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Sample records for clinical neurophysiology kyoto

  1. Objective pain diagnostics: clinical neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Larrea, L

    2012-06-01

    Neurophysiological techniques help in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of chronic pain, and are particularly useful to determine its neuropathic origin. According to current standards, the diagnosis of definite neuropathic pain (NP) needs objective confirmation of a lesion or disease of somatosensory systems, which can be provided by neurophysiological testing. Lesions causing NP mostly concern the pain-temperature pathways, and therefore neurophysiological procedures allowing the specific testing of these pathways (i.e., A-delta and C-fibres, spino-thalamo-cortical tracts) are essential for objective diagnosis. Different techniques to stimulate selectively pain-temperature pathways are discussed. Of these, laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) appear as the easiest and most reliable neurophysiological method of assessing nociceptive function, and their coupling with autonomic responses (e.g., galvanic skin response) and psychophysics (quantitative sensory testing - QST) can still enhance their diagnostic yield. Neurophysiological techniques not exploring specifically nociception, such as standard nerve conduction velocities (NCV) and SEPs to non-noxious stimulation, should be associated to the exploration of nociceptive systems, not only because both may be simultaneously affected to different degrees, but also because some specific painful symptoms, such as paroxysmal discharges, may depend on specific alteration of highly myelinated A-beta fibres. The choice of techniques is determined after anamnesis and clinical exam, and tries to answer a number of questions: (a) is the pain-related to injury of somatosensory pathways?; (b) to what extent are different subsystems affected?; (c) are mechanisms and lesion site in accordance with imaging data?; (d) are results of use for diagnostic or therapeutic follow-up? Neuropathic pain (NP) affects more than 15 million people in Western countries, and its belated diagnosis leads to insufficient or delayed therapy. The use of

  2. Clinical Neurophysiology of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Piero; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has relevant impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers and causes relevant costs because of hospitalizations and work days lost. Its quantification is important to perform adequate clinical trials on this relevant complication of cirrhosis and portal-systemic shunting. Clinical neurophysiology, which detects functional alterations of the nervous system, has been applied to the study of HE for over 60 years. This review aims at summarizing and clarifying the role of neurophysiologic techniques in the study of HE. Methods A narrative review was performed aiming at interpreting the cited papers and the techniques on the basis of their physiological and pathophysiological meaning. Results The potential role of EEG, quantified EEG, evoked potentials—both exogenous, endogenous and motor—have been clarified to the reader that may be unfamiliar with neurophysiology. Conclusions The EEG, reflecting the oscillatory changes of neural network is the preferable tool to detect and monitor HE, with the exception of its most severe stage, when EEG flattens. SSEP and MEP have indication to detect and monitor transmission alterations that are likely related to myelin changes and microedema. PMID:26041960

  3. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society: EEG Guidelines Introduction.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Tammy N; Acharya, Jayant N; Halford, Jonathan J; Kuratani, John D; Sinha, Saurabh R; Stecker, Mark M; Tatum, William O; Drislane, Frank W

    2016-08-01

    This revision to the EEG Guidelines is an update incorporating current EEG technology and practice. "Standards of practice in clinical electroencephalography" (previously Guideline 4) has been removed. It is currently undergoing revision through collaboration among multiple medical societies and will become part of "Qualifications and Responsibilities of Personnel Performing and Interpreting Clinical Neurophysiology Procedures." The remaining guidelines are reordered and renumbered. PMID:27482792

  4. The role of clinical neurophysiology in bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Prakash, K M; Lo, Y L

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and biological agents have been used as weapons of mass destruction for a long time and presents as a serious threat to mankind. They have been used in many great wars and terrorist attacks with devastating results. The knowledge about these weapons of mass destruction is crucial to health care providers. Early recognition of the clinical characteristics of poisoning as a result of these chemical and biological agents is important to initiate appropriate therapy and minimizing casualties. Neurophysiological investigations when integrated with clinical features are helpful in early identification of some of these agents, especially when serological confirmation is not rapidly available. In this review, we have focused on chemical and biological weapons, which affect the nervous system and the role of clinical neurophysiology in such conditions. PMID:15595931

  5. Clinical and neurophysiological features of tick paralysis.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, P J; Morris, J G; Johnston, H M; Yiannikas, C; Malik, R; Russell, R; Ouvrier, R A

    1997-11-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological findings in six Australian children with generalized tick paralysis are described. Paralysis is usually caused by the mature female of the species Ixodes holocyclus. It most frequently occurs in the spring and summer months but can be seen at any time of year. Children aged 1-5 years are most commonly affected. The tick is usually found in the scalp, often behind the ear. The typical presentation is a prodrome followed by the development of an unsteady gait, and then ascending, symmetrical, flaccid paralysis. Early cranial nerve involvement is a feature, particularly the presence of both internal and external ophthalmoplegia. In contrast to the experience with North American ticks, worsening of paralysis in the 24-48 h following tick removal is common and the child must be carefully observed over this period. Death from respiratory failure was relatively common in the first half of the century and tick paralysis remains a potentially fatal condition. Respiratory support may be required for > 1 week but full recovery occurs. This is slow with several weeks passing before the child can walk unaided. Anti-toxin has a role in the treatment of seriously ill children but there is a high incidence of acute allergy and serum sickness. Neurophysiological studies reveal low-amplitude compound muscle action potentials with normal motor conduction velocities, normal sensory studies and normal response to repetitive stimulation. The biochemical structure of the toxin of I. holocyclus has not been fully characterized but there are many clinical, neurophysiological and experimental similarities to botulinum toxin. PMID:9397015

  6. [Pain disorders in traumatized individuals - neurophysiology and clinical presentation].

    PubMed

    Egloff, N; Hirschi, A; von Känel, R

    2012-01-18

    This overview portrays the salient physiological mechanisms being involved in the clinical manifestation of chronic pain in traumatized patients. A «hypermnesia-hyperarousal-model» is purported to support the neurophysiologic plausibility of the trauma-pain-relationship. We discuss seven characteristic clinical pain entities which alone or in combination can be found in patients with a previous psychological trauma. PMID:22252590

  7. Neurophysiology versus clinical genetics in Rett syndrome: A multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Nicky; Smeets, Eric E; Julu, Peter; Witt-Engerström, Ingegerd; Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Hansen, Stig; Apartopoulos, Flora; Delamont, Robert; van Roozendaal, Kees; Scusa, Maria F; Borelli, Paolo; Candel, Math; Curfs, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have attempted to establish the genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome (RTT). Cardiorespiratory measurements provide robust objective data, to correlate with each of the different clinical phenotypes. It has important implications for the management and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of this study was to correlate the genotype with the quantitative cardiorespiratory data obtained by neurophysiological measurement combined with a clinical severity score. This international multicenter study was conducted in four European countries from 1999 to 2012. The study cohort consisted of a group of 132 well-defined RTT females aged between 2 and 43 years with extended clinical, molecular, and neurophysiological assessments. Diagnosis of RTT was based on the consensus criteria for RTT and molecular confirmation. Genotype-phenotype analyses of clinical features and cardiorespiratory data were performed after grouping mutations by the same type and localization or having the same putative biological effect on the MeCP2 protein, and subsequently on eight single recurrent mutations. A less severe phenotype was seen in females with CTS, p.R133C, and p.R294X mutations. Autonomic disturbances were present in all females, and not restricted to nor influenced by one specific group or any single recurrent mutation. The objective information from non-invasive neurophysiological evaluation of the disturbed central autonomic control is of great importance in helping to organize the lifelong care for females with RTT. Further research is needed to provide insights into the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction, and to develop evidence-based management in RTT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27354166

  8. Clinical and neurophysiological changes in patients with pineal region expansions.

    PubMed

    Hajnsek, Sanja; Paladino, Josip; Gadze, Zeljka Petelin; Nanković, Sibila; Mrak, Goran; Lupret, Velimir

    2013-03-01

    In the last 20 years neurological and neurosurgical follow up of our patients with pineal region expansions (118 patients) pointed to certain clinical and neurophysiological regularities. We performed retrospective study which included 84 patients with pineal region expansions in the period from 1992 to 2009. The study included 55 women and 29 men, mean age 30.08 +/- 13.93 years, with positive brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)--70 patients (83.4%) had simple pineal gland cysts, and 14 patients (16.67%) had expansive process in pineal region with compressive effect. All patients had headache, while 32 patients (38%) had epileptic phenomena--primary generalized seizures. Patients had common electroencephalography (EEG) pattern with paroxysmal discharges of 3Hz (or more than 3 Hz) spike-and-wave complexes. Operation with supracerebellar infratentorial approach was performed in 70 patients. In most of our patients indication for the operation was established based on the size of the cyst (15 mm or more), with the signs of compression on the quadrigeminal plate and compression of the surrounding veins, which could result in seizures and EEG changes verified in our group of patients. Pathohistological analysis revealed pineocytomas in 11 cases (15.71%), pinealoblastomas in 2 cases (2.86%), one case of teratoma (1.43%), while 56 patients had pineal gland cysts (80%). Following surgery clinical condition improved in all patients--patients became seizure-free and headaches significantly decreased. Other symptoms including diplopiae, nausea, vomiting, vertigo as well as blurred vision also disappeared. There were no complications after surgical procedures. This study points to often appearance of seizures that clinically and neurophysiologically present as primary generalized epilepsy in patients with pineal region expansions. Our hypotheses are that mass effect on the surrounding veins that affects normal perfusion, compressive effect on the quadrigeminal plate and the

  9. Customer needs, expectations, and satisfaction with clinical neurophysiology services in Ireland: a case for tele-neurophysiology development.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, M; Ronan, L; Murphy, K; Browne, G; Connolly, S; McMenamin, J; Delanty, N

    2004-01-01

    Although equitable access to services should be based on need, geographical location of patients and their clinicians can give rise to inequalities in healthcare delivery. Development of tele-medicine services can improve equity of access. The specialty of Clinical Neurophysiology (CN), currently under-developed in Ireland provides an example of such potential. This study aimed to determine the needs, expectations, and satisfaction of CN customers, namely patients and referring clinicians. The goal was to examine geographical impediments to access that might be addressed by the introduction of tele-neurophysiology. Two customer surveys were conducted: CN referring clinicians and CN patients. Thirty-one North Western Health Board (NWHB) consultant clinicians responded to a postal survey. Distance and delays caused by long waiting lists were felt to deter or make CN referral irrelevant. Ninety-seven percent believed the lack of a local service negatively impacts on patient management and 93% would welcome the introduction of a tele-neurophysiology service. The geographical location of patient's residence and/or the location of the referring clinician's practice influenced waiting lists for CN. Fifty-eight (105/182) percent of patients living in a region with a CN service compared to 39% (50/128) of those living in a region with no service received an appointment within one month. In addition to the current insufficient CN service capacity in Ireland, these surveys highlighted geographical inequities. Tele-neurophysiology has the potential to speed-up diagnosis, result in more patients being appropriately investigated and be fairer to patients. PMID:15490998

  10. Neurophysiological measures in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: markers of progression in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Chio, Adriano; Dengler, Reinhard; Hecht, Martin; Weber, Markus; Swash, Michael

    2005-03-01

    In this review we evaluate clinical neurophysiological methods, originally described for use in diagnosis that can be applied to measurement of change during the progress of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Such measurements are potentially important in clinical trials, and also in clinical practice. We have assessed methods for lower and upper motor neuron function, including conventional EMG, nerve conduction and F-wave studies, the derived Neurophysiological Index, motor unit counting methods (MUNE), and transcranial magnetic motor cortex stimulation. We have also addressed the validity of measurements of electromechanical coupling. Methods for measuring muscle strength are beyond the scope of this review. We conclude that MUNE, M-wave amplitude and the Neurophysiological Index are sufficiently reliable, sensitive, and relevant to the clinical problem of ALS, to be used in clinical trials in the disease. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is of limited value, but a combination of the measurements made as part of this technique may also be useful. We conclude that clinical neurophysiological techniques should now be used in measuring change in clinical trials in ALS. PMID:16036422

  11. [Clinical signs, neurophysiological evaluation, and medication of spasticity--review].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2008-12-01

    Spasticity is usually observed along with paralysis, hyperreflexia, Babinski sign and abnormal associated movements associated with dysfunction of central motor tracts. In spasticity, exaggeration of the stretch reflex results in increased resistance during passive movements. Therefore, spasticity is pathophysiologically described as increased muscle tone whose pathognomonic sign is decreased passivity. Resistance is more strongly felt during rapid passive movements than during slow movements. The resistance felt at the beginning of the passive movement abruptly diminishes, which is well known as the clasp-knife phenomenon. Another character of spasticity is the distribution of the increment in the muscle tone. Not only rigidity, dystonia, and muscle stiffness demonstrating increased muscle tone, but also Gegenhalten and contracture of joint with normal muscle tone should be differentiated. No neurophysiological parameters reflect the degree of spasticity in a strictly parallel fashion. However, neurophysiological examinations provide some supportive objective data. Surface electromyography is useful to distinguish spasticity from rigidity and other conditions with increase muscle tone. The increased amplitude ratio and the decreased threshold ratio of the H-wave to the M-wave, and increased amplitude and persistence of the F-wave are observed the patients with spasticity. Magnetic stimulation is a useful tool to detect corticospinal tract lesions that induce leading to spasticity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic brainstem stimulation, and magnetic spinal motor root stimulation are used to examine the entire motor pathway. Since positive correlation between spasticity and shortening of the silent period is reported, many investigations including paired-pulse magnetic stimulation will be necessary for understanding pathophysiology of spasticity. Patients with mild and reversible spasticity are usually treated with medications. Significant variations

  12. Clinical and Neurophysiological Aspects of Epilepsy in Subjects with Autism and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elia, M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Clinical and neurophysiological findings for 28 patients (mean age 15 years) with mental retardation, autism, and epilepsy were described, including classification of seizure type and epileptic syndrome, etiology, severity of autism and epilepsy, electroencephalography findings, and neuroimaging findings. No particular epileptic syndrome…

  13. Present status of PACS at Kyoto University Hospital: image workstation for clinical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kotaro; Komori, Masaru; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Okajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Ishu; Takahashi, Takashi; Konishi, Junji; Abe, Mituyuki; Gotoh, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    1990-08-01

    The PAC system: KIDS (Kyoto University Hospital Image Database and Communication System) has been expanded to include several major digital imaging modalities such as X-ray CT, MRI, DSA and CR. The fiber optic high-speed local area network and the workstation with quick image handling are newly designed. The system (new KIDS) is intended to achieve a film-less environment in the department of radiology and to evaluate the feasibility of a hospital-wide PAC system. The present status of the system at the end of 1989 including a image workstation installed in a lecture hall for clinical education is described.

  14. Cobalamin (Cbl) C/D deficiency: clinical, neurophysiological and neuroradiologic findings in 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, R; Cerone, R; Schiaffino, M C; Caruso, U; Veneselli, E; Perrone, M V; Rossi, A; Gatti, R

    2001-02-01

    The early onset type of cobalamin (Cbl) C/D deficiency is characterised by feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, seizures, microcephaly and developmental delay. It has an unfavourable outcome, often with early death and significant neurological impairment in survivors. While clinical and biochemical features of Cbl C/D deficiency are well known, only a few isolated case reports are available concerning neurophysiological and neuroimaging findings. We carried out clinical, biochemical, neurophysiological and neuroradiologic investigations in 14 cases with early-onset of the Cbl CID defect. Mental retardation was identified in most of the cases. A variable degree of supratentorial white matter atrophy was detected in 11 cases by MR imaging and tetraventricular hydrocephalus was present in the remaining 3 patients. Waking EEG showed a clear prevalence of epileptiform abnormalities, possibly related to the high incidence of seizures in these cases. Increased latency of evoked responses and/or prolongation of central conduction time were the most significant neurophysiological abnormalities. The selective white matter involvement, shown both by neuroradiologic and neurophysiological studies, seems to be the most consistent finding of Cbl C/D deficiency and may be related to a reduced supply of methyl groups, possibly caused by the dysfunction in the methyl-transfer pathway. PMID:11315197

  15. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 7: Guidelines for EEG Reporting.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Olga, Selioutski; Ochoa, Juan G; Munger Clary, Heidi; Cheek, Janna; Drislane, Frank; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This EEG Guideline incorporates the practice of structuring a report of results obtained during routine adult electroencephalography. It is intended to reflect one of the current practices in reporting an EEG and serves as a revision of the previous guideline entitled "Writing an EEG Report." The goal of this guideline is not only to convey clinically relevant information, but also to improve interrater reliability for clinical and research use by standardizing the format of EEG reports. With this in mind, there is expanded documentation of the patient history to include more relevant clinical information that can affect the EEG recording and interpretation. Recommendations for the technical conditions of the recording are also enhanced to include post hoc review parameters and type of EEG recording. Sleep feature documentation is also expanded upon. More descriptive terms are included for background features and interictal discharges that are concordant with efforts to standardize terminology. In the clinical correlation section, examples of common clinical scenarios are now provided that encourages uniformity in reporting. Including digital samples of abnormal waveforms is now readily available with current EEG recording systems and may be beneficial in augmenting reports when controversial waveforms or important features are encountered. PMID:27482790

  16. Sativex(®) and clinical-neurophysiological measures of spasticity in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leocani, Letizia; Nuara, Arturo; Houdayer, Elise; Schiavetti, Irene; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Amadio, Stefano; Straffi, Laura; Rossi, Paolo; Martinelli, Vittorio; Vila, Carlos; Sormani, Maria Pia; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-11-01

    Despite the proven efficacy of Sativex(®) (9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol plus cannabidiol) oromucosal spray in reducing spasticity symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known about the neurophysiological correlates of such effects. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of Sativex on neurophysiological measures of spasticity (H/M ratio) and corticospinal excitability in patients with progressive MS. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Consecutive subjects with progressive MS and lower limb spasticity referred to our center were randomized to 4 weeks' treatment (including 2 weeks' titration) with Sativex or placebo, with crossover after a 2-week washout. Clinical and neurophysiological measures (H/M ratio and cortical excitability) of spasticity were assessed. The H/M ratio was the primary outcome, with sample size calculation of 40 patients. Of 44 recruited patients, 34 were analyzed due to 6 drop-outs and 4 exclusions, which lowered the power of the study to show differences between treatments. Neurophysiological measures did not differ significantly according to treatment and did not correlate significantly with clinical response. Response on the modified Ashworth scale (at least 20 % improvement) was significantly more frequent after Sativex than placebo (50 vs 23.5 %; p = 0.041; McNemar). Side effects did not differ significantly according to treatment. Our findings confirm the clinical benefit of Sativex on MS spasticity. The lack of corresponding changes in corticospinal excitability and on the monosynaptic component, of the stretch reflex, although in a limited sample size, points to the involvement of other spinal and supraspinal mechanisms in the physiopathology of spasticity in progressive MS. PMID:26289497

  17. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy: prospective clinical and neurophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, S; Schmalbruch, H; Rørth, M; Krarup, C

    2007-04-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron or the distal axon was primarily affected, we have carried out serial clinical and electrophysiological studies in 16 males with testicular cancer before or early and late during and after treatment with cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin at limited (<400 mg/m2 cisplatin), conventional (approximately 400 mg/m2 cisplatin) or high (>400 mg/m2 cisplatin) doses. At cumulative doses of cisplatin higher than 300 mg/m2 the patients lost distal tendon and H-reflexes and displayed reduced vibration sense in the feet and the fingers. The amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the fingers innervated by the median nerve and the dorsolateral side of the foot innervated by the sural nerve were 50-60% reduced, whereas no definite changes occurred at lower doses. The SNAP conduction velocities were reduced by 10-15% at cumulative doses of 400-700 mg/m2 consistent with loss of large myelinated fibres. SNAPs from primarily Pacinian corpuscles in digit 3 and the dorsolateral side of the foot evoked by a tactile probe showed similar changes to those observed in SNAPs evoked by electrical stimulation. At these doses, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from the tibial nerve had increased latencies of peripheral, spinal and central responses suggesting loss of central processes of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal axonal degeneration even at the lowest toxic doses of cisplatin. PMID:17301082

  18. Vitiligo vulgaris and autoimmune diseases in Japan: A report from vitiligo clinic in Kyoto University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tanioka, Miki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Katoh, Mayumi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed the causes of "loss of skin color" in 144 patients, who visited Vitiligo Clinic of Kyoto University Hospital between April 2005 and August 2008. The numbers of patients with generalized and segmental Vitiligo vulgaris were 98 (68.1%) and 26 (18.1%), respectively. Small numbers of the patients suffered from Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, piebaldism, congenital albinism, Hypomelanosis of Ito, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation, white leaf-shaped macules associated with tuberous sclerosis and nevus hypopigmentosus. One forth of the patients with generalized vitiligo had complications, while no complications were found in the patients with segmental vitiligo. Among the complications, autoimmune diseases dominated 43% (10 of 23 cases). Autoimmune thyroid diseases explained for the most of the complicated autoimmune diseases and were associated with 7.4% of the patients with generalized vitiligo. Minor autoimmune complications include myasthenia gravis, Sjogren syndrome and autoimmune nephritis. Reflecting the condition that our clinic is located in a university hospital, vitiligo patients with end-stage non-melanoma cancers of internal organs accounted for 8.4% of the patients of generalized vitiligo. PMID:20046588

  19. Clinical and Neurophysiological Improvement of SGCE Myoclonus-Dystonia with GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kurtis, Monica M; San Luciano, Marta; Yu, Qiping; Goodman, Robert R; Ford, Blair; Raymond, Deborah; Pullman, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is characterized by early onset myoclonus and dystonia. It is thought to be subcortical in origin. Response to oral medications may be incomplete, such that deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery to the globus pallidum interna (GPi) or ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) may be considered. The optimal site is not known. The physiology and surgical response for a 63 year-old woman who underwent GPi DBS for M-D with onset at age 2 and related to a mutation in the epsilon-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE) is described. She showed excellent clinical and neurophysiological improvement of both myoclonus and dystonia, suggesting that modulation by DBS is effective even after long disease duration and only partial response to oral medications. PMID:19896264

  20. Tri-cresyl phosphate neuropathy in Sri Lanka: a clinical and neurophysiological study with a three year follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, N

    1981-01-01

    Clinical and neurophysiological findings in twenty patients intoxicated with tri-cresyl phosphate following consumption of contaminated gingili oil are reported. Marked distal axonopathy, high incidence of pyramidal tract dysfunction and minimal sensory abnormalities were the cardinal features. Despite pronounced motor weakness in the early stages, the patients showed remarkable improvement during a three year follow up. PMID:7310416

  1. Early history of electroencephalography and establishment of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society.

    PubMed

    Stone, James L; Hughes, John R

    2013-02-01

    The field of electroencephalography (EEG) had its origin with the discovery of recordable electrical potentials from activated nerves and muscles of animals and in the last quarter of the 19th century from the cerebral cortex of animals. By the 1920s, Hans Berger, a neuropsychiatrist from Germany, recorded potentials from the scalp of patients with skull defects and, a few years later, with more sensitive equipment from intact subjects. Concurrently, the introduction of electronic vacuum tube amplification and the cathode ray oscilloscope was made by American physiologists or "axonologists," interested in peripheral nerve recordings. Berger's findings were independently confirmed in early 1934 by Lord Adrian in England and by Hallowell Davis at Harvard, in the United States. In the United States, the earliest contributions to human EEG were made by Hallowell Davis, Herbert H. Jasper, Frederic A. Gibbs, William Lennox, and Alfred L. Loomis. Remarkable progress in the development of EEG as a useful clinical tool followed the 1935 report by the Harvard group on the electrographic and clinical correlations in patients with absence (petit mal) seizures and altered states of consciousness. Technical aspects of the EEG and additional clinical EEG correlations were elucidated by the above investigators and a number of others. Further study led to gatherings of the EEG pioneers at Loomis' laboratory in New York (1935-1939), Regional EEG society formation, and the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society in 1946. PMID:23377440

  2. Microelectrode investigations of the visual system at the Department Of Clinical Neurophysiology, Freiburg i.Br.: a historical account of the first 10 years, 1951-1960.

    PubMed

    Grüsser, Otto-Joachim; Kapp, Hermann; Grüsser-Cornehls, Ursula

    2005-09-01

    The history of the first ten years of neurophysiological science (1951-1960) at the Department of Clinical Neurophysiology in Freiburg i.Br. (Germany) is described by some of the participants. We describe the concepts of Richard Jung for the development of an experimental neurophysiology, the technical conditions which helped to realize these ideas, and the integration of the newly emerging German neurophysiological science into the international community, through the large number of foreign visitors. A short account is given of the young scientists working at the Freiburg laboratory during this period, their main lines of research, as well as the results of their studies. PMID:16188709

  3. Protirelin tartrate (TRH-T) in upper motoneuron syndrome: a controlled neurophysiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Civardi, C; Naldi, P; Cantello, R; Gianelli, M; Mutani, R

    1994-11-01

    This randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 20 patients with chronic upper motoneuron syndrome due to ischemic cerebrovascular lesions, selected in order to ensure the greatest possible homogeneity in terms of the severity of the syndrome. All of them were treated with protirelin tartrate 4 mg/die i.m. The study included semiquantitative clinical evaluations of neurological examinations, with particular attention being paid to weakness and spasticity. These were accompanied by neurophysiological evaluations (F-waves, magnetic motor evoked potentials). Extended biohumoral investigations of possible side effects were also carried out. The results indicate a slight but statistically significant absolute improvement in spasticity and muscular strength following protirelin tartrate, especially in the lower limbs; at the same time, the drug also proved to be capable as favourably modifying the response of the biceps femoris muscle to transcranial magnetic stimulation (reappearance, increased amplitude and a reduction in the threshold of motor evoked potentials). The drug was generally well tolerated. PMID:7875957

  4. Clinical features and neurophysiological follow-up in a case of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Grandis, D; Passadore, P; Chinaglia, M; Brazzo, F; Ravenni, R; Cudia, P

    2005-08-01

    Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare disease of unknown origin commonly considered as part of the large group of motor neuron diseases. The course is quite variable: it may be quickly fatal or protracted, with relapsing phases followed by periods of arrest and even partial improvement. We describe a case of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome with strong family history for sensorineural hearing impairment. The patient came to our medical attention for severe respiratory failure and leg weakness. The clinical conditions partially improved with recovery of spontaneous respiration and mild increase in muscle strength. The neurophysiological studies performed on our patient showed evidence of nerve damage with subsequent improvement. Our study raises the possibility that the disorder is due to primary nerve damage, which can better justify the intermittent course of the disease, the partial clinical regression and the neurophysiological improvement, never detected in typical motor neuron disorders. PMID:16009552

  5. A clinical syndrome of rostral and caudal spinal injury: neurological, neurophysiological and urodynamic evidence for occult sacral lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Berić, A; Dimitrijević, M R; Light, J K

    1987-01-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury show upper motor neuron dysfunction below the level of the lesion. Some patients with cervical and high thoracic injuries show unexpected lower leg atrophy and ankle jerk abnormalities together with persistence of urinary retention. Clinical, neurophysiological and urodynamic findings in 130 patients with cervical and thoracic injuries showed that 18 patients had additional lumbosacral dysfunction. Three patients had radiological findings demonstrating a second lesion of the lower spine. The remaining 15 patients, however, did not have any obvious bony lesion to account for the lumbosacral dysfunction. Atypical neurological findings, abnormal neurophysiological testing and aberrant detrusor behaviour were the essence of the occult lumbosacral dysfunction in cervical and thoracic spinal cord injury patients. Recognition of the presence of a double lesion was important for care of the neuropathic bladder and pain in addition to understanding the unexpected clinical signs. Images PMID:3585385

  6. An international survey of physicians regarding clinical trials: a comparison between Kyoto University Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background International clinical trials are now rapidly expanding into Asia. However, the proportion of global trials is higher in South Korea compared to Japan despite implementation of similar governmental support in both countries. The difference in clinical trial environment might influence the respective physicians’ attitudes and experience towards clinical trials. Therefore, we designed a questionnaire to explore how physicians conceive the issues surrounding clinical trials in both countries. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted at Kyoto University Hospital (KUHP) and Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH) in 2008. The questionnaire consisted of 15 questions and 2 open-ended questions on broad key issues relating to clinical trials. Results The number of responders was 301 at KUHP and 398 at SNUH. Doctors with trial experience were 196 at KUHP and 150 at SNUH. Among them, 12% (24/196) at KUHP and 41% (61/150) at SUNH had global trial experience. Most respondents at both institutions viewed clinical trials favorably and thought that conducting clinical trials contributed to medical advances, which would ultimately lead to new and better treatments. The main reason raised as a hindrance to conducting clinical trials was the lack of personnel support and time. Doctors at both university hospitals thought that more clinical research coordinators were required to conduct clinical trials more efficiently. KUHP doctors were driven mainly by pure academic interest or for their desire to find new treatments, while obtaining credits for board certification and co-authorship on manuscripts also served as motivation factors for doctors at SNUH. Conclusions Our results revealed that there might be two different approaches to increase clinical trial activity. One is a social level approach to establish clinical trial infrastructure providing sufficient clinical research professionals. The other is an individual level approach that would provide incentives to

  7. Clinical, neurophysiological and morphological study of dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth type C neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Florian P; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Gondim, Francisco A A; Tournev, Ivailo; Rao, Chitharanjan V; Ishpekova, Boryana; Kinsella, Laurence J; Pan, Yi; Geller, Thomas J; Litvinenko, Ivan; De Jonghe, Peter; Scherer, Steven S; Jordanova, Albena

    2016-03-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy subtype C (DI-CMTC) was associated with mutations in the YARS gene, encoding tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, in two large unrelated Bulgarian and US pedigrees and one sporadic case. Here for the first time we describe the clinical, neurophysiological and histopathological features, and phenotypic differences between these two DI-CMTC families. Twenty-one affected individuals from the US family and 27 from the Bulgarian family were evaluated. The mean age of onset in US subjects was 10.7 years in men and 7.3 years in women, while in the Bulgarian participants it was 18.2 years in men and 33.7 years in women. The course was slowly progressive. Extensor digitorum brevis atrophy was uniform. Atrophy and/or weakness of upper and lower limb muscles were found in over 50 % of the subjects. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were abnormal in all US adults and five of six children and all Bulgarian patients except one asymptomatic 25-year-old man. Median motor NCS were in the range of 29.5-45.6 m/s in the US family and 24.7-57.8 m/s in the Bulgarian family. Sural sensory nerve action potentials were absent in 14/21 and 4/12 NCS from adult US and Bulgarian participants, respectively. Analysis of sural nerve biopsies from US patients revealed age-dependent morphological changes of axonal degeneration, absence of onion bulbs, and <10 % fibers with segmental remyelination. Our findings provide further insights into the diagnosis and pathology of intermediate CMT. They also extend the phenotypic spectrum of peripheral neuropathies associated with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase mutations. PMID:26725087

  8. [The acute visual hallucinosis in infancy. Clinical, neurophysiological and psychodevelopmental aspects and differential typology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Eggers, C

    1975-09-01

    By introducing the definition "hallucinosis" (Wernicke) it has become possible to confine the psychoses of organic origin more closely. Therefore, this term should also be used in pediatry and pedopsychiatry in order to designate cases with corresponding clinical aspects. Thus, accordance to the phenomenological characteristics of such syndromes as described in this paper, it is justified to emphasize that the acute hallucinosis in children is a special type of disease as compared to other psychoses caused by exogenic influences in this age group. The 10 case reports deal with visual hallucinoses which turned out to be characteristically different compared to those in adults. Hallucinating children at the age of 3 to 9 years predominantly visualized animals and legendary beings. Contrary to findings in adults, scenic and systematized visions were scarcely noticed, which psychodevelopmentally may be attributed to the fact that creative power in children is still little pronounced. Etiologically intoxications and infectious diseases were the cause for the visual hallucinations of the 10 children described. In the development of visual hallucinations somatic and psychic factors are significant. They have been discussed on the basis of today's knowledge. As today, however, there exists no satisfactory theory concerning the conditions favoring the development of hallucinations. To explain the somatogenesis of visual hallucinations three theories have been outlined, based on the present neurophysiological findings. It has been worked out that especially in children emotion plays an essential role in the origin of hallucinations. In infancy and early school age, while rational control of reality is still suppressed to a great extent, domination of emotional life goes along with lack of differentiation. At the same time the difference between imagination and perception is still little precise; therefore, phenomena, impressing as hallucinations in the adult, occur with

  9. Neurophysiology Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2001-01-01

    flight. Building on these basic research studies are more applied studies focused on the development of countermeasures to the untoward neurophysiological responses to space flight. At the 2001 workshop, applied research studies were presented addressing issues related to the use of rotational artificial gravity (centripetal acceleration) as a multisystem (bone, muscle, cardiovascular, and, perhaps, neurovestibular) countermeasure. Also presented was a clinical study reporting on a new rating system for clinical evaluation of postflight functional neurological status.

