinical examination and validated shoulder scales: Western Ontario Shoulder Stability Index (WOSI), Melbourne Instability Shoulder Score (MISS) and l'Insalata Shoulder Questionnaire. Shoulder structure was evaluated by computed tomography. Results Thirty-two cases were enrolled (mean age 27.0 years). One patient reported a redislocation during the follow-up period. Clinical examination revealed that the median external rotation (at 0° and 90° abduction) was reduced on the operative side by 7.5° (p < 0.01) and 10° (p < 0.001), respectively. Subjective shoulder function was good. Mean (SD) scores on the WOSI, MISS and l'Insalata scales were 78.0 (19.7), 75.8 (11.5) and 89.3 (9.9), respectively. No loss of subscapularis strength was identified (p > 0.05). Radiological evaluation revealed a mean (SD) pre-operative glenoid surface area loss of 169.5 (48.5) mm2 reconstituted surgically by a bone block of 225.4 (73.8) mm2. Subscapularis muscle bulk was reduced on the operative side, above the level of the muscle split (p < 0.05). Conclusions The Latarjet procedure reliably restores lost glenoid surface area, shoulder stability, strength and function. A small loss of external rotation is expected and related to altered subscapularis anatomy.

  10. Paradoxical Lung Function Response to Beta2-agonists: Radiologic Correlates and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Surya P.; Wells, James M.; Kim, Victor; Criner, Gerard J.; Hersh, Craig P.; Hardin, Megan; Bailey, William C.; Nath, Hrudaya; il-Kim, Young; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Stinson, Douglas S.; Wilson, Carla G.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Make, Barry J.; Dransfield, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchodilator response is seen in a significant proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there are also reports of a paradoxical response (PR) to beta2-agonists, resulting in bronchoconstriction. Asymptomatic bronchoconstriction is likely far more common but there has been no systematic study of this phenomenon.We assessed theprevalence of PR in current and former smokers with and without COPD, and its radiologic correlates and clinical implications. Methods Subjects from a large multicenter study (COPDGene) were categorized into two groups based on PR defined as at least a 12% and 200mLreduction in FEV1 and/or FVC after administration of a short-acting beta2-agonist (180ucg albuterol). Predictors of PR and associations with respiratory morbidity and computed tomographic measures of emphysema and airway disease were assessed. Findings 9986 subjects were included. PR was seen in 4.54% and the frequency was similar in those with COPD and smokers without airflow obstruction. Compared to Caucasians, PR was twice as common in African-Americans (6.9% vs. 3.4%;p <0.001). On multivariate analyses, African- American race (adjusted OR 1.89, 95%CI 1.50 to 2.39), lesspercent emphysema (OR 0.96, 95%CI 0.92 to 0.99) and increased wall-area% of segmental airways (OR 1.04,95%CI 1.01 to 1.08) were independently associated with PR.PR was independently associated with worse dyspnea, lower six-minute-walk distance, higher BODE index, and a greater frequency of exacerbations(increased by a factor of 1.35, 95%CI 1.003 to 1.81). Interpretation Paradoxical response to beta2-agonists is associated with respiratory morbidity and is more common in African Americans. PMID:25217076

  11. The clinical display of radiologic information as an interactive multimedia report.

    PubMed

    Maloney, K; Hamlet, C T

    1999-05-01

    We regard the delivery of radiological information as an interactive multimedia report. We use a multimedia report model based on Extensible Markup Language (XML), rather than a traditional workstation model. Others have suggested a similar document-based approach. This display presentation includes image-related and text-based information and may contain interactive components (e.g., window, level and zoom). Using XML as a foundation for this multimedia presentation, we achieve flexibility and platform independence at a lower cost. XML allows for the separation of content and form. Content information, defined as elements (e.g., images, radiologic reports, and demographic information), is treated as independent information objects. The behavior of the elements can be changed for different users and tasks. In addition, by separating format detail from content, the appearance of the elements within the report can be modified. XML does not replace existing standards (i.e., Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine [DICOM], Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol [TCP/IP]). Instead, it provides a powerful framework that is used in combination with existing standards to allow system designers to modify display characteristics based on user need. We describe our application of XML to the clinical display of radiologic information. PMID:10342186

  12. Homozygous N540K hypochondroplasia--first report: radiological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, M Laura Garcia; Fano, Virginia; Araoz, H Verónica; Chertkoff, Lilien; Obregon, M Gabriela

    2014-07-01

    We describe a 16-month-old male with N540K homozygous mutation in the FGFR3 gene who showed a more severe phenotype than hypochondroplasia (HCH). To our knowledge, a homozygous state for this mutation causing HCH has not been reported before. The clinical and radiological characteristics of our patient represent an intermediate condition between achondroplasia and achondroplasia/hypochondroplasia compound heterozygosity. This case represents a new expression of FGFR3 spectrum and it is of considerable importance for the genetic counseling in cases where both parents are affected with HCH. PMID:24715719

  13. T1- Thresholds in Black Holes Increase Clinical-Radiological Correlation in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias; Sedlacik, Jan; Holst, Brigitte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Young, Kim Lea; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an established tool in diagnosing and evaluating disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While clinical-radiological correlations are limited in general, hypointense T1 lesions (also known as Black Holes (BH)) have shown some promising results. The definition of BHs is very heterogeneous and depends on subjective visual evaluation. Objective We aimed to improve clinical-radiological correlations by defining BHs using T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) thresholds to achieve best possible correlation between BH lesion volume and clinical disability. Method 40 patients with mainly relapsing-remitting MS underwent MRI including 3-dimensional fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) before and after Gadolinium (GD) injection and double inversion-contrast magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequences. BHs (BHvis) were marked by two raters on native T1-weighted (T1w)-MPRAGE, contrast-enhancing lesions (CE lesions) on T1w-MPRAGE after GD and FLAIR lesions (total-FLAIR lesions) were detected separately. BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion maps were registered to MP2RAGE images, and the mean T1-RT were calculated for all lesion ROIs. Mean T1 values of the cortex (CTX) were calculated for each patient. Subsequently, Spearman rank correlations between clinical scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) and lesion volume were determined for different T1-RT thresholds. Results Significant differences in T1-RT were obtained between all different lesion types with highest T1 values in visually marked BHs (BHvis: 1453.3±213.4 ms, total-FLAIR lesions: 1394.33±187.38 ms, CTX: 1305.6±35.8 ms; p<0.05). Significant correlations between BHvis/total-FLAIR lesion volume and clinical disability were obtained for a wide range of T1-RT thresholds. The highest correlation for BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion masks were found at T1-RT>1500 ms

  14. Radiologist-initiated double reading of abdominal CT: retrospective analysis of the clinical importance of changes to radiology reports

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Aamodt, Rolf; Heggelund, Thomas; Dahl, Fredrik A; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Hurlen, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Background Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals frequently request second reads by colleagues in real time. Our objective was to estimate the frequency of clinically important changes to radiology reports produced by these prospectively obtained double readings. Methods We retrospectively compared the preliminary and final reports from 1071 consecutive double-read abdominal CT examinations of surgical patients at five public hospitals in Norway. Experienced gastrointestinal surgeons rated the clinical importance of changes from the preliminary to final report. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged or decreased. Results Changes were classified as clinically important in 146 of 1071 reports (14%). Changes to 3 reports (0.3%) were critical (demanding immediate action), 35 (3%) were major (implying a change in treatment) and 108 (10%) were intermediate (requiring further investigations). The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 118 (81%) of the clinically important changes. Important changes were made less frequently when abdominal radiologists were first readers, more frequently when they were second readers, and more frequently to urgent examinations. Conclusion A 14% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and a targeted selection of urgent cases and radiologists reading outside their specialty may increase the yield of discrepant cases. PMID:27013638

  15. Measurements of entrance surface dose using a fiber-optic dosimeter in diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Seo, Jeong Ki; Shin, Sang Hun; Han, Ki-Tek; Jeon, Dayeong; Jang, Kyoung Won; Sim, Hyeok In; Lee, Bongsoo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) was developed to measure entrance surface dose (ESD) in diagnostic radiology. We measured the scintillating lights in order to obtain ESDs, which changed with the various exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR) system, such as tube potential, current-time product, focus-surface distance (FSD), and field size, using the fabricated FOD system. From the experimental results, the output light signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs of the conventional semiconductor dosimeter. In conclusion, we characterized the measured ESDs as functions of exposure parameters by using two different types of dosimeters and demonstrated that the proposed FOD using a plastic scintillating fiber and a plastic optical fiber (POF) makes it possible to measure ESDs in the energy range of diagnostic radiology. From the results of this study, it is anticipated that the FOD will be a useful dosimeter in low-energy photon applications including diagnostic radiology.

  16. An autopsy study of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: correlations among clinical, radiological, and pathological features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical evaluation to differentiate the characteristic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is often difficult in patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), but diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis is important for evaluating treatment options and the risk of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia of such patients. As far as we know, it is the first report describing a correlation among clinical, radiological, and whole-lung pathological features in an autopsy cases of CPFE patients. Methods Experts retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts and examined chest computed tomography (CT) images and pathological findings of an autopsy series of 22 CPFE patients, and compared these with findings from 8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients and 17 emphysema-alone patients. Results All patients had a history of heavy smoking. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) was significantly lower in the emphysema-alone group than the CPFE and IPF-alone groups. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO%) was significantly lower in the CPFE group than the IPF- and emphysema-alone groups. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern was observed radiologically in 15 (68.2%) CPFE and 8 (100%) IPF-alone patients and was pathologically observed in all patients from both groups. Pathologically thick-cystic lesions involving one or more acini with dense wall fibrosis and occasional fibroblastic foci surrounded by honeycombing and normal alveoli were confirmed by post-mortem observation as thick-walled cystic lesions (TWCLs). Emphysematous destruction and enlargement of membranous and respiratory bronchioles with fibrosis were observed in the TWCLs. The cystic lesions were always larger than the cysts of honeycombing. The prevalence of both radiological and pathological TWCLs was 72.7% among CPFE patients, but no such lesions were observed in patients with IPF or emphysema

  17. Congenital spinal dermal tract: how accurate is clinical and radiological evaluation?

    PubMed

    Tisdall, Martin M; Hayward, Richard D; Thompson, Dominic N P

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT A dermal sinus tract is a common form of occult spinal dysraphism. The presumed etiology relates to a focal failure of disjunction resulting in a persistent adhesion between the neural and cutaneous ectoderm. Clinical and radiological features can appear innocuous, leading to delayed diagnosis and failure to appreciate the implications or extent of the abnormality. If it is left untreated, complications can include meningitis, spinal abscess, and inclusion cyst formation. The authors present their experience in 74 pediatric cases of spinal dermal tract in an attempt to identify which clinical and radiological factors are associated with an infective presentation and to assess the reliability of MRI in evaluating this entity. METHODS Consecutive cases of spinal dermal tract treated with resection between 1998 and 2010 were identified from the departmental surgical database. Demographics, clinical history, and radiological and operative findings were collected from the patient records. The presence or absence of active infection (abscess, meningitis) at the time of neurosurgical presentation and any history of local sinus discharge or infection was assessed. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed to evaluate the extent of the sinus tract and determine the presence of an inclusion cyst. Radiological and operative findings were compared. RESULTS The surgical course was uncomplicated in 90% of 74 cases eligible for analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging underreported the presence of both an intradural tract (MRI 46%, operative finding 86%) and an intraspinal inclusion cyst (MRI 15%, operative finding 24%). A history of sinus discharge (OR 12.8, p = 0.0003) and the intraoperative identification of intraspinal inclusion cysts (OR 5.6, p = 0.023) were associated with an infective presentation. There was no significant association between the presence of an intradural tract discovered at surgery and an infective presentation. CONCLUSIONS Surgery for the treatment of

  18. Anesthesia Practice and Clinical Trends in Interventional Radiology: A European Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, Philip J.; Yap, Bernard; Mueller, Peter R.; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-07-15

    Purpose: To determine current European practice in interventional radiology regarding nursing care, anesthesia, and clinical care trends.Methods: A survey was sent to 977 European interventional radiologists to assess the use of sedoanalgesia, nursing care, monitoring equipment, pre- and postprocedural care, and clinical trends in interventional radiology. Patterns of sedoanalgesia were recorded for both vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Responders rated their preferred level of sedoanalgesia for each procedure as follows: (a) awake/alert, (b) drowsy/arousable, (c) asleep/arousable, (d) deep sedation, and (e) general anesthesia. Sedoanalgesic drugs and patient care trends were also recorded. A comparison was performed with data derived from a similar survey of interventional practice in the United States.Results: Two hundred and forty-three of 977 radiologists responded (25%). The total number of procedures analyzed was 210,194. The majority (56%) of diagnostic and therapeutic vascular procedures were performed at the awake/alert level of sedation, 32% were performed at the drowsy/arousable level, and 12% at deeper levels of sedation. The majority of visceral interventional procedures were performed at the drowsy/arousable level of sedation (41%), 29% were performed at deeper levels of sedation, and 30% at the awake/alert level. In general, more sedoanalgesia is used in the United States. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported the use of a full-time radiology nurse, 67% used routine blood pressure/pulse oximetry monitoring, and 46% reported the presence of a dedicated recovery area. Forty-nine percent reported daily patient rounds, 30% had inpatient hospital beds, and 51% had day case beds.Conclusion: This survey shows clear differences in the use of sedation for vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Many, often complex, procedures are performed at the awake/alert level of sedation in Europe, whereas deeper levels of sedation are

  19. [Congenital lacrimonasal duct cyst: Do not forget this radiological and clinical entity].

    PubMed

    Braun, J-J; Debry, C; Donato, L; Riehm, S

    2016-02-01

    Although obstruction of the lacrimonasal duct is a fairly common finding in newborns, development of a dacryocystocele (nasolacrimal duct cyst) is uncommon and is caused by stenosis in the proximal and distal area of the nasolacrimal duct leading to a cystic dilatation. Its diagnosis remains difficult for the pediatrician, the ENT specialist, the ophthalmologist, and the radiologist. The study of six cases of dacryocystocele and the review of the literature led the authors to describe the clinical and radiological features of this uncommon entity. The symptomatology includes nasal obstruction and, when bilateral, significant respiratory distress in the newborn (obligate nose-breather) and dilatation of the lacrimal duct with blue cystic swelling inferior to the medial canthus or with an inflammatory aspect of the lacrimal duct in case of infection. A careful endoscopic examination of the nasal cavities and CT or MRI imaging reveals a cystic tumor, which arises in the inferior meatus, inferolateral to the inferior turbinate, and can partly or completely obstruct the endonasal space, uni- or bilaterally. CT and MRI are equally sensitive in detecting dacryocystocele and are also useful for differential diagnosis for other cystic or tumoral nasal lesions such as meningoencephalocele, dermoid cyst, and glioma. To avoid the risk of potential complications (respiratory distress or even sudden infant death, infectious ophthalmologic complications), this radiological and clinical entity should not be forgotten. Endoscopic marsupialization leads to immediate and definitive healing recovery. PMID:26724215

  20. Metabolic disorders with clinical and radiologic features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Michael H.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Forner, Sven A.; Wong, Katherine K.; Kuo, Amy; Johnson, David Y.; Colacurcio, Valerie; Andrews, Bret D.; Miller, Bruce L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two patients with metabolic disorders presented with clinical and radiologic features suggestive of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Case 1 was a 50-year-old man with rapid decline in cognitive, behavioral, and motor function following new-onset seizures. MRI was read as consistent with CJD, and he was referred for a treatment trial, but it was determined that he recently experienced rapid correction of hyponatremia resulting in extrapontine myelinolysis. Case 2 was a 66-year-old woman with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus who was found unconscious after a suspected insulin overdose. Examination showed altered mental status and neuroimaging was remarkable for cortical/striatal hyperintensities suggestive of sCJD. On autopsy, she had hypoglycemic/hypoxic nerve cell loss. Although characteristic MRI findings have high sensitivity and specificity for sCJD, potentially reversible metabolic disorders sometimes present rapidly and can resemble sCJD both clinically and radiologically. These cases highlight the importance of establishing a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with suspected sCJD. PMID:26137419

  1. Clinical and Radiological Classification of the Jawbone Anatomy in Endosseous Dental Implant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kubilius, Marius

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review the classifications suggested for assessment of the jawbone anatomy, to evaluate the diagnostic possibilities of mandibular canal identification and risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury, aesthetic considerations in aesthetic zone, as well as to suggest new classification system of the jawbone anatomy in endosseous dental implant treatment. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandible; mandibular canal; alveolar nerve, inferior; anatomy, cross-sectional; dental implants; classification. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to March 2013. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy and oral surgery books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical and human anatomy studies. Results In total 109 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The classifications suggested for assessment of the jawbone anatomy, diagnostic possibilities of mandibular canal identification and risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury, aesthetic considerations in aesthetic zone were discussed. New classification system of the jawbone anatomy in endosseous dental implant treatment based on anatomical and radiologic findings and literature review results was suggested. Conclusions The classification system proposed here based on anatomical and radiological jawbone quantity and quality evaluation is a helpful tool for planning of treatment strategy and collaboration among specialists. Further clinical studies should be conducted for new classification validation and reliability evaluation. PMID:24422030

  2. Tuberculous meningitis with multiple intracranial tuberculomas mimicking neurocysticercosis clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Oncul, Oral; Baylan, Orhan; Mutlu, Hakan; Cavuslu, Saban; Doganci, Levent

    2005-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis (TB), the most dangerous form of TB, remains a public health problem, particularly in developing countries. In the differential diagnosis of intracranial tuberculomas (ICTs), images on radiological findings should be differentiated from other causes of space-occupying lesions. These lesions include malignant diseases such as glioma or lymphoma, pyogenic abscess, toxoplasmosis, neurocysticercosis (NC), sarcoidosis, hydatidosis and late syphilitic involvement of CNS. We present a case with multiple ICTs mimicking NC with similar clinical and imaging manifestations in a young immunocompetent patient. The diagnosis was based on brain magnetic resonance imaging findings. The definitive diagnosis was confirmed mycobacteriologically in cerebrospinal fluid and sputum specimens. Adequate response to anti-TB chemotherapy was achieved while multiple ICTs in the brain disappeared slowly. In the absence of appropriate therapy, these pathologies might be fatal; the possibilities of differential diagnosis would be of great clinical importance, particularly because of the different treatment protocols required for the NC and ICTs. PMID:16377875

  3. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Summary The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Based on reports from different authors, SCIWORA is responsible for 6 to 19% and 9% to 14% of spinal injuries in children and adults, respectively. Underlying degenerative changes, including spondylosis or spinal canal stenosis, are typically present in adult patients. The level of spinal cord injury corresponds to the location of these changes. With recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, especially in magnetic resonance imaging, and with increasing availability of MRI as a diagnostic tool, the overall detection rate of SCIWORA has significantly improved. PMID:25505497

  4. Percutaneous Stabilization System Osseofix® for Treatment of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures - Clinical and Radiological Results after 12 Months

    PubMed Central

    Ender, Stephan Albrecht; Wetterau, Elmar; Ender, Michaela; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Merk, Harry Rudolf; Kayser, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Study Design A prospective consecutive cohort study (follow-up study). Objective Our study investigated whether implantation of an expandable titanium mesh cage (Osseofix®) is a successful and safe minimally invasive therapy for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCF). Our experiences, clinical and radiological findings after 12 months follow-up are presented. Kypho- and vertebroplasty are well-established minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of osteoporotic VCF. The main complications associated with both procedures are uncontrolled bone cement leakage. Therefore a suitable alternative has been investigated. Methods During June 2010 to May 2011 24 patients were included with 32 osteoporotic VCF (T6 to L4). All of them were stabilized with the Osseofix® system. Preinterventionally we performed X-ray, MRI, and bone density measurements (DXA). Clinical and radiological results were evaluated preop., postop. and after 12 months postop. based on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), X-ray (Beck Index, Cobb-angle) and CT. Results There was a significant improvement in the mean ODI (70,6% to 30,1%) as well as a significant reduction in pain intensity (VAS) (7,7 to 1,4) after 12 month. The mean kyphotic angle according to Cobb showed significant improvements (11,7° to 10,4°) after 12 months. Postinterventional imaging showed only one case of loss of height in a stabilized vertebral body (3.1%). We saw no changes in posterior vertebral wall or adjacent fractures. Except for one pronounced postoperative hematoma we saw no surgical complications including no cement leakage. Conclusions Stabilization of symptomatic osteoporotic VCF with Osseofix® system is a safe and effective procedure, even in fractures with posterior wall involvement. The clinical mid-term results are good at a very low complication rate. The Osseofix® system is an interesting alternative to the established procedures of cement augmentation

  5. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes among Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty, Compression Hip Screw and Proximal Femur Nail Antirotation in Treating Comminuted Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Suh, You-Sung; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Seong-Min; Hong, Sijohn; Choi, Hyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In comminuted intertrochanteric fractures, various operative options have been introduced. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in clinical and radiologic outcomes among bipolar hemiarthroplasty (BH), compression hip screw (CHS) and proximal femur nail antirotation (PFNA) in treating comminuted intertrochanteric fractures (AO/OTA classification, A2 [22, 23]) Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated total 150 patients (BH, 50; CHS, 50; PFNA, 50) who were operated due to intertrochanteric fractures from March 2010 to December 2012 and were older than 65 years at the time of surgery. We compared these three groups for radiologic and clinical outcomes at 12 months postoperatively, including Harris Hip Score, mobility (Koval stage), visual analogue scale and radiologic limb length discrepancy (shortening). Results There was no statistical significance among three groups in clinical outcomes including Harris Hip Score, mobility (Koval stage), visual analogue scale. However, there was significant differences in radiologic limb discrepancy in plain radiographs at 12 months postoperatively (radiologic shortening: BH, 2.3 mm; CHS, 5.1 mm; PFNA, 3.0 mm; P=0.000). Conclusion There were no clinical differences among BH, PFNA, and CHS in this study. However, notable limb length shortening could be originated during fracture healing in osteosynthesis, compared to arthroplasty (BH

  6. Informatics in radiology: improving clinical work flow through an AIM database: a sample web-based lesion tracking application.

    PubMed

    Abajian, Aaron C; Levy, Mia; Rubin, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative assessments on images are crucial to clinical decision making, especially in cancer patients, in whom measurements of lesions are tracked over time. However, the potential value of quantitative approaches to imaging is impeded by the difficulty and time-intensive nature of compiling this information from prior studies and reporting corresponding information on current studies. The authors believe that the quantitative imaging work flow can be automated by making temporal data computationally accessible. In this article, they demonstrate the utility of the Annotation and Image Markup standard in a World Wide Web-based application that was developed to automatically summarize prior and current quantitative imaging measurements. The system calculates the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors metric, along with several alternative indicators of cancer treatment response, by using the data stored in the annotation files. The application also allows the user to overlay the recorded metrics on the original images for visual inspection. Clinical evaluation of the system demonstrates its potential utility in accelerating the standard radiology work flow and in providing a means to evaluate alternative response metrics that are difficult to compute by hand. The system, which illustrates the utility of capturing quantitative information in a standard format and linking it to the image from which it was derived, could enhance quantitative imaging in clinical practice without adversely affecting the current work flow. PMID:22745220

  7. Critical evaluation of the radiological and clinical features of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Becker, T; Buchner, A; Kaffe, I

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiological and clinical features of adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (AOTs). Methods A total of 272 cases (267 from the English-language literature and 5 new cases) were analysed with special emphasis on their radiological features. Results The patients' ages at time of diagnosis ranged from 3 years to 82 years (mean 18.4 years). The maxilla-to-mandible ratio was 1.7:1. Mandibular lesions were significantly more frequent among patients older than 16 years (p = 0.032). Expansion of the cortex was significantly more prominent among patients older than 16 years (p = 0.045). There was a positive correlation between the size of the lesion and the age of the patient at the time of diagnosis (p = 0.016). The size was also associated with increased root resorption (p < 0.001), ill-defined borders (p < 0.001), expansion (p < 0.001) and perforation of the cortex (p < 0.001). Small opacities were present in 77% of lesions and were associated with expansion of the cortex (p = 0.043). The significant radiological features in patients aged 30 years and above were root resorption (p = 0.013) and lesions crossing the midline (p = 0.019). Conclusions The size of an AOT is influenced by the patient's age. It is also associated with root resorption, ill-defined borders, expansion and perforation of the cortex, but it cannot be ruled out that those changes reflect a longer duration of the lesion. PMID:22752319

  8. Clinical and Radiological Comparison between Ipsilateral and Contralateral Side Canal Decompression Using an Unilateral Laminotomy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woong Bae; Lee, Sang Won; Sung, Jae Hoon; Yang, Seung Ho; Kim, IL Sub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical and radiological outcome of both sides using the unilateral approach. Methods Unilateral laminotomy was performed to achieve bilateral decompression. Thirty-nine patients who underwent this procedure were analyzed prospectively using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score to evaluate symptoms in both legs, and the radiological morphometric index to calculate the anteriorposterior diameter and midcanal width. The incidence of complications from this approach was then evaluated. Results The mean follow-up time was 12.2 months. The mean ODI was 48.4 preoperatively and 14.2 postoperatively. The mean dural sac widening of the ipsilateral side (187.0%) was significantly larger (p<0.01) than that of the the contralateral side (145.6%). The VAS improvement ratio ([preoperative VAS score-postoperative VAS score]/[preoperative VAS score]×100) for the pain in each leg was 75.4%(ipsilateral side) and 73.7%(contralateral side). While the VAS improvement ratio for pain in each side was significantly reduced, the difference in the VAS ratio between sides was statistically insignificant (p=0.64). There were 2 cases (5.1%) of dural tearing during the procedure, 1 case (2.6%) of transient paresthesia of nerve roots, and 2 cases (5.1%) of transient paresthesia of the contralateral nerve root. The transient paresthesias of nerve roots never lasted more than 2 weeks. Conclusion This technique allows for significant decompression of the contralateral canal and excellent clinical outcomes without troublesome complications. Although ipsilateral the dural sac widening was significantly larger than contralateral side, the difference in the clinical outcome between sides was statistically insignificant. PMID:27437011

  9. Intermediate clinical and radiological results of cervical TDR (Mobi-C®) with up to 2 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Beaurain, J.; Bernard, P.; Dufour, T.; Fuentes, J. M.; Hovorka, I.; Huppert, J.; Steib, J. P.; Vital, J. M.; Aubourg, L.

    2009-01-01

    The interest in cervical total disc replacement (TDR) as an alternative to the so-far gold standard in the surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD), e.g anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), is growing very rapidly. Many authors have established the fact that ACDF may result in progressive degeneration in adjacent segments. On the contrary, but still theoretically, preservation of motion with TDR at the surgically treated level may potentially reduce the occurrence of adjacent-level degeneration (ALD). The authors report the intermediate results of an undergoing multicentre prospective study of TDR with Mobi-C® prosthesis. The aim of the study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the device in the treatment of DDD and secondary to evaluate the radiological status of adjacent levels and the occurrence of ossifications, at 2-year follow-up (FU). 76 patients have performed their 2-year FU visit and have been analyzed clinically and radiologically. Clinical outcomes (NDI, VAS, SF-36) and ROM measurements were analyzed pre-operatively and at the different post-operative time-points. Complications and re-operations were also assessed. Occurrences of heterotopic ossifications (HOs) and of adjacent disc degeneration radiographic changes have been analyzed from 2-year FU X-rays. The mean NDI and VAS scores for arm and neck are reduced significantly at each post-operative time-point compared to pre-operative condition. Motion is preserved over the time at index levels (mean ROM = 9° at 2 years) and 85.5% of the segments are mobile at 2 years. HOs are responsible for the fusion of 6/76 levels at 2 years. However, presence of HO does not alter the clinical outcomes. The occurrence rate of radiological signs of ALD is very low at 2 years (9.1%). There has been no subsidence, no expulsion and no sub-luxation of the implant. Finally, after 2 years, 91% of the patients assume that they would undergo the procedure again. These intermediate

  10. Clinical measures and treatment needs.

    PubMed

    Marcus, M; Reifel, N M; Nakazono, T T

    1997-05-01

    Clinically evaluated oral health outcome variables from the ICS-II USA data set were examined in the diverse ethnic groups, for two adult age cohorts (35-44 and 65-74 years). These measures were derived from epidemiological examinations and include the DMFT components, loss of attachment, and an indicator of treatment need--the ratio of decayed teeth over decayed and filled teeth. The ratio of decayed over decayed and filled teeth was used in multivariate analysis, since this measure represents an area where public policy could have an impact if determinants were understood. The most important independent variables were race-ethnicity, educational attainment, no fear of dental visits because of pain, and oral hygiene practices. Having a usual source of dental care and visiting the dentist within the past 12 months did not appear to be as important in predicting unmet needs as these other variables. To bridge the gap between the oral health status of majority and minority populations, health educators in minority communities need to become more accessible, have a pro-active interest in oral health, and also be cognizant of the various socio-cultural issues influencing oral health. The problems regarding Native American adults are more complex and require more careful study. PMID:9549992

  11. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

  12. Recurrent Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Atypical Clinical and Radiological Features

    PubMed Central

    Lamdhade, S.; Almulla, A.; Alroughani, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is a clinical diagnosis with serious neurological consequences. Its occurrence is underestimated in nonalcoholics and is uncommon in adolescents. We aim to draw the attention to a rare case, which had additional clinical and radiological features. Case. A 16-year-old girl presented with three-week history of vomiting secondary to intestinal obstruction. She developed diplopia soon after hospitalization. Neurological evaluation revealed restriction of bilateral lateral recti with horizontal nystagmus, and bilateral limb dysmetria. Brain MRI was normal. She had prompt improvement to thiamine. Four months later, she presented with headache, bilateral severe deafness, and tinnitus. Clinically, she had severe sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral lateral recti paresis, and gait ataxia. CT head showed bilateral caudate nucleus hypodensities. MRI brain revealed gadolinium enhancement of mamillary bodies and vermis. She had significant improvement after IV thiamine. Headache completely resolved while the ocular movements, hearing, and tinnitus improved partially in 72 hours. Conclusions. Recurrent WE in adolescence is uncommon. Headache, tinnitus, and deafness are rare clinical features. Although MRI study shows typical features of WE, the presence of bilateral caudate nuclei hypodensities on CT scan is uncommon. Prompt treatment with thiamine is warranted in suspected cases to prevent permanent neurological sequelae. PMID:24790762

  13. Electronic Healthcare Record and clinical research in cardiovascular radiology. HL7 CDA and CDISC ODM interoperability.

    PubMed

    El Fadly, A; Daniel, C; Bousquet, C; Dart, T; Lastic, P-Y; Degoulet, P

    2007-01-01

    Integrating clinical research data entry with patient care data entry is a challenging issue. At the G. Pompidou European Hospital (HEGP), cardiovascular radiology reports are captured twice, first in the Electronic Health Record (EHR) and then in a national clinical research server. Informatics standards are different for EHR (HL7 CDA) and clinical research (CDISC ODM). The objective of this work is to feed both the EHR and a Clinical Research Data Management System (CDMS) from a single multipurpose form. We adopted and compared two approaches. First approach consists in implementing the single "care-research" form within the EHR and aligning XML structures of HL7 CDA document and CDISC ODM message to export relevant data from EHR to CDMS. Second approach consists in displaying a single "care-research" XForms form within the EHR and generating both HL7 CDA document and CDISC message to feed both EHR and CDMS. The solution based on XForms avoids overloading both EHR and CDMS with irrelevant information. Beyond syntactic interoperability, a perspective is to address the issue of semantic interoperability between both domains. PMID:18693829

  14. [Pseudotumoral medullary syndrome manifesting a probably beginning multiple sclerosis. Clinical, radiological and neuropathological correlations].

    PubMed

    Reznik, M; Franck, G; Flandroy, P; Lenelle, J

    1994-01-01

    A 19-y old sportsman was admitted because he complained of ascending paresthesia since two weeks, muscular strength diminution in both arms, then respiratory difficulties without fever. Clinical examination confirmed an asymmetric bilateral pyramidal syndrome affecting the four limbs, a hyposensitive level up to C5, without meningeal symptoms. MRI detected a widening of the cervical (C2-C5) spinal cord, with gadolinium enhancement. CSF demonstrated lymphocytic pleocytosis and total protein of 530 mg/l with an oligoclonal IgG pattern. With a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, a corticoid therapy was started but without clinical improvement. Six weeks later, a new MRI revealed an increased enlargement of the cervical spinal cord suggesting a tumoral process. No tumor could be detected at neurosurgery. Biopsy specimen (from C3-C4) demonstrated an inflammatory demyelinating disease with astrocytic hypertrophy. Electron microscopy confirmed the active demyelinating disorder with persistently denuded axons. Several macrophages were observed, but no lymphocytic invasion. Astrocytes were prominent in some areas with "en plaque" gliosis. MRI failed to discover any other demyelinating lesions. Further clinical evaluation was inconspicuous, the patient regaining full activities after 6 months. MRI after 9 months demonstrated no spinal cord lesion. This observation contributes to suggest the influence of the blood-brain barrier breakdown on the occurrence of clinical and radiological signs of new lesions in suspected multiple sclerosis. PMID:8140889

  15. Radioactivity: Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (1962), (ICRU) Report 10 c.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This handbook presents recommendations agreed upon at the meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) held in Montreux, Switzerland, in April 1962. It is written in a report form with a preface including symbols, abbreviations and definitions of terms used in the report. The report consists of four…

  16. Differential Diagnoses of Overgrowth Syndromes: The Most Important Clinical and Radiological Disease Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Letícia da Silva; Alves, Úrsula David; Zanier, José Fernando Cardona; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by excessive tissue development. Some of these syndromes may be associated with dysfunction in the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/PI3K/AKT pathway, which results in an increased expression of the insulin receptor. In the current review, four overgrowth syndromes were characterized (Proteus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome, Madelung's disease, and neurofibromatosis type I) and illustrated using cases from our institution. Because these syndromes have overlapping clinical manifestations and have no established genetic tests for their diagnosis, radiological methods are important contributors to the diagnosis of many of these syndromes. The correlation of genetic discoveries and molecular pathways that may contribute to the phenotypic expression is also of interest, as this may lead to potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25009745

  17. Clinical, radiologic and arthroscopic assessment and treatment of bilateral discoid lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sharath K; Sripathi Rao, P

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate clinical, radiologic and arthroscopic features of bilateral discoid lateral meniscus and to assess the outcome of arthroscopic meniscectomy. Among the 177 arthroscopies performed for discoid lateral meniscus between January 1993 and January 2004, 12 were bilateral. The clinical and radiologic evaluation was done from the records. The type of discoid meniscus, the type of tear was assessed arthroscopically. All patients underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. Patients were followed up for a minimum period of 2 years. All patients had pain as presenting symptom. Eight patients presented with bilateral knee pain and four patients developed pain in the opposite knee after the affected knee was treated. The classically described thud was present in 11 knees. The widening of the joint space was found in 13 knee radiographs; 14 knees had complete type, nine had incomplete type and one had ring type of discoid lateral meniscus on arthroscopic evaluation; 20 knees involving 10 complete types, all incomplete types and ring type of discoid lateral meniscus showed obvious meniscal tears. The remaining four meniscus showed softening of a portion of the meniscus. Underlying intra-substance tear was visualized arthroscopically in the softened areas on saucerisation. All but one discoid menisci underwent arthroscopic partial central meniscectomy. When followed up for an average period of 32.6 months 19 knees showed excellent results and 5 knees good results. Possibility of bilaterality should be suspected in discoid lateral meniscus. Softening of meniscus denotes underlying intra-substance tear. This finding has not been described in the literature so far. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy gives good results in symptomatic bilateral discoid meniscus. This to our knowledge is the largest series of bilateral discoid lateral menisci. PMID:17225177

  18. RESULTS FROM CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL FOLLOW-UP, AFTER SURGICAL TREATMENT OF CHONDROBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Penna, Valter; Toller, Eduardo Areas; Ferreira, Adriano Jander; Dias, Dante Palloni Costa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the long-term clinical and radiological results from patients who underwent surgical treatment of chondroblastoma, between 2003 and 2009, by the same surgical team, using the same operative technique. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 12 patients with histological diagnoses of chondroblastoma, who were attended between 2003 and 2009 at the Pius XII Foundation (Barretos Cancer Hospital, Barretos, State of São Paulo). These patients underwent surgical treatment with intralesional resection of the tumor, adjuvant electrocauterization and replacement with methyl methacrylate (11 cases) or an autologous graft from the iliac crest (one case). The preoperative evaluation included physical examination, plain radiographs of the site, magnetic resonance imaging, computed axial tomography and bone scintigraphy. The patients were assessed clinically and radiologically according to a predefined protocol, with a series of plain radiographs, and a functional assessment in accordance with the Enneking functional score. Results: The average age at the time of diagnosis was 14 years and 4 months. The most frequent location affected was the distal femoral epiphysis (75%), followed by the proximal tibial epiphysis (16.6%) and the calcaneus (8.4%). There was higher prevalence among the female patients than among the male patients (3:1). In three cases, preoperative biopsy was necessary. During the follow-up, there was no evidence of local tumor recurrence, and all the patients presented an excellent functional result from the surgical technique used, with Enneking scores ranging from 20 to 30. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of chondroblastoma, using intralesional resection, adjuvant electrocauterization and replacement with methyl methacrylate or bone graft produced good results. PMID:27027054

  19. A clinical and radiological profile of neuromyelitis optica and spectrum disorders in an Indian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barhate, Kavita Sohan; Ganeshan, Malti; Singhal, Bhim Sen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is insufficient data on the clinical and radiological features of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) from India. Objective: The objective of the following study is to examine the clinico-radiological features of NMO and NMOSD in an Indian cohort. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included 44 consecutive patients who (1) satisfied the 2006 Wingerchuk criteria for NMO (16 seropositive and 7 seronegative); or (2) had isolated or recurrent optic neuritis (ON) with seropositivity (n = 4); or (3) had isolated or recurrent myelitis with seropositivity (n = 17). Results: The female:male ratio was 7.8:1 with median age of onset 26.5 (range 8-72). Annualized relapse rate (ARR) was comparable across all groups (F [3, 40] = 0.938 and P = 0.431). Various presentations other than ON and myelitis were noted. All 40 patients with myelitis had spinal cord lesions involving ≥3 vertebral segments during the course of the disease. Cervicomedullary involvement was seen in 32.5% (13/40) patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was available for 40 patients; eight of these (20%) had brain lesions in locations described in multiple sclerosis (MS), 27.5% (11/40) had lesions at sites unusual for MS and 52.5% (21/40) had normal brain imaging. Conclusion: NMO and NMOSD patients in this cohort have comparable ARR regardless of clinical presentation, supporting the emerging trend of treating all patients with immunotherapeutic agents at an early stage. Varied presentations seen in NMO and NMOSD highlight the need for a high index of suspicion for NMO in demyelinating episodes not classical for MS. PMID:24753665

  20. Attitudes of Radiologic Science Students, Technologists, and Clinical Instructors Regarding Their Experiential Learning and Career Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Radiologic science is an essential part of the healthcare continuum and preparing radiologic science students with experiential learning is essential. It is from this experience working with the patient that students begin to prepare for entry-level practice. The purpose of the study was to examine the attitudes of current radiologic science…

  1. A guide for effluent radiological measurements at DOE installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corley, J. P.; Corbit, C. D.

    1983-07-01

    Effluent monitoring and reporting programs are maintained at all US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities that may: (1) discharge significant concentrations of radioactivity in relation to applicable standards, or (2) discharge quantities of radioactivity that have potential health and safety or other environmental significance. This Guide is intended to provide supplemental guidance to DOE Orders on methods, procedures, and performance criteria to bring more comparable rationale to DOE facility effluent measurement programs and promote compliance with applicable standards and provide the DOE Office of Operational Safety (OOS) and Operations Offices with an additional tool for evaluating effluent measurement programs at DOE facilities.

  2. Enchondroma versus Low-Grade Chondrosarcoma in Appendicular Skeleton: Clinical and Radiological Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Santacreu, Eugenio M.; Ortiz-Cruz, Eduardo J.; González-López, José Manuel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the validity of clinical and radiological features of enchondroma and low grade chondrosarcoma, and contrast the biopsy results with the clinical diagnosis based on the history and imaging. Material and Method. The study included 96 patients with cartilage type lesions suggestive of an enchondroma (E) or an low grade chondrosarcoma (LGC) according to the clinical and imaging data. The hypotheses were contrasted with the biopsy. Results. Of the 82 patients studied completely, 56 were considered E (68.29%), 8 as LGC (8.33%) and in 18 (18.75%) were doubtful cases and considered as suspected LGC. Of these, the biopsy showed 4 E (25%), 10 LGC (50%) and 4 were not definitive. On the other hand, of the 56 cases diagnosed as E, 15 were biopsied, 5 of these biopsies turned out to be LGC (33.3%). The 8 cases diagnosed as LGC, were also biopsied and only 4 biopsies (50%) confirmed the initial diagnosis. Features analyzed in the study showed no statistically significant difference. Correlation analysis between the diagnosis issued initially and the biopsy result gave a value of 0.69 (kappa coefficient), which was considered a good correlation. Conclusion. Features analyzed did not have any statistical significance. However, there was a good correlation between initial diagnosis and biopsy's result. PMID:22593766

  3. Infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver: a radiologic-pathologic-clinical correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Dachman, A.H.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Friedman, A.C.; Hartman, D.S.

    1983-06-01

    Infantile hemangioendothelioma is the most common symptomatic vascular liver tumor of infancy. It is considered a benign tumor; however, aggressive behavior is occasionally seen microscopically, and rarely distant metastases have been reported. The exact incidence of infantile hemangioendothelioma is difficult to determine because often it has been either misdiagnosed or mislabeled as cavernous hemangioma in the literature. Cavernous hemangioma is the most common primary liver tumor in older age groups but is rarely found in infants as a clinically significant tumor. Levick and Rubie were the first to recognize an association between hemangioendothelioma of the liver and congestive heart failure, and there were subsequent reports substantiating this association. However, it is our impression and the finding of others that congestive heart failure is distinctly less common than abdominal mass or hepatomegaly as the presenting sign in infantile hemangioendothelioma. Congestive heart failure is rarely a feature of cavernous hemangioma. Because of the errors in terminology and questions regarding clinical presentation, a radiologic-pathologic-clinical correlation study of infantile hemangioendothelioma and review of the literature was undertaken.

  4. Liver Masses: A Clinical, Radiological and Pathological Perspective For: Perspectives in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Chandan, Vishal; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2013-01-01

    Liver masses present a relatively common clinical dilemma, particularly with the increasing use of various imaging modalities in the diagnosis of abdominal and other symptoms. The accurate and reliable determination of the nature of the liver mass is critical, not only to reassure individuals with benign lesions but also, and perhaps more importantly, to ensure that malignant lesions are diagnosed correctly. This avoids the devastating consequences of missed diagnosis and the delayed treatment of malignancy or the unnecessary treatment of benign lesions With appropriate interpretation of the clinical history and physical examination, and the judicious use of laboratory and imaging studies, the majority of liver masses can be characterized noninvasively. Accurate characterization of liver masses by cross-sectional imaging is particularly dependent on an understanding of the unique phasic vascular perfusion of the liver and the characteristic behaviors of different lesions during multiphasic contrast imaging. When non-invasive characterization is indeterminate, a liver biopsy may be necessary for definitive diagnosis. Standard histologic examination is usually complemented by immunohistochemical analysis of protein biomarkers. Accurate diagnosis allows the appropriate selection of optimal management, which is frequently reassurance or intermittent follow up for benign masses. For malignant lesions or those at risk of malignant transformation, management depends on the tumor staging, the functional status of the uninvolved liver and technical surgical considerations. Unresectable metastatic masses require oncologic consultation and therapy. The efficient characterization and management of liver masses therefore requires a multidisciplinary collaboration between the gastroenterologist/hepatologist, radiologist, pathologist, hepatobiliary or transplant surgeon, and medical oncologist. PMID:24055987

  5. Diffuse lung uptake (DLU) on Ga-67 scintigraph: Clinical, radiologic and pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, W.M.; Seo, I.S.; Vieira, J.; Zaman, M.

    1985-05-01

    Review, analysis and correlation (clinical, radiologic and pathologic) of 29 consecutive adults (16 drug addicts and/or homosexuals) with DLU on Ga-67 scintigraph were made. Diffuse increased uptake of at least 75% of both lungs was considered as DLU. WFOF cameras were used to obtain 24 to 96 hr. scintigraphs after IV injection of 3-5 mCi of Ga-67 citrate. In 26, tissue diagnosis established: pneumocystis carinii (PC) 15, miliary tuberculosis (TB) 3, sarcoidosis (SR) 3, drug-induced toxicity 2, and toxoplasmosis (TX), primary hyperparathyroidism and nonspecific lymphocytic pneumonia-one each. In two with breast and one with esophageal carcinomas, no lung tissue diagnosis was sought. Concurrent chest x-rays were negative in 16, but in 7/16, lung infiltrate was later documented. An average of 31 days elapsed before x-rays became positive in four with PC, 7 days in two with TB, and 22 days in one with TX. In 13, concurrent x-rays showed lung infiltrate, but in 6, only subtle, localized rather than diffuse infiltrate was noted. Fourteen of 29 had at least two Ga-67 studies. In 12 (7 PC, 2 TB, 3 SR) of 14 whose repeat studies showed significant to total disappearance of DLU, all did well clinically. In two whose initial studies were negative or equivocal, they became clinically worse when the repeat study showed DLU. In three others (2 PC, 1 TX) who died, their single studies recorded intense DLU. DLU on gallium scintigraph indicated a variety of pathology. In 55.2%, gallium scintigraph predated x-ray findings by a few days to weeks. In 20.3%, x-ray findings were only subtle or localized. Scintigraphic changes correlated well with the clinical courses in various diseases.

  6. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments. PMID:23578318

  7. Multiparametric MRI of the anterior prostate gland: clinical-radiological-histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, B; Flood, T A; Al-Dandan, O; Breau, R H; Cagiannos, I; Morash, C; Malone, S C; Schieda, N

    2016-05-01

    Anterior prostate cancer (APC) is defined as a tumour in which more than half of malignant tissue is located anterior to the urethra. APCs are increasingly recognized as clinically important, particularly in patients undergoing active surveillance and for patients with negative non-targeted systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsies but with persistent clinical suspicion of cancer. Multiparametric (mp) MRI has a crucial role for the diagnosis of anterior tumours, eventual histological sampling of suspicious lesions using image-guided targeted biopsy techniques, and potentially, to improve local staging of disease. mpMRI is accurate for the detection of APC and for differentiation of tumour from other anterior prostatic structures including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and the anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFMS). Characterization and reporting of APC should rely on the recently revised Prostate Imaging and Data Reporting System (PI-RADS) version 2.0 document. T2-weighted (T2W) imaging is emphasized as the determining sequence for assessment of the anterior prostate and specific features for APC on T2W imaging include: ill-defined/spiculated margin, lenticular shape, anterior/inferior location, and growth pattern (invasion of urethra or AFMS and crossing midline). Functional imaging, mainly with diffusion-weighted imaging, is also contributory and improves the sensitivity for detection of APC compared to T2W imaging alone. APCs commonly show positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy and staging of disease extent using conventional clinical parameters is limited. mpMRI may have a future role to improve local staging of APC. This review illustrates the importance of mpMRI in APC using a clinical-radiological-histopathological approach. PMID:26888762

  8. Atypical clinical and radiological course of a patient with Canavan disease.

    PubMed

    Sarret, Catherine; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Rodriguez, Diana

    2016-04-01

    Canavan disease (CD) is a rare metabolic disorder caused by aspartoacylase (ASPA) deficiency. It leads to severe neurological degeneration with spongiform brain degeneration. Accumulation of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in brain and urine is specific to the disease and guides diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually shows diffuse white matter abnormalities with involvement of the basal ganglia. Mild forms of the disease with a more favorable clinical course and radiological involvement of the basal ganglia without white matter abnormalities have also been reported. Here we report an atypical case of a girl aged nine years with CD. The disease started at the classical age of five months. Classical elevation of NAA in brain and urine was present and genetic analysis identified mutations in the ASPA gene. However, clinical evolution was milder than typical CD, with partial motor impairment and relatively well-preserved cognitive skills. MRI was also atypical with low white matter involvement and unusual topography and evolution of abnormalities in the basal ganglia. PMID:26586007

  9. Pathophysiology, clinical features and radiological findings of differentiation syndrome/all-trans-retinoic acid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Luciano; Asteggiano, Francesco; Moretti, Federica; Torre, Federico; Ulisciani, Stefano; Fava, Carmen; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna

    2014-08-28

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia, differentiation therapy based on all-trans-retinoic acid can be complicated by the development of a differentiation syndrome (DS). DS is a life-threatening complication, characterized by respiratory distress, unexplained fever, weight gain, interstitial lung infiltrates, pleural or pericardial effusions, hypotension and acute renal failure. The diagnosis of DS is made on clinical grounds and has proven to be difficult, because none of the symptoms is pathognomonic for the syndrome without any definitive diagnostic criteria. As DS can have subtle signs and symptoms at presentation but progress rapidly, end-stage DS clinical picture resembles the acute respiratory distress syndrome with extremely poor prognosis; so it is of absolute importance to be conscious of these complications and initiate therapy as soon as it was suspected. The radiologic appearance resembles the typical features of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Diagnosis of DS remains a great skill for radiologists and haematologist but it is of an utmost importance the cooperation in suspect DS, detect the early signs of DS, examine the patients' behaviour and rapidly detect the complications. PMID:25170395

  10. A comparative analysis of patients with mesiodenses: a clinical and radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Suk; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Jeong, Kyung-In; Kim, Young-Kyun; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Nan-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A mesiodens appears most commonly as a supernumerary tooth impacted in the anterior maxilla. The purpose of this study is analyze mesiodens clinically. Materials and Methods Gender, crown form, direction of impaction, relation to permanent incisors, and chief complaints of patients with extracted mesiodens were analyzed. Results Patients were analyzed for motivation to visit the hospital; 85.4% of the patients were referred from other hospitals. Mesiodens was more common in males than in females (3.7:1), and 70.1% of patients had only one mesiodens, while 29.6% had two mesiodenses. Of the mesiodenses, 61.4% were of the aconical form, and the most common direction was upward (62.4%), followed by the normal position (26.0%) and the horizontal position (11.6%). The mesiodenses caused orthodontic problems with the permanent incisors in 46.3% of cases. Mesiodens associated with dentigerous cyst was rarely observed in our patient group. Conclusion Mesiodens is more common in males than in females and often affects the permanent incisors. Thus, careful clinical and radiological evaluations of mesiodenses are important. PMID:26339577

  11. Clinical, hormonal and radiological profile of 46XY disorders of sexual development

    PubMed Central

    Vasundhera, Chauhan; Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gupta, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: 46 XY disorders of sexual development (DSD) cover a wide spectrum of phenotypes ranging from unambiguous female genitalia to ambiguous male genitalia with hypospadias or dysgenetic gonads. Management of these patients depends on the cause of DSD, degree of feminization, age at presentation, and gender orientation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presentation and management of patients with 46XY DSD at our center. Patients and Methods: All new and old patients of 46XY DSD attending the endocrine OPD in a period of 16 months were included in this study. Clinical, cytogenetic, hormonal, and radiological evaluation were done to identify the cause of DSD. Results: Among 19 patients, eight were diagnosed with disorders of gonadal development (one with complete gonadal dysgenesis, four with partial gonadal dysgenesis, two with congenital bilateral anorchia, and one with ovotesticular DSD) and eight with disorders of androgen synthesis and action (one with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome [AIS], three with partial AIS and four with 5α reductase deficiency). In three patients, a definitive diagnosis could not be made. Conclusions: Management of patients with DSD depends on etiology, gender assignment, gender orientation, hormonal treatment, genital surgery, and consequent psychosocial implications. Due to the overlapping clinical and biochemical parameters in different subsets of DSD, only a preliminary etiological diagnosis can be made in some cases. Genetic studies with long-term follow-up are required for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27186544

  12. Clinical Experience With A High Resolution Digital Imaging System For Gastro-Intestinal Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Rowlands, J. A.; Hynes, D. M.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In our department, it is planned that the gastro-intestinal fluoroscopic area will be equipped entirely with digital imaging systems. The use of the 1024 X 1024 pixel frame store, backed by a hard disc for rapid image transfer, and the production of hard copy on a laser imager has reached the point where clinical efficacy and acceptance are assured. The further addition of facilities for annotation and the application of digital post-processing techniques are being explored both at the clinical site and at the research laboratorieS. The use of laser imaging has produced a further improvement in image quality and some of the practical problems related to this apparatus will be described. The availability of larger capacity laser disc image storage enables the local area network or "mini-PACS" system for fluoroscopy areas to become a concept worthy of investigation. We present our experience over a number of years with these systems, together with our latest investigations into potential applications of laser technology to the practice of radiology in a busy imaging centre.