  10. Applications of GRID in clinical neurophysiology and Electrical Impedance Tomography of brain function.

    PubMed

    Fritschy, J; Horesh, L; Holder, D; Bayford, R

    2005-01-01

    The computational requirements in Neurophysiology are increasing with the development of new analysis methods. The resources the GRID has to offer are ideally suited for this complex processing. A practical implementation of the GRID, Condor, has been assessed using a local cluster of 920 PCs. The reduction in processing time was assessed in spike recognition of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) in epilepsy using wavelets and the computationally demanding task of non-linear image reconstruction with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). Processing times were decreased by 25 and 40 times respectively. This represents a substantial improvement in processing time, but is still sub optimal due to factors such as shared access to resources and lack of checkpoints so that interrupted jobs had to be restarted. Future work will be to use these methods in non-linear EIT image reconstruction of brain function and methods for automated EEG analysis, if possible with further optimized GRID middleware. PMID:15923723

  11. Neural network classification of clinical neurophysiological data for acute care monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sgro, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of neurophysiological monitoring of the 'acute care' patient is to allow the accurate recognition of changing or deteriorating neurological function as close to the moment of occurrence as possible, thus permitting immediate intervention. Results confirm that: (1) neural networks are able to accurately identify electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns and evoked potential (EP) wave components, and measuring EP waveform latencies and amplitudes; (2) neural networks are able to accurately detect EP and EEG recordings that have been contaminated by noise; (3) the best performance was obtained consistently with the back propagation network for EP and the HONN for EEG's; (4) neural network performed consistently better than other methods evaluated; and (5) neural network EEG and EP analyses are readily performed on multichannel data.

  12. Experience With A Small Scale All Digital CT And MRI Clinical Service Unit: Present Status Of Kyoto University Hospital Image Database And Communication System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, K.; Komori, M.; Nakano, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Kyoto University Hospital is currently developing a prototype PAC system named KIDS (Kyoto univ. hosp. Image Database and communication System). The present goal of the system is to achieve the totally digital CT and MRI unit in the radiological department. Because KIDS is designed as a first step of a long-range plan towards a hospital wide system, it includes all of the basic functions required in realizing the PAC system, such as communication networks, a long term archiving unit, a laser film printer and image workstations. The system concept, architecture and current status are described in this paper. Our early experience and evaluations with the system in a clinical environment are also mentioned.

  13. Neurophysiology of Robot-Mediated Training and Therapy: A Perspective for Future Use in Clinical Populations

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Duncan L.; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Birbaumer, Niels; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Luft, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of functional movements following injury to the central nervous system (CNS) is multifaceted and is accompanied by processes occurring in the injured and non-injured hemispheres of the brain or above/below a spinal cord lesion. The changes in the CNS are the consequence of functional and structural processes collectively termed neuroplasticity and these may occur spontaneously and/or be induced by movement practice. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying such brain plasticity may take different forms in different types of injury, for example stroke vs. spinal cord injury (SCI). Recovery of movement can be enhanced by intensive, repetitive, variable, and rewarding motor practice. To this end, robots that enable or facilitate repetitive movements have been developed to assist recovery and rehabilitation. Here, we suggest that some elements of robot-mediated training such as assistance and perturbation may have the potential to enhance neuroplasticity. Together the elemental components for developing integrated robot-mediated training protocols may form part of a neurorehabilitation framework alongside those methods already employed by therapists. Robots could thus open up a wider choice of options for delivering movement rehabilitation grounded on the principles underpinning neuroplasticity in the human CNS. PMID:24312073

  14. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part II: The referring clinician and patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Feedback from service users will provide insight into opportunities for improvement so that performance can be optimised. In the context of a formative evaluation referring clinician and patient satisfaction with a teleneurophysiology service was examined during a 20 week pilot period. Methods Questionnaire surveys of referring clinicians and patients were conducted. Results Fifteen (58%) clinicians responded to the first part of a postal survey which examined their satisfaction with traditional clinical neurophysiology services. Nine (35%) responded to a second part which assessed their experience with the teleneurophysiology service. Teleneurophysiology improved satisfaction with waiting times, availability of results and impact on patient management. There was unanimous support from the clinicians for the permanent development of a teleneurophysiology service, although 2 cautioned this could delay establishing a neurology service in their region. Eighty-two percent (116/142) of patients responded to a survey of their satisfaction with teleneurophysiology. This was compared to a previous report of 322 patients' experience with traditional CN services in Ireland. Waiting times for appointment were shorter for the former group who supported the telemedicine model recognising that it reduced the travel burden and need for overnight journeys. The two groups were equally anxious about the investigation although the teleneurophysiology patients received more prior information. Conclusion This study illustrates that teleneurophysiology is an acceptable model of service delivery for its primary customers. Their feedback is important in informing appropriate design and governance of such innovative models of health service provision. PMID:20843310

  15. Correlations between the clinical, histological and neurophysiological examinations in patients before and after parotid gland tumor surgery: verification of facial nerve transmission.

    PubMed

    Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka; Huber, Juliusz; Wojtysiak, Magdalena; Golusiński, Wojciech; Pieńkowski, Piotr; Golusiński, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Parotid gland tumor surgery sometimes leads to facial nerve paralysis. Malignant more than benign tumors determine nerve function preoperatively, while postoperative observations based on clinical, histological and neurophysiological studies have not been reported in detail. The aims of this pilot study were evaluation and correlations of histological properties of tumor (its size and location) and clinical and neurophysiological assessment of facial nerve function pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months). Comparative studies included 17 patients with benign (n = 13) and malignant (n = 4) tumors. Clinical assessment was based on House-Brackmann scale (H-B), neurophysiological diagnostics included facial electroneurography [ENG, compound muscle action potential (CMAP)], mimetic muscle electromyography (EMG) and blink-reflex examinations (BR). Mainly grade I of H-B was recorded both pre- (n = 13) and post-operatively (n = 12) in patients with small (1.5-2.4 cm) benign tumors located in superficial lobes. Patients with medium size (2.5-3.4 cm) malignant tumors in both lobes were scored at grade I (n = 2) and III (n = 2) pre- and mainly VI (n = 4) post-operatively. CMAP amplitudes after stimulation of mandibular marginal branch were reduced at about 25 % in patients with benign tumors after surgery. In the cases of malignant tumors CMAPs were not recorded following stimulation of any branch. A similar trend was found for BR results. H-B and ENG results revealed positive correlations between the type of tumor and surgery with facial nerve function. Neurophysiological studies detected clinically silent facial nerve neuropathy of mandibular marginal branch in postoperative period. Needle EMG, ENG and BR examinations allow for the evaluation of face muscles reinnervation and facial nerve regeneration. PMID:24740733

  16. Future clinical uses of neurophysiological biomarkers to predict and monitor treatment response for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Light, Gregory A.; Swerdlow, Neal R.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in psychiatric neuroscience have transformed our understanding of impaired and spared brain functions in psychotic illnesses. Despite substantial progress, few if any laboratory tests have graduated to clinics to inform diagnoses, guide treatments, and monitor treatment response. Providers must rely on careful behavioral observation and interview techniques to make inferences about patients’ inner experiences and then secondary deductions about impacted neural systems. Development of more effective treatments has also been hindered by a lack of translational quantitative biomarkers that can span the brain–behavior–treatment knowledge gap. Here, we describe an example of a simple, low-cost, and translatable electroencephalography (EEG) measure that offers promise for improving our understanding and treatment of psychotic illnesses: mismatch negativity (MMN). MMN is sensitive to and/or predicts response to some pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions and accounts for substantial portions of variance in clinical, cognitive, and psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. This measure has recently been validated for use in large-scale multisite clinical studies of schizophrenia. Lastly, MMN greatly improves our ability to forecast which individuals at high clinical risk actually develop a psychotic illness. These attributes suggest that MMN can contribute to personalized biomarker-guided treatment strategies aimed at ameliorating or even preventing the onset of psychosis. PMID:25752648

  17. Multiprocessing computer system for sensory evoked potentials and EEG spectral analysis for clinical neurophysiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Steben, J D; Streletz, L J; Fariello, R G

    1985-12-01

    A general-purpose minicomputer has been adapted and interfaced for the averaging and analysis of clinical evoked potentials and for compressed spectral arrays (CSA) of the routine EEG. In the first 2 years of operation, over 1,000 routine clinical studies of visual evoked potentials (VEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) have been performed with it, as well as over 100 CSAs and a variety of special and research studies. The CSA modality gives comparative frequency-domain pictures of left and right hemisphere power. An attached graphics terminal gives a live cumulative display of the EP and CSA. In addition, the system has automated and comprehensive physician-interactive graphics analysis and report generation capabilities. The reports are finalized versions used in the patient's chart, minimizing clerical efforts. PMID:3841553

  18. Influence of emotional states on inhibitory gating: Animals models to clinical neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Howard C.; Atchley, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating research efforts using a cross-domain approach could redefine traditional constructs used in behavioral and clinical neuroscience by demonstrating that behavior and mental processes arise not from functional isolation but from integration. Our research group has been examining the interface between cognitive and emotional processes by studying inhibitory gating. Inhibitory gating can be measured via changes in behavior or neural signal processing. Sensorimotor gating of the startle response is a well-used measure. To study how emotion and cognition interact during startle modulation in the animal model, we examined ultrasonic vocalization (USV) emissions during acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition. We found high rates of USV emission during the sensorimotor gating paradigm and revealed links between prepulse inhibition (PPI) and USV emission that could reflect emotional and cognitive influences. Measuring inhibitory gating as P50 event-related potential suppression has also revealed possible connections between emotional states and cognitive processes. We have examined the single unit responses during the traditional gating paradigm and found that acute and chronic stress can alter gating of neural signals in regions such as amygdala, striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings point to the need for more cross-domain research on how shifting states of emotion can impact basic mechanisms of information processing. Results could inform clinical work with the development of tools that depend upon cross-domain communication, and enable a better understanding and evaluation of psychological impairment. PMID:24861710

  19. Effects of aldose reductase inhibitor treatment in diabetic polyneuropathy - a clinical and neurophysiological study.

    PubMed Central

    Fagius, J; Jameson, S

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor (1,3-dioxo-1 H-benz-de-isoquinoline-2(3H)-acetic acid, AY-22,284, Alrestatin) on peripheral nerve function in diabetic polyneuropathy was assessed. Thirty patients with long-standing diabetes and slight to moderate neuropathy participated in the double-blind placebo trial. Clinical examination, sensory threshold determinations for vibratory, tactile and thermal stimuli, conduction velocity measurements and studies of automatic function were performed to evaluate the treatment. Significant differences favouring Alrestatin over placebo were found for many of the measured variables, whereas no changes occurred on placebo. The apparent improvement of neuropathy occurred despite persisting hyperglycaemia. The results indicate that aldose reductase inhibitor treatment may be of value in diabetic polyneuropathy, and provide support for the sorbitol pathway hypothesis of diabetic polyneuropathy. PMID:6801211

  20. A Neurophysiological and Neuropsychological Consideration of Mindful Movement: Clinical and Research Implications

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tamara Anne; Arcuri, Silvia Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present ideas related to three key aspects of mindfulness training: the regulation of attention via noradrenaline, the importance of working memory and its various components (particularly the central executive and episodic buffer), and the relationship of both of these to mind-wandering. These same aspects of mindfulness training are also involved in the preparation and execution of movement and implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis. We argue that by moving in a mindful way, there may be an additive effect of training as the two elements of the practice (mindfulness and movement) independently, and perhaps synergistically, engage common underlying systems (the default mode network). We discuss how working with mindful movement may be one route to mindfulness training for individuals who would struggle to sit still to complete the more commonly taught mindfulness practices. Drawing on our clinical experience working with individuals with severe and enduring mental health conditions, we show the real world application of these ideas and how they can be used to help those who are suffering and for whom current treatments are still far from adequate. PMID:26074800

  1. [Clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of motor cortical responsiveness during prolonged cranial osteoplasty].

    PubMed

    Shevtsov, V I; Khudiaev, A T; Shein, A P; D'iachkov, A N; Men'shchikova, I A; Krivonogova, Z M; Mukhtiaev, S V

    2002-01-01

    The data of global and stimulation poly-EMG were used to estimate the outcomes of multimodality treatment of sequelae of brain injury and stroke, which was based on the vasoactive effects of prolonged cranial osteoplasty. Thirteen patients (7 males and 6 females) aged 19 to 64 (mean 42 +/- 4) years who had signs of left- (n = 2) and right-sided (n = 11) spastic hemiparesis. Global and stimulation poly-EMG, which involved recording and analysis of resting and total EMG under the maximum voluntary tension, M-waves H-reflexes, transcranially evoked potentials. The muscles of the shoulder, forearm, hand, femur, leg, and foot were studied. The surgical procedure developed at the Russian Research Center "VTO" for stimulation of cerebral blood flow in combination with conventional conservative treatments (physiotherapy, therapeutical exercises, and adequate drug therapy) was shown to increase the transmission coefficient of an efferent signal in the motor cortex-spinal motor neurons-muscle system, which is clinically accompanied by improved coordination of simple and complex movements realized with the participation of the muscles of both the paretic and contralateral extremity. The ambiguous effects of the vasoactive factors of prolonged osteoplasty on the functions of unequally modal pathologically changed cerebral motor structures were noted. The findings may be considered as evidence for the low traumatic ability of the VTO's techniques for replacing posttraumatic defects of skull vault bones. PMID:11989287

  2. Ambient intelligence for monitoring and research in clinical neurophysiology and medicine: the MIMERICA* project and prototype.

    PubMed

    Pignolo, L; Riganello, F; Dolce, G; Sannita, W G

    2013-04-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) provides extended but unobtrusive sensing and computing devices and ubiquitous networking for human/environment interaction. It is a new paradigm in information technology compliant with the international Integrating Healthcare Enterprise board (IHE) and eHealth HL7 technological standards in the functional integration of biomedical domotics and informatics in hospital and home care. AmI allows real-time automatic recording of biological/medical information and environmental data. It is extensively applicable to patient monitoring, medicine and neuroscience research, which require large biomedical data sets; for example, in the study of spontaneous or condition-dependent variability or chronobiology. In this respect, AML is equivalent to a traditional laboratory for data collection and processing, with minimal dedicated equipment, staff, and costs; it benefits from the integration of artificial intelligence technology with traditional/innovative sensors to monitor clinical or functional parameters. A prototype AmI platform (MIMERICA*) has been implemented and is operated in a semi-intensive unit for the vegetative and minimally conscious states, to investigate the spontaneous or environment-related fluctuations of physiological parameters in these conditions. PMID:23545248

  3. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  4. The neurophysiological effects of dry needling in patients with upper trapezius myofascial trigger points: study protocol of a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadeh-Amirdehi, Maryam; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dry needling (DN) is an effective method for the treatment of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). There is no report on the neurophysiological effects of DN in patients with MTrPs. The aim of the present study will be to assess the immediate neurophysiological efficacy of deep DN in patients with upper trapezius MTrPs. Methods and analysis A prospective, controlled clinical trial was designed to include patients with upper trapezius MTrPs and volunteered healthy participants to receive one session of DN. The primary outcome measures are neuromuscular junction response and sympathetic skin response. The secondary outcomes are pain intensity and pressure pain threshold. Data will be collected at baseline and immediately after intervention. Ethics and dissemination This study protocol has been approved by the Research Council, School of Rehabilitation and the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The results of the study will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. PMID:23793673

  5. [Responsiveness and resistance of spinal cord structures in patients with closed thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries: neurophysiological and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Shein, A P; Krivoruchko, G A; Chukhareva, N A; Liulin, S V

    2000-01-01

    The study was undertaken to explore the time course of parameters of neuromotor dysfunction in patients with thoracic and lumbar spinal fractures characterized by the varying degrees of neurological symptoms. The study was based on the results of complex neurophysiological testing (global and stimulation electroneuromyography (EMG) in 45 patients with thoracic and lumbar spinal fractures who had been admitted to the "VTO" Russian Research Center without complications. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) 17 patients without neurological disorders and 2) 28 with mild neurological ones. There was evidence that there were no complicated vertebral injuries. Group 1 patients were found to have steady-state changes in the EMG structure, lower voluntary and involuntary activities (M responses) of the muscles of the hip, leg, and foot, enhanced reflex excitability of leg muscles, EMG signs of spasticity and irritation of segmental radicular structures, long-term asymmetry virtually in all EMG parameters. It was also ascertained that the group of patients with uncomplicated vertebral fractures was represented by individuals having more fitness or those belonging to the so-called "muscular" somato-type. The findings lead to the conclusion that the VTO treatment of vertebrospinal injuries, that is based on the use of a refinement of an external spinal fixation apparatus, creates necessary prerequisites for prevention of further development of neurological deficit and for the optimal course of compensatory-reparative processes in the damaged spinal cord structures. PMID:10723262

  6. Correspondence between neurophysiological and clinical measurements of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: secondary analysis of data from the CI-PeriNoms study

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Kathleen A.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Renn, Cynthia L.; Zhu, Shijun; Johantgen, Mary E.; Cornblath, David R.; Argyriou, Andreas A.; Cavaletti, Guido; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.; Alberti, Paola; Postma, Tjeerd J.; Rossi, Emanuela; Frigeni, Barbara; Bruna, Jordi; Velasco, Roser; Kalofonos, Haralabos P.; Psimaras, Dimitri; Ricard, Damien; Pace, Andrea; Galie, Edvina; Briani, Chiara; Torre, Chiara Dalla; Faber, Catharina G.; Lalisang, Roy I.; Boogerd, Willem; Brandsma, Dieta; Koeppen, Susanne; Hense, Joerg; Storey, Dawn J.; Kerrigan, Simon; Schenone, Angelo; Fabbri, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) lacks standardized clinical measurement. The objective of the current secondary analysis was to examine data from the CIPN Outcomes Standardization (CI-PeriNomS) study for associations between clinical examinations and neurophysiological abnormalities. Logistic regression estimated the strength of associations of vibration, pin, and monofilament examinations with lower limb sensory and motor amplitudes. Examinations were classified as normal (0), moderately abnormal (1), or severely abnormal (2). Among 218 participants, those with class 1 upper extremity (UE) and class 1 or 2 lower extremity (LE) monofilament abnormality were 2.79 (95%CI: 1.28-6.07), 3.49 (95%CI: 1.61-7.55) and 4.42 (95%CI: 1.35-14.46) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to individuals with normal examinations. Likewise, those with class 2 UE and class 1 or 2 LE vibration abnormality were 8.65 (95%CI: 1.81-41.42), 2.54 (95%CI: 1.19-5.41) and 7.47 (95%CI: 2.49-22.40) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to participants with normal examinations. Abnormalities in vibration and monofilament examinations are associated with abnormal sural nerve amplitudes and are useful in identifying CIPN. PMID:24814100

  7. Correspondence between neurophysiological and clinical measurements of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: secondary analysis of data from the CI-PeriNomS study.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Kathleen A; Dorsey, Susan G; Renn, Cynthia L; Zhu, Shijun; Johantgen, Mary E; Cornblath, David R; Argyriou, Andreas A; Cavaletti, Guido; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Alberti, Paola; Postma, Tjeerd J; Rossi, Emanuela; Frigeni, Barbara; Bruna, Jordi; Velasco, Roser; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Psimaras, Dimitri; Ricard, Damien; Pace, Andrea; Galie, Edvina; Briani, Chiara; Dalla Torre, Chiara; Faber, Catharina G; Lalisang, Roy I; Boogerd, Willem; Brandsma, Dieta; Koeppen, Susanne; Hense, Joerg; Storey, Dawn J; Kerrigan, Simon; Schenone, Angelo; Fabbri, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) lacks standardized clinical measurement. The objective of the current secondary analysis was to examine data from the CIPN Outcomes Standardization (CI-PeriNomS) study for associations between clinical examinations and neurophysiological abnormalities. Logistic regression estimated the strength of associations of vibration, pin, and monofilament examinations with lower limb sensory and motor amplitudes. Examinations were classified as normal (0), moderately abnormal (1), or severely abnormal (2). Among 218 participants, those with class 1 upper extremity (UE) and classes 1 or 2 lower extremity (LE) monofilament abnormality were 2.79 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28-6.07), 3.49 (95%CI: 1.61-7.55), and 4.42 (95%CI: 1.35-14.46) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to individuals with normal examinations. Likewise, those with class 2 UE and classes 1 or 2 LE vibration abnormality were 8.65 (95%CI: 1.81-41.42), 2.54 (95%CI: 1.19-5.41), and 7.47 (95%CI: 2.49-22.40) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to participants with normal examinations. Abnormalities in vibration and monofilament examinations are associated with abnormal sural nerve amplitudes and are useful in identifying CIPN. PMID:24814100

  8. The Neurophysiology of Learning and Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellettieri, A. J.

    In an effort to narrow the gap between scientific findings and applied clinicians, the author exposed clinical cases to recent laboratory findings of neurophysiology and sought to relate some possible linkage between the two. Two studies about the operation of the mind in information processing and learning were related to two clinical cases. The…

  9. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  10. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  11. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  12. Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Tadashi; Ozaki, Shinobu; Hattori, Takashi; Ishii, M.; Sasaki, Minoru; Takeyama, Norihide

    1998-07-01

    We are building the second version of the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph (Ohtani et al., this symposium). This will be mounted on the MAGNUM, a 2-m telescope under construction at Haleakala, and also on the SUBARU. The spectrograph has four observational modes: Fabry-Perot imager, integral field spectrograph (IFS) with a microlens array, long-slit spectrograph, and filter-imaging modes. The new spectrograph is significantly better than the first version in several ways. The IFS has as many as 37 X 37 microlenses, each of which subtends 0' .39 at the MAGNUM. The optics is designed to be used in wide wavelength ranges from 360 nm to 900 nm. The transmission at any wavelength between 370 and 900 nm is designed to exceed 50% for the collimator plus camera system, and to reach almost 40% even at 360 nm. In order to achieve high efficiency at short wavelengths, we use an anti- reflection coated backside-illuminated 2K X 2K CCD. We are also planning a further improvement by using multi-layer anti- reflection coatings for lenses, in collaboration with National Astronomical Observatory, Japan. In order to assure good image quality under a severe weight limit of 150 kg for this instrument, we have carried out mechanical design by calculating the flexure of the instrument for all telescope attitudes with finite element analysis, and succeeded in limiting the maximum flexure to 30 micrometer. This does not degrade image quality. The movements on the CCD of the light from the center of the focal plane have also been simulated, depending on the telescope attitudes. This is important to obtain not only a good image, but also a correct flat field and wavelength calibration in the IFS mode. The movements are expected to be confined almost within one pixel for an attitude, which is considered to be small enough.

  13. VOJTA neurophysiologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, H; Appaji, G; Mundt, D

    1992-01-01

    The reflexlocomotion acc. to VOJTA is a neurophysiologic facilitation system for the whole CNS and neuromuscular apparatus. It consists of all components, in a reciprocal manner of locomotion: (i) automatic control of posture, (ii) uprighting, (iii) aimed movements. Consequently the indications for this type of kinesiologic facilitation are really extensive. In this article the following complete list of indications is described: CCD (central coordination disorder), CP (cerebral palsy), peripheral paresis, Spina bifida (MMC), Myopathies, congenital malformations, orthopaedic problems, traumatic cross sections, neuromuscular dysfunctions etc. Further the experiences of the treatment in each disease are discussed. Even EMG-detections have shown the effect of the therapy in peripheral and central damage. Therefore a good prognosis for improvement and rehabilitation can be given in a large number of disorders, irrespective of age. PMID:1535338

  14. Changes in muscle activity determine progression of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic spine-related muscle pain. A complex clinical and neurophysiological approach

    PubMed Central

    Wytra̦żek, Marcin; Huber, Juliusz; Lisiński, Przemysław

    Summary Spine-related muscle pain can affect muscle strength and motor unit activity. This study was undertaken to investigate whether surface electromyographic (sEMG) recordings performed during relaxation and maximal contraction reveal differences in the activity of muscles with or without trigger points (TRPs). We also analyzed the possible coexistence of characteristic spontaneous activity in needle electromyographic (eEMG) recordings with the presence of TRPs. Thirty patients with non-specific cervical and back pain were evaluated using clinical, neuroimaging and electroneurographic examinations. Muscle pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and strength using Lovett’s scale; trigger points were detected by palpation. EMG was used to examine motor unit activity. Trigger points were found mainly in the trapezius muscles in thirteen patients. Their presence was accompanied by increased pain intensity, decreased muscle strength, increased resting sEMG amplitude, and decreased sEMG amplitude during muscle contraction. eEMG revealed characteristic asynchronous discharges in TRPs. The results of EMG examinations point to a complexity of muscle pain that depends on progression of the myofascial syndrome PMID:22152435

  15. NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SENSORY SYSTEMS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to many neurotoxic compounds has been shown to produce a sensory system dysfunction. Neurophysiological assessment of sensory function in humans and animal models often uses techniques known as sensory evoked potentials. Because both humans and animals show analogous res...