  13. How to Develop, Validate, and Compare Clinical Prediction Models Involving Radiological Parameters: Study Design and Statistical Methods.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyunghwa; Song, Kijun; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-01-01

    Clinical prediction models are developed to calculate estimates of the probability of the presence/occurrence or future course of a particular prognostic or diagnostic outcome from multiple clinical or non-clinical parameters. Radiologic imaging techniques are being developed for accurate detection and early diagnosis of disease, which will eventually affect patient outcomes. Hence, results obtained by radiological means, especially diagnostic imaging, are frequently incorporated into a clinical prediction model as important predictive parameters, and the performance of the prediction model may improve in both diagnostic and prognostic settings. This article explains in a conceptual manner the overall process of developing and validating a clinical prediction model involving radiological parameters in relation to the study design and statistical methods. Collection of a raw dataset; selection of an appropriate statistical model; predictor selection; evaluation of model performance using a calibration plot, Hosmer-Lemeshow test and c-index; internal and external validation; comparison of different models using c-index, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement; and a method to create an easy-to-use prediction score system will be addressed. This article may serve as a practical methodological reference for clinical researchers. PMID:27134523

  14. How to Develop, Validate, and Compare Clinical Prediction Models Involving Radiological Parameters: Study Design and Statistical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyunghwa; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-01-01

    Clinical prediction models are developed to calculate estimates of the probability of the presence/occurrence or future course of a particular prognostic or diagnostic outcome from multiple clinical or non-clinical parameters. Radiologic imaging techniques are being developed for accurate detection and early diagnosis of disease, which will eventually affect patient outcomes. Hence, results obtained by radiological means, especially diagnostic imaging, are frequently incorporated into a clinical prediction model as important predictive parameters, and the performance of the prediction model may improve in both diagnostic and prognostic settings. This article explains in a conceptual manner the overall process of developing and validating a clinical prediction model involving radiological parameters in relation to the study design and statistical methods. Collection of a raw dataset; selection of an appropriate statistical model; predictor selection; evaluation of model performance using a calibration plot, Hosmer-Lemeshow test and c-index; internal and external validation; comparison of different models using c-index, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement; and a method to create an easy-to-use prediction score system will be addressed. This article may serve as a practical methodological reference for clinical researchers. PMID:27134523

  15. Late-onset ankylosing spondylitis and related spondylarthropathies: clinical and radiological characteristics and pharmacological treatment options.

    PubMed

    Toussirot, Eric; Wendling, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is the prototype of related diseases commonly called spondylarthropathies which include reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (enteropathic arthritis) and undifferentiated spondylarthropathies. Ankylosing spondylitis and spondylarthropathies are generally observed in young patients but can be observed later in life or in persons >50 years of age. All the spondylarthropathy subgroups are represented in the elderly with some features particular to this age group. Indeed, radiological aspects of ankylosing spondylitis may be difficult to interpret because of the radiological changes induced by aging. Late-onset peripheral spondylarthropathies are characterised by severe disease, marked elevation of laboratory parameters of inflammation, oligoarthritis involving the lower limbs and oedema of the extremities. Psoriatic arthritis is more severe in the elderly and is associated with worse outcomes than in young patients. The clinical presentation of undifferentiated spondylarthropathy is as varied in the elderly as in young and middle-aged adults. Reactive arthritis and enteropathic arthritis are observed in the elderly more rarely. The effects of aging on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics, together with the existence of co-morbidities and polypharmacy, are responsible for difficulties in the therapeutic management of late-onset ankylosing spondylitis or spondylarthropathies. Indeed, NSAIDs should be used with caution in older patients because of the high risk of serious gastrointestinal complications. Sulfasalazine and methotrexate have been used as disease-controlling drugs but did not prove very effective. Pamidronate and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antagonists offer a therapeutic alternative but have not been specifically tested in the elderly. Pamidronate has been tested in young-onset ankylosing spondylitis and spondylarthropathies with conflicting results but can be used in

  16. Spinous Process splitting Laminectomy: Clinical outcome and Radiological analysis of extent of decompression

    PubMed Central

    Srikantha, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spinous process splitting laminectomy (SPSL) is a useful technique in achieving adequate decompression for lumbar canal stenosis, has the advantage of simultaneously decompressing multiple levels and minimising injury to the paraspinal muscles. Some concern has been expressed over the efficacy of this technique in decompressing lateral recesses. This study was undertaken to assess the clinical outcome of SPSL technique and radiologically assess the extent of decompression. Patients and Methods Thirty-nine consecutive patients treated by SPSL for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis were methodically assessed for demographic data, clinical findings, Pre- and post-op VAS, JOA scores and spinal canal dimensions on imaging. Surgical technique for SPSL is described. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.9 yrs. The mean follow-up was 7.3 months. The mean pre- and post-operative VAS scores were 7.8 and 3.7, respectively. The mean pre- and post-operative JOA scores were 6.3 and 11.2, respectively. The mean JOA recovery rate was 57.3%. 77% of the patients were in the ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ McNab's grades at follow-up. Radiologic results were assessed separately at the 118 levels decompressed by the SPSL technique. The ratio increase for the spinal canal dimensions on post-operative images were as follows – Interfacet distance–116.6%; Effective AP distance–67.6%; Right lateral recess depth–165.1%; Right lateral recess angle–145.5%; Left lateral recess depth–149.3%; Left lateral recess angle–133.6%; Cross-sectional spinal canal area–163.8%. There was no worsening of pre-existing degenerative listhesis or scoliosis in any case. Conclusion SPSL achieves effective central and lateral recess decompression, at the same time minimising injury to the paraspinal muscles thus reducing post-operative pain and aiding in quicker mobilisation and recovery. It is an effective tool to treat multiple level spinal stenosis, especially in elderly

  17. CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION ON DEVELOPMENTAL HIP DYSPLASIA AFTER SALTER AND OMBRÉDANNE PROCEDURE

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Válney Luiz; Thomé, André Luiz Coelho; da Silva Castro, Daniel Labres; de Oliveira, Leandro Zica; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiological medium-term results from surgical treatment of developmental hip dysplasia through Salter innominate bone osteotomy and Ombrédanne femoral shortening. Methods: Fourteen patients were evaluated, with surgical treatment on 18 hips (seven right-side hips and eleven left-side hips) using the proposal technique, performed between 1998 and 2008. The Dutoit and Severin criteria were used respectively for clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The average preoperative index for the seven right-side hips was 43.3° (40° to 50°), and this was corrected through surgery to an average of 31.57° (24° to 42°). The average preoperative index for the eleven left-side hips was 42.1° (36° to 56°), and this was corrected through surgery to an average of 30.36° (20° to 44°). There was a statistically significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative acetabular indexes, with P > 0.05. The clinical evaluation showed that there were seven excellent hips (38.9%), eight good ones (44.4%), three fair hips (16.7%) and no poor ones (0%). By grouping the hips rated good and excellent as satisfactory and those rated poor and fair as unsatisfactory, 83.3% of the results were seen to be favorable. There were no statistically significant correlations between occurrences of complications and patient age at the time of surgery or between complications and the preoperative acetabular index (p > 0.05). The complications observed consisted of one case each of subluxation, osteonecrosis and osteonecrosis together with subluxation. Conclusion: The combined procedure of Salter and Ombrédanne is a viable option for treating developmental hip dysplasia after patients have started to walk. PMID:27027068

  18. Rigid Bronchoscopy in Airway Foreign Bodies: Value of the Clinical and Radiological Signs

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Kunjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Foreign body in airway is a common emergency in ENT practice. As we know, Rigid Bronchoscopy is the method of choice for removing it, although at times it leads to specialists performing unnecessary bronchoscopy, exposing patients to hazards of general anesthesia. Objective  The objective of my study is to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, odds ratio from the clinical and radiological signs, comparing with the gold standard, the rigid bronchoscope procedure. Method  This is a prospective analytical study designed at University Teaching Hospital and conducted over a period of 18 months, from March 2011 to August 2012. Data collection was broadly classified into three different categories: (1) Symptomatology, such as presence or absence of choking, cyanosis, and difficulty in breathing; (2) Clinical signs, such as the presence or absence of air entry, crackles, and rhonchi 3. Chest X-ray findings were suggestive of a foreign body. Results  There were a total of 40 rigid bronchoscopies performed under general anesthesia for the diagnosis and therapeutic reasons. Among 40 patients who underwent rigid bronchoscopy, 32 (80%) were found to have varieties of foreign bodies in their airway while 8 patients (20%) had negative bronchoscopy. The history of choking is the only clinical symptoms which came out to be statistically Significant (p = 0.043) with odds ratio of 5. Conclusion  Rigid bronchoscopy is the gold standard technique for diagnosis and procedure of choice to remove FB from airway. Regardless, it still presents a small chance of negative result, especially when there is no history of aspiration. PMID:27413398

  19. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Beachey, David J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-15

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator (2) to characterize the energy of this beam (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3x0.3 to 4.0x4.0 cm{sup 2}, varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  20. Characterization of optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters to measure organ doses in diagnostic radiology

    PubMed Central

    Endo, A; Katoh, T; Kobayashi, I; Joshi, R; Sur, J; Okano, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) for use in diagnostic radiology and to apply the OSLD in measuring the organ doses by panoramic radiography. Methods The dose linearity, energy dependency and angular dependency of aluminium oxide-based OSLDs were examined using an X-ray generator to simulate various exposure settings in diagnostic radiology. The organ doses were then measured by inserting the dosemeters into an anthropomorphic phantom while using three panoramic machines. Results The dosemeters demonstrated consistent dose linearity (coefficient of variation<1.5%) and no significant energy dependency (coefficient of variation<1.5%) under the applied exposure conditions. They also exhibited negligible angular dependency (≤10%). The organ doses of the X-ray as a result of panoramic imaging by three machines were calculated using the dosemeters. Conclusion OSLDs can be utilized to measure the organ doses in diagnostic radiology. The availability of these dosemeters in strip form proves to be reliably advantageous. PMID:22116136

  1. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-01-01

    Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Results Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and

  2. Keratocystic odontogenic tumour in a Hong Kong community: the clinical and radiological features

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S; Li, T K

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and conventional radiological features of a consecutive series of cases of “keratocystic odontogenic tumour” (KCOT) affecting a Hong Kong Chinese community and to determine their outcome by follow-up. Methods All cases were accompanied by appropriate radiography and were histopathologically confirmed. Results 33 consecutive KCOTs were reviewed. 18 patients were male. The mean age at first presentation was 30.6 years. Swelling was the most frequent presenting symptom. Those patients first presenting with pain were significantly older, whereas those first presenting with a maxillary lesion were significantly younger. The maxilla and mandible were affected in 13 and 20 cases, respectively. KCOTs were most frequently confined to the posterior sextants of both jaws. KCOTs affecting the maxilla were mainly unilocular, whereas those affecting the mandible were multilocular. Patients with multilocular KCOTs were significantly older. Patients with KCOTs associated with root resorption were significantly older, whereas patients associated with unerupted teeth were significantly younger. 69% displaced teeth, 41% resorbed them and 56% were associated with unerupted teeth. All but two were followed up for at least 2 years. Three lesions recurred. Conclusions KCOTs in this community displayed some differences from those reported in the literature. PMID:20203279

  3. Tubercular meningitis in children: Clinical, pathological, and radiological profile and factors associated with mortality

    PubMed Central

    Israni, Anil V.; Dave, Divya A.; Mandal, Anirban; Singh, Amitabh; Sahi, Puneet K.; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Shah, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Context: Childhood tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries with tubercular meningitis being a serious complication with high mortality and morbidity. Aim: To study the clinicopathological as well as radiological profile of childhood tuberculous meningitis (TBM) cases. Settings and Design: Prospective, observational study including children <14 years of age with TBM admitted in a tertiary care hospital from Western India. Subjects and Methods: TBM was diagnosed based on predefined criteria. Glassgow coma scale (GCS) and intracranial pressure (ICP) was recorded. Staging was done as per British Medical Council Staging System. Mantoux test, chest X-ray, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination, neuroimaging, and other investigations were done to confirm TB. Statistical Analysis Used: STATA software (version 9.0) was used for data analysis. Various risk factors were determined using Chi-square tests, and a P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Forty-seven children were included, of which 11 (24.3%) died. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and meningismus was the most common sign. Twenty-nine (62%) children presented with Stage III disease. Stage III disease, low GCS, and raised ICP were predictors of mortality. Findings on neuroimaging or CSF examination did not predict mortality. Conclusions: Childhood TBM presents with nonspecific clinical features. Stage III disease, low GCS, lack of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin vaccination at birth and raised ICP seem to the most important adverse prognostic factors. PMID:27365958

  4. Informatics in radiology: IHE teaching file and clinical trial export integration profile: functional examples.

    PubMed

    Kamauu, Aaron W C; Whipple, Jeffrey J; DuVall, Scott L; Siddiqui, Khan M; Siegel, Eliot L; Avrin, David

    2008-01-01

    The digital revolution in radiology introduced the need for electronic export of medical images. However, the current export process is complicated and time consuming. In response to this continued difficulty, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative published the Teaching File and Clinical Trial Export (TCE) integration profile. The IHE TCE profile describes a method for using existing standards to simplify the export of key medical images for education, research, and publication. This article reviews the authors' experience in implementing the TCE profile in the following three processes: (a) the retrieval of images for a typical teaching file application within a TCE-compliant picture archiving and communication system (PACS); (b) the export of images, independent of TCE compliance of the PACS, to a typical teaching file application; and (c) the TCE-compliant transfer of images for publication. These examples demonstrate methods with which the TCE profile can be implemented to ease the burden of collecting key medical images from the PACS. PMID:18635622

  5. Clinical and Radiological Outcome in Cases of Posterolateral Fusion with Instrumentation for Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar Spondylolisthesis as a cause of low back pain and lower limb radiculopathy has been treated using varied surgical options. The role of laminectomy for decompression of neural elements and stabilization using instrumentation in the form of pedicle screws and rod construct has been a well-established and time tested treatment modality. Aim and Objectives This study analyses the role of laminectomy and instrumentation in obtaining clinical and radiologically favourable outcome. Materials and Methods Data was analysed from the case records for the duration from January 2010 to March 2014. The study analyses the influence of lumbar decompression (laminectomy) and transpedicular instrumentation using titanium pedicle screws and intertransverse process iliac crest graft on patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Conclusion Decompression primarily relieves radicular symptoms and neurogenic claudication whereas fusion primarily relieves back pain by elimination of instability. The addition of posterolateral instrumentation (pedicle screws) enhances the ability to obtain a solid arthrodesis. Posterolateral instrumentation enables improved functional outcome, better patient satisfaction and less back and lower limb symptomatology. This is irrespective of bony arthrodesis or pseudoarthrosis, at least in the short term follow-up. PMID:26266162

  6. Kudo total elbow arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Rauhaniemi, J; Tiusanen, H; Kyrö, A

    2006-04-01

    We have analysed the results of 28 total elbow replacements in 27 patients. The replacements were made using the Kudo unconstrained, unlinked, total elbow prosthesis. The elbows were all affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The follow-up time was from 3 to 7 years, with a mean follow-up of 58 months. Our results with this prosthesis in rheumatoid arthritis appear promising and only few complications were noticed. In one case, a radiological loosening of the ulnar component was observed at the 5-year visit but without any clinical symptoms and no operations were needed. In two other cases, an open reduction was performed within the first 3 months to correct a subluxation. A triceps tendon was re-inserted for a fourth patient 55 months postoperatively. In general, the range of motion became statistically significantly better with the prosthesis and there was also a high rate of relief of pain in patients in whom the elbow was severely affected by rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16137809

  7. Clinical and radiological factors affecting progressive collapse of acute osteoporotic compression spinal fractures.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sergei; Smorgick, Yossi; Mirovsky, Yigal; Anekstein, Yoram; Blecher, Ronen; Tal, Sigal

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporotic compression spine fractures have a different clinical course and outcomes when compared to spinal fractures occurring in the younger population. Only a few studies have investigated the risk factors for progressive osteoporotic compression spine fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological factors related to progressive collapse following acute osteoporotic compression spine fractures. We retrospectively identified all patients treated for thoracolumbar fractures in our institution between January 2008 and July 2013. Included cases were examined by plain radiographs and CT scans. For each patient we classified the fracture according to the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. The difference between initial and final height loss and initial and final local kyphosis was documented as height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference. The presence of old fractures and intravertebral cleft were also documented. The study included 153 patients, comprising 102 women and 51 men. The mean patient age was 68.9years. The mean length of follow up was 15months. A statistically significant correlation was found between patient age, final height loss, height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference. Height loss difference and kyphotic angle difference were significantly correlated to type of fracture according to the AO classification system. The height loss difference was 18.1% in A1 type fractures, 27.1% in A2 type fractures, 24.2% in A3 type fractures and 25.7% in A4 type fractures. During a minimum 3-month follow up of conservative treatment for acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, age and the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System were predictive factors for progressive collapse. PMID:27387197

  8. Etiological, clinical, and radiological features of longitudinally extensive myelopathy in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihe; Jiao, Yujuan; Cui, Lei; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Linwei; Jiao, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Longitudinally extensive myelopathy (LEM) is a rare spinal syndrome, and was mostly assessed in western populations. In order to investigate the etiological, clinical, and radiological features of LEM in Chinese patients, we retrospectively analyzed eighty-nine (40 men and 49 women, median age 45.9±15.7years) patients with LEM hospitalized in China-Japan Friendship Hospital. LEM comprised autoimmune inflammatory myelitis (n=53), metabolic and compressive disorders (n=13), vascular diseases (n=10), neoplastic diseases (n=7), infectious diseases (n=4), and syringomyelia (n=2). Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) was the most common cause of transverse myelopathy identified in LEM (38/89 [42.7%]) characterized by intractable vomiting and hiccups and painful tonic spasms. Subacute combined degeneration and anterior spinal artery syndrome accounted for the largest non-transverse LEM, which selectively affected the spinal dorsal and/or lateral columns and the spinal anterior region, respectively. Radicular pain was common in anterior spinal artery syndrome. Postrema (n=15, 39.5%) and cervical (n=31, 81.6%) lesions were significantly increased in NMOSD versus non-NMOSD (n=7, 13.7% and n=34, 66.7%, respectively, p<0.05]. Axial T2-weighted MRI indicated that 46 (51.7%) patients exhibited complete lesions; 43 (48.3%) patients exhibited non-transverse lesions, mainly unilateral or symmetrical tract lesions. Twenty-four (51.1%) LEM patients exhibited distinct gadolinium contrast enhancement. In this Chinese cohort, LEM was primarily attributed to NMOSD. While the etiological distribution in the non-NMOSD group was different from western populations, clinical and imaging features may facilitate a differential diagnosis. PMID:27526974

  9. Somatosensory evoked potentials in cervical spondylosis. Correlation of median, ulnar and posterior tibial nerve responses with clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Jones, S J

    1985-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) following median, ulnar and tibial nerve stimulation were recorded from sites over the shoulders, neck and scalp in 34 patients with cervical spondylosis. Twenty control subjects were matched for sex and age. Detailed clinical and radiological data were assembled, with particular attention to the sensory modalities impaired and the locus and severity of cord compression. The patients were divided clinically into 4 groups: combined myelopathy and radiculopathy (6 cases), myelopathy alone (15), radiculopathy (6) and neck pain (7). Four cases are described in detail. SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with clinical myelopathy, but not with radiculopathy. Median and ulnar nerve responses were less often affected than tibial, even with myelopathy above C6 level. Tibial nerve SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with posterior column signs on the same side of the body, but not with anterolateral column sensory signs. In myelopathy cases, the SEP examination appeared to be more sensitive to sensory pathway involvement than clinical sensory testing. SEP abnormalities were infrequent in cases of radiculopathy and neck pain, bearing no relation to the clinical locus of root lesions. Abnormal SEPs consistent with subclinical posterior column involvement, however, were recorded in 1 patient with radiculopathy and 2 with neck pain. Follow-up recordings made postoperatively in 7 myelopathy cases reflected the clinical course (improvement, deterioration or no change) in 4, but failed to reflect improvement in 3. The correlation of SEP findings with radiological data was generally poor. SEP abnormalities were detected in 6 out of 8 patients with clinical myelopathy but no radiological evidence of posterior cord compression, suggesting that impairment of the blood supply may be an important factor contributing to cord damage. An application for SEPs in the clinical management of cervical spondylosis may lie in the detection of

  10. Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Interstitial Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lammi, Matthew R.; Baughman, Robert P.; Birring, Surinder S.; Russell, Anne-Marie; Ryu, Jay H.; Scholand, Marybeth; Distler, Oliver; LeSage, Daphne; Sarver, Catherine; Antoniou, Katerina; Highland, Kristin B.; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia; Lasky, Joseph A.; Wells, Athol U.; Saketkoo, Lesley Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are a group of heterogeneous pulmonary parenchymal disorders described by radiologic and histological patterns termed usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). These include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and those related to connective tissue disease (CTD) and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Beyond the importance of establishing an appropriate diagnosis, designing optimal clinical trials for IIPs has been fraught with difficulties in consistency of clinical endpoints making power analyses, and the establishment of efficacy and interpretation of results across trials challenging. Preliminary recommendations, developed by rigorous consensus methods, proposed a minimum set of outcome measures, a ‘core set’, to be incorporated into future clinical trials (Saketkoo et al, THORAX. 2014.). This paper sets out to examine the candidate instruments for each domain (Dyspnea, Cough, Health Related Quality of Life, Imaging, Lung Physiology and Function, Mortality). Candidate measures that were not selected as well as measures that were not available for examination at the time of the consensus process will also be discussed. PMID:27019654

  11. Congenital intestinal malrotation in adolescent and adult patients: a 12-year clinical and radiological survey.

    PubMed

    Husberg, Britt; Salehi, Karin; Peters, Trevor; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Michanek, Margareta; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Strigård, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Congenital intestinal malrotation is mainly detected in childhood and caused by incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestines providing the prerequisites for life-threatening volvulus of the midgut. The objective of this study was to evaluate a large cohort of adult patients with intestinal malrotation. Thirty-nine patients, 15-67 years, were diagnosed and admitted to a university setting with congenital intestinal malrotation 2002-2013. The patients were divided into three age groups for stratified evaluation. Medical charts were scrutinized, and clinical outcome of surgery was reviewed. Twelve patients presented as emergency cases, whereas 27 were admitted as elective cases. Diagnosis was established in 33 patients who underwent radiological investigation and in the remaining 6 during surgery. A Ladd's operation was performed in 31 symptomatic patients; a conservative strategy was chosen in eight cases. Volvulus was more common in the younger age group. Twenty-six surgically treated patients were available for telephone interview, 1-12 years after surgery. All patients, except one, regarded their general condition improved to a high degree (n = 18) or with some reservation (n = 7). Twelve patients suffered remaining abdominal pain of a chronic and diffuse character. Due to recurrence of malrotation six patients were reoperated. Symptomatic malrotation occurs in both children and the adult population. Improved awareness and an accurately performed CT scan can reveal the malformation and enable surgical treatment. A Ladd's procedure relieved most patients from their severe complaints even when a history of several years of suffering existed. PMID:27026938

  12. Clinical improvement and radiological progression in a girl with early onset scoliosis (EOS) treated conservatively – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf

    2006-01-01

    . However, the weight the patient gained cannot explain the cosmetical improvement in this case. Conservative treatment with a certain standard of quality seems a viable alternative for patients with Cobb angles of > 60° when surgical treatment is refused. Specialists in scoliosis management should be aware of the fact that curve progression can occur even if the clinical measurements show an improvement. PMID:16872503

  13. Association of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma: clinical and radiological features, allergy and inflammation markers.

    PubMed

    Staikūniene, Jūrate; Vaitkus, Saulius; Japertiene, Lidija Marija; Ryskiene, Silvija

    2008-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with and without nasal polyps represent different stages of one chronic inflammatory disease of the mucosa of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Coexistence of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma and rather similar characteristics of inflammation support assumption that chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps and asthma may be, at least in part, the same disease process. We therefore aimed to evaluate the differences of sinus radiologic findings, systemic inflammation and allergy markers, pulmonary function of chronic rhinosinusitis associated with nasal polyps and asthma. A total of 121 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis referred to tertiary center were evaluated; 23 healthy persons served as controls. Sinus CT scans and nasal endoscopy were performed. Allergic rhinitis was diagnosed according to history and positive skin prick tests to common inhalant allergens. Asthma was diagnosed according to GINA by history and pulmonary function tests. Aspirin intolerance was assessed by history. Total IgE, Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgE levels, leukocyte and eosinophil count in the peripheral blood were measured. Nasal polyps were detected in 84 patients (69.4%), asthma diagnosed in 48 patients (39.6%), associated with nasal polyps (91.7%) and allergic rhinitis in 45.5% of patients. Forty-four patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and having nasal polyps and asthma were characterized by older age (P<0.01), greater duration of nasal symptoms (P<0.001), higher number previous surgeries (P<0.01), more severe sinus disease on CT scan (P<0.001), greater blood leukocyte and eosinophil count, total IgE level (P<0.01), bronchial obstruction (P<0.05), incidence of allergic rhinitis (P<0.01), and sensitivity to house dust mite D. pteronyssinus (47.7%, P<0.01) and mold allergens (29.5%, P<0.01) comparing to the patients with isolated chronic rhinosinusitis. The extent of sinus CT changes was greater in asthmatics and correlated

  14. Solid variant of aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as a giant cervical mass: A clinical, radiological, histopathological dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Savardekar, Amey R.; Patra, Deviprasad; Chatterjee, Debajyoti; Ahuja, Chirag K.; Salunke, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Typical aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are osteolytic, multicystic lesions with parietal sclerosis and blood-filled cysts. In rare instances, the cystic components may be completely absent. Such solid variants in ABC (s-ABC) exhibit a solid architecture; making the clinical, radiological, and histological differentiation from other solid bone tumors like osteosarcoma (especially giant cell rich osteosarcoma) and giant cell tumor, a difficult task. Case Report: We report the case of a 45–year-old male presenting with a giant solid cervical spine lesion. Histopathology revealed solid variant of ABC, even though the radiological and fine needle aspiration cytology studies pointed toward a giant cell tumor. Conclusion: We aim to discuss the clinical, radiological, and histological findings of solid ABC (a rare benign entity) vis-à-vis the common neoplastic entities of osteosarcoma and giant cell tumor. The histopathological nuisances in making the diagnosis of s-ABC are put forth, along with its impact on management of such giant bony spinal lesions. PMID:26005581

  15. Deposition Measurements From the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Lorne; Lebel, Luke; Korpach, Ed; Berg, Rodney; Inrig, Elizabeth; Watson, Ian; Liu, Chuanlei; Gilhuly, Colleen; Quayle, Debora

    2016-05-01

    In 2012, Defence Research and Development Canada led a series of experiments, titled the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials, in which short-lived radioactive material was explosively dispersed and the resulting plume and deposition were characterized through a variety of methods. Presented here are the results of a number of measurements that were taken to characterize the radioactive ground deposition. These included in situ gamma measurements, deposition filter samples, and witness plate measurements that were taken in situ with handheld beta survey meters. The results from the different measurement techniques are compared to each other and to a simple deposition model. Results showed that approximately 3% of the original source activity was deposited in the immediate vicinity of ground zero, and an additional 15-30% of the original activity was deposited within 450 m of ground zero. Implications of these results for emergency response are discussed. PMID:27023032

  16. Clinical and radiological signs of ABPA associated with airways infection with Aspergillus in the absence of specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Sunzini, F; Barbato, C; Canofari, C; Lugari, L; Perricone, R; Bergamini, A

    2016-09-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a hypersensitivity reaction to Aspergillus that mainly affects patients with asthma. For diagnosis, elevated serum IgE level are needed according to Greenberger and Patterson criteria. We report a case of 43 years-old woman who developed ABPA with productive cough, fever and radiological findings of multiple confluent areas of consolidation in both upper lobes. Laboratory tests showed elevated peripheral eosinophil counts (9.3 x 10(3)/ml). In bronchial washing A. galactomannans and A. Fumigatus were isolated, although we found normal levels of serum IgE, and the absence of serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Aspergillus and A. galactomannans. In conclusion, clinical and radiological signs of ABPA can be associated with Aspergillus infection also in the absence of a specific serum antibody reaction. PMID:27608478

  17. infoRAD: computers for clinical practice and education in radiology. Teleradiology: fundamental considerations and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G T; Morin, R L; Staab, E V

    1993-05-01

    Teleradiology, the practice of radiology from a distance, involves transmission of images between two locations. Radiologists off site can be consulted easily and quickly whenever critical questions arise. Similarly, long-distance, real-time radiologic monitoring of patients is possible. Second opinions can be obtained from specialists in difficult cases. The result is improved and more efficient delivery of patient care. The large number of teleradiology products and features often confuses radiologists who are considering the incorporation of teleradiology into their practices. It is important that practice patterns and needs be evaluated prior to specification and acquisition of a teleradiology system. PMID:8316673

  18. iPad-based patient briefing for radiological examinations-a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Schlechtweg, Philipp M; Hammon, Matthias; Giese, David; Heberlein, Christian; Uder, Michael; Schwab, Siegfried A

    2014-08-01

    To analyze if an iPad-based patient briefing can serve as a digital alternative to conventional documentations prior to radiological examinations. One hundred one patients referred for routine MRI were randomized into two groups, who underwent iPad-based and classic written briefing in opposite order. For each briefing completion time, completeness and correctness were noted. Patient's knowledge about the content of either briefing modality was subsequently tested. The influence of patient-related factors on the performance of the electronic briefing (EB) was analyzed. Finally, the patient's subjective impression of the EB was assessed. The mean durations were 4.4 ± 2.2 min for EB and 1.7 ± 1.3 min for the classic briefing (p < 0.01). All iPad briefings were returned entirely filled out, whereas 11 % of the classic forms were returned with missing data. No significant differences in memorization of the briefing's information were objectified. There was a positive correlation between the duration of EB and age (r = 0.53; p < 0.01), whereas a negative correlation was found between computer skills and patient's age (r = -0.55; p < 0.01) or duration of EB (r = -0.62; p < 0.01). More than half of the study patients would prefer EB in the future; another 29 % had no preference at all. Patient briefing on iPads transfers the information for the patients equally well compared to the classic written approach. Although iPad briefing took patients longer to perform, the majority would prefer it to written consent briefings in the future. Nevertheless, measures have to be undertaken to improve the overall acceptance and performance. PMID:24687643

  19. Bridging the Gap between Basic and Clinical Sciences: A Description of a Radiological Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Anna; Staskiewicz, Grzegorz J.; Lisiecka, Justyna; Pietrzyk, Lukasz; Czekajlo, Michael; Arancibia, Carlos U.; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Torres, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of medical imaging techniques pervade modern medicine, and the changing portability and performance of tools like ultrasound imaging have brought these medical imaging techniques into the everyday practice of many specialties outside of radiology. However, proper interpretation of ultrasonographic and computed tomographic images…

  20. Radiology/Imaging. Clinical Rotation. Instructor's Packet and Student Study Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    The instructor's packet, the first of two packets, is one of a series of materials designed to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This packet…

  1. Clinical and Radiological Results of Microsurgical Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Decompression without Posterior Instrumentation for Lateral Recess Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Şişman, Lokman; Türkmen, Faik; Efe, Duran; Pekince, Oğuzhan; Göncü, Recep Gani; Sever, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A single-center, retrospective patient review of clinical and radiological outcomes of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression, without posterior instrumentation, for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Purpose This study documented the clinical and radiological results of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression of the lateral recess using interbody cages without posterior instrumentation for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Overview of Literature Although microsurgery has some advantages, various complications have been reported following microsurgical decompression, including cage migration, pseudoarthrosis, neurologic deficits, and persistent pain. Methods A total of 34 patients (13 men, 21 women), with a mean age of 56.65±9.1 years (range, 40-77 years) confirmed spinal stability, and preoperative radiological findings of lateral recess stenosis, were included in the study. Interbody polyetheretherketone cages and auto grafts were used in all patients. Posterior instrumentation was not used because of limited resection of the posterior lumbar structures. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed and compared to images taken at the final follow-up. Functional recovery was also evaluated according to the Macnab criteria at the final follow-up. Results The average follow-up time was 35.05±8.65 months (range, 24-46 months). The clinical results, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and duration of hospital stay were similar to previously published results; the fusion rate (85.2%) was decreased and the migration rate (5.8%) was increased, compared with prior reports. Conclusions Although microsurgery has some advantages, migration and pseudoarthrosis remain challenges to achieving adequate lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:26435789

  2. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Denahm, D. H.; Barnes, M. G.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.; Gilbert, R. O.; Hoenes, G. R.; Jamison, J. D.; McMurray, B. J.; Watson, E. C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations.

  3. Pathogenesis, clinical course and neuro-radiological signs of Proprionibacterium acnes cerebritis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yakhkind, Aleksandra; Yacoub, Hussam A; Grove, Jacqueline; Varrato, Jay D; Castaldo, John E

    2015-01-01

    The clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of brain infections related to Propionibacterium acnes are not well-characterized, making early diagnosis and treatment a challenge. More recently, life-threatening central nervous system infections with P. acnes are being reported with increasing frequency as complications of neurointerventional procedures. We present a rare case of P. acnes cerebritis that occurred as a sequela of bare platinum aneurysm coiling and a contaminant of percutaneous angiographic intervention. We include an extensive review of the literature describing the pathogenesis of P. acnes and neuro-radiological signs of brain infections related to this pathogen. PMID:25762004

  4. Dynamic Cervical Implant versus Anterior Cervical Diskectomy and Fusion: A Prospective Study of Clinical and Radiologic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Richter, Heiko; Seule, Martin; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical and radiologic outcome in patients treated with a dynamic cervical implant (DCI) or anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF). Study Design A prospective comparative cohort study. Methods The study included 60 patients with one- or two-level cervical degenerative disk disease (DDD) undergoing treatment with either DCI (n = 30) or ACDF (n = 30). Clinical and radiologic outcomes were assessed 3 and 12 months after surgery. Clinical scoring systems included the Visual Analog Scale for Neck (VAS-N) and Arm pain (VAS-A), the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD), and the European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). Results Both the DCI and ACDF group showed significant clinical improvement 12 months after surgery using the VAS-N (p = 0.034 and p < 0.001, respectively), VAS-A (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), NPAD (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), and EQ-5D (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). There were no significant differences in clinical outcome comparing both groups at the 3- and 12-month follow-up. The fusion rate at 12 months after surgery was 39.4% and 80.0% in the DCI and ACDF groups, respectively. Radiolucency was found in 90.9% in the DCI group at 12-month follow-up. Conclusion The clinical results for DCI treatment are equivalent to those for ACDF in the treatment of one- and two-level cervical DDD at 12 months after surgery. Further studies are necessary to investigate the high rates of radiolucency and fusion associated with DCI treatment. PMID:27088592

  5. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. PMID:24200475

  6. Clinical outcome measures for Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Joerg; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous group of rare skin diseases that only rarely have been subjected to controlled clinical trials. This may be have been partly due to a lack of suitable validated outcome instruments. Recently the FDA mandated that organ specific trials for lupus erythematosus need to use a combination of different outcome measures. The patient’s condition needs to be assessed in terms of quality of life, the patient’s global response and organ specific instruments that measure activity of the disease as well as damage due to the disease. For the skin the only formally validated and published instrument is currently the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosis Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). This paper discusses the background of the development of the CLASI as well as issues related to its use and interpretation in the context of clinical research of CLE. PMID:20693208

  7. Clinical evaluation of using semantic searching engine for radiological imaging services in RIS-integrated PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tonghui; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hua, Yanqing; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-03-01

    We had designed a semantic searching engine (SSE) for radiological imaging to search both reports and images in RIS-integrated PACS environment. In this presentation, we present evaluation results of this SSE about how it impacting the radiologists' behaviors in reporting for different kinds of examinations, and how it improving the performance of retrieval and usage of historical images in RIS-integrated PACS.

  8. Quality initiatives: anatomy and pathophysiology of errors occurring in clinical radiology practice.

    PubMed

    Brook, Olga R; O'Connell, Anna Marie; Thornton, Eavan; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Kruskal, Jonathan B

    2010-09-01

    The Joint Commission requires development of comprehensive error detection systems that incorporate root cause analyses for all sentinel events. To prevent medical errors from occurring, there is a need for a readily available and easy-to-implement system for detecting, classifying, and managing mistakes. The wide spectrum of interrelated contributing factors makes the classification of errors difficult. Contributors to and causes of radiologic errors can be classified under latent and active failures. Latent failures include technical and system-related failures, with a radiology-specific subgroup of communication failures that includes documentation, inaccurate or incomplete information, and communication loop failures. Active failures may be ascribed to human failures (more specifically failure of execution of a task, inadequate planning, or behavior-related failures), patient-based failures, and external failures. Classification of an error should also include the impact of the error on the patient, staff, other customers, and radiology practice. Further considerations should include nonmedical impact of the error, including legal, social, and economic effects on both the patient and the system. Rather than focusing the investigation on blaming individuals for active failures, the primary effort should be to discover latent system failures that can be remedied at a departmental level. Such an error classification system will decrease the likelihood of future errors and diminish their adverse impact. PMID:20622192

  9. Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Barrett; Vawdrey, David K.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution’s patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration’s Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia’s CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution’s patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia’s CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1–4). PMID:26306284

  10. Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barrett; Vawdrey, David K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution's patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration's Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4). PMID:26306284

  11. Clinical and radiological results after coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction for type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using three different techniques. A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    VASCELLARI, ALBERTO; SCHIAVETTI, STEFANO; BATTISTELLA, GIUSEPPE; REBUZZI, ENRICO; COLETTI, NICOLÒ

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this retrospective study was to present the outcomes of three different techniques for the treatment of type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations: arthroscopic TightRope (TR), arthroscopic GraftRope (GR), and open reconstruction of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament using the Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System (LARS). Methods eighteen patients underwent clinical and radiological evaluations after a mean follow-up time of 43 months. The following clinical outcome measures were considered: the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome measure (DASH), the Nottingham Clavicle Score (NCS), and the Constant score (CS). On X-rays, the CC distance was measured. Results the median DASH score at follow-up was 12.5 in the TR group, 5 in the GR group, and 4.2 in the LARS group. The median NCS value was 88 in the TR group, 88 in the GR group, and 91 in the LARS group. The median CS was 100 in the TR group, 95 in the GR group, and 94.5 in the LARS group. The mean CC distance was 10.3 mm in the TR group, 13.8 in the GR group, and 16.6 in the LARS group. Conclusions all three techniques proved to be reliable in providing good clinical outcomes, although none of the studied techniques demonstrated reliability in maintaining anatomical reduction after surgery. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:26605251

  12. Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: Review of Literature and a Proposal of a Combined Clinical and Radiological Classification

    PubMed Central

    Santosh, P

    2015-01-01

    Tooth impaction is a pathological situation where a tooth fails to attain its normal functional position. Impacted third molars are commonly encountered in routine dental practice. The impaction rate is higher for third molars when compared with other teeth. The mandibular third molar impaction is said to be due to the inadequate space between the distal of the second mandibular molar and the anterior border of the ascending ramus of the mandible. Impacted teeth may remain asymptomatic or may be associated with various pathologies such as caries, pericoronitis, cysts, tumors, and also root resorption of the adjacent tooth. Even though various classifications exist in the literature, none of those address the combined clinical and radiologic assessment of the impacted third molar. Literature search using the advanced features of various databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Google Scholar, Directory of Open Access Journals and Cochrane electronic databases was carried out. Keywords like impaction, mandibular third molar, impacted mandibular third molar, complications, anatomy, inferior alveolar nerve injury, lingual nerve injury were used to search the databases. A total of 826 articles were screened, and 50 articles were included in the review which was obtained from 1980 to February 2015. In the present paper, the authors have proposed a classification based on clinical and radiological assessment of the impacted mandibular third molar. PMID:26229709

  13. Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: Review of Literature and a Proposal of a Combined Clinical and Radiological Classification.

    PubMed

    Santosh, P

    2015-01-01

    Tooth impaction is a pathological situation where a tooth fails to attain its normal functional position. Impacted third molars are commonly encountered in routine dental practice. The impaction rate is higher for third molars when compared with other teeth. The mandibular third molar impaction is said to be due to the inadequate space between the distal of the second mandibular molar and the anterior border of the ascending ramus of the mandible. Impacted teeth may remain asymptomatic or may be associated with various pathologies such as caries, pericoronitis, cysts, tumors, and also root resorption of the adjacent tooth. Even though various classifications exist in the literature, none of those address the combined clinical and radiologic assessment of the impacted third molar. Literature search using the advanced features of various databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Google Scholar, Directory of Open Access Journals and Cochrane electronic databases was carried out. Keywords like impaction, mandibular third molar, impacted mandibular third molar, complications, anatomy, inferior alveolar nerve injury, lingual nerve injury were used to search the databases. A total of 826 articles were screened, and 50 articles were included in the review which was obtained from 1980 to February 2015. In the present paper, the authors have proposed a classification based on clinical and radiological assessment of the impacted mandibular third molar. PMID:26229709

  14. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Parameters with Two Different Surgical Methods for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Çiloğlu, Osman; Çiçek, Hakan; Yılmaz, Ahmet; Özalay, Metin; Söker, Gökhan; Leblebici, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the effects anatomic or nonanatomic femoral tunnel positions and tunnel fixation methods obtained using two different surgery methods on tunnel widening and clinical results in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Methods: Patients with isolated anterior cruciate ligament rupture are included to study who don’t have intra-and extra-articular additional pathology of the knee, without previously a history of operations of both knees. 2 groups were created. Group 1 Aperfix implant were used which can be able to perform non anatomical femoral tunnel and intra tunnel fixation with transtibial technique. In Group 2 Endobutton CL implant were used which can make fixation from outside the cortex with anatomic femoral tunnel in use of anteromedial portal techniques. 27 patients (average age 29,33, range 18 to 55 years) in group 1 and 27 patients (average age 27,51, range 16 to 45 years) in group 2 totally 54 patients were performed surgery. All patients were assessed using the IKDC (International knee documentation committee), Tegner Activity Scala and Lysholm II Functional Scores. Muscle strength measurements in both groups compared to intact knee was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer Biodex System 3 Pro. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture and tunnel widening were imaged with 3D reconstructive computed tomography. All measurements were performed using the same software application by the same radiologist. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to age and sex distribution, operated side, the size of the tunnel created, and follow-up period (p>0.05). After surgery in both groups, the clinical scores showed significant improvement compared to preoperative (p=0,0001). However, postoperative clinical outcomes in the two groups did not show a difference significantly (p>0,005). Isokinetic muscle strength study showed significant differences between the two groups (p=0,0001). Location of femoral tunnel aperture

  15. Retrospective Comparison of Radiological and Clinical Outcomes of PLIF and TLIF Techniques in Patients Who Underwent Lumbar Spinal Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Yaldiz, Can

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Degenerative disc disease and spinal stenosis lead to various symptoms. Degeneration of facet joints is added to this degenerative process with aging. Seventy-four patients who were admitted to the Spinal Column Outpatient Clinic of the Neurosurgery Department with a diagnosis of degenerative narrow spinal canal and lumbar spondylolisthesis between 2011 and 2013 and who underwent surgery were included in the study. Our study was conducted with 74 patients of whom 73.0% (n = 54) were female and 27.0% (n = 20) were male. Mean age was 54.86 ± 7.87 years (range 34–74). Although we did not detect a difference between the two surgical methods with regard to clinical improvement, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is preferred due to radiological advantages observed one year later, ease of application, and the development of fewer complications. PMID:27124016

  16. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  17. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  18. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  19. The relationship of anthropometric measures to radiological features of the breast in premenopausal women.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, N. F.; Lockwood, G. A.; Byng, J. W.; Little, L. E.; Yaffe, M. J.; Tritchler, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    We studied 273 premenopausal women recruited from mammography units who had different degrees of density of the breast parenchyma on mammography, in whom we measured height, weight and skinfold thicknesses. Mammograms were digitized to high spatial resolution by a scanning densitometer and images analysed to measure the area of dense tissue and the total area of the breast. Per cent density and the area of non-dense tissue were calculated from these measurements. We found that the mammographic measures had different associations with body size. Weight and the Quetelet index of obesity were strongly and positively associated with the area of non-dense tissue and with the total area of the breast, but less strongly and negatively correlated with the area of dense tissue. We also found a strong inverse relationship between the areas of radiologically dense and non-dense breast tissue. Statistical models containing anthropometric variables explained up to 8% of the variance in dense area, but explained up to 49% of the variance in non-dense area and 43% of variance in total area. These results suggest that aetiological studies in breast cancer that use mammographic density should consider dense and non-dense tissues separately. In addition to per cent density, methods should be examined that combine information from these two tissues. Images Figure 1 PMID:9820186

  20. Yttrium-90 hepatic radioembolization: clinical review and current techniques in interventional radiology and personalized dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tong, Aaron K T; Kao, Yung Hsiang; Too, Chow Wei; Chin, Kenneth F W; Ng, David C E; Chow, Pierce K H

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microsphere radioembolization has been establishing itself as a safe and efficacious treatment for both primary and metastatic liver cancers. This extends to both first-line therapies as well as in the salvage setting. In addition, radioembolization appears efficacious for patients with portal vein thrombosis, which is currently a contraindication for surgery, transplantation and transarterial chemoembolization. This article reviews the efficacy and expanding use of (90)Y microsphere radioembolization with an added emphasis on recent advances in personalized dosimetry and interventional radiology techniques. Directions for future research into combination therapies with radioembolization and expansion into sites other than the liver are also explored. PMID:26943239

  1. Results of radiological measurements taken in the Niagara Falls, New York, area (NF002)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.K.; Berven, B.A.

    1986-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of 100 elevated gamma radiation anomalies in the Niagara Falls, New York, area are presented. These radiation anomalies were identified by a mobile gamma scanning survey during the period October 3-16, 1984, and were recommended for an onsite survey to determine if the elevated levels of radiation may be related to the transportation of radioactive waste material to the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works for storage. In this survey, radiological measurements included outdoor gamma exposure rates at 1 m above the surface; outdoor gamma exposure rates at the surface, range of gamma exposure rates during scan; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in biased surface soil samples. The results show 38 anomalies (35 located along Pletcher Road and 3 associated with other unreleated locations) were found to exceed Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) remedial action guidelines and were recommended for formal characterization surveys. (Since the time of this survey, remedial actions have been conducted on the 38 anomalies identified as exceeding FUSRAP guidelines, and the radioactive material above guidelines has been removed.) The remaining 62 anomalies are associated with asphalt driveways and parking lots, which used a phosphate slag material (previously identified as cyclowollastonite, synthetic CaSiO/sub 3/). This rocky-slag waste material was used for bedding under asphalt surfaces and in general gravel applications. Most of the contaminated soil and rock samples collected at the latter anomalies had approximately equal concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 238/U and, therefore, are not related to materials connected with the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), including material that was transported to the NFSS. 13 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Combining Radiography and Passive Measurements for Radiological Threat Localization in Cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Sean M.; Wittman, Richard A.

    2015-10-01

    Detecting shielded special nuclear material (SNM) in a cargo container is a difficult problem, since shielding reduces the amount of radiation escaping the container. Radiography provides information that is complementary to that provided by passive gamma-ray detection systems: while not directly sensitive to radiological materials, radiography can reveal highly shielded regions that may mask a passive radiological signal. Combining these measurements has the potential to improve SNM detection, either through improved sensitivity or by providing a solution to the inverse problem to estimate source properties (strength and location). We present a data-fusion method that uses a radiograph to provide an estimate of the radiation-transport environment for gamma rays from potential sources. This approach makes quantitative use of radiographic images without relying on image interpretation, and results in a probabilistic description of likely source locations and strengths. We present results for this method for a modeled test case of a cargo container passing through a plastic-scintillator-based radiation portal monitor and a transmission-radiography system. We find that a radiograph-based inversion scheme allows for localization of a low-noise source placed randomly within the test container to within 40 cm, compared to 70 cm for triangulation alone, while strength estimation accuracy is improved by a factor of six. Improvements are seen in regions of both high and low shielding, but are most pronounced in highly shielded regions. The approach proposed here combines transmission and emission data in a manner that has not been explored in the cargo-screening literature, advancing the ability to accurately describe a hidden source based on currently-available instrumentation.