  16. Neurophysiology and itch pathways.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    As we all can easily differentiate the sensations of itch and pain, the most straightforward neurophysiologic concept would consist of two specific pathways that independently encode itch and pain. Indeed, a neuronal pathway for histamine-induced itch in the peripheral and central nervous system has been described in animals and humans, and recently several non-histaminergic pathways for itch have been discovered in rodents that support a dichotomous concept differentiated into a pain and an itch pathway, with both pathways being composed of different "flavors." Numerous markers and mediators have been found that are linked to itch processing pathways. Thus, the delineation of neuronal pathways for itch from pain pathways seemingly proves that all sensory aspects of itch are based on an itch-specific neuronal pathway. However, such a concept is incomplete as itch can also be induced by the activation of the pain pathway in particular when the stimulus is applied in a highly localized spatial pattern. These opposite views reflect the old dispute between specificity and pattern theories of itch. Rather than only being of theoretic interest, this conceptual problem has key implication for the strategy to treat chronic itch as key therapeutic targets would be either itch-specific pathways or unspecific nociceptive pathways. PMID:25861773

  17. Neurophysiology of pain and hypnosis for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Dillworth, Tiara; Mendoza, M Elena; Jensen, Mark P

    2012-03-01

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in (1) understanding the neurophysiological components of the pain experiences, (2) randomized clinical trials testing the efficacy of hypnotic treatments on chronic pain, and (3) laboratory research examining the effects of hypnosis on the neurophysiological processes implicated in pain. Work done in these areas has not only demonstrated the efficacy of hypnosis for treating chronic pain but is beginning to shed light on neurophysiological processes that may play a role in its effectiveness. This paper reviews a selection of published studies from these areas of research, focusing on recent findings that have the most potential to inform both clinical work and research in this area. The paper concludes with research and clinical recommendations for maximizing treatment efficacy based on the research findings that are available. PMID:24073099

  18. Fabrication of neurophysiological monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A system designed to collect electroencephalographic, electro-oculographic, electromyographic, and head motion data is described. The portable instrumentation provides a rapid and simple means by which neurophysiological data can be obtained by the patient in his home and the taped data returned to the laboratory for analysis. The system was designed primarily for the study of sleep.

  19. Neurophysiological Factors in Spatial Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lauren Jay

    Some of the major lines of investigation that point to neurophysiological factors in spatial skill are presented. These lines include: the two hemispheres of the brain, recent studies, tachistoscopic studies, morphological differences between the cerebral hemispheres, Geschwind and Levitsky's discovery, cerebral dominance re-examined, sex…

  20. Kyoto tridimensional spectrograph II: progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Shinobu; Hattori, Takashi; Ishii, Motomi; Ishigaki, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Tadashi; Sasaki, Minoru; Takeyama, Norihide

    2000-08-01

    We are building the Kyoto tridimensional spectrograph II and are planning to mount it on Subaru telescope. The spectrograph has four observational modes: Fabry-Perot imager, integral field spectrograph (IFS) with a microlens array, long-slit spectrograph, and filter-imaging modes. The optics is designed to be used in wide wavelength range from 360 nm to 900 nm. The design well matches with high spatial resolution of Subaru: 0 inch .06 pixel-1 in Fabry- Perot mode, for which we actually will use binning before adaptive optics at optical wavelengths becomes available, and 0 inch .1 lens-1 in microlens array mode. These well sample image sizes obtained by Subaru, which are about 0 inch .4 in relatively good conditions. We have evaluated a point spread function of our cylindrical microlens array and found that it consists of a diffraction pattern and more extended component which probably comes from border regions between microlenses. With a suitable mask at the micro pupil position, the crosstalk between spectra will be limited down to a few percent. With a suitable mask at the micro pupil position, the crosstalk between spectra will be limited down to a few percent. We have succeeded in synchronizing frequency switching of Fabry-Perot etalons with the movement of charge on the CCD. This technique enables to average out all temporal variations between each passband.

  1. Neurophysiology of hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Laureys, S; Faymonville, M-E

    2014-10-01

    We here review behavioral, neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies of hypnosis as a state, as well as hypnosis as a tool to modulate brain responses to painful stimulations. Studies have shown that hypnotic processes modify internal (self awareness) as well as external (environmental awareness) brain networks. Brain mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain perception under hypnotic conditions involve cortical as well as subcortical areas including anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, basal ganglia and thalami. Combined with local anesthesia and conscious sedation in patients undergoing surgery, hypnosis is associated with improved peri- and postoperative comfort of patients and surgeons. Finally, hypnosis can be considered as a useful analogue for simulating conversion and dissociation symptoms in healthy subjects, permitting better characterization of these challenging disorders by producing clinically similar experiences. PMID:25306075

  2. Clinical and neurophysiological features of the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy due to the 17p11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline Pinheiro Martins de; Pereira, Raquel Campos; Onofre, Patrícia Toscano; Marques, Vanessa Daccach; Andrade, Gilberto Brown de; Barreira, Amilton Antunes; Marques Junior, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autossomal dominant disorder manifesting recurrent mononeuropathies. Objective Evaluate its clinical and nerve conduction studies (NCS) characteristics, searching for diagnostic particularities. Method We reviewed the neurological manifestations of 39 and the NCS of 33 patients. Results Family history was absent in 16/39 (41%). The onset complaints were weakness in 24, pain in 6, sensory deficit in 5 and paresthesias in 4. Pain was seen in 3 other patients. The following neuropathy patterns were found: multiple mononeuropathy (26), mononeuropathy (7), chronic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (4), chronic sensory polyneuropathy (1) and unilateral brachial plexopathy (1). NCS showed a sensorimotor neuropathy with focal conduction slowing in 31, two had mononeuropathy and another brachial plexopathy. Conclusion HNPP presentation is variable and may include pain. The most frequent pattern is of an asymmetrical sensory and motor neuropathy with focal slowing at specific topographies on NCS. PMID:26982985

  3. The role of the circadian system in fractal neurophysiological control

    PubMed Central

    Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin R.; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Butler, Matthew P.; Shea, Steven A.; Hu, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Many neurophysiological variables such as heart rate, motor activity, and neural activity are known to exhibit intrinsic fractal fluctuations - similar temporal fluctuation patterns at different time scales. These fractal patterns contain information about health, as many pathological conditions are accompanied by their alteration or absence. In physical systems, such fluctuations are characteristic of critical states on the border between randomness and order, frequently arising from nonlinear feedback interactions between mechanisms operating on multiple scales. Thus, the existence of fractal fluctuations in physiology challenges traditional conceptions of health and disease, suggesting that high levels of integrity and adaptability are marked by complex variability, not constancy, and are properties of a neurophysiological network, not individual components. Despite the subject's theoretical and clinical interest, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying fractal regulation remain largely unknown. The recent discovery that the circadian pacemaker (suprachiasmatic nucleus) plays a crucial role in generating fractal patterns in motor activity and heart rate sheds an entirely new light on both fractal control networks and the function of this master circadian clock, and builds a bridge between the fields of circadian biology and fractal physiology. In this review, we sketch the emerging picture of the developing interdisciplinary field of fractal neurophysiology by examining the circadian system’s role in fractal regulation. PMID:23573942

  4. Evaluation of an easy, standardized and clinically practical method (SurePrep) for the preparation of electrode-skin contact in neurophysiological recordings.

    PubMed

    Stjerna, Susanna; Alatalo, Päivi; Mäki, Jarmo; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the practicality, reliability and safety of a recently introduced method of skin preparation for EEG recordings. We compared the traditional skin abrasion (SA) method to a method called SurePrep (SP), which creates tiny incisions through the upper epithelial layers. The study comprised three parts. In part 1, forearm recordings (n = 400; ten healthy volunteers) were conducted to examine acute and late (24 h) impedances, skin reactions, as well as the effects on electrode movement artefacts. In part 2, the effect of repeated (up to nine) SP sticks on impedances was examined on the forearm skin in two subjects (n = 99). In part 3, preparation speed and skin impedances were measured from preparation of a standard EEG cap in four subjects (n = 74). Immediately after preparation, skin impedances were a little lower (n.s.) after SA, but the variability in impedances was significantly less after SP (p < 0.01). After one day, there was no mean impedance difference but a greater proportion of SP sites were >10 kOmega. The frequency of immediate skin irritations (93.5%) was much higher after SA compared to 42.5% after SP, but there was no clinically significant difference observed after one day. The SP method exposed interstitial fluid in 5% of cases, while SA caused a wound-like lesion in 4.5% of the sites. No macroscopic blood was observed in any case (n = 400). Three sticks with the SP device produced clinically sufficient (<10 kOmega) impedances in 85% of the cases, and a total of five to six sticks secured a sufficient skin contact in all skin sites examined (n = 99). Preparation of skin contacts in the EEG cap was faster by SP compared to SA in all four study subjects. Our results demonstrate that skin contacts of sufficient quality can be reliably, easily and quickly prepared by the SP method. SP is a useful alternative for EEG recordings in general, although SA may provide the slightly better preserved skin contacts needed for long

  5. Low-frequency rTMS in patients with subacute ischemic stroke: clinical evaluation of short and long-term outcomes and neurophysiological assessment of cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Blesneag, AV; Slăvoacă, DF; Popa, L; Stan, AD; Jemna, N; Isai Moldovan, F; Mureșanu, DF

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used alone or in combination with physiotherapy for rehabilitation of stroke patients. TMS mapping can also quantify the excitability of the motor area in both the ipsilesional (IL) and contralateral (CL) hemisphere. Objective: This study is the first to measure the dynamics of cortical excitability by TMS mapping before and after treatment with low-frequency (LF) rTMS in the contralesional hemisphere at three different timepoints. Furthermore, the patients were clinically evaluated during the same visit as the mapping to establish both short and long-term outcomes after rTMS treatment. Methods and Results: A total of 16 participants with acute ischemic stroke were assessed 10 days post-stroke by TMS mapping. The patients were randomized into two equal groups: a real rTMS group and a sham group. The rTMS group received LF-rTMS to the contralesional hemisphere for 10 days, starting on the first day after the first mapping. Each subject was also evaluated by mapping on days 45 and 90 after stroke onset. The primary clinical outcome measured was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity (FMA-UE) on days 10, 45 and 90 post-stroke. At 10 days after stroke onset, both groups presented low excitability in the lesion side and high excitability in the non-affected side. In the real rTMS group, at 45 days after stroke, a downward trend in the excitability of the contralesional hemisphere and an upward trend in the excitability of the lesioned side were observed. At 90 days after stroke, a tendency toward balanced excitability between both hemispheres was observed. In the sham group, at both 45 and 90 days, we observed increased excitability in the non-affected side compared to the side with the lesioned motor area. At 45 days, the real rTMS group demonstrated a better recovery of the upper limb motor function than the sham group, but at 90 days, there was no significant difference between the two groups

  6. The Kyoto Protocol: A business perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, C.B.

    1998-01-19

    Governments have made a tentative start in responding to climate change. In marathon negotiating sessions that extended into an extra day Dec. 1--11 in Kyoto, Japan, representatives from more than 160 governments hammered out the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The protocol calls for developed countries to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on averaged by 5.2% below 1990 levels by the years 2008--2012. Developing countries have no new obligations. The paper discusses the agreement, ratification, future questions, business role, and the challenge.

  7. Insomnia: Neurophysiological and neuropsychological approaches.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Célyne H

    2011-03-01

    Insomnia is a symptom, a syndrome and a comorbid disorder. Its diagnosis relies on subjective reports from the afflicted individual and is defined as difficulties in initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, waking up too early or non-restorative sleep. However, insomnia and especially, primary insomnia, has received much attention in insomnia research with the use of objective measures. Insomnia, its peculiarities, most frequent subtypes and two most prominent models will first be briefly introduced. Then, insomnia will be reviewed according to results obtained with the use of neurophysiological measures as basic/traditional as polysomnography to more sophisticated ones such as power spectral analysis, neuroimaging, cyclic alternating patterns and event-related potentials. In addition, a review of the discrepancies between subjective and objective reports of cognitive alterations through neuropsychological testing is offered. The need to combine measures is then highlighted in conclusion. PMID:21249453

  8. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  9. Neurophysiology of Skin Thermal Sensations.

    PubMed

    Filingeri, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Undoubtedly, adjusting our thermoregulatory behavior represents the most effective mechanism to maintain thermal homeostasis and ensure survival in the diverse thermal environments that we face on this planet. Remarkably, our thermal behavior is entirely dependent on the ability to detect variations in our internal (i.e., body) and external environment, via sensing changes in skin temperature and wetness. In the past 30 years, we have seen a significant expansion of our understanding of the molecular, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological mechanisms that allow humans to sense temperature and humidity. The discovery of temperature-activated ion channels which gate the generation of action potentials in thermosensitive neurons, along with the characterization of the spino-thalamo-cortical thermosensory pathway, and the development of neural models for the perception of skin wetness, are only some of the recent advances which have provided incredible insights on how biophysical changes in skin temperature and wetness are transduced into those neural signals which constitute the physiological substrate of skin thermal and wetness sensations. Understanding how afferent thermal inputs are integrated and how these contribute to behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory responses under normal brain function is critical to determine how these mechanisms are disrupted in those neurological conditions, which see the concurrent presence of afferent thermosensory abnormalities and efferent thermoregulatory dysfunctions. Furthermore, advancing the knowledge on skin thermal and wetness sensations is crucial to support the development of neuroprosthetics. In light of the aforementioned text, this review will focus on the peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning skin thermal and wetness sensations in humans. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1279-1294, 2016.2016. PMID:27347898

  10. A Possible Common Neurophysiologic Basis for MDD, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizophrenia: Lessons from Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Goded

    2016-01-01

    There is ample electrophysiological evidence of attention dysfunction in the EEG/ERP signal of major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The reduced attention-related ERP waves show much similarity between MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, raising the question whether there are similarities in the neurophysiologic process that underlies attention dysfunction in these pathologies. The present work suggests that there is such a unified underlying neurophysiologic process, which results in reduced attention in the three pathologies. Naturally, as these pathologies involve different clinical manifestations, we expect differences in their underlying neurophysiology. These differences and their subtle manifestation in the ERP marker for attention are also discussed. MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia are just three of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, which involve changes in the EEG/ERP manifestations of attention. Further work should expand the basic model presented here to offer comprehensive modeling of these multiple disorders and to emphasize similarities and dissimilarities of the underlying neurophysiologic processes. PMID:27313546

  11. Confirmation of the neurophysiologically predicted therapeutic effects of trazodone on its target symptoms depression, anxiety and insomnia by postmarketing clinical studies with a controlled-release formulation in depressed outpatients.

    PubMed

    Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda Maria; Anderer, Peter; Arnold, Oliver; Saletu, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    improved, in the self-rated Zung SDS sadness and loss of drive came second and third in the improvement ranking, in the self-rated Zung SAS anxiety and the feeling of falling apart. Tolerability was very good. In the 2nd week only 16.9% and in the 6th week only 7.6% of the patients reported side effects, mostly characterized by tiredness and rarely by nausea and vertigo. The present clinical study is in agreement with previous studies identifying trazodone as a safe and effective antidepressant, specifically regarding its target symptoms insomnia, depression and anxiety. It also confirms our own early predictions based on neurophysiological investigations concerning the mode of action of the drug. PMID:14673218

  12. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Design Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. Results All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. Conclusions A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. PMID:26187502

  13. Increasing use of yellow colors in Kyoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Munehira; Nara, Iwao

    2002-06-01

    Colors used for commercial signboards, displayed outdoors as well as indoors through windows, such as a store sign, an advertising sign, a sky sign, a poster, a placard, and a billboard were extensively surveyed in Kyoto City, Japan, in 1998. The survey showed that various kinds of yellow painted signs have increased rapidly and invaded a center area and suburbs of the city. Vivid yellow, what we called it the Y98 virus, is specially considered a color unpleasantly matched to the city image of Kyoto which was the capital of Japan for nearly 1000 years (794 to 1868) and is endowed with cultural and historic heritage. Discussions trying to find out what we could do to prevent the rapid spread of a big commercial display painted with vivid yellows what we called 'the Y98 virus' over the city will be summarized in a main text.

  14. [Neurophysiological research on the trigeminal nerve].

    PubMed

    Müller, D

    1989-01-01

    With neurophysiologic investigations we can distinguish many aspects of functional lesions in the nervus trigeminus, for example localization, prognosis and effects of treatment. Interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary. PMID:2532824

  15. Incorporating neurophysiological concepts in mathematical thermoregulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingma, Boris R. M.; Vosselman, M. J.; Frijns, A. J. H.; van Steenhoven, A. A.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W. D.

    2014-01-01

    Skin blood flow (SBF) is a key player in human thermoregulation during mild thermal challenges. Various numerical models of SBF regulation exist. However, none explicitly incorporates the neurophysiology of thermal reception. This study tested a new SBF model that is in line with experimental data on thermal reception and the neurophysiological pathways involved in thermoregulatory SBF control. Additionally, a numerical thermoregulation model was used as a platform to test the function of the neurophysiological SBF model for skin temperature simulation. The prediction-error of the SBF-model was quantified by root-mean-squared-residual (RMSR) between simulations and experimental measurement data. Measurement data consisted of SBF (abdomen, forearm, hand), core and skin temperature recordings of young males during three transient thermal challenges (1 development and 2 validation). Additionally, ThermoSEM, a thermoregulation model, was used to simulate body temperatures using the new neurophysiological SBF-model. The RMSR between simulated and measured mean skin temperature was used to validate the model. The neurophysiological model predicted SBF with an accuracy of RMSR < 0.27. Tskin simulation results were within 0.37 °C of the measured mean skin temperature. This study shows that (1) thermal reception and neurophysiological pathways involved in thermoregulatory SBF control can be captured in a mathematical model, and (2) human thermoregulation models can be equipped with SBF control functions that are based on neurophysiology without loss of performance. The neurophysiological approach in modelling thermoregulation is favourable over engineering approaches because it is more in line with the underlying physiology.

  16. Behavioral guides for sensory neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Konishi, M

    2006-06-01

    The study of natural behavior is important for understanding the coding schemes of sensory systems. The jamming avoidance response of the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia is an excellent example of a bottom-up approach, in which behavioral analyses guided neurophysiological studies. These studies started from the electroreceptive sense organs to the motor output consisting of pacemaker neurons. Going in the opposite direction, from the central nervous system to lower centers, is the characteristic of the top-down approach. Although this approach is perhaps more difficult than the bottom-up approach, it was successfully employed in the neuroethological analysis of sound localization in the barn owl. In the latter studies, high-order neurons selective for complex natural stimuli led to the discovery of neural pathways and networks responsible for the genesis of the stimulus selectivity. Comparison of Eigenmannia and barn owls, and their neural systems, has revealed similarities in network designs, such as parallel pathways and their convergence to produce stimulus selectivity necessary for detection of natural stimuli. PMID:16432726

  17. Neurophysiological assessment in the diagnosis of botulism: usefulness of single-fiber EMG.

    PubMed

    Padua, L; Aprile, I; Monaco, M L; Fenicia, L; Anniballi, F; Pauri, F; Tonali, P

    1999-10-01

    We report the clinical, serological, and neurophysiological findings in seven patients with foodborne botulism caused by ingestion of black olives in water. The clinical picture was characterized by mild symptoms with a long latency of onset and by involvement of cranial and upper limb muscles; only one patient, a child, developed respiratory failure. Spores of Clostridium botulinum were found in stools in some but not all cases. Conventional neurophysiological tests had low sensitivity; abnormal findings were present only in the patient with severe clinical involvement, in whom compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) appeared reduced. Repetitive nerve stimulation at a high rate showed pseudofacilitation and not true posttetanic facilitation, but single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) showed abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission in every case. Neurophysiological evaluation, particularly SFEMG, is important because it allows rapid identification of abnormal neuromuscular transmission while bioassay studies are in progress. PMID:10487905

  18. Neurological complications of ankylosing spondylitis: neurophysiological assessment.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Eman M; Rashad, Sonia M; Hamed, Sherifa A; El-Zharaa, Fatma; Abdalla, Abdel Karim H

    2009-07-01

    Studies examined the neurological involvement of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are limited. This study aimed to assess the frequency of myelopathy, radiculopathy and myopathy in AS correlating them to the clinical, radiological and laboratory parameters. Included were 24 patients with AS. Axial status was assessed using bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI). Patients underwent (a) standard cervical and lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint radiography, (b) somatosensory (SSEP) and magnetic motor (MEP) evoked potentials of upper and lower limbs, (c) electromyography (EMG) of trapezius and supraspinatus muscles. Patients' mean age and duration of illness were 36 and 5.99 years. Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index mean score was 4.6. Twenty-five percent (n = 6) of patients had neurological manifestations, 8.3% of them had myelopathy and 16.7% had radiculopathy. Ossification of the posterior (OPLL) and anterior (OALL) longitudinal ligaments were found in 8.3% (n = 2) and 4.2% (n = 1). About 70.8% (n = 17) had >or=1 neurophysiological test abnormalities. Twelve patients (50%) had SSEP abnormalities, seven had prolonged central conduction time (CCT) of median and/or ulnar nerves suggesting cervical myelopathy. Six had delayed peripheral or root latencies at Erb's or interpeak latency (Erb's-C5) suggesting radiculopathy. Motor evoked potentials was abnormal in 54% (n = 13). Twelve (50%) and five (20.8%) patients had abnormal MEP of upper limbs and lower limbs, respectively. About 50% (n = 12) had myopathic features of trapezius and supraspinatus muscles. Only 8.3% (n = 2) had neuropathic features. We concluded that subclinical neurological complications are frequent in AS compared to clinically manifest complications. Somatosensory evoked potential and MEP are useful to identify AS patients prone to develop neurological complications. PMID:19153738

  19. Neurophysiological biomarkers for Lewy body dementias

    PubMed Central

    Cromarty, Ruth A.; Elder, Greg J.; Graziadio, Sara; Baker, Mark; Bonanni, Laura; Onofrj, Marco; O’Brien, John T.; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lewy body dementias (LBD) include both dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson’s disease with dementia (PDD), and the differentiation of LBD from other neurodegenerative dementias can be difficult. Currently, there are few biomarkers which might assist early diagnosis, map onto LBD symptom severity, and provide metrics of treatment response. Traditionally, biomarkers in LBD have focussed on neuroimaging modalities; however, as biomarkers need to be simple, inexpensive and non-invasive, neurophysiological approaches might also be useful as LBD biomarkers. Methods In this review, we searched PubMED and PsycINFO databases in a semi-systematic manner in order to identify potential neurophysiological biomarkers in the LBDs. Results We identified 1491 studies; of these, 37 studies specifically examined neurophysiological biomarkers in LBD patients. We found that there was substantial heterogeneity with respect to methodologies and patient cohorts. Conclusion Generally, many of the findings have yet to be replicated, although preliminary findings reinforce the potential utility of approaches such as quantitative electroencephalography and motor cortical stimulation paradigms. Significance Various neurophysiological techniques have the potential to be useful biomarkers in the LBDs. We recommend that future studies focus on maximising the diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of the most promising neurophysiological biomarkers. PMID:26183755

  20. A neurophysiological study in children with Miller Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, V

    1997-04-01

    Serial neurophysiological studies were performed in four children with Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) (n = 2) and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) (n = 2) to delineate the extent of subclinical neurological involvement. Nerve conduction study showed radiculo-neuropathy in both MFS and GBS. Somatosensory evoked potential study showed evidence of peripheral and central involvement of the neural pathway in both. Brainstem auditory evoked potential study showed peripheral auditory and brainstem involvement in MFS but was normal in GBS. This study provides neurophysiological evidence that MFS and GBS might possibly belong to the clinical spectrum of encephalo-myclo-radiculo-neuropathy (EMRN) with different extent of central and peripheral involvement. PMID:9134191

  1. Cocaine Addiction: Psychology and Neurophysiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawin, Frank H.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of cocaine addiction, cocaine abstinence symptoms, and the short-term and long-term neurochemical actions of cocaine are discussed. The relative therapeutic value of various medications and treatment programs are discussed. (KR)

  2. Brain Oscillations Forever--Neurophysiology in Future Research of Child Psychiatric Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberger, Aribert

    2009-01-01

    For decades neurophysiology has successfully contributed to research and clinical care in child psychiatry. Recently, methodological progress has led to a revival of interest in brain oscillations (i.e., a band of periodic neuronal frequencies with a wave-duration from milliseconds to several seconds which may code and decode information). These…

  3. Computerization of the Student Neurophysiology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Beverly

    1985-01-01

    Describes how a traditional neurophysiology laboratory has been computerized and how students work with digitizing on-line data. Points out advantages of computerization, including the speed, accuracy, and reliability in the acquisition, reduction, and analysis of data. Also describes four generic computer programs tailored to the particular…

  4. Continuity and Change: Kyoto Chefs Engage with Science.

    PubMed

    de St Maurice, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Kyoto's chefs have reacted proactively to changes brought about by the most recent phase of globalization, hoping to ensure the continued existence and resonance of Kyoto cuisine by using science to adapt it to contemporary circumstances. These chefs are breaking new ground in their pursuit of a scientific understanding of how Kyoto cuisine works. They meet once a month in a kitchen laboratory at Kyoto University to present and analyze culinary experiments in keeping with a predetermined theme. They use their acquired knowledge to more precisely hone their culinary skills and to explain Kyoto cuisine to a global audience. Chefs visit local elementary schools, appear on national television, and welcome chefs from abroad into their kitchens so that people across the world will better understand what authentic Kyoto cuisine consists of. Although these chefs' efforts are groundbreaking, there is also remarkable continuity to their approach. Not only has Kyoto cuisine always been in a steady state of transformation, but the chefs in the Laboratory are engaging with science and a global audience specifically so that they can ascertain Kyoto cuisine's continued existence and importance. Though their means of understanding and articulating what Kyoto cuisine is differs from that of their predecessors, concepts like shun (seasonality) and hin (refinement) still guide chefs today. Ultimately, then, based on interviews and participant observation conducted in and outside of the Japanese Cuisine Laboratory in 2012 and 2013, I argue that by engaging with contemporary food science, Kyoto's chefs achieve a strategic balance of protecting their culinary heritage while adapting it to contemporary circumstances. PMID:26598840

  5. [Anaesthetic management of excision of a cervical intraspinal tumor with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in a pregnant woman at 29 weeks].

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Domínguez, R; González-González, G; Rubio-Romero, R; Federero-Martínez, F; Jiménez, I

    2016-05-01

    The intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a technique used to test and monitor nervous function. This technique has become essential in some neurosurgery interventions, since it avoids neurological injuries during surgery and reduces morbidity. The experience of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is limited in some clinical cases due to the low incidence of pregnant women undergoing a surgical procedure. A case is presented of a 29-weeks pregnant woman suffering from a cervical intraspinal tumour with intense pain, which required surgery. The collaboration of a multidisciplinary team composed of anaesthesiologists, neurosurgeons, neurophysiologists and obstetricians, the continuous monitoring of the foetus, the intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, and maintaining the neurophysiological and utero-placental variables were crucial for the proper development of the surgery. According to our experience and the limited publications in the literature, no damaging effects of this technique were detected at maternal-foetal level. On the contrary, it brings important benefits during the surgery and for the final result. PMID:26275733

  6. Anatomy and Neurophysiology of Cough

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J.; Chang, Anne B.; Bolser, Donald C.; Smith, Jaclyn A.; Mazzone, Stuart B.; Adams, Todd M.; Altman, Kenneth W.; Barker, Alan F.; Birring, Surinder S.; Blackhall, Fiona; Bolser, Donald, C.; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Braman, Sidney S.; Brightling, Christopher; Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla; Canning, Brendan; Chang, Anne Bernadette; Coeytaux, Remy; Cowley, Terrie; Davenport, Paul; Diekemper, Rebecca L.; Ebihara, Satoru; El Solh, Ali A.; Escalante, Patricio; Feinstein, Anthony; Field, Stephen K.; Fisher, Dina; French, Cynthia T.; Gibson, Peter; Gold, Philip; Grant, Cameron; Harding, Susan M.; Harnden, Anthony; Hill, Adam T.; Irwin, Richard S.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Keogh, Karina A.; Lane, Andrew P.; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Lim, Kaiser; Malesker, Mark A.; Mazzone, Peter; Mazzone, Stuart; Molasiotis, Alex; Murad, M. Hassan; Newcombe, Peter; Nguyen, Huong Q.; Oppenheimer, John; Prezant, David; Pringsheim, Tamara; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Rosen, Mark; Rubin, Bruce; Ryu, Jay H.; Smith, Jaclyn; Tarlo, Susan M.; Turner, Ronald B.; Vertigan, Anne; Wang, Gang; Weir, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary C-fibers and a subset of mechanically sensitive, acid-sensitive myelinated sensory nerves play essential roles in regulating cough. These vagal sensory nerves terminate primarily in the larynx, trachea, carina, and large intrapulmonary bronchi. Other bronchopulmonary sensory nerves, sensory nerves innervating other viscera, as well as somatosensory nerves innervating the chest wall, diaphragm, and abdominal musculature regulate cough patterning and cough sensitivity. The responsiveness and morphology of the airway vagal sensory nerve subtypes and the extrapulmonary sensory nerves that regulate coughing are described. The brainstem and higher brain control systems that process this sensory information are complex, but our current understanding of them is considerable and increasing. The relevance of these neural systems to clinical phenomena, such as urge to cough and psychologic methods for treatment of dystussia, is high, and modern imaging methods have revealed potential neural substrates for some features of cough in the human. PMID:25188530

  7. PREFACE: Beyond Kyoto - the necessary road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2009-03-01

    The Beyond Kyoto conference in Aarhus March 2009 was organised in collaboration with other knowledge institutions, businesses and authorities. It brought together leading scientists, policy-makers, authorities, intergovernmental organisations, NGO's, business stakeholders and business organisations. The conference was a joint interdisciplinary project involving many academic areas and disciplines. These conference proceedings are organised in central and recurring themes that cut across many debates on climate change, the climatic challenges as well as the solutions. In the front there is a short presentation of the conference concept. Part I of the proceedings focuses on issues related to the society - covering climate policy, law, market based instruments, financial structure, behaviour and consumption, public participation, media communication and response from indigenous peoples etc. Part II of the proceedings concerns the scientific knowledge base on climate related issues - covering climate change processes per se, the potential impacts of projected climate change on biodiversity and adaptation possibilities, the interplay between climate, agriculture and biodiversity, emissions, agricultural systems, increasing pressure on the functioning of agriculture and natural areas, vulnerability to extreme weather events and risks in respect to sea-level rise etc. The conference proceedings committee consists of four professors from Aarhus University: Jens-Christian Svenning, Jørgen E Olesen, Mads Forchhammer and Ellen Margrethe Basse. Aarhus University's Climate Secretariat has had the overall responsibility for coordinating the many presentations, as well as the practical side of arranging the conference and supporting the publication of papers. As Head of the Climate Secretariat and Chair of Aarhus University's Climate Panel, I would like to thank everyone for their contribution. This applies both to the scientific and the practical efforts. Special thanks to

  8. [A Matter of Nerves - Applied Neurophysiology of Female Sexuality].

    PubMed

    Bischof, Karoline

    2015-06-17

    Sexual problems are often attributed to psychological or physical deficits that are difficult to modify, or to a poor lover. In contrast, the neurophysiological interaction between body and brain can be understood as fundamental for the genital and emotional experience of sexuality. Neuropsychological discoveries and clinical observations show that elevated muscle tension, superficial breathing and reduced body movement, as employed by many individuals during sexual arousal, will limit the perception of arousal and the degree of sexual pleasure. In contrast, deep breathing and variations in movement and muscle tension support it. Through the use of self awareness exercises and physical learning steps, patients can integrate their sexuality and increases its resistance to psychological, medical and relational interferences. PMID:26081382

  9. [Present status and future development of neurophysiological examination in laboratory medicine].

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Shiro; Hirata, Masayuki; Goto, Tetsu; Okazaki, Asako; Takahashi, Ayumi; Sugata, Hisato; Onodera, Ayako; Hosokawa, Sachiyo

    2012-09-01

    In 2011, nine brain and six nerve and muscle physiological examinations were covered by the national health insurance in Japan. The greatest recent change was the digitalization of electroencephalography in the neurophysiological laboratory. This change is good for hospital affairs both economically and ecologically. Board certified doctors or technologists by the Academic Society in Neurophysiology are increasing each year and are improving the clinical level in daily laboratory work. One problem is that the level of neurophysiological laboratory examinations differs among hospitals in Japan, but they are showing a gradual improvement. Future development is promising in this field. Technological progress in neurophysiological functions is remarkable, including magnetic methods. Magnetoencephalography has powerful spatiotemporal resolution and can analyze higher brain function such as language, memory, calculation and so on. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is also available for laboratory examination of the nervous system, including motor and higher brain functions. In this symposium we showed cerebellar-related motor potentials in the soleus muscle by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the posterior fossa. This report summarizes the present status and future development of the neurological field in physiological laboratory examinations. PMID:23157121

  10. An Online Lab Manual for Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Olivo, Richard F.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of student interest, a grant for computers, and a suggestion from a colleague led me to convert the printed lab manual for my neurophysiology course into an online version. The web-based version incorporates videos of procedures, color photos, diagrams, links to articles, and other supplementary materials. This paper discusses designing for the web, retaining compatibility with print, layering information, making videos in digital format, and sharing self-published resources. The labs themselves (appendix) are traditional “wet” experiments with crayfish that have been used in many neurobiology courses. PMID:23494073

  11. Conceptual Coordination Bridges Information Processing and Neurophysiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Norrig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Information processing theories of memory and skills can be reformulated in terms of how categories are physically and temporally related, a process called conceptual coordination. Dreaming can then be understood as a story understanding process in which two mechanisms found in everyday comprehension are missing: conceiving sequences (chunking categories in time as a categorization) and coordinating across modalities (e.g., relating the sound of a word and the image of its meaning). On this basis, we can readily identify isomorphisms between dream phenomenology and neurophysiology, and explain the function of dreaming as facilitating future coordination of sequential, cross-modal categorization (i.e., REM sleep lowers activation thresholds, "unlearning").

  12. [AMYGDALA: NEUROANATOMY AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF FEAR].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, E A; Krasnoshchekova, E I; Vesselkin, N P; Kharazova, A D

    2015-01-01

    This work describes neuroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms of Pavlovian fear conditioning, focusing on contributions of the amygdala, a subcortical nuclear group, to control of conditioned fear responses. The mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at projections to the amygdala and within amygdala were shown to mediate the formation and retention of fear memory. This work reviews current data on anatomical organization of the amygdala, as well as its afferent and efferent projections, in respect to the role of the amygdala in auditory fear conditioning during which acoustic signals serve as the conditioned stimulus. PMID:26983275

  13. Carbon Sequestered, Carbon Displaced and the Kyoto Context

    SciTech Connect

    Marland, G.; Schlamadinger, B.

    1999-04-18

    The integrated system that embraces forest management, forest products, and land-use change impacts the global carbon cycle - and hence the net emission of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide - in four fundamental ways. Carbon is stored in living and dead biomass, carbon is stored in wood products and landfills, forest products substitute in the market place for products made from other materials, and forest harvests can be used wholly or partially to displace fossil fuels in the energy sector. Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change would result in the creation of international markets for carbon dioxide emissions credits, but the current Kyoto text does not treat all carbon identically. We have developed a carbon accounting model, GORCAM, to examine a variety of scenarios for land management and the production of forest products. In this paper we explore, for two simple scenarios of forest management, the carbon flows that occur and how these might be accounted for under the Kyoto text. The Kyoto protocol raises questions about what activities can result in emissions credits, which carbon reservoirs will be counted, who will receive the credits, and how much credit will be available? The Kyoto Protocol would sometimes give credits for carbon sequestered, but it would always give credits when fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are displaced.

  14. Handling Metadata in a Neurophysiology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Zehl, Lyuba; Jaillet, Florent; Stoewer, Adrian; Grewe, Jan; Sobolev, Andrey; Wachtler, Thomas; Brochier, Thomas G; Riehle, Alexa; Denker, Michael; Grün, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    To date, non-reproducibility of neurophysiological research is a matter of intense discussion in the scientific community. A crucial component to enhance reproducibility is to comprehensively collect and store metadata, that is, all information about the experiment, the data, and the applied preprocessing steps on the data, such that they can be accessed and shared in a consistent and simple manner. However, the complexity of experiments, the highly specialized analysis workflows and a lack of knowledge on how to make use of supporting software tools often overburden researchers to perform such a detailed documentation. For this reason, the collected metadata are often incomplete, incomprehensible for outsiders or ambiguous. Based on our research experience in dealing with diverse datasets, we here provide conceptual and technical guidance to overcome the challenges associated with the collection, organization, and storage of metadata in a neurophysiology laboratory. Through the concrete example of managing the metadata of a complex experiment that yields multi-channel recordings from monkeys performing a behavioral motor task, we practically demonstrate the implementation of these approaches and solutions with the intention that they may be generalized to other projects. Moreover, we detail five use cases that demonstrate the resulting benefits of constructing a well-organized metadata collection when processing or analyzing the recorded data, in particular when these are shared between laboratories in a modern scientific collaboration. Finally, we suggest an adaptable workflow to accumulate, structure and store metadata from different sources using, by way of example, the odML metadata framework. PMID:27486397

  15. Handling Metadata in a Neurophysiology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Zehl, Lyuba; Jaillet, Florent; Stoewer, Adrian; Grewe, Jan; Sobolev, Andrey; Wachtler, Thomas; Brochier, Thomas G.; Riehle, Alexa; Denker, Michael; Grün, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    To date, non-reproducibility of neurophysiological research is a matter of intense discussion in the scientific community. A crucial component to enhance reproducibility is to comprehensively collect and store metadata, that is, all information about the experiment, the data, and the applied preprocessing steps on the data, such that they can be accessed and shared in a consistent and simple manner. However, the complexity of experiments, the highly specialized analysis workflows and a lack of knowledge on how to make use of supporting software tools often overburden researchers to perform such a detailed documentation. For this reason, the collected metadata are often incomplete, incomprehensible for outsiders or ambiguous. Based on our research experience in dealing with diverse datasets, we here provide conceptual and technical guidance to overcome the challenges associated with the collection, organization, and storage of metadata in a neurophysiology laboratory. Through the concrete example of managing the metadata of a complex experiment that yields multi-channel recordings from monkeys performing a behavioral motor task, we practically demonstrate the implementation of these approaches and solutions with the intention that they may be generalized to other projects. Moreover, we detail five use cases that demonstrate the resulting benefits of constructing a well-organized metadata collection when processing or analyzing the recorded data, in particular when these are shared between laboratories in a modern scientific collaboration. Finally, we suggest an adaptable workflow to accumulate, structure and store metadata from different sources using, by way of example, the odML metadata framework. PMID:27486397

  16. Operational neuroscience: neurophysiological measures in applied environments.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Amy A

    2007-05-01

    There is, without question, an interest within the military services to understand, account for, and adapt to the cognitive state of the individual warfighter. As the field of neuroscience has matured through investments from numerous government agencies, we are on the cusp of being able to move confidently from the lab into the field--and deepen our understanding of the cognitive issues embedded in the warfighting environment. However, as we edge closer to this integration--it is critical for researchers in this arena to understand the landscape they are entering-reflected not only in the challenges of each task or operational environment but also in the individual differences intrinsic to each warfighter. The research papers in this section cover this spectrum, including individual differences and their prediction of adaptability to high-stress environments, the influence of sleep-deprivation on neurophysiological measures of stimulus categorization, neurophysiological measures of stress in the training environment and, finally, real-time neural measures of task engagement, mental workload and vigilance. It is clear from this research, and other work detailed in this supplement, that the judicious use of neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and physiology in the applied environment is desirable for both researchers and operators. In fact, we suggest that these investigations merit a field designation unto their own: Operational Neuroscience. It is our hope that the discussion of this new field of study will galvanize others to increase the confidence and utility of this research through their own investigations. PMID:17547320

  17. [Neurophysiologic bases and neuropsychological approach to the study of infantile hyperactivity].

    PubMed

    Polaino-Lorente, A; Cabanyes, J

    1989-01-01

    Hyperactivity is a common important group of childhood behaviour problems with great influence on the personal, familiar and social sphere, a better knowledge of which is important. Up to now several explanatory hypotheses have been pointed out. From some time ago, the physiopathological roots of this clinical description has been studied in depth. The authors make a review of the neurophysiological and neuropsychological bases of hyperactivity in children. PMID:2701763

  18. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological insights into hoarding disorder

    PubMed Central

    Grisham, Jessica R; Baldwin, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Hoarding disorder (HD) is associated with significant personal impairment in function and constitutes a severe public health burden. Individuals who hoard experience intense distress in discarding a large number of objects, which results in extreme clutter. Research and theory suggest that hoarding may be associated with specific deficits in information processing, particularly in the areas of attention, memory, and executive functioning. There is also growing interest in the neural underpinnings of hoarding behavior. Thus, the primary aim of this review is to summarize the current state of evidence regarding neuropsychological deficits associated with hoarding and review research on its neurophysiological underpinnings. We also outline the prominent theoretical model of hoarding and provide an up-to-date description of empirically based psychological and medical treatment approaches for HD. Finally, we discuss important future avenues for elaborating our model of HD and improving treatment access and outcomes for this disabling disorder. PMID:25897231

  19. [Neurophysiological methods in evaliuation of neurorehabiltation in children].

    PubMed

    Świerczyńska, Anna; Kłusek, Renata; Kaciński, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The authors reviewed neurophysiological methods, which are used in the evaluation of children referred for neurorehabilitation. Rehabilitation techniques which may stimulate or provoke pathological changes in EEG must be ruled out. Electrophysiological and clinical improvement allow for the extension and intensification of rehabilitation. Normal EEG pattern ensures the safe use of techniques consisting of neuromuscular re-education or passive verticalisation, electrotherapy and thermotherapy. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of cognitive impairment is based on neuropsychological tests and endogenous evoked potentials (most often P300). Presence of cognitive dysfunction needs the use of neuropsychological and neurologopedic therapy. Based on results of exogenous evoked potentials appropriate neurorehabilitation program (physiotherapy, kinezytherapy) can be determined and clinical outcome predicted. EMG allows appropriate usage of applications, patterns and principles in the PNF method (such as compression, stretching, resistance), adapting them optimally to the possibility of a child. ENG estimates conduction in motor and sensory nerves. Based on the results nerve impairment can be localized, severity and character of damage estimated (demyelinating, axonal or complex) and course of the disease and treatment monitored. Short characteristics of 37 children with Guillain-Barre syndrome referred for rehabilitation was presented. Special attention was drawn to floppy infants. Results of neuroelectrophysiological examinations determine suitable rehabilitation program adjusted to the course of central nervous system impairment. PMID:27349051

  20. Ocean fertilization, carbon credits and the Kyoto Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westley, M. B.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial interest in ocean fertilization as a carbon sequestration tool was excited by the December 1997 agreement of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change. The Protocol commits industrialized countries to caps on net greenhouse gas emissions and allows for various flexible mechanisms to achieve these caps in the most economically efficient manner possible, including trade in carbon credits from projects that reduce emissions or enhance sinks. The carbon market was valued at 64 billion in 2007, with the bulk of the trading (50 billion) taking place in the highly regulated European Union Emission Trading Scheme, which deals primarily in emission allowances in the energy sector. A much smaller amount, worth $265 million, was traded in the largely unregulated "voluntary" market (Capoor and Ambrosi 2008). As the voluntary market grows, so do calls for its regulation, with several efforts underway to set rules and standards for the sale of voluntary carbon credits using the Kyoto Protocol as a starting point. Four US-based companies and an Australian company currently seek to develop ocean fertilization technologies for the generation of carbon credits. We review these plans through the lens of the Kyoto Protocol and its flexible mechanisms, and examine whether and how ocean fertilization could generate tradable carbon credits. We note that at present, ocean sinks are not included in the Kyoto Protocol, and that furthermore, the Kyoto Protocol only addresses sources and sinks of greenhouse gases within national boundaries, making open-ocean fertilization projects a jurisdictional challenge. We discuss the negotiating history behind the limited inclusion of land use, land use change and forestry in the Kyoto Protocol and the controversy and eventual compromise concerning methodologies for terrestrial carbon accounting. We conclude that current technologies for measuring and monitoring carbon sequestration following ocean fertilization

  1. Long-term effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on the peripheral nervous system. Clinical and neurophysiological controlled study on subjects with chloracne from the Seveso area.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, S; Pirovano, C; Scarlato, G; Tarchini, P; Zappa, A; Maranzana, M

    1988-01-01

    This work was set up to investigate the possible presence of peripheral nervous system involvement as a long-term effect of the exposure to dioxin in 152 subjects with chloracne from the Seveso area; 123 age- and sex-matched subjects living in nearby towns with similar environmental pollution formed the control group. The accident in Seveso took place in July, 1976, and this study was carried out from October, 1982, to May, 1983. Although a peripheral neuropathy was not found in any of the subjects, a significant increase of the number of individuals presenting at least two bilateral clinical signs (p less than 0.05) or one abnormal electrophysiological parameter (p less than 0.02) was found in the Seveso group. Principal component analysis did not show any subdivision between these two groups. The Fisher approach to discriminant analysis reveals a clear subdivision between the group of the most exposed subjects and randomly selected subgroups of control subjects. In conclusion, clinical and electrophysiological signs of peripheral nervous system involvement occur with a statistically increased frequency in the Seveso population 6 years after the accident, although a peripheral neuropathy was not evident in any of the chloracne patients using the World Health Organization diagnostic criteria. PMID:2829044

  2. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes. PMID:26900733

  3. Neurophysiological models for new treatment development in schizophrenia: early sensory approaches

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a major mental disorder associated with core neurocognitive impairments. The ability to recreate these deficits in animal models is limited, hampering ongoing translational drug development efforts. This paper reviews the use of electroencephalography (EEG)-based neurophysiological measures, such as event-related potentials (ERP) or event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP), as novel translational biomarkers for both etiological and treatment development research in neuropsychiatry. In schizophrenia, cognitive impairments manifest as deficits not only in high-level processes, such as working memory or executive processing, but also as deficits in neurophysiological responses to simple auditory and visual stimuli. Moreover, neurophysiological responses can be assessed even in untrained animals and are therefore particularly amenable to translational, cross-species investigation. To date, several sensory-level ERP measures, including auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) and N1, and visual P1 and steady-state responses, have been validated in both human clinical investigations and animal models. Deficits have been tied to impaired neurotransmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate–type glutamate receptors (NMDARs). Time-frequency analysis of ERSP permits further extension of these findings from physiological to circuit/cellular levels of analysis. PMID:25721890

  4. Psychological pain interventions and neurophysiology: implications for a mechanism-based approach.

    PubMed

    Flor, Herta

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an illustrative overview of neurophysiological changes related to acute and chronic pain involving structural and functional brain changes, which might be the targets of psychological interventions. A number of psychological pain treatments have been examined with respect to their effects on brain activity, ranging from cognitive- and operant behavioral interventions, meditation and hypnosis, to neuro- and biofeedback, discrimination training, imagery and mirror treatment, as well as virtual reality and placebo applications. These treatments affect both ascending and descending aspects of pain processing and act through brain mechanisms that involve sensorimotor areas as well as those involved in affective-motivational and cognitive-evaluative aspects. The analysis of neurophysiological changes related to effective psychological pain treatment can help to identify subgroups of patients with chronic pain who might profit from different interventions, can aid in predicting treatment outcome, and can assist in identifying responders and nonresponders, thus enhancing the efficacy and efficiency of psychological interventions. Moreover, new treatment targets can be developed and tested. Finally, the use of neurophysiological measures can also aid in motivating patients to participate in psychological interventions and can increase their acceptance in clinical practice. PMID:24547804

  5. Neurophysiological changes following traumatic spinal lesions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S; Ashby, P; Verrier, M

    1984-01-01

    Neurophysiological observations were made on normal subjects and on 57 patients who had had injuries to the spinal cord. The amplitude of the muscle compound action potential (M response) recorded from triceps surae in response to supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve was reduced in the patients indicating that there are changes in motor units below the level of a spinal lesion in man. In the patients who were clinically spastic it was found that: (1) The proportion of the triceps surae motoneuron pool reflexly activated either by tapping the Achilles tendon or by stimulating the tibial nerve just below the threshold of the alpha motoneuron axons (H reflex) was greater than in normal subjects. This can be explained by an increase in the excitability of central reflex pathways. (2) Vibration of the tendo Achilles depressed the H reflex less effectively than in normal subjects. This may indicate altered transmission in the premotoneuronal portion of the H reflex pathway. (3) The H reflex elicited 50 and 100 ms after a standardised conditioning stimulus to the tibial nerve and expressed as percentage of the unconditioned reflex was greater than in normal subjects. This could reflect a change in the excitability of motoneurons or of interneurons. PMID:6502167

  6. Neurophysiological effects of exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Roelands, B; De Pauw, K; Meeusen, R

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue during prolonged exercise is a multifactorial phenomenon. The complex interplay between factors originating from both the periphery and the brain will determine the onset of fatigue. In recent years, electrophysiological and imaging tools have been fine-tuned, allowing for an improved understanding of what happens in the brain. In the first part of the review, we present literature that studied the changes in electrocortical activity during and after exercise in normal and high ambient temperature. In general, exercise in a thermo-neutral environment or at light to moderate intensity increases the activity in the β frequency range, while exercising at high intensity or in the heat reduces β activity. In the second part, we review literature that manipulated brain neurotransmission, through either pharmacological or nutritional means, during exercise in the heat. The dominant outcomes were that manipulations changing brain dopamine concentration have the potential to delay fatigue, while the manipulation of serotonin had no effect and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition was detrimental for performance in the heat. Research on the effects of neurotransmitter manipulations on brain activity during or after exercise is scarce. The combination of brain imaging techniques with electrophysiological measures presents one of the major future challenges in exercise physiology/neurophysiology. PMID:25943657

  7. Individual neurophysiological profile in external effects investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtseva, Daria; Tatiana Kotrovskaya, D..

    Cortex biopotentials are the significant elements in human psychophysiological individuality. Considered that cortical biopotentials are diverse and individually stable, therefore there is the existence of certain dependence between the basic properties of higher nervous activity and cerebral bioelectric activity. The main purpose of the study was to reveal the individual neurophysiological profile and CNS initial functional state manifestation in human electroencephalogram (EEG) under effect of inert gases (argon, xenon, helium), hypoxia, pressure changes (0.02 and 0.2 MPa). We obtained 5-minute eyes closed background EEG on 19 scalp positions using Ag/AgCl electrodes mounted in an electrode cap. All EEG signals were re-referenced to average earlobes; Fast Furies Transformation analysis was used to calculate the relative power spectrum of delta-, theta-, alpha- and beta frequency band in artifact-free EEG. The study involved 26 healthy men who provided written informed consent, aged 20 to 35 years. Data obtained depend as individual EEG type and initial central nervous functional state as intensity, duration and mix of factors. Pronounced alpha rhythm in the raw EEG correlated with their adaptive capacity under studied factor exposure. Representation change and zonal distribution perversion of EEG alpha rhythm were accompanied by emotional instability, increased anxiety and difficulty adapting subjects. High power factor or combination factor with psychological and emotional or physical exertion minimizes individual EEG pattern.

  8. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-16

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  9. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  10. Neurophysiology of performance monitoring and adaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Ullsperger, Markus; Danielmeier, Claudia; Jocham, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Successful goal-directed behavior requires not only correct action selection, planning, and execution but also the ability to flexibly adapt behavior when performance problems occur or the environment changes. A prerequisite for determining the necessity, type, and magnitude of adjustments is to continuously monitor the course and outcome of one's actions. Feedback-control loops correcting deviations from intended states constitute a basic functional principle of adaptation at all levels of the nervous system. Here, we review the neurophysiology of evaluating action course and outcome with respect to their valence, i.e., reward and punishment, and initiating short- and long-term adaptations, learning, and decisions. Based on studies in humans and other mammals, we outline the physiological principles of performance monitoring and subsequent cognitive, motivational, autonomic, and behavioral adaptation and link them to the underlying neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, psychological theories, and computational models. We provide an overview of invasive and noninvasive systemic measures, such as electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and lesion data. We describe how a wide network of brain areas encompassing frontal cortices, basal ganglia, thalamus, and monoaminergic brain stem nuclei detects and evaluates deviations of actual from predicted states indicating changed action costs or outcomes. This information is used to learn and update stimulus and action values, guide action selection, and recruit adaptive mechanisms that compensate errors and optimize goal achievement. PMID:24382883

  11. Non-Kyoto Radiative Forcing in Long-Run Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Steven K.; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Riahi, Keywan; Stefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-27

    Climate policies designed to achieve climate change objectives must consider radiative forcing from the Kyoto greenhouse gas, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone. Net positive forcing leads to global average temperature increases. Modeling of non-Kyoto forcing is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. Five of the nineteen models in the EMF-27 Study model both Kyoto and non-Kyoto forcing. This paper describes and assesses current non-Kyoto radiative forcing modeling within these integrated assessment models. The study finds negative forcing from aerosols masking significant positive forcing in reference non-climate policy projections. There are however large differences across models in projected non-Kyoto emissions and forcing, with differences stemming from differences in relationships between Kyoto and non-Kyoto emissions and fundamental differences in modeling structure and assumptions. Air pollution and non-Kyoto forcing decline in the climate policy scenarios. However, non-Kyoto forcing appears to be influencing mitigation results, including allowable carbon dioxide emissions, and further evaluation is merited. Overall, there is substantial uncertainty related to non-Kyoto forcing that must be considered.

  12. Remote Sensing and the Kyoto Protocol: A Workshop Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenqvist, Ake; Imhoff, Marc; Milne, Anthony; Dobson, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change contains quantified, legally binding commitments to limit or reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels and allows carbon emissions to be balanced by carbon sinks represented by vegetation. The issue of using vegetation cover as an emission offset raises a debate about the adequacy of current remote sensing systems and data archives to both assess carbon stocks/sinks at 1990 levels, and monitor the current and future global status of those stocks. These concerns and the potential ratification of the Protocol among participating countries is stimulating policy debates and underscoring a need for the exchange of information between the international legal community and the remote sensing community. On October 20-22 1999, two working groups of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) joined with the University of Michigan (Michigan, USA) to convene discussions on how remote sensing technology could contribute to the information requirements raised by implementation of, and compliance with, the Kyoto Protocol. The meeting originated as a joint effort between the Global Monitoring Working Group and the Radar Applications Working Group in Commission VII of the ISPRS, co-sponsored by the University of Michigan. Tile meeting was attended by representatives from national government agencies and international organizations and academic institutions. Some of the key themes addressed were: (1) legal aspects of transnational remote sensing in the context of the Kyoto Protocol; (2) a review of the current and future and remote sensing technologies that could be applied to the Kyoto Protocol; (3) identification of areas where additional research is needed in order to advance and align remote sensing technology with the requirements and expectations of the Protocol; and 94) the bureaucratic and research management approaches needed to align the remote sensing

  13. Neurophysiology of Sleep and Wakefulness: Basic Science and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jonathan R.L; Roth, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Increased attention to the prevalence of excessive sleepiness has led to a clear need to treat this symptom, thus reinforcing the need for a greater understanding of the neurobiology of sleep and wakefulness. Although the physiological mechanisms of sleep and wakefulness are highly interrelated, recent research reveals that there are distinct differences in the active brain processing and the specific neurochemical systems involved in the two states. In this review, we will examine the specific neuronal pathways, transmitters, and receptors composing the ascending arousal system that flow from the brainstem through the thalamus, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex. We will also discuss the mutually inhibitory interaction between the core neuronal components of this arousal system and the sleep-active neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, which serves as a brainstem-switch, regulating the stability of the sleep-wake states. In addition, we will review the role of homeostatic and circadian processes in the sleep-wake cycle, including the influence of the suprachiasmatic nucleus on coordination of sleep-wake systems. Finally, we will summarize how the above processes are reflected in disorders of sleep and wakefulness, including insomnia, narcolepsy, disorders associated with fragmented sleep, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, and primary neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. PMID:19587857

  14. Tilt table testing in neurology and clinical neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Saal, D P; Thijs, R D; van Dijk, J G

    2016-02-01

    Reflex syncope is responsible for 1-6% of hospital admissions and the economic burden of syncope is huge. A considerable part of these high costs is still spent on tests that are not indicated. Till now few neurologists have taken an interest in syncope and tilt table testing (TTT). However, reflex syncope and epilepsy are often in each other's differential diagnosis and require a similar emphasis on history taking and deductive reasoning. A TTT can be helpful for diagnosis and treatment. The pathophysiological rationale behind the TTT is the fact that it uses gravity to provoke a downwards shift of blood that in turn triggers syncope. Various indications and methods of the TTT are discussed in this paper. PMID:26404035

  15. Using Crickets to Introduce Neurophysiology to Early Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Dagda, Ruben K.; Thalhauser, Rachael M.; Dagda, Raul; Marzullo, Timothy C.; Gage, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy and physiology instructors often face the daunting task of teaching the principles of neurophysiology as part of a laboratory course with very limited resources. Teaching neurophysiology can be a difficult undertaking as sophisticated electrophysiology and data acquisition equipment is often financially out-of-reach for two-year institutions, and for many preparations, instructors need to be highly skilled in electrophysiology techniques when teaching hands-on laboratories. In the absence of appropriate laboratory tools, many undergraduate students have difficulty understanding concepts related to neurophysiology. The cricket can serve as a reliable invertebrate model to teach the basic concepts of neurophysiology in the educational laboratory. In this manuscript, we describe a series of hands-on, demonstrative, technologically simple, and affordable laboratory activities that will help undergraduate students gain an understanding of the principles of neurophysiology. By using the cerci ganglion and leg preparation, students can quantify extracellular neural activity in response to sensory stimulation, understand the principles of rate coding and somatotopy, perform electrical microstimulation to understand the threshold of sensory stimulation, and do pharmacological manipulation of neuronal activity. We describe the utility of these laboratory activities, provide a convenient protocol for quantifying extracellular recordings, and discuss feedback provided by undergraduate students with regards to the quality of the educational experience after performing the lab activities. PMID:24319394

  16. Intradural Intramedullary Mixed Type Hemangioma: Optimizing the Surgical Management through Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Situmeang, Adrian; Safri, Ahmad Yanuar; Fadhly, Zulfa Indah K.