  3. Clinical measurements using fiber optic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, J.N.

    1987-09-01

    The use of fiber optics in clinical measurements for illumination and imaging is widespread, but a more advanced sensing concept can be realized. The attachment of species specific fiber terminations at the distal end of the fiber optic so that in-situ analysis can be made is discussed along with measurement instrumentation. These terminations are called optrodes (optical electrodes), and a group of optrodes are presently under development for the in-vivo and in-vitro identification and quantification of species of interest to the clinician. The current development includes pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, and anti-cancer drugs. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  4. [Measurement of the Dose Rate Using Dosimeters in Interventional Radiology and Its Difficulty].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hidenori; Takahashi, Chiharu; Narita, Nobuhiro; Mizusawa, Yasuhiko; Sekiya, Masaru; Ohkubo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    In equipment used for interventional radiology (IVR), automatic exposure control (AEC) is incorporated to obtain the X-ray output suitable for the treatment of targeted lesions. For the AEC, users select a region as the signal sensing region (measuring field, MF) in the flat panel detector; MFs with various sizes and shapes were pre-defined and prepared in the system. The aim of this study was to examine the change of measured dose rate with the selection of MFs, the type of dosimeters (the ionization chamber dosimeter and the semiconductor dosimeter), and the dosimeter placement relative to the direction of X-ray tube (from cathode to anode). The IVR equipment was Allura Xper FD20/10 (Philips Medical Systems), and six kinds of built-in MFs were used. It was found that dose rate measured by the ionization chamber dosimeter showed a variation of -2 mGy/min with the MFs and the ionization chamber dosimeter placement. The dose rate measured by the semiconductor dosimeter showed more variation than the ionization chamber dosimeter. The change of dose rate with the dosimeter placement would be caused by the MF overlapping the dosimeter which would affect the AEC (the X-ray output). Also, the change of dose rate with the dosimeter placement was considered to be related to the heel effect of the X-ray beam. When performing dose rate measurements, we should notice that the selection of MFs, the type of dosimeters, and the dosimeter placement would affect the measured values. PMID:26796935

  5. Metatarsal leiomyosarcoma masquerading as acute osteomyelitis - A diagnostic trap unveiled by vigilant clinical, radiologic and pathologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2016-06-01

    Due to overlapping clinical and radiological features, the differentiation between osteomyelitis and bone tumor can be challenging. A 48-year-old lady presented with intermittent left foot pain for a few months. Plain radiographs showed an osteolytic lesion affecting the proximal diaphysis of the left fourth metatarsal bone, with thinning and irregularities of the cortex and focal periosteal reaction. Ultrasonography revealed diffuse subcutaneous edema in the dorsum of the left foot, cortical irregularities along the mid-shaft of the left fourth metatarsal bone, and surrounding periosteal collection. Computed tomography showed medullary expansion along the shaft and base of the left fourth metatarsal bone with cortical irregularities and defects suggestive of cloaca, and focal mild periosteal new bone formation. The clinico-radiologic diagnosis was acute osteomyelitis with periosteal collection. During open biopsy, the finding of intramedullary fleshy tissue in the absence of significant inflammatory edema and purulent discharge, and subsequent negative culture result prompted a review of the histologic slides which was initially reported as benign fibroblastic tissue proliferation. Careful analysis of the histomorphology disclosed a spindle cell sarcoma for which ray amputation of the fourth and fifth metatarsal was performed. The final diagnosis was grade 1 leiomyosarcoma and the patient remained well 33 months after the operation. PMID:26802815

  6. Characterisation of an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dose measurements in radiology beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, L. M. S.; Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Santos, W. S.; Pereira, A. J. S.; Rodrigues, T. M. A.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dosimetric measurements of conventional radiology beams. This phantom was developed by a previous research project at the Federal University of Sergipe for image quality control tests. As the phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material, it is possible to characterise it for dosimetric studies. For comparison, a geometric chest phantom, consisting of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) with dimensions of 30×30×15 cm³ was used. Measurements of incident air kerma (Ki) and entrance surface dose (ESD) were performed using ionisation chambers. From the results, backscatter factors (BSFs) of the two phantoms were determined and compared with values estimated by CALDose_X software, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. For the technical parameters evaluated in this study, the ESD and BSF values obtained experimentally showed a good similarity between the two phantoms, with minimum and maximum difference of 0.2% and 7.0%, respectively, and showed good agreement with the results published in the literature. Organ doses and effective doses for the anthropomorphic phantom were also estimated by the determination of conversion coefficients (CCs) using the visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code. Therefore, the results of this study prove that the anthropomorphic thorax phantom proposed is a good tool to use in dosimetry and can be used for risk evaluation of X-ray diagnostic procedures.

  7. Liposarcoma or invasive lipomatosis in flower horn fish, hybrid cichlid: clinical, radiological, ultrasonographical and histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Rahmati-Holasoo, H; Shokrpoor, S; Tavakkoli, A; Vajhi, A; Ebrahimzadeh Mousavi, H

    2016-03-01

    Liposarcoma or invasive lipomatosis affecting three indoor aquarium fish (flower horn fish, hybrid cichlid) is characterized, by the presence of mature adipocytes of variable sizes and by an invasive behaviour, which affected internal organs and eyes of all cases. Detailed macroscopic, radiological, ultrasonographical and histopathological features are presented. All fish had bilateral exophthalmia with some masses around the eyes. Ultrasonography confirmed the presence of hyperechoic masses in the eyes. Histopathology of all cases described the presence of variable-sized adipose cells in the eyes. The suggested diagnosis is well-differentiated liposarcoma or invasive lipomatosis. This is the first report of liposarcoma or invasive lipomatosis in flower horn fish, hybrid cichlid. PMID:25753688

  8. Measuring pacemaker dose: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T; Xiao, Ying; Harrison, Amy S

    2012-01-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired. PMID:21875785

  9. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S.

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  10. Novel Somatic Mutations in Primary Hyperaldosteronism are related to the Clinical, Radiological and Pathological Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Ute I.; Healy, James M.; Thiel, Anne; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Brown, Taylor C.; Kunstman, John W.; Horne, Matthew J.; Dietrich, Dimo; Riemer, Jasmin; Kücükköylü, Seher; Reimer, Esther N.; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Goh, Gerald; Kristiansen, Glen; Mahajan, Amit; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.; Prasad, Manju L.; Carling, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia are important causes of secondary hypertension. Somatic mutations in KCNJ5, CACNA1D, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CTNNB1 have been described in APAs. Objective To characterize clinical-pathological features in APAs and unilateral adrenal hyperplasia, and correlate them with genotypes. Design Retrospective study. Subjects and Measurements Clinical and pathological characteristics of 90 APAs and 7 diffusely or focally hyperplastic adrenal glands were reviewed, and samples were examined for mutations in known disease genes by Sanger or exome sequencing. Results Mutation frequencies were: KCNJ5, 37.1%; CACNA1D, 10.3%; ATP1A1, 8.2%; ATP2B3, 3.1%; CTNNB1, 2.1%. Previously unidentified mutations included I157K, F154C and 2 insertions (I150_G151insM and I144_E145insAI) in KCNJ5, all close to the selectivity filter, V426G_V427Q_A428_L433del in ATP2B3, and A39Efs*3 in CTNNB1. Mutations in KCNJ5 were associated with female, and other mutations with male gender (p=0.007). On computed tomography, KCNJ5-mutant tumors displayed significantly greater diameter (p=0.023), calculated area (p=0.002) and lower pre-contrast Hounsfield Units (p=0.0002) vs. tumors with mutations in other genes. Accordingly, KCNJ5-mutant tumors were predominantly comprised of lipid-rich fasciculata-like clear cells, whereas other tumors were heterogeneous (p=5×10−6 vs. non-KCNJ5 mutant and p=0.0003 vs. wild type tumors, respectively). CACNA1D mutations were present in two samples with hyperplasia without adenoma. Conclusions KCNJ5 mutant tumors appear to be associated with fasciculata-like clear cell predominant histology and tend to be larger with a characteristic imaging phenotype. Novel somatic KCNJ5 variants likely cause adenomas by loss of potassium selectivity, similar to previously described mutations. PMID:26252618

  11. [Clinical and radiological study on tissue regeneration after alveolar bone augmentation with various osteoplastic materials and membranes].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlovskiĭ, A A; Kulakov, A A; Korolev, V M; Vinnichenko, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficiency of alveolar bone augmentation using a variety of osteoplastic materials and collagen membrane and healing under a clot. The study included patients undergoing the extraction of symmetric teeth. After extraction one of the sockets were filled with osteoplastic materials while symmetrically located socket with no bone grafting served as a control. In group 1 augmentation was performed using Bio-Oss Collagen Bio-Gide membrane, in group 2 - Osteodent-M and Collost membranes, in group 3 - BIOPLAST-dent and BIOPLAST-dent-MK membranes. Clinical and radiological evaluation revealed positive impact of bioplastic materials on the bone tissue healing and recovery rates. The best results showed Bio-Oss Collagen with barrier bioresorbable membrane Bio-Gide allowing the creation of the most favorable conditions for delayed implantation. PMID:25377579

  12. Histopathological study of the outer membrane of the dura mater in chronic sub dural hematoma: Its clinical and radiological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Bokka, Sriharsha; Trivedi, Adarsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic subdural hematoma is an old clot of blood on the surface of the brain between dura and arachnoid membranes. These liquefied clots most often occur in patients aged 60 and older with brain atrophy. When the brain shrinks inside the skull over time, minor head trauma can cause tearing of blood vessels over the brain surface, resulting in a slow accumulation of blood over several days to weeks. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the role of membrane in hematoma evaluation and to correlate its histopathology with clinic-radiological aspects of the condition and overall prognosis of patients. Material and Methods: The study incorporated all cases of chronic SDH admitted to the Neurosurgery department of JLN Hospital and Research Centre, Bhilai, between November 2011 and November 2013. All such cases were analyzed clinically, radiologically like site, size, thickness in computed tomography, the attenuation value, midline shift and histopathological features were recorded. Criteria for Inclusion: All cases of chronic subdural haematoma irrespective of age and sex were incorporated into the study. Criteria for Exclusion: All cases of acute subdural haematoma and cases of chronic sub dural hematoma which were managed conservatively irrespective of age and sex were excluded from the study Results: In our series of cases, the most common histopathological type of membrane was the inflammatory membrane (Type II) seen in 42.30% of cases followed by hemorrhagic inflammatory membrane (Type III) seen in 34.62% of cases while scar inflammatory type of membrane (Type IV) was seen in 23.08% of cases. No case with noninflammatory type (Type I) was encountered. PMID:26889276

  13. Comparison of clinical and radiological outcomes after automated open lumbar discectomy and conventional microdiscectomy: a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Bae, Jun Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Microdiscectomy (MD) is the gold standard for surgical discectomy. As a minimally invasive discectomy, automated open lumbar discectomy (AOLD) is designed to preserve annular integrity and disc height as well as effectively remove herniated disc and degenerated disc material. However, there have been no prospective clinical studies comparing their effectiveness. The study was designed to compare clinical and radiological outcomes after AOLD with those of MD. Methods: Seventy-eight patients were evaluated for unilateral leg pain with the presence of disc herniation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at a single attributable level. Sixty-two patients were enrolled; 33 patients (53%) were randomly assigned to the AOLD group and the remaining 29 patients (47%) were assigned to the MD group. Follow-up assessment was performed for 19 of the AOLD patients and 17 of the MD patients. The average follow-up period was 20 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using VAS and ODI scores. Change of disc height (DH), instability, and disc degeneration were assessed from radiographs, while Modic change and reherniation were assessed using MRI scans. Results: Postoperative VAS scores for leg pain and ODI scores for function were significantly improved in both groups. Postoperative VAS for back pain tended to decrease in the MD group but the decrease was statistically insignificant (P = 0.081). The postoperative VAS for back pain was significantly reduced in the AOLD group (P = 0.012). Patients from the MD group showed greater DH reduction than the AOLD group (P = 0.049). The MD group experienced greater disc degeneration and Modic change than the AOLD group. Follow-up MRI revealed 2 cases of reherniation in the AOLD group; 1 case was symptomatic, the other was asymptomatic. Conclusions: AOLD showed comparable clinical and radiological outcomes to conventional MD. AOLD preserves the central disc and removes only the loose degenerative disc fragments

  14. Work Productivity in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relationship with Clinical and Radiological Features

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro del Moral, Rafael; Rillo, Oscar Luis; Casalla, Luciana; Morón, Carolina Bru; Citera, Gustavo; Cocco, José A. Maldonado; Correa, María de los Ángeles; Buschiazzo, Emilio; Tamborenea, Natalia; Mysler, Eduardo; Tate, Guillermo; Baños, Andrea; Herscovich, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the relationship between work productivity with disease activity, functional capacity, life quality and radiological damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. The study included consecutive employed patients with RA (ACR'87), aged over 18. Demographic, disease-related, and work-related variables were determined. The reduction of work productivity was assessed by WPAI-RA. Results. 90 patients were evaluated, 71% women. Age average is 50 years old, DAS28 4, and RAQoL 12. Median SENS is 18 and HAQ-A 0.87. Mean absenteeism was of 14%, presenting an average of 6.30 work hours wasted weekly. The reduction in performance at work or assistance was of 38.4% and the waste of productivity was of 45%. Assistance correlated with DAS28 (r = 0.446; P < 0.001), HAQ-A (r = 0.545; P < 0.001) and RAQoL (r = 0.475; P < 0.001). Lower total productivity was noticed in higher levels of activity and functional disability. Patients with SENS > 18 showed lower work productivity than those with SENS < 18 (50 versus 34; P = 0.04). In multiple regression analysis, variables associated with reduction of total work productivity were HAQ-A and RAQoL. Conclusion. RA patients with higher disease severity showed higher work productivity compromise. PMID:23320166

  15. Justification in clinical radiological practice: a survey among staff of five London hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koutalonis, M; Horrocks, J

    2012-04-01

    This study represents a survey performed among staff who, according to the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposures) Regulations of 2000 (IRMER), are responsible for justifying radiological examinations in the UK. The aim of the survey is to map the current situation regarding knowledge of risks from X-ray exposures and the criteria used for their justification. An anonymous electronic questionnaire was emailed to 219 radiologists and radiographers of five National Health Service hospitals. The questions were designed to investigate the way the sample group defines/assesses risk and benefit when justifying medical exposures, and to test their knowledge on radiation doses, risk communication, and on relevant national legislation. The majority of the respondents are aware of the relevant legislation/guidelines. Patient's medical condition, age and sex, and alternative techniques using less or no ionising radiation are the main criteria used for justification. However, when estimating the effective dose of various examinations in chest radiograph equivalents, the majority of the responses were incorrect. Although there is good knowledge of legislation around justification of medical exposures, there seems to be a lack of knowledge on radiation doses and risks among IRMER practitioners. PMID:21576178

  16. Benefits of hospital-wide PACS networks: a survey of clinical users of radiology services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Stirling; Weatherburn, Gwyneth C.; Watkins, Jessamy; Buxton, Martin J.

    1998-07-01

    An independent evaluation of PACS has been carried out at Hammersmith Hospital. This paper describes one element: the use of a questionnaire instrument to assess radiology service user's views on the quality of the service being provided; major causes of dissatisfaction with the service; the extent to which images are unavailable; and the consequences of images unavailability. The objective was to investigate some of the key claims made for the PACS technology. The principal research design was a 'before and after' comparison at Hammersmith Hospital. A number of other, comparator, hospitals were included in this survey in order to allow inferences to be made about the any observed changes at Hammersmith. The questionnaire was distributed on three occasions before PACS was operational at Hammersmith and on one occasion afterwards. Across all data collection rounds and all sites, very high levels of satisfaction with image quality were reported. When asked about satisfaction with the written reporting service, a larger proportion of respondents across all sites and rounds indicated their discontent Following the introduction of PACS, the proportion of respondents indicating that lost ward or outpatient images was a problem was significantly lower and the rate of re-examination was lower.

  17. Radiologically Defined Ecological Dynamics and Clinical Outcomes in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Preliminary Results1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence; Goldgof, Dmitry; Russo, Robin; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Gillies, Robert; Gatenby, Robert

    2014-01-01

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations from 32 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) enrolled in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Spatial variations in T1 post-gadolinium and either T2-weighted or fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences from each tumor MRI study were used to characterize each small region of the tumor by its local contrast enhancement and edema/cellularity (“habitat”). The patient cohort was divided into group 1 (survival < 400 days, n = 16) and group 2 (survival > 400 days, n = 16). RESULTS: Histograms of relative values in each sequence demonstrated that the tumor regions were consistently divided into high and low blood contrast enhancement, each of which could be subdivided into regions of high, low, and intermediate cell density/interstitial edema. Group 1 tumors contained greater volumes of habitats with low contrast enhancement but intermediate and high cell density (not fully necrotic) than group 2. Both leave-one-out and 10-fold cross-validation schemes demonstrated that individual patients could be correctly assigned to the short or long survival group with 81.25% accuracy. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that novel image analytic techniques can characterize regional habitat variations in GBMs using combinations of MRI sequences. A preliminary study of 32 patients from the TCGA database found that the distribution of MRI-defined habitats varied significantly among the different survival groups. Radiologically defined ecological tumor analysis may provide valuable prognostic and predictive biomarkers in GBM and other tumors. PMID:24772202

  18. Radiologically Isolated Syndrome: 5-Year Risk for an Initial Clinical Event

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Darin T.; Siva, Aksel; Kantarci, Orhun; Inglese, Matilde; Katz, Ilana; Tutuncu, Melih; Keegan, B. Mark; Donlon, Stacy; Hua, Le H.; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Montalban, Xavier; Rovira, Alex; Tintoré, Mar; Amato, Maria Pia; Brochet, Bruno; de Seze, Jérôme; Brassat, David; Vermersch, Patrick; De Stefano, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the 5-year risk and to identify risk factors for the development of a seminal acute or progressive clinical event in a multi-national cohort of asymptomatic subjects meeting 2009 RIS Criteria. Methods Retrospectively identified RIS subjects from 22 databases within 5 countries were evaluated. Time to the first clinical event related to demyelination (acute or 12-month progression of neurological deficits) was compared across different groups by univariate and multivariate analyses utilizing a Cox regression model. Results Data were available in 451 RIS subjects (F: 354 (78.5%)). The mean age at from the time of the first brain MRI revealing anomalies suggestive of MS was 37.2 years (y) (median: 37.1 y, range: 11–74 y) with mean clinical follow-up time of 4.4 y (median: 2.8 y, range: 0.01–21.1 y). Clinical events were identified in 34% (standard error = 3%) of individuals within a 5-year period from the first brain MRI study. Of those who developed symptoms, 9.6% fulfilled criteria for primary progressive MS. In the multivariate model, age [hazard ratio (HR): 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96–0.99); p = 0.03], sex (male) [HR: 1.93 (1.24–2.99); p = 0.004], and lesions within the cervical or thoracic spinal cord [HR: 3.08 (2.06–4.62); p = <0.001] were identified as significant predictors for the development of a first clinical event. Interpretation These data provide supportive evidence that a meaningful number of RIS subjects evolve to a first clinical symptom. An age <37 y, male sex, and spinal cord involvement appear to be the most important independent predictors of symptom onset. PMID:24598783

  19. Impact on Patient Safety and Satisfaction of Implementation of an Outpatient Clinic in Interventional Radiology (IPSIPOLI-Study): A Quasi-Experimental Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lutjeboer, Jacob Burgmans, Mark Christiaan E-mail: mburgmans@hotmail.com; Chung, Kaman Erkel, Arian Robert van

    2015-06-15

    PurposeInterventional radiology (IR) procedures are associated with high rates of preparation and planning errors. In many centers, pre-procedural consultation and screening of patients is performed by referring physicians. Interventional radiologists have better knowledge about procedure details and risks, but often only get acquainted with the patient in the procedure room. We hypothesized that patient safety (PS) and patient satisfaction (PSAT) in elective IR procedures would improve by implementation of a pre-procedural visit to an outpatient IR clinic.Material and MethodsIRB approval was obtained and informed consent was waived. PS and PSAT were measured in patients undergoing elective IR procedures before (control group; n = 110) and after (experimental group; n = 110) implementation of an outpatient IR clinic. PS was measured as the number of process deviations. PSAT was assessed using a questionnaire measuring Likert scores of three dimensions: interpersonal care aspects, information/communication, and patient participation. Differences in PS and PSAT between the two groups were compared using an independent t test.ResultsThe average number of process deviations per patient was 0.39 in the control group compared to 0.06 in the experimental group (p < 0.001). In 9.1 % patients in the control group, no legal informed consent was obtained compared to 0 % in the experimental group. The mean overall Likert score was significantly higher in the experimental group compared to the control group: 2.68 (SD 0.314) versus 2.48 (SD 0.381) (p < 0.001).ConclusionPS and PSAT improve significantly if patients receive consultation and screening in an IR outpatient clinic prior to elective IR procedures.

  20. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle Joint: Clinical, Radiological, and Intraoperative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Choudry, Q.; Garg, S.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis, also termed synovial osteochondromatosis, is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium of the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most commonly involves large joints, such as the knee, hip, and shoulder, but its presence in smaller joints has also been reported. Nevertheless, ankle involvement is unusual. The diagnosis is commonly made following a thorough history, clinical, physical, and radiographic examination. We report a case of a young patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint and present the clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative findings. PMID:26177002

  1. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle Joint: Clinical, Radiological, and Intraoperative Findings.

    PubMed

    Sedeek, Sedeek Mohamed; Choudry, Q; Garg, S

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis, also termed synovial osteochondromatosis, is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium of the joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most commonly involves large joints, such as the knee, hip, and shoulder, but its presence in smaller joints has also been reported. Nevertheless, ankle involvement is unusual. The diagnosis is commonly made following a thorough history, clinical, physical, and radiographic examination. We report a case of a young patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the ankle joint and present the clinical, radiographic, and intraoperative findings. PMID:26177002

  2. Sclerosing bone dysplasias: genetic, clinical and radiology update of hereditary and non-hereditary disorders.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Cedric; Madani, Hardi; Lenchik, Leon; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Amalnath, Deepak S; de Mey, Johan; De Maeseneer, Michel

    2016-06-01

    There is a wide variety of hereditary and non-hereditary bone dysplasias, many with unique radiographic findings. Hereditary bony dysplasias include osteopoikilosis, osteopathia striata, osteopetrosis, progressive diaphyseal dysplasia, hereditary multiple diaphyseal sclerosis and pyknodysostosis. Non-hereditary dysplasias include melorheostosis, intramedullary osteosclerosis and overlap syndromes. Although many of these dysplasias are uncommon, radiologists should be familiar with their genetic, clinical and imaging findings to allow for differentiation from acquired causes of bony sclerosis. We present an overview of hereditary and non-hereditary bony dysplasias with focus on the pathogenesis, clinical and radiographic findings of each disorder. PMID:26898950

  3. Radiologically isolated syndrome: an uncommon finding at a university clinic in a high-prevalence region for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, Maria; Fredrikson, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Objective The improved availability of MRI in medicine has led to an increase in incidental findings. Unexpected brain MRI findings suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) without typical symptoms of MS were recently defined as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The prevalence of RIS is uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of RIS at a university hospital in a region with a high prevalence for MS and describe the long-term prognosis of the identified patients. Design Retrospective cohort study conducted in 2012. Setting All brain MRI examinations performed at Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden during 2001 were retrospectively screened by a single rater for findings fulfilling the Okuda criteria. The sample year was chosen in order to establish the long-term prognosis of the patients identified. The examinations of interest were re-evaluated according to the Barkhof criteria by a neuroradiologist with long experience in MS. Participants In total 2105 individuals were included in the study. Ages ranged from 0 to 90 years with a median age of 48 years. Only one patient with RIS was identified, equivalent to a prevalence of 0.05% in the studied population, or 0.15% among patients aged 15–40 years. The patient with RIS developed symptoms consistent with MS within 3 months accompanied with radiological progression and was diagnosed with MS. Conclusions RIS, according to present criteria, is an uncommon finding in a tertiary hospital setting in a high-prevalence region for MS where awareness and clinical suspicion of MS is common. In order to study the prognosis of RIS, multicentre studies, or case–control studies are recommended. PMID:24189079

  4. [The aging heart and its pathology. An epidemiological study of 229 cases based on a clinical and radiological classification].

    PubMed

    Tamburrini, L R; Di Monte, M; Gerometta, R; Ponte, E; Cherubini, M

    1989-12-01

    The paper studies epidemiological distribution of the aging heart and its pathology in a sample of 229 subjects (101 male and 128 female) on the basis of a clinical and radiological classification into cardiological phenotypes. This study involved the use of mathematical statistical procedures following a standard method using SIR database (Scientific Information Retrieval) software implemented on the CDC Cyber 170/730 mainframe in the Trieste University Computing Center that is connected with the Chair of Geriatric Pathology. Using this software it was possible to assess the epidemiological significance of the usual clinical parameters, and show that the most representative cardiopathy is the 3rd type, i.e. the hypertrophic-ischemic cardiopathy belonging to the large aortic heart. Its natural pathogenesis is independent of risk factors and relates to the aging of muscular and connective tissues in which the coronary circulation is involved in the deterioration of the cardiovascular system and is therefore different from the primary ischemias of adults. PMID:2622569

  5. The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Digital Imaging Network, Picture Archival and Communication System, and Radiology Information System.

    PubMed

    Goldszal, A F; Brown, G K; McDonald, H J; Vucich, J J; Staab, E V

    2001-06-01

    In this work, we describe the digital imaging network (DIN), picture archival and communication system (PACS), and radiology information system (RIS) currently being implemented at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH). These systems are presently in clinical operation. The DIN is a redundant meshed network designed to address gigabit density and expected high bandwidth requirements for image transfer and server aggregation. The PACS projected workload is 5.0 TB of new imaging data per year. Its architecture consists of a central, high-throughput Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data repository and distributed redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) servers employing fiber-channel technology for immediate delivery of imaging data. On demand distribution of images and reports to clinicians and researchers is accomplished via a clustered web server. The RIS follows a client-server model and provides tools to order exams, schedule resources, retrieve and review results, and generate management reports. The RIS-hospital information system (HIS) interfaces include admissions, discharges, and transfers (ATDs)/demographics, orders, appointment notifications, doctors update, and results. PMID:11442088

  6. Lipoprotein (a) measurements for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Albers, John J

    2016-04-01

    The high degree of size heterogeneity of apo(a), the distinct protein component of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], renders the development and selection of specific antibodies directed to apo(a) more difficult and poses significant challenges to the development of immunoassays to measure its concentration in plasma or serum samples. Apo(a) is extremely variable in size not only between but also within individuals because of the presence of two different, genetically determined apo(a) isoform sizes. Therefore, the antigenic determinants per particle available to interact with the antibodies will vary in the samples and the calibrators, thus contributing to apo(a) size-dependent inaccuracy of different methods. The lack of rigorous validation of the immunoassays and common means of expressing Lp(a) concentrations hinder the harmonization of results obtained by different studies and contribute to the lack of common cut points for identification of individuals at risk for coronary artery disease or for interventions aimed at reducing Lp(a) levels. The aim of our review is to present and critically evaluate the issues surrounding the measurements of Lp(a), their impact on the clinical interpretation of the data, and the obstacles we need to overcome to achieve the standardization of Lp(a) measurements. PMID:26637278

  7. Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response

    SciTech Connect

    E. C. Nielsen

    2006-01-01

    During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

  8. Comparison of structural allograft and traditional autograft technique in occipitocervical fusion: radiological and clinical outcomes from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Godzik, Jakub; Ravindra, Vijay M; Ray, Wilson Z; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F; Dailey, Andrew T

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The authors' objectives were to compare the rate of fusion after occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis using structural allograft with the fusion rate from using autograft, to evaluate correction of radiographic parameters, and to describe symptom relief with each graft technique. METHODS The authors assessed radiological fusion at 6 and 12 months after surgery and obtained radiographic measurements of C1-2 and C2-7 lordotic angles, C2-7 sagittal vertical alignments, and posterior occipitocervical angles at preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up examinations. Demographic data, intraoperative details, adverse events, and functional outcomes were collected from hospitalization records. Radiological fusion was defined as the presence of bone trabeculation and no movement between the graft and the occiput or C-2 on routine flexion-extension cervical radiographs. Radiographic measurements were obtained from lateral standing radiographs with patients in the neutral position. RESULTS At the University of Utah, 28 adult patients underwent occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis between 2003 and 2010 using bicortical allograft, and 11 patients were treated using iliac crest autograft. Mean follow-up for all patients was 20 months (range 1-108 months). Of the 27 patients with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up, 18 (95%) of 19 in the allograft group and 8 (100%) of 8 in the autograft group demonstrated evidence of bony fusion shown by imaging. Patients in both groups demonstrated minimal deterioration of sagittal vertical alignment at final follow-up. Operative times were comparable, but patients undergoing occipitocervical fusion with autograft demonstrated greater blood loss (316 ml vs 195 ml). One (9%) of 11 patients suffered a significant complication related to autograft harvesting. CONCLUSIONS The use of allograft in occipitocervical fusion allows a high rate of successful arthrodesis yet avoids the potentially significant morbidity and pain associated with

  9. Comparison of structural allograft and traditional autograft technique in occipitocervical fusion: radiological and clinical outcomes from a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Godzik, Jakub; Ravindra, Vijay M.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Bisson, Erica F.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Object The authors' objectives were to compare the rate of fusion after occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis using structural allograft with the fusion rate from using autograft, to evaluate correction of radiographic parameters, and to describe symptom relief with each graft technique. Methods The authors assessed radiological fusion at 6 and 12 months after surgery and obtained radiographic measurements of C1–2 and C2–7 lordotic angles, C2–7 sagittal vertical alignments, and posterior occipitocervical angles at preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up examinations. Demographic data, intraoperative details, adverse events, and functional outcomes were collected from hospitalization records. Radiological fusion was defined as the presence of bone trabeculation and no movement between the graft and the occiput or C-2 on routine flexion-extension cervical radiographs. Radiographic measurements were obtained from lateral standing radiographs with patients in the neutral position. Results At the University of Utah, 28 adult patients underwent occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis between 2003 and 2010 using bicortical allograft, and 11 patients were treated using iliac crest autograft. Mean follow-up for all patients was 20 months (range 1–108 months). Of the 27 patients with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up, 18 (95%) of 19 in the allograft group and 8 (100%) of 8 in the autograft group demonstrated evidence of bony fusion shown by imaging. Patients in both groups demonstrated minimal deterioration of sagittal vertical alignment at final follow-up. Operative times were comparable, but patients undergoing occipitocervical fusion with autograft demonstrated greater blood loss (316 ml vs 195 ml). One (9%) of 11 patients suffered a significant complication related to autograft harvesting. Conclusions The use of allograft in occipitocervical fusion allows a high rate of successful arthrodesis yet avoids the potentially significant morbidity and pain associated

  10. Burkitt's lymphoma: a child's case presenting in the maxilla. Clinical and radiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Salas, Borja; Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco-Jesús

    2010-05-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a neoplasm which, despite its very aggressive behaviour is potentially curable. It typically affects the paediatric population. BL belongs to the non-Hodgkin lymphomas group, and is the first human tumour undoubtedly related to a viral origin (Epstein-Barr virus). Two main clinical subtypes are recognized: endemic or African type, and sporadic type; HIV associated BL constitutes a third type. Although common in endemic BL, maxillary involvement is rare in sporadic cases. This, together with the clinical lack of specificity associated to this location, makes diagnosis difficult. New chemotherapeutic protocols achieve a high survival rate. Most important prognostic factors are location and tumour stage. We report a paediatric case of BL presenting in the maxilla, with a review and a description of the characteristics of the disease. PMID:20038882

  11. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome - Clinical and Radiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ibrahim K; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Salve, Prashant; Goyal, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by skeletal anomalies and multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws. The skeletal anomalies of this syndrome are mandibular prognathism, bossing of frontal and parietal bones, high-arched palate, and bifid rib. We report three cases with NBCCS, emphasizing the clinical and radiographic findings, the importance of the early diagnosis of NBCCS, and a preventive multidisciplinary approach in the management of NBCCS.

  12. Clinical and radiological features of brain neurotoxicity caused by antitumor and immunosuppressant treatments.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Salmaggi, Andrea; Sghirlanzoni, Angelo; Silvani, Antonio; Potepan, Paolo; Botturi, Andrea; Ciceri, Elisa; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2008-06-01

    Antitumor and immunosuppressant treatment-related neurotoxicity can determine nonspecific clinical syndromes. Exclusion of other possible causes, among which tumor progression, appearance of paraneoplastic disease, renal or hepatic failure, diabetes or hypertension, is relevant. We report clinical and neuroradiological features in five patients with neurotoxic syndromes due to chemotherapy/radiotherapy or immunosuppression in the context of neoplastic disease/organ transplantation. Acute neurological syndrome developed in three patients after methotrexate (MTX), cyclosporine A, and L-asparaginase therapy, respectively. MRI showed posterior reversible encephalopathy in two cases and venous thrombosis with intraparenchymal hematoma in the third patient. Late onset clinical syndrome occurred in the last two patients, treated with MTX or radiation therapy for breast cancer metastasis and pituitary adenoma. Neuroimaging showed brain diffuse abnormalities. Patients affected by tumors suffer from increased risk for treatment-related toxicities. Appearance or worsening of neurological signs and symptoms challenge the clinician to discriminate between CNS involvement by the tumor, toxicity of drugs, parane-oplastic disease and infections. MRI has a key role in differential diagnosis. Close interaction between the neurologist, the oncologist and the neuroradiologist leads to the optimal management of patients. PMID:18612759

  13. Use of Fisiograft in Intrabony Defects- A Clinical and Radiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ruchi; Madhumala, R.; Saranyan, R.; Sreekanth, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of Polylactic Acid/Polygycolic Acid (PLA/PGA -Fisiograft®) with Open Flap Debridement (OFD) and OFD alone in the treatment of intrabony defects over a period of 9 months. Material and Methods: Twenty Nine systemically healthy subjects with total of 30 defects were included in the present, randomized, controlled and two arm parallel study. Tests were treated with OFD along with Fisiograft® and controls with OFD alone. Results: On intra-group comparison, clinical parameters at 6 and 9 months showed statistically significant results. On comparing between the two groups, the reduction in Defect Specific Bleeding Score (DSBS), Defect Specific Plaque Score (DSPS), Probing Depth (PD) and gain in Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) revealed no statistical significances other than Recession Depth (REC) which was more in controls. The mean radiographic parameters at 9 months post-operatively in both the groups were statistically significant. However, the inter-group comparison revealed no statistically significant values. Conclusions: The overall results at the end study proved that the adjunctive use of Fisiograft® was not beneficial when compared with OFD alone. Clinical Significance: Synthetic bone replacement graft materials are commonly used for periodontal regeneration. The present study was conducted by using PLA/PGA reveals no additional benefit over OFD alone in treatment of intrabony defects. PMID:24298530

  14. Jackson-Weiss syndrome: Clinical and radiological findings in a large kindred and exclusion of the gene from 7p21 and 5qter

    SciTech Connect

    Ades, L.C.; Haan, E.A.; Mulley, J.C.; Senga, I.P.; Morris, L.L.; David, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of the Jackson-Weiss syndrome (JWS) in a large South Australian kindred. Radiological abnormalities not previously described in the hands include coned epiphyses, distal and middle phalangeal hypoplasia, and carpal bone malsegmentation. New radiological findings in the feet include coned epiphyses, hallux valgus, phalangeal, tarso-navicular and calcaneo-navicular fusions, and uniform absence of metatarsal fusions. Absence of linkage to eight markers along the short arm of chromosome 7 excluded allelian between JWS and Saethre-Chotzen syndrome at 7p21. No linkage was detected to D5S211, excluding allelism to another recently described cephalosyndactyly syndrome mapping to 5qter. 35 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Clinical and radiologic features and their relationships with neurofunctional scores in patients with acute cerebellar infarct

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Poyraz, Necdet; Anliaçık, Süleyman Ömer; Tokgöz, Osman Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cerebellar infarct is a rare condition with very nonspecific clinical features. The aim of this study was to assess the full spectrum of the clinical characteristics, neuroimaging findings and neurofunctional analyses of cerebellar infarction, and the relationship between them. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 59 patients admitted to our department during an 8-year period. We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between demographic characteristics, clinical symptomatology, etiological factors, functional condition, vascular distribution, frequency of subcortical white matter lesions (WMLs), and concomitant lesion outside the cerebellum in patients with acute cerebellar infarct (ACI) at time of admission. Results: The mean age in our series was 65.2 years, with most being male (57.6%). The posterior inferior cerebellar (PICA) artery was the most commonly affected territory at 62.7%. There was concomitant lesion outside the cerebellum in 45.7%. The main etiology in PICA was cardioembolism. While mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission was 2.08 ± 1.67 in study group, modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on admission was detected to be mRS1 (n: 44, 74.5%) and mRS2 (n: 12, 20.3%) most frequently. Fourteen (35%) patients were detected to be in Fazekas stage 0; 11 (27.5%) patients in Fazekas stage 1; 6 (15%) patients in Fazekas stage 2; and 9 (22.5%) patients in Fazekas stage 3. Conclusion: Cerebellar infarct is very heterogeneous. The other cerebral area infarcts which accompany ACI negatively affect neurologic functional scores. Although it is difficult to detect the relationship between WMLs and neurologic functional severity, timely detection of risk factors and their modulation may be associated with prevention and treatability of WMLs, and this may be one of the important points for prevention of stroke-related disability. PMID:27293332

  16. Papillary tumor of the pineal region with extended clinical and radiologic follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Hakeem J.; Qiu, Jingxin; Prasad, Dheerendra; Mechtler, Laszlo L.; Fenstermaker, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Papillary tumor of the pineal region (PTPR) is a rare neoplasm with only anecdotal data to guide the treatment. Results of treatment with surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have been reported to have varying degrees of success. Here we report a patient with a PTPR, who underwent subtotal resection, gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery, and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy. Case Description: During 9 years of clinical and radiographic follow-up, the patient has had regression of residual tumor and remains asymptomatic. Conclusion: When gross total resection of a PTPR is not possible, treatment with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery and temozolomide chemotherapy may provide long-term tumor control. PMID:26539320

  17. Hepatolithiasis and the syndrome of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis: clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Wilson Man-shan; Chan, Yiu-kay; Wong, Chi-tat; Lo, Yan-fai; Yeung, Yat-wah; Lee, Yat-wing

    2011-02-01

    Primary hepatothiasis (HL) and recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) are two terms describing the different aspects of the same disease, with HL emphasizing the pathologic changes and RPC emphasizing the clinical presentation and suppurative inflammation. It is predominantly a disease of the Far East. In the 1960s, it was the third most common cause of emergency abdominal surgery at a university hospital in Hong Kong. Thereafter, its incidence has decreased considerably, possibly due to improved standards of living and Westernized diet. Clinically, patients may present acutely with recurrent bacterial cholangitis and its possible complications, such as liver abscess and septicemic shock, or with chronic complications, such as cholangiocarcinoma. Pathologically, it is characterized by pigmented calcium bilirubinate stones within dilated intrahepatic bile ducts featuring chronic inflammation, mural fibrosis, and proliferation of peribiliary glands, without extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Episodes of suppurative inflammation cumulate in sclerosing cholangitis of peripheral ducts and parenchymal fibrosis resulting from collapse and scarring. Mass-forming inflammatory pseudotumor and neoplasms like intraductal papillary neoplasms and cholangiocarcinoma are increasingly recognized complications. Modern imaging techniques allow definitive diagnosis, accurate assessment for treatment planning, and detection of complications. A multidisciplinary team approach (interventional endoscopist, interventional radiologist, hepatobiliary surgeon, and intensivists) is important for optimal patient outcome. PMID:21344349

  18. Quality initiatives: improving patient flow for a bone densitometry practice: results from a Mayo Clinic radiology quality initiative.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Kenneth T; Valley, Timothy B; O'Connor, Michael K

    2010-03-01

    Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies have been used in manufacturing for some time. However, Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies also are applicable to radiology as a way to identify opportunities for improvement in patient care delivery settings. A multidisciplinary team of physicians and staff conducted a 100-day quality improvement project with the guidance of a quality advisor. By using the framework of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control), time studies were performed for all aspects of patient and technologist involvement. From these studies, value stream maps for the current state and for the future were developed, and tests of change were implemented. Comprehensive value stream maps showed that before implementation of process changes, an average time of 20.95 minutes was required for completion of a bone densitometry study. Two process changes (ie, tests of change) were undertaken. First, the location for completion of a patient assessment form was moved from inside the imaging room to the waiting area, enabling patients to complete the form while waiting for the technologist. Second, the patient was instructed to sit in a waiting area immediately outside the imaging rooms, rather than in the main reception area, which is far removed from the imaging area. Realignment of these process steps, with reduced technologist travel distances, resulted in a 3-minute average decrease in the patient cycle time. This represented a 15% reduction in the initial patient cycle time with no change in staff or costs. Radiology process improvement projects can yield positive results despite small incremental changes. PMID:20067999

  19. Clinical Signs of Radiologic Pneumonia in Under-Five Hypokalemic Diarrheal Children Admitted to an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Das, Sumon Kumar; Shahunja, K. M.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical signs of pneumonia are often veiled in under-five diarrheal children presenting with hypokalemia, making clinical diagnosis of pneumonia very difficult in such population. However, there is no published report that describes the influences of hypokalemia on the clinical signs of pneumonia in diarrheal children. Our objective was to assess the influences of hypokalemia, and their outcome in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled all under-five diarrheal children (n = 180) admitted to the Special Care Ward of the Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b from September-December 2007 with radiological pneumonia who also had their serum potassium estimated. We compared the clinical features and outcome of the diarrheal children having pneumonia with (cases = 55) and without hypokalemia (controls = 125). Results The case-fatality among the cases was 2 times higher compared to the controls, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.202). In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders such as age of the patient, clinical dehydration, severe wasting, abnormally sleepy, lower chest wall in-drawing, nasal flaring and inability to drink on admission, under-five diarrheal children with pneumonia who presented with nutritional edema had 3 times more risk to have hypokalemia compared to those without nutritional edema (OR = 2.76, 95% CI = 1.01–7.51) and these hypokalemic children were 64% less likely to present with fast breathing (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.17–0.74). Conclusion and significance The results of our analysis are simple but may have great public health implications and underscore the importance of diligent assessment for pneumonia in under-five diarrheal children having risk of hypokalemia as in children with nutritional edema even in absence of fast breathing, a useful sign of pneumonia. This may help for early initiation of first dose of parental antibiotics along with

  20. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type II: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Priyanka; Sharda, Neelkamal; Bhowate, Rahul R.

    2013-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited genetic disease characterized by sclerosis of the skeleton caused by the absence or malfunction of osteoclasts. Three distinct forms of the disease have been recognized, autosomal dominant osteopetrosis being the most common. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis exhibits a heterogeneous trait with milder symptoms, often at later childhood or adulthood. The aim of this case report is to present the clinical and radiographic features of a 35-year-old female patient with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II who exhibited features of chronic generalised periodontitis, and the radiographs revealed generalised osteosclerosis and hallmark radiographic features of ADO type II, that is, “bone-within-bone appearance” and “Erlenmeyer-flask deformity.” PMID:24260721

  1. Clinical-radiological evaluation of sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.

    1989-12-01

    Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery has been used to treat 322 patients with surgically-inaccessible intracranial vascular malformations. (The clinical results of this method for the treatment of angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain are described in separate reports of this symposium). The great majority of patients have had an uneventful post-treatment course with satisfactory health outcomes. However, several categories of delayed sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery have been identified, involving the vascular structures essential for the integrity of the brain tissue and the brain parenchyma directly. These categories reflect both reaction to injury and to alterations in regional hemodynamic status, and include vasogenic edema, occlusion of functional vasculature, radiation necrosis, and local or remote effects on cerebral arterial aneurysms. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The clinical and radiological spectrum of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. A prospective series of 67 patients.

    PubMed

    Ducros, Anne; Boukobza, Monique; Porcher, Raphaël; Sarov, Mariana; Valade, Dominique; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2007-12-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by the association of severe headaches with or without additional neurological symptoms and a 'string and beads' appearance on cerebral arteries, which resolves spontaneously in 1-3 months. We present the clinical, neuroimaging and outcome data of 67 consecutive patients prospectively diagnosed over 3 years in our institution with an angiographically confirmed RCVS. There were 43 females and 24 males with a mean age of 42 years (19-70). RCVS was spontaneous in 37% of patients and secondary in the 63% others, to postpartum in 5 and to exposure to various vasoactive substances in 37, mainly cannabis, selective serotonin-recapture inhibitors and nasal decongestants. The main pattern of presentation (94% of patients) was multiple thunderclap headaches recurring over a mean period of 1 week. In 51 patients (76%), headaches resumed the clinical presentation. Various complications were observed, with different time courses. Cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) (22%), intracerebral haemorrhage (6%), seizures (3%) and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (9%) were early complications, occurring mainly within the first week. Ischaemic events, including TIAs (16%) and cerebral infarction (4%), occurred significantly later than haemorrhagic events, mainly during the second week. Significant sex differences were observed: women were older, had more frequent single-drug exposure and a higher rate of stroke and cSAH. Sixty-one patients were treated by nimodipine: 36% had recurrent headaches, 7% TIAs and one multiple infarcts. The different time courses of thunderclap headaches, vasoconstriction and strokes suggest that the responsible vasospastic disorder starts distally and progresses towards medium sized and large arteries. No relapse was observed during the 16 +/- 12.4 months of follow-up. Our data suggest that RCVS is more frequent than previously thought, is more often secondary particularly to

  3. Enchondroma versus Chondrosarcoma in Long Bones of Appendicular Skeleton: Clinical and Radiological Criteria—A Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Santacreu, Eugenio M.; Ortiz-Cruz, Eduardo J.; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; Pozo Kreilinger, Jose Juan

    2016-01-01

    As of today two types of cartilage tumors remain a challenge even for the orthopedic oncologist: enchondroma (E), a benign tumor, and chondrosarcoma (LGC), a malignant and low aggressiveness tumor. A prospective study of 133 patients with a cartilaginous tumor of low aggressiveness in the long bones of the appendicular skeleton was done to prove this difficult differential diagnosis. Parameters including medical history and radiological and nuclear imaging were collected and compared to the result of the biopsy. A scale of aggressiveness was applied to each patient according to the number of aggressiveness episodes present. A comparison of the results of the biopsy with the initial diagnosis made by the orthopedic oncologist based solely on clinical data and imaging tests was also made. Finally, a management algorithm for these cases was proposed. A statistical significance for LGC resulted from the parameter as follows: pain on palpation, involvement of cortical in either the CT or MRI, and Tc99 bone scan uptake equal or superior to anterosuperior iliac crest. In our series, a tumor scoring 5 points or higher in the scale of aggressiveness can have 50% more chance of being LGC. When compared with the gold standard (the biopsy), surgeon's initial judgement showed a sensitivity of 73.5% and a specificity of 94.1%. PMID:27034667

  4. Assessment of clinical and radiological response to sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Rodolfo; Mismas, Valeria; Romano, Antonio; Bertini, Marco; Bertoni, Michele; Federici, Graziana; Metrangolo, Salvatore; Parisi, Giuseppe; Tumino, Emanuele; Bresci, Giampaolo; Giacomelli, Luca; Marceglia, Sara; Bargellini, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib is an effective anti-angiogenic treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The assessment of tumor progression in patients treated with sorafenib is crucial to help identify potentially-resistant patients, avoiding unnecessary toxicities. Traditional methods to assess tumor progression are based on variations in tumor size and provide unreliable results in patients treated with sorafenib. New methods to assess tumor progression such as the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors or European Association for the Study of Liver criteria are based on imaging to measure the vascularization and tumor volume (viable or necrotic). These however fail especially when the tumor response results in irregular development of necrotic tissue. Newer assessment techniques focus on the evaluation of tumor volume, density or perfusion. Perfusion computed tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-UltraSound can measure the vascularization of HCC lesions and help predict tumor response to anti-angiogenic therapies. Mean Transit Time is a possible predictive biomarker to measure tumor response. Volumetric techniques are reliable, reproducible and time-efficient and can help measure minimal changes in viable tumor or necrotic tissue, allowing the prompt identification of non-responders. Volume ratio may be a reproducible biomarker for tumor response. Larger trials are needed to confirm the use of these techniques in the prediction of response to sorafenib. PMID:25624994

  5. Measurements of radiological data of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; More, Chaitali V.; Surung, Bharat S.; Raut, Siddheshwar D.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2016-05-01

    Radiological parameters such as μm, σt, σe, Zeff and Neff of amino acids, namely Lysine (C6H15N2O2), Histidine (C6H9N3O2) and Arginine (C6H15N4O2), were measured using NaI (Tl)-based gamma spectrometry. Radioactive sources used in the study are 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co and 22Na. Gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set up was used in the study. The measured data were compared against XCOM-based data. The agreement is within 2%.

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease in children--clinical, endoscopic, radiologic and histopathologic investigation.

    PubMed

    Seo, J K; Yeon, K M; Chi, J G

    1992-09-01

    This paper reviews our five years' clinical experience (1987 to 1991) of 22 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There were 12 patients with Crohn's disease and 10 patients with ulcerative colitis. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.7 years (2 to 14 years). Clinical impressions before referral were chronic diarrhea in 11, irritable bowel syndrome in 5, colon polyp in 4, lymphoma in 3, intestinal tuberculosis in 2, amoebic colitis in 2, ulcerative colitis in 2 children and other diseases. The mean interval from the onset of symptoms to the diagnosis of IBD was 18 months. Diagnosis of Crohn's disease was delayed for more than 13 months in 8 (67%), whereas that of ulcerative colitis was delayed for more than 13 months in 4 (40%). Diarrhea (50%), abdominal pain (36%) and rectal bleeding (36%) were the three most frequent presenting complaints of IBD. Moderately severe abdominal pain was a more common chief complaint in Crohn's disease (58%) than in ulcerative colitis (10%). Hematochezia (90% vs 17%) and moderately severe diarrhea (90% vs 75%) were more common gastrointestinal manifestations in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease. The associated extraintestinal manifestations were oral ulcer in 7, arthralgia in 11 and arthritis in 4, skin lesions in 2, eye lesions in 2 and growth failure in 9 patients. Of 12 children with Crohn's disease, granuloma was found in 5, aphthous ulcerations in 8, cobble stone appearance in 8, skip area or asymmetric lesions in 6, transmural involvement in 7, and perianal fistula in 3. Among 10 children with ulcerative Colitis, there were crypt abscess in 8, granularity or friability in 10 and rectosigmoid ulcerations with purulent exudate in 8 children. The main sites of involvement in children with Crohn's disease were both the small and large bowels in 7 (58%), small bowel only in 2 (16%), and colon only in 3 (25%). Terminal ileum involvement was seen in 75% of Crohn's disease cases. The main sites of involvement in children

  7. Combining Radiography and Passive Measurements for Radiological Threat Detection in Cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Sean M.; Scherrer, Charles; Wittman, Richard S.

    2012-12-01

    Abstract Radiography is widely understood to provide information complimentary to passive detection: while not directly sensitive to radiological materials, radiography can reveal highly shielded regions which may mask a passive radiological signal. We present a method for combining radiographic and passive data which uses the radiograph to provide an estimate of scatter and attenuation for possible sources. This approach allows quantitative use of radiographic images without relying on image interpretation, and results in a probabilistic description of likely source locations and strengths. We present first results for this method for a simple modeled test case of a cargo container driving through a PVT portal. With this inversion approach, we address criteria for an integrated passive and radiographic screening system and how detection of SNM threats might be improved in such a system.

  8. Lumbar Transpedicular Implant Failure: A Clinical and Surgical Challenge and Its Radiological Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdel Mohsen Arafa

    2014-01-01

    Study Design It is a multicenter, controlled case study review of a big scale of pedicle-screw procedures from January 2000 to June 2010. The outcomes were compared to those with no implant failure. Purpose The purpose of this study was to review retrospectively the outcome of 100 patients with implant failure in comparison to 100 control-patients, and to study the causes of failure and its prevention. Overview of Literature Transpedicular fixation is associated with risks of hardware failure, such as screw/rod breakage and/or loosening at the screw-rod interface and difficulties in the system assembly, which remain a significant clinical problem. Removal or revision of the spinal hardware is often required. Methods Two hundred patients (88 women, 112 men) were divided into 2 major groups, with 100 patients in group I (implant failure group G1) and 100 patients in group II (successful fusion, control group G2). We subdivided the study groups into two subgroups: subgroup a (single-level instrumented group) and subgroup b (multilevel instrumented group). The implant status was assessed based on intraoperative and follow-up radiographs. Results Implant failure in general was present in 36% in G1a, and in 64% in G1b, and types of implant failure included screw fracture (34%), rod fracture (24%), rod loosening (22%), screw loosening (16%), and failure of both rod and screw (4%). Most of the failures (90%) occurred within 6 months after surgery, with no reported cases 1 year postoperatively. Conclusions We tried to address the problem and study the causes of failure, and proposed solutions for its prevention. PMID:24967042

  9. Cervical Pedicle Screw Fixation: Anatomic Feasibility of Pedicle Morphology and Radiologic Evaluation of the Anatomical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Study Design All parameters were measured manually and with a computed tomography (CT) scanner. For the manual measurements, a Vernier scale instrument was used. Purpose This study evaluates quantitatively pedicles of middle and lower cervical spine (C3 to C7) and to evaluate the possibilities of using these structures as anchors in posterior cervical fusion. Overview of Literature Pedicle screws may be an alternative fixation technique for posterior cervical instrumentation. Methods Twenty-two bony sets of adult cervical spines were studied (110 vertebrae, 220 pedicles) from C3 down to C7. Results CT measurement of cervical pedicles appeared to be accurate and valuable for preoperative planning of cervical pedicle screw instrumentation. The study showed a high correlation between the values obtained by manual and CT measurements of pedicle dimensions. The technical challenge of insertion is the obvious theoretical drawback of the use of cervical pedicle screws. Many technical factors are important to consider, namely, the point of screw entry, the pedicle dimensions, the screw direction according to the pedicle angle and orientation, the screw diameter and length, and the method of screw introduction. Conclusions Transpedicular screw fixation of the cervical spine appears to be promising. Anatomic limitations should be clear to the surgeon. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are needed to settle this technique. PMID:24967041

  10. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de Andrade, Celi Santos Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi; Ferreira, Lorraine Braga Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Cury, Patrícia Maluf

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO{sub 2}) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO{sub 2} epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers.

  11. Diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Leeds, N.E.; Jacobson, H.G.

    1986-10-17

    Developments in the burgeoning field of diagnostic radiology have continued apace. Four areas that represent either subspecialities or technological advances in diagnostic radiology will be considered in this report: ultrasonography, interventional radiology, nuclear radiology, and magnetic resonance. In no sense is the exclusion of other subdisciplines and modalities (eg, pediatric radiology, computed tomography) and indication of their of importance or their failure to include innovative concepts.

  12. The clinical and radiological evaluation of the use of an allograft-prosthesis composite in the treatment of proximal femoral giant cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, R; Kiran Kumar, G N; K Digge, V; Kumar, V

    2014-08-01

    Giant cell tumour is the most common aggressive benign tumour of the musculoskeletal system and has a high rate of local recurrence. When it occurs in proximity to the hip, reconstruction of the joint is a challenge. Options for reconstruction after wide resection include the use of a megaprosthesis or an allograft-prosthesis composite. We performed a clinical and radiological study to evaluate the functional results of a proximal femoral allograft-prosthesis composite in the treatment of proximal femoral giant cell tumour after wide resection. This was an observational study, between 2006 and 2012, of 18 patients with a mean age of 32 years (28 to 42) and a mean follow-up of 54 months (18 to 79). We achieved excellent outcomes using Harris Hip Score in 13 patients and a good outcome in five. All allografts united. There were no complications such as infection, failure, fracture or resorption of the graft, or recurrent tumour. Resection and reconstruction of giant cell tumours with proximal femoral allograft-prosthesis composite is a better option than using a prosthesis considering preservation of bone stock and excellent restoration of function. A good result requires demanding bone banking techniques, effective measures to prevent infection and stability at the allograft-host junction. PMID:25086128

  13. Methylmercury poisoning: long-term clinical, radiological, toxicological, and pathological studies of an affected family.

    PubMed

    Davis, L E; Kornfeld, M; Mooney, H S; Fiedler, K J; Haaland, K Y; Orrison, W W; Cernichiari, E; Clarkson, T W

    1994-06-01

    For 3 months in 1969 a family in the United States that included a pregnant mother consumed pork containing methylmercury. Children, aged 20, 13, and 8 years and a neonate, developed severe neurological signs. Twenty-two years later, the 2 oldest had cortical blindness or constricted visual fields, diminished hand proprioception, choreoathetosis, and attentional deficits. Magnetic resonance images showed tissue loss in the calcarine and parietal cortices and cerebellar folia. The youngest had quadriplegia, blindness, and severe mental retardation until their deaths. The brain of the 8-year-old who died at age 30 showed cortical atrophy, neuronal loss, and gliosis, most pronounced in the paracentral and parietooccipital regions. The total mercury level in formalin-fixed, left occipital cortex was 1,974 ng/gm as measured by atomic absorption. Regional brain mercury levels correlated with extent of brain damage. A control patient had 38.5 ng of mercury/gm in the occipital cortex. Systemic organs in the patient and a control subject had comparable mercury levels. In mercury-intoxicated rats, we found that only 5 to 10% of total brain mercury was lost by formalin fixation. Brain inorganic mercury in the patient ranged from 82 to 100%. Since inorganic mercury crosses the blood-brain barrier poorly, biotransformation of methyl to inorganic mercury may have occurred after methylmercury crossed the blood-brain barrier, accounting for its persistence in brain and causing part of the brain damage. PMID:8210224

  14. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  15. The Ability of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center to Collect and Disseminate Environmental Measurements during Radiological Emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Marianno and James Essex

    2007-04-30

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is the United States’ response organization for radiological emergencies. The FRMAC is structured as an operations center and employs the combined resources of several federal agencies to respond to any disaster resulting in the release of radioactivity. The mission of the FRMAC is to support state and local authorities in the gathering of environmental data using an array of survey equipment ranging from alpha probes, beta/gamma probes, and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectroscopy to the gathering of physical samples. Once collected, the data are projected on maps to assist public officials make protective action decisions. In addition to the accumulation of data, it is the legal obligation of the FRMAC to keep archival records of all data points and their actions. During an event, it is conceivable that hundreds to thousands of sample points will be recorded over a relatively short time. It is in the interest of the federal government and public that the information collected be put to the best use as fast as possible. Toward this end, the Remote Sensing Laboratory, working under the direction of the United States Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration, is investigating the use of several technologies that will accelerate data flow from field teams to the FRMAC and, finally, distribution of data to decision makers and the public. Not only can finished data products be viewed through the internet, but the actual collection of data via “real-time” telemetry can be viewed using this same method. Data from the field will be transferred directly to the FRMAC using the MCPD (multi-path communication device). This base station receives the survey information from the field teams via Bluetooth and instantly investigates the best communication pathway to transfer data to the FRMAC. Possible paths include standalone radio, commercial cellular networks (GPRS and CDMA) and

  16. The validity of a novel radiological method for measuring femoral stem version on anteroposterior radiographs of the hip after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Lechler, P; von Kunow, F; Völlner, F; Keshmiri, A; Hapfelmeier, A; Grifka, J; Renkawitz, T

    2015-03-01

    Femoral stem version has a major influence on impingement and early post-operative stability after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of a novel radiological method for measuring stem version. Anteroposterior (AP) radiographs and three-dimensional CT scans were obtained for 115 patients (female/male 63/72, mean age 62.5 years (50 to 75)) who had undergone minimally invasive, cementless THA. Stem version was calculated from the AP hip radiograph by rotation-based change in the projected prosthetic neck-shaft (NSA*) angle using the mathematical formula ST = arcos [tan (NSA*) / tan (135)]. We used two independent observers who repeated the analysis after a six-week interval. Radiological measurements were compared with 3D-CT measurements by an independent, blinded external institute. We found a mean difference of 1.2° (sd 6.2) between radiological and 3D-CT measurements of stem version. The correlation between the mean radiological and 3D-CT stem torsion was r = 0.88 (p < 0.001). The intra- (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.94) and inter-observer agreement (mean concordance correlation coefficient = 0.87) for the radiological measurements were excellent. We found that femoral tilt was associated with the mean radiological measurement error (r = 0.22, p = 0.02). The projected neck-shaft angle is a reliable method for measuring stem version on AP radiographs of the hip after a THA. However, a highly standardised radiological technique is required for its precise measurement. PMID:25737512

  17. Radiology image perception and observer performance: How does expertise and clinical information alter interpretation? Stroke detection explored through eye-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Lindsey; Gale, Alastair; Darker, Iain; Toms, Andoni; Saada, Janak

    2009-02-01

    Historically, radiology research has been dominated by chest and breast screening. Few studies have examined complex interpretative tasks such as the reading of multidimensional brain CT or MRI scans. Additionally, no studies at the time of writing have explored the interpretation of stroke images; from novices through to experienced practitioners using eye movement analysis. Finally, there appears a lack of evidence on the clinical effects of radiology reports and their influence on image appraisal and clinical diagnosis. A computer-based, eye-tracking study was designed to assess diagnostic accuracy and interpretation in stroke CT and MR imagery. Eight predetermined clinical cases, five images per case, were presented to participants (novices, trainee, and radiologists; n=8). The presence or absence of abnormalities was rated on a five-point Likert scale and their locations reported. Half cases of the cases were accompanied by clinical information; half were not, to assess the impact of information on observer performance. Results highlight differences in visual search patterns amongst novice, trainee and expert observers; the most marked differences occurred between novice readers and experts. Experts spent more time in challenging areas of interest (AOI) than novices and trainee, and were more confident unless a lesion was large and obvious. The time to first AOI fixation differed by size, shape and clarity of lesion. 'Time to lesion' dropped significantly when recognition appeared to occur between slices. The influence of clinical information was minimal.

  18. Glycosylated haemoglobin: measurement and clinical use.

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, I

    1984-01-01

    The discovery, biochemistry, laboratory determination, and clinical application of glycosylated haemoglobins are reviewed. Sources of error are discussed in detail. No single assay method is suitable for all purposes, and in the foreseeable future generally acceptable standards and reference ranges are unlikely to be agreed. Each laboratory must establish its own. Nevertheless, the development of glycosylated haemoglobin assays is an important advance. They offer the best available means of assessing diabetic control. PMID:6381544

  19. Do clinical outcome measures assess consumer-defined recovery?

    PubMed

    Andresen, Retta; Caputi, Peter; Oades, Lindsay G

    2010-05-30

    There is an international call for mental health services to become recovery-oriented, and also to use evidence-based practices. Addressing this call requires recovery-oriented measurement of outcomes and service evaluation. Mental health consumers view recovery as leading as meaningful life, and have criticised traditional clinical measures for being too disability-oriented. This study compares three measures of consumer-defined recovery from enduring mental illness: the Recovery Assessment Scale, the Mental Health Recovery Measure and the Self-Identified Stage of Recovery, with four conventional clinical measures. Correlational analyses supported the convergent validity of the recovery measures, although certain subscales were unrelated to each other. More importantly, little relationship was found between consumer-defined recovery and the clinical measures. Analyses of variance revealed that scores on the recovery measures increased across self-identified stage of recovery, but scores on most clinical measures did not improve consistently across stage of recovery. The findings demonstrate the qualitative difference between the two types of measures, supporting the claim by consumers that clinical measures do not assess important aspects of recovery. There is a need for further research and refinement of recovery measurement, including assessment of stages of recovery, with the aim of including such measures as an adjunct in routine clinical assessment, service evaluation and research. PMID:20227768

  20. Battlefield radiology

    PubMed Central

    Graham, R N J

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing tempo of military conflicts in the last decade, much has been learnt about imaging battlefield casualties in the acute setting. Ultrasound in the form of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) has proven invaluable in emergency triage of patients for immediate surgery. Multidetector CT allows accurate determination of battlefield trauma injuries. It permits the surgeons and anaesthetists to plan their interventions more thoroughly and to be made aware of clinically occult injuries. There are common injury patterns associated with blast injury, gunshot wounds and blunt trauma. While this body of knowledge is most applicable to the battlefield, there are parallels with peacetime radiology, particularly in terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. This pictorial review is based on the experiences of a UK radiologist deployed in Afghanistan in 2010. PMID:22806621

  1. A pilot study measuring changes in student impressions before and after clinical training using a questionnaire based on the semantic differential technique.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Naomi; Terashita, Takayoshi; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Students with a positive impression of their studies can become more motivated. This study measured the learning impact of clinical training by comparing student impressions before and after clinical training. The study included 32 students of radiological technology in their final year with the Division of Radiological Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Hokkaido University. To measure student impressions of x-ray examination training, we developed a questionnaire using the semantic differential technique. The resulting factor analysis identified 2 factors that accounted for 44.9% of the 10 bipolar adjective scales. Factor 1 represented a "resistance" impression of x-ray examination training, and factor 2 represented a "responsibility" impression. The differences in factor scores before and after the clinical training suggest that student impressions are affected by clinical training. PMID:23920812

  2. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy caused by homozygous deletion in HPGD gene in a family: changing clinical and radiological findings with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Yılmaz, Saliha; Kasapçopur, Özgür; Erener-Ercan, Tuğba; Ceyhun, Emre; Bilguvar, Kaya; Günel, Murat

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy1 (PHOAR1) is characterized by delayed closure of the fontanels, digital clubbing, arthropathy and periostosis. Homozygous mutations in hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) gene are the underlying pathology of PHOAR1. The aim of this study was to analyze the HPGD gene and the changing clinical and radiological findings with advancing age of two siblings with the diagnosis of PHOAR1. A novel 2-bp homozygous deletion was found in exon 3 (c.310-311delCT) of HPGD gene in the patients. Clinical and radiological findings of the siblings were evaluated between 4 months and 8 years and 6 months of age. The painful swelling and sweating of the hands and feet, cranial ossification defect and expanded diaphyses were evident at infantile period and gradually showed improvement until 4 years of age. After the age of 4 years, digital clubbing and swelling of knees persisted, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis developed and acro-osteolysis became evident on hand radiographs. In conclusion, we suggest that the clinical findings of the patients with PHOAR1 should be classified in two periods as early and late childhood. We also observed that there was intrafamilial variability of clinical findings. PMID:24816859

  3. Possible clinical outcome measures for clinical trials in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Myla D.; Motl, Robert W.; Rudick, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease with both clinical and pathological heterogeneity. The complexity of the MS population has offered challenges to the measurement of MS disease progression in therapeutic trials. The current standard clinical outcome measures are relapse rate, Expanded Disability Severity Scale (EDSS), and the MS Functional Composite (MSFC). These measures each have strengths and some weakness. Two additional measures, the six-minute walk and accelerometry, show promise in augmenting current measures. MS therapeutics is a quickly advancing field which requires sensitive clinical outcome measures that can detect small changes in disability that reliably reflect long-term changes in sustained disease progression in a complex population. A single clinical outcome measure of sustained disease progression may remain elusive. Rather, an integration of current and new outcome measures may be most appropriate and utilization of different measures depending on the MS population and stage of the disease may be preferred. PMID:21179614

  4. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  5. How best to measure cough clinically.

    PubMed

    Birring, Surinder S; Spinou, Arietta

    2015-06-01

    It is possible to measure cough by assessing its severity, frequency, intensity, associated urge and its impact on quality of life. Cough severity can simply be assessed with a Visual Analogue Scale. Cough frequency can be assessed objectively with cough frequency monitors. Validated cough monitors include the Leicester Cough Monitor and the VitaloJAK. Cough reflex sensitivity measurement is better used to investigate the mechanisms of action of antitussive medications, rather than assessing efficacy. Health-Related Quality of Life measures are available to assess the impact of cough; they include the validated Leicester Cough Questionnaire and Cough-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire for adult patients. It is best to assess cough with a combination of subjective and objective tools, to capture its wide-ranging impact. PMID:25819594

  6. Radiomic Profiling of Glioblastoma: Identifying an Imaging Predictor of Patient Survival with Improved Performance over Established Clinical and Radiologic Risk Models.

    PubMed

    Kickingereder, Philipp; Burth, Sina; Wick, Antje; Götz, Michael; Eidel, Oliver; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Maier-Hein, Klaus H; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Radbruch, Alexander; Bonekamp, David

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether radiomic feature-based magnetic resonance (MR) imaging signatures allow prediction of survival and stratification of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma with improved accuracy compared with that of established clinical and radiologic risk models. Materials and Methods Retrospective evaluation of data was approved by the local ethics committee and informed consent was waived. A total of 119 patients (allocated in a 2:1 ratio to a discovery [n = 79] or validation [n = 40] set) with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were subjected to radiomic feature extraction (12 190 features extracted, including first-order, volume, shape, and texture features) from the multiparametric (contrast material-enhanced T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery imaging sequences) and multiregional (contrast-enhanced and unenhanced) tumor volumes. Radiomic features of patients in the discovery set were subjected to a supervised principal component (SPC) analysis to predict progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) and were validated in the validation set. The performance of a Cox proportional hazards model with the SPC analysis predictor was assessed with C index and integrated Brier scores (IBS, lower scores indicating higher accuracy) and compared with Cox models based on clinical (age and Karnofsky performance score) and radiologic (Gaussian normalized relative cerebral blood volume and apparent diffusion coefficient) parameters. Results SPC analysis allowed stratification based on 11 features of patients in the discovery set into a low- or high-risk group for PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.43; P = .002) and OS (HR, 4.33; P < .001), and the results were validated successfully in the validation set for PFS (HR, 2.28; P = .032) and OS (HR, 3.45; P = .004). The performance of the SPC analysis (OS: IBS, 0.149; C index, 0.654; PFS: IBS, 0.138; C index, 0.611) was higher compared with that of the radiologic (OS: IBS, 0.175; C index, 0

  7. Radiology practice models: the 2008 ACR Forum.

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Van Moore, Arl; Hillman, Bruce J; Neiman, Harvey L; Thrall, James H

    2008-09-01

    The 2008 ACR Forum brought together a diverse group of participants from clinical radiology, radiology leadership and practice management, managed care, economics, law, and entrepreneurship in Washington, DC, in January 2008 to discuss current models of radiology practice and anticipate new ones. It addressed what forces shape the practice of radiology, how these forces are changing, and how radiology practices can most effectively respond to them in the future. PMID:18755435

  8. Investigation of an MLE Algorithm for Quantification of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Michael; Essex, James

    2012-05-10

    Aerial radiation detection is routinely used by many organizations (DHS, DOE, EPA, etc.) for the purposes of identifying the presence of and quantifying the existence of radiation along the ground. This work involves the search for lost or missing sources, as well as the characterization of large-scale releases such as might occur in a nuclear power plant accident. The standard in aerial radiological surveys involves flying large arrays of sodium-iodide detectors at altitude (15 to 700 meters) to acquire geo-referenced, 1 Hz, 1024-channel spectra. The historical shortfalls of this technology include: • Very low spatial resolution (typical field of view is circle of two-times altitude) • Relatively low detectability associated with large stand-off distances • Fundamental challenges in performing ground-level quantification This work uses modern computational power in conjunction with multi-dimensional deconvolution algorithms in an effort to improve spatial resolution, enhance detectability, and provide a robust framework for quantification.

  9. Application of radiological protection measures to meet different environmental protection criteria.

    PubMed

    Copplestone, D

    2012-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recognises that there is no simple or single universal definition of 'environmental protection', and that the concept differs from country to country and from one circumstance to another. However, there is an increasing need to be able to demonstrate that the environment is protected from radioactive substances released under authorisation for various reasons, such as for wildlife conservation requirements, or wildlife management for commercial reasons, or simply as part of pollution control. The Commission is developing the concept of Representative Organisms, which may be identified from any specific legal requirements or from more general requirements to protect local habitats or ecosystems. Such organisms may be the actual objects of protection or they may be hypothetical, depending on the objectives of the assessment. They may be similar to, or even congruent with, one or more of the Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs). Where this is not the case, attempts can be made to consider the extent to which the Representative Organisms differ from the nearest RAP in terms of known radiation effects upon it, basic biology, radiation dosimetry, and pathways of exposure. This paper discusses the practical implications of such an approach. PMID:23089025

  10. Evaluating the Referring Physician's Clinical History and Indication as a Means for Communicating Chronic Conditions That Are Pertinent at the Point of Radiologic Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Obara, Piotr; Sevenster, Merlijn; Travis, Adam; Qian, Yuechen; Westin, Charles; Chang, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    The clinical history and indication (CHI) provided with a radiological examination are critical components of a quality interpretation by the radiologist. A patient's chronic conditions offer the context in which acute symptoms and findings can be interpreted more accurately. Seven pertinent (potentially diagnosis altering) chronic conditions, which are fairly prevalent at our institution, were selected. We analyze if and how in 140 CHIs there was mention of a patient's previously reported chronic condition and if and how the condition was subsequently described in the radiology report using a four-item scheme (Mention/Specialization, Generalization, Common comorbidity, No mention). In 40.7% of CHIs, the condition was rated Mention/Specialization. Therefore, we reject our first hypothesis that the CHI is a reliable source for obtaining pertinent chronic conditions (≥ 90.0%). Non-oncological conditions were significantly more likely rated No mention in the CHI than oncological conditions (58.7 versus 8.3%, P < 0.0001). Stat cases were significantly more frequently No mention than non-stat cases (60.0 versus 31.3%, P = 0.0134). We accept our second hypothesis that the condition's rating in the CHI is significantly correlated with its rating of the final radiology report (χ(2) test, P < 0.00001). Our study demonstrates an alarming lack of communication of pertinent medical information to the radiologist, which may negatively impact interpretation quality. Presenting automatically aggregated patient information to the radiologist may be a potential avenue for improving interpretation and adding value of the radiology department to the care chain. PMID:25533493

  11. Lower limit of detection: definition and elaboration of a proposed position for radiological effluent and environmental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, L.A.

    1984-09-01

    A manual is provided to define and illustrate a proposed use of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) for Radiological Effluent and Environmental Measurements. The manual contains a review of information regarding LLD practices gained from site visits; a review of the literature and a summary of basic principles underlying the concept of detection in Nuclear and Analytical Chemistry; a detailed presentation of the application of LLD principles to a range of problem categories (simple counting to multinuclide spectroscopy), including derivations, equations, and numerical examples; and a brief examination of related issues such as reference samples, numerical quality control, and instrumental limitations. An appendix contains a summary of notation and terminology, a bibliography, and worked-out examples. 100 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

  12. Technology insight: measuring prolactin in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas P; Kavanagh, Lucille; Healy, Marie-Louise; McKenna, T Joseph

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of prolactin is one of the most commonly undertaken hormonal investigations in evaluating patients with reproductive disorders. Hyperprolactinemia is found in up to 17% of such cases. Diagnostic evaluation of hyperprolactinemia is difficult but is facilitated by a logical approach where a thorough patient history is obtained, secondary causes of hyperprolactinemia are excluded, and the limitations of current prolactin assays are appreciated. Once hyperprolactinemia has been confirmed, attempts to establish the underlying cause can start. Given current workloads, laboratories rely on automated platforms to measure prolactin, most of which employ two-site immunoassay sandwich methods. Although generally robust and reliable, such immunoassays are susceptible to interference, and good collaboration between clinicians and the laboratory helps to minimize problems. A major challenge facing laboratories is correct differentiation of patients with true hyperprolactinemia from those with macroprolactinemia. Macroprolactin is a high-molecular-mass, biologically inactive form of prolactin that is detected to varying degrees by all prolactin immunoassays. Conservative estimates suggest that the presence of macroprolactin leads to misdiagnosis in as many as 10% of all reported instances of biochemical hyperprolactinemia. In the absence of specific testing, macroprolactin represents a diagnostic pitfall that results in the misdiagnosis and mismanagement of large numbers of patients. PMID:17315036

  13. Teaching concepts of clinical measurement variation to medical students.

    PubMed

    Hodder, R A; Longfield, J N; Cruess, D F; Horton, J A

    1982-09-01

    An exercise in clinical epidemiology was developed for medical students to demonstrate the process and limitations of scientific measurement using models that simulate common clinical experiences. All scales of measurement (nominal, ordinal and interval) were used to illustrate concepts of intra- and interobserver variation, systematic error, recording error, and procedural error. In a laboratory, students a) determined blood pressures on six videotaped subjects, b) graded sugar content of unknown solutions from 0 to 4+ using Clinitest tablets, c) measured papules that simulated PPD reactions, d) measured heart and kidney size on X-rays and, e) described a model skin lesion (melanoma). Traditionally, measurement variation is taught in biostatistics or epidemiology courses using previously collected data. Use of these models enables students to produce their own data using measurements commonly employed by the clinician. The exercise provided material for a meaningful discussion of the implications of measurement error in clinical decision-making. PMID:7129744

  14. Units of Measure in Clinical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schadow, Gunther; McDonald, Clement J.; Suico, Jeffrey G.; Föhring, Ulrich; Tolxdorff, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The authors surveyed existing standard codes for units of measures, such as ISO 2955, ANSI ×3.50, and Health Level 7′s ISO+. Because these standards specify only the character representation of units, the authors developed a semantic model for units based on dimensional analysis. Through this model, conversion between units and calculations with dimensioned quantities become as simple as calculating with numbers. All atomic symbols for prefixes and units are defined in one small table. Huge permutated conversion tables are not required. This method is also simple enough to be widely implementable in today's information systems. To promote the application of the method the authors provide an open-source implementation of this method in JAVA. All existing code standards for units, however, are incomplete for practical use and require substantial changes to correct their many ambiguities. The authors therefore developed a code for units that is much more complete and free from ambiguities. PMID:10094068

  15. Algorithms used in heterogeneous dose calculations show systematic differences as measured with the Radiological Physics Center’s anthropomorphic thorax phantom used for RTOG credentialing

    PubMed Central

    Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Molineu, Andrea; Amador, Carrie; Galvin, James; Followill, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of treatment planning algorithm on the accuracy of heterogeneous dose calculations in the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) thorax phantom. Methods and Materials We retrospectively analyzed the results of 304 irradiations of the RPC thorax phantom at 221 different institutions as part of credentialing for RTOG clinical trials; the irradiations were all done using 6-MV beams. Treatment plans included those for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as well as 3D conformal therapy (3D CRT). Heterogeneous plans were developed using Monte Carlo (MC), convolution/superposition (CS) and the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), as well as pencil beam (PB) algorithms. For each plan and delivery, the absolute dose measured in the center of a lung target was compared to the calculated dose, as was the planar dose in 3 orthogonal planes. The difference between measured and calculated dose was examined as a function of planning algorithm as well as use of IMRT. Results PB algorithms overestimated the dose delivered to the center of the target by 4.9% on average. Surprisingly, CS algorithms and AAA also showed a systematic overestimation of the dose to the center of the target, by 3.7% on average. In contrast, the MC algorithm dose calculations agreed with measurement within 0.6% on average. There was no difference observed between IMRT and 3D CRT calculation accuracy. Conclusion Unexpectedly, advanced treatment planning systems (those using CS and AAA algorithms) overestimated the dose that was delivered to the lung target. This issue requires attention in terms of heterogeneity calculations and potentially in terms of clinical practice. PMID:23237006

  16. Roadmap for harmonization of clinical laboratory measurement procedures.

    PubMed

    Greg Miller, W; Myers, Gary L; Lou Gantzer, Mary; Kahn, Stephen E; Schönbrunner, E Ralf; Thienpont, Linda M; Bunk, David M; Christenson, Robert H; Eckfeldt, John H; Lo, Stanley F; Nübling, C Micha; Sturgeon, Catharine M

    2011-08-01

    Results between different clinical laboratory measurement procedures (CLMP) should be equivalent, within clinically meaningful limits, to enable optimal use of clinical guidelines for disease diagnosis and patient management. When laboratory test results are neither standardized nor harmonized, a different numeric result may be obtained for the same clinical sample. Unfortunately, some guidelines are based on test results from a specific laboratory measurement procedure without consideration of the possibility or likelihood of differences between various procedures. When this happens, aggregation of data from different clinical research investigations and development of appropriate clinical practice guidelines will be flawed. A lack of recognition that results are neither standardized nor harmonized may lead to erroneous clinical, financial, regulatory, or technical decisions. Standardization of CLMPs has been accomplished for several measurands for which primary (pure substance) reference materials exist and/or reference measurement procedures (RMPs) have been developed. However, the harmonization of clinical laboratory procedures for measurands that do not have RMPs has been problematic owing to inadequate definition of the measurand, inadequate analytical specificity for the measurand, inadequate attention to the commutability of reference materials, and lack of a systematic approach for harmonization. To address these problems, an infrastructure must be developed to enable a systematic approach for identification and prioritization of measurands to be harmonized on the basis of clinical importance and technical feasibility, and for management of the technical implementation of a harmonization process for a specific measurand. PMID:21677092

  17. Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome from Infancy to Adulthood: Clinical, Hormonal, and Radiological Assessment According to the Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Céline; Zadro, Charline; Diene, Gwenaelle; Oliver, Isabelle; Pienkowski, Catherine; Jouret, Béatrice; Cartault, Audrey; Ajaltouni, Zeina; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Sevely, Annick; Tauber, Maithé; Edouard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) are initially referred for hypoglycemia during the neonatal period or growth retardation during childhood. PSIS is either isolated (nonsyndromic) or associated with extra-pituitary malformations (syndromic). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and long-term evolution in patients with PSIS according to the initial presentation. Study Design Sixty-seven patients with PSIS were included. Data from subgroups were compared: neonates (n = 10) versus growth retardation patients (n = 47), and syndromic (n = 32) versus nonsyndromic patients (n = 35). Results Neonates displayed a more severe hormonal and radiological phenotype than children referred for growth retardation, with a higher incidence of multiple hormonal deficiencies (100% versus 34%; P = 0.0005) and a nonvisible anterior pituitary lobe (33% versus 2%; P = 0.0017). Regular follow-up of growth might have allowed earlier diagnosis in the children with growth retardation, as decreased growth velocity and growth retardation were present respectively 3 and 2 years before referral. We documented a progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood in these patients. Presence of extra-pituitary malformations (found in 48%) was not associated with more severe hormonal and radiological characteristics. Growth under GH treatment was similar in the patient groups and did not vary according to the pituitary MRI findings. Conclusions PSIS diagnosed in the neonatal period has a particularly severe hormonal and radiological phenotype. The progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood justifies periodic follow-up to check for additional hormonal deficiencies. PMID:26562670

  18. [Instruction in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, W J M; Kreulen, C M; Berkhout, W E R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive intensive theoretical and practical training in practical and theoretical radiology, with the aim of obtaining the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor Tandartsen en Orthodontisten'-certificate, which is required for legal permission to use oral radiology in dental practice. It is recommended that the curriculum be expanded to include the areas of knowledge required to qualify for the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor het gebruik van CBCT-toestellen door tandartsen' (the certificate for the use of conebeam radiology by dentists). The general dental practitioner is faced with changing laws and regulations in all areas of practice. One of the most significant legal changes in the field of dental radiology was the introduction of the new radiation protection and safety rules in 2014. Moreover, a large group of dentists is also being confronted with the transition from conventional to digital images, with all its challenges and changes in everyday practice. PMID:27073811

  19. [Double measurement of the Böhler angle: prognostic value of radiological angles in posterior facet fractures of the calcaneus].

    PubMed

    Chaminade, B; Zographos, S; Uthéza, G

    2001-11-01

    In 1931, Böhler proposed that measuring the radiological angle of the tuberosity could be useful in posterior facet fractures of the calcaneus to evaluate initial damage as well as reduction quality. In opposition to the 1998 SOFCOT symposium, certain authors considered that the Böhler angle has no prognostic value. Progress in pathological anatomy has helped to better understand posterior facet fractures, justifying the use of a "double measurement". The fundamental fracture line separates the posterior facet into a lowered medial fragment and a pivoted lateral fragment. The double contour of the posterior facet visualized radiographically allows measurement of a medial Böhler angle and a lateral Böhler angle. It is demonstrated that is the smaller the medial Böhler angle, the greater the subtalar degeneration. Surgical restoration of a satisfactory Böhler angle is a necessary prerequisite for a good outcome. "Double measurement" of the Böhler angle on the lateral view contributes to the prognostic value of this historical angle. PMID:11845075

  20. The use of a modular system to convert an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty: Clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Weber-Spickschen, T S; Alfke, D; Agneskirchner, J D

    2015-12-01

    If a modular convertible total shoulder system is used as a primary implant for an anatomical total shoulder arthroplasty, failure of the prosthesis or the rotator cuff can be addressed by converting it to a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA), with retention of the humeral stem and glenoid baseplate. This has the potential to reduce morbidity and improve the results. In a retrospective study of 14 patients (15 shoulders) with a mean age of 70 years (47 to 83) we reviewed the clinical and radiological outcome of converting an anatomical shoulder arthroplasty (ASA) to a RSA using a convertible prosthetic system (SMR system, Lima, San Daniele, Italy). The mean operating time was 64 minutes (45 to 75). All humeral stems and glenoid baseplates were found to be well-fixed and could be retained. There were no intra-operative or early post-operative complications and no post-operative infection. The mean follow-up was 43 months (21 to 83), by which time the mean visual analogue scale for pain had decreased from 8 pre-operatively to 1, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Score from 12 to 76, the mean Oxford shoulder score from 3 to 39, the mean Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder Score from 1618 to 418 and the mean Subjective shoulder value from 15 to 61. On radiological review, one patient had a lucency around the humeral stem, two had stress shielding. There were no fatigue fractures of the acromion but four cases of grade 1 scapular notching. The use of a convertible prosthetic system to revise a failed ASA reduces morbidity and minimises the rate of complications. The mid-term clinical and radiological results of this technique are promising. PMID:26637682

  1. Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using an Outside-in Technique: Two- to Six-Year Clinical and Radiological Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jae Ang; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kim, Kyung Ok; Kim, Jong Keun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the clinical and radiological outcomes of double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an outside-in technique with a follow-up of two- to six-years, especially in terms of the sports activity level and radiological degeneration. Materials and Methods Sixty-seven patients who were available for a minimum two-year follow-up after double-bundle ACL reconstruction using an outside-in technique were retrospectively evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 43.7 months. The knee function and stability were evaluated before the operation, one year after the operation (short-term follow-up), and more than two years after the operation (last follow-up). Results Regarding the knee function, the Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation, and hop test showed significant improvement. Regarding the stability, the Lachman test, pivot shift test, KT-2000 arthrometer data, and anterior drawer radiographs using Telos showed significant improvement. Regarding the sports activity level, the patients who returned to pre-injury level activity was 68.7% according to the Tegner activity score and 76.1% according to the Cincinnati sports activity scale score. The incidence of aggravated degeneration or development of greater than IKDC grade A degeneration after surgery was 10.4%. Conclusions Double-bundle ACL reconstruction using an outside-in technique showed favorable clinical and radiological outcomes with respect to the knee function and stability, joint degeneraion, and, especially, return to pre-injury sports activity. PMID:25750892

  2. Cervical Arthroplasty for Moderate to Severe Disc Degeneration: Clinical and Radiological Assessments after a Minimum Follow-Up of 18 Months: Pfirrmann Grade and Cervical Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Kim, Do Yeon; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Kim, Yeo Ju; Hyun, Dongkeun; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Hyeonseon; Park, Hyeong-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical outcomes and radiologic results after cervical arthroplasty have been reported in many articles, yet relatively few studies after cervical arthroplasty have been conducted in severe degenerative cervical disc disease. Materials and Methods Sixty patients who underwent cervical arthroplasty (Mobi-C®) between April 2006 and November 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 18 months were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to Pfirrmann classification on preoperative cervical MR images: group A (Pfirrmann disc grade III, n=38) and group B (Pfirrmann disc grades IV or V, n=22). Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of neck and arm pain, modified Oswestry Disability Index (mODI) score, and radiological results including cervical range of motion (ROM) were assessed before and after surgery. Results VAS and mean mODI scores decreased after surgery from 5.1 and 57.6 to 2.7 and 31.5 in group A and from 6.1 and 59.9 to 3.7 and 38.4 in group B, respectively. In both groups, VAS and mODI scores significantly improved postoperatively (p<0.001), although no significant intergroup differences were found. Also, cervical dynamic ROM was preserved or gradually improved up to 18 months after cervical arthroplasty in both groups. Global, segmental and adjacent ROM was similar for both groups during follow-up. No cases of device subsidence or extrusion were recorded. Conclusion Clinical and radiological results following cervical arthroplasty in patients with severe degenerative cervical disc disease were no different from those in patients with mild degenerative cervical disc disease after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24954339

  3. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the ...

  4. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  5. Most lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical lobular hyperplasia diagnosed on core needle biopsy can be managed clinically with radiologic follow-up in a multidisciplinary setting

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Lavinia P; Sneige, Nour; Coyne, Robin; Shen, Yu; Dong, Wenli; Dempsey, Peter; Bevers, Therese B

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of using standard radiologic and histologic criteria to guide the follow-up of patients with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), lobular neoplasia (LN), or atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH). Patients with high-risk benign lesions diagnosed on biopsy were presented and reviewed in a multidisciplinary clinical management conference from 1 November 2003 through September 2011. Associations between patient characteristics and rates of upgrade were determined by univariate and multivariate logistic models, and times to diagnosis carcinoma were calculated. Of 853 cases reviewed, 124 (14.5%) were lobular neoplasms. In all, 104 patients were clinically and/or radiographically monitored. In 20 patients, who were found to have LN on core biopsy and were recommended to have immediate surgical excision, a more significant lesion was identified in 8 (40%) of the excised specimens. Factors associated with a more significant lesion on excisional biopsy included whether the lobular lesion had been targeted for biopsy and whether the extent of disease involved three or more terminal duct lobular units. Of the 104 patients radiographically and clinically monitored, the median follow-up time was 3.4 years with a range of 0.44–8.6 years. Five patients under surveillance were subsequently diagnosed with breast malignancy (three of the five at a site unrelated to the initial biopsy). Patients with incidental lobular lesions identified on percutaneous core needle biopsy have a small risk of upgrade and may not require an excisional biopsy. Clinical management of low-volume lobular lesions in a multidisciplinary setting is an efficacious alternative to surgical excision when radiologic and histologic characteristics are well-defined. PMID:24639339

  6. The Availability of Radiological Measurement of Femoral Anteversion Angle: Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ha Young; Shin, Heesuk; Lee, Eun Shin; Kong, Min Sik; Lee, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for measuring femoral anteversion angle (FAA) by a radiographic method using three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction (3D-CT). Methods The study included 82 children who presented with intoeing gait. 3D-CT data taken between 2006 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. FAA was measured by 3D-CT. FAA is defined as the angle between the long axis of the femur neck and condylar axis of the distal femur. FAA measurement was performed twice at both lower extremities by each rater. The intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results One hundred and sixty-four lower limbs of 82 children (31 boys and 51 girls, 6.3±3.2 years old) were included. The ICCs of intra-rater measurement for the angle of femoral neck axis (NA) were 0.89 for rater A and 0.96 for rater B, and those of condylar axis (CA) were 0.99 for rater A and 0.99 for rater B, respectively. The ICC of inter-rater measurement for the angle of NA was 0.89 and that of CA was 0.92. By each rater, the ICCs of the intrarater measurement for FAA were 0.97 for rater A and 0.95 for rater B, respectively and the ICC of the inter-rater measurement for FAA was 0.89. Conclusion The 3D-CT measures for FAA are reliable within individual raters and between different raters. The 3D-CT measures of FAA can be a useful method for accurate diagnosis and follow-up of femoral anteversion. PMID:27152273

  7. Skeletal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The main emphasis of the chapter on skeletal radiology is CAT scanning and its use in the diagnosis of neoplasms. Other topics that are discussed include infections, arthritis, trauma, and metabolic and endocrine diseases as they relate to skeletal radiology. (KRM)

  8. Handbooks in radiology: Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    This series of handbooks covers the basic facts, major concepts and highlights in seven radiological subspecialties. ''Nuclear Medicine'' is a review of the principles, procedures and clinical applications that every radiology resident and practicing general radiologist should know about nuclear medicine. Presented in an outline format it covers all of the organ systems that are imaged by nuclear medicine.

  9. The effectiveness of service delivery initiatives at improving patients' waiting times in clinical radiology departments: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Olisemeke, B; Chen, Y F; Hemming, K; Girling, A

    2014-12-01

    We reviewed the literature for the impact of service delivery initiatives (SDIs) on patients' waiting times within radiology departments. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, INSPEC and The Cochrane Library for relevant articles published between 1995 and February, 2013. The Cochrane EPOC risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias on studies that met specified design criteria. Fifty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. The types of SDI implemented included extended scope practice (ESP, three studies), quality management (12 studies), productivity-enhancing technologies (PETs, 29 studies), multiple interventions (11 studies), outsourcing and pay-for-performance (one study each). The uncontrolled pre- and post-intervention and the post-intervention designs were used in 54 (95%) of the studies. The reporting quality was poor: many of the studies did not test and/or report the statistical significance of their results. The studies were highly heterogeneous, therefore meta-analysis was inappropriate. The following type of SDIs showed promising results: extended scope practice; quality management methodologies including Six Sigma, Lean methodology, and continuous quality improvement; productivity-enhancing technologies including speech recognition reporting, teleradiology and computerised physician order entry systems. We have suggested improved study design and the mapping of the definitions of patient waiting times in radiology to generic timelines as a starting point for moving towards a situation where it becomes less restrictive to compare and/or pool the results of future studies in a meta-analysis. PMID:24888629

  10. Ground-Glass Opacity Lung Nodules in the Era of Lung Cancer CT Screening: Radiology, Pathology, and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Saghir, Zaigham; Wille, Mathilde Marie Winkler; Thomsen, Laura Hohwü; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer; Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-03-01

    The advent of computed tomography screening for lung cancer will increase the incidence of ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules detected and referred for diagnostic evaluation and management. GGO nodules remain a diagnostic challenge; therefore, a more systematic approach is necessary to ensure correct diagnosis and optimal management. Here we present the latest advances in the radiologic imaging and pathology of GGO nodules, demonstrating that radiologic features are increasingly predictive of the pathology of GGO nodules. We review the current guidelines from the Fleischner Society, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the British Thoracic Society. In addition, we discuss the management and follow-up of GGO nodules in the light of experience from screening trials. Minimally invasive tissue biopsies and the marking of GGO nodules for surgery are new and rapidly developing fields that will yield improvements in both diagnosis and treatment. The standard-of-care surgical treatment of early lung cancer is still minimally invasive lobectomy with systematic lymph node dissection. However, recent research has shown that some GGO lesions may be treated with sublobar resections; these findings may expand the surgical treatment options available in the future. PMID:26984222

  11. Measurement uncertainty for clinical laboratories - a revision of the concept.

    PubMed

    Dallas Jones, Graham Ross

    2016-08-01

    The uncertainty of a measurement result is a fundamental concept in metrology indicating the range within the "true" value of a measurement should lie. Although not commonly reported with results, the calculation of measurement uncertainty (MU) has become common in routine clinical laboratories. Interpretation of numerical pathology results is made by comparison with data from other measurements. As MU is aimed at assisting with result interpretation, it should be related to the specific comparison being made. There are three basic type of comparators: a previous result from the same patient, a population reference interval, or a clinical decision point. For each comparison, the "true" value is that which would have been obtained from the instrument used to make the comparator measurements if it was measured without uncertainty. The MU is the range of likely deviations from this true value due to the method used to produce the result under interpretation. For patient monitoring, if the two measurements were made on the same analyzer, the uncertainty is the imprecision of the assay over the relevant time frame. In comparing with a manufacturer-specific reference interval, the MU is deviation from the manufacturer's master calibrator. For clinical decision points produced with the assays traceable to international references, the MU is related to deviation from that reference standard. For optimal use of MU in the clinical laboratory, it may be necessary to consider the use of the test result and the concept of a single MU for each result may need to be revised. PMID:27176746

  12. Measuring the instructional validity of clinical simulation problems.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, E; Gustavson, L P; Levine, H G

    1983-03-01

    Written clinical simulation problems in two formats--forced-choiced and essay--were used to test junior and senior medical students at the conclusion of their pediatric rotations. A comparison was made in the performance of students with varying levels of clinical experience. There seemed to be no consistent pattern of improvement with increased instructional time on the forced-choice management problems. Junior students did show improvement over time on the essay management problems, which also seemed to reflect the increased problem-solving and organizational skills of seniors in comparison to juniors. Correlations across problems and correlations between the clinical problem test and other measurement techniques were very weak, partly due to the low sampling reliability of clinical simulation problems. In this study, clinical simulation problems failed to demonstrate responsiveness to development and maturation in the problem-solving approach to patient care. PMID:10259952

  13. Connecting Stuttering Management and Measurement: I. Core Speech Measures of Clinical Process and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenker, Rosalee C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There will always be a place for stuttering treatments designed to eliminate or reduce stuttered speech. When those treatments are required, direct speech measures of treatment process and outcome are needed in clinical practice. Aims: Based on the contents of published clinical trials of such treatments, three "core" measures of…

  14. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography.

  15. Initial Study of Radiological and Clinical Efficacy Radioembolization Using 188Re-Human Serum Albumin (HSA) Microspheres in Patients with Progressive, Unresectable Primary or Secondary Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Mirosław L.; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.; Sankowski, Artur J.; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Grimes, Josh; Celler, Anna; Buscombe, John R.; Bator, Andrzej; Pech, Maciej; Mikołajczak, Renata; Pawlak, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this initial study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological effectiveness of radioembolization (RE) using 188Re-Human Serum Albumin (HSA) microspheres in patients with advanced, progressive, unresectable primary or secondary liver cancers, not suitable to any other form of therapy. Material/Methods Overall, we included 13 patients with 20 therapy sessions. Clinical and radiological responses were assessed at 6 weeks after therapy, and then every 3 months. The objective radiological response was classified according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v.1.0 by sequential MRI. Adverse events were evaluated using NCI CTCAE v.4.03. Results There were 4 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 6 with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), 2 with neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), and 1 patient with ovarian carcinoma. Mean administered activity of 188Re HSA was 7.24 GBq (range 3.8–12.4) A high microspheres labeling efficacy of over 97±2.1% and low urinary excretion of 188Re (6.5±2.3%) during first 48-h follow-up. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 7.1 months (CI 6.2–13.3) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.1 months (CI 2.4–9.9). In those patients who had a clinical partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and disease progression (DP) as assessed 6 weeks after therapy, the median OS was 9/5/4 months, respectively, and PFS was 5/2/0 months, respectively. The treatment adverse events (toxicity) were at an acceptable level. Initially and after 6 weeks, the CTC AE was grade 2, while after 3 months it increased to grade 3 in 4 subjects. This effect was mostly related to rapid cancer progression in this patient subgroup. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that RE using 188Re HSA is feasible and a viable option for palliative therapy in patients with extensive progressive liver cancer. It was well tolerated by most patients, with a low level of toxicity during the 3 months of

  16. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  17. Clinical & radiological evaluation of atherosclerotic changes in carotid & coronary arteries in asymptomatic & clinically symptomatic individuals as a tool for pre-symptomatic diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Prasad, T.N.; Ananthalakshmi, S.; Karthik, G.A.; Cherian, George; Dayananda, Yaligar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: An increase in prevalence of atherosclerosis has been noted worldwide with reports of higher incidence of atherosclerotic vascular changes in Asian Indians. There is a need to measure vascular atherosclerotic changes and provide objective parameter to predict cardiac and cerebrovascular adverse events. Atherosclerotic changes in carotids and coronaries are generally accepted as an association. We attempted in this study to relate intimal-luminal changes in carotid arteries to luminal changes in coronary arteries. Our study presents results of high resolution ultra sonographic (HRUS) evaluation of intimal-medial-thickness (IMT) in carotid with luminal changes in coronaries on multidetector-CT (MDCT) in clinically asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals. Methods: In this prospective study, HRUS examination of the carotid bifurcation was performed in 151 individuals to measure IMT in asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Assessments of coronary arteries of the same group of patients were evaluated by MDCT within a week interval. IMT changes were associated with age, sex, predisposing factors, calcium burden of coronaries and structural atherosclerotic changes in coronary arteries. Results: A linear association of IMT was observed with increasing age. IMT of 0.5-0.69 mm was noted in 50 per cent of patients between 51-56 yr with higher number of symptomatic patients in this group. Linear increases in coronary vascular changes were noted with increasing IMT thickness. Changes were more prevalent in diabetic, hypertensive, treadmill test (TMT) positive and clinically symptomatic patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Age-related progression of atherosclerosis was evident in internal carotid arteries. Significant association was observed in the IMT thickness of right common carotid (RCC) and coronary disease in symptomatic group; whereas IMT of left common carotid and internal carotid arteries did not show any association. RCC IMT between 0

  18. Radiology of thoracic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, S.J.; Pugatch, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents the essential clinical and radiologic findings of a wide variety of thoracic diseases. The authors include conventional, CT and MR images of each disease discussed. In addition, they present practical differential diagnostic considerations for most of the radiographic findings or patterns portrayed.