    2015-01-01

    Intradural intramedullary mixed type hemangioma is a rare histotype of primary spinal cord tumors, though it can carry a severe clinical burden leading to limb dysfunction or motor and sensory disturbances. Timely intervention with radical resection is the hallmark of treatment but achieving it is not an easy task even for experienced neurosurgeons. We herein present an exemplificative case presenting with sudden paraplegia in which total resection was achieved under intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring. A thorough discussion on the operative technique and the role of neuromonitoring in allowing a safe surgical management of primary spinal cord tumors is presented. PMID:26839729

  17. [The endophenotype concept in the neurophysiological studies of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Kirenskaia, A V; Storozheva, Z I; Miamlin, V V; Tkachenko, A A

    2013-01-01

    The endophenotype concept is considered as theoretical basis for the study of pathobiological mechanisms of schizophrenia and for the development of the complex of instrumental diagnostic methods. The contemporary state of the problem and the most significant results of the study of three neurophysiological schizophrenia endophenotypes are presented in the review: P50 auditory evoked potential suppression, prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and antisaccade task. The current understanding of the underlying neurophysiological and neurochemical mechanisms is described for each measure. The results of the association studies of neurophysiological endophenotypes with the relevant to schizophrenia genes' polymorphisms are laid down. High degree of independence of the considered endophenotypes is demonstrated. Taking into account the data on relatively low specificity of each endophenotype to schizophrenia compared to other mental disturbances the authors pay special attention to the model of multivariate endophenotype as a scientific and diagnostic tool. PMID:25464754

  18. [The endophenotype concept in the neurophysiological studies of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The endophenotype concept is considered as theoretical basis for the study of pathobiological mechanisms of schizophrenia and for the development of the complex of instrumental diagnostic methods. The contemporary state of the problem and the most significant results of the study of three neurophysiological schizophrenia endophenotypes are presented in the review: P50 auditory evoked potential suppression, prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and antisaccade task. The current understanding of the underlying neurophysiological and neurochemical mechanisms is described for each measure. The results of the association studies of neurophysiological endophenotypes with the relevant to schizophrenia genes' polymorphisms are laid down. High degree of independence of the considered endophenotypes is demonstrated. Taking into account the data on relatively low specificity of each endophenotype to schizophrenia compared to other mental disturbances the authors pay special attention to the model of multivariate endophenotype as a scientific and diagnostic tool. PMID:25508385

  19. S-LSR, Cooler Ring Development at Kyoto University

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Shinji; Ikegami, Masahiro; Noda, Akira; Souda, Hikaru; Tanabe, Mikio; Tongu, Hiromu; Noda, Koji; Shibuya, Shinji; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Takeshi; Iwata, Soma; Takubo, Atsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi; Yuri, Yosuke; Grieser, Manfred; Syresin, Evgeny M.

    2006-03-20

    A compact ion cooler ring, S-LSR is under construction in Kyoto University. One of the subjects of S-LSR is a realization of the crystalline beams using the electron beam and the laser cooling. The ring is designed to be satisfied several required conditions for the beam ordering, such as a small betatron phase advance, a small magnetic error and a precise magnet alignment. The design phase advance per a period is less than 127 degree. The calculated closed orbit distortion and the stopband is less than 1 mm and 0.001 without correction, respectively.

  20. Let`s focus on sustainability, not Kyoto

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, H.R.

    1999-03-01

    This article addresses how to reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide produced in the combustion of fossil fuels -- oil, natural gas, and coal -- in a less painful way than that called for in the Kyoto Protocol. Adopting a 1,000-gigatonne global carbon budget for years 1991 to 2100 and a peak annual carbon emission level of 11 gigatonnes between years 2030 and 2040 will buy the time to develop and deploy low- and zero-carbon emission technologies while deferring the controversial issue of the compliance of developing countries.

  1. After Kyoto, science still probes global warming causes

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, G.

    1998-01-19

    The Kyoto meeting has come and gone. In the US, the treaty still has to be signed by President Bill Clinton and ratified by the Senate, an action that is most unlikely in view of last year`s 95-0 vote on the issue. In the short term 36 senators are up for reelection in November and therefore likely to come under intense pressure to change their positions, to support the Kyoto treaty, and to push for Senate action. Senators will need support, additional inputs, and overall reinforcement of their positions. One area that this writer believes still has much to offer in this context is the quality--more specifically, the lack of quality--of much of the scientific evidence behind this treaty. Part of that subject is the natural variability in the climate. Natural climate variability is based on cyclical forces, random events, and the Earth`s response to these two factors. These forces create the variability in the climate, the background noise above which any signal of anthropogenic warming must rise in order to be detected. A review of key climatic cycles is the subject of this article.

  2. The relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and fear avoidance in people with chronic pain: A point in time, observational study.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Claire; Bradnam, Lynley; Barr, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent in the western world; however fear of pain often has a greater impact than the degree of initial injury. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between knowledge of the neurophysiology of pain and fear avoidance in individuals diagnosed with chronic pain. Twenty-nine people with chronic musculoskeletal pain were recruited and completed questionnaires to determine their understanding of pain neurophysiology and the degree of their fear avoidance beliefs. There was an inverse relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and the level of fear avoidance. Patients with higher pain knowledge reported less fear avoidance and lower perceived disability due to pain. There was no relationship with the educational level or compensable status for either variable. The findings suggest that fear avoidance is positively influenced by neurophysiology of pain education, so that a higher level of pain knowledge is associated with less activity-related fear. The clinical implication is that reducing fear avoidance/kinesiophobia using neurophysiology of pain education in people with chronic pain may provide an effective strategy to help manage fear avoidance and related disability in the chronic pain population in order to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27049810

  3. A systems neurophysiology approach to voluntary event coding.

    PubMed

    Petruo, Vanessa A; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Münchau, Alexander; Beste, Christian

    2016-07-15

    Mechanisms responsible for the integration of perceptual events and appropriate actions (sensorimotor processes) have been subject to intense research. Different theoretical frameworks have been put forward with the "Theory of Event Coding (TEC)" being one of the most influential. In the current study, we focus on the concept of 'event files' within TEC and examine what sub-processes being dissociable by means of cognitive-neurophysiological methods are involved in voluntary event coding. This was combined with EEG source localization. We also introduce reward manipulations to delineate the neurophysiological sub-processes most relevant for performance variations during event coding. The results show that processes involved in voluntary event coding included predominantly stimulus categorization, feature unbinding and response selection, which were reflected by distinct neurophysiological processes (the P1, N2 and P3 ERPs). On a system's neurophysiological level, voluntary event-file coding is thus related to widely distributed parietal-medial frontal networks. Attentional selection processes (N1 ERP) turned out to be less important. Reward modulated stimulus categorization in parietal regions likely reflecting aspects of perceptual decision making but not in other processes. The perceptual categorization stage appears central for voluntary event-file coding. PMID:27153981

  4. Science Education: An Experiment in Facilitating the Learning of Neurophysiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Herbert

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the experiences of a zoology professor attempting to construct a student-centered course in neurophysiology. Various aspects of the organization and conduct of the course are described, including the beginning experience, topics of interest, lecture, laboratory, computer simulation, examinations, student lectures. Evaluation of the…

  5. At the Root of Embodied Cognition: Cognitive Science Meets Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbarini, Francesca; Adenzato, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental research in the field of neurophysiology has led to the discovery of two classes of visuomotor neurons: canonical neurons and mirror neurons. In light of these studies, we propose here an overview of two classical themes in the cognitive science panorama: James Gibson's theory of affordances and Eleanor Rosch's principles of…

  6. Is There a Link between Learning Style and Neurophysiology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garger, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    To succeed in traditional classrooms, students must first learn not to talk, fidget, or move around. The neurophysiology field suggests that some students who do not succeed in school fail initially because their physiological needs are being controverted. This article explores the relationship between learning style and the field of…

  7. Neurophysiological influence of musical training on speech perception.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Antoine J

    2011-01-01

    Does musical training affect our perception of speech? For example, does learning to play a musical instrument modify the neural circuitry for auditory processing in a way that improves one's ability to perceive speech more clearly in noisy environments? If so, can speech perception in individuals with hearing loss (HL), who struggle in noisy situations, benefit from musical training? While music and speech exhibit some specialization in neural processing, there is evidence suggesting that skills acquired through musical training for specific acoustical processes may transfer to, and thereby improve, speech perception. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the influence of musical training on speech processing and the extent of this influence remains a rich area to be explored. A prerequisite for such transfer is the facilitation of greater neurophysiological overlap between speech and music processing following musical training. This review first establishes a neurophysiological link between musical training and speech perception, and subsequently provides further hypotheses on the neurophysiological implications of musical training on speech perception in adverse acoustical environments and in individuals with HL. PMID:21716639

  8. Backwards and Forwards: Behavioral and Neurophysiological Investigations into Dependency Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witzel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the processing of sentences involving long-distance linguistic dependencies, or sentences containing elements that must be linked across intervening words and phrases. Specifically, both behavioral (self-paced reading and eye tracking) and neurophysiological (electroencephalography) methods were used (a) to evaluate the…

  9. Robot cognitive control with a neurophysiologically inspired reinforcement learning model.

    PubMed

    Khamassi, Mehdi; Lallée, Stéphane; Enel, Pierre; Procyk, Emmanuel; Dominey, Peter F

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in modern robotics is to liberate robots from controlled industrial settings, and allow them to interact with humans and changing environments in the real-world. The current research attempts to determine if a neurophysiologically motivated model of cortical function in the primate can help to address this challenge. Primates are endowed with cognitive systems that allow them to maximize the feedback from their environment by learning the values of actions in diverse situations and by adjusting their behavioral parameters (i.e., cognitive control) to accommodate unexpected events. In such contexts uncertainty can arise from at least two distinct sources - expected uncertainty resulting from noise during sensory-motor interaction in a known context, and unexpected uncertainty resulting from the changing probabilistic structure of the environment. However, it is not clear how neurophysiological mechanisms of reinforcement learning and cognitive control integrate in the brain to produce efficient behavior. Based on primate neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, we propose a novel computational model for the interaction between lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex reconciling previous models dedicated to these two functions. We deployed the model in two robots and demonstrate that, based on adaptive regulation of a meta-parameter β that controls the exploration rate, the model can robustly deal with the two kinds of uncertainties in the real-world. In addition the model could reproduce monkey behavioral performance and neurophysiological data in two problem-solving tasks. A last experiment extends this to human-robot interaction with the iCub humanoid, and novel sources of uncertainty corresponding to "cheating" by the human. The combined results provide concrete evidence for the ability of neurophysiologically inspired cognitive systems to control advanced robots in the real-world. PMID:21808619

  10. Robot Cognitive Control with a Neurophysiologically Inspired Reinforcement Learning Model

    PubMed Central

    Khamassi, Mehdi; Lallée, Stéphane; Enel, Pierre; Procyk, Emmanuel; Dominey, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in modern robotics is to liberate robots from controlled industrial settings, and allow them to interact with humans and changing environments in the real-world. The current research attempts to determine if a neurophysiologically motivated model of cortical function in the primate can help to address this challenge. Primates are endowed with cognitive systems that allow them to maximize the feedback from their environment by learning the values of actions in diverse situations and by adjusting their behavioral parameters (i.e., cognitive control) to accommodate unexpected events. In such contexts uncertainty can arise from at least two distinct sources – expected uncertainty resulting from noise during sensory-motor interaction in a known context, and unexpected uncertainty resulting from the changing probabilistic structure of the environment. However, it is not clear how neurophysiological mechanisms of reinforcement learning and cognitive control integrate in the brain to produce efficient behavior. Based on primate neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, we propose a novel computational model for the interaction between lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex reconciling previous models dedicated to these two functions. We deployed the model in two robots and demonstrate that, based on adaptive regulation of a meta-parameter β that controls the exploration rate, the model can robustly deal with the two kinds of uncertainties in the real-world. In addition the model could reproduce monkey behavioral performance and neurophysiological data in two problem-solving tasks. A last experiment extends this to human–robot interaction with the iCub humanoid, and novel sources of uncertainty corresponding to “cheating” by the human. The combined results provide concrete evidence for the ability of neurophysiologically inspired cognitive systems to control advanced robots in the real-world. PMID:21808619

  11. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: The Economics of The Kyoto Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    JA Edmonds; CN MacCracken; RD Sands; SH Kim

    2000-07-06

    The Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) was completed on the morning of December 11, 1997, following over two years of negotiations. The product of these deliberations is a complex and incomplete document knitting together the diversity of interests and perspectives represented by the more than 150 delegations. Because the document is complex, its implications are not immediately obvious. If it enters into force, the Kyoto Protocol will have far-reaching implications for all nations--both nations with obligations under the Protocol and those without obligations. National energy systems, and the world's energy system, could be forever changed. In this paper the authors develop an assessment of the energy and economic implications of achieving the goals of the Kyoto Protocol. They find that many of the details of the Protocol that remain to be worked out introduce critical uncertainties affecting the cost of compliance. There are also a variety of uncertainties that further complicate the analysis. These include future non-CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas emissions and the cost of their mitigation. Other uncertainties include the resolution of negotiations to establish rules for determining and allocating land-use emissions rights, mechanisms for Annex 1 trading, and participation by non-Annex 1 members in the Clean Development Mechanism. In addition, there are economic uncertainties, such as the behavior of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union in supplying emissions credits under Annex 1 trading. These uncertainties in turn could affect private sector investments in anticipation of the Protocol's entrance into force. The longer the nature of future obligations remains unclear, the less able decision makers will be to incorporate these rules into their investment decisions. They find that the cost of implementing the Protocol in the US can vary by more than an order of magnitude. The marginal cost could be as low as $26 per tonne of

  12. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  13. Neurophysiological indices of atypical auditory processing and multisensory integration are associated with symptom severity in autism

    PubMed Central

    Brandwein, A.B.; Foxe, J.J.; Butler, J.S.; Frey, H.P.; Bates, J.C.; Shulman, L.; Molholm, S.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical processing and integration of sensory inputs are hypothesized to play a role in unusual sensory reactions and social-cognitive deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reports on the relationship between objective metrics of sensory processing and clinical symptoms, however, are surprisingly sparse. Here we examined the relationship between neurophysiological assays of sensory processing and 1) autism severity and 2) sensory sensitivities, in individuals with ASD aged 6–17. Multiple linear regression indicated significant associations between neural markers of auditory processing and multisensory integration, and autism severity. No such relationships were apparent for clinical measures of visual/auditory sensitivities. These data support that aberrant early sensory processing contributes to autism symptoms, and reveal the potential of electrophysiology to objectively subtype autism. PMID:25245785

  14. Neurophysiology and neurobiology of the musical experience.

    PubMed

    Boso, Marianna; Politi, Pierluigi; Barale, Francesco; Enzo, Emanuele

    2006-01-01

    Music, a universal art form that exists in every culture around the world, is integral to a number of social and courtship activities, and is closely associated with other creative behaviours such as dancing. Recently, neuroimaging studies have allowed researchers to investigate the neural correlates of music processing and perception in the brain. Notably, musical stimuli have been shown to activate specific pathways in several brain areas associated with emotional behaviours, such as the insular and cingulate cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex. In addition, neurochemical studies have suggested that several biochemical mediators, such as endorphins, endocannabinoids, dopamine and nitric oxide, may play a role in the musical experience. A growing body of evidence also indicates that music therapy could be useful in the clinical management of numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders. Indeed, music therapy could be effective in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson?s disease, as well as in psychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety and autism spectrum disorders. Unfortunately, there is still a shortage of rigorous scientific data supporting the clinical application of music therapy, and there is thus a need to confirm and expand the preliminary findings regarding the potential and actual effectiveness of music therapy. This need should be addressed through prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded investigations of the short- and long-term effects of music therapy in diverse clinical conditions. PMID:17367577

  15. Nighttime instabilities of neurophysiological, cardiovascular, and respiratory activity: integrative modeling and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Troy, William C; Abdelmessih, Medhat; Hoffman, Stacy; Nemec, Jan; Strollo, Patrick J; London, Barry; Lampert, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Unstable (cyclical alternating pattern, or CAP) sleep is associated with surges of sympathetic nervous system activity, increased blood pressure and vasoconstriction, heightened baroreflex sensitivity, and unstable heart rhythm and breathing. In susceptible persons, CAP sleep provokes clinically significant events, including hypertensive crises, sleep-disordered breathing, and cardiac arrhythmias. Here we explore the neurophysiology of CAP sleep and its impact on cardiovascular and respiratory functions. We show that: (i) an increase in neurophysiological recovery rate can explain the emergence of slow, self-sustained, hypersynchronized A1 CAP-sleep pattern and its transition to the faster A2-A3 CAP-sleep patterns; (ii) in a two-dimensional, continuous model of cardiac tissue with heterogeneous action potential duration (APD) distribution, heart rate accelerations during CAP sleep may encounter incompletely recovered electrical excitability in cell clusters with longer APD. If the interaction between short cycle length and incomplete, spatially heterogeneous repolarization persists over multiple cycles, irregularities and asymmetry of depolarization front may accumulate and ultimately lead to a conduction block, retrograde conduction, breakup of activation waves, reentrant activity, and arrhythmias; and (iii) these modeling results are consistent with the nighttime data obtained from patients with structural heart disease (N=13) that show clusters of atrial and ventricular premature beats occurring during the periods of unstable heart rhythm and respiration that accompany CAP sleep. In these patients, CAP sleep is also accompanied by delayed adaptation of QT intervals and T-wave alternans. PMID:26341647

  16. Neurophysiological features of Internet gaming disorder and alcohol use disorder: a resting-state EEG study.

    PubMed

    Son, K-L; Choi, J-S; Lee, J; Park, S M; Lim, J-A; Lee, J Y; Kim, S N; Oh, S; Kim, D J; Kwon, J S

    2015-01-01

    Despite that Internet gaming disorder (IGD) shares clinical, neuropsychological and personality characteristics with alcohol use disorder (AUD), little is known about the resting-state quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) patterns associated with IGD and AUD. Therefore, this study compared the QEEG patterns in patients with IGD with those in patients with AUD to identify unique neurophysiological characteristics that can be used as biomarkers of IGD. A total of 76 subjects (34 with IGD, 17 with AUD and 25 healthy controls) participated in this study. Resting-state, eyes-closed QEEGs were recorded, and the absolute and relative power of brains were analyzed. The generalized estimating equation showed that the IGD group had lower absolute beta power than AUD (estimate = 5.319, P < 0.01) and the healthy control group (estimate = 2.612, P = 0.01). The AUD group showed higher absolute delta power than IGD (estimate = 7.516, P < 0.01) and the healthy control group (estimate = 7.179, P < 0.01). We found no significant correlations between the severity of IGD and QEEG activities in patients with IGD. The current findings suggest that lower absolute beta power can be used as a potential trait marker of IGD. Higher absolute power in the delta band may be a susceptibility marker for AUD. This study clarifies the unique characteristics of IGD as a behavioral addiction, which is distinct from AUD, by providing neurophysiological evidence. PMID:26327686

  17. Surge of neurophysiological coherence and connectivity in the dying brain

    PubMed Central

    Borjigin, Jimo; Lee, UnCheol; Liu, Tiecheng; Pal, Dinesh; Huff, Sean; Klarr, Daniel; Sloboda, Jennifer; Hernandez, Jason; Wang, Michael M.; Mashour, George A.

    2013-01-01

    The brain is assumed to be hypoactive during cardiac arrest. However, the neurophysiological state of the brain immediately following cardiac arrest has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we performed continuous electroencephalography in rats undergoing experimental cardiac arrest and analyzed changes in power density, coherence, directed connectivity, and cross-frequency coupling. We identified a transient surge of synchronous gamma oscillations that occurred within the first 30 s after cardiac arrest and preceded isoelectric electroencephalogram. Gamma oscillations during cardiac arrest were global and highly coherent; moreover, this frequency band exhibited a striking increase in anterior–posterior-directed connectivity and tight phase-coupling to both theta and alpha waves. High-frequency neurophysiological activity in the near-death state exceeded levels found during the conscious waking state. These data demonstrate that the mammalian brain can, albeit paradoxically, generate neural correlates of heightened conscious processing at near-death. PMID:23940340

  18. [Neurophysiological mechanisms and effects of emotional regulation on time perception].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2016-08-25

    Time is an important element for cognitive processes. Timing and time perception have been investigated by neuroscientists and psychologists for many years. It is well accepted that emotions could alter our experience of time. Previous studies of the emotional modulation on temporal perception focus primarily on behavioral and psychological experiments. In recent years, studies about the neurophysiological mechanisms of time perception have made some progress. Therefore, researchers started to explore how emotions influence our sense of time on the aspects of neural networks, neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity. In this paper, we tried to review current studies about the effects of emotional regulation on time perception and the relevant neurophysiological mechanisms. This review will help us to deeply understand the neural mechanisms of time perception. PMID:27546506

  19. Neurophysiologic Correlates of Post-stroke Mood and Emotional Control

    PubMed Central

    Doruk, Deniz; Simis, Marcel; Imamura, Marta; Brunoni, André R.; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Anghinah, Renato; Fregni, Felipe; Battistella, Linamara R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Emotional disturbance is a common complication of stroke significantly affecting functional recovery and quality of life. Identifying relevant neurophysiologic markers associated with post-stroke emotional disturbance may lead to a better understanding of this disabling condition, guiding the diagnosis, development of new interventions and the assessments of treatment response. Methods: Thirty-five subjects with chronic stroke were enrolled in this study. The emotion sub-domain of Stroke Impact Scale (SIS-Emotion) was used to assess post-stroke mood and emotional control. The relation between SIS-Emotion and neurophysiologic measures was assessed by using covariance mapping and univariate linear regression. Multivariate analyses were conducted to identify and adjust for potential confounders. Neurophysiologic measures included power asymmetry and coherence assessed by electroencephalography (EEG); and motor threshold, intracortical inhibition (ICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Results: Lower scores on SIS-Emotion was associated with (1) frontal EEG power asymmetry in alpha and beta bands, (2) central EEG power asymmetry in alpha and theta bands, and (3) lower inter-hemispheric coherence over frontal and central areas in alpha band. SIS-Emotion also correlated with higher ICF and MT in the unlesioned hemisphere as measured by TMS. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study using EEG and TMS to index neurophysiologic changes associated with post-stroke mood and emotional control. Our results suggest that inter-hemispheric imbalance measured by EEG power and coherence, as well as an increased ICF in the unlesioned hemisphere measured by TMS might be relevant markers associated with post-stroke mood and emotional control which can guide future studies investigating new diagnostic and treatment modalities in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:27625600

  20. Neurophysiological findings relevant to echolocation in marine animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, T. H.; Ridgway, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    A review of echolocation mechanisms in marine mammals, chiefly porpoises, is given. Data cover peripheral auditory and central neurophysiological specializations favorable to the analysis of echolocating clicks and their echoes. Conclusions show (1) signals are received from 50 up to at least 135 kHz, (2) sound is received through the mandible skin, and (3) the midbrain sites are insensitive to low frequencies (below 6 kHz).

  1. Human skin wetness perception: psychophysical and neurophysiological bases

    PubMed Central

    Filingeri, Davide; Havenith, George

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perceive thermal changes in the surrounding environment is critical for survival. However, sensing temperature is not the only factor among the cutaneous sensations to contribute to thermoregulatory responses in humans. Sensing skin wetness (i.e. hygrosensation) is also critical both for behavioral and autonomic adaptations. Although much has been done to define the biophysical role of skin wetness in contributing to thermal homeostasis, little is known on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning the ability to sense skin wetness. Humans are not provided with skin humidity receptors (i.e., hygroreceptors) and psychophysical studies have identified potential sensory cues (i.e. thermal and mechanosensory) which could contribute to sensing wetness. Recently, a neurophysiological model of human wetness sensitivity has been developed. In helping clarifying the peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in sensing skin wetness, this model has provided evidence for the existence of a specific human hygrosensation strategy, which is underpinned by perceptual learning via sensory experience. Remarkably, this strategy seems to be shared by other hygroreceptor-lacking animals. However, questions remain on whether these sensory mechanisms are underpinned by specific neuromolecular pathways in humans. Although the first study on human wetness perception dates back to more than 100 years, it is surprising that the neurophysiological bases of such an important sensory feature have only recently started to be unveiled. Hence, to provide an overview of the current knowledge on human hygrosensation, along with potential directions for future research, this review will examine the psychophysical and neurophysiological bases of human skin wetness perception. PMID:27227008

  2. Reversible motor and sensory neurophysiological abnormalities in cauda equina claudication.

    PubMed Central

    Saadeh, I K; Illis, L S; Jamshidi Fard, A R; Hughes, P J; Sedgwick, E M

    1994-01-01

    A case of cauda equina claudication with canal stenosis is presented. Neurophysiological studies show reversible changes during symptomatic and asymptomatic phases. The somatosensory evoked potential from the tibial nerve was reduced in amplitude. Central motor conduction time (CMCT) after transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain was reversibly prolonged in the symptomatic phase. Reversible CMCT changes have not been previously shown. The findings are discussed in the light of the pathophysiology of ischaemic nerve. Images PMID:7931390

  3. Pain in trigeminal neuralgia: neurophysiology and measurement: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Rastogi, S; Kumar, S; Mahendra, P; Bansal, M; Chandra, L

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined as sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing recurrent episodes of pain within the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is the most frequent cranial neuralgia, the incidence being 1 per 1,000,00 persons per year. Pain attacks start abruptly and last several seconds but may persist 1 to 2 minutes. The attacks are initiated by non painful physical stimulation of specific areas (trigger points or zones) that are located ipsilateral to the pain. After each episode, there is usually a refractive period during which stimulation of the trigger zone will not induce the pain. According to the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines on neuropathic pain assessment and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN)-EFNS guidelines on TN management the neurophysiological recording of trigeminal reflexes represents the most useful and reliable test for the neurophysiological diagnosis of trigeminal pains. The present article discusses different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system by which an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. With the aid of neurophysiological recordings and quantitative sensory testing, it is possible to approach a mechanism-based classification of orofacial pain. PMID:24701256

  4. Memory formation during anaesthesia: plausibility of a neurophysiological basis.

    PubMed

    Veselis, R A

    2015-07-01

    As opposed to conscious, personally relevant (explicit) memories that we can recall at will, implicit (unconscious) memories are prototypical of 'hidden' memory; memories that exist, but that we do not know we possess. Nevertheless, our behaviour can be affected by these memories; in fact, these memories allow us to function in an ever-changing world. It is still unclear from behavioural studies whether similar memories can be formed during anaesthesia. Thus, a relevant question is whether implicit memory formation is a realistic possibility during anaesthesia, considering the underlying neurophysiology. A different conceptualization of memory taxonomy is presented, the serial parallel independent model of Tulving, which focuses on dynamic information processing with interactions among different memory systems rather than static classification of different types of memories. The neurophysiological basis for subliminal information processing is considered in the context of brain function as embodied in network interactions. Function of sensory cortices and thalamic activity during anaesthesia are reviewed. The role of sensory and perisensory cortices, in particular the auditory cortex, in support of memory function is discussed. Although improbable, with the current knowledge of neurophysiology one cannot rule out the possibility of memory formation during anaesthesia. PMID:25735711

  5. Memory formation during anaesthesia: plausibility of a neurophysiological basis

    PubMed Central

    Veselis, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    As opposed to conscious, personally relevant (explicit) memories that we can recall at will, implicit (unconscious) memories are prototypical of ‘hidden’ memory; memories that exist, but that we do not know we possess. Nevertheless, our behaviour can be affected by these memories; in fact, these memories allow us to function in an ever-changing world. It is still unclear from behavioural studies whether similar memories can be formed during anaesthesia. Thus, a relevant question is whether implicit memory formation is a realistic possibility during anaesthesia, considering the underlying neurophysiology. A different conceptualization of memory taxonomy is presented, the serial parallel independent model of Tulving, which focuses on dynamic information processing with interactions among different memory systems rather than static classification of different types of memories. The neurophysiological basis for subliminal information processing is considered in the context of brain function as embodied in network interactions. Function of sensory cortices and thalamic activity during anaesthesia are reviewed. The role of sensory and perisensory cortices, in particular the auditory cortex, in support of memory function is discussed. Although improbable, with the current knowledge of neurophysiology one cannot rule out the possibility of memory formation during anaesthesia. PMID:25735711

  6. Measuring consciousness: relating behavioural and neurophysiological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Anil K.; Dienes, Zoltán; Cleeremans, Axel; Overgaard, Morten; Pessoa, Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The resurgent science of consciousness has been accompanied by a recent emphasis on the problem of measurement. Having dependable measures of consciousness is essential both for mapping experimental evidence to theory and for designing perspicuous experiments. Here, we review a series of behavioural and brain-based measures, assessing their ability to track graded consciousness and clarifying how they relate to each other by showing what theories are presupposed by each. We identify possible and actual conflicts among measures that can stimulate new experiments, and we conclude that measures must prove themselves by iteratively building knowledge in the context of theoretical frameworks. Advances in measuring consciousness have implications for basic cognitive neuroscience, for comparative studies of consciousness and for clinical applications. PMID:18606562

  7. The characteristic of the building damage from historical large earthquakes in Kyoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Akihito

    2016-04-01

    The Kyoto city, which is located in the northern part of Kyoto basin in Japan, has a long history of >1,200 years since the city was initially constructed. The city has been a populated area with many buildings and the center of the politics, economy and culture in Japan for nearly 1,000 years. Some of these buildings are now subscribed as the world's cultural heritage. The Kyoto city has experienced six damaging large earthquakes during the historical period: i.e., in 976, 1185, 1449, 1596, 1662, and 1830. Among these, the last three earthquakes which caused severe damage in Kyoto occurred during the period in which the urban area had expanded. These earthquakes are considered to be inland earthquakes which occurred around the Kyoto basin. The damage distribution in Kyoto from historical large earthquakes is strongly controlled by ground condition and earthquakes resistance of buildings rather than distance from estimated source fault. Therefore, it is necessary to consider not only the strength of ground shaking but also the condition of building such as elapsed years since the construction or last repair in order to more accurately and reliably estimate seismic intensity distribution from historical earthquakes in Kyoto. The obtained seismic intensity map would be helpful for reducing and mitigating disaster from future large earthquakes.