  19. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  20. Radiology of spinal curvature

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered.

  1. JC Virus PCR Detection Is Not Infallible: A Fulminant Case of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy with False-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Studies despite Progressive Clinical Course and Radiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Babi, Mohamed-Ali; Pendlebury, William; Braff, Steven; Waheed, Waqar

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case with a false-negative PCR-based analysis for JC virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a patient with clinical and radiological findings suggestive of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. Our patient developed rapidly progressive global decline with clinical and radiographic findings suggestive of PML, but JC virus PCR in CSF was negative. The patient passed away 3 months from the onset of her neurological symptoms. Autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of PML with presence of JC-polyoma virus by immunohistochemical staining. This case highlights the potential of false-negative JC virus PCR in CSF when radiographic and clinical features are suggestive of “possible PML.” We review the plausible causes of potential false-negative CSF results and suggest that when the clinical presentation is suspicious for PML repeat CSF analysis utilizing ultrasensitive PCR assay and subsequent brain biopsy should be considered if CSF remains negative. Additionally, appropriate exclusion of other neurologic conditions is essential. PMID:25861493

  2. Comparison of Clinical and Radiologic Results between Expandable Cages and Titanium Mesh Cages for Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gwang-Jun; Hur, Hyuk; Jang, Jae-Won; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Soo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Objective A thoracolumbar burst fracture is usually unstable and can cause neurological deficits and angular deformity. Patients with unstable thoracolumbar burst fracture usually need surgery for decompression of the spinal canal, correction of the angular deformity, and stabilization of the spinal column. We compared two struts, titanium mesh cages (TMCs) and expandable cages. Methods 33 patients, who underwent anterior thoracolumbar reconstruction using either TMCs (n=16) or expandable cages (n=17) between June 2000 and September 2011 were included in this study. Clinical outcome was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale and Low Back Outcome Score (LBOS) for functional neurological evaluation. The Cobb angle, body height of the fractured vertebra, the operation time and amount of intra-operative bleeding were measured in both groups. Results In the expandable cage group, operation time and amount of intraoperative blood loss were lower than that in the TMC group. The mean VAS scores and LBOS in both groups were improved, but no significant difference. Cobb angle was corrected higher than that in expandable cage group from postoperative to the last follow-up. The change in Cobb angles between preoperative, postoperative, and the last follow-up did not show any significant difference. There was no difference in the subsidence of anterior body height between both groups. Conclusion There was no significant difference in the change in Cobb angles with an inter-group comparison, the expandable cage group showed better results in loss of kyphosis correction, operation time, and amount of intraoperative blood loss. PMID:24851149

  3. Evaluation of the Success Criteria for Zirconia Dental Implants: A Four-Year Clinical and Radiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Vavassori, Virna; Calvo-Guirado, Josè Luis; Delgado Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Maiorana, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to evaluate survival and success rates, soft tissue health, and radiographic marginal bone loss (MBL) of zirconia implants placed in the esthetic and posterior areas of the jaws and in association with multiple or single implant restorations after at least 6 months of definitive restoration. Material and Methods. 35 one-piece zirconium implants were utilized for single or partially edentulous ridges rehabilitation. All implants received immediate temporary restorations and six months after surgery were definitively restored. Every 6 months after implant placement, a clinical-radiographic evaluation was performed. For each radiograph, the measurements of MBL were calculated. Results. The results showed that the mean MBL at 48-month followup was 1.631 mm. The mean MBL during the first year of loading was not more significant for implants placed in the first molar regions than for those positioned in other areas. Moreover, no differences in marginal bone level changes were revealed for multiple and single implants, whereas MBL in the first year was observed to be slightly greater for implants placed in the maxilla than for those placed in the mandible. Conclusion. Zirconia showed a good marginal bone preservation that could be correlated with one-piece morphology and characteristics of zirconia implants. PMID:24065992

  4. Choice impulsivity: Definitions, measurement issues, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Mitchell, Marci R; Wing, Victoria C; Balodis, Iris M; Bickel, Warren K; Fillmore, Mark; Lane, Scott D; Lejuez, C W; Littlefield, Andrew K; Luijten, Maartje; Mathias, Charles W; Mitchell, Suzanne H; Napier, T Celeste; Reynolds, Brady; Schütz, Christian G; Setlow, Barry; Sher, Kenneth J; Swann, Alan C; Tedford, Stephanie E; White, Melanie J; Winstanley, Catharine A; Yi, Richard; Potenza, Marc N; Moeller, F Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Impulsivity critically relates to many psychiatric disorders. Given the multifaceted construct that impulsivity represents, defining core aspects of impulsivity is vital for the assessment and understanding of clinical conditions. Choice impulsivity (CI), involving the preferential selection of smaller sooner rewards over larger later rewards, represents one important type of impulsivity. The International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) convened to discuss the definition and assessment of CI and provide recommendations regarding measurement across species. Commonly used preclinical and clinical CI behavioral tasks are described, and considerations for each task are provided to guide CI task selection. Differences in assessment of CI (self-report, behavioral) and calculating CI indices (e.g., area-under-the-curve, indifference point, and steepness of discounting curve) are discussed along with properties of specific behavioral tasks used in preclinical and clinical settings. The InSRI group recommends inclusion of measures of CI in human studies examining impulsivity. Animal studies examining impulsivity should also include assessments of CI and these measures should be harmonized in accordance with human studies of the disorders being modeled in the preclinical investigations. The choice of specific CI measures to be included should be based on the goals of the study and existing preclinical and clinical literature using established CI measures. PMID:25867841

  5. Choice Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Mitchell, Marci R.; Wing, Victoria C.; Balodis, Iris M.; Bickel, Warren K.; Fillmore, Mark; Lane, Scott D.; Lejuez, C. W.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Luijten, Maartje; Mathias, Charles W.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Napier, T. Celeste; Reynolds, Brady; Schütz, Christian G.; Setlow, Barry; Sher, Kenneth J.; Swann, Alan C.; Tedford, Stephanie E.; White, Melanie J.; Winstanley, Catharine A.; Yi, Richard; Potenza, Marc N.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background Impulsivity critically relates to many psychiatric disorders. Given the multi-faceted construct that impulsivity represents, defining core aspects of impulsivity is vital for the assessment and understanding of clinical conditions. Choice impulsivity (CI), involving the preferential selection of smaller sooner rewards over larger later rewards, represents one important type of impulsivity. Method The International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) convened to discuss the definition and assessment of CI and provide recommendations regarding measurement across species. Results Commonly used preclinical and clinical CI behavioral tasks are described, and considerations for each task are provided to guide CI task selection. Differences in assessment of CI (self-report, behavioral) and calculating CI indices (e.g., area-under-the-curve, indifference point, steepness of discounting curve) are discussed along with properties of specific behavioral tasks used in preclinical and clinical settings. Conclusions The InSRI group recommends inclusion of measures of CI in human studies examining impulsivity. Animal studies examining impulsivity should also include assessments of CI and these measures should be harmonized in accordance with human studies of the disorders being modeled in the preclinical investigations. The choice of specific CI measures to be included should be based on the goals of the study and existing preclinical and clinical literature using established CI measures. PMID:25867841

  6. Dysspondyloenchondromatosis (DSC) associated with COL2A1 mutation: Clinical and radiological overlap with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia-Strudwick type (SEMD-S).

    PubMed

    Merrick, Blair; Calder, Alistair; Wakeling, Emma

    2015-12-01

    Dysspondyloenchondromatosis (DSC) is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by enchondroma-like lesions and anisospondyly. The former leads to discrepancies in limb length, and the latter, to progressive kyphoscoliosis. Two recent cases have highlighted the genetic heterogeneity of DSC, one demonstrating the presence and, the other, the absence of a COL2A1 mutation. This may have important clinical implications, for example, screening for complications including atlanto-axial instability associated with type II collagenopathies, as well as long-term patient management. We report on a case with radiographic features of DSC with overlap into the type II collagenopathy spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type, who was found to carry a novel heterozygous mutation in the COL2A1 gene. Testing for COL2A1 mutations should be performed in all patients with radiological features of DSC. Further research is needed to identify the underlying molecular cause in cases where no COL2A1 mutation is identified. PMID:26250472

  7. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy-1 and β = 0.0615 Gy-2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  8. Clinical Application Of The Direct Measurement Of Human Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Vincent, R.; Marks, P.; English, M. J.

    1980-07-01

    A system is described for the recording and measurement of human body shape by a series of circular ultrasound scans. Computer manipulation of the echo data provides a graphic display of body contour, and a measurement of total body surface area and volume. The theoretical resolution for distance measurements using this device is 2.5 mm, a figure achieved in practical calibration experiments using a metal test object. Measurements from the body surface, although less precise, are sufficiently accurate and reproducible to enable useful clinical information to be obtained, particularly in recording the morphological changes associated with obesity and malnutrition.

  9. Colloid osmotic pressure: its measurement and clinical value.

    PubMed Central

    Morissette, M. P.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is an important determinant in the appearance of edema. The development of a simple technique for COP measurement, based on an electronic pressure transducer and a semipermeable membrane system, has led to an appreciation of the value of COP determinations in clinical practice. In a steady state the measured COP replicates the value computed from serum proteins. In pathologic sera a derived value is unreliable. The normal human plasma COP averages 25.4 mm Hg. This value tends to decrease with age, is lower in females and is also lower in subjects at bed rest. As a clinical tool COP measurement represents an unduplicated contribution to the differential diagnosis of pulmonary edema. In critically ill patients COP measurement represents a reliable predictor of survival. PMID:851930

  10. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Yu, Shunzhi; Zhao, Yantao; Hou, Shuxun; Fu, Qiang; Li, Fengning; Hou, Tiesheng; Zhong, Hongbin

    2014-06-01

    This study compared the clinical and radiological outcomes of dynamic cervical implant (DCI; Scient'x, Villers-Bretonneux, France) arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. This prospective cohort study enrolled patients with single-level cervical degenerative disc disease who underwent DCI arthroplasty or ACDF between September 2009 and June 2011. Patients were followed up for more than 2years. Clinical evaluation included the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for neck and arm pain. Radiological assessments included segmental range of motion (ROM), overall ROM (C2-C7), disc height (DHI), and changes in adjacent disc spaces. The VAS, SF-36, JOA, and NDI scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and ACDF groups. The VAS, JOA, and SF-36 scores were not significantly different between the DCI and ACDF groups at the final follow-up. The segmental ROM at the treated level and overall ROM increased significantly after surgery in the DCI group, but the ROM in the adjacent cephalad and caudal segments did not change significantly. The mean DHI at the treated level was significantly restored after surgery in both groups. Five patients (12.8%) in the DCI group showed new signs of adjacent segment degeneration. These results indicate that DCI is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. However, there is no definitive evidence that DCI arthroplasty has better intermediate-term results than ACDF. PMID:24411326

  11. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty and cervical total disc replacement for single-level cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Shichang, Liu; Yueming, Song; Limin, Liu; Lei, Wang; Zhongjie, Zhou; Chunguang, Zhou; Xi, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, to date the most successful spine procedure for the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy, has limitations that have led to the development of non-fusion cervical procedures, such as cervical total disc replacement (TDR) and dynamic cervical implant (DCI) arthroplasty. We compared the clinical and radiological results of DCI and cervical TDR for the treatment of single-level cervical degenerative disc disease in Chinese patients. A retrospective review of 179 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who underwent DCI or TDR between April 2010 and October 2012 was conducted, and 152 consecutive patients (67 patients single-level DCI and 85 single-level TDR) who completed at least 2years of follow-up were included. Clinical and radiological assessments were performed preoperatively and at 1week and 3, 6, 12, and 24months postoperatively. The most common operative level was C5/C6 (49.3%). The differences in blood loss, duration of surgery, and duration of hospitalization were not statistically significant. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Visual Analog Scale, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and TDR groups (P<0.05), but the differences were not statistically significant at the final follow-up. The rate of occurrence of heterotopic ossification was 22.4% and 28.2% in the DCI and TDR groups, respectively. As an effective non-fusion technique, DCI is a more economical procedure. Further prospective, randomized studies with long-term follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term effects. PMID:26928156

  12. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  13. Rapid-Response Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Anastasio, Noelle C.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Fink, Latham H.; Wing, Victoria C.; Mathias, Charles W.; Lane, Scott D.; Schutz, Christian; Swann, Alan C.; Lejuez, C.W.; Clark, Luke; Moeller, F. Gerard; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted construct that is a core feature of multiple psychiatric conditions and personality disorders. However, progress in understanding and treating impulsivity in the context of these conditions is limited by a lack of precision and consistency in its definition and assessment. Rapid-response-impulsivity (RRI) represents a tendency toward immediate action that occurs with diminished forethought and is out of context with the present demands of the environment. Experts from the International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) met to discuss and evaluate RRI-measures in terms of reliability, sensitivity, and validity with the goal of helping researchers and clinicians make informed decisions about the use and interpretation of findings from RRI-measures. Their recommendations are described in this manuscript. Commonly-used clinical and preclinical RRI-tasks are described, and considerations are provided to guide task selection. Tasks measuring two conceptually and neurobiologically distinct types of RRI, “refraining from action initiation” (RAI) and “stopping an ongoing action” (SOA) are described. RAI and SOA-tasks capture distinct aspects of RRI that may relate to distinct clinical outcomes. The InSRI group recommends that: 1) selection of RRI-measures should be informed by careful consideration of the strengths, limitations, and practical considerations of the available measures; 2) researchers use both RAI and SOA tasks in RRI studies to allow for direct comparison of RRI types and examination of their associations with clinically relevant measures; and, 3) similar considerations should be made for human and non-human studies in an effort to harmonize and integrate pre-clinical and clinical research. PMID:25867840

  14. Measuring Clinical Trial–Associated Workload in a Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Good, Marjorie J.; Lubejko, Barbara; Humphries, Keisha; Medders, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to quantify clinical trial–associated workload can have a significant impact on the efficiency and success of a research organization. However, methods to effectively estimate the number of research staff needed for clinical trial recruitment, maintenance, compliance, and follow-up are lacking. To address this need, the Wichita Community Clinical Oncology Program (WCCOP) developed and implemented an acuity-based workload assessment tool to facilitate assessment and balancing of workload among its research nursing staff. Methods: An acuity-based measurement tool was developed, assigning acuity scores for individual clinical trials using six trial-related determinants. Using trial acuity scores and numbers of patients per trial, acuity scores for individual research nursing staff were then calculated and compared on a monthly basis. Results: During the 11 years that data were collected, acuity scores increased from 65% to 181%. However, during this same period, WCCOP was able to decrease individual research nurse staff full-time equivalent (FTE) acuity scores and number of patients per FTE. These trends reflect the use of the acuity-based measurement tool to determine actual workload and use of the acuity data to direct hiring decisions. Conclusion: Clinical trial workload has been successfully measured and used to guide staffing by one community clinical oncology program. Further research is needed regarding its applicability to other research programs. PMID:23942924

  15. Exploring Patient Activation in the Clinic: Measurement from Three Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Christy J. W.; Ledford, Christopher C.; Childress, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To further conceptualize and operationalize patient activation (PA), using measures from patient, physician, and researcher perspectives. Data Source/Study Setting. Multimethod observation in 2010 within a family medicine clinic. Study Design. Part of an intervention with 130 patients with type 2 diabetes, this observational study…

  16. Automated clinical data collection for national quality measurement reporting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Noirot, Laura A; Reichley, Richard M; Storey, Patricia; Traynor, Patrick; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data for the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) ORYX Core Measurement Reporting can be automated using an object-oriented, client-developed program that extracts data from a clinical data repository and utilizes an MHA vendor upload process. The process eliminated 39% of the manual data collection efforts. PMID:18694244

  17. Measuring Depression in a Clinical Population Using the MMPI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Linda D.

    1987-01-01

    Administered Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) to clinically depressed and nondepressed inpatients, and compared scores from its Depression scale with scores from the Beck Depression Inventory. Demonstrated a positive linear relationship between the two measures and their ability to discriminate between depressed and nondepressed…

  18. Silicon diode detectors used in radiological physics measurements. Part II: Measurement of dosimetry data for high-energy photons.

    PubMed

    Wright, A E; Gager, L D

    1977-01-01

    Initial calibration of a linear accelerator requires physics instruments to measure accurately central axis depth-dose and off-axis data, both in and out of the beam. These data for an 8- MeV unit were first measured using film, a Farmer 0.6-cm3 ion chamber, a 0.3-cm3 ion chamber, and a 0.1-cm3 silicon diode. Both small probes and film gave a high response compared to the Farmer probe, which has a uniform energy response. Measurements with the diode interfaced to an X-Y recorder required only a fraction of the time required with the chambers, minimizing error due to change in machine output, and permitted resolution of isodose lines in the penumbra. However, corrections required at points in depth due to nonuniform energy response of the unshielded diode were laborious. Construction of a partially shielded diode which duplicates the response of the Farmer probe eliminated the necessity for corrections, permitting rapid accumulation of a wide range of depth-dose and off-axis data. PMID:927387

  19. Clinical guidelines for responding to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and trauma/burn mass casualty incidents: Quick reference guides for emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Joseph; Burich, David; Smith, Deborah; Hayes, Lynn; Paturas, James; Tomassoni, Anthony

    The word 'DISASTER' may be used as a mnemonic for listing the critical elements of emergency response. The National Disaster Life Support Education Foundation's (NDLSEC) DISASTER paradigm emphasises out-of-hospital emergency response and includes the following elements: (1) detect; (2) incident command system; (3) security and safety; (4) assessment; (5) support; (6) triage and treatment; (7) evacuate; and (8) recovery. This paper describes how the DISASTER paradigm was used to create a series of clinical guidelines to assist the preparedness effort of hospitals for mitigating chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear incidents or explosive devices resulting in trauma/burn mass casualty incidents (MCIs) and their initial response to these events. Descriptive information was obtained from observations and records associated with this project. The information contributed by a group of subject matter experts in disaster medicine, at the Yale New Haven Health System Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response was used to author the clinical guidelines. Akin to the paradigm developed by the NDLSEC for conducting on-scene activities, the clinical guidelines use the letters in the word 'disaster' as a mnemonic for recalling the main elements required for mitigating MCIs in the hospital emergency department. PMID:25416374

  20. Fractured rheumatoid elbow: treatment with Souter elbow arthroplasty--a clinical and radiologic midterm follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ikävalko, M; Lehto, M U

    2001-01-01

    We report the results in 26 patients who had 32 preoperative fractures treated with Souter elbow arthroplasty. All were rheumatoid patients with a mean disease duration of 29.7 years (range, 10 to 43). Six of the fractures were of the olecranon and 26 of the distal humerus. The time interval between fracture and arthroplasty was 9 months (mean; range, 0 to 48). Fragments were not excised, and osteosynthesis was performed. The follow-up was 2.6 years (mean; range, 0.5 to 8), when 20 of the fractures had united and 12 had not. K-wire fixation, either alone or in combination with cerclage or PDS suture, and bone grafting led to satisfactory results. Union was verified in 14 of 17 cases treated with this technique. There were no severe early complications. Six patients had late complications. In 3 cases, loosening of the humeral component was observed radiologically. One patient had a hematogenous deep infection 4 years after the operation, and 2 patients had avulsion rupture of the triceps tendon. Fracture in the badly destroyed elbow can be more reasonably treated with an arthroplasty than with an attempt of osteosynthesis before arthroplasty. If excision of the fragments is avoided, original, or near original, anatomy of the elbow joint can be better restored and acceptable outcome obtained with elbow arthroplasty. PMID:11408908

  1. An automated motion measurement system for clinical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K D; Mottier, F M; Simmons, D W; Cohen, W; Pavlak, R; Cornell, D P; Hankins, G B

    1982-01-01

    An automated motion measurement system using a television camera interfaced to a computer was constructed and evaluated to determine its applicability to clinical gait analysis. Experimental data indicate that the motion measurement system has a resolution of 1 part in 2000 and a static accuracy of 1 part in 1000 with a worst case dynamic error of 1 part in 300. The study has also shown that this system can reliably track multiple passive markers on a human illuminated with infrared light emitting diodes. This approach minimizes patient distraction, since the illumination is not visible, and reduces patient discomfort since a marker telemetry back pack system, to control active markers, is not needed. Further, the motion measurement system has been successfully demonstrated under conditions similar to those expected in a clinical environment. PMID:7130206

  2. Radiological study of the knee joint line position measured from the fibular head and proximal tibial landmarks.

    PubMed

    Havet, Eric; Gabrion, Antoine; Leiber-Wackenheim, Frederic; Vernois, Joël; Olory, Bruno; Mertl, Patrice

    2007-06-01

    Restoring the joint line level is one of the surgical challenges during revision of total knee arthroplasty. The position of the tibial surface is commonly estimated by its distance to the apex of fibular head, but no study evaluating this distance accurately has been published yet. The purpose of this work was to study the distance between the knee joint line and the apex of the fibular head and the proximal tibia, particularly the tibial tuberosity. Variability with clinical data and relations with other local measurements have been evaluated on knee radiographs (an antero-posterior view, a medio-lateral view and an anteroposterior full length view) of 100 subjects (125 knees). Results showed no correlation between the joint line-fibular head apex distance and any clinical data of the patients, or any other performed measurements. Relations between tibial measurements and the sexe or the height of the subjects were noted. Besides, the review of the 25 bilateral cases did not show statistically significant side difference but the descriptive analysis showed too large discrepancies for the joint line-fibular head apex distance to be used as a landmark. We conclude that the fibular head apex cannot be used as a morphologic landmark to determine the knee joint line position. Its interest in clinical and surgical practice must be discussed. PMID:17440678

  3. Application of nitric oxide measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma

    PubMed Central

    Malinovschi, Andrei; Ludviksdottir, Dora; Tufvesson, Ellen; Rolla, Giovanni; Bjermer, Leif; Alving, Kjell; Diamant, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a convenient, non-invasive method for the assessment of active, mainly Th2-driven, airway inflammation, which is sensitive to treatment with standard anti-inflammatory therapy. Consequently, FeNO serves as a valued tool to aid diagnosis and monitoring in several asthma phenotypes. More recently, FeNO has been evaluated in several other respiratory, infectious, and/or immunological conditions. In this short review, we provide an overview of several clinical studies and discuss the status of potential applications of NO measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma. PMID:26672962

  4. Clinical evaluation of five electronic root canal length measuring instruments.

    PubMed

    Fouad, A F; Krell, K V; McKendry, D J; Koorbusch, G F; Olson, R A

    1990-09-01

    A previous in vitro study has shown high accuracy, but no clinically significant differences in a group of five electronic root canal length measuring instruments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of the same group of instruments under clinical conditions and to correlate their accuracy to radiographic estimates of canal length. Five electronic root canal length measuring instruments were used to measure the working length to the "apex" in 20 single-rooted teeth scheduled for extraction. After extraction, the actual canal length was measured visually to a point just within the apical foramen. This length was compared with instrument length as determined electronically. The accuracy of the instruments in determining canal measurement within +/- 0.5 mm from the apical foramen varied from 55 to 75%. The differences between the instruments were not statistically significant. On average, all of the instruments except for the Endocater gave canal length measurements that were beyond the apical foramen. The variability of the measurements, which was comparable to that of estimates of canal length from preoperative radiographs, indicated that radiographic verification of the working length is still desirable. PMID:2098464

  5. Development of the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement System to Measure Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yu, Wei-Chieh; Chu, Tsui-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Critical thinking skills and clinical competence are for providing quality patient care. The purpose of this study is to develop the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement system based on the Clinical Reasoning Model. The system can evaluate and identify learning needs for clinical competency and be used as a learning tool to increase clinical competency by using computers. The system includes 10 high-risk, high-volume clinical case scenarios coupled with questions testing clinical reasoning, interpersonal, and technical skills. Questions were sequenced to reflect patients' changing condition and arranged by following the process of collecting and managing information, diagnosing and differentiating urgency of problems, and solving problems. The content validity and known-groups validity was established. The Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 was 0.90 and test-retest reliability was supported (r = 0.78). Nursing educators can use the system to understand students' needs for achieving clinical competence, and therefore, educational plans can be made to better prepare students and facilitate their smooth transition to a future clinical environment. Clinical nurses can use the system to evaluate their performance-based abilities and weakness in clinical reasoning. Appropriate training programs can be designed and implemented to practically promote nurses' clinical competence and quality of patient care. PMID:26829522

  6. Studies on nursing risks and measures of clinical medication.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Bai, Jie; Huang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the cause analysis of clinical medication nursing risks and propose relevant nursing measures, so as to control and reduce the clinical nursing risks and reach the physical and mental safety of patients and nurses. Clinical nursing risk events with 30 cases in TCM Hospital of Zhengzhou City from June 2010 to April 2012 were underwent statistical analyses. The risk of medication error ranked the first in the direct reasons of nursing risks, accounting for a higher ratio. Moreover, the reasons of nursing risks were also involved in nonstandard operation, disease observation and other relative factors. Nurses must fully understand the relative factors of medication nursing risks, regarding the patients as their own family and always permeating the consciousness of nursing risks into the working process. PMID:26525028

  7. Single-blind randomized clinical trial to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes after one year of immediate versus delayed implant placement supporting full-arch prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Bagán, Leticia; Fichy-Fernandez, Antonio J.; Canullo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare peri-implant health, marginal bone loss and success of immediate and delayed implant placement for rehabilitation with full-arch fixed prostheses. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective, randomized, single-blind, clinical preliminary trial. Patients were randomized into two treatment groups. In Group A implants were placed immediately post-extraction and in Group B six months after extraction. The following control time-points were established: one week, six months and twelve months after loading. Measurements were taken of peri-implant crevicular fluid volume, plaque index, gingival retraction, keratinized mucosa, probing depth, modified gingival index and presence of mucositis. Implant success rates were evaluated for the two groups. The study sample included fifteen patients (nine women and six men) with a mean average age of 63.7 years. One hundred and forty-four implants were placed: 76 placed in healed sites and 68 placed immediately. Results: At the moment of prosthetic loading, keratinized mucosa width and probing depth were higher in immediate implants than delayed implants, with statistically significant differences. However, after six and twelve months, differences between groups had disappeared. Bone loss was 0.54 ± 0.39 mm for immediate implants and 0.66 ± 0.25 mm for delayed implants (p=0.201). No implants failed in either group. Conclusions: The present study with a short follow-up and a small sample yielded no statistically significant differences in implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss between immediate and delayed implants with fixed full-arch prostheses. Peri-implant health showed no statistically significant differences for any of the studied parameters (crevicular fluid volume, plaque index, gingival retraction, keratinized mucosa, probing depth, modified gingival index and presence of mucositis) at the twelve-month follow-up. Key words:Immediate implants, delayed implants

  8. A study of clinical profile, radiological and electroencephalographic characteristics of suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a tertiary care centre in South India

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Javali, Mahendra; Mehta, Anish; Sharma, Suryanarayana; Acharya, Purushottam; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disease classified under transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) or prion diseases. It is characterized by long asymptomatic period followed by rapid clinical deterioration leading to the death within months. The disease is still under-reported in India. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic characteristics of eight cases of CJD encountered in MS Ramaiah Medical college and Hospital, Bangalore over the past 3 years (2010-2013). This was retrospective, observational, hospital-based study. Results: The mean age of patients was 66.6 years (range: 54-82) and there was female predominance (five patients). The main clinical manifestations were cognitive disturbance (8/8) and myoclonus (8/8), followed by behavioral disturbance (5/8), ataxia (5/8) and extra-pyramidal symptoms/signs (4/8). Time interval (mean) between onset of disease to death was 6.6 months (range: 3-14). Brain MRI abnormalities were noted in 6 patients: Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensities with restriction on diffusion-weighted image/apparent diffusion coefficient (DWI/ADC) in caudate and putamen, and diffusion hyperintensities without restriction on ADC in parieto-occipital, frontal and temporal regions. Classical electroencephalogram (EEG) changes of periodic triphasic waves were seen in 87% of patients. The CSF 14-3-3 protein assay was positive in two patients (out of four). Seven cases were probable CJD and one was possible CJD. Conclusion: A strong clinical suspicion aided by characteristic brain MRI and EEG abnormalities is essential for timely diagnosis of this fatal disease. PMID:25552850

  9. Adult post-mortem imaging in traumatic and cardiorespiratory death and its relation to clinical radiological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Adlam, D; Robinson, C; Pakkal, M; Rutty, G N

    2014-01-01

    The use of post-mortem imaging is expanding throughout the world with increasing use of advanced imaging techniques, such as contrast-enhanced CT and MRI. The questions asked of post-mortem imaging are complex and can be very different, for example for natural sudden death investigation will focus on the cause, whereas for trauma the cause of death is often clear, but injury patterns may be very revealing in investigating the background to the incident. Post-mortem imaging is different to clinical imaging regarding both the appearance of pathology and the information required, but there is much to learn from many years of clinical research in the use of these techniques. Furthermore, it is possible that post-mortem imaging research could be used not only for investigating the cause of death but also as a model to conduct clinically relevant research. This article reviews challenges to the development of post-mortem imaging for trauma, identification and cardiorespiratory death, and how they may be influenced by current clinical thinking and practice. PMID:24338941

  10. Novel Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiddens, Harm AWM; Puderbach, Michael; Venegas, Jose G; Ratjen, Felix; Donaldson, Scott H; Davis, Stephanie D; Rowe, Steven M; Sagel, Scott D; Higgins, Mark; Waltz, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common inherited condition caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane regulator protein. With increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CF and the development of new therapies there comes the need to develop new outcome measures to assess the disease, its progression and response to treatment. As there are limitations to the current endpoints accepted for regulatory purposes, a workshop to discuss novel endpoints for clinical trials in CF was held in Anaheim, California in November 2011. The pros and cons of novel outcome measures with potential utility for evaluation of novel treatments in CF were critically evaluated. The highlights of the 2011 workshop and subsequent advances in technologies and techniques that could be used to inform the development of clinical trial endpoints are summarized in this review. Pediatr Pulmonol. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Pulmonology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25641878

  11. Measurement of social capital among clinical research trainees.

    PubMed

    Primack, Brian A; Colditz, Jason B; Cohen, Elan; Switzer, Galen E; Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Seltzer, Deborah L; Rubio, Doris M; Kapoor, Wishwa N

    2014-02-01

    While physical and human capital are established as important predictors of success among early-career clinical investigators, less is known about the role of social capital. The authors aimed to develop a brief scale to assess social capital in this population and test its reliability and validity. A three-item assessment was developed based on a conceptual framework and measures of social capital from other fields and was administered to 414 clinical research trainees at the University of Pittsburgh in 2007-2012. The measure exhibited good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.71) and a normal distribution. On a 10-point scale, mean social capital was 6.4 (SD = 1.7). Social capital was significantly associated with 7 of the 9 expected constructs: sex, age, confidence in research skills, work-related motivation, burnout, and social support. Exploratory multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that social capital was most strongly associated with higher research confidence (β = 0.35, p < 0.001), higher extrinsic motivation (β = 0.50, p = 0.003), and lower burnout (ptrend = 0.02). This three-item scale measures social capital in this population with adequate internal consistency reliability, face validity, and construct validity. This brief assessment provides a tool that may be valuable to benchmark social capital of clinical research trainees and to better contextualize programmatic and trainee outcomes. PMID:24118964

  12. Dehydration and Performance on Clinical Concussion Measures in Collegiate Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Amanda Friedline; Mihalik, Jason P.; Register-Mihalik, Johna K.; Mays, Sally; Prentice, William E.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The effects of dehydration induced by wrestling-related weight-cutting tactics on clinical concussion outcomes, such as neurocognitive function, balance performance, and symptoms, have not been adequately studied. Objective: To evaluate the effects of dehydration on the outcome of clinical concussion measures in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate wrestlers. Design: Repeated-measures design. Setting: Clinical research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-two Division I healthy collegiate male wrestlers (age = 20.0 ± 1.4 years; height = 175.0 ± 7.5 cm; baseline mass = 79.2 ± 12.6 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed preseason concussion baseline testing in early September. Weight and urine samples were also collected at this time. All participants reported to prewrestling practice and postwrestling practice for the same test battery and protocol in mid-October. They had begun practicing weight-cutting tactics a day before prepractice and postpractice testing. Differences between these measures permitted us to evaluate how dehydration and weight-cutting tactics affected concussion measures. Main Outcome Measures: Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2), Balance Error Scoring System, Graded Symptom Checklist, and Simple Reaction Time scores. The Simple Reaction Time was measured using the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics. Results: The SCAT2 measurements were lower at prepractice (P = .002) and postpractice (P < .001) when compared with baseline. The BESS error scores were higher at postpractice when compared with baseline (P = .015). The GSC severity scores were higher at prepractice (P = .011) and postpractice (P < .001) than at baseline and at postpractice when than at prepractice (P = .003). The number of Graded Symptom Checklist symptoms reported was also higher at prepractice (P = .036) and postpractice (P < .001) when compared with baseline, and at postpractice when compared with

  13. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  14. Clinically Relevant Measures of Fit? A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Nancy R.

    2012-01-01

    Risk reclassification methods have become popular in the medical literature as a means of comparing risk prediction models. In this issue of the Journal, Pencina et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(6):492–494) present further results for continuous measures of model discrimination and describe their characteristics in nested models with normally distributed variables. Measures include the change in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, the integrated discrimination improvement, and the continuous net reclassification improvement. Although theoretically interesting, these continuous measures may not be the most appropriate to assess clinical utility. The continuous net reclassification improvement, in particular, is a measure of effect rather than model improvement and can sometimes exhibit erratic behavior, as illustrated in 2 examples. Caution is needed before using this as a measure of improvement. Further, the test of the continuous net reclassification improvement and that for the integrated discrimination improvement are similar to the likelihood ratio test in nested models and may be overinterpreted. Reclassification in risk strata, while requiring thresholds, may be more relevant clinically with its ability to examine potential changes in treatment decisions. PMID:22875759

  15. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Castle, Jessica R; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J Hans; Doyle, Francis J; Griffen, Steven C; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L; Nimri, Revital; O'Neal, David N; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Zisser, Howard; Lum, John W

    2016-07-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27330126

  16. Two cases of Temple-Baraitser syndrome: natural history and further delineation of the clinical and radiologic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Joseph J

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on two individuals with Temple-Baraitser syndrome, manifesting typical hallux and pollex findings, global developmental delay, and seizures. In the five previous cases identified to date, consistent craniofacial and osseous characteristics have been observed. The children described herein exhibit minor differences within this phenotype and are older, highlighting the phenotypic variability and natural history of the clinical and radiographic findings. PMID:25629734

  17. Two cases of Temple–Baraitser syndrome: natural history and further delineation of the clinical and radiologic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on two individuals with Temple–Baraitser syndrome, manifesting typical hallux and pollex findings, global developmental delay, and seizures. In the five previous cases identified to date, consistent craniofacial and osseous characteristics have been observed. The children described herein exhibit minor differences within this phenotype and are older, highlighting the phenotypic variability and natural history of the clinical and radiographic findings. PMID:25629734

  18. Radiology and the mobile device: Radiology in motion.

    PubMed

    Panughpath, Sridhar G; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2012-10-01

    The use of mobile devices is revolutionizing the way we communicate, interact, are entertained, and organize our lives. With healthcare in general and radiology in particular becoming increasingly digital, the use of such devices in radiologic practice is inevitable. This article reviews the current status of the use of mobile devices in the clinical practice of radiology, namely in emergency teleradiology. Technical parameters such as luminance and resolution are discussed. The article also discusses the benefits of such mobility vis-à-vis the current limitations of the technologies available. PMID:23833412

  19. Interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This reference gives a step-by-step presentation of the elements of interventional radiology. CONTENTS: Introduction; Radiation protection; Embolotherapy; Interventional techniques in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding; Transluminal angioplasty; Thrombolytic therapy; Foreign body removal; Inferior vena cava filter placement; Percutaneous uroradiologic techniques; Interventional techniques in the biliary tract; Nonvascular gastrointestinal tract dilations; Percutaneous biopsy techniques; Drainage of abscess fluid collections in the abdomen.

  20. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim of the book is to show radiology as a dynamic subject which can help clinicians, while at the same time assisting radiologists to understand the needs of the orthopedic surgeon.

  1. Clinical workflow for spinal curvature measurement with portable ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabanfar, Reza; Yan, Christina; Kempston, Michael; Borschneck, Daniel; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: Spinal curvature monitoring is essential in making treatment decisions in scoliosis. Monitoring entails radiographic examinations, however repeated ionizing radiation exposure has been shown to increase cancer risk. Ultrasound does not emit ionizing radiation and is safer for spinal curvature monitoring. We investigated a clinical sonography protocol and challenges associated with position-tracked ultrasound in spinal curvature measurement in scoliosis. METHODS: Transverse processes were landmarked along each vertebra using tracked ultrasound snapshots. The transverse process angle was used to determine the orientation of each vertebra. We tested our methodology on five patients in a local pediatric scoliosis clinic, comparing ultrasound to radiographic curvature measurements. RESULTS: Despite strong correlation between radiographic and ultrasound curvature angles in phantom studies, we encountered new challenges in the clinical setting. Our main challenge was differentiating transverse processes from ribs and other structures during landmarking. We observed up to 13° angle variability for a single vertebra and a 9.85° +/- 10.81° difference between ultrasound and radiographic Cobb angles for thoracic curvatures. Additionally, we were unable to visualize anatomical landmarks in the lumbar region where soft tissue depth was 25-35mm. In volunteers with large Cobb angles (greater than 40° thoracic and 60° lumbar), we observed spinal protrusions resulting in incomplete probe-skin contact and partial ultrasound images not suitable for landmarking. CONCLUSION: Spinal curvature measurement using tracked ultrasound is viable on phantom spine models. In the clinic, new challenges were encountered which must be resolved before a universal sonography protocol can be developed.

  2. Exercise blood pressure: clinical relevance and correct measurement.

    PubMed

    Sharman, J E; LaGerche, A

    2015-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a mandatory safety measure during graded intensity clinical exercise stress testing. While it is generally accepted that exercise hypotension is a poor prognostic sign linked to severe cardiac dysfunction, recent meta-analysis data also implicate excessive rises in submaximal exercise BP with adverse cardiovascular events and mortality, irrespective of resting BP. Although more data is needed to derive submaximal normative BP thresholds, the association of a hypertensive response to exercise with increased cardiovascular risk may be due to underlying hypertension that has gone unnoticed by conventional resting BP screening methods. Delayed BP decline during recovery is also associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Thus, above and beyond being used as a routine safety measure during stress testing, exercise (and recovery) BP may be useful for identifying high-risk individuals and also as an aid to optimise care through appropriate follow-up after exercise stress testing. Accordingly, careful attention should be paid to correct measurement of exercise stress test BP (before, during and after exercise) using a standardised approach with trained operators and validated BP monitoring equipment (manual or automated). Recommendations for exercise BP measurement based on consolidated international guidelines and expert consensus are presented in this review. PMID:25273859

  3. Radiologic Determination of Corpus Callosum Injury in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Associated Clinical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Shin; Yang, Jin Seo; Cho, Yong Jun; Kang, Suk Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of corpus callosum injury (CCI) in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) using brain MRI. We also performed a review of the clinical characteristics associated with this injury. Methods A total of 356 patients in the study were diagnosed with TBI, with 94 patients classified as having mild TBI. We included patients with mild TBI for further evaluation if they had normal findings via brain computed tomography (CT) scans and also underwent brain MRI in the acute phase following trauma. As assessed by brain MRI, CCI was defined as a high-signal lesion in T2 sagittal images and a corresponding low-signal lesion as determined by axial gradient echo (GRE) imaging. Based on these criteria, we divided patients into two groups for further analysis : Group I (TBI patients with CCI) and Group II (TBI patients without CCI). Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled in this study (including 16 patients in Group I and 40 patients in Group II). Analysis of clinical symptoms revealed a significant difference in headache severity between groups. Over 50% of patients in Group I experienced prolonged neurological symptoms including dizziness and gait disturbance and were more common in Group I than Group II (dizziness : 37 and 12% in Groups I and II, respectively; gait disturbance : 12 and 0% in Groups I and II, respectively). Conclusion The incidence of CCI in patients with mild TBI was approximately 29%. We suggest that brain MRI is a useful method to reveal the cause of persistent symptoms and predict clinical prognosis. PMID:26361529

  4. Role Of The Bureau Of Radiological Health In Assessment Of Risks From Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mary P.; Athey, T. W.; Phillips, Robert A.

    1982-12-01

    The 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act provide for the classification of a medical device intended for human use into one of three regulatory classes based on the extent of control necessary to ensure safety and effectiveness: Class I, General Controls; Class II, Performance Standards; Class III, Premarket Approval. Class III devices are those for which there is insufficient information available to ensure safety and effectiveness through General Controls and Performance Standards alone. New devices such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems fall under Class III because they were developed after the date of the law's enactment (28 May 1976). Investigational studies involving human subjects undertaken to develop safety and effectiveness data for a post-enactment Class III device come under the Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Regulation (21 CFR 812). This regulation distinguishes between investigations of devices that pose a significant risk to the human subject and those that do not. A significant risk investigation "presents a potential for serious risk to the health, safety, or welfare of a subject." Procedures for obtaining an IDE differ if the device does or does not pose a significant risk. The sponsor of a clinical trial, and ultimately the Institutional Review Board (IRB), have the primary responsibility to determine whether a certain clinical use of the investigational device represents a significant risk to the subject of the investigation. A finding of significant risk does not mean that a device is too hazardous for clinical studies, but it does mean that a formal application for an IDE must be made to and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before a clinical trial can begin. If the device is deemed not to pose a significant risk, unless otherwise notified by FDA, the sponsor is not required to submit an IDE application to FDA. Instead, the sponsor and investigators must satisfy only

  5. RASCH ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL OUTCOME MEASURES IN SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY

    PubMed Central

    CANO, STEFAN J.; MAYHEW, ANNA; GLANZMAN, ALLAN M.; KROSSCHELL, KRISTIN J.; SWOBODA, KATHRYN J.; MAIN, MARION; STEFFENSEN, BIRGIT F.; BÉRARD, CAROLE; GIRARDOT, FRANÇOISE; PAYAN, CHRISTINE A.M.; MERCURI, EUGENIO; MAZZONE, ELENA; ELSHEIKH, BAKRI; FLORENCE, JULAINE; HYNAN, LINDA S.; IANNACCONE, SUSAN T.; NELSON, LESLIE L.; PANDYA, SHREE; ROSE, MICHAEL; SCOTT, CHARLES; SADJADI, REZA; YORE, MACKENSIE A.; JOYCE, CYNTHIA; KISSEL, JOHN T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Trial design for SMA depends on meaningful rating scales to assess outcomes. In this study Rasch methodology was applied to 9 motor scales in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Methods Data from all 3 SMA types were provided by research groups for 9 commonly used scales. Rasch methodology assessed the ordering of response option thresholds, tests of fit, spread of item locations, residual correlations, and person separation index. Results Each scale had good reliability. However, several issues impacting scale validity were identified, including the extent that items defined clinically meaningful constructs and how well each scale measured performance across the SMA spectrum. Conclusions The sensitivity and potential utility of each SMA scale as outcome measures for trials could be improved by establishing clear definitions of what is measured, reconsidering items that misfit and items whose response categories have reversed thresholds, and adding new items at the extremes of scale ranges. PMID:23836324

  6. Historical perspectives in clinical pathology: a history of glucose measurement.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Nareshni; Ngxamngxa, Unathi; Turzyniecka, Magdalena J; Pillay, Tahir S

    2015-04-01

    This is the second in the series of historical articles dealing with developments in clinical pathology. As one of the most commonly measured analytes in pathology, the assessment of glucose dates back to the time of the ancient Egyptians. It was only in the 19th century that advances in chemistry led to the identification of the sugar in urine being glucose. The following century witnessed the development of more chemical and enzymatic methods which became incorporated into the modern analysers and point-of-care instruments which are as ubiquitous as the modern day cellphones. Tracking the milestones in these developments shows the striking paradigms and the many parallels in the development of other clinical chemistry methods. PMID:25568429

  7. Silicon Matrix Calcium Phosphate as a Bone Substitute: Early Clinical and Radiological Results in a Prospective Study With 12-Month Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pesántez, Carlos Fernando Arias; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Autograft has been the “gold standard” for orthopedic bone grafting applications, but with some clinical challenges. Here we present the rationale and clinical outcomes supporting the use of a bone substitute material that consists of a mixture of two calcium phosphates (HA and ß-TCP), which are integrated into a silicon xerogel matrix, promoting nanocrystalline apatite layers on the surface of the material following implantation into a physiological environment. Methods Twenty-four patients with a median age of 53.80 (36–81) years underwent lumbar spinal fusion for degenerative disease, selected by clinical presentation, X-rays, and MRI findings. Subjects were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. The outcome assessment consisted of visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and radiological assessment analyzing the state of fusion on X-ray and CT evaluation by 3 independent radiologists. Results All patients completed 12-month follow-up. The mean VAS decreased from 9.3 (± 0.9) to 2.4 (± 1.6) and the mean ODI decreased from 55.0 (± 9.2) to 19.3 (± 11.4) at 12-month follow-up. Three months after surgery, 10 patients (41.67%) had solid fusion based on analysis of CT scans and dynamic radiographs. At 6 months postoperatively, the fusion rate had increased to 75% (18 patients). Twelve months after surgery, 95.83% of patients had solid fusion (23 patients). Conclusions The clinical results from this study of silicon matrix calcium phosphate are consistent with previous in vitro studies indicating that this material stimulates formation of a bioactive layer and provides an effective bone graft material for lumbar fusion applications. In comparison with previous studies involving rhBMP-2, silicon matrix calcium phosphate provided a lower fusion rate at 3- and 6-month follow-up points, but after 12 months, the fusion rate was similar, with no statistical differences and lower overall costs. No

  8. Choice of Approach Does Not Affect Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes: A Comparative Cohort of Patients Having Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Patients Having Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion at 24 Months

    PubMed Central

    Malham, Gregory M.; Parker, Rhiannon M.; Blecher, Carl M.; Chow, Fiona Y.; Seex, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected registry data. Objective  This study aimed to compare the clinical and radiologic outcomes between comparative cohorts of patients having anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and patients having lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). Methods  Ninety consecutive patients were treated by a single surgeon with either ALIF (n = 50) or LLIF (n = 40). Inclusion criteria were patients age 45 to 70 years with degenerative disk disease or grade 1 to 2 spondylolisthesis and single-level pathology from L1 to S1. Patient-reported outcome measures included pain (visual analog scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), and quality of life (Short Form 36 physical component score [PCS] and mental component scores [MCS]). Assessment of fusion and measurement of lordosis and posterior disk height were performed on computed tomography scans. Results  At 24 months, patients having ALIF had significant improvements in back (64%) and leg (65%) pain and ODI (60%), PCS (44%), and MCS (26%; p < 0.05) scores. Patients having LLIF had significant improvements in back (56%) and leg (57%) pain and ODI (52%), PCS (48%), and MCS (12%; p < 0.05) scores. Fourteen complications occurred in the ALIF group, and in the LLIF group, there were 17 complications (p > 0.05). The fusion rate was 100% for ALIF and 95% for LLIF (p = 0.1948). ALIF added ∼6 degrees of lordosis and 3 mm of height, primarily measured at L5–S1, and LLIF added ∼3 degrees of lordosis and 2 mm of height between L1 to L5. Mean follow-up was 34.1 months. Conclusions  In comparative cohorts of patients having ALIF and patients having LLIF at 24 months postoperatively, there were no significant differences in clinical outcomes, complication rates, or fusion rates. PMID:27433432

  9. Developing an instrument to measure effective factors on Clinical Learning

    PubMed Central

    DADGARAN, IDEH; SHIRAZI, MANDANA; MOHAMMADI, AEEN; RAVARI, ALI

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although nursing students spend a large part of their learning period in the clinical environment, clinical learning has not been perceived by its nature yet. To develop an instrument to measure effective factors on clinical learning in nursing students. Methods This is a mixed methods study performed in 2 steps. First, the researchers defined “clinical learning” in nursing students through qualitative content analysis and designed items of the questionnaire based on semi-structured individual interviews with nursing students. Then, as the second step, psychometric properties of the questionnaire were evaluated using the face validity, content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency evaluated on 227 students from fourth or higher semesters. All the interviews were recorded and transcribed, and then, they were analyzed using Max Qualitative Data Analysis and all of qualitative data were analyzed using SPSS 14. Results To do the study, we constructed the preliminary questionnaire containing 102 expressions. After determination of face and content validities by qualitative and quantitative approaches, the expressions of the questionnaire were reduced to 45. To determine the construct validity, exploratory factor analysis was applied. The results indicated that the maximum variance percentage (40.55%) was defined by the first 3 factors while the rest of the total variance percentage (59.45%) was determined by the other 42 factors. Results of exploratory factor analysis of this questionnaire indicated the presence of 3 instructor-staff, students, and educational related factors. Finally, 41 expressions were kept in 3 factor groups. The α-Cronbach coefficient (0.93) confirmed the high internal consistency of the questionnaire. Conclusion Results indicated that the prepared questionnaire was an efficient instrument in the study of the effective factors on clinical learning as viewed by nursing students since it involves 41 expressions and

  10. Frailty measurement in research and clinical practice: A review.

    PubMed

    Dent, Elsa; Kowal, Paul; Hoogendijk, Emiel O

    2016-06-01

    One of the leading causes of morbidity and premature mortality in older people is frailty. Frailty occurs when multiple physiological systems decline, to the extent that an individual's cellular repair mechanisms cannot maintain system homeostasis. This review gives an overview of the definitions and measurement of frailty in research and clinical practice, including: Fried's frailty phenotype; Rockwood and Mitnitski's Frailty Index (FI); the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) Index; Edmonton Frailty Scale (EFS); the Fatigue, Resistance, Ambulation, Illness and Loss of weight (FRAIL) Index; Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS); the Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI); Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI); PRISMA-7; Groningen Frailty Indicator (GFI), Sherbrooke Postal Questionnaire (SPQ); the Gérontopôle Frailty Screening Tool (GFST) and the Kihon Checklist (KCL), among others. We summarise the main strengths and limitations of existing frailty measurements, and examine how well these measurements operationalise frailty according to Clegg's guidelines for frailty classification - that is: their accuracy in identifying frailty; their basis on biological causative theory; and their ability to reliably predict patient outcomes and response to potential therapies. PMID:27039014

  11. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical myelopathy: a meta-analysis of clinical and radiological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Jaebong; Kang, James D; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Posterior cervical surgery, expansive laminoplasty (EL) or laminectomy followed by fusion (LF), is usually performed in patients with multilevel (≥ 3) cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, the superiority of either of these techniques is still open to debate. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and postoperative kyphosis in patients undergoing EL versus LF by performing a meta-analysis. METHODS Included in the meta-analysis were all studies of EL versus LF in adults with multilevel CSM in MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane library. A random-effects model was applied to pool data using the mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, such as the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) grade, the cervical curvature index (CCI), and the visual analog scale (VAS) score for neck pain. RESULTS Seven studies comprising 302 and 290 patients treated with EL and LF, respectively, were included in the final analyses. Both treatment groups showed slight cervical lordosis and moderate neck pain in the baseline state. Both groups were similarly improved in JOA grade (MD 0.09, 95% CI -0.37 to 0.54, p = 0.07) and neck pain VAS score (MD -0.33, 95% CI -1.50 to 0.84, p = 0.58). Both groups evenly lost cervical lordosis. In the LF group lordosis seemed to be preserved in long-term follow-up studies, although the difference between the 2 treatment groups was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Both EL and LF lead to clinical improvement and loss of lordosis evenly. There is no evidence to support EL over LF in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Any superiority between EL and LF remains in question, although the LF group shows favorable long-term results. PMID:25815808

  12. Radiological and clinical outcome of screw placement in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: evaluation with low-dose computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ohlin, Acke; Strömbeck, Anita; Maly, Pavel; Sundgren, Pia C.

    2009-01-01

    Posterior corrective surgery using “all pedicle screw construct” carries risk of neurovascular complications. The study aims were to assess the screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using CT with low-radiation dose, and to evaluate the clinical outcome in patients with misplaced pedicle screws. CTs of 49 consecutive patients (873 screws, 79% thoracic) were retrospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. A new grading system was developed to distinguish between lateral, medial and anterior cortical perforations, endplate perforation and foraminal perforation. The grading system is based on whether the cortical violation is partial or total rather than on mm-basis. The overall rate of screw misplacement was 17% (n = 149): 8% were laterally placed and 6.1% were medially placed. The rates of anterior cortical, endplate and foraminal perforation were 1.5, 0.9, and 0.5%, respectively. Lateral cortical perforation was more frequent in the thoracic spine (P = 0.005), whereas other types of misplacement including medial cortical perforation were more frequent on the left and the concave side of scoliotic curves (P = 0.002 and 0.003). No neurovascular complications were reported. The association between the occurrence of screw misplacement and the Cobb angle was statistically significant (P = 0.037). Misplacements exceeding half screw diameter should be classified as unacceptable. Low-dose CT implies exposing these young individuals to a significantly lower radiation dose than do other protocols used in daily clinical practice. We recommend using low-dose CT and the grading system proposed here in the postoperative assessment of screw placement. PMID:19888607

  13. Evaluation of 2.0-mm Titanium Three-Dimensional Curved Angle Strut Plate in the Fixation of Mandibular Angle Fractures—A Prospective Clinical and Radiological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chhabaria, Gaurav; Halli, Rajshekhar; Chandan, Sanjay; Joshi, Samir; Setiya, Sneha; Shah, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and complication rate with use of 2.0-mm titanium three-dimensional (3D) curved angle strut plate for mandibular angle fractures. Twenty cases requiring internal fixation of the mandibular angle by 2.0-mm titanium 3D curved angle strut plates were evaluated. Postoperative clinical and radiological analyses were done on 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th weeks, which included wound healing, transmitted movements, difficulty in function and occlusion, and neurosensory changes, if any. Reasonable level of success in terms of immediate jaw function was noted in all cases. Transient inferior alveolar nerve dysfunction was observed in three cases, which recovered gradually in 2 months, and surgical site infection was observed in two cases, which resolved with appropriate course of antibiotics and wound care. Fixation of mandibular angle fractures with a 2.0-mm titanium 3D curved angle strut plate is predictable, expeditious, and has less complication rate. PMID:25050147

  14. Clinical outcome study and radiological findings of Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasty. a follow-up of 6 to 15 years.

    PubMed

    Paleochorlidis, Ilias S; Badras, Leonidas S; Skretas, Efstathios F; Georgaklis, Vasilios A; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2009-01-01

    We report the clinical and radiological outcome of 99 Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasties in 84 patients followed up prospectively for a mean period of 9.5 (range, 6-15) years. There were 29 (34.5%) male and 55 (65.5%) female patients with a mean age of 62.85 years (range, 50-70 years) at the time of surgery. All patients had osteoarthritis. One acetabular component and one stem were revised due to aseptic loosening. One femoral stem was revised due to a periprosthetic fracture. HHS score improved from a preoperative mean of 62.56 points (SD 8.87) to a final postoperative follow-up mean of 93.48 (SD 7.7). Cumulative success rate for both implants at 13 years, with aseptic loosening as the end point, was 97.05%, while for both implants at 13 years, with revision for any reason as the end point, it was 91.17%. Satisfactory results were observed with the use of this prosthesis. PMID:20041375

  15. Clinical and radiological outcome of anterior-posterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for symptomatic disc degeneration: a retrospective comparative study of 133 patients.

    PubMed

    Faundez, Antonio A; Schwender, James D; Safriel, Yair; Gilbert, Thomas J; Mehbod, Amir A; Denis, Francis; Transfeldt, Ensor E; Wroblewski, Jill M

    2009-02-01

    Abundant data are available for direct anterior/posterior spine fusion (APF) and some for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), but only few studies from one institution compares the two techniques. One-hundred and thirty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed, 68 having APF and 65 having TLIF. All patients had symptomatic disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Only those with one or two-level surgeries were included. Clinical chart and radiologic reviews were done, fusion solidity assessed, and functional outcomes determined by pre- and postoperative SF-36 and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and a satisfaction questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 24 months. The mean operating room time and hospital length of stay were less in the TLIF group. The blood loss was slightly less in the TLIF group (409 vs. 480 cc.). Intra-operative complications were higher in the APF group, mostly due to vein lacerations in the anterior retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative complications were higher in the TLIF group due to graft material extruding against the nerve root or wound drainage. The pseudarthrosis rate was statistically equal (APF 17.6% and TLIF 23.1%) and was higher than most published reports. Significant improvements were noted in both groups for the SF-36 questionnaires. The mean ODI scores at follow-up were 33.5 for the APF and 39.5 for the TLIF group. The patient satisfaction rate was equal for the two groups. PMID:19125304

  16. Clinical and radiological outcome of anterior–posterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for symptomatic disc degeneration: a retrospective comparative study of 133 patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, James D.; Safriel, Yair; Gilbert, Thomas J.; Mehbod, Amir A.; Denis, Francis; Transfeldt, Ensor E.; Wroblewski, Jill M.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant data are available for direct anterior/posterior spine fusion (APF) and some for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), but only few studies from one institution compares the two techniques. One-hundred and thirty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed, 68 having APF and 65 having TLIF. All patients had symptomatic disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Only those with one or two-level surgeries were included. Clinical chart and radiologic reviews were done, fusion solidity assessed, and functional outcomes determined by pre- and postoperative SF-36 and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and a satisfaction questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 24 months. The mean operating room time and hospital length of stay were less in the TLIF group. The blood loss was slightly less in the TLIF group (409 vs. 480 cc.). Intra-operative complications were higher in the APF group, mostly due to vein lacerations in the anterior retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative complications were higher in the TLIF group due to graft material extruding against the nerve root or wound drainage. The pseudarthrosis rate was statistically equal (APF 17.6% and TLIF 23.1%) and was higher than most published reports. Significant improvements were noted in both groups for the SF-36 questionnaires. The mean ODI scores at follow-up were 33.5 for the APF and 39.5 for the TLIF group. The patient satisfaction rate was equal for the two groups. PMID:19125304

  17. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case.

  18. Genitourinary radiology

    SciTech Connect

    McClennan, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review of genitourinary radiology highlights new findings in the field that have occurred in the past year. The physiology of contrast media, and the occasional life-threatening contrast medial reaction are discussed. Common urologic problems such as stones, infection, and obstruction are examined in order to interpret static radiographs in a more meaningful way. The field of interventional uroradiology continues to expand, with new procedures being tried and new indications for old procedures being developed. (KRM)

  19. Open reduction and internal fixation of extracapsular mandibular condyle fractures: a long-term clinical and radiological follow-up of 25 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During the last 2 decades, many studies on the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture have been published. The incidence of mandibular condyle fractures is variable, ranging from 17.5% to 52% of all mandibular fractures. This retrospective study evaluated the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes after surgical treatment of 25 patients with a total of 26 extracapsular condyle fractures. Methods We used 2 types of surgical approaches, the retromandibular retroparotid or preauricular approach. Three kinds of rigid internal fixation plates were used—single plate, double plate, and trapezoidal plate. The following post-operative clinical parameters were evaluated: dental occlusion, facial nerve functionality, skin scarring, and temporomandibular joint functionality. All patients underwent post-operative orthopanoramic radiography and computed tomography. The patients were also monitored for complications such as Frey’s syndrome, infection, salivary fistula, plate fracture, and permanent paralysis of the facial nerve; the patient’s satisfaction was also recorded. Results Of the 25 patients, 80% showed occlusion recovery, 88% had no facial nerve injury, and 88% presented good surgical skin scarring. The patients showed early complete recovery of temporomandibular joint functionality and 72% of them were found to be asymptomatic. The postoperative radiographs of all patients indicated good recovery of the anatomical condylar region, and 80% of them had no postoperative complications. The average degree of patient satisfaction was 8.32 out of 10. Our results confirm that the technique of open reduction and internal fixation in association with postoperative functional rehabilitation therapy should be considered for treating patients with extracapsular condylar fractures. Conclusion The topic of condylar injury has generated more discussion and controversy than any other topic in the field of maxillofacial trauma. We confirm that open reduction and

  20. Comparison of Epidemiological, Clinical, Laboratory and Radiological Features of Hospitalized Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients With Pulmonary Tuberculosis at Razi Hospital in Ahvaz

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Khoshkho, Mohammad Mehdi; Salmanzadeh, Shokrolah; Eghtesad, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) due to suppressive effect on cellular immunity can impact on progression of tuberculosis (TB). Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of DM on the epidemiological, clinical and para clinical aspects of pulmonary TB. Patients and Methods: The information of 148 admitted pulmonary TB patients in infectious ward of Razi hospital in Ahvaz from 2009 to 2010 was extracted from their medical files. The patients were divided into two groups as TB with DM (n = 36) and TB without DM (n = 112). The related data on epidemiology, signs, symptoms, radiology and sputum smear examination in both groups were compared in SPSS 16 by using chi squared test. Results: The mean age of TB with DM patients was higher TB without DM patients (56.6 ± 12.7 vs. 44.8 ± 18.3; respectively, P = 0.006). Whereas cough, night sweating, fever and weigh loss was not statistically different, sputum, hemoptysis and dyspnea was more prominent in TB with DM (69.4%, 33.4%, 44.5% vs. 36.6%, 9.8%, 20.5%; P = 0.005, P = 0.001, P = 0.005, respectively). In chest x-ray, cavitation and reticulonodular pattern was more frequent in TB with DM (55.5%, 22.2% vs. 31.2%, 8% - P = 0.008, P = 0.02, respectively). The rate of sputum smear positivity in TB with DM and TB without DM was 66.6% and 47.3%, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusions: According to the results of this study, in approach to every DM cases suffering of respiratory symptoms such as productive cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea in association with cavitation or miliary mottling in chest x-ray, pulmonary TB should be considered at the top of the differential diagnosis list. PMID:25485064

  1. The Prevalence of Tonsilloliths and Other Soft Tissue Calcifications in Patients Attending Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Clinic of the University of Iowa

    PubMed Central

    Bamgbose, Babatunde Olamide; Ruprecht, Axel; Timmons, Sherry; Qian, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of tonsiliths in patients attending the oral and maxillofacial radiology clinic of The University of Iowa and to determine if there is any correlation between the presence of tonsiliths and the presence of stones in other body tissues, ducts, or organs. Study Design. This was a two-part study. The first part was a prevalence study whereas the second was a matched pair case-control study. The matched pair case-control study commenced after the prevalence study was concluded. No new or unusual radiographs were made in this study. The study only reviewed radiographs that were made for clinical purposes. Results. A total of 1524 pantomographs were reviewed and 124 subjects (53 males and 71 females) aged 9 years and 2 months to 87 years (mean age 52.6 years) were included for data analysis. Thirty-eight subjects had single tonsiliths whereas 86 subjects had multiple tonsiliths. The prevalence of tonsiliths in the study population was 8.14%. A total of 20 subjects were included in the second part of the study, comprising 10 each for matched pair case-control groups. The observations did not indicate any correlation between the presence of tonsiliths and the presence of stones in other body tissues, ducts, or organs. Conclusion. The prevalence of tonsiliths in our study population was 8.14%. The observations in our study do not support any correlations between tonsiliths and calcifications in other body tissues, organs, or ducts. PMID:24587913

  2. Fractures of the neck of the fifth metacarpal bone, treated by percutaneous intramedullary nailing: surgical technique, radiological and clinical results study (28 cases).

    PubMed

    Boussakri, Hassan; Elidrissi, Mohamad; Azarkane, Mohamad; Bensaad, Soufiane; Bachiri, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohamed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    This study report the results in 28 patients affected by closed fractures of the neck of the fifth metacarpal bone (boxer's fracture), treated with percutaneous elastic intramedullary nailing using a single wire, to verify the effectiveness of this surgical treatment. We reviewed the results of 28 patients treated with A single Kirschner wire (K-wire) pre-bent in a lazy-S fashion with a mild bend at approximately 5 millimeters, The K-wire is inserted blunt end first in an antegrade manner and the fracture reduced as the wire is passed across the fracture site The wire is usually removed with pliers post-operatively at four weeks in the fracture clinic. The follow-up period averaged of 20,75 months. The parameters evaluated included angulation, rotational alignment, postoperative metacarpophalangeal (MCP) range of motion, and time to union. We opted for this treatment in all cases, regardless volar angulation of the metacarpal head, malrotation of the fifth finger and associated or/no with a severe swelling of the hand. All the patients were reviewed clinically and radiologically at an average of 20,75 months after surgery. At the final follow-up, no patient reported residual pain and All fractures proceeded to bony union but we have one fracture had to be revised for failed fixation and three superficial wound infections needed antibiotic treatment. We recommend that this minimally invasive: percutaneous intramedullary nailing using a single k-wire in all metacarpal neck fracture (boxers' fractures), especially when severe swelling of the hand is present, with good functional results and low morbidity. PMID:25419314

  3. Clinical measurements analysis of multi-spectral photoplethysmograph biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asare, Lasma; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-05-01

    The developed portable multi-spectral photoplethysmograph (MS-PPG) optical biosensor device, intended for analysis of peripheral blood volume pulsations at different vascular depths, has been clinically verified. Multi-spectral monitoring was performed by means of a four - wavelengths (454 nm, 519 nm, 632 nm and 888 nm) light emitted diodes and photodiode with multi-channel signal output processing. Two such sensors can be operated in parallel and imposed on the patient's skin. The clinical measurements confirmed ability to detect PPG signals at four wavelengths simultaneously and to record temporal differences in the signal shapes (corresponding to different penetration depths) in normal and pathological skin. This study analyzed wavelengths relations between systole and diastole peak difference at various tissue depths in normal and pathological skin. The difference between parameters of healthy and pathological skin at various skin depths could be explain by oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin dominance at different wavelengths operated in sensor. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications in dermatology for skin assessment are discussed.

  4. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  5. Accurate skin dose measurements using radiochromic film in clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, S.; Seuntjens, J.; Abdel-Rahman, W.; Evans, M.; Olivares, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Vuong, Te; Soares, Christopher G.

    2006-04-15

    Megavoltage x-ray beams exhibit the well-known phenomena of dose buildup within the first few millimeters of the incident phantom surface, or the skin. Results of the surface dose measurements, however, depend vastly on the measurement technique employed. Our goal in this study was to determine a correction procedure in order to obtain an accurate skin dose estimate at the clinically relevant depth based on radiochromic film measurements. To illustrate this correction, we have used as a reference point a depth of 70 {mu}. We used the new GAFCHROMIC[reg] dosimetry films (HS, XR-T, and EBT) that have effective points of measurement at depths slightly larger than 70 {mu}. In addition to films, we also used an Attix parallel-plate chamber and a home-built extrapolation chamber to cover tissue-equivalent depths in the range from 4 {mu} to 1 mm of water-equivalent depth. Our measurements suggest that within the first millimeter of the skin region, the PDD for a 6 MV photon beam and field size of 10x10 cm{sup 2} increases from 14% to 43%. For the three GAFCHROMIC[reg] dosimetry film models, the 6 MV beam entrance skin dose measurement corrections due to their effective point of measurement are as follows: 15% for the EBT, 15% for the HS, and 16% for the XR-T model GAFCHROMIC[reg] films. The correction factors for the exit skin dose due to the build-down region are negligible. There is a small field size dependence for the entrance skin dose correction factor when using the EBT GAFCHROMIC[reg] film model. Finally, a procedure that uses EBT model GAFCHROMIC[reg] film for an accurate measurement of the skin dose in a parallel-opposed pair 6 MV photon beam arrangement is described.

  6. Measurement of scapula upward rotation: a reliable clinical procedure

    PubMed Central

    Watson, L; Balster, S; Finch, C; Dalziel, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: It is important to deal with the scapula when developing rehabilitation strategies for the shoulder complex. This requires clinical measurement tools that are readily available and easy to apply and which provide a reliable evaluation of scapula motion. Method: Twenty six patients were assessed in two repeat tests within a single testing session. Patients exhibiting a wide spectrum of shoulder pathology were selected. The angle of scapular upward rotation was measured during total shoulder abduction. The measurement protocol was performed twice during a single testing session by a single tester. Results of the two tests were compared and the reliability assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results: There was no significant difference in the scapula measurements taken during the two tests at each testing position. Overall, there was very good intrarater reliability (ICC = 0.88). The ICC ranged from 0.81 (at 135°) to 0.94 (at both resting and end of total shoulder abduction range). Conclusion: The Plurimeter-V gravity inclinometer can be used effectively and reliably for measuring upward rotation of the scapula in all ranges of shoulder abduction in the coronal plane. PMID:16118295

  7. Image processing for the rest of us: the potential utility of inexpensive computerized image analysis in clinical pathology and radiology.

    PubMed

    McEachron, D L; Hess, S; Knecht, L B; True, L D

    1989-01-01

    Recent progress in computer technology in both hardware and software, combined with marked cost reductions, have placed quantitatively accurate video densitometry systems within the reach of the individual clinician, biomedical researcher, and community hospital. While much of the attention generated by advances in image processing has focussed on larger scale procedures, such as CAT, chemical shift, and positron emission tomography, important applications can be found for considerably more modest systems. In this article, we discuss three such applications of DUMAS, a personal computer-based imaging system developed by the Image Processing Center at Drexel University. A potential technique for quantifying numbers of estrogen receptors in tumorous breast tissue samples as a predictor of patient responsiveness to hormonal therapy is described first, along with possible sources of error. The second application, also related to clinical pathology and cancer, outlines methods for relating changes in nuclear and cell morphology to the diagnosis of Sezary Cell Syndrome. The utility of binary image filtering methods in the classification of cell types is discussed. The third application involves the development of a semi-automatic procedure for the determination of vessel diameter in arteriograms. A detailed description of the optimization and curve-fitting algorithms is provided along with preliminary test results comparing various approaches. The need for user demand to fuel research and development in small-scale imaging systems is also discussed. PMID:2647281

  8. Women with TSC: Relationship between Clinical, Lung Function and Radiological Features in a Genotyped Population Investigated for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Imeri, Gianluca; Palumbo, Giuseppina; La Briola, Francesca; Tresoldi, Silvia; Volpi, Angela; Gualandri, Lorenzo; Ghelma, Filippo; Alfano, Rosa Maria; Montanari, Emanuele; Gorio, Alfredo; Lesma, Elena; Peron, Angela; Canevini, Maria Paola; Centanni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The advent of pharmacological therapies for lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) has made early diagnosis important in women with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), although the lifelong cumulative radiation exposure caused by chest computer tomography (CT) should not be underestimated. We retrospectively investigated, in a cohort of TSC outpatients of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) 1) the role of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for LAM diagnosis, 2) the association between LAM and other features of TSC (e.g. demography, extrapulmonary manifestations, genetic mutations, etc.), and 3) the characteristics of patients with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MMPH). Eighty-six women underwent chest CT scan; pulmonary involvement was found in 66 patients (77%; 49% LAM with or without MMPH, and 28% MMPH alone). LAM patients were older, with a higher rate of pneumothorax, presented more frequently with renal and hepatic angiomyolipomas, and tended to have a TSC2 mutation profile. PFTs, assessed in 64% of women unaffected by cognitive impairments, revealed a lower lung diffusion capacity in LAM patients. In multivariate analysis, age, but not PFTs, resulted independently associated with LAM diagnosis. Patients with MMPH alone did not show specific clinical, functional or genetic features. A mild respiratory impairment was most common in LAM-TSC patients: In conclusions, PFTs, even if indicated to assess impairment in lung function, are feasible in a limited number of patients, and are not significantly useful for LAM diagnosis in women with TSC. PMID:27171001

  9. Development of radiological and clinical evidence of parenchymal fibrosis in men with non-malignant asbestos-related pleural lesions.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, G H; Rossiter, C E

    1982-01-01

    After assessment of radiographs taken in 1966, 201 men employed at HM Dockyard, Devonport, were judged to have pleural abnormalities due to exposure to asbestos but to be free from small opacities (ILO U/C 1971 category 1/1 or more), mesothelioma, or bronchial carcinoma. By 1976, 32 of these men had died. Of the survivors, 155 were re-examined to determine the attack rates of parenchymal fibrosis or malignant disease, or both. In 1976, 16 (10.3%) of the survivors had radiographs showing small opacities of category 1/1 or more. When additional clinical criteria had to be satisfied before a diagnosis of parenchymal fibrosis was made the attack rate in the survivors was 4.5%. These attack rates were substantially higher than those observed in a sample of men with no initial pleural abnormality but were unrelated to age, smoking habit, occupation, duration of exposure to asbestos, or type of pleural abnormality. The number of cases of malignant disease was too small to allow any reliable conclusions. PMID:7066220

  10. Summary measures for clinical gait analysis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela

    2014-04-01

    Instrumented 3D-gait analysis (3D-GA) is an important method used to obtain information that is crucial for establishing the level of functional limitation due to pathology, observing its evolution over time and evaluating rehabilitative intervention effects. However, a typical 3D-GA evaluation produces a vast amount of data, and despite its objectivity, its use is complicated, and the data interpretation is difficult. It is even more difficult to obtain an overview on patient cohorts for a comparison. Moreover, there is a growing awareness of the need for a concise index, specifically, a single measure of the 'quality' of a particular gait pattern. Several gait summary measures, which have been used in conjunction with 3D-GA, have been proposed to objectify clinical impression, quantify the degree of gait deviation from normal, stratify the severity of pathology, document the changes in gait patterns over time and evaluate interventions. PMID:24613461

  11. A Tactile Stimulation Device for EEG Measurements in Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Christoph; Breitwieser, Christian; Muller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-06-01

    A tactile stimulation device for EEG measurements in clinical environments is proposed. The main purpose of the tactile stimulation device is to provide tactile stimulation to different parts of the body. To stimulate all four major types of mechanoreceptors, different stimulation patterns with frequencies in the range of 5-250 Hz have to be generated. The device provides two independent channels, delivers enough power to drive different types of electromagnetic transducers, is small and portable, and no expensive components are required to construct this device. The generated stimulation patterns are very stable, and deterministic control of the device is possible. To meet electrical safety requirements, the device was designed to be fully galvanically isolated. Leakage currents of the entire EEG measurement system including the tactile stimulation device were measured by the European Testing and Certifying Body for Medical Products Graz (Notified Body 0636). All measured currents were far below the maximum allowable currents defined in the safety standard EN 60601-1:2006 for medical electrical equipment. The successful operation of the tactile stimulation device was tested during an EEG experiment. The left and right wrist of one healthy subject were randomly stimulated with seven different frequencies. Steady-state somatosensory evoked potential (SSSEPs) could successfully be evoked and significant tuning curves at electrode positions contralateral to the stimulated wrist could be found. The device is ready to be used in clinical environment in a variety of applications to investigate the somatosensory system, in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), or to provide tactile feedback. PMID:23864261

  12. Measuring energy expenditure in clinical populations: rewards and challenges.

    PubMed

    Psota, T; Chen, K Y

    2013-05-01

    The measurement of energy expenditure (EE) is recommended as an important component of comprehensive clinical nutrition assessments in patients with altered metabolic states, who failed to respond to nutrition support and with critical illness that require individualized nutrition support. There is evidence that EE is variable in patients with metabolic diseases, such as chronic renal disease, cirrhosis, HIV, cancer cachexia, cystic fibrosis and patients under intensive care. By using appropriate techniques and interpretations of basal or resting EE, clinicians can facilitate the adequate nutrition support with minimum negative impacts from under- or overfeeding in these patients. This review is based on our current understanding of the different components of EE and the techniques to measure them, and to re-examine advances and challenges to determine energy needs in clinical populations with more focuses on the obese, pediatric and elderly patients. In addition, technological advances have expanded the choices of market-available equipments for assessing EE, which also bring specific challenges and rewards in selecting the right equipment with specific performance criteria. Lastly, analytical considerations of interpreting the results of EE in the context of changing body composition are presented and discussed. PMID:23443826

  13. On model selections for repeated measurement data in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Zou, Baiming; Jin, Bo; Koch, Gary G; Zhou, Haibo; Borst, Stephen E; Menon, Sandeep; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2015-05-10

    Repeated measurement designs have been widely used in various randomized controlled trials for evaluating long-term intervention efficacies. For some clinical trials, the primary research question is how to compare two treatments at a fixed time, using a t-test. Although simple, robust, and convenient, this type of analysis fails to utilize a large amount of collected information. Alternatively, the mixed-effects model is commonly used for repeated measurement data. It models all available data jointly and allows explicit assessment of the overall treatment effects across the entire time spectrum. In this paper, we propose an analytic strategy for longitudinal clinical trial data where the mixed-effects model is coupled with a model selection scheme. The proposed test statistics not only make full use of all available data but also utilize the information from the optimal model deemed for the data. The performance of the proposed method under various setups, including different data missing mechanisms, is evaluated via extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Our numerical results demonstrate that the proposed analytic procedure is more powerful than the t-test when the primary interest is to test for the treatment effect at the last time point. Simulations also reveal that the proposed method outperforms the usual mixed-effects model for testing the overall treatment effects across time. In addition, the proposed framework is more robust and flexible in dealing with missing data compared with several competing methods. The utility of the proposed method is demonstrated by analyzing a clinical trial on the cognitive effect of testosterone in geriatric men with low baseline testosterone levels. PMID:25645442

  14. Visceral pleural invasion in lung adenocarcinoma ≤3 cm with ground-glass opacity: a clinical, pathological and radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Lan; Xie, Hui-Kang; Zhang, Li-Ping; Zha, Jun-Yan; Zhou, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Ge-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral pleural invasion (VPI) had been demonstrated as an aggressive sign in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, its incidence and clinical relevance in early lung cancer showing ground glass nodules (GGNs) has not been clarified. Methods All consecutive surgically treated patients with solitary GGNs between 2009 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were defined as lesions ≤3 cm with pleura abutting on computed tomography (CT) scan and pathologically confirmed NSCLC. Results Out of 156 enrolled patients, 38 had pathologically confirmed VPI. The incidence of VPI was 41.5% (27/65) if the tumor diameter was larger than 2.0 cm and 14.3% (13/91) if diameter was smaller than 2.0 cm (P<0.001). Further, the incidence was 17.4% (12/69) in pure GGNs and 32.2% (28/87) in part-solid GGNs (P=0.040). The tumor size and the nodule nodule-pleural relationship were significant predictors of positive VPI. In cases with pleural indentation, attachment, and closeness, the incidence was 38.1%, 25.5%, and 5.3%, respectively (P=0.001). All cases were PL0 and PL1, with no PL2 cases observed. Conclusions Although VPI was visible in both pure/mix GGNs, it was more common in larger (>2 cm) GGNs. The radiographic findings of nodule abutment or a pleural tag did not reliably predict or exclude VPI. In patients with GGNs, a low rate of PL2 invasion may be observed. PMID:27499970

  15. Informatics in radiology: Render: an online searchable radiology study repository.

    PubMed

    Dang, Pragya A; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Schultz, Thomas J; Graham, Steven A; Dreyer, Keith J

    2009-01-01

    Radiology departments are a rich source of information in the form of digital radiology reports and images obtained in patients with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. A free text radiology report and image search application known as Render was created to allow users to find pertinent cases for a variety of purposes. Render is a radiology report and image repository that pools researchable information derived from multiple systems in near real time with use of (a) Health Level 7 links for radiology information system data, (b) periodic file transfers from the picture archiving and communication system, and (c) the results of natural language processing (NLP) analysis. Users can perform more structured and detailed searches with this application by combining different imaging and patient characteristics such as examination number; patient age, gender, and medical record number; and imaging modality. Use of NLP analysis allows a more effective search for reports with positive findings, resulting in the retrieval of more cases and terms having greater relevance. From the retrieved results, users can save images, bookmark examinations, and navigate to an external search engine such as Google. Render has applications in the fields of radiology education, research, and clinical decision support. PMID:19564253

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome severity staging using sonographic and clinical measures

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Volz, Kevin R.; Fahy, Christine M.; Evans, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasonography may be valuable in staging carpal tunnel syndrome severity, especially by combining multiple measures. This study aimed to develop a preliminary severity staging model using multiple sonographic and clinical measures. Methods Measures were obtained in 104 participants. Multiple categorization structures for each variable were correlated to diagnostic severity based on nerve conduction. Goodness-of-fit was evaluated for models using iterative combinations of highly correlated variables. Using the best-fit model, a preliminary scoring system was developed, and frequency of misclassification was calculated. Results The severity staging model with best fit (Rho 0.90) included patient-reported symptoms, functional deficits, provocative testing, nerve cross-sectional area, and nerve longitudinal appearance. An 8-point scoring scale classified severity accurately for 79.8% of participants. Discussion This severity staging model is a novel approach to carpal tunnel syndrome evaluation. Including more sensitive measures of nerve vascularity, nerve excursion, or other emerging techniques may refine this preliminary model. PMID:25287477

  17. Clinical demand for and access to images and interpretations of chest radiographs in a medical intensive care unit serviced by an integrated PACS-radiology information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shile, Peter E.; Kundel, Harold L.; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Carey, Bruce; Kishore, Sheel; Brikman, Inna; Feingold, Eric R.; Lanken, Paul N.

    1994-05-01

    Digital communication systems have been proposed as a means of improving the flow of information between radiologists and other physicians. In the intensive care unit (ICU), physicians require more rapid access to images and interpretations than physicians in most other hospital settings. Thus these systems must be designed to ensure that rapid exchange of radiological information can be achieved. To better define system design for the electronic communication of radiological information to ICUs, this study examined bottlenecks in information flow through an integrated PACS-Radiology Information System.

  18. Is there an association between clinical features, response to diagnostic analgesia and radiological findings in horses with a magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of navicular disease or other injuries of the podotrochlear apparatus?

    PubMed

    Parkes, Rebecca; Newton, Richard; Dyson, Sue

    2015-04-01

    Previous descriptions of the clinical features of navicular disease occurred before the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed a more definitive diagnosis of foot pain. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical features of horses with lesions of the podotrochlear apparatus with those with other causes of foot pain. It was hypothesised that primary navicular bone disease would be associated with more advanced radiological findings than other diagnoses. A retrospective study was performed of all horses examined at a referral centre with a definitive diagnosis of foot pain based on MRI ± post-mortem examination. Clinical examination findings, response to diagnostic analgesia and radiological grading of the navicular bone were compared among five diagnosis groups: (1) primary navicular bone pathology (NB); (2) lesions of the collateral sesamoidean ligament and/or distal sesamoidean impar ligament (CSL + DSIL); (3) primary deep digital flexor tendon injury (DDFT); (4) navicular bone pathology and other lesions of the podotrochlear apparatus ± DDFT (PTA) and (5) Other. There were 702 horses (NB, 62; CSL + DSIL, 180; DDFT, 69; PTA, 92; Other, 299). Horses with PTA injuries were more frequently unilaterally lame than other groups (P = 0.04). Horses with DDFT injury were more likely to exhibit pain on turning than other groups (P <0.01). There were no associations between response to diagnostic analgesia and diagnostic group, and no association between radiological grade and diagnostic group. Clinical examination findings generally did not discriminate between diseases of the PTA and other causes of foot pain. Overall radiological scores of the navicular bone did not accurately predict navicular bone pathology. PMID:25724857

  19. Real Time in Situ Gamma Radiation Measurements of the Plume Evolution from the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials.

    PubMed

    Korpach, Ed; Berg, Rodney; Erhardt, Lorne; Lebel, Luke; Liu, Chuanlei

    2016-05-01

    During the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials carried out in Suffield in 2012, several suites of detection and sampling equipment were used to measure and characterize the explosive dispersal of the short half-life radioactive tracer Lanthanum-140 ((140)La). The equipment deployed included networks of in situ real-time radiation monitoring detectors providing measurements of different sensitivities and characteristics. A dense array of lower sensitivity detectors was established near field, ranging from 10 to 450 m from the detonation location. A sparser array of more sensitive detectors was established in the far field (150 m to 3.5 km from the detonation location). Each was used to collect and report the dose rate data from the radioactive plume passage with a sample time resolution of 1 s. The two systems went through independent calibrations and were compared and shown to be consistent with each other. The in situ gamma radiation measurements have allowed the movement and evolution of the plume to be described and to identify deposition rates and non-uniformities in the temporal shape of the plume. This knowledge could be applied for emergency planning guidance for the case of release of radioactive material by a radiological dispersive device. PMID:27023030

  20. The retrograde limb of internal mammary vessels as reliable recipient vessels in DIEP flap breast reconstruction: a clinical and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Salgarello, Marzia; Visconti, Giuseppe; Barone-Adesi, Liliana; Cina, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    For many microsurgeons, antegrade internal mammary vessels (AIMVs) represent the recipients of choice in autogenous breast reconstruction. For the past few years, the retrograde internal mammary vessels (RIMVs) have been demonstrated to be a further reliable option when needed, according to many papers focusing more on the vein than on the artery. Besides the clinical evidence, the hemodynamic features of the retrograde system have been very seldom analyzed.In this article, we report our clinical experience with deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps anastomosed to RIMVs, along with a perioperative radiological follow-up to study RIMVs' hemodynamics and to further support the reliability of the retrograde system with particular focus on the retrograde internal mammary artery.Prospective, preoperative, and postoperative (3 days, 21 days, and 3 months, respectively) color Doppler sonographies of the internal mammary artery (IMA) and DIEPs have been performed to collect the velocity of flow (v) and resistive index (RI) data. Twenty-two patients agreed to undergo this protocol, of which 10 unipedicle flaps were anastomosed to AIMVs ("control" group), 10 bipedicle DIEPs to both AIMVs and RIMVs ("study" group), and 2 DIEPs anastomosed to retrograde internal mammary artery and antegrade internal mammary vein (not statistically analyzed for their paucity). Student t test was performed to compare the "control" and "study" groups.All the flaps survived, and no re-exploration was needed. Internal mammary artery and perforators v showed similar but speculate trend, whereas IMA and perforators RI looked stable during that time. Significant differences have been found in the "study" group for IMA v at 3-day period, for perforator v at 21- and 90-day periods, and for perforator RI at 90-day period, without any clinical implication for flap viability.Retrograde internal mammary vessels can be considered reliable vessels for both arterial flap input and venous flap

  1. INTEGRITY OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON AFTER OPEN SURGERY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY: A CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Osvandré; Piluski, Paulo; Tambani, Renato; Castro, Nero; Pimentel, Gilnei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the integrity of the subscapularis tendon by strength, function and magnetic resonance imaging after deltopectoralis access for anterior shoulder instability. Methods: 20 patients with anterior shoulder instability have been evaluated. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 40 months. Only male patients were included, with a mean of age of 29 years (20 − 42 years). The patients have been submitted to physical examinations of mobility, muscular strength, Belly Test and Gerber Test. The isokinetic strength in internal and external rotation, in angular speeds of 600/s and 1800/s, for both shoulders was measured using a dynamometer. In 15 patients magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out on both shoulders for evaluating the thickness, cross-sectional area and atrophy of the subscapularis muscle. Results: A significant difference was found between torque peaks at the speed of 600/s for internal (p=0.036) and external (p=0.008) rotation. However, at 1800/s the opposite happens (internal rotation: p=0.133; external rotation: p=0.393). Subscapularis muscle thickness and area are significantly smaller than the normal side, with a deficit of 19% and 23%, respectively. According to Rowe and UCLA scores, we find excellent and good results for the majority of patients, with a mean of 88 and 31.6 points, respectively. Conclusion: Despite of the good functional results, open surgery can limit strength and reduce the thickness and the cross-sectional area of subscapularis muscle. However, the best results were found in the patients who had the dominant side operated. PMID:27004190

  2. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture.

  3. Pediatric radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton. (KRM)

  4. Why use automated office blood pressure measurements in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Agaliotis, Gerasimos D; Tsakanikas, Athanasios P; Mousoulis, George P

    2011-09-01

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement with the patient resting alone in a quiet examining room can eliminate the white-coat effect associated with conventional readings taken by manual sphygmomanometer. The key to reducing the white-coat response appears to be multiple blood pressure (BP) readings taken in a non-observer office setting, thus eliminating any interaction that could provoke an office-induced increase in BP. Furthermore, AOBP readings have shown a higher correlation with the mean awake ambulatory BP compared with BP readings recorded in routine clinical practice. Although there is a paucity of studies connecting AOBP with organ damage, AOBP values were recently found to be equally associated with left ventricular mass index as those of ambulatory BP. This concludes that in contrast to routine manual office BP, AOBP readings compare favourably with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in the appraisal of cardiac remodelling and, as such, could be complementary to ambulatory readings in a way similar to home BP measurements. PMID:21950780

  5. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Improvement Between the Modified Trephine and High-speed Drill as Main Osteotomy Instrument in Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Zhang, Di; Shen, Yong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2015-11-01

    High-speed drill is the main osteotomy instrument in pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) currently. Considering the long duration of surgery, the large amount of blood loss, and the high incidence of neurovascular injury, the osteotomy procedure is challenging. Use of trephine for the osteotomy displays high efficiency by shortening surgery time and reducing blood loss in anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion. However, the potential risk of neurological injury is high. We modified the trephine by adding locking instrument, when the serrated top of the trephine reaches the tip of the probe; the locking instrument on the probe restricts the trephine and improves security during the osteotomy procedure.The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiological improvement between the modified trephine and high-speed drill as main osteotomy instrument in PSO.From February 2009 to 2013, 50 patients with severe thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity caused by old compressive vertebrae were prospectively reviewed. All patients were randomly assigned to the experimental group (27 patients received PSO with modified trephine) and the control group (23 patients received PSO with high-speed drill). The clinical records were reviewed and compared for surgical time, operative blood loss, functional improvement (Oswestry Disability Index), and pain relief (visual analog scale). The radiological records were reviewed and compared for correction of kyphotic deformity postoperatively and correction loss at 2-year follow-up.All patients successfully finished the PSO procedure, and got satisfactory kyphotic deformity correction and overall function improvement. The surgery time was shorter in the experimental group than that in the control group (132.7 ± 12.6 vs 141.7 ± 16.7 min; P = 0.03). No significant difference was found in blood loss (882.9 ± 98.9 mL vs 902.2 ± 84.9 mL; P = 0.47) or correction of the kyphotic angle (33.4 ± 3.4° vs 32

  6. Defining and measuring negative symptoms of schizophrenia in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Marder, Stephen R; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Recent attention has focused on negative symptoms as a target for new therapeutic approaches including pharmacological agents, medical devices, and psychosocial treatments. Each of these approaches requires an instrument for measuring the severity of negative symptoms as well as changes in severity over time. The instrument selected should provide coverage for the domains of negative symptoms; it should be sensitive to change; it should be reliable and relatively brief; and it should be useful for large international trials. These criteria were used to evaluate a number of older instruments including the Schedule for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment Scale (NSA). Two newer scales, the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) were developed following a National Institute of Mental Health consensus meeting and addressed some of the shortcomings of earlier instruments. PMID:24275698

  7. Quantifying isocenter measurements to establish clinically meaningful thresholds.

    PubMed

    Denton, Travis R; Shields, Lisa B E; Howe, Jonathan N; Spalding, Aaron C

    2015-01-01

    A dataset range of isocenter congruency verification tests have been examined from a statistical perspective for the purpose of establishing tolerance levels that are meaningful, based on the fundamental limitation of linear accelerator isocentricity and the demands of a high-precision stereotactic radiosurgery program. Using a laser-defined isocenter, a total of 149 individual isocenter congruency tests were examined with recorded values for ideal spatial corrections to the isocenter test tool. These spatial corrections were determined from radiation exposures recorded on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) at various gantry, collimator, and treatment couch combinations. The limitations of establishing an ideal isocenter were quantified from each variable which contributed to uncertainty in isocenter definition. Individual contributors to uncertainty, specifically, daily positioning setup errors, gantry sag, multileaf collimator (MLC) offset, and couch walkout, were isolated from isocenter congruency measurements to determine a clinically meaningful isocenter measurement. Variations in positioning of the test tool constituted, on average, 0.38 mm magnitude of correction. Gantry sag and MLC offset contributed 0.4 and 0.16 mm, respectively. Couch walkout had an average degrading effect to isocenter of 0.72 mm. Considering the magnitude of uncertainty contributed by each uncertainty variable and the nature of their combination, an appropriate schedule action and immediate action level were determined for use in analyzing daily isocenter congruency test results in a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) program. The recommendations of this study for this linear accelerator include a schedule action level of 1.25 mm and an immediate action level of 1.50mm, requiring prompt correction response from clinical medical physicists before SRS or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) is administered. These absolute values were derived from considering relative data from a

  8. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  9. SU-F-18C-10: Clinical Implementation of Radiochromic Film Based CTDI Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero, C; Seuntjens, J; Devic, S; Tomic, N; DeBlois, F

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate accuracy and reproducibility of a radiochromic film-based protocol to measure computer tomography dose index (CTDI) as a part of annual QA on CT scanners and kV CBCT systems attached to linear accelerators. Methods: Energy dependence of Gafchromic XR-QA2(R) film model was tested over imaging beam qualities (50 – 140 kVp). Film pieces were irradiated in air to known values of air kerma in air (up to 10 cGy). Change in film reflectance was determined with an in-house written code using images produced by a flatbed document scanner. Calibration curves for each beam quality were created, and film responses for same air-kerma values were compared.Sets of film strips were placed into holes of a CTDI phantom and irradiated for several clinical scanning protocols on CT-simulators and CBCT systems. Film reflectance change was converted into dose to water and used to calculate CTDIvol values. Measured CTDIvol values were compared to tabulated CTDIvol values. Results: Average variations of ±5.2% in the mean film reflectance change were observed in the energy range of 80 to 140 keV, and 11.1% between 50 and 140 keV. The averaged measured CTDI values presented a mean variation for the same machine and protocol of 2.6%. However, measured CTDI values were in average 10% lower than tabulated CTDI values for CT-simulators, and 44% higher for CBCT systems. Conclusion: We found that in relatively broad range of beam qualities used in diagnostic radiology variation of film response is within ±5% resulting in ±15% systematic error in dose estimates if a single calibration curve is used. Relatively large discrepancy between measured and tabulated CTDI values for different protocols and imaging systems used within radiotherapy department strongly support the trend towards replacing CTDI value with equilibrium dose measurement in the center of cylindrical phantom as suggested by TG-111. This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research

  10. Otologic radiology with clinical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruenes, R.; De la Cruz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors discuss temporal bone and adjacent structures. Chapters include imaging techniques and anatomy, congenital malformations, middle and external ear infections, otosclerosis and otospongiosis, temporal bone fractures, the facial nerve tumors of the temporal bone and skull base, tumors of the cerebellar pontine angle, and, finally, a short chapter on the newer technique of cochlear implants. Illustrations include plain radiography and multidirectional tomography. Computed tomography (CT) is included. Magnetic resonance imaging is mentioned briefly, and its importance is stressed particularly in the diagnosis of internal auditory canal and other cerebellar pontine angle tumors.

  11. Clinical review: Sleep measurement in critical care patients: research and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Richard S; Minelli, Cosetta; Mills, Gary H; Kandler, Rosalind

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in critically ill patients and have been characterised by numerous studies using polysomnography. Issues regarding patient populations, monitoring duration and timing (nocturnal versus continuous), as well as practical problems encountered in critical care studies using polysomnography are considered with regard to future interventional studies on sleep. Polysomnography is the gold standard in objectively measuring the quality and quantity of sleep. However, it is difficult to undertake, particularly in patients recovering from critical illness in an acute-care area. Therefore, other objective (actigraphy and bispectral index) and subjective (nurse or patient assessment) methods have been used in other critical care studies. Each of these techniques has its own particular advantages and disadvantages. We use data from an interventional study to compare agreement between four of these alternative techniques in the measurement of nocturnal sleep quantity. Recommendations for further developments in sleep monitoring techniques for research and clinical application are made. Also, methodological problems in studies validating various sleep measurement techniques are explored. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN47578325. PMID:17764582

  12. Risk management in radiology departments

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  13. Potential Clinical Utility of Copeptin (C-terminal provasopressin) measurements in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, K C; Brabant, G

    2016-03-01

    Copeptin is a 39-amino-acids containing glycosylated peptide derived from the C-terminal part of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) precursor. In the process of proteolysis the AVP precursor is processed to AVP, neurophysin II, and copeptin in equimolar amounts. In contrast to AVP, copeptin remains stable for several days at room temperature in serum or plasma. Hence, copeptin serves as a bona fide biomarker of AVP release. We briefly summarise clinical utility of copeptin in the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus. We also discuss potential applications of copeptin measurements in hyponatraemic states, assessment of an anterior pituitary function, as well as a wide range of several acute and chronic medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction, stroke or diabetes mellitus. PMID:27008633

  14. Integrating IT into the radiology environment.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Rather than perpetuating the struggle, "who controls the PACS, Radiology or Information Technology (IT)," Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula (CHOMP) took the approach of incorporating IT support within the Radiology Department. CHOMP faced the challenge of staffing Radiology computer systems and networks by using a two-pronged approach; promoting and training clinical staff in IT functions and transferring an experienced IT person into the Radiology Department. Roles and responsibilities are divided. CHOMP's IT Department supports the Radiology Department's desktop devices, PCs, printers, and standard peripherals; while the department's DICOM print and archive network, specialized hardware (e.g., Merge DICOM interface computers), and applications are supported by the Radiology Department. The IT Department provides operating system support for multi-user VMS, Unix, and NT-based systems, e.g. Sun Solaris for the DICOM archive, and Windows NT for Mitra PACS Broker, the HL7/DICOM interface engine. IT also supports network communications, i.e., network electronics (routers, switches, etc.), TCP/IP communications, and network traffic analysis; and OS operations support for major Radiology systems, e.g. back-ups and off-site tape storage. Radiology staff provides applications support and troubleshooting, including analyst functions for RIS; and are the first point of contact with the Radiology systems vendors, e.g., GE Medical, or Siemens. The Radiology Department's senior IT person, the Clinical Technology Coordinator, transferred from CHOMP's IT Department after 7 years in that department. She performs analysis and design associated with Radiology's computer systems, coordinates development of the department's strategic plan, evaluates vendor proposals, and assists the department with product and application selection. Her IT experience and growing knowledge of Radiology's clinical tasks enhances communications between the Radiology and IT departments. Formal

  15. Small bowel radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Antes, G.; Eggemann, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals mainly with technique, experiences and results of the biphasic small bowel enema (enteroclysis) with barium and methyl cellulose. The method allows the evaluation of both morphology and function of the small bowel. The introduction describes the examination technique, basic patterns, interpretation and indications, while the atlas shows a broad spectrum of small bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, other inflammatory diseases, tumors, motility disorders, obstructions and malformations). The possibilities of small bowel radiology are demonstrated with reference to clinical findings and differential diagnoses.

  16. Application of clinical laboratory measurements to issues of environmental health.

    PubMed

    Rej, R; Silkworth, J B; DeCaprio, A P

    1992-03-13

    Monitoring of biochemical constituents in serum is an important component in revealing potential toxicity in humans and experimental animals due to exposure to a variety of xenobiotic agents. The relative toxicity of pure compounds, usually at large doses, has helped elucidate the mode of action of these compounds and their relative risk. However, most actual cases of environmental exposure present an extensive range of components and the potential for synergistic or inhibitory interactions. In this paper we review two such environmental cases: The Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, NY, and the transformer fire at the State Office Building in Binghamton, NY. We focus on the clinical laboratory measurements obtained in these studies (including serum glucose, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, sodium and potassium), their usefulness, limitations, and application to such cases. Significant alterations in serum triglyceride and alanine aminotransferase levels were found in guinea pigs due to exposure to dioxins. These two tests were useful in estimating the 'equivalent' concentration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in complex chemical mixtures. PMID:1572081

  17. Radiology of syndromes and metabolic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Taybi, H.; Lachman, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe both the clinical and radiologic manifestations of 700 syndromes. They provide illustrations describing each syndrome and descriptions of those syndromes discovered since publication of a previous edition.