  8. Preterm EEG: a multimodal neurophysiological protocol.

    PubMed

    Stjerna, Susanna; Voipio, Juha; Metsäranta, Marjo; Kaila, Kai; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction in early 1950s, electroencephalography (EEG) has been widely used in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for assessment and monitoring of brain function in preterm and term babies. Most common indications are the diagnosis of epileptic seizures, assessment of brain maturity, and recovery from hypoxic-ischemic events. EEG recording techniques and the understanding of neonatal EEG signals have dramatically improved, but these advances have been slow to penetrate through the clinical traditions. The aim of this presentation is to bring theory and practice of advanced EEG recording available for neonatal units. In the theoretical part, we will present animations to illustrate how a preterm brain gives rise to spontaneous and evoked EEG activities, both of which are unique to this developmental phase, as well as crucial for a proper brain maturation. Recent animal work has shown that the structural brain development is clearly reflected in early EEG activity. Most important structures in this regard are the growing long range connections and the transient cortical structure, subplate. Sensory stimuli in a preterm baby will generate responses that are seen at a single trial level, and they have underpinnings in the subplate-cortex interaction. This brings neonatal EEG readily into a multimodal study, where EEG is not only recording cortical function, but it also tests subplate function via different sensory modalities. Finally, introduction of clinically suitable dense array EEG caps, as well as amplifiers capable of recording low frequencies, have disclosed multitude of brain activities that have as yet been overlooked. In the practical part of this video, we show how a multimodal, dense array EEG study is performed in neonatal intensive care unit from a preterm baby in the incubator. The video demonstrates preparation of the baby and incubator, application of the EEG cap, and performance of the sensory stimulations. PMID:22371054

  9. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring: II. Facial nerve function.

    PubMed

    Niparko, J K; Kileny, P R; Kemink, J L; Lee, H M; Graham, M D

    1989-01-01

    Intraoperative facial nerve monitoring provides a potentially useful adjunct to recent surgical advances in neurotology and neurosurgery. These measures further aid the surgeon in preserving facial nerve function by enhancing visual identification with electrical monitoring of mechanically evoked facial muscle activation. Facial nerve monitoring in neurotologic surgery may achieve the following goals: (1) early recognition of surgical trauma to the facial nerve, with immediate feedback made available to the surgeon through monitoring of mechanical activation; (2) assistance in distinguishing the facial nerve from regional cranial nerves and from adjacent soft tissue and tumor with selective electrical stimulation; (3) facilitation of tumor excision by electrical mapping of portions of tumor that are remote from the facial nerve; (4) confirmation of nerve stimulability at the completion of surgery; and (5) identification of the site and degree of neural dysfunction in patients undergoing nerve exploration for suspected facial nerve neoplasm or undergoing decompression in acute facial palsy. This paper provides an overview of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring principles and methodology and reports a recent clinical investigation that demonstrates the utility of facial nerve monitoring in translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery. PMID:2655465

  10. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and other neurophysiological investigations.

    PubMed

    Paetau, Ritva; Mohamed, Ismail S

    2013-01-01

    Cortical generators of epileptic and certain physiological activity can be localized noninvasively by magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG detects weak magnetic fields produced by the postsynaptic currents of pyramidal cortical cells in sulcal walls. Unlike EEG, MEG signals are not distorted by edema or bone defects, and unlike fMRI, abnormal hemodynamics do not alter the MEG. The patient's head is centered inside a helmet housing over a hundred magnetic field sensors. Cortical generators of MEG signals are determined with a useful spatial resolution and an excellent time resolution, which enable tracking of brain activity in successive points of, for example, an epileptic network. MEG sources can be co-registered and visualized on magnetic resonance images (MRI). MEG is highly sensitive for the detection of interictal epileptic discharges, and present techniques allow some degree of head movements enabling ictal recordings also. MEG is also useful for localizing the somatosensory, visual, and language areas before tailored surgery in the vicinity of eloquent cortex. In conjunction with other noninvasive modalities MEG provides nonredundant data in one-third of epilepsy surgery patients. Clinical MEG utilization is mainly focused on presurgical localization of the epileptogenic zone and eloquent cortex in epilepsy surgery candidates, including patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome. However, MEG is also an excellent noninvasive tool to study the source distribution in childhood epilepsy syndromes and epileptic encephalopathies. PMID:23622195

  11. Neurophysiological Distinction between Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mathalon, Daniel H.; Hoffman, Ralph E.; Watson, Todd D.; Miller, Ryan M.; Roach, Brian J.; Ford, Judith M.

    2009-01-01

    Schizoaffective disorder (SA) is distinguished from schizophrenia (SZ) based on the presence of prominent mood symptoms over the illness course. Despite this clinical distinction, SA and SZ patients are often combined in research studies, in part because data supporting a distinct pathophysiological boundary between the disorders are lacking. Indeed, few studies have addressed whether neurobiological abnormalities associated with SZ, such as the widely replicated reduction and delay of the P300 event-related potential (ERP), are also present in SA. Scalp EEG was acquired from patients with DSM-IV SA (n = 15) or SZ (n = 22), as well as healthy controls (HC; n = 22) to assess the P300 elicited by infrequent target (15%) and task-irrelevant distractor (15%) stimuli in separate auditory and visual ”oddball” tasks. P300 amplitude was reduced and delayed in SZ, relative to HC, consistent with prior studies. These SZ abnormalities did not interact with stimulus type (target vs. task-irrelevant distractor) or modality (auditory vs. visual). Across sensory modality and stimulus type, SA patients exhibited normal P300 amplitudes (significantly larger than SZ patients and indistinguishable from HC). However, P300 latency and reaction time were both equivalently delayed in SZ and SA patients, relative to HC. P300 differences between SA and SZ patients could not be accounted for by variation in symptom severity, socio-economic status, education, or illness duration. Although both groups show similar deficits in processing speed, SA patients do not exhibit the P300 amplitude deficits evident in SZ, consistent with an underlying pathophysiological boundary between these disorders. PMID:20140266

  12. Experimental Equipments for Microwave Power Transmission in Kyoto University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Shinohara, N.; Mitani, T.

    2004-12-01

    RISH, Research Institute of Sustainable Humanosphere, of Kyoto University is one of the most active research laboratories for a microwave power transmission (MPT) and SSPS (Space Solar Power System) in Japan. Since the first MPT rocket experiment in the ionosphere was conducted in early 1980's by Radio Science Center for Space and Atmosphere (RASC), the former institute of the RISH, the RISH has conducted a variety of theoretical and experimental studies on the MPT and SSPS both in laboratory and field. In the paper, we will show the experimental equipments for the MPT and the SSPS research in the RISH. We have two facilities of METLAB (Microwave Energy Transmission LABoratory) and SPSLAB (SPS LABoratory) for the MPT researches. The METLAB is composed of an anechoic radio wave chamber and an experimental system specially designed for the MPT experiment. The SPSLAB is a facility to promote a systematic research for conceptual, technical and coordinative research with our colleagues in all parts of Japan including the industrial partners. These facilities are now open for inter-universities collaborations. The other available experimental facilities are multiple MPT systems with a phased array transmitter using phase controlled magnetrons (PCMs) at both 2.45 GHz and 5.8 GHz, and a semiconductor-based beam control system and a retrodirective target detecting system. These facilities are named SPORTS (Space POwer Radio Transmission System) 2.45 and SPORTS5.8.

  13. Neurophysiological sensitivity for impaired phonological processing in the acute stage of aphasia.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Annelies; van Mierlo, Pieter; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Santens, Patrick; De Letter, Miet

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate neurophysiological substrates of phoneme and word processing in 10 patients with acute aphasia (PWA). More specifically, phoneme discrimination was studied in a passive and active oddball task with respect to different phonemic contrasts, while lexical detection was investigated by presenting infrequent pseudowords among frequent words in a passive oddball task. Concerning phoneme discrimination, PWA in the acute stage had smaller MMN and P300 amplitudes than the norm group for voicing, whereas for place and manner they only demonstrated smaller P300 amplitudes. PWA showed a distinct pattern of impaired phonemic contrast sensitivity, with place displaying the largest amplitude and voicing the smallest. Concerning lexical detection, pseudowords elicited larger responses than words in both groups, but with a delay and larger P200 amplitude for pseudowords in PWA compared to the norm group. For clinical practice, passive tasks seem more suitable than active tasks in acute aphasia. PMID:26197257

  14. Music enhances spatial-temporal reasoning: towards a neurophysiological basis using EEG.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G L; Bodner, M

    1999-10-01

    Motivated by predictions from the structured trion model of the cortex, based on Mountcastle's columnar organizational principle, behavioral experiments have demonstrated a causal short-term enhancement of spatial-temporal reasoning in college students following listening to a Mozart Sonata (K.448) but not in control conditions. An EEG coherence study reported presence of right frontal and left temporoparietal activity induced by listening to the Mozart Sonata, which carried over into the spatial-temporal tasks in three of the seven subjects. In this paper, we present further predictions from the trion model and discuss how the new SYMMETRIC analysis method can be used in EEG recordings to help determine the neurophysiological basis of specific music enhancing spatial-temporal reasoning. We conclude with potential clinical applications of major significance. PMID:10513321

  15. Neurophysiological assessment of Alzheimer's disease individuals by a single electroencephalographic marker.

    PubMed

    Lizio, Roberta; Del Percio, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Yener, Görsev G; Başar, Erol; Mundi, Ciro; De Rosa, Salvatore; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ferri, Raffaele; Arnaldi, Dario; Nobili, Flavio Mariano; Cordone, Susanna; Lopez, Susanna; Carducci, Filippo; Santi, Giulia; Gesualdo, Loreto; Rossini, Paolo M; Cavedo, Enrica; Mauri, Margherita; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Babiloni, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Here we presented a single electroencephalographic (EEG) marker for a neurophysiological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients already diagnosed by current guidelines. The ability of the EEG marker to classify 127 AD individuals and 121 matched cognitively intact normal elderly (Nold) individuals was tested. Furthermore, its relationship to AD patients' cognitive status and structural brain integrity was examined. Low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) freeware estimated cortical sources of resting state eyes-closed EEG rhythms. The EEG marker was defined as the ratio between the activity of parieto-occipital cortical sources of delta (2-4 Hz) and low-frequency alpha (8-10.5 Hz) rhythms. Results showed 77.2% of sensitivity in the recognition of the AD individuals; 65% of specificity in the recognition of the Nold individuals; and 0.75 of area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. Compared to the AD subgroup with the EEG maker within one standard deviation of the Nold mean (EEG-), the AD subgroup with EEG+ showed lower global cognitive status, as revealed by Mini-Mental State Evaluation score, and more abnormal values of white-matter and cerebrospinal fluid normalized volumes, as revealed by structural magnetic resonance imaging. We posit that cognitive and functional status being equal, AD patients with EEG+ should receive special clinical attention due to a neurophysiological "frailty". EEG+ label can be also used in clinical trials (i) to form homogeneous groups of AD patients diagnosed by current guidelines and (ii) as end-point to evaluate intervention effects. PMID:26444753

  16. Intradetrusorial Botulinum Toxin in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Neurophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Antonella; Giannantoni, Antonella; Gubbiotti, Marilena; Pontecorvo, Simona; Millefiorini, Enrico; Francia, Ada; Porena, Massimo; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) often complain of urinary disturbances characterized by overactive bladder syndrome and difficulties in bladder emptying. The aim of the study was to investigate the pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction and the neurophysiological effects of intradetrusorial incobotulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) in patients with MS having both brain and spinal MS-related lesions. Twenty-five MS patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) underwent clinical evaluation and soleus Hoffmann reflex (H reflex) study during urodynamics. Of the 25 patients, 14 underwent a further session one month after intradetrusorial BoNT/A injection. Eighteen healthy subjects acted as the control. In healthy subjects, the H reflex size significantly decreased at maximum cystometric capacity (MCC), whereas in MS patients with NDO, the H reflex remained unchanged. In the patients who received intradetrusorial BoNT/A, clinical and urodynamic investigations showed that NDO improved significantly. Volumes at the first, normal and strong desire to void and MCC increased significantly. Despite its efficacy in improving bladder symptoms and in increasing volumes for first desire, normal and strong desire to void, BoNT/A left the H reflex modulation during bladder filling unchanged. In the MS patients we studied having both brain and spinal MS-related lesions, the H reflex size remained unchanged at maximum bladder filling. Since this neurophysiological pattern has been previously found in patients with spinal cord injury, we suggest that bladder dysfunction arises from the MS-related spinal lesions. BoNT/A improves bladder dysfunction by changing bladder afferent input, as shown by urodynamic findings on bladder filling sensations, but its effects on H reflex modulation remain undetectable. PMID:26343721

  17. THE MECHANISM OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM)-ASSOCIATED ZINC IN CARDIAC INJURY IN WISTAR KYOTO RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have recently found that inhaled combustion particulate matter (PM) with leachable zinc causes myocardial damage without significant pulmonary inflammation or remodeling; this damage is histologically demonstrable in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Cardiac injury from PM exposure can...

  18. Influence of outdoor advertisement colors on psychological evaluation of townscape in Kyoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Ayumi; Ishida, Taiichiro; Katsuya, Yoshiko

    2002-06-01

    Outdoor advertisements must be one of the major factors that affect our psychological impression for townscapes. They often conflict with propr color environments in cities particularly in historic cities like Kyoto. In this study we investigated how outdoor advertisements influenced our visual evaluation of townscapes in Kyoto. In recent years, a new regulation for outdoor advertisements came into operation in Kyoto and some of the advertisements have been replaced or removed gradually. We examined psychological evaluation for the townscapes before and after their changes. In the experiment, subjects evaluated 'visual harmony,' 'visual busyness,' 'visual comfort' and 'suitability to Kyoto' of townscapes projected on a screen. The results indicated that the evaluation of 'visual busyness' significantly decreased with the amount of the advertisements. The relations between the advertisements and the psychological evaluation of the townscape are discussed.

  19. SWIMMY: Free Software for Teaching Neurophysiology of Neuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A; Krasne, Franklin B

    2008-01-01

    To circumvent the many problems in teaching neurophysiology as a "wet lab," we developed SWIMMY, a virtual fish that swims by moving its virtual tail by means of a virtual neural circuit. SWIMMY diminishes the need for expensive equipment, troubleshooting, and manual skills that require practice. Also, SWIMMY effectively replaces live preparations, which some students find objectionable. Using SWIMMY, students (1) review the basics of neurophysiology, (2) identify the neurons in the circuit, (3) ascertain the neurons' synaptic interconnections, (4) discover which cells generate the motor pattern of swimming, (5) discover how the rhythm is generated, and finally (6) use an animation that corresponds to the activity of the motoneurons to discover the behavioral effects produced by various lesions and explain them in terms of their neural underpinnings. SWIMMY is a genuine inquiry-based exercise producing data that requires individual thought and interpretation. It is neither a cookbook exercise nor a demonstration. We have used SWIMMY for several terms with great success. SWIMMY solidifies students' understanding of material learned in traditional lecture courses because they must apply the concepts. Student ratings of SWIMMY have been very positive, particularly ratings from students who have also been exposed to a "wet" neurophysiology lab. Because SWIMMY requires only computers for implementation and makes minimal demands on instructional resources, it provides for a great deal of flexibility. Instructors could use SWIMMY as part of a traditional lab course, as a classroom exercise, in distance learning, or in blended instructional formats (internet with classroom). SWIMMY is now available for free online complete with student and instructor manuals at http://mdcune.psych.ucla.edu. PMID:23492869

  20. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Signatures of Benzodiazepine-Related Driving Impairments.

    PubMed

    Stone, Bradly T; Correa, Kelly A; Brown, Timothy L; Spurgin, Andrew L; Stikic, Maja; Johnson, Robin R; Berka, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem worldwide; estimates show that 18-23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; Walsh et al., 2004; NHTSA, 2010). Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one's driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009). Currently, drug recognition experts (DREs; law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving), have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS) depressants (Smith et al., 2002). The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake et al., 2011), further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSim(TM)). This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (electroencephalography, ECG). While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009), we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of DREs. Our analyses revealed that (1) specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and (2) the neurocognitive tasks' metrics were able to classify "impaired" vs. "unimpaired" with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in larger studies, our results not only identified

  1. [Developments in neurophysiology in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Hess, C W

    1994-04-19

    The rise of neurophysiology in the 19th century was kindled by Luigi Aloysius Galvani's revolutionary claim for animal electricity at the end of the preceding century. He was first challenged by Allessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta who showed that the muscle twitch in Galvani's experiment was the result of electric stimulation rather than of an enabled biological current. The controversy between Galvani and Volta became a predominant and stimulating issue among the scientists of the early century and found its ultimate elucidation only 40 years later by the pioneering work of Carlo Matteucci of Pisa and Emil Heinrich Du Bois-Reymond of Berlin, who both deserve the reknown as founders of modern neurophysiology. As the first influential promoter and mastermind of the experimental physiology, François Magendie of Paris primarily investigated the nervous system and inaugurated the lesion experiments to clarify specific functions of neural structures. Johannes Müller founded the German school of physiology with its eminent neurophysiological offspring: Du Bois-Reymond, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz, and Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Pflüger. It was Helmholtz's merit to have for the first time precisely assessed the motor conduction velocity by measuring the time interval between two different stimulation sites of the sciatic nerve of the frog. In their brilliant work published in 1870 Gustav Theodor Fritsch and Eduard Hitzig demonstrated that appropriately located focal electrical stimulation of the exposed cortex of dogs induces movement of the contralateral limbs and unequivocally disproved the then prevailing dogma of holistic capacity of the hemispheres, which denied localised functions within the cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8191189

  2. Neurophysiologic effect of GWAS derived schizophrenia and bipolar risk variants.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mei-Hua; Levy, Deborah L; Salisbury, Dean F; Haddad, Steve; Gallagher, Patience; Lohan, Mary; Cohen, Bruce; Ongür, Dost; Smoller, Jordan W

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as disease associated variants for schizophrenia (SCZ), bipolar disorder (BPD), or both. Although these results are statistically robust, the functional effects of these variants and their role in the pathophysiology of SCZ or BPD remain unclear. Dissecting the effects of risk genes on distinct domains of brain function can provide important biological insights into the mechanisms by which these genes may confer illness risk. This study used quantitative event related potentials to characterize the neurophysiological effects of well-documented GWAS-derived SCZ/BPD susceptibility variants in order to map gene effects onto important domains of brain function. We genotyped 199 patients with DSM-IV diagnoses of SCZ or BPD and 74 healthy control subjects for 19 risk SNPs derived from previous GWAS findings and tested their association with five neurophysiologic traits (P3 amplitude, P3 latency, N1 amplitude, P2 amplitude, and P50 sensory gating responses) known to be abnormal in psychosis. The TCF4 SNP rs17512836 risk allele showed a significant association with reduced auditory P3 amplitude (P = 0.00016) after correction for multiple testing. The same allele was also associated with delayed P3 latency (P = 0.005). Our results suggest that a SCZ risk variant in TCF4 is associated with neurophysiologic traits thought to index attention and working memory abnormalities in psychotic disorders. These findings suggest a mechanism by which TCF4 may contribute to the neurobiological basis of psychotic illness. PMID:24339136

  3. Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring: Basic Principles and Recent Update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Seung Hyun; Seo, Dae-Won

    2013-01-01

    The recent developments of new devices and advances in anesthesiology have greatly improved the utility and accuracy of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM). Herein, we review the basic principles of the electrophysiological methods employed under IOM in the operating room. These include motor evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, electroencephalography, electromyography, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and visual evoked potentials. Most of these techniques have certain limitations and their utility is still being debated. In this review, we also discuss the optimal stimulation/recording method for each of these modalities during individual surgeries as well as the diverse criteria for alarm signs. PMID:24015028

  4. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  5. Early neurophysiological indices of second language morphosyntax learning

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Jeff; Shtyrov, Yury; Williams, John; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Humans show variable degrees of success in acquiring a second language (L2). In many cases, morphological and syntactic knowledge remain deficient, although some learners succeed in reaching nativelike levels, even if they begin acquiring their L2 relatively late. In this study, we use psycholinguistic, online language proficiency tests and a neurophysiological index of syntactic processing, the syntactic mismatch negativity (sMMN) to local agreement violations, to compare behavioural and neurophysiological markers of grammar processing between native speakers (NS) of English and non-native speakers (NNS). Variable grammar proficiency was measured by psycholinguistic tests. When NS heard ungrammatical word sequences lacking agreement between subject and verb (e.g. *we kicks), the MMN was enhanced compared with syntactically legal sentences (e.g. he kicks). More proficient NNS also showed this difference, but less proficient NNS did not. The main cortical sources of the MMN responses were localised in bilateral superior temporal areas, where, crucially, source strength of grammar-related neuronal activity correlated significantly with grammatical proficiency of individual L2 speakers as revealed by the psycholinguistic tests. As our results show similar, early MMN indices to morpho-syntactic agreement violations among both native speakers and non-native speakers with high grammar proficiency, they appear consistent with the use of similar brain mechanisms for at least certain aspects of L1 and L2 grammars. PMID:26752451

  6. Early neurophysiological indices of second language morphosyntax learning.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jeff; Shtyrov, Yury; Williams, John; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2016-02-01

    Humans show variable degrees of success in acquiring a second language (L2). In many cases, morphological and syntactic knowledge remain deficient, although some learners succeed in reaching nativelike levels, even if they begin acquiring their L2 relatively late. In this study, we use psycholinguistic, online language proficiency tests and a neurophysiological index of syntactic processing, the syntactic mismatch negativity (sMMN) to local agreement violations, to compare behavioural and neurophysiological markers of grammar processing between native speakers (NS) of English and non-native speakers (NNS). Variable grammar proficiency was measured by psycholinguistic tests. When NS heard ungrammatical word sequences lacking agreement between subject and verb (e.g. *we kicks), the MMN was enhanced compared with syntactically legal sentences (e.g. he kicks). More proficient NNS also showed this difference, but less proficient NNS did not. The main cortical sources of the MMN responses were localised in bilateral superior temporal areas, where, crucially, source strength of grammar-related neuronal activity correlated significantly with grammatical proficiency of individual L2 speakers as revealed by the psycholinguistic tests. As our results show similar, early MMN indices to morpho-syntactic agreement violations among both native speakers and non-native speakers with high grammar proficiency, they appear consistent with the use of similar brain mechanisms for at least certain aspects of L1 and L2 grammars. PMID:26752451

  7. Linking Behavioral and Neurophysiological Indicators of Perceptual Tuning to Language

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Bortfeld, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms that underlie tuning to the native language(s) in early infancy. Here we review language tuning through the lens of type and amount of language experience and introduce a new manner in which to conceptualize the phenomenon of language tuning: the relative speed of tuning hypothesis. This hypothesis has as its goal a characterization of the unique time course of the tuning process, given the different components (e.g., phonology, prosody, syntax, semantics) of one or more languages as they become available to infants, and biologically based maturational constraints. In this review, we first examine the established behavioral findings and integrate more recent neurophysiological data on neonatal development, which together demonstrate evidence of early language tuning given differential language exposure even in utero. Next, we examine traditional accounts of sensitive and critical periods to determine how these constructs complement current data on the neural mechanisms underlying language tuning. We then synthesize the extant infant behavioral and neurophysiological data on monolingual, bilingual, and sensory deprived tuning, thereby scrutinizing the effect of these three different language profiles on the specific timing, progression, and outcome of language tuning. Finally, we discuss future directions researchers might pursue to further understand this aspect of language development, advocating our relative speed of tuning hypothesis as a useful framework for conceptualizing the complex process by which language experience works together with biological constraints to shape language development. PMID:21866226

  8. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Signatures of Benzodiazepine-Related Driving Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Bradly T.; Correa, Kelly A.; Brown, Timothy L.; Spurgin, Andrew L.; Stikic, Maja; Johnson, Robin R.; Berka, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem worldwide; estimates show that 18–23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; Walsh et al., 2004; NHTSA, 2010). Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one’s driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009). Currently, drug recognition experts (DREs; law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving), have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS) depressants (Smith et al., 2002). The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake et al., 2011), further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSimTM). This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (electroencephalography, ECG). While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009), we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of DREs. Our analyses revealed that (1) specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and (2) the neurocognitive tasks’ metrics were able to classify “impaired” vs. “unimpaired” with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in larger studies, our results not

  9. An Insight Into Neurophysiology of Pulpal Pain: Facts and Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Abhishek; N., Meena

    2013-01-01

    Pain and pain control are important to the dental profession because the general perception of the public is that dental treatment and pain go hand in hand. Successful dental treatment requires that the source of pain be detected. If the origin of pain is not found, inappropriate dental care and, ultimately, extraction may result. Pain experienced before, during, or after endodontic therapy is a serious concern to both patients and endodontists, and the variability of discomfort presents a challenge in terms of diagnostic methods, endodontic therapy, and endodontic knowledge. This review will help clinicians understand the basic neurophysiology of pulpal pain and other painful conditions of the dental pulp that are not well understood. PMID:24156000

  10. [Neurophysiologic mechanisms of combat post-extreme state of health].

    PubMed

    Tsygan, V N

    2014-10-01

    The effects of ecological and occupational stress (EOS) on brain neurodynamics of Soviet and Afghanistan servicemen have been studied. The investigations have been made in Afghanistan. Neurophysiological characteristics of traumatic stress and consequences of combat trauma were studied in patients wounded in Afghanistan, in the acute phase as well as since 0.5-3 years after leaving the battlefield. The combined effect of combat situation, hot climate, highlands and desert forms EOS. It does not cause an adaptation process in servicemen. EOS is characterized by changes in bioelectrical indices of brain in interhemispheric relations both as a whole and in isolated rhythm components of EEG, by activating the stress limiting system. It exhibits pathopsychological and autonomic components which remain significant during 3 years after leaving the combat conditions. The formation of a general adaptation syndrome is prevented in explosion trauma under the influence of EOS. PMID:25697028

  11. The leading sense: supramodal control of neurophysiological context by attention

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, P.; O’Connell, M.N.; Barczak, A.; Mills, A.; Javitt, D.C.; Schroeder, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Attending to a stimulus enhances its neuronal representation, even at the level of primary sensory cortex. Cross-modal modulation can similarly enhance a neuronal representation, and this process can also operate at the primary cortical level. Phase reset of ongoing neuronal oscillatory activity has been shown to be an important element of the underlying modulation of local cortical excitability in both cases. We investigated the influence of attention on oscillatory phase reset in primary auditory and visual cortices of macaques performing an intermodal selective attention task. In addition to responses “driven” by preferred modality stimuli, we noted that both preferred and non-preferred modality stimuli could “modulate” local cortical excitability by phase reset of ongoing oscillatory activity, and that this effect was linked to their being attended. These findings outline a supramodal mechanism by which attention can control neurophysiological context, thus determining the representation of specific sensory content in primary sensory cortex. PMID:19914189

  12. Dreaming and the brain: from phenomenology to neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nir, Yuval; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Dreams are a most remarkable experiment in psychology and neuroscience, conducted every night in every sleeping person. They show that our brain, disconnected from the environment, can generate by itself an entire world of conscious experiences. Content analysis and developmental studies have furthered our understanding of dream phenomenology. In parallel, brain lesion studies, functional imaging, and neurophysiology have advanced our knowledge of the neural basis of dreaming. It is now possible to start integrating these two strands of research in order to address some fundamental questions that dreams pose for cognitive neuroscience: how conscious experiences in sleep relate to underlying brain activity; why the dreamer is largely disconnected from the environment; and whether dreaming is more closely related to mental imagery or to perception. PMID:20079677

  13. Computing Hopf bifurcations II: Three examples from neurophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, J.; Myers, M.

    1996-11-01

    In [Guckenheimer, Myers, and Sturmfels, SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 34 (1997)] the authors present algorithms for detecting Hopf bifurcations in two-parameter families of vector fields based on classical algebraic construction in addition to their utility as augmented systems for use with standard Newton-type continuation methods, they are shown to be particularly well adapted for solution by computer algebra techniques for vector fields of small or moderate dimension. The present study examines the performance of these methods on test problems selected from current research interest in neurophysiology. Implementation issues are examined and the numerical properties of the proposed methods are compared with several alternative algorithms for Hopf path following that appear in the literature.