  18. Differential diagnosis in pediatric radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Grunebaum, M.

    1986-01-01

    This work presents 415 tables of differential diagnosis applicable to pediatric radiology, emphasizing clinical presentation and the findings of conventional radiographs. The six chapters cover the respiratory, cardiovascular, urinary, gastrointestinal, and skeletal systems, and the head. The first few tables in each chapter cover major clinical signs, the next few deal with the newborn period only, and the remainder deal with radiographic differential diagnoses seen in children. An index and brief reference list complete the book.

  19. Current radiology. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

  20. [Development of software for the verification of patient flow through a daily clinical environment by use of the radiology information system (RIS)].

    PubMed

    Nose, Hideo; Shiraishi, Junji

    2012-01-01

    In order to manage relationship between patients' movements and operating efficiency, we developed a special software which can make patient flow visible on a display monitor by use of actual data obtained from the radiology information system (RIS). In this software, a simple floor map of the radiology department in our hospital was drawn on the monitor and each patient was indicated with a small figure. This software was developed with commercialized computer software [Excel 2007 visual basic applications (VBA) Microsoft]. Movements of the patient figures were simulated by use of actual time data such as registration of radiology department, and start and ending time of examinations. The patient figures were moved along with predetermined flow lines every second. The movements of the patient figures were controlled by several buttons (i.e., play and stop) and setting switches for determining reproduction date and time. In conclusion, by use of this software, the patient flows could be analyzed systematically by checking efficient operation such as average waiting time of the patients and/or standby time of radiological technologists. PMID:23089836

  1. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  2. Use Of Clinical Decision Analysis In Predicting The Efficacy Of Newer Radiological Imaging Modalities: Radioscintigraphy Versus Single Photon Transverse Section Emission Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, John R.

    1982-12-01

    Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy have been shown to be useful measures of the clinical efficacy of diagnostic tests and can be used to predict the potential improvement in diagnostic certitude resulting from the introduction of a competing technology. This communication demonstrates how the informal use of clinical decision analysis may guide health planners in the allocation of resources, purchasing decisions, and implementation of high technology. For didactic purposes the focus is on a comparison between conventional planar radioscintigraphy (RS) and single photon transverse section emission conputed tomography (SPECT). For example, positive predictive accuracy (PPA) for brain RS in a specialist hospital with a 50% disease prevalance is about 95%. SPECT should increase this predicted accuracy to 96%. In a primary care hospital with only a 15% disease prevalance the PPA is only 77% and SPECT may increase this accuracy to about 79%. Similar calculations based on published data show that marginal improvements are expected with SPECT in the liver. It is concluded that: a) The decision to purchase a high technology imaging modality such as SPECT for clinical purposes should be analyzed on an individual organ system and institutional basis. High technology may be justified in specialist hospitals but not necessarily in primary care hospitals. This is more dependent on disease prevalance than procedure volume; b) It is questionable whether SPECT imaging will be competitive with standard RS procedures. Research should concentrate on the development of different medical applications.

  3. Radiometric calibration to consider in quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litorja, M.; Urbas, A.; Zong, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent light detected by a clinical imager is assumed to be proportional only to the amount of fluorescent substance present in the sample and the level of excitation. Unfortunately, there are many factors that can add or subtract to the light signal directly attributable to the desired fluorescence emission, especially with fluorescence from inside the body imaged remotely. The quantification of fluorescence emission is feasible by calibrating the imager using international system of units (SI)-traceable physical and material calibration artifacts such that the detector's digital numbers (DN) can be converted to radiometric units. Here we discuss three calibration methods for quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging systems.

  4. The radiologically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, C

    2015-10-01

    Even prior to the introduction of criteria defining the radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS), longitudinal clinical data from individuals with incidentally identified T2 lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) were described. Healthy individuals who do not exhibit signs of neurological dysfunction may have a brain MRI performed for a reason other than suspicion of MS that reveals unexpected anomalies highly suggestive of demyelinating plaques given their size, location, and morphology. These healthy subjects lack a history or symptomatology suggestive of MS and fulfill formal criteria for RIS, a recently described MS subtype that shares the phenotype of at-risk individuals for future demyelinating events. A formal description of RIS was first introduced in 2009 by Okuda et al., and defines a cohort of individuals who are at risk for future demyelinating events. European or North American observational studies have found that up to 30-45% of patients presenting with RIS will present with neurological symptoms, either acute or progressive. The median time to clinical conversion differs between studies. It was 2.3 years for a series of French patients and 5.4 years for an American cohort. Most patients who developed clinical symptoms had prior radiological progression. The presence of asymptomatic lesions in the cervical cord indicated an increased risk of progression, either to relapsing or to progressive MS. The consortium studying the epidemiology of RIS worldwide (RISC) presented their first retrospective cohort last year. Data were available for 451 RIS subjects (F: 354 [78.5%]). The mean age at RIS diagnosis was 37.2 years with a mean clinical follow-up time of 4.4 years. The observed 5-year conversion rate to the first clinical event was 34%. Of the converters within this time period, 9.6% fulfilled criteria for primary progressive MS. In the multivariate model, age, sex (male), and lesions within the cervical or thoracic spinal cord were identified as

  5. Middle ear meningiomas: a case series reviewing the clinical presentation, radiologic features, and contemporary management of a rare temporal bone pathology.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristin L; Carlson, Matthew L; Pelosi, Stanley; Haynes, David S

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial intracranial neoplasm and frequently develop in the parasagittal region. Rarely, meningiomas may involve the middle ear and mastoid, resulting from contiguous spread of adjacent intracranial tumor, or less commonly as an isolated primary tumor of the middle ear. Patients with primary middle ear meningiomas (MEMs) often present with non-specific otologic complaints including hearing loss, otorrhea and otalgia thereby mimicking common chronic otitis media, while secondary lesions more frequently manifest sensorineural hearing loss, cranial neuropathy and other neurologic symptoms from the associated intracranial component. The radiological appearance of MEMs often overlaps with other tumors of the temporal bone. Therefore, a correct diagnosis cannot always be made prior to surgical biopsy. While gross total resection with preservation of existing neurological function is possible with smaller lesions, complete tumor removal may be extremely morbid with more extensive or adherent MEMs. In such cases, aggressive subtotal resection with close radiologic follow-up should be considered. Given the rarity of the studied condition, the literature addressing MEMs is sparse. The current study reviews ten additional cases of MEMs, highlighting the clinicopathologic and radiological features that distinguish meningiomas from other middle ear and mastoid pathology. PMID:24650749

  6. Semi-Spontaneous Oral Text Production: Measurements in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Marianne; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil; Moen, Inger; Simonsen, Hanne Gram

    2009-01-01

    Functionally relevant assessment of the language production of speakers with aphasia should include assessment of connected speech production. Despite the ecological validity of everyday conversations, more controlled and monological types of texts may be easier to obtain and analyse in clinical practice. This article discusses some simple…

  7. Utility of personality measurement of clinic patients with insomnia.

    PubMed

    Sexton-Radek, Kathy; Urban, Amanda; Pichler-Maury, Rene

    2007-04-01

    An assessment study examining the relationship between sleep quality and personality style in individuals presenting to a sleep clinic with symptoms of insomnia was conducted. The protocol entailed standard clinical interviews conducted by a board certified sleep physician and licensed clinical psychologist. Participants were then assessed using a standard interview and the Millon Clinical Multi-axial Inventory III (MCMI-III) A follow-up appointment was conducted to provide interpretation and treatment recommendations from the interview and testing data. The results from a review of 210 cases are presented in terms of their sleep quality and dominant MCMI-III patterns. Preliminary multivariate analyses indicated two common profiles that correspond to the presentation of insomnia symptomology. These clusters were termed "avoidant" and "anxious" profiles, accordingly. Item content analyses were conducted via the Noteworthy Item classification in the MCMI-III manual to determine the viability of a category determined by the authors called Sleep Behavior Preoccupation. Of this sample 17% fit into the category. PMID:17566457

  8. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    SciTech Connect

    Konzen, K.K.; Langsted, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  9. [Virtual organization in the digital age of radiology - principle and solution for radiologic research?].

    PubMed

    Leppek, R; Krass, S; Bourquain, H; Lang, M; Wein, B; Mildenberger, P; Schaller, S; Klose, K J; Peitgen, H-O

    2003-11-01

    The research project "VICORA - Virtual Institute for Computer-Assisted Radiology", funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, was initiated in the year 2000. Its virtual organization brings together physical science, engineering, information technology, clinical radiology and the medical technology industry. In the German radiology research domain VICORA serves as a model for interdisciplinary collaboration for the changing radiology paradigm illustrated by a "radiologycube". The project does not only aim at scientific goals but also considers the infrastructure, components and human resource management within a virtual organization. The common rapid prototyping platform ILAB 4 ensures user-friendly and time-efficient software that assists with the routine radiology work-flow including full DICOM functionality. By offering a new work environment and collaborative culture based on telematics and knowledge exchange in radiology research, VICORA overcomes limitations of traditional research organization. PMID:14610709

  10. Laboratory evaluation of a SpectraMax microplate reader and test strips for field measurement of creatinine in spot urine samples in the event of a radiological accident.

    PubMed

    Daka, Joseph N; Moodie, Gerry; Li, Chunsheng; Wilkins, Ruth; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-08-01

    The fear that terrorists might use radiological or nuclear (RN) devices to attack others is a new but growing phenomenon, arising mainly from the events of 11 September 2001. Research on rapid analytical methods that can allow analyses of large numbers of people who may become internally contaminated with radionuclides due to a RN accident is still limited. To contribute to this bioassay capacity for emergency response, the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada has identified and evaluated two new portable SpectraMax plate readers (model 250 and Plus 384) and one brand of dry reagent strips for rapid measurement of creatinine in spot urine samples. Concentrations of creatinine in spot urine samples provide a means of adjusting or normalizing urine collections to 24 h, upon which accurate internal dose assessments due to the radionuclides can be made. Preliminary test results of the devices showed the two SpectraMax plate readers and the TECO dry creatinine reagent strips were portable, rapid and reliable for urinary creatinine measurements in spot samples, suggesting they can be used in rapid dose screening of people. PMID:21709503

  11. Consistency between Self-Reported and Recorded Values for Clinical Measures

    PubMed Central

    III, Joseph Thomas; Paulet, Mindy; Rajpura, Jigar R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated consistency between self-reported values for clinical measures and recorded clinical measures. Methods. Self-reported values were collected for the clinical measures: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose level, height, weight, and cholesterol from health risk assessments completed by enrollees in a privately insured cohort. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from reported height and weight. Practitioner recorded values for the clinical measures were obtained from health screenings. We used bivariate Pearson correlation analysis and descriptive statistics to evaluate consistency between self-reported data and recorded clinic measurements. Results. There was high correlation between self-reported clinical values and recorded clinical measures for diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.91, P = <0.0001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.93, P = <0.0001), cholesterol (r = 0.97, P = <0.0001), body mass index (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), glucose (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), weight (r = 0.98, P = <0.0001), and height (r = 0.89, P = <0.0001). Conclusions. Self-reported clinical values for each of the eight clinical measures examined had good consistency with practitioner recorded data. PMID:26942034

  12. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xian-Zhao; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Li, Ming; Wang, Zi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function. This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively. Methods: Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed. Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs. The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between the axis of the femur and the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1) from hip joint extension to hip joint flexion, was proposed as the RHF. The validity of this method was assessed via concomitant measurements of changes in the femur-horizontal angle (between the axis of the femur and the horizontal line) and the sacrum-horizontal angle (SHA) (between the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1 and the horizontal line), the difference of which should equal the change in the SFA. Results: The mean change in the SFA was 112.5 ± 7.4°, and was independent of participant age, height, weight, or body mass index. The mean changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs were 123.0 ± 6.4° and 11.4 ± 3.0°, respectively. This confirmed that the change of SFA between hip joint extension and hip joint flexion was equal to the difference between the changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs. Conclusions: Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity. PMID:26315079

  13. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... of common interventional techniques is below. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures Angiography An X-ray exam of the ... into the vertebra. Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair Ridge Drive • Suite ...

  14. Measuring Cognitive Errors Using the Cognitive Distortions Scale (CDS): Psychometric Properties in Clinical and Non-Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Özdel, Kadir; Taymur, Ibrahim; Guriz, Seher Olga; Tulaci, Riza Gökcer; Kuru, Erkan; Turkcapar, Mehmet Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The Cognitive Distortions Scale was developed to assess thinking errors using case examples in two domains: interpersonal and personal achievement. Although its validity and reliability has been previously demonstrated in non-clinical samples, its psychometric properties and scoring has not yet been evaluated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Cognitive Distortions Scale in two Turkish samples and to examine the usefulness of the categorical scoring system. A total of 325 individuals (Sample 1 and Sample 2) were enrolled in this study to assess those psychometric properties. Our Sample 1 consisted of 225 individuals working as interns at the Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Teaching and Research Hospital and Sample 2 consisted of 100 patients diagnosed with depression presenting to the outpatient unit of the same Hospital. Construct validity was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, and the Automatic Thought Questionnaire. Factor analyses supported a one-factor model in these clinical and non-clinical samples. Cronbach's α values were excellent in both the non-clinical and clinical samples (0.933 and 0.918 respectively). Cognitive Distortions Scale scores showed significant correlation with relevant clinical measures. Study Cognitive Distortions Scale scores were stable over a time span of two weeks. This study showed that the Cognitive Distortions Scale is a valid and reliable measure in clinical and non-clinical populations. In addition, it shows that the categorical exists/does not exist scoring system is relevant and could be used in clinical settings. PMID:25170942

  15. Clinical use of three-dimensional video measurements of eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Black, F. O.; Wade, S.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Noninvasive measurements of three-dimensional eye position can be accurately achieved with video methods. A case study showing the potential clinical benefit of these enhanced measurements is presented along with some thoughts about technological advances, essential for clinical application, that are likely to occur in the next several years.

  16. An improved measurement of progesterone in saliva and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Weidenheim, K M; Anderson, C J; Sgoutas, D S; Mitchell, D E

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of progesterone in saliva offers several advantages when compared to assays of serum progesterone, especially when ovarian activity is being assessed. Most published methods for the determination of progesterone in saliva are based on assays developed in research centers, which employ "in-house" reagents that are critically dependent on supplies of highly selected antisera. In this report, the adaptation of a readily available commercial progesterone "kit", the Pantex Immunodirect Progesterone (125I) is described for the measurement of salivary progesterone. A single extraction step was added, however, to improve assay performance and to ensure that total salivary progesterone was measured. PMID:3087267

  17. Picture archiving and communication in radiology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marzia; Nanni, Marinella; Cimarra, Stefania; Crisafulli, Letizia; Campioni, Paolo; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    After over 80 years of exclusive archiving of radiologic films, at present, in Radiology, digital archiving is increasingly gaining ground. Digital archiving allows a considerable reduction in costs and space saving, but most importantly, immediate or remote consultation of all examinations and reports in the hospital clinical wards, is feasible. The RIS system, in this case, is the starting point of the process of electronic archiving which however is the task of PACS. The latter can be used as radiologic archive in accordance with the law provided that it is in conformance with some specifications as the use of optical long-term storage media or with electronic track of change. PACS archives, in a hierarchical system, all digital images produced by each diagnostic imaging modality. Images and patient data can be retrieved and used for consultation or remote consultation by the reporting radiologist who requires images and reports of previous radiologic examinations or by the referring physician of the ward. Modern PACS owing to the WEB server allow remote access to extremely simplified images and data however ensuring the due regulations and access protections. Since the PACS enables a simpler data communication within the hospital, security and patient privacy should be protected. A secure and reliable PACS should be able to minimize the risk of accidental data destruction, and should prevent non authorized access to the archive with adequate security measures in relation to the acquired knowledge and based on the technological advances. Archiving of data produced by modern digital imaging is a problem now present also in small Radiology services. The technology is able to readily solve problems which were extremely complex up to some years ago as the connection between equipment and archiving system owing also to the universalization of the DICOM 3.0 standard. The evolution of communication networks and the use of standard protocols as TCP/IP can minimize

  18. Evaluation of measurement uncertainty of glucose in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berçik Inal, B; Koldas, M; Inal, H; Coskun, C; Gümüs, A; Döventas, Y

    2007-04-01

    The definition of the uncertainty of measurement used in the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM) is a parameter associated with the result of a measurement, which characterizes the dispersion of the values that could reasonably be attributed to the measurand. Uncertainty of measurement comprises many components. In addition to every parameter, the measurement uncertainty is that a value should be given by all institutions that have been accredited. This value shows reliability of the measurement. GUM, published by NIST, contains uncertainty directions. Eurachem/CITAC Guide CG4 was also published by Eurachem/CITAC Working Group in the year 2000. Both of them offer a mathematical model, for uncertainty can be calculated. There are two types of uncertainty in measurement. Type A is the evaluation of uncertainty through the statistical analysis and type B is the evaluation of uncertainty through other means, for example, certificate reference material. Eurachem Guide uses four types of distribution functions: (1) rectangular distribution that gives limits without specifying a level of confidence (u(x)=a/ radical3) to a certificate; (2) triangular distribution that values near to the same point (u(x)=a/ radical6); (3) normal distribution in which an uncertainty is given in the form of a standard deviation s, a relative standard deviation s/ radicaln, or a coefficient of variance CV% without specifying the distribution (a = certificate value, u = standard uncertainty); and (4) confidence interval. PMID:17460183

  19. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. ); Kreel, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma.

  20. Hospital preparedness for chemical and radiological disasters.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brooks L; Geller, Robert J; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-02-01

    Hospital planning for chemical or radiological events is essential but all too often treated as a low priority. Although some other types of disasters like hurricanes and tornadoes may be more frequent, chemical and radiological emergencies have the potential for major disruptions to clinical care. Thorough planning can mitigate the impact of a chemical or radiological event. Planning needs to include all 4 phases of an event: mitigation (preplanning), preparation, response, and recovery. Mitigation activities should include the performance of a hazards vulnerability analysis and identification of local subject-matter experts and team leaders. PMID:25455661

  1. Interventional radiology of the abdomen. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrucci, J.T.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Simeone, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book differs from several other presently available texts on interventional radiology in that it is explicitly not derived from the principles of catheter angiography. Abdominal interventional radiology depends as much, if not more, on ultrasonographic and computed tomographic guidance and, while perhaps less glamorous, also on conventional fluoroscopic guidance (for procedures such as urinary and biliary manipulations). Thus, while technical aspects of catheter design and manipulation can never be minimized, they are not the sole elements of successful interventional radiology in the abdomen. Relevant anatomy and pathophysiology, along with clinical aspects of medical and surgical care and thorough patient follow-up are of equal concern.

  2. Multidimensional Interactive Radiology Report and Analysis: standardization of workflow and reporting for renal mass tracking and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Darryl H.; Ma, Kevin; Yepes, Fernando; Nadamuni, Mridula; Nayyar, Megha; Liu, Brent; Duddalwar, Vinay; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    A conventional radiology report primarily consists of a large amount of unstructured text, and lacks clear, concise, consistent and content-rich information. Hence, an area of unmet clinical need consists of developing better ways to communicate radiology findings and information specific to each patient. Here, we design a new workflow and reporting system that combines and integrates advances in engineering technology with those from the medical sciences, the Multidimensional Interactive Radiology Report and Analysis (MIRRA). Until recently, clinical standards have primarily relied on 2D images for the purpose of measurement, but with the advent of 3D processing, many of the manually measured metrics can be automated, leading to better reproducibility and less subjective measurement placement. Hence, we make use this newly available 3D processing in our workflow. Our pipeline is used here to standardize the labeling, tracking, and quantifying of metrics for renal masses.

  3. Seeking value in Medicare: performance measurement for clinical professionals.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lisa

    2013-10-30

    The Medicare program, despite its reputation of being a bill payer with little regard to the worth of the services it buys, has begun to put in place a range of programs aimed at assessing quality and value, with more to come. Attention to resource use and cost is nascent. The issues are complex, and it is no surprise that there is a level of contention between providers and regulators, even though both profess commitment to improved quality. This paper summarizes the quality and value programs that apply to physicians and other clinical professionals, as well as programs designed to encourage the adoption of technology to support quality improvement. Participation in all is voluntary. However, a decision not to participate increasingly carries a financial penalty, as Congress (and, by extension, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS) tries to encourage behavior it cannot force. PMID:24312987

  4. Anthrax threat: a review of clinical and diagnostic measures.

    PubMed

    Alqurashi, Abdelrahman Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Anthrax is the plague of the ancient world and its existence is confirmed by the Roman poet Virgil. Also it is a threat in the modern world as it can be used in biological wars and bioterrorism. Anthrax is caused by Bacillus anthracis an unmovable, aerobic, gram-positive rod. It forms spores, which can survive for years in the environment. Three clinical forms result after exposure to anthrax spores: cutaneous, respiratory, and gastro- intestinal. The cutaneous anthrax commonly prevails among humans. The respiratory form occurs most likely due to inhalation of the bacterial spores, whereas the gastrointestinal form happens after spores' ingestion. Prophylactic, early diagnosis and proper treatment will reduce mortalities of anthrax. Thus, the physicians, senior nurses and individuals at risk should be aware of the danger of this disease. PMID:23697023

  5. The Clinical Relevance of Neurocognitive Measures in Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Marhe, Reshmi; Luijten, Maartje; Franken, Ingmar H. A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in addiction treatment is relapse prevention, as rates of relapse following treatment remain very high across the main classes of drugs of abuse. Relapse prevention could be improved by a better understanding of the factors that influence treatment outcomes, including better predictors of risk of relapse following treatment. Recent developments in cognitive neuroscience point to neurocognitive measures (i.e., brain-imaging measures during cognitive-task performance) as potential predictors of relapse. These might even be better predictors than self-report measures, such as craving. We first give an overview of the current state of the field, and then discuss the outstanding challenges and future directions in this area of research. PMID:24454294

  6. Quality management in clinical application of mass spectrometry measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Vogeser, Michael; Seger, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Thanks to highly specific analyte detection and potentially complete compensation for matrix variables based on the principle of stable isotope derivative internal standardisation, mass spectrometry methods allow the development of diagnostic tests of outstanding analytical quality. However, these features per se do not guarantee reliability of tests. A wide range of factors can introduce analytical errors and inaccuracy due to the extreme complexity of the methods involved. Furthermore, it can be expected that the application patterns of MS methods in diagnostic laboratories will change substantially during the coming years - with presumably less specialised laboratories implementing mass spectrometry. Introduction of highly automated test solutions by manufacturers will require some trade-off between operation convenience, sample throughput and analytical performance. Structured and careful quality and risk management is therefore crucial to translate the analytical power of mass spectrometry into actionable and reliable results for individual patients' care and to maintain the degree of reliability that is expected from MS methods in clinical pathology. This reflection review discusses whether particular quality assurance tools have to be applied for MS-based diagnostic tests and whether these tools are different from those applied for optical- and affinity-based standard tests. Both pre-implementation strategies and surveillance of assays with assessment of metadata in routine testing are addressed. The release of the CLSI guideline C62-A in 2014 was a substantial achievement in this context because it addresses a wide spectrum of relevant issues in quality assurance of mass spectrometry-based clinical tests. However, the translation of this best practice document into individual laboratory settings is likely to be heterogeneous. PMID:27400682

  7. Gastrointestinal Lymphoma: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Somwaru, Alexander S; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Levine, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Extranodal lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms that can affect every abdominal organ, with distinctive pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features. The radiologic findings are closely related to the underlying pathophysiology, and an understanding of these characteristic features should facilitate recognition of extranodal lymphoma and its various subtypes. Within the abdomen, lymphoma is found most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach. This article presents the findings in gastrointestinal tract lymphoma. PMID:27265607

  8. A systematic review of measures used to assess chronic musculoskeletal pain in clinical and randomized controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Litcher-Kelly, Leighann; Martino, Sharon A.; Broderick, Joan E.; Stone, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    There are many types of pain assessments available to researchers conducting clinical trials, ranging from simple, single-item Visual Analog Scale (VAS) questions through extensive, multidimensional inventories. The primary question addressed in this survey of top-tier medical journals was: Which pain assessments are most commonly used in trials? Articles addressing chronic musculoskeletal pain in clinical trials were identified in seven major medical journals for the year 2003. A total of 50 studies (total original research articles reviewed: 1,476) met selection criteria, and from these we identified 28 types of pain assessments. Selected studies were classified according to the dimensions of pain assessed, the type of scale and descriptors/anchors used, and the reporting period specified. The most frequently used assessments were the single-item VAS scale and the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS); multidimensional inventories were used infrequently. There was considerable variability in the instructions patients received about the period to consider when evaluating their pain, and many studies provided only cursory information about their assessments in the methods. Overall, it appears that clinical trials utilize simple measures of pain and that there is no widely accepted standard for clinical pain assessment that would facilitate comparison of outcomes across trials. Perspective This review highlights the heterogeneity of pain outcome measures used and the abundance of single-item measures in clinical trials. While there are many pain outcome measures available to clinical researchers, more consistency in the field should be encouraged so that results between studies can be compared. PMID:17690014

  9. 21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiologic quality assurance instrument. 892.1940... instrument. (a) Identification. A radiologic quality assurance instrument is a device intended for medical purposes to measure a physical characteristic associated with another radiologic device. (b)...

  10. A study of the clinical and radiological features in a cohort of 93 patients with a COL2A1 mutation causing spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita or a related phenotype.

    PubMed

    Terhal, Paulien A; Nievelstein, Rutger Jan A J; Verver, Eva J J; Topsakal, Vedat; van Dommelen, Paula; Hoornaert, Kristien; Le Merrer, Martine; Zankl, Andreas; Simon, Marleen E H; Smithson, Sarah F; Marcelis, Carlo; Kerr, Bronwyn; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kinning, Esther; Mansour, Sahar; Elmslie, Frances; Goodwin, Linda; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Herkert, Johanna C; Lund, Allan M; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Mégarbané, André; Lees, Melissa M; Wilson, Louise C; Male, Alison; Hurst, Jane; Alanay, Yasemin; Annerén, Göran; Betz, Regina C; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Dieux, Anne; David, Albert; Elting, Mariet W; van den Ende, Jenneke; Green, Andrew; van Hagen, Johanna M; Hertel, Niels Thomas; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; den Hollander, Nicolette; Homfray, Tessa; Hove, Hanne D; Price, Susan; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rohrbach, Marianne; Schroeter, Barbara; Suri, Mohnish; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Tobias, Edward S; Toutain, Annick; Vreeburg, Maaike; Wakeling, Emma; Knoers, Nine V; Coucke, Paul; Mortier, Geert R

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 collagen disorders encompass a diverse group of skeletal dysplasias that are commonly associated with orthopedic, ocular, and hearing problems. However, the frequency of many clinical features has never been determined. We retrospectively investigated the clinical, radiological, and genotypic data in a group of 93 patients with molecularly confirmed SEDC or a related disorder. The majority of the patients (80/93) had short stature, with radiological features of SEDC (n = 64), others having SEMD (n = 5), Kniest dysplasia (n = 7), spondyloperipheral dysplasia (n = 2), or Torrance-like dysplasia (n = 2). The remaining 13 patients had normal stature with mild SED, Stickler-like syndrome or multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. Over 50% of the patients had undergone orthopedic surgery, usually for scoliosis, femoral osteotomy or hip replacement. Odontoid hypoplasia was present in 56% (95% CI 38-74) and a correlation between odontoid hypoplasia and short stature was observed. Atlanto-axial instability, was observed in 5 of the 18 patients (28%, 95% CI 10-54) in whom flexion-extension films of the cervical spine were available; however, it was rarely accompanied by myelopathy. Myopia was found in 45% (95% CI 35-56), and retinal detachment had occurred in 12% (95% CI 6-21; median age 14 years; youngest age 3.5 years). Thirty-two patients complained of hearing loss (37%, 95% CI 27-48) of whom 17 required hearing aids. The ophthalmological features and possibly also hearing loss are often relatively frequent and severe in patients with splicing mutations. Based on clinical findings, age at onset and genotype-phenotype correlations in this cohort, we propose guidelines for the management and follow-up in this group of disorders. PMID:25604898

  11. Radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.M.

    1981-12-01

    Dosimeters were provided for development within the crew compartment and on the astronauts flight garments to detect radiation encountered by the space crew during the mission. The STS-1 mission encountered geomagnetically trapped electrons and protons on 13 low altitude passes through the South Atlantic anomaly. The orbital inclination was such that encounters with the outer belt horn was negligible. Radiation dose to the crew from the above events was estimated to be 5 millirad. Total PDL measured dose to the crew from all sources during the STS-1 mission was 20 millirad.

  12. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-06-09

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

  13. Radiological instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Seibentritt, C.R. Jr.

    1986-12-23

    An instrument is described for measuring radiation, particularly nuclear radiation, comprising: a radiation sensitive structure pivoted toward one end and including a pair of elongated solid members contiguously joined together along their length dimensions and having a common planar interface therebetween. One of the pairs of members is comprised of radiochromic material whose index of refraction changes due to anomolous dispersion as a result of being exposed to nuclear radiation. The pair of members further has mutually different indices of refraction with the member having the larger index of refraction further being transparent for the passage of light and of energy therethrough; means located toward the other end of the structure for varying the angle of longitudinal elevation of the pair of members; means for generating and projecting a beam of light into one end of the member having the larger index of refraction. The beam of light is projected toward the planar interface where it is reflected out of the other end of the same member as a first output beam; means projecting a portion of the beam of light into one end of the member having the larger index of refraction where it traverses therethrough without reflection and out of the other end of the same member as a second output beam; and means adjacent the structure for receiving the first and second output beams, whereby a calibrated change in the angle of elevation of the structure between positions of equal intensity of the first and second output beams prior to and following exposure provides a measure of the radiation sensed due to a change of refraction of the radiochromic material.

  14. SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlbrenner, R; Kolli, KP; Taylor, A; Kohi, M; Fidelman, N; LaBerge, J; Kerlan, R; Gould, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Methods: Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests. Results: Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms. Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav

  15. Dynamic measurements and uncertainty estimation of clinical thermometers using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorevc, Jaka; Bojkovski, Jovan; Pušnik, Igor; Drnovšek, Janko

    2016-09-01

    Clinical thermometers in intensive care units are used for the continuous measurement of body temperature. This study describes a procedure for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation in order to examine the requirements for clinical thermometer dynamic properties in standards and recommendations. In this study thermistors were used as temperature sensors, transient temperature measurements were performed in water and air and the measurement data were processed for the investigation of thermometer dynamic properties. The thermometers were mathematically modelled. A Monte Carlo method was implemented for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation. The measurement uncertainty was analysed for static and dynamic conditions. Results showed that dynamic uncertainty is much larger than steady-state uncertainty. The results of dynamic uncertainty analysis were applied on an example of clinical measurements and were compared to current requirements in ISO standard for clinical thermometers. It can be concluded that there was no need for dynamic evaluation of clinical thermometers for continuous measurement, while dynamic measurement uncertainty was within the demands of target uncertainty. Whereas in the case of intermittent predictive thermometers, the thermometer dynamic properties had a significant impact on the measurement result. Estimation of dynamic uncertainty is crucial for the assurance of traceable and comparable measurements.

  16. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dhatt, Harpreet S; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, computed tomography (CT) findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In our article, we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and nonocclusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26526436

  17. Designing an optical bendloss sensor for clinical force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linders, David R.; Wang, Wei-Chih; Nuckley, David J.

    2009-03-01

    In current physical medicine, specific manual forces are applied to patients for diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation, but these forces remain largely qualitiative. No universal tool exists to measure these forces and display them in real-time. To provide real-time quantitative feedback to clinicians, we have developed a disposable glove with a force sensor embedded in the fingertips or palm. The sensor is based on the fiberoptic bendloss effect whereby light intensity from an infrared source is attenuated as the fiber is bent between a series of corrugated teeth. The sensor fabricated has a very low profile (10 × 7 × 1 mm) and has demonstrated high sensitivity, accuracy, range, and durability. Forces as low as 0.1 N and up to 90 N have been measured with high signal to noise ratios. Good agreement with theoretical predictions of bendloss has been demonstrated. Current trials have obtained data from 20 ACL reconstruction patients demonstrating a significant increase in range of motion recovery for patients who consistently stretch at home over those who do not.

  18. Clinical and experimental observations with fontanel pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Ivan, L P; Badejo, A

    1983-01-01

    Using the Ladd fiberoptic system, fontanel pressure measurements were performed in infants from 1 to 219 days of age. Various holding devices were used for standardizing the application force and remarkably consistent values were found among three different holders. In group I (neonates), 9.45, 8.45 and 8.2 mm Hg were the mean values. In group II (4 days to 4 weeks), 10.3 and 9.2 were the mean values. In group III (34-219 days), the mean values were 9.9 and 12.4. In a group of 36 hydrocephalic children, epidural, ventricular and fontanel pressures were compared during surgery, and linear correlation was found but the ventricular fluid pressure readings were consistently lower. In dogs with artificial fontanels, cisternal and fontanel pressure was monitored while volume pressure studies were performed. In 80% of the cases, close linear correlation was found. Fontanel pressure measurement and monitoring give very valuable data on ICP. The correct zero reference point is a difficulty which can be eliminated with standardized holding devices. PMID:6661933

  19. An Approach for Automatic Classification of Radiology Reports in Spanish.

    PubMed

    Cotik, Viviana; Filippo, Darío; Castaño, José

    2015-01-01

    Automatic detection of relevant terms in medical reports is useful for educational purposes and for clinical research. Natural language processing (NLP) techniques can be applied in order to identify them. In this work we present an approach to classify radiology reports written in Spanish into two sets: the ones that indicate pathological findings and the ones that do not. In addition, the entities corresponding to pathological findings are identified in the reports. We use RadLex, a lexicon of English radiology terms, and NLP techniques to identify the occurrence of pathological findings. Reports are classified using a simple algorithm based on the presence of pathological findings, negation and hedge terms. The implemented algorithms were tested with a test set of 248 reports annotated by an expert, obtaining a best result of 0.72 F1 measure. The output of the classification task can be used to look for specific occurrences of pathological findings. PMID:26262128

  20. High-resolution workstations for primary and secondary radiology readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Ricky K.; Simons, Margaret A.; Razavi, Mahmood; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Boechat, Maria I.; Hall, Theodore R.; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Huang, H. K.; Eldredge, Sandra L.

    1990-08-01

    We have implemented two high resolution workstations within our pediatric radiology PACS module: a two-monitor 2K x 2K station and a six-monitor 1K x 1K station. The 2K x 2K workstation is under evaluation for primary reading of pediatric radiographs from a computed radiography unit. System implementation and evaluation methods are described. Operational efficiency measures of both film and digital systems are reported. This study is our first attempt to integrate a primary viewing station into a busy clinical environment. The 1K x 1K workstation is available 24-hours a day, 7 days a week for fast reviews by referring physicians. Images from a compated radiography system are available at the workstation in about 8 minutes. A digital voice reporting system is being developed to communicate radiology reports from the 2K x 2K workstation to the 1K x 1K secondary review station.

  1. Neurophysiological measures in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: markers of progression in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Chio, Adriano; Dengler, Reinhard; Hecht, Martin; Weber, Markus; Swash, Michael

    2005-03-01

    In this review we evaluate clinical neurophysiological methods, originally described for use in diagnosis that can be applied to measurement of change during the progress of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Such measurements are potentially important in clinical trials, and also in clinical practice. We have assessed methods for lower and upper motor neuron function, including conventional EMG, nerve conduction and F-wave studies, the derived Neurophysiological Index, motor unit counting methods (MUNE), and transcranial magnetic motor cortex stimulation. We have also addressed the validity of measurements of electromechanical coupling. Methods for measuring muscle strength are beyond the scope of this review. We conclude that MUNE, M-wave amplitude and the Neurophysiological Index are sufficiently reliable, sensitive, and relevant to the clinical problem of ALS, to be used in clinical trials in the disease. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is of limited value, but a combination of the measurements made as part of this technique may also be useful. We conclude that clinical neurophysiological techniques should now be used in measuring change in clinical trials in ALS. PMID:16036422

  2. Clinical Potentials for Measuring Stress in Youth with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Schreier, Hannah M. C.; Miller, Gregory E.; Chen, Edith

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis It is well established that the course of asthma can be affected by the psychological stress an individual experiences. In this article we review literature assessing the impact of psychological stress on asthma outcomes and discuss the benefits and disadvantages of different measures for assessing stress, including subjective questionnaires, event checklists, and interview-based approaches. We further discuss the importance of taking into account the timing and chronicity of stress, as well as individuals’ subjective appraisals of stress. We suggest that while questionnaire and checklist approaches are easier to administer, interview-based stress assessments are preferable where feasible as they generate richer and more in-depth information regarding the stressors that people experience. In addition, this kind of information appears to be more robustly linked to pediatric asthma outcomes of interest. PMID:21094922

  3. Anterior chamber volume. Its measurement and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Coakes, R L; Lloyd-Jones, D; Hitchings, R A

    1979-04-01

    Measurement of anterior chamber volume is discussed and attention drawn to a new, convenient slit-image method, which was used to study anterior chamber depth and volume before and after prophylactic peripheral iridectomy in the fellow eyes of patients presenting with unilateral acute angle-closure glaucoma. There was no significant change in depth after iridectomy but the mean anterior chamber volume increased significantly (P less than 0.01), by nearly 3 per cent. This increase was due to elimination of peripheral iris bombé which was not present in two control groups of normal eyes, one matched for anterior chamber depth and the other for age and refraction. Peripheral iris bombé may be a quantifiable factor predisposing to the development of acute angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:297385

  4. Update on a Clinical Measure for the Assessment of Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Robert C.; Karow, Colleen M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Rapid Assessment of Problem Solving test (RAPS) is a clinical measure of problem solving based on the 20 Questions Test. This article updates clinicians on the RAPS, addresses questions raised about the test in an earlier article (R. C. Marshall, C. M. Karow, C. Morelli, K. Iden, & J. Dixon, 2003a), and discusses the clinical utility…

  5. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26466187

  6. Physiological measurements of tissue health; implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jennifer H; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath M

    2012-12-01

    Pressure mapping alone insufficiently describes tissue health. Comprehensive, quantitative non invasive assessment is crucial. Interface pressures (IPs) and transcutaneous blood gas levels [transcutaneous tissue oxygen (T(c) PO(2) )] were simultaneously assessed over both ischia and the sacrum to investigate the hypotheses: (i) tissue oxygenation decreases with sustained applied pressure; (ii) tissue oxygen and IP are inversely correlated in loaded soft tissues; (iii) multisite assessments are unnecessary because healthy individuals are symmetrical. Measurements were taken at 5-minute intervals for 20 minutes in both sitting and supine lying for a cohort of 20 able-bodied adults. There were no statistically significant changes over time for either variable in 96% of timepoint comparisons. Specifically, no significant differences were seen between 10 and 20 minutes in either position. These findings imply that a 10-minute assessment can reliably indicate tissue health and that tissue may adapt to applied load over time. No statistically significant correlations between T(c) PO(2) and IP were observed. However, the left and right ischia were significantly different for both variables in supine lying (P < 0.001) and for sitting IP (P < 0.010). Thus, even in this healthy cohort, postural symmetry was not observed and should not be assumed for other populations with restricted mobility. If a multisite technique cannot be used, repeated tissue health assessments must use the same anatomic location. PMID:22289151

  7. Diagnostic measure to quantify loss of clinical components in multi-lead electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, R K; Sharma, L N; Dandapat, S

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, a novel principal component (PC)-based diagnostic measure (PCDM) is proposed to quantify loss of clinical components in the multi-lead electrocardiogram (MECG) signals. The analysis of MECG shows that, the clinical components are captured in few PCs. The proposed diagnostic measure is defined as the sum of weighted percentage root mean square difference (PRD) between the PCs of original and processed MECG signals. The values of the weight depend on the clinical importance of PCs. The PCDM is tested over MECG enhancement and a novel MECG data reduction scheme. The proposed measure is compared with weighted diagnostic distortion, wavelet energy diagnostic distortion and PRD. The qualitative evaluation is performed using Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient (SROCC) and Pearson linear correlation coefficient. The simulation result demonstrates that the PCDM performs better to quantify loss of clinical components in MECG and shows a SROCC value of 0.9686 with subjective measure. PMID:27222735

  8. Radiology Reporting System Data Exchange With the Electronic Health Record System: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Bashiri, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In order to better designing of electronic health record system in Iran, integration of health information systems based on a common language must be done to interpret and exchange this information with this system is required. Background: This study provides a conceptual model of radiology reporting system using unified modeling language. The proposed model can solve the problem of integration this information system with the electronic health record system. By using this model and design its service based, easily connect to electronic health record in Iran and facilitate transfer radiology report data. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2013. The study population was 22 experts that working at the Imaging Center in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran and the sample was accorded with the community. Research tool was a questionnaire that prepared by the researcher to determine the information requirements. Content validity and test-retest method was used to measure validity and reliability of questioner respectively. Data analyzed with average index, using SPSS. Also Visual Paradigm software was used to design a conceptual model. Result: Based on the requirements assessment of experts and related texts, administrative, demographic and clinical data and radiological examination results and if the anesthesia procedure performed, anesthesia data suggested as minimum data set for radiology report and based it class diagram designed. Also by identifying radiology reporting system process, use case was drawn. Conclusion: According to the application of radiology reports in electronic health record system for diagnosing and managing of clinical problem of the patient, with providing the conceptual Model for radiology reporting system; in order to systematically design it, the problem of data sharing between these systems and electronic health records system would eliminate. PMID:26156904

  9. Radiological Image Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Chung Benedict

    The movement toward digital images in radiology presents the problem of how to conveniently and economically store, retrieve, and transmit the volume of digital images. Basic research into image data compression is necessary in order to move from a film-based department to an efficient digital -based department. Digital data compression technology consists of two types of compression technique: error-free and irreversible. Error -free image compression is desired; however, present techniques can only achieve compression ratio of from 1.5:1 to 3:1, depending upon the image characteristics. Irreversible image compression can achieve a much higher compression ratio; however, the image reconstructed from the compressed data shows some difference from the original image. This dissertation studies both error-free and irreversible image compression techniques. In particular, some modified error-free techniques have been tested and the recommended strategies for various radiological images are discussed. A full-frame bit-allocation irreversible compression technique has been derived. A total of 76 images which include CT head and body, and radiographs digitized to 2048 x 2048, 1024 x 1024, and 512 x 512 have been used to test this algorithm. The normalized mean -square-error (NMSE) on the difference image, defined as the difference between the original and the reconstructed image from a given compression ratio, is used as a global measurement on the quality of the reconstructed image. The NMSE's of total of 380 reconstructed and 380 difference images are measured and the results tabulated. Three complex compression methods are also suggested to compress images with special characteristics. Finally, various parameters which would effect the quality of the reconstructed images are discussed. A proposed hardware compression module is given in the last chapter.

  10. Interventional radiology in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Ahmad, Farhan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiological percutaneous procedures are becoming all the more important in the curative or palliative management of elderly frail patients with multiple underlying comorbidities. They may serve either as alternative primary minimally invasive therapies or adjuncts to traditional surgical treatments. The present report provides a concise review of the most important interventional radiological procedures with a special focus on the treatment of the primary debilitating pathologies of the elderly population. The authors elaborate on the scientific evidence and latest developments of thermoablation of solid organ malignancies, palliative stent placement for gastrointestinal tract cancer, airway stenting for tracheobronchial strictures, endovascular management of aortic and peripheral arterial vascular disease, and cement stabilization of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The added benefits of high technical and clinical success coupled with lower procedural mortality and morbidity are highlighted. PMID:19503761

  11. [Fibrous dysplasia of the skull. Radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Amato, C; Moschini, M; Colavita, N; Tagliaferri, G

    1993-09-01

    The authors examined 11 patients with fibrous dysplasia of the skull pointing out its radiologic features and preferential sites. Conventional radiology, CT and MR imaging were used. As for conventional radiology, tangential scans which of great value to depict the most typical morphologic patterns. Lesions of the skull base were most frequent in the sphenoid (7 of 11 cases), where 5 of 7 exhibited a sclerotic pattern. Bone changes in the skull vault were: mixed (3 cases), pagetoid (2 cases), "ground glass" (1 case) and lytic (1 case): none of these cases was of the sclerotic type. A typical feature of vault lesions was the widening of diploic space associated with expansion of the outer bone and integrity of the inner bone. Radiologic findings, often associated with suggestive clinical manifestations, always allowed a diagnostic hypothesis; histopathologic confirmation was needed only in a few cases (4 of 11 patients). PMID:8210526

  12. Characterization of a cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors for 'in vivo' entrance skin dose measurements in interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, Maria Daniela; D'Andrea, Marco; Strigari, Lidia; D'Alessio, Daniela; Quagliani, Francesco; Santoni, Riccardo; Bosco, Alessia Lo

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: During radiological interventional procedures (RIP) the skin of a patient under examination may undergo a prolonged x-ray exposure, receiving a dose as high as 5 Gy in a single session. This paper describes the use of the OneDose{sup TM} cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors to determine the entrance skin dose (ESD) at selected points during RIP. Methods: At first, some dosimetric characteristics of the detector, such as reproducibility, linearity, and fading, have been investigated using a C-arc as a source of radiation. The reference setting (RS) was: 80 kV energy, 40 cm Multiplication-Sign 40 cm field of view (FOV), current-time product of 50 mAs and source to skin distance (SSD) of 50 cm. A calibrated PMX III solid state detector was used as the reference detector and Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} films have been used as an independent dosimetric system to test the entire procedure. A calibration factor for the RS and correction factors as functions of tube voltage and FOV size have been determined. Results: Reproducibility ranged from 4% at low doses (around 10 cGy as measured by the reference detector) to about 1% for high doses (around 2 Gy). The system response was found to be linear with respect to both dose measured with the PMX III and tube voltage. The fading test has shown that the maximum deviation from the optimal reading conditions (3 min after a single irradiation) was 9.1% corresponding to four irradiations in one hour read 3 min after the last exposure. The calibration factor in the RS has shown that the system response at the kV energy range is about four times larger than in the MV energy range. A fifth order and fourth order polynomial functions were found to provide correction factors for tube voltage and FOV size, respectively, in measurement settings different than the RS. ESDs measured with the system after applying the proper correction factors agreed within one standard deviation (SD) with the corresponding ESDs

  13. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  14. Case studies in clinical practice development.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Romi; Lipman, John; Murphy, Timothy P

    2005-03-01

    By asking identical questions of several successful practitioners of clinical interventional radiology, a snapshot of the current and future status of interventional radiology as a clinical discipline is presented. PMID:21326672

  15. Measurement of physiochemical parameters and determination of the level of radiological threat to the population associated with the Karnaphuli River sediment containing municipal and industrial wastes of Chittagong city in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kowsar; Chakraborty, Shyamal Ranjan; Rahman, Abul Khaer Mohammad Rezaur; Deb, Arun Kumar; Kamal, Masud; Chowdhury, Mantazul Islam; Uddin, Md Suza

    2013-03-01

    The research work has been aimed to assess the radiological and chemical threat caused due to urban and industrial wastage drainage to the inhabitants of the Chittagong city in Bangladesh. For finding the chemical effects along with the measurement of radiological threat, the physiochemical characteristics (temperature, pH value and oxidation-reduction potential) of the sediment samples have been analysed. The activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (238)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K in the investigated samples have been found to be higher than those of the world average values. The artificial radionuclide (137)Cs in the samples studied has not been detected. The mean value of the radium equivalent activity and outdoor exposure rate in the study region have been found to be 240.94 ± 23.12 Bq kg(-1) and 115.82 ± 10.81 nGy h(-1), respectively. The radiation doses have been measured directly by employing beta-gamma survey meter (model: LUDLUM 44-9) from where the samples have been collected. The average values of the radiological parameters have been calculated from the activity concentrations of the radionuclides mentioned in the sediment samples found to be higher than those of the corresponding world average values. PMID:22807494

  16. [The balanced scorecard--applications in a radiology department].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M H; Teichgräber, U; Kröncke, T J; Hamm, B; Lemke, A J

    2012-12-01

    The balanced scorecard (BSC) represents a comprehensive management tool for organizations with the aim to focus all activities on a chosen strategy. Targets for various perspectives of the environment such as the customer, financial, process, and potential perspective are linked with concrete measures, and cause-effect relationships between the objectives are analyzed. This article shows that the BSC can also be used for the comprehensive control of a radiology department and thus provides a meaningful contribution in organizing the various diagnostic and treatment services, the management of complex clinical environment and can be of help with the tasks in research and teaching. PMID:23059697

  17. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses. PMID:26913507

  18. Clinical and radiological outcomes of conservative treatment after stable post-traumatic thoracolumbar fractures in elderly: Is it really best option for all elderly patients?