  14. Neurophysiological model of the normal and abnormal human pupil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenz, W.; Robin, M.; Barez, S.; Stark, L.

    1985-01-01

    Anatomical, experimental, and computer simulation studies were used to determine the structure of the neurophysiological model of the pupil size control system. The computer simulation of this model demonstrates the role played by each of the elements in the neurological pathways influencing the size of the pupil. Simulations of the effect of drugs and common abnormalities in the system help to illustrate the workings of the pathways and processes involved. The simulation program allows the user to select pupil condition (normal or an abnormality), specific site along the neurological pathway (retina, hypothalamus, etc.) drug class input (barbiturate, narcotic, etc.), stimulus/response mode, display mode, stimulus type and input waveform, stimulus or background intensity and frequency, the input and output conditions, and the response at the neuroanatomical site. The model can be used as a teaching aid or as a tool for testing hypotheses regarding the system.

  15. Energy Drinks and the Neurophysiological Impact of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Persad, Leeana Aarthi Bagwath

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body. PMID:22025909

  16. FEL Beamline for Wide Tunable Range and Beam Sharing System at Kyoto University

    SciTech Connect

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Yoshida, K.; Higashimura, K.; Ueda, S.; Kinjo, R.; Sonobe, T.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.; Zen, H.

    2010-02-03

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL) facility (KU-FEL: Kyoto University Free Electron Laser) has been constructed for developing energy materials in Institute of Advanced Energy (IAE), Kyoto University. The tunable range of KU-FEL was estimated as 5-13.2 {mu}m by numerical calculation to design the MIR-FEL transport line for application purposes. Aiming to increase the number of FEL users with different desires we decided to develop an FEL beam sharing system that is useful for multi-utilization at different end-stations. The transport line and the beam sharing system has been designed and constructed to the user stations. Applications of the MIR-FEL in the renewable energy research at Kyoto University will start as well.

  17. Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactors in Japanese Universities: Experimental Study Using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shiroya, S.; Unesaki, H.; Misawa, T.

    2001-06-17

    A series of basic experiments for an accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor (ADSR) was officially launched in financial year 2000 at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) as a joint-use program among Japanese universities. These experiments are closely related to the future plan of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. A final goal of this plan is to establish a next-generation neutron source as a substitute for the 5-MW Kyoto University Reactor and based on the ADSR concept to promote joint research among Japanese universities. An attractive point of the ADSR system is that either pulsed or steady neutrons can be provided depending on the accelerator's operation mode.

  18. Sleep-dependent neurophysiological processes in implicit sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Urbain, Charline; Schmitz, Rémy; Schmidt, Christina; Cleeremans, Axel; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Maquet, Pierre; Peigneux, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Behavioral studies have cast doubts about the role that posttraining sleep may play in the consolidation of implicit sequence learning. Here, we used event-related fMRI to test the hypothesis that sleep-dependent functional reorganization would take place in the underlying neural circuits even in the possible absence of obvious behavioral changes. Twenty-four healthy human adults were scanned at Day 1 and then at Day 4 during an implicit probabilistic serial RT task. They either slept normally (RS) or were sleep-deprived (SD) on the first posttraining night. Unknown to them, the sequential structure of the material was based on a probabilistic finite-state grammar, with 15% chance on each trial of replacing the rules-based grammatical (G) stimulus with a nongrammatical (NG) one. Results indicated a gradual differentiation across sessions between RTs (faster RTs for G than NG), together with NG-related BOLD responses reflecting sequence learning. Similar behavioral patterns were observed in RS and SD participants at Day 4, indicating time- but not sleep-dependent consolidation of performance. Notwithstanding, we observed at Day 4 in the RS group a diminished differentiation between G- and NG-related neurophysiological responses in a set of cortical and subcortical areas previously identified as being part of the network involved in implicit sequence learning and its offline processing during sleep, indicating a sleep-dependent processing of both regular and deviant stimuli. Our results suggest the sleep-dependent development of distinct neurophysiological processes subtending consolidation of implicit motor sequence learning, even in the absence of overt behavioral differences. PMID:23806174

  19. Dual format course design: neuroanatomy and neurophysiology for adult learners.

    PubMed

    Estes, Rebecca I

    2007-01-01

    Adult learners require alternative learning opportunities to enable them to work and still be able to upgrade their education. This dual format course, combining online and face-to-face components, was developed to meet the need of students to complete a prerequisite undergraduate level neuroanatomy and neurophysiology course while attending a program that included fly-in weekends (seven) and online instruction (15 weeks). A combination of online lectures and on-campus lectures were used to teach pre-requisite neuroanatomy and neurophysiology course topics. The article presents the teaching material division between online and on-campus lectures and presentation of data collected. Survey data collected included student preferred: online media presentation, online activities developed to facilitate learning of the online material, online case study discussion, and testing formats. Students also were asked to comment on whether the class should move to a 100% online format and what their concerns would be moving to an all online format. Additional qualitative data on student input related to the course, adult learning and the learning environment will be presented. Blackboard data include: student daily access patterns, media and documents access and download patterns, and case study participation. Additionally, descriptive statistics from in class quizzes versus online quizzes includes: student patterns of test taking in an unlimited retake environment, scores on retakes and final scores (highest of retakes), in-class quiz scores, and comparison of comprehensive final exam scores from online versus face-to-face lecture material and testing. Findings provide valuable information for online course formatting, revisions and additional course development. PMID:23493658

  20. Learned helplessness and social avoidance in the Wistar-Kyoto rat

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyungwoo; Clinton, Sarah M.; Jackson, Nateka L.; Kerman, Ilan A.

    2014-01-01

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is an established depression model characterized by elevated anxiety- and depression-like behavior across a variety of tests. Here we further characterized specific behavioral and functional domains relevant to depression that are altered in WKY rats. Moreover, since early-life experience potently shapes emotional behavior, we also determined whether aspects of WKYs' phenotype were modifiable by early-life factors using neonatal handling or maternal separation. We first compared WKYs' behavior to that of Sprague–Dawley (SD), Wistar, and Spontaneously Hypertensive (SHR) rats in: the open field test, elevated plus maze, novelty-suppressed feeding test, a social interaction test, and the forced swim test (FST). WKYs exhibited high baseline immobility in the FST and were the only strain to show increased immobility on FST Day 2 vs. Day 1 (an indicator of learned helplessness). WKYs also showed greater social avoidance, along with enlarged adrenal glands and hearts relative to other strains. We next tested whether neonatal handling or early-life maternal separation stress influenced WKYs' behavior. Neither manipulation affected their anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, likely due to a strong genetic underpinning of their phenotype. Our findings indicate that WKY rats are a useful model that captures specific functional domains relevant to clinical depression including: psychomotor retardation, behavioral inhibition, learned helplessness, social withdrawal, and physiological dysfunction. WKY rats appear to be resistant to early-life manipulations (i.e., neonatal handling) that are therapeutic in other strains, and may be a useful model for the development of personalized anti-depressant therapies for treatment resistant depression. PMID:24744709

  1. Neurocognitive rehabilitation for addiction medicine: From neurophysiological markers to cognitive rehabilitation and relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Currently, relapse prevention remains the main challenge in addiction medicine, indicating that the established treatment methods combining psychotherapy with neuropharmacological interventions are not entirely effective. Therefore, there is a push to develop alternatives to psychotherapy- and medication-based approaches to addiction treatment. Two major cognitive factors have been identified that trigger relapse in addicted patients: attentional biases directed toward drug-related cues, which increase the urge to consume, and impaired response inhibition toward these cues, which makes it more difficult for addicted people to resist temptation. Recent studies on newly detoxified alcoholic patients have shown that by using the appropriate tasks to index these cognitive functions with event-related potentials (ERPs), it is possible to discriminate between future relapsers and nonrelapsers. These preliminary data suggest that the ERP technique has great clinical potential for preventing relapse in alcohol-dependent patients, as well as for addictive states in general. Indeed, ERPs may help to identify patients highly vulnerable to relapse and allow the development of individually adapted cognitive rehabilitation programs. The implementation of this combined approach requires an intense collaboration between psychiatry departments, clinical neurophysiology laboratories, and neuropsychological rehabilitation centers. The potential pitfalls and limitations of this approach are also discussed. PMID:26822355

  2. Neurophysiological strategies for the diagnosis of disorders of the neuromuscular junction in children.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Matthew

    2008-05-01

    The disorders of the neuromuscular junction seen in children, the congenital myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune myasthenia gravis, are very rare. Their clinical symptoms and signs may be variable, most notably in the neonate and infant. They should enter the differential diagnosis of many different clinical presentations, such as 'floppy infant' or attacks of episodic apnoea. Many molecular genetic abnormalities have been discovered in congenital myasthenic syndromes, but screening for these is impracticable without confirmation of a disorder of the neuromuscular junction. In this review, the different neurophysiological tests that can be used are discussed, with their merits and contraindications in children. After consideration of the acceptability of the different techniques, it has been found that stimulation single-fibre electromyography (stimSFEMG) of orbicularis oculi seems to be the best choice in children. In most instances it can be performed on the conscious child and it has a good specificity and high sensitivity. A protocol for using stimSFEMG is described. PMID:18312422

  3. Analysis of 1014 consecutive operative cases to determine the utility of intraoperative neurophysiological data

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Namath Syed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) during neurosurgical procedures has become the standard of care at tertiary care medical centers. While prospective data regarding the clinical utility of IOM are conspicuously lacking, retrospective analyses continue to provide useful information regarding surgeon responses to reported waveform changes. Methods: Data regarding clinical presentation, operative course, IOM, and postoperative neurological examination were compiled from a database of 1014 cranial and spinal surgical cases at a tertiary care medical center from 2005 to 2011. IOM modalities utilized included somatosensory evoked potentials, transcranial motor evoked potentials, pedicle screw stimulation, and electromyography. Surgeon responses to changes in IOM waveforms were recorded. Results: Changes in IOM waveforms indicating potential injury were present in 87 of 1014 cases (8.6%). In 23 of the 87 cases (26.4%), the surgeon responded by repositioning the patient (n = 12), repositioning retractors (n = 1) or implanted instrumentation (n = 9), or by stopping surgery (n = 1). Loss of IOM waveforms predicted postoperative neurological deficit in 10 cases (11.5% of cases with IOM changes). Conclusions: In the largest IOM series to date, we report that the surgeon responded by appropriate interventions in over 25% of cases during which there were IOM indicators of potential harm to neural structures. Prospective studies remain to be undertaken to adequately evaluate the utility of IOM in changing surgeon behavior. Our data is in agreement with previous observations in indicating a trend that supports the continued use of IOM. PMID:26396602

  4. Neurophysiological assessment for evaluating residual cognition in vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    De Salvo, Simona; Caminiti, Fabrizia; Bonanno, Lilla; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Corallo, Francesco; Caizzone, Antonino; Rifici, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to assess residual cognitive function and perform outcome evaluation in vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) patients, using Neurowave, a system able to monitor event-related potentials (ERPs) induced by neurosensory stimulation. Eleven VS and five MCS patients underwent neurological examination and clinical evaluation performed using validated clinical and behavioral scales; they also underwent neurosensory stimulation, which consisted of administration of target images (rare stimuli), relevant to the patient’s personal history and having emotional significance, alternated with non-target images (“standard” stimuli), which had no emotional significance. All simultaneous ERP responses at baseline (T0) and at three months from T0 (T1) were recorded. At T0 we found significant differences between the VS and MCS patients for the N200 (p=0.02) and P300 (p=0.04) waves. The neurophysiological analysis at T1 showed a significant difference only for P300 (p=0.02), probably due to the improvements observed in the VS subjects for the N100 (p=0.009) and N200 (p=0.02) sensory components. Our findings seem to show the value of ERP monitoring in VS and MCS patients as a means of investigating residual cognitive function. This approach could guide early therapeutic and rehabilitation interventions, and contribute to identifying better diagnostic and prognostic markers for use in unresponsive or low-responsive patients. PMID:26727702

  5. Brain oscillations forever--neurophysiology in future research of child psychiatric problems.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Aribert

    2009-01-01

    For decades neurophysiology has successfully contributed to research and clinical care in child psychiatry. Recently, methodological progress has led to a revival of interest in brain oscillations (i.e., a band of periodic neuronal frequencies with a wave-duration from milliseconds to several seconds which may code and decode information). These oscillations will nurture future information processing research during normal and pathological brain development, allowing us to investigate basic neuronal connectivity as well as interactions of brain systems and their modulation (e.g., by temporal neuronal synchronisation) as close correlates of behaviour and intermediate phenotypes from genes to behavioural variations. Especially, a systematic neurodynamic look at transitional processes from rest to stimulus-triggered goal-directed performance will aid behavioural understanding and guidance of children. Preliminary data suggest two separate oscillatory mechanisms in this respect. One is ongoing from pre- to post-stimulus processing and related to quantitative modification of behaviour, while another is merely related to qualitative effects of behaviour and reflects 'on-top' post-stimulus processing by temporal neuronal synchronisation of the oscillatory network in question. Suggested neurodynamic models may be tested in multilevel clinical experiments as well as in the framework of computational neuropsychiatry. PMID:19220591

  6. Systems-level neurophysiological state characteristics for drug evaluation in an animal model of levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Tamtè, Martin; Brys, Ivani; Richter, Ulrike; Ivica, Nedjeljka; Halje, Pär; Petersson, Per

    2016-03-01

    Disorders affecting the central nervous system have proven particularly hard to treat, and disappointingly few novel therapies have reached the clinics in recent decades. A better understanding of the physiological processes in the brain underlying various symptoms could therefore greatly improve the rate of progress in this field. We here show how systems-level descriptions of different brain states reliably can be obtained through a newly developed method based on large-scale recordings in distributed neural networks encompassing several different brain structures. Using this technology, we characterize the neurophysiological states associated with parkinsonism and levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease together with pharmacological interventions aimed at reducing dyskinetic symptoms. Our results show that the obtained electrophysiological data add significant information to conventional behavioral evaluations and hereby elucidate the underlying effects of treatments in greater detail. Taken together, these results potentially open up for studies of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying symptoms in a wide range of neurological and psychiatric conditions that until now have been very hard to investigate in animal models of disease. PMID:26740532

  7. Impulsivity is Associated with Early Sensory Inhibition in Neurophysiological Processing of Affective Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Soshi, Takahiro; Noda, Takamasa; Ando, Kumiko; Nakazawa, Kanako; Tsumura, Hideki; Okada, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is widely related to socially problematic behaviors and psychiatric illness. Previous studies have investigated the relationship between response inhibition and impulsivity. However, no study has intensively examined how impulsivity correlates with automatic sensory processing before the drive for response inhibition to sensory inputs. Sensory gating (SG) is an automatic inhibitory function that attenuates the neural response to redundant sensory information and protects higher cognitive functions from the burst of information processing. Although SG functions abnormally in several clinical populations, there is very little evidence supporting SG changes in conjunction with impulsivity traits in non-clinical populations. The present study recruited healthy adults (n = 23) to conduct a neurophysiological experiment using a paired-click paradigm and self-report scales assessing impulsive behavioral traits. Auditory stimuli included not only a pure tone but also white noise to explore the differences in auditory-evoked potential (AEP) responses between the two stimuli. White noise is more affective than pure tones; therefore, we predicted that the SG of AEPs (P50, N100, and P200) for white noise would correlate more with self-reported impulsivity than with those for pure tones. Our main findings showed that SG of the P50 and P200 amplitudes significantly correlated with self-reported reward responsiveness and fun-seeking, respectively, only for white noise stimuli, demonstrating that higher-scoring impulsivity subcomponents were related to greater SG. Frequency-domain analyses also revealed that greater desynchronization of the beta band for the second white noise stimulus was associated with higher motor impulsivity scores, suggesting that an impulsivity-related change of SG was associated with attentional modulation. These findings indicate that the measurement of SG of white noise may be an efficient tool to evaluate impulsivity in non-clinical

  8. Characterization of the winter atmospheric aerosols in Kyoto and Seoul using PIXE, EAS and IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Kasahara, Mikio; Tohno, Susumu; Hwang, Kyung-Chul

    Characteristics of atmospheric aerosols in Kyoto, Japan and Seoul, Korea were investigated using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), elemental analysis system (EAS) and ion chromatograph (IC). Atmospheric aerosols were collected into fine and coarse fractions using a two-stage filter pack sampler in Kyoto and Seoul in winter of 1998. PIXE was applied to analyze the middle and heavy elements with atomic number greater than 14 (Si), and EAS was applied to analyze the light elements such as H, C and N. The total mass concentration in Seoul was about two times higher than in Kyoto and the concentration of Ca, Si, and Ti that are mainly originated from soil were remarkably higher in Seoul. During an Asian dust storm event, the concentration of soil components increased dramatically and amounted to about 15 times higher than average concentration. The fine/coarse ratios of NH 4+, NO 3-, and SO 42- were extremely high in both sites. The fact that nearly 70% of fine particles in both Kyoto and Seoul consist of the light elements (N, C, and H) suggests the importance of light elements measurement. Good mass closure for fine particles with light element data was achieved.

  9. BRAIN ACONITASE ACTIVITY IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SHR) AND WISTAR-KYOTO (WKY) RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal models of susceptibility are critical for human health risk assessment. Previous studies indicate that spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats are more sensitive than Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats to the cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors such as carbaryl and chlorpyrifos. This diffe...

  10. Analysis of the Impacts of an Early Start for Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol

    EIA Publications

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Energy Information Administration's analysis of the impacts of an early start, using the same methodology as in Impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on U.S. Energy Markets and Economic Activity, with only those changes in assumptions caused by the early start date.

  11. Museum as an integrated imaging device: visualization of ancient Kyoto cityscape from folding screen artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Oyabu, Umi; Kojima, Michihiro

    2012-03-01

    Museums hold cultural resources such as artworks, historical artifacts, and folklore materials. The National Museum of Japanese History holds over 200,000 of the cultural resources. A role of museum is to exhibit the cultural resources, therefore a museum could be referred to as a visualization device for the information society. In this research, visualization of a history image from cultural resources with interactive user interface will be mentioned. The material focused on is the oldest extant version of a genre of folding screen paintings that depict the thriving city of Kyoto in the four seasons, named Rekihaku's "Scenes In and Around Kyoto" designated as a nationally important cultural property in Japan. Over 1,400 people and a lot of residences, temples, and houses are drawn, and those are also information resource telling us about city scenes and people's life in Kyoto at that time. Historical researches were done by using a high resolution digital image obtained by a large scaled scanner, and scanned images are used for computer programs to visualize a history image of ancient Kyoto. Combinations between real materials and information provided by using the computer programs are also described in this research.

  12. Neurophysiological indices of strategy development and skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Smith, M E; McEvoy, L K; Gevins, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to examine neurophysiological changes associated with the development of cognitive and visuomotor strategies and skills, spectral features of the EEG were measured as participants learned to perform new tasks. In one experiment eight individuals practiced working memory tasks that required development of either spatial or verbal rehearsal and updating strategies. In a second experiment six individuals practiced a video game with a difficult visuomotor tracking component. The alpha rhythm, which is attenuated by functional cortical activation, was affected by task practice. In both experiments, a lower-frequency, centrally distributed alpha component increased between practice sessions in a task-independent fashion, reflecting an overall decrease in the extent of cortical activation after practice. A second, higher-frequency, posterior component of the alpha rhythm displayed task-specific practice effects. Practice in the verbal working memory task resulted in an increase of this signal over right posterior regions, an effect not seen after practice with the spatial working memory task or with the video game. This between-task difference presumably reflects a continued involvement of the posterior region of the right hemisphere in tasks that invoke visuospatial processes. This finding thus provides neurophysiological evidence for the formation of a task-specific neurocognitive strategy. In the second experiment a third component of the alpha rhythm, localized over somatomotor cortex, was enhanced in conjunction with acquisition of tracking skill. These alpha band results suggest that cortical regions not necessary for task performance become less active as skills develop. In both experiments the frontal midline (Fm) theta rhythm also displayed increases over the course of test sessions. This signal is associated with states of focused concentration, and its enhancement might reflect the conscious control over attention associated with maintenance of a task

  13. Insomnia in Shift Work Disorder Relates to Occupational and Neurophysiological Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Ren; Gumenyuk, Valentina; Roth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether occupational and neurophysiological decrements within shift work disorder (SWD) are differentially related to its two diagnostic symptoms, insomnia and excessive sleepiness. Methods: Thirty-four permanent night workers participated in an overnight lab protocol including a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and an event-related brain potential (ERP) task testing auditory target detection (P3a and P3b). At 16:00, each subject completed an Endicott Work Productivity Scale (EWPS), two Insomnia Severity Indices (ISI-Day, ISI-Night), and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Subjects were grouped by ISI and ESS scores into clinical phenotypes. This study compared EWPS and ERP results between alert insomniacs (“AI,” reporting insomnia without sleepiness), sleepy insomniacs (“SI,” reporting both insomnia and sleepiness), and controls. Results: The AI group was most impaired on the EWPS, significantly more impaired than controls (25.8 ± 14.8 vs. 12.3 ± 9.4, p < 0.05). SI were not statistically different from controls (19.5 ± 8.7 vs. 12.3 ± 9.4, p > 0.05). Compared to controls, AI showed significantly attenuated P3a response (Fcz, Czp, Cpz, mean difference [MD] 1.62–1.77, p < 0.05) and target-detection P3b response (Fcz, Czp, Cpz, MD 1.28–1.64, p < 0.05). P3b in SI was not different from controls (p > 0.10), and P3a was only different at one electrode site (Cpz, MD 1.43, p < 0.01). Neither the MSLT nor the ESS correlated with EWPS scores or ERP (P3a/P3b) amplitudes (p > 0.10). However, the mean of the ISI measurements correlated with the EWPS (r = 0.409, p < 0.01) and the attention-to-novelty P3a (r = −0.410, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Among shift work disorder patients, insomnia is linked to functional and cognitive impairments. Insomniacs with normal sleepiness showed more severe impairments than insomniacs who also reported excessive sleepiness. Citation: Belcher R, Gumenyuk V, Roth T. Insomnia in shift work disorder

  14. The neurophysiological effects of a single session of spinal joint mobilization: does the effect last?

    PubMed Central

    Hegedus, Eric J; Goode, Adam; Butler, Robert J; Slaven, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Studies detailing the neurophysiological effects of spinal manual therapy have fueled a paradigm shift away from a strict biomechanical model. However, a recent systematic review of the temporal nature of a single session of spinal thrust manipulation found that the neurophysiological effects were only temporary. The objective of this review was to examine the temporal nature of neurophysiological effects after one session of spinal mobilization. Studies eligible for this review had to report on the temporal component of the neurophysiological effects of a single session of joint mobilization of the spine in human subjects. In order to be sure that the temporal nature of these effects was captured, the studies had to monitor neurophysiological effects for a time beyond the immediate post-treatment period. This systematic review followed the methodology for preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. In order to assess the quality, strength, and importance of the included studies, the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation system was used. Results of this review showed that the neurophysiological effects of a single session of spinal mobilization are mostly 5 minutes or less. An exception to these findings is hypoalgesia which may last up to 24 hours, based on one study. Continued research on small samples of healthy subjects with irrelevant immediate outcomes like salivary rate, skin conductance, and skin temperature should give way to randomized controlled trials on subjects with pain and decreased function. PMID:22851877

  15. Cocaine cue versus cocaine dosing in humans: Evidence for distinct neurophysiological response profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Malcolm S.; Flammino, Frank; Howard, Bryant; Nilsen, Diana; Prichep, Leslie S.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective, physiological and electroencephalographic (EEG) profiles were studied in cocaine dependent study participants in response to cocaine cue exposure or a dose of smoked cocaine. Both stimuli increased subjective ratings of cocaine high and craving, enhanced negative affect, and boosted plasma ACTH and skin conductance levels. However, cocaine dose produced a greater increase in high and a more prolonged increase in plasma ACTH, while cocaine cue produced a decline in skin temperature. Both stimuli produced increases in absolute theta, alpha and beta EEG power over the prefrontal cortex. However, interhemispheric EEG coherence over the prefrontal cortex decreased during cocaine cue exposure but increased following cocaine dose. Moreover, correlation analysis of subjective, physiological and EEG responding to cocaine cue and dose revealed distinct profiles. Delta and theta activity were associated with negative affect during cocaine cue exposure, but were associated with cocaine craving and reward following cocaine dosing. In both conditions, alpha activity was marker for anxiousness but not high. These data demonstrate similar subjective, physiological responding in clinical laboratory states of cocaine craving and reward. However, differences in EEG response profiles, and their relationship to function, indicate distinct neurophysiological mediators of cocaine craving and reward within the prefrontal cortex. PMID:18674556

  16. Behavioral and neurophysiological investigation of the influence of verbal suggestion on tactile perception.

    PubMed

    Fiorio, M; Recchia, S; Corrà, F; Tinazzi, M

    2014-01-31

    Recently we demonstrated that it is possible to influence tactile perception by applying a placebo manipulation consisting of verbal suggestion and conditioning and that this influence is associated to changes in the late components (N140 and P200) of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) (Fiorio et al., 2012). Due to the powerful effects of words in changing symptoms perception in the clinical domain, aim of this study was to investigate whether even in the tactile modality, perception can be changed by the mere use of persuasive words in a specific context. To this purpose, we adopted the same experimental setting of our previous study, apart from the conditioning procedure. A group of subjects (experimental group) has been verbally suggested about the effect of an inert cream in enhancing tactile perception, while a control group was informed about the inefficacy of the cream. In order to unveil the neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect, we compared the amplitude of late SEPs (P100, N140, P200), before and after treatment. Results showed that the experimental group did not perceive an increase of tactile sensation after the treatment and no modification occurred in the late SEPs. This study proves that verbal suggestion alone is not sufficient to induce enhanced tactile perception (at least with this experimental setting), suggesting that a conditioning procedure may be necessary in the tactile modality. The absence of changes in the late SEP components could reflect the lack of strong expectation following the placebo procedure. PMID:24291728

  17. Primary headaches and trigeminal neuralgia: neuropathic pain yes or not? Evidences from neurophysiological procedures.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Vecchio, Eleonora

    2013-09-01

    Despite the fact that neurophysiological evaluation is not useful for primary headache diagnosis, the nociceptive system exploration through reflexes and evoked potentials procedures may give an aid in understanding the pathophysiological mechanism subtending pain. Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, which is supported by clinical evaluation and instrumental assessment by trigeminal and nociceptive reflexes and laser evoked potentials. The same methods, applied to migraine and cluster headache, together with evidences coming from structural and functional neuroimaging, excluded the neuropathic origin of pain, which is attaining to symptomatic and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but confirmed a complex dysfunction of pain processing. Tension-type headache fits with a model of non-nociceptive and non-neuropathic pain, subtended by a complex interaction of peripheral muscular and central neuronal factors. The presence of altered modulation of pain concurs with migraine and tension-type headache, and should be taken into account for the choice of the best therapeutic approach. PMID:23952254

  18. An effective intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring scheme for aneurysm clipping and spinal fusion surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Yaylali, Ilker; Cabrerizo, Mercedes; Vedala, Krishnatej; Adjouadi, Malek

    2012-04-01

    Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) have been widely used for intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). Currently at least 200-300 trials are required to generate a readable SSEP signal. This study introduces a novel approach that yields accurate detection results of the SSEP signal yet with a significantly reduced number of trials, resulting in an effectual monitoring process. The analysis was performed on data recorded in seven patients undergoing surgery, where the posterior tibial nerve was stimulated and the SSEP response was recorded from scalp electroencephalography using two bipolar electrodes, C3-C4 and CZ-FZ. The proposed approach employs an innovative, simple yet effective algorithm based on a patient-specific Gaussian template to detect the SSEP using only 30 trials. The time latencies of the P37 and N45 peaks are detected along with the peak-to-peak amplitudes. The time latencies are detected with a mean accuracy greater than 95%. Also, the P37 and N45 peak latencies and the peak-to-peak amplitude were found to be consistent throughout the surgical procedure within the 10% and 50% acceptable clinical limits, respectively. The results obtained support the assertion that the algorithm is capable of detecting SSEPs with high accuracy and consistency throughout the entire surgical procedure using only 30 trials.