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Yilmaz, Serdar; Deveci, Alper; Dundar, Abdurrahim; Yoldas, Burak; Toprak, Ali; Tabak, Yalcın

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to research the effectiveness of conservative treatment of stable post-traumatic thoracolumbar vertebral fractures in elderly patients. Methods The study included 21 elderly patients (13 females, 8 males) with post-traumatic thoracolumbar compression fracture who were treated with a brace. Fractures without any trauma history, pathological fractures, patients younger than 60 years old and patients with no malignancy history were excluded from study. Neurological examination and posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) were intact in all patients. Radiological parameters and pain scores were recorded in regular follow-up. Results The mean age and follow-up were 71.3 years (range, 60–84 years) and 20.1 months (range, 12–26 months) respectively. During follow-up, 4 patients had significant height loss resulting in kyphotic deformity and intractable pain. There was a significant increase in the local kyphosis angle (p = 0.001) and height loss percentage (p = 0.017). At the final follow-up, the mean Denis Score of pain was 1.62 ± 0.74. Conclusion Although there is wide acceptance of conservative treatment of post-traumatic stable thoracolumbar fracture with intact PCL according to the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS), elderly female patients with a post-traumatic compression fracture in the junctional region are at great risk of conservative treatment failure. These patients should be well-informed about the possible complications and poor results of conservative treatment, and surgical treatment should be considered in selective cases with the informed consent of the patients. PMID:26566438

  19. Use of Telehealth for Research and Clinical Measures in Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Michelle L.; Goehring, Jenny L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.; Diaz, Gina R.; Sanford, Todd; Harpster, Roger; Valente, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to compare clinical and research-based cochlear implant (CI) measures using telehealth versus traditional methods. Method: This prospective study used an ABA design (A = laboratory, B = remote site). All measures were made twice per visit for the purpose of assessing within-session variability. Twenty-nine adult…

  20. Scale Development of a Measure to Assess Community-Based and Clinical Intervention Group Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patrick A.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Neufeld, Sharon; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2008-01-01

    Though group interventions are widely used in community-based and clinical settings, there are few brief instruments for assessing the group environment. Two studies on the development of a brief measure to assess intervention group environments are described, and psychometric properties of the new scale are presented. The new measure is based on…

  1. Characterization of Potential Outcome Measures for Future Clinical Trials in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Sumis, Allison; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Lara, Rebecca; Wuu, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting recently elucidated synaptic defects in fragile X syndrome (FXS) will require outcome measures capable of assessing short-term changes in cognitive functioning. Potentially useful measures for FXS were evaluated here in a test-retest setting in males and females with FXS (N = 46). Good reproducibility, determined by an…

  2. A Measure for the Reliability of a Rating Scale Based on Longitudinal Clinical Trial Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laenen, Annouschka; Alonso, Ariel; Molenberghs, Geert

    2007-01-01

    A new measure for reliability of a rating scale is introduced, based on the classical definition of reliability, as the ratio of the true score variance and the total variance. Clinical trial data can be employed to estimate the reliability of the scale in use, whenever repeated measurements are taken. The reliability is estimated from the…

  3. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  4. INTEGRATING CLINICAL LABORATORY MEASURES AND ICD-9 CODE DIAGNOSES IN PHENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anurag; Leader, Joseph B.; Verma, Shefali S.; Frase, Alex; Wallace, John; Dudek, Scott; Lavage, Daniel R.; Van Hout, Cristopher V.; Dewey, Frederick E.; Penn, John; Lopez, Alex; Overton, John D.; Carey, David J.; Ledbetter, David H.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) provide a comprehensive resource for discovery, allowing unprecedented exploration of the impact of genetic architecture on health and disease. The data of EHRs also allow for exploration of the complex interactions between health measures across health and disease. The discoveries arising from EHR based research provide important information for the identification of genetic variation for clinical decision-making. Due to the breadth of information collected within the EHR, a challenge for discovery using EHR based data is the development of high-throughput tools that expose important areas of further research, from genetic variants to phenotypes. Phenome-Wide Association studies (PheWAS) provide a way to explore the association between genetic variants and comprehensive phenotypic measurements, generating new hypotheses and also exposing the complex relationships between genetic architecture and outcomes, including pleiotropy. EHR based PheWAS have mainly evaluated associations with case/control status from International Classification of Disease, Ninth Edition (ICD-9) codes. While these studies have highlighted discovery through PheWAS, the rich resource of clinical lab measures collected within the EHR can be better utilized for high-throughput PheWAS analyses and discovery. To better use these resources and enrich PheWAS association results we have developed a sound methodology for extracting a wide range of clinical lab measures from EHR data. We have extracted a first set of 21 clinical lab measures from the de-identified EHR of participants of the Geisinger MyCode™ biorepository, and calculated the median of these lab measures for 12,039 subjects. Next we evaluated the association between these 21 clinical lab median values and 635,525 genetic variants, performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for each of 21 clinical lab measures. We then calculated the association between SNPs from these GWAS passing our Bonferroni

  5. INTEGRATING CLINICAL LABORATORY MEASURES AND ICD-9 CODE DIAGNOSES IN PHENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anurag; Leader, Joseph B; Verma, Shefali S; Frase, Alex; Wallace, John; Dudek, Scott; Lavage, Daniel R; Van Hout, Cristopher V; Dewey, Frederick E; Penn, John; Lopez, Alex; Overton, John D; Carey, David J; Ledbetter, David H; Kirchner, H Lester; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Pendergrass, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) provide a comprehensive resource for discovery, allowing unprecedented exploration of the impact of genetic architecture on health and disease. The data of EHRs also allow for exploration of the complex interactions between health measures across health and disease. The discoveries arising from EHR based research provide important information for the identification of genetic variation for clinical decision-making. Due to the breadth of information collected within the EHR, a challenge for discovery using EHR based data is the development of high-throughput tools that expose important areas of further research, from genetic variants to phenotypes. Phenome-Wide Association studies (PheWAS) provide a way to explore the association between genetic variants and comprehensive phenotypic measurements, generating new hypotheses and also exposing the complex relationships between genetic architecture and outcomes, including pleiotropy. EHR based PheWAS have mainly evaluated associations with case/control status from International Classification of Disease, Ninth Edition (ICD-9) codes. While these studies have highlighted discovery through PheWAS, the rich resource of clinical lab measures collected within the EHR can be better utilized for high-throughput PheWAS analyses and discovery. To better use these resources and enrich PheWAS association results we have developed a sound methodology for extracting a wide range of clinical lab measures from EHR data. We have extracted a first set of 21 clinical lab measures from the de-identified EHR of participants of the Geisinger MyCodeTM biorepository, and calculated the median of these lab measures for 12,039 subjects. Next we evaluated the association between these 21 clinical lab median values and 635,525 genetic variants, performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for each of 21 clinical lab measures. We then calculated the association between SNPs from these GWAS passing our Bonferroni

  6. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: A review of imagery measures and a guiding framework

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, David G.; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M.A.; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Holmes, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. PMID:23123567

  7. Clinical complexity in medicine: A measurement model of task and patient complexity

    PubMed Central

    Islam, R.; Weir, C.; Fiol, G. Del

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Complexity in medicine needs to be reduced to simple components in a way that is comprehensible to researchers and clinicians. Few studies in the current literature propose a measurement model that addresses both task and patient complexity in medicine. Objective The objective of this paper is to develop an integrated approach to understand and measure clinical complexity by incorporating both task and patient complexity components focusing on infectious disease domain. The measurement model was adapted and modified to healthcare domain. Methods Three clinical Infectious Disease teams were observed, audio-recorded and transcribed. Each team included an Infectious Diseases expert, one Infectious Diseases fellow, one physician assistant and one pharmacy resident fellow. The transcripts were parsed and the authors independently coded complexity attributes. This baseline measurement model of clinical complexity was modified in an initial set of coding process and further validated in a consensus-based iterative process that included several meetings and email discussions by three clinical experts from diverse backgrounds from the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using Cohen’s kappa. Results The proposed clinical complexity model consists of two separate components. The first is a clinical task complexity model with 13 clinical complexity-contributing factors and 7 dimensions. The second is the patient complexity model with 11 complexity-contributing factors and 5 dimensions. Conclusion The measurement model for complexity encompassing both task and patient complexity will be a valuable resource for future researchers and industry to measure and understand complexity in healthcare. PMID:26404626

  8. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Iaccarino, Vittorio Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  9. Slovenian experience from diagnostic angiography to interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pavcnik, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of writing this article is to document the important events and people in the first 50 years of diagnostic angiography and interventional radiology in Slovenia. During this period not only did the name of the institutions and departments change, but also its governance. Conclusions This depicted the important roles different people played at various times in the cardiovascular divisions inside and outside of the diagnostic and interventional radiology. Historical data show that Slovenian radiology has relatively immediately introduced the new methods of interventional radiology in clinical practice. PMID:25435857

  10. Measuring patient safety in a UK dental hospital: development of a dental clinical effectiveness dashboard.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, M N; Ashley, M P; Shaw, A; Dickson, S; Saksena, A

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety is an important marker of quality for any healthcare organisation. In 2008, the British Government white paper entitled High quality care for all, resulting from a review led by Lord Darzi, identified patient safety as a key component of quality and discussed how it might be measured, analysed and acted upon. National and local clinically curated metrics were suggested, which could be displayed via a 'clinical dashboard'. This paper explains the development of a clinical effectiveness dashboard focused on patient safety in an English dental hospital and how it has helped us identify relevant patient safety issues in secondary dental care. PMID:25303591

  11. Evaluation of hydroxyapatite (Periobone-G) as a bone graft material and calcium sulfate barrier (Capset) in treatment of interproximal vertical defects: A clinical and radiologic study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Vandana, K. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study has been undertaken to assess treatment response of interproximal vertical defects using an alloplast (Periobone-G) and calcium sulfate (Capset) as a barrier both clinically and radiographically. Materials and Methods: Eight patients were selected with 16 sites that were divided into control and experimental sites based on split mouth study design. Plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival margin position were recorded at baseline and 9 months and radiographic assessment was done at baseline and 9 months after recording clinical parameters, the sites were randomly treated either with hydroxyapatite granules Periobone-G or hydroxyapatite granules (control group) was used to fill the osseous defect and calcium sulfate (Capset) (experiment group) barrier was placed. Result: The plaque score reduction was statistically highly significant within control and experimental groups. The gingival score reduction was significant within control and experimental groups, although there were no significant difference between the 2 groups. The pocket depth reduction was significant within control and experimental group, however, the hydroxyapatite + capset group showed significant reduction as compared with hydroxyapatite alone group. The clinical attachment gain and gingival margin position was significant within control and experimental groups, although there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. The amount of defect fill was significant in both control and experimental groups but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant. The mean change in alveolar crest level between control and experimental groups was significant (P=0.02). The percentage of original defect resolved was not significant. Conclusion: The use of calcium sulfate as a barrier proved its role in the treatment of interproximal defects. The application of calcium sulfate (Capset) barrier is easy and simple. The multifaceted

  12. Multiple measures of corticospinal excitability are associated with clinical features of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Neva, J L; Lakhani, B; Brown, K E; Wadden, K P; Mang, C S; Ledwell, N H M; Borich, M R; Vavasour, I M; Laule, C; Traboulsee, A L; MacKay, A L; Boyd, L A

    2016-01-15

    In individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may be employed to assess the integrity of corticospinal system and provides a potential surrogate biomarker of disability. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive examination of the relationship between multiple measures corticospinal excitability and clinical disability in MS (expanded disability status scale (EDSS)). Bilateral corticospinal excitability was assessed using motor evoked potential (MEP) input-output (IO) curves, cortical silent period (CSP), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and transcallosal inhibition (TCI) in 26 individuals with MS and 11 healthy controls. Measures of corticospinal excitability were compared between individuals with MS and controls. We evaluated the relationship(s) between age and clinical demographics such as age at MS onset (AO), disease duration (DD) and clinical disability (EDSS) with measures of corticospinal excitability. Corticospinal excitability thresholds were higher, MEP latency and CSP onset delayed and MEP durations prolonged in individuals with MS compared to controls. Age, DD and EDSS correlated with corticospinal excitability thresholds. Also, TCI duration and the linear slope of the MEP amplitude IO curve correlated with EDSS. Hierarchical regression modeling demonstrated that combining multiple TMS-based measures of corticospinal excitability accounted for unique variance in clinical disability (EDSS) beyond that of clinical demographics (AO, DD). Our results indicate that multiple TMS-based measures of corticospinal and interhemispheric excitability provide insights into the potential neural mechanisms associated with clinical disability in MS. These findings may aid in the clinical evaluation, disease monitoring and prediction of disability in MS. PMID:26467603

  13. Facilitating comfort for hospitalized patients using non-pharmacological measures: preliminary development of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anne M; Davies, Anne; Griffiths, Gareth

    2009-06-01

    Nurses often use non-pharmacological measures to facilitate comfort for patients within the hospital setting. However, guidelines for use of these measures are commonly inadequate or absent. This paper presents 12 clinical practice guidelines that were developed from the findings of a literature review into non-pharmacological measures that are thought to facilitate patient comfort. The non-pharmacological measures addressed in these guidelines are: Aromotherapy, Distraction, Guided Imagery, Laughter, Massage, Music, Reiki, Heat or Cold, Meditation, Reflexology, Reposition and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation. These are preliminary guidelines for the use of non-pharmacological measures and further research and development of such guidelines is recommended. PMID:19531072

  14. Radiological instrument. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1985-10-10

    This patent application discloses a radiological measuring instrument including an angularly variable radiation-sensitive structure comprised of two blocks of material having a different index of refraction with one of the materials comprising a radiochromic substance whose refractive index changes through anomolous dispersion as a result of being exposed to radiation. The ratio of the two indices of refraction is selected to be close to unity, with the radiation-sensitive structure being pivotally adjusted so that light is directed into one end of the block comprising the material having the greater index of refraction. This element, moreover, is selected to be clear and transparent with the incident angle being close to the critical angle where total reflection of all incident light occurs. A portion of the incident light is furthermore projected through the clear transparent block without reflection, with the two beams emerging from the other end of the block, where they are detected. Exposure to radiation changes the index of refraction of the radiochromic block and accordingly the reflected energy emerging therefrom. Calibrated readjustment of the angle of incidence provides a measure of the sensed radiation.

  15. New standard measures for clinical voice analysis include high speed films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mette; Munch, Kasper

    2012-02-01

    In the clinical work with patients in a medical voice clinic it is important to have a normal updated reference for the data used. Several new parameters have to be correlated to older traditional measures. The older ones are stroboscopy, eventually coordinated with electroglottography (EGG), the Multi- Dimensional-Voice Program and airflow rates. Long Time Averaged Spectrograms (LTAS) and phonetograms (voice profiles) are calculating the range and dynamics of tones of the patients. High-speed films, updated airflow measures as well as area calculations of phonotograms add information to the understanding of the glottis closure in single movements of the vocal cords. A multivariate analysis was made to study the connection between the measures. This information can be used in many connections, also in the otolaryngological clinic.

  16. Critical dosimetry measures and surrogate tools that can facilitate clinical success in PDT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Davis, Scott C.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Palanisami, Akilan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy can be a highly complex treatment with more than one parameter to control, or in some cases it is easily implemented with little control other than prescribed drug and light values. The role of measured dosimetry as related to clinical adoption has not been as successful as it could have been, and part of this may be from the conflicting goals of advocating for as many measurements as possible for accurate control, versus companies and clinical adopters advocating for as few measurements as possible, to keep it simple. An organized approach to dosimetry selection is required, which shifts from mechanistic measurements in pre-clinical and early phase I trials, towards just those essential dose limiting measurements and a focus on possible surrogate measures in phase II/III trials. This essential and surrogate approach to dosimetry should help successful adoption of clinical PDT if successful. The examples of essential dosimetry points and surrogate dosimetry tools which might be implemented in phase II and higher trials are discussed for solid tissue PDT with verteporfin and skin lesion treatment with aminolevulinc acid.

  17. Point-Connecting Measurements of the Hallux Valgus Deformity: A New Measurement and Its Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeong-Ho; Boedijono, Dimas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate new point-connecting measurements for the hallux valgus angle (HVA) and the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA), which can reflect the degree of subluxation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ). Also, this study attempted to compare the validity of midline measurements and the new point-connecting measurements for the determination of HVA and IMA values. Materials and Methods Sixty feet of hallux valgus patients who underwent surgery between 2007 and 2011 were classified in terms of the severity of HVA, congruency of the first MTPJ, and type of chevron metatarsal osteotomy. On weight-bearing dorsal-plantar radiographs, HVA and IMA values were measured and compared preoperatively and postoperatively using both the conventional and new methods. Results Compared with midline measurements, point-connecting measurements showed higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for preoperative HVA/IMA and similar or higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for postoperative HVA/IMA. Patients who underwent distal chevron metatarsal osteotomy (DCMO) had higher intraclass correlation coefficient for inter- and intra-observer reliability for pre- and post-operative HVA and IMA measured by the point-connecting method compared with the midline method. All differences in the preoperative HVAs and IMAs determined by both the midline method and point-connecting methods were significant between the deviated group and subluxated groups (p=0.001). Conclusion The point-connecting method for measuring HVA and IMA in the subluxated first MTPJ may better reflect the severity of a HV deformity with higher reliability than the midline method, and is more useful in patients with DCMO than in patients with proximal chevron metatarsal osteotomy. PMID:26996576

  18. Amotivation in Schizophrenia: Integrated Assessment With Behavioral, Clinical, and Imaging Measures

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Kantrowitz, Jacob J.; Katchmar, Natalie; Vandekar, Lillie; Elliott, Mark A.; Ruparel, Kosha

    2014-01-01

    Motivational deficits play a central role in disability caused by schizophrenia and constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. Negative symptoms have previously been linked to hypofunction in ventral striatum (VS), a core component of brain motivation circuitry. However, it remains unclear to what extent this relationship holds for specific negative symptoms such as amotivation, and this question has not been addressed with integrated behavioral, clinical, and imaging measures. Here, 41 individuals with schizophrenia and 37 controls performed a brief, computerized progressive ratio task (PRT) that quantifies effort exerted in pursuit of monetary reward. Clinical amotivation was assessed using the recently validated Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS). VS function was probed during functional magnetic resonance imaging using a monetary guessing paradigm. We found that individuals with schizophrenia had diminished motivation as measured by the PRT, which significantly and selectively related to clinical amotivation as measured by the CAINS. Critically, lower PRT motivation in schizophrenia was also dimensionally related to VS hypofunction. Our results demonstrate robust dimensional associations between behavioral amotivation, clinical amotivation, and VS hypofunction in schizophrenia. Integrating behavioral measures such as the PRT will facilitate translational efforts to identify biomarkers of amotivation and to assess response to novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:24657876

  19. Semantic information extracting system for classification of radiological reports in radiology information system (RIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liehang; Ling, Tonghui; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists currently use a variety of terminologies and standards in most hospitals in China, and even there are multiple terminologies being used for different sections in one department. In this presentation, we introduce a medical semantic comprehension system (MedSCS) to extract semantic information about clinical findings and conclusion from free text radiology reports so that the reports can be classified correctly based on medical terms indexing standards such as Radlex or SONMED-CT. Our system (MedSCS) is based on both rule-based methods and statistics-based methods which improve the performance and the scalability of MedSCS. In order to evaluate the over all of the system and measure the accuracy of the outcomes, we developed computation methods to calculate the parameters of precision rate, recall rate, F-score and exact confidence interval.

  20. [The first linear electron accelerator, the Therac 15 Saturne, in clinical service. I. Technical data and measurements in photon radiation].

    PubMed

    Strauch, B

    1983-09-01

    A report is given about the linear electron accelerator operating at the Alfried Krupp Krankenhaus in Essen. This is the first accelerator of the type Therac Saturne supplied for 15 MeV. Besides a description of the most important technical data and the service instructions, dosimetric data for 12 MV photon radiation are presented. The authors communicate the clinical experiences gained hitherto with the accelerator and the patient-orientated verification and recording system which has still to be improved, especially as far as the recording part is concerned. The accelerator meets the requirements of radiologic oncology. PMID:6636211

  1. A mobile tele-radiology imaging system with JPEG2000 for an emergency care.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Keun; Kim, Eung Y; Yang, Kun H; Lee, Chung Ki; Yoo, Sun K

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design a tele-radiology imaging system for rapid emergency care via mobile networks and to assess the diagnostic feasibility of the Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) radiological imaging using portable devices. Rapid patient information and image exchange is helpful to make clinical decisions. We assessed the usefulness of the mobile tele-radiology system by measuring both a quantitative method, PNSR calculation, for image qualities, and its transmission time via mobile networks in different mobile networks, respectively; code division multiple access evolution-data optimized, wireless broadband, and high-speed downlink packet access; and the feasibility of the JPEG2000 computed tomography (CT) images by qualitatively assessing with the Alberta stroke program early CT score method with 12 CT image cases (seven normal and five abnormal cases). We found that the quality of the JPEG2000 radiological images was satisfied quantitatively and was judged as acceptable qualitatively at 5:1 and 10:1 compression levels for the mobile tele-radiology imaging system. The JPEG2000-format radiological images achieved a fast transmission while maintaining a diagnosis quality on a portable device via mobile networks. Unfortunately, a PDA device, having a limited screen resolution, posed difficulties in reviewing the JPEG2000 images regardless of the compression levels. An ultra mobile PC was preferable to study the medical image. The mobile tele-radiology imaging systems supporting JPEG2000 image transmission can be applied to actual emergency care services under mobile computing environments. PMID:20824300

  2. Efficacy Outcome Measures for Procedural Sedation Clinical Trials in Adults: An ACTTION Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark R; McKeown, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Miner, James R; Sessler, Daniel I; Vargo, John; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Successful procedural sedation represents a spectrum of patient- and clinician-related goals. The absence of a gold-standard measure of the efficacy of procedural sedation has led to a variety of outcomes being used in clinical trials, with the consequent lack of consistency among measures, making comparisons among trials and meta-analyses challenging. We evaluated which existing measures have undergone psychometric analysis in a procedural sedation setting and whether the validity of any of these measures support their use across the range of procedures for which sedation is indicated. Numerous measures were found to have been used in clinical research on procedural sedation across a wide range of procedures. However, reliability and validity have been evaluated for only a limited number of sedation scales, observer-rated pain/discomfort scales, and satisfaction measures in only a few categories of procedures. Typically, studies only examined 1 or 2 aspects of scale validity. The results are likely unique to the specific clinical settings they were tested in. Certain scales, for example, those requiring motor stimulation, are unsuitable to evaluate sedation for procedures where movement is prohibited (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging scans). Further work is required to evaluate existing measures for procedures for which they were not developed. Depending on the outcomes of these efforts, it might ultimately be necessary to consider measures of sedation efficacy to be procedure specific. PMID:26678470

  3. Hazard control indices for radiological and non-radiological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boothe, G.F.

    1994-12-21

    This document devises a method of comparing radiological and non-radiological hazard control levels. Such a comparison will be useful in determining the design control features for facilities that handle radioactive mixed waste. The design control features of interest are those that assure the protection of workers and the environment from unsafe airborne levels of radiological or non-radiological hazards.

  4. Measuring impedance in congestive heart failure: Current options and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tong, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of impedance is becoming increasingly available in the clinical setting as a tool for assessing hemodynamics and volume status in patients with heart failure. The 2 major categories of impedance assessment are the band electrode method and the implanted device lead method. The exact sources of the impedance signal are complex and can be influenced by physiologic effects such as blood volume, fluid, and positioning. This article provides a critical review of our current understanding and promises of impedance measurements, the techniques that have evolved, as well as the evidence and limitations regarding their clinical applications in the setting of heart failure management. PMID:19249408

  5. Magnetic field measurements of a clinical MR imager at 1.5 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhech, A.; Tellez, I.; Esteva, M.; Marrufo, O.; Jimenez, L.; Vazquez, F.; Taboada, J.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    In the clinical environment is mandatory to run periodically measurements of uniformity of the magnetic field produced by the magnet to assure good image quality. The phase difference method was used to measure the magnetic field uniformity of the 1.5 T scanner of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia MVS. The uniformity field values showed that the imager performance is reasonably good for clinical imaging. Some concern was raised since results may not be good enough for magnetic resonance spectroscopy runs.

  6. The disaggregation of radiology.

    PubMed

    Brant-Zawadzki, Michael N; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2008-12-01

    The authors discuss certain market and political forces buffeting the traditional structure of radiology, both in practice and in the academic setting. These forces can be, to a certain degree, disruptive and produce fragmentation of what are now integrated radiology services and specialties. The potential fallout from the current rapidly changing environment of health care, including strategies for delivering care along service lines or within discrete episodes of care, may have a profound impact on the future of radiology. Understanding the dynamics of the current environment may help plan strategies for dealing with the potential impact on our specialty. PMID:19027680

  7. Enhanced radiological work planning

    SciTech Connect

    DECKER, W.A.

    1999-05-21

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System.

  8. Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head Treated with Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: Analysis of Short-term Clinical Outcomes of Treatment with Radiologic Staging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Kwon, Jae-Woo; Park, Jung-Seob; Han, Kyeol; Shin, Woo-jin; Lee, Jeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate clinical results of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) with radiographic staging on patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH). Materials and Methods We evaluated 24 patients diagnosed with AVNFH (32 hip joints) who were treated with ESWT from 1993 to 2012. Average follow-up period was 27 months, and the average age of patients was 47.8 years. The Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) system was used to grade radiographic stage prior to treatment. For this study patients were divided into two groups based on their ARCO stage, group 1 (ARCO stages I and II) and group 2 (ARCO stage III). Comparative analyses were done between the two groups using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Harris hip score (HHS) at pre-treatment and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. Failure was defined when radiographic stage progressed or arthroplasty surgery was needed due to clinical exacerbation. Results Both groups showed clinical improvements with VAS scoring at final follow-up (group 1: median 7 to 1.5, P<0.001; group 2: mean 7 to 4, P=0.056). Using HHS, group 1 showed a significant improvement (from 65.5 to 95 [P<0.001]), while no significance was observed for group 2 (P=0.280). At final follow-up, 3 hips from group 1 and one hip from group 2 showed radiographic improvement; however, two patients underwent total hip arthroplasty due to persistent pain and dysfunction. Conclusion ESWT can be considered as an interventional option before surgical treatment in patients with not only early stage AVNFH but also with mid stage. PMID:27536633

  9. Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints In Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Thomas R.; Powers, John H

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important considerations in designing clinical trials is the choice of outcome measures. These outcome measures could be clinically meaningful endpoints that are direct measures of how patients feel, function and survive. Alternatively, indirect measures, such as biomarkers that include physical signs of disease, laboratory measures and radiological tests, often are considered as replacement endpoints or “surrogates” for clinically meaningful endpoints. We discuss the definitions of clinically meaningful endpoints and surrogate endpoints, and provide examples from recent clinical trials. We provide insight into why indirect measures such as biomarkers may fail to provide reliable evidence about the benefit-to-risk profile of interventions. We also discuss the nature of evidence that is important in assessing whether treatment effects on a biomarker reliably predict effects on a clinically meaningful endpoint, and provide insights into why this reliability is specific to the context of use of the biomarker. . PMID:22711298

  10. Prospective Analysis of a New Bone Graft in Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a 2- Year Prospective Clinical and Radiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, Yannic

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the efficacy and safety of bone graft material ABM/P-15 (iFACTOR) for use in posterior lumbar interbody fusion. ABM/P-15 has been used safely for more than a decade in dental applications. Methods Forty patients underwent PLIF surgery, with each patient as control. Assessments up to 24 months included radiographs, CT scan, VAS, and ODI. Primary success criteria were fusion and safety. Results Intra-cage bridging bone occurred earlier with ABM/P-15 than autograft (97.73% vs. 59.09% at 6 months). On average pain decreased 29 points and function improved 43 points. Radio dense material outside the disk space occurred more frequently with ABM/P-15 than autograft, without clinical consequence. Conclusions This study suggests that ABM/P-15 has equal or greater efficacy at 6 and 12 months. Pain improvements exceeded success criteria at all time points. Functional improvement exceeded success criteria at all time points. Clinical Relevance This study explores the safety and efficacy of an osteobiologic peptide enhanced bone graft material as a viable alternative to autograft and its attendant risks. PMID:25709887

  11. Breast adenomyoepithelioma and adenomyoepithelioma with carcinoma (malignant adenomyoepithelioma) with associated breast malignancies: A case series emphasizing histologic, radiologic, and clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Moritz, August W; Wiedenhoefer, James F; Profit, Amanda P; Jagirdar, Jaishree

    2016-10-01

    The 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of breast tumors distinguishes adenomyoepitheliomas (AMEs) as benign tumors composed of a biphasic proliferation of phenotypically variable myoepithelial cells around small epithelial lined spaces. Many AMEs have demonstrated benign behavior and are often cured with excision with negative margins, but some have exhibited malignant transformation of the myoepithelial cells, ductal epithelial cells, or both. When one of the components is histologically malignant, it is termed AME with carcinoma. Due to the rarity, the literature correlating imaging, histology, and clinical outcome is limited. A retrospective review was undertaken. A review of an institutional pathology database identified 14 cases with AME or malignant AME. Most AMEs had nonspecific imaging findings and were categorized as Bi-Rads 4. Histologic features of AME did not correlate with prior or concurrent breast malignancies or any radiographic features. Clinical follow up could be obtained for all but one case (mean follow up time = 75 months). 5 cases had no known treatment post-biopsy and 5 patients received mastectomy. No recurrences were noted. 3/13 cases of benign AME had associated breast malignancies including invasive ductal adenocarcinoma and ductal carcinoma in-situ. 1 case of malignant AME had a synchronous separate malignant phyllodes tumor. Given the unclear and unpredictable propensity for malignant transformation, conservative excision with negative margins currently seems appropriate. PMID:27494340

  12. On-line performance characteristics of a radiology PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Albert W. K.; Loloyan, Mansur; Lou, Shyhliang A.; Huang, H. K.

    1992-07-01

    We have experienced that system reliability and performance become primary concerns when we moved our PACS from a research and development laboratory to a clinical environment. Providing consistent uptime builds user confidence and fast service accelerates system acceptance. The fault-tolerant mechanism implemented in our PACS has minimized system downtime. This paper considers the performance issues of an on-line multimodal PACS. The intent of conducting performance measurements on individual PACS components such as the radiological imaging devices, archive devices, host computers, and communication networks is to compare the throughput rates of these components in a real-time clinical environment as a basis of evaluating the overall throughput of a PACS system. Our primary goal is to identify the major factors that degrade the performance of a PACS, and to establish new strategies so that fast service with minimal delay is provided to the clinic. Approximately 200-Gbyte data transactions including CT, MR and CR images from our PACS were analyzed. Results showed that PACS throughput was limited by two major factors: (1) low-speed data interface used in the radiological imaging devices and archive devices; (2) network degradation due to heavy network traffic. We concluded that PACS throughput could be improved by well- designed network architecture and image-routing strategy. However, device-dependent low- speed data interface limited PACS performance.

  13. Development of a provisional core set of response measures for clinical trials of systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, D; Lovell, D J; Giannini, E; Clements, P J; Merkel, P A; Seibold, J R; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Denton, C P; Mayes, M D; Steen, V D; Varga, J; Furst, D E

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a provisional core set of response measures for clinical trials of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods The Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium (SCTC) conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise to reach consensus on a core set of measures for clinical trials of SSc. Round 1 asked the SCTC investigators to list items in 11 pre-defined domains (skin, musculoskeletal, cardiac, pulmonary, cardio-pulmonary, gastrointestinal, renal, Raynaud phenomenon and digital ulcers, health-related quality of life and function, global health, and biomarkers) for SSc clinical trials. Round 2 asked respondents to rate the importance of the chosen items and was followed by a meeting, during which the Steering Committee discussed the feasibility, reliability, redundancy and validity of the items. Round 3 sought to obtain broader consensus on the core set measures. Members also voted on items that had data on feasibility but lacked data on reliability and validity, but may still be useful research outcome measures for future trials. Results A total of 50 SCTC investigators participated in round 1, providing 212 unique items for the 11 domains. In all, 46 (92%) participants responded in round 2 and rated 177 items. The ratings of 177 items were reviewed by the Steering Committee and 31 items from the 11 domains were judged to be appropriate for inclusion in a 1-year multi-centre clinical trial. In total, 40 SCTC investigators completed round 3 and ranked 30 of 31 items as acceptable for inclusion in the core set. The Steering Committee also proposed 14 items for a research agenda. Conclusion Using a Delphi exercise, we have developed a provisional core set of measures for assessment of disease activity and severity in clinical trials of SSc. PMID:17893248

  14. Brain Parenchymal Fraction: A Relatively Simple MRI Measure to Clinically Distinguish ALS Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Pioro, Erik P.

    2015-01-01

    Even though neuroimaging and clinical studies indicate that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) manifests with distinct clinical phenotypes, no objective test exists to assess upper motor degeneration in ALS. There is great interest in identifying biomarkers of ALS to allow earlier diagnosis and to recognize disease subtypes. Current quantitative neuroimaging techniques such as T2 relaxometry and diffusion tensor imaging are time-consuming to use in clinical settings due to extensive postprocessing requirements. Therefore, we aimed to study the potential role of brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) as a relatively simple quantitative measure for distinguishing ALS phenotypes. T1-weighted MR images of brain were obtained in 15 neurological controls and 88 ALS patients categorized into 4 distinct clinical phenotypes, upper motor neuron- (UMN-) predominant ALS patients with/without corticospinal tract (CST) hyperintensity on T2/PD-weighted images, classic ALS, and ALS with frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). BPF was calculated using intracranial grey matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volumes obtained in control and ALS subgroups using SPM8 software. Only ALS-FTD patients had significant reduction in BPF when compared to controls and nondemented ALS patients. Correlation of clinical measures such as disease duration with BPF further supports the view that the BPF could be a potential biomarker for clinical diagnosis of ALS-FTD patients. PMID:26783524

  15. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Adriana; Feixas, Guillem; Bados, Arturo; García-Grau, Eugeni; Salla, Marta; Medina, Joan Carles; Montesano, Adrián; Soriano, José; Medeiros-Ferreira, Leticia; Cañete, Josep; Corbella, Sergi; Grau, Antoni; Lana, Fernando; Evans, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper is to assess the reliability and validity of the Spanish translation of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure, a 34-item self-report questionnaire that measures the client’s status in the domains of Subjective well-being, Problems/Symptoms, Life functioning, and Risk. Method Six hundred and forty-four adult participants were included in two samples: the clinical sample (n=192) from different mental health and primary care centers; and the nonclinical sample (n=452), which included a student and a community sample. Results The questionnaire showed good acceptability and internal consistency, appropriate test–retest reliability, and acceptable convergent validity. Strong differentiation between clinical and nonclinical samples was found. As expected, the Risk domain had different characteristics than other domains, but all findings were comparable with the UK referential data. Cutoff scores were calculated for clinical significant change assessment. Conclusion The Spanish version of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure showed acceptable psychometric properties, providing support for using the questionnaire for monitoring the progress of Spanish-speaking psychotherapy clients. PMID:27382288

  16. Suspected acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as an outcome measure in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has become an important outcome measure in clinical trials. This study aimed to explore the concept of suspected acute exacerbation as an outcome measure. Methods Three investigators retrospectively reviewed subjects enrolled in the Sildenafil Trial of Exercise Performance in IPF who experienced a respiratory serious adverse event during the course of the study. Events were classified as definite acute exacerbation, suspected acute exacerbation, or other, according to established criteria. Results Thirty-five events were identified. Four were classified as definite acute exacerbation, fourteen as suspected acute exacerbation, and seventeen as other. Definite and suspected acute exacerbations were clinically indistinguishable. Both were most common in the winter and spring months and were associated with a high risk of disease progression and short-term mortality. Conclusions In this study one half of respiratory serious adverse events were attributed to definite or suspected acute exacerbations. Suspected acute exacerbations are clinically indistinguishable from definite acute exacerbations and represent clinically meaningful events. Clinical trialists should consider capturing both definite and suspected acute exacerbations as outcome measures. PMID:23848435

  17. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results of Posterolateral Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of L4 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Shugo; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Tateiwa, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Hisatoshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter analysis of two groups of patients surgically treated for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis is widely performed. However, few reports have compared the outcome of PLF to that of PLIF for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Methods Patients with L4 unstable spondylolisthesis with Meyerding grade II or more, slip of >10° or >4 mm upon maximum flexion and extension bending, and posterior opening of >5 degree upon flexion bending were studied. Patients were treated from January 2008 to January 2010. Patients who underwent PLF (n=12) and PLIF (n=19) were followed-up for >2 years. Radiographic findings and clinical outcomes evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were compared between the two groups. Radiographic evaluation included slip angle, translation, slip angle and translation during maximum flexion and extension bending, intervertebral disc height, lumbar lordotic angle, and fusion rate. Results JOA scores of the PLF group before surgery and at final follow-up were 12.3±4.8 and 24.1±3.7, respectively; those of the PLIF group were 14.7±4.8 and 24.2±7.8, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups. Correction of slip estimated from postoperative slip angle, translation, and maintenance of intervertebral disc height in the PLIF group was significantly (p<0.05) better than those in the PLF group. However, there was no significant difference in lumbar lordotic angle, slip angle and translation angle upon maximum flexion, or extension bending. Fusion rates of the PLIF and PLF groups had no significant difference. Conclusions The L4–L5 level posterior instrumented fusion for unstable spondylolisthesis using both PLF and PLIF

  18. 3.3 Diagnostic Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Moores, B. M.; Stieve, F.-E.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.3 Diagnostic Radiology' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  19. Radiologic Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the radiologic technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories; Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); Program…

  20. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... how interventional radiology research improves patients’ lives at Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting; read ... comments to CMS on two MACRA coding issues; society is engaged with CMS as they develop codes ...

  1. PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN): Further expansion of the clinical, radiological and mutation spectrum associated with infantile and atypical childhood-onset disease

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, M.A.; Meyer, E.; Chong, W.K.; Manzur, A.Y.; Carr, L.J.; Younis, R.; Hardy, C.; McDonald, F.; Childs, A.M.; Stewart, B.; Warren, D.; Kneen, R.; King, M.D.; Hayflick, S.J.; Kurian, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) is a major phenotype of autosomal recessive Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA). We describe the clinical phenotypes, neuroimaging features and PLA2G6 mutations in 5 children, of whom 4 presented with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). One other patient was diagnosed with the onset of PLAN in childhood, and our report highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with this atypical PLAN subtype. In this series, the neuroradiological relevance of classical PLAN features as well as apparent claval hypertrophy’ is explored. Novel PLA2G6 mutations were identified in all patients. PLAN should be considered not only in patients presenting with a classic INAD phenotype but also in older patients presenting later in childhood with non-specific progressive neurological features including social communication difficulties, gait disturbance, dyspraxia, neuropsychiatric symptoms and extrapyramidal motor features. PMID:24745848

  2. Clinical Comparison of Two Contrast Agents for Oral Cholecystography: Radiologic Efficacy and Drug Safety of Iopanoic Acid and Iopronic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Laurence; Putman, Charles E.; Burrell, Morton

    1979-01-01

    Oral doses of either iopronic acid (4.5 g Oravue, Squibb) or iopanoic acid (3 g Telepaque, Winthrop) were given to 98 patients requiring cholecystography. Radiographs were taken 13 to 16 hours after treatment showed good to excellent gallbladder opacification in 44 percent of patients after the first dose of iopronic acid and in an additional 29 percent after a second dose. Similar opacification occurred in 42 percent of patients after the first dose of iopanoic acid and in 34 percent after a second dose. Drug-related abnormalities in blood and urine tests occurred about equally in both groups and one patient in each group exhibited a clinically adverse reaction (diarrhea). Thus, the performance (radiographic efficacy and drug safety) of the new contrast agent, iopronic acid, was similar to a widely used drug, iopanoic acid. PMID:380184

  3. Clinical outcome assessment in malignant glioma trials: measuring signs, symptoms, and functional limitations.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Coons, Stephen Joel; Corboy, John R; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Mendoza, Tito R; Wefel, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-01

    The shared goal of all parties developing therapeutics against malignant gliomas is to positively impact the lives of people affected by these cancers. Clinical outcome assessment (COA) tools, including measures of patient-reported outcome, performance outcome, clinician-reported outcome, and observer-reported outcome, allow patient-focused assessments to complement traditional efficacy measures such as overall survival and radiographic endpoints. This review examines the properties of various COA measures used in malignant glioma clinical trials to date and cross references their content to the priority signs, symptoms, and functional limitations defined through a community survey conducted by the National Brain Tumor Society. The overarching goal of this initiative is to identify COA measures that are feasible and have appropriate psychometric properties for use in this patient population as well as highlight where further development is needed. PMID:26989128

  4. Ten-year Investigation of Clinical, Laboratory and Radiologic Manifestations and Complications in Patients with Takayasu’s Arteritis in Three University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Nooshin, Dalili; Neda, Pazhouhi; Shahdokht, Samangooyi; Ali, Jamalian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Takayasu arteritis is a condition of unknown aetiology that affects the aorta and its primary branches. The disease has been primarily recognized and described in Asia. The aims of this study were to identify the main clinical, laboratory, and angiographic features of Takayasu arteritis in Iranian patients over a 10 year period from 2000 to 2010. Methods: Data were obtained from angiographic and medical records of patients treated at Shahid-Rajai, Taleghani, and Loghman Hospitals during the above-mentioned time period. The criteria for definitions and findings were those proposed by the American College of Rheumatology. Results: A total of 15 patients were identified. The median age at presentation was 36 years and 73.3% of patients were females. Fever was the most common presentation. According to “modified” National Institute of Health criteria, 44.7% of patients were in the acute phase of disease with systemic symptoms such as fever, weight loss, and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Immunological markers such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (C-ANCA) were absent. The tuberculin test result was positive in 40% of the patients. Vascular bruit was present in 86.7% and hypertension was detected in 53.3% with 13.3% having associated renal artery stenosis. The angiographic manifestations were classified as; type I, cervicobrachial type (26.6%); type II, thoracoabdominal type (20.0%); type III, peripheral type (6.6%); and type IV, generalised type (46.7%). Coronary arteries were involved in three cases, pulmonary in two and renal in two. Conclusion: Based on our findings, the most common clinical, laboratory and angiographic findings were fever, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and stenosis, respectively. Because of dangerous consequences of this disease, attention to fever and increased ESR, especially in young women may be helpful for physicians to prevent diagnosis delay. PMID:23966824

  5. Interventional Radiology in China

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Gaojun Xu Ke; Ni Caifang; Li Linsun

    2008-03-15

    With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists.

  6. Utility of Clinical Swallowing Examination Measures for Detecting Aspiration Post-Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, G. H.; Rosenbek, J. C.; Wertz, R. T.; McCoy, S.; Mann, G.; McCullough, K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the utility of clinical swallowing examination (CSE) measures for detecting aspiration as defined by videofluoroscopic swallowing examination (VFSE). This study, involving 165 participants, is a follow-up to a previously published investigation of 60 participants. Findings are compared with that…

  7. The Factorial Measurment of Master's Level Clinical Functions in Mental Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogart, Lynn C.; Smith, Ronald G.

    This research is part of an effort to assess the job functions required of master's level clinical psychologists, to simplify their relationships through factor analysis, and to develop factor scales for the measurement of job functions required at mental health agencies. In response to an earlier questionnaire, 20 master's level clinical…

  8. Relations between Parenting Behavior and SES in a Clinical Sample: Validity of SES Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Corissa L.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2010-01-01

    Two common methods of measuring socioeconomic status (SES) were examined in relation to observed parenting behaviors in a clinical sample of 89 mothers of 3- to 6-year-olds referred for treatment of oppositional defiant disorder. Families were 74% Caucasian, 9% African American, 5% Hispanic, 1% Asian, and 11% Biracial. Most children were male…

  9. Unscheduled Telephone Calls to Measure Percent Syllables Stuttered during Clinical Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark; Menzies, Ross; Packman, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have used unscheduled telephone calls for many years during clinical trials to measure adult stuttering severity before and after treatment. Because variability is a hallmark of stuttering severity with adults, it is questionable whether an unscheduled telephone call is truly representative of their everyday speech. Method:…

  10. Evaluation of the Brief Problem Checklist: Child and Caregiver Interviews to Measure Clinical Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chorpita, Bruce F.; Reise, Steven; Weisz, John R.; Grubbs, Kathleen; Becker, Kimberly D.; Krull, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To support ongoing monitoring of child response during treatment, we sought to develop a brief, easily administered, clinically relevant, and psychometrically sound measure. Method: We first developed child and caregiver forms of a 12-item Brief Problem Checklist (BPC) interview by applying item response theory and factor analysis to…

  11. Functional outcome measures for NF1-associated optic pathway glioma clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Robert A.; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Ferner, Rosalie E.; Gutmann, David H.; Listernick, Robert; Martin, Staci; Ullrich, Nicole J.; Liu, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of the Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis Visual Outcomes Committee is to define the best functional outcome measures for future neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-associated optic pathway glioma (OPG) clinical trials. Methods: The committee considered the components of vision, other ophthalmologic parameters affected by OPG, potential biomarkers of visual function, and quality of life measures to arrive at consensus-based, evidence-driven recommendations for objective and measurable functional endpoints for OPG trials. Results: Visual acuity (VA) assessments using consistent quantitative testing methods are recommended as the main functional outcome measure for NF1-OPG clinical trials. Teller acuity cards are recommended for use as the primary VA endpoint, and HOTV as a secondary endpoint once subjects are old enough to complete it. The optic disc should be assessed for pallor, as this appears to be a contributory variable that may affect the interpretation of VA change over time. Given the importance of capturing patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials, evaluating visual quality of life using the Children's Visual Function Questionnaire as a secondary endpoint is also proposed. Conclusions: The use of these key functional endpoints will be essential for evaluating the efficacy of future OPG clinical trials. PMID:24249802

  12. Design, Development, and Initial Evaluation of a Terminology for Clinical Decision Support and Electronic Clinical Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanhua; Staes, Catherine J; Shields, David E; Kandula, Vijay; Welch, Brandon M; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    When coupled with a common information model, a common terminology for clinical decision support (CDS) and electronic clinical quality measurement (eCQM) could greatly facilitate the distributed development and sharing of CDS and eCQM knowledge resources. To enable such scalable knowledge authoring and sharing, we systematically developed an extensible and standards-based terminology for CDS and eCQM in the context of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) information model. The development of this terminology entailed three steps: (1) systematic, physician-curated concept identification from sources such as the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) and the SNOMED-CT CORE problem list; (2) concept de-duplication leveraging the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap and Metathesaurus; and (3) systematic concept naming using standard terminologies and heuristic algorithms. This process generated 3,046 concepts spanning 68 domains. Evaluation against representative CDS and eCQM resources revealed approximately 50–70% concept coverage, indicating the need for continued expansion of the terminology. PMID:26958220

  13. Design, Development, and Initial Evaluation of a Terminology for Clinical Decision Support and Electronic Clinical Quality Measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanhua; Staes, Catherine J; Shields, David E; Kandula, Vijay; Welch, Brandon M; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    When coupled with a common information model, a common terminology for clinical decision support (CDS) and electronic clinical quality measurement (eCQM) could greatly facilitate the distributed development and sharing of CDS and eCQM knowledge resources. To enable such scalable knowledge authoring and sharing, we systematically developed an extensible and standards-based terminology for CDS and eCQM in the context of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) information model. The development of this terminology entailed three steps: (1) systematic, physician-curated concept identification from sources such as the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) and the SNOMED-CT CORE problem list; (2) concept de-duplication leveraging the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap and Metathesaurus; and (3) systematic concept naming using standard terminologies and heuristic algorithms. This process generated 3,046 concepts spanning 68 domains. Evaluation against representative CDS and eCQM resources revealed approximately 50-70% concept coverage, indicating the need for continued expansion of the terminology. PMID:26958220

  14. Designing Radiology Outcomes Studies-Essential Principles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Stella K; Mushlin, Alvin I

    2016-07-01

    Health outcomes research is essential to align radiology with current standards of high-value patient care, through the assessment of end results of diagnostic tests, interventions, or policy on patient health. To bridge studies of diagnostic test accuracy and health outcomes research, key considerations include: (1) how to determine when a diagnostic test merits evaluation of impact on outcomes, (2) when study of intermediate/surrogate outcomes can be useful, (3) how to consider the possible harms as well as potential benefits of a test, and (4) how to integrate evidence of an imaging test's efficacy/effectiveness with clinical data to assess outcomes. Due to challenges in conducting studies of long-term outcomes consequent to imaging use, intermediate health outcomes may capture a test's impact on successful diagnosis and therapy, and can provide readily measurable, incremental insights into the role of imaging in health-care delivery and efficiency. In an era marked by recognition of quality and value of care, outcomes research will provide essential evidence to inform radiologists' guidance of imaging use toward improved patient care, creation of clinical guidelines, and policy decisions. PMID:27066756

  15. Tolerance to Dose Escalation in Minibeam Radiation Therapy Applied to Normal Rat Brain: Long-Term Clinical, Radiological and Histopathological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prezado, Yolanda; Deman, Pierre; Varlet, Pascale; Jouvion, Gregory; Gil, Silvia; Le Clec'H, Céline; Bernard, Hélène; Le Duc, Géraldine; Sarun, Sukhena

    2015-09-01

    The major limitation to reaching a curative radiation dose in radioresistant tumors such as malignant gliomas is the high sensitivity to radiation and subsequent damage of the surrounding normal tissues. Novel dose delivery methods such as minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) may help to overcome this limitation. MBRT utilizes a combination of spatial fractionation of the dose and submillimetric (600 μm) field sizes with an array ("comb") of parallel thin beams ("teeth"). The dose profiles in MBRT consist of peaks and valleys. In contrast, the seamless irradiations of the several squared centimeter field sizes employed in standard radiotherapy result in homogeneous dose distributions (and consequently, flat dose profiles). The innovative dose delivery methods employed in MBRT, unlike standard radiation therapy, have demonstrated remarkable normal tissue sparing. In this pilot work, we investigated the tolerance of the rat brain after whole-brain MBRT irradiation. A dose escalation was used to study the tissue response as a function of dose, so that a threshold could be established: doses as high as 100 Gy in one fraction were still well tolerated by the rat brain. This finding suggests that MBRT may be used to deliver higher and potentially curative radiation doses in clinical practice. PMID:26284420

  16. Abuse liability measures for use in analgesic clinical trials in patients with pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Alec B; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Colucci, Robert; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Klein, Michael; O'Brien, Charles; Posner, Kelly; Rappaport, Bob A; Reisfield, Gary; Adams, Edgar H; Balster, Robert L; Bigelow, George E; Burke, Laurie B; Comer, Sandra D; Cone, Edward; Cowan, Penney; Denisco, Richard A; Farrar, John T; Foltin, Richard W; Haddox, J David; Hertz, Sharon; Jay, Gary W; Junor, Roderick; Kopecky, Ernest A; Leiderman, Deborah B; McDermott, Michael P; Palmer, Pamela P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rauschkolb, Christine; Rowbotham, Michael C; Sampaio, Cristina; Setnik, Beatrice; Smith, Shannon M; Sokolowska, Marta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Walsh, Sharon L; Zacny, James P

    2013-11-01

    Assessing and mitigating the abuse liability (AL) of analgesics is an urgent clinical and societal problem. Analgesics have traditionally been assessed in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) designed to demonstrate analgesic efficacy relative to placebo or an active comparator. In these trials, rigorous, prospectively designed assessment for AL is generally not performed. The Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) convened a consensus meeting to review the available evidence and discuss methods for improving the assessment of the AL of analgesics in clinical trials in patients with pain. Recommendations for improved assessment include: (1) performing trials that include individuals with diverse risks of abuse; (2) improving the assessment of AL