  19. Afference copy as a quantitative neurophysiological model for consciousness.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D

    2014-06-01

    Consciousness is a topic of considerable human curiosity with a long history of philosophical analysis and debate. We consider there is nothing particularly complicated about consciousness when viewed as a necessary process of the vertebrate nervous system. Here, we propose a physiological "explanatory gap" is created during each present moment by the temporal requirements of neuronal activity. The gap extends from the time exteroceptive and proprioceptive stimuli activate the nervous system until they emerge into consciousness. During this "moment", it is impossible for an organism to have any conscious knowledge of the ongoing evolution of its environment. In our schematic model, a mechanism of "afference copy" is employed to bridge the explanatory gap with consciously experienced percepts. These percepts are fabricated from the conjunction of the cumulative memory of previous relevant experience and the given stimuli. They are structured to provide the best possible prediction of the expected content of subjective conscious experience likely to occur during the period of the gap. The model is based on the proposition that the neural circuitry necessary to support consciousness is a product of sub/preconscious reflexive learning and recall processes. Based on a review of various psychological and neurophysiological findings, we develop a framework which contextualizes the model and briefly discuss further implications. PMID:25012715

  20. Do Stretch Durations Affect Muscle Mechanical and Neurophysiological Properties?

    PubMed

    Opplert, J; Genty, J-B; Babault, N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether stretching durations influence acute changes of mechanical and neurophysiological properties of plantar flexor muscles. Plantar flexors of 10 active males were stretched in passive conditions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Different durations of static stretching were tested in 5 randomly ordered experimental trials (1, 2, 3, 4 and 10×30-s). Fascicle stiffness index, evoked contractile properties and spinal excitability (Hmax/Mmax) were examined before (PRE), immediately after (POST0) and 5 min after (POST5) stretching. No stretch duration effect was recorded for any variable. Moreover, whatever the stretching duration, stiffness index, peak twitch torque and rate of force development were significantly lower at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Electromechanical delay was longer at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Whatever the stretch duration, no significant changes of Hmax/Mmax ratio were recorded. In conclusion, 30 s of static stretching to maximum tolerated discomfort is sufficient enough to alter mechanical properties of plantar flexor muscles, but 10×30 s does not significantly affect these properties further. Stretching does not impair spinal excitability. PMID:27191211

  1. Neurophysiological mechanisms involved in language learning in adults

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Cunillera, Toni; Mestres-Missé, Anna; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the brain mechanisms involved in word learning during infancy and in second language acquisition and about the way these new words become stable representations that sustain language processing. In several studies we have adopted the human simulation perspective, studying the effects of brain-lesions and combining different neuroimaging techniques such as event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging in order to examine the language learning (LL) process. In the present article, we review this evidence focusing on how different brain signatures relate to (i) the extraction of words from speech, (ii) the discovery of their embedded grammatical structure, and (iii) how meaning derived from verbal contexts can inform us about the cognitive mechanisms underlying the learning process. We compile these findings and frame them into an integrative neurophysiological model that tries to delineate the major neural networks that might be involved in the initial stages of LL. Finally, we propose that LL simulations can help us to understand natural language processing and how the recovery from language disorders in infants and adults can be accomplished. PMID:19933142

  2. Foundations for evidence-based intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Howick, Jeremy; Cohen, Bernard Allan; McCulloch, Peter; Thompson, Matthew; Skinner, Stanley A

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we recommend means to enhance the evidence-base for intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). We address two preliminary issues: (1) whether IONM should be evaluated as a diagnostic test or an intervention, and (2) the state of the evidence for IONM (as presented in systematic reviews, for example). Three reasons may be suggested to evaluate at least some IONM applications as interventions (or as part of an "interventional cascade"). First, practical barriers limit our ability to measure IONM diagnostic accuracy. Second, IONM results are designed to be correlated with interventions during surgery. Third, IONM should improve patient outcomes when IONM-directed intervention alters the course of surgery. Observational evidence for IONM is growing yet more is required to understand the conditions under which IONM, in its variety of settings, can benefit patients. A multi-center observational cohort study would represent an important initial compromise between the pragmatic difficulties with conducting controlled trials in IONM and the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) view that large scale randomized trials are required. Such a cohort study would improve the evidence base and (if justified) provide the rationale for controlled trials. PMID:26268581

  3. Neurophysiology for Detection of High Risk for Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Pantlin, Lara N; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex and often disabling disorder that is characterized by a wide range of social, emotional, and cognitive deficits. Increasing research suggests that the greatest social and cognitive therapeutic impact comes from early identification. The present study applied a well-established neurophysiological paradigm in the schizophrenia literature, mismatch negativity (MMN), to college students identified as high risk (HR) for psychosis to investigate MMN as a potential biomarker for the onset of psychosis. The hypothesis was that HR would exhibit attenuated MMN amplitudes compared to controls, as has been established in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Participants (N = 121) were separated into Group 1 (controls) (n 1 = 72) and Group 2 (HR) (n 2 = 49) based on the established cutoff score of the 16-item Prodromal Questionnaire. Participants then completed a time based MMN paradigm during which brain activity was recorded with EEG. For all electrode locations, controls demonstrated significantly more negative amplitudes than HR (Cz: F(1,119) = 8.09, p = .005; Fz: F(1, 119) = 5.74, p = .018; Pz: F(1,119) = 5.88, p = .017). Results suggested that MMN may assist in identifying those who appear high-functioning but may be at risk for later development of psychosis or cognitive and psychological difficulties associated with psychosis. PMID:27579180

  4. Pitch, Harmonicity and Concurrent Sound Segregation: Psychoacoustical and Neurophysiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Micheyl, Christophe; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Harmonic complex tones are a particularly important class of sounds found in both speech and music. Although these sounds contain multiple frequency components, they are usually perceived as a coherent whole, with a pitch corresponding to the fundamental frequency (F0). However, when two or more harmonic sounds occur concurrently, e.g., at a cocktail party or in a symphony, the auditory system must separate harmonics and assign them to their respective F0s so that a coherent and veridical representation of the different sounds sources is formed. Here we review both psychophysical and neurophysiological (single-unit and evoked-potential) findings, which provide some insight into how, and how well, the auditory system accomplishes this task. A survey of computational models designed to estimate multiple F0s and segregate concurrent sources is followed by a review of the empirical literature on the perception and neural coding of concurrent harmonic sounds, including vowels, as well as findings obtained using single complex tones with “mistuned” harmonics. PMID:19788920

  5. Neurophysiological Pathways to Obesity: Below Awareness and Beyond Individual Control

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    A global obesity epidemic is occurring simultaneously with ongoing increases in the availability and salience of food in the environment. Obesity is increasing across all socioeconomic groups and educational levels and occurs even among individuals with the highest levels of education and expertise in nutrition and related fields. Given these circumstances, it is plausible that excessive food consumption occurs in ways that defy personal insight or are below individual awareness. The current food environment stimulates automatic reflexive responses that enhance the desire to eat and increase caloric intake, making it exceedingly difficult for individuals to resist, especially because they may not be aware of these influences. This article identifies 10 neurophysiological pathways that can lead people to make food choices subconsciously or, in some cases, automatically. These pathways include reflexive and uncontrollable neurohormonal responses to food images, cues, and smells; mirror neurons that cause people to imitate the eating behavior of others without awareness; and limited cognitive capacity to make informed decisions about food. Given that people have limited ability to shape the food environment individually and no ability to control automatic responses to food-related cues that are unconsciously perceived, it is incumbent upon society as a whole to regulate the food environment, including the number and types of food-related cues, portion sizes, food availability, and food advertising. PMID:18586908

  6. Cough: neurophysiology, methods of research, pharmacological therapy and phonoaudiology

    PubMed Central

    Balbani, Aracy Pereira Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The cough is the more common respiratory symptom in children and adults. Objective: To present a revision on the neurophysiology and the methods for study of the consequence of the cough, as well as the pharmacotherapy and phonoaudiology therapy of the cough, based on the works published between 2005 and 2010 and indexed in the bases Medline, Lilacs and Library Cochrane under them to keywords “cough” or “anti-cough”. Synthesis of the data: The consequence of the cough involves activation of receiving multiples becomes vacant in the aerial ways and of neural projections of the nucleus of the solitary treatment for other structures of the central nervous system. Experimental techniques allow studying the consequence of the cough to the cellular and molecular level to develop new anti-cough agents. It does not have evidences of that anti-cough exempt of medical lapsing they have superior effectiveness to the one of placebo for the relief of the cough. The phonoaudiology therapy can benefit patients with refractory chronic cough to the pharmacological treatment, over all when paradoxical movement of the vocal folds coexists. Final Comments: The boarding to multidiscipline has basic paper in the etiological diagnosis and treatment of the cough. The otolaryngologist must inform the patients on the risks of the anti-cough of free sales in order to prevent adverse poisonings and effect, especially in children. PMID:25991944

  7. Neurophysiology for Detection of High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex and often disabling disorder that is characterized by a wide range of social, emotional, and cognitive deficits. Increasing research suggests that the greatest social and cognitive therapeutic impact comes from early identification. The present study applied a well-established neurophysiological paradigm in the schizophrenia literature, mismatch negativity (MMN), to college students identified as high risk (HR) for psychosis to investigate MMN as a potential biomarker for the onset of psychosis. The hypothesis was that HR would exhibit attenuated MMN amplitudes compared to controls, as has been established in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Participants (N = 121) were separated into Group 1 (controls) (n1 = 72) and Group 2 (HR) (n2 = 49) based on the established cutoff score of the 16-item Prodromal Questionnaire. Participants then completed a time based MMN paradigm during which brain activity was recorded with EEG. For all electrode locations, controls demonstrated significantly more negative amplitudes than HR (Cz: F(1,119) = 8.09, p = .005; Fz: F(1, 119) = 5.74, p = .018; Pz: F(1,119) = 5.88, p = .017). Results suggested that MMN may assist in identifying those who appear high-functioning but may be at risk for later development of psychosis or cognitive and psychological difficulties associated with psychosis. PMID:27579180

  8. Neurophysiological predictor of SMR-based BCI performance.

    PubMed

    Blankertz, Benjamin; Sannelli, Claudia; Halder, Sebastian; Hammer, Eva M; Kübler, Andrea; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Curio, Gabriel; Dickhaus, Thorsten

    2010-07-15

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow a user to control a computer application by brain activity as measured, e.g., by electroencephalography (EEG). After about 30years of BCI research, the success of control that is achieved by means of a BCI system still greatly varies between subjects. For about 20% of potential users the obtained accuracy does not reach the level criterion, meaning that BCI control is not accurate enough to control an application. The determination of factors that may serve to predict BCI performance, and the development of methods to quantify a predictor value from psychological and/or physiological data serve two purposes: a better understanding of the 'BCI-illiteracy phenomenon', and avoidance of a costly and eventually frustrating training procedure for participants who might not obtain BCI control. Furthermore, such predictors may lead to approaches to antagonize BCI illiteracy. Here, we propose a neurophysiological predictor of BCI performance which can be determined from a two minute recording of a 'relax with eyes open' condition using two Laplacian EEG channels. A correlation of r=0.53 between the proposed predictor and BCI feedback performance was obtained on a large data base with N=80 BCI-naive participants in their first session with the Berlin brain-computer interface (BBCI) system which operates on modulations of sensory motor rhythms (SMRs). PMID:20303409

  9. Consensus paper of the WFSBP Task Force on Biological Markers: Criteria for biomarkers and endophenotypes of schizophrenia part I: Neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Thibaut, Florence; Boutros, Nash N; Jarema, Marek; Oranje, Bob; Hasan, Alkomiet; Daskalakis, Zafiris Jeffrey; Wichniak, Adam; Schmitt, Andrea; Riederer, Peter; Falkai, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The neurophysiological components that have been proposed as biomarkers or as endophenotypes for schizophrenia can be measured through electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), polysomnography (PSG), registration of event-related potentials (ERPs), assessment of smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM) and antisaccade paradigms. Most of them demonstrate deficits in schizophrenia, show at least moderate stability over time and do not depend on clinical status, which means that they fulfil the criteria as valid endophenotypes for genetic studies. Deficits in cortical inhibition and plasticity measured using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques seem promising markers of outcome and prognosis. However the utility of these markers as biomarkers for predicting conversion to psychosis, response to treatments, or for tracking disease progression needs to be further studied. PMID:26213111

  10. Ecology and Neurophysiology of Sleep in Two Wild Sloth Species

    PubMed Central

    Voirin, Bryson; Scriba, Madeleine F.; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Wikelski, Martin; Rattenborg, Niels C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Interspecific variation in sleep measured in captivity correlates with various physiological and environmental factors, including estimates of predation risk in the wild. However, it remains unclear whether prior comparative studies have been confounded by the captive recording environment. Herein we examine the effect of predation pressure on sleep in sloths living in the wild. Design: Comparison of two closely related sloth species, one exposed to predation and one free from predation. Setting: Panamanian mainland rainforest (predators present) and island mangrove (predators absent). Participants: Mainland (Bradypus variegatus, five males and four females) and island (Bradypus pygmaeus, six males) sloths. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded using a miniature data logger. Although both species spent between 9 and 10 h per day sleeping, the mainland sloths showed a preference for sleeping at night, whereas island sloths showed no preference for sleeping during the day or night. Standardized EEG activity during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed lower low-frequency power, and increased spindle and higher frequency power in island sloths when compared to mainland sloths. Conclusions: In sloths sleeping in the wild, predation pressure influenced the timing of sleep, but not the amount of time spent asleep. The preference for sleeping at night in mainland sloths may be a strategy to avoid detection by nocturnal cats. The pronounced differences in the NREM sleep EEG spectrum remain unexplained, but might be related to genetic or environmental factors. Citation: Voirin B; Scriba MF; Martinez-Gonzalez D; Vyssotski AL; Wikelski M; Rattenborg NC. Ecology and neurophysiology of sleep in two wild sloth species. SLEEP 2014;37(4):753-761. PMID:24899764

  11. Artificial gravity exposure impairs exercise-related neurophysiological benefits.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Tobias; Abeln, Vera; Strüder, Heiko K; Schneider, Stefan

    2014-01-17

    Artificial gravity (AG) exposure is suggested to counteract health deconditioning, theoretically complementing exercise during space habitations. Exercise-benefits on mental health are well documented (i.e. well-being, enhanced executive functions). Although AG is coherent for the integrity of fundamental physiological systems, the effects of its exposure on neurophysiological processes related to cognitive performance are poorly understood and therefore characterize the primary aim of this study. 16 healthy males participated in two randomly assigned sessions, AG and exercise (30minute each). Participants were exposed to AG at continuous +2Gz in a short-arm human centrifuge and performed moderate exercise (cycling ergometer). Using 64 active electrodes, resting EEG was recorded before (pre), immediately after (post), and 15min after (post15) each session. Alpha (7.5-12.5Hz) and beta frequencies (12.5-35.0Hz) were exported for analysis. Cognitive performance and mood states were assessed before and after each session. Cognitive performance improved after exercise (p<0.05), but not after AG. This was reflected by typical EEG patterns after exercise, however not after AG. Frontal alpha (post p<0.01, post15 p<0.001) and beta activity (post15 p<0.001) increased after AG compared to a decrease in frontal alpha (post15 p<0.05) and beta activity (post p<0.01) after exercise. Relaxed cortical states were indicated after exercise, but were less apparent after AG. Changes in mood states failed significance after both sessions. Summarized, the benefits to mental health, recorded after exercise, were absent after AG, indicating that AG might cause neurocognitive deconditioning. PMID:24184512

  12. Considering WTO law in the design of climate change regimes beyond Kyoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Sanford E.

    2009-11-01

    This article describes the most important provisions of World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements that should be considered in designing laws and regulations under likely post-Kyoto climate change mitigation regimes. The Kyoto Protocol and the expected post-Kyoto international climate agreement depend on national measures to implement market-based mitigation measures. This market strategy promotes international exchanges of goods, investments, and services such as cross-border trading of credits for emissions reductions and transnational financing for projects that avoid emissions through the Clean Development Mechanism. Moreover, the United States and other countries, concerned over "leakage" of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through relocation of industry to other countries coupled with political worry over manufacturing competitiveness, have proposed national climate legislation containing border adjustments on imported goods or implicit subsidies for national producers, raising additional WTO considerations. The article assesses the likely effectiveness of such trade-related measures in achieving climate change mitigation goals and the potential trade policy infringements and trade distortions that they might bring about. Alternative strategies for achieving GHG mitigation goals in closer conformity with WTO law and policy will be suggested.

  13. Remote Sensing and the Kyoto Protocol: A Review of Available and Future Technology for Monitoring Treaty Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Rosenquist, A.; Milne, A. K.; Dobson, M. C.; Qi, J.

    2000-01-01

    An International workshop was held to address how remote sensing technology could be used to support the environmental monitoring requirements of the Kyoto Protocol. An overview of the issues addressed and the findings of the workshop are discussed.

  14. MatOFF: A Tool For Analyzing Behaviorally-Complex Neurophysiological Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Genovesio, Aldo; Mitz, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    The simple operant conditioning originally used in behavioral neurophysiology 30 years ago has given way to complex and sophisticated behavioral paradigms; so much so, that early general purpose programs for analyzing neurophysiological data are ill-suited for complex experiments. The trend has been to develop custom software for each class of experiment, but custom software can have serious drawbacks. We describe here a general purpose software tool for behavioral and electrophysiological studies, called MatOFF, that is especially suited for processing neurophysiological data gathered during the execution of complex behaviors. Written in the MATLAB programming language, MatOFF solves the problem of handling complex analysis requirements in a unique and powerful way. While other neurophysiological programs are either a loose collection of tools or append MATLAB as a post-processing step, MatOFF is an integrated environment that supports MATLAB scripting within the event search engine safely isolated in programming sandbox. The results from scripting are stored separately, but in parallel with the raw data, and thus available to all subsequent MatOFF analysis and display processing. An example from a recently published experiment shows how all the features of MatOFF work together to analyze complex experiments and mine neurophysiological data in efficient ways. PMID:17604115

  15. Using neurophysiological signals that reflect cognitive or affective state: six recommendations to avoid common pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Zander, Thorsten O.; van Erp, Jan B. F.; Korteling, Johannes E.; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating cognitive or affective state from neurophysiological signals and designing applications that make use of this information requires expertise in many disciplines such as neurophysiology, machine learning, experimental psychology, and human factors. This makes it difficult to perform research that is strong in all its aspects as well as to judge a study or application on its merits. On the occasion of the special topic “Using neurophysiological signals that reflect cognitive or affective state” we here summarize often occurring pitfalls and recommendations on how to avoid them, both for authors (researchers) and readers. They relate to defining the state of interest, the neurophysiological processes that are expected to be involved in the state of interest, confounding factors, inadvertently “cheating” with classification analyses, insight on what underlies successful state estimation, and finally, the added value of neurophysiological measures in the context of an application. We hope that this paper will support the community in producing high quality studies and well-validated, useful applications. PMID:25983676

  16. Neurophysiological investigation of spontaneous correlated and anticorrelated fluctuations of the BOLD signal

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Corey J.; Bickel, Stephan; Honey, Christopher J.; Groppe, David M.; Entz, Laszlo; Craddock, R. Cameron; Lado, Fred A.; Kelly, Clare; Milham, Michael; Mehta, Ashesh D.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of intrinsic fMRI BOLD signal fluctuations reliably reveal correlated and anticorrelated functional networks in the brain. Since the BOLD signal is an indirect measure of neuronal activity, and anticorrelations can be introduced by preprocessing steps such as global signal regression (GSR), the neurophysiological significance of correlated and anticorrelated BOLD fluctuations is a source of debate. Here, we address this question by examining the correspondence between the spatial organization of correlated BOLD fluctuations and correlated fluctuations in electrophysiological high gamma power (HGP) signals recorded directly from the cortical surface of 5 patients. We demonstrate that both positive and negative BOLD correlations have neurophysiological correlates reflected in fluctuations of spontaneous neuronal activity. Although applying GSR to BOLD signals results in some BOLD anticorrelations that are not apparent in the ECoG data, it enhances the neuronal-hemodynamic correspondence overall. Together, these findings provide support for the neurophysiological fidelity of BOLD correlations and anticorrelations. PMID:23575832

  17. Application of neurophysiological biomarkers for Huntington's disease: evaluating a phosphodiesterase 9A inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Dávid; Tingley, Francis D; Stoiljkovic, Milan; Hajós, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    Several neurophysiological abnormalities have been described in Huntington's disease, including auditory gating deficit, which are considered to reflect impaired brain information-processing. Since transgenic animal models of Huntington's disease capture basic neuropathology of the disorder, auditory gating was studied in BACHD (line5) transgenic rats and Q175 transgenic mice, together with local field gamma power in the hippocampus and primary auditory cortex. Using clinically equivalent acoustic-stimulation paradigms, impaired auditory gating was detected in transgenic BACHD rats under anesthesia and in freely-moving condition. In addition, transgenic BACHD rats showed a lower level of hippocampal and cortical field gamma band power compared to wild-type counterpart, which might be related to their compromised mitochondrial function. Systemic administration of the recently developed phosphodiesterase 9A (PDE9A) inhibitor PF-04447943 dose-dependently improved gating deficit in transgenic BACHD rats in both brain regions. Q175 mice, including wild-type, heterozygote and homozygote mice showed similarly poor gating, and administration of PF-04447943 was without effect. Treatment of transgenic BACHD rats with daily administration of PF-04447943 (1mg/kg) over 7-days resulted in an improvement in their auditory gating both in the hippocampus and primary auditory cortex as evaluated 24h after the last treatment. In fact, differences in auditory gating between wild-type and transgenic BACHD rats were totally abolished after sub-chronic treatment with the PDE9A inhibitor. Our findings indicate that BACHD transgenic rats show abnormal auditory gating with features resembling those of Huntington's disease patients, which could be considered as potential translational biomarker for drug development in treatment of this disease. PMID:25315303

  18. Spectrum of peripheral neuropathies associated with surgical interventions; A neurophysiological assessment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that a wide range of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathies, not just in close proximity but also remote from procedural sites. The aim of this study was to classify post-operative neuropathies and the procedures associated with them. Methods We retrospectively identified 66 patients diagnosed with post-procedure neuropathies between January 2005 and June 2008. We reviewed their referral cards and medical records for patient demographics, information on procedures, symptoms, as well as clinical and neurophysiological findings. Results Thirty patients (45.4%) had neuropathies remote from procedural sites and 36 patients (54.5%) had neuropathies in close proximity to procedural sites. Half of the remote neuropathies (15/30) developed following relatively short procedures. In 27% of cases (8/30) remote neuropathies were bilateral. Seven patients developed neuropathies remote from operative sites following hip arthroplasties (7/30: 23.3%), making hip arthroplasty the most common procedure associated with remote neuropathies. Sciatic neuropathies due to hip arthroplasty (12/36, 33.3%) accounted for the majority of neuropathies occurring in close proximity to operative sites. Five medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathies occurred following arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formation. Conclusions An array of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathy. Almost half of post-procedure neuropathies occur remote from the site of procedure, emphasizing the need to try to prevent not just local, but also remote neuropathies. Mechanical factors and patient positioning should be considered in the prevention of post-operative neuropathies. There is a possible association between AVF formation and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathy, which requires further study for validation. PMID:20398427

  19. Use of virtual slide system for quick frozen intra-operative telepathology diagnosis in Kyoto, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, Yasunari; Takamatsu, Terumasa; Hashimoto, Yukimasa; Takashima, Tooru; Nakano, Kooji; Fujita, Setsuya

    2008-01-01

    We started to use virtual slide (VS) and virtual microscopy (VM) systems for quick frozen intra-operative telepathology diagnosis in Kyoto, Japan. In the system we used a digital slide scanner, VASSALO by CLARO Inc., and a broadband optic fibre provided by NTT West Japan Inc. with the best effort capacity of 100 Mbps. The client is the pathology laboratory of Yamashiro Public Hospital, one of the local centre hospitals located in the south of Kyoto Prefecture, where a full-time pathologist is not present. The client is connected by VPN to the telepathology centre of our institute located in central Kyoto. As a result of the recent 15 test cases of VS telepathology diagnosis, including cases judging negative or positive surgical margins, we could estimate the usefulness of VS in intra-operative remote diagnosis. The time required for the frozen section VS file making was found to be around 10 min when we use x10 objective and if the maximal dimension of the frozen sample is less than 20 mm. Good correct focus of VS images was attained in all cases and all the fields of each tissue specimen. Up to now the capacity of best effort B-band appears to be sufficient to attain diagnosis on time in intra-operation. Telepathology diagnosis was achieved within 5 minutes in most cases using VS viewer provided by CLARO Inc. The VS telepathology system was found to be superior to the conventional still image telepathology system using a robotic microscope since in the former we can observe much greater image information than in the latter in a certain limited time of intra-operation and in the much more efficient ways. In the near future VS telepathology will replace conventional still image telepathology with a robotic microscope even in quick frozen intra-operative diagnosis. PMID:18673520

  20. [Climatic change and public health: scenarios after the coming into force of the Kyoto Protocol].

    PubMed

    Ballester, Ferran; Díaz, Julio; Moreno, José Manuel

    2006-03-01

    According to the reports of the intergovernmental panel for climatic change (IPCC) human beings of the present and near future are going to experiment, in fact we are already experimenting, important changes in the world climate. Conscious of the magnitude of the problem, international organizations have taken a series of initiatives headed to stop the climatic change and to reduce its impact. This willingness has been shaped into the agreements established in the Kyoto protocol, where countries commit to reduce greenhouse-effect gas emissions. Kyoto protocol has come into force on February 16th 2005 with the support of 141 signing countries. Among the major worries are the effects which climatic change may have upon health, such as: 1) changes in the morbidity- mortality related to temperature; 2) Effects on health related with extreme meteorological events (tornados, storms, hurricanes and extreme raining); 3) Air pollution and increase of associated health effects; d) Diseases transmitted by food and water and 4) Infectious diseases transmitted by vectors and by rodents. Even if all the countries in the world committed to the Kyoto Protocol, some consequences of the climatic change will be inevitable; among them some will have a negative impact on health. It would be necessary to adapt a key response strategy to minimize the impacts of climatic change and to reduce, at minimum cost, its adverse effects on health. From the Public Health position, a relevant role can and must be played concerning the understanding of the risks for health of such climatic changes, the design of surveillance systems to evaluate possible impacts, and the establishment of systems to prevent or reduce damages as well as the identification and development of investigation needs. PMID:16539979

  1. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Effects of Morphological Awareness Training on Spelling and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Silvana; Grabner, Roland H.; Kargl, Reinhard; Purgstaller, Christian; Fink, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a computer-aided morphological training protocol were examined in German-speaking children from Grades 3 to 9. Study 1 compared morphological awareness, reading, and spelling skills of 34 trained children with an untrained control group of 34 children matched for age, sex, and intelligence. All…

  2. Aging and emotional memory: the co-occurrence of neurophysiological and behavioral positivity effects.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; van Strien, Jan W

    2009-06-01

    The positivity effect is a trend for adults to increasingly process positive and/or decreasingly process negative information compared with other information with advancing age. The positivity effect has been observed with behavioral measures, such as in attention and memory tests, and with measures of neurophysiological activity, such as in amygdala activation and the late positive potential (LPP). In this study, it was investigated whether these behavioral and neurophysiological positivity effects co-occur. The electroencephalogram of younger (19-26 years) and older (65-82 years) adults was recorded while they encoded unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant pictures for retrieval in free and cued recall tests. Positivity effects occurred in the late LPP amplitude (700-1,000 ms) and in the free recall test, with negativity biases in younger adults and no biases in older adults. The occurrence of a valence bias in the LPP was substantially but nonsignificantly correlated with the occurrence of a similar valence bias in memory in the older adults. In conclusion, neurophysiological and behavioral positivity effects appear to co-occur, a finding that awaits expansion using different neurophysiological and behavioral measures. PMID:19485614

  3. Overcoming Misconceptions in Neurophysiology Learning: An Approach Using Color-Coded Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guy, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Anyone who has taught neurophysiology would be aware of recurring concepts that students find difficult to understand. However, a greater problem is the development of misconceptions that may be difficult to change. For example, one common misconception is that action potentials pass directly across chemical synapses. Difficulties may be…

  4. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Reflexive and Voluntary Saccades in Non-Human Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Kevin; Everling, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    A multitude of cognitive functions can easily be tested by a number of relatively simple saccadic eye movement tasks. This approach has been employed extensively with patient populations to investigate the functional deficits associated with psychiatric disorders. Neurophysiological studies in non-human primates performing the same tasks have…

  5. The Neurophysiological Correlates of Face Processing in Adults and Children with Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Kate; Hamm, Jeff P.; Kirk, Ian J.

    2005-01-01

    Past research has found evidence for face and emotional expression processing differences between individuals with Asperger's syndrome (AS) and neurotypical (NT) controls at both the neurological and behavioural levels. The aim of the present study was to examine the neurophysiological basis of emotional expression processing in children and…

  6. Risk and Resilience: Early Manipulation of Macaque Social Experience and Persistent Behavioral and Neurophysiological Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Hanna E.; Leckman, James F.; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    A literature review on macaque monkeys finds that peer rearing of young macaques and rearing of young macaques by mothers that are undergoing variable foraging conditions result in emotional and neurophysiological disturbance. Certain genotypes contribute to resilience to this disturbance. The findings have implications to child mental health and…

  7. Neurophysiologic Evaluation of Early Cognitive Development in High-Risk Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deRegnier, Raye-Ann

    2005-01-01

    New knowledge of the perceptual, discriminative, and memory capabilities of very young infants has opened the door to further evaluation of these abilities in infants who have risk factors for cognitive impairments. A neurophysiologic technique that has been very useful in this regard is the recording of event-related potentials (ERPs). The…

  8. A Study of the Effectiveness of Sensory Integration Therapy on Neuro-Physiological Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Christopher; Reynolds, Kathleen Sheena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sensory integration theory proposes that because there is plasticity within the central nervous system (the brain is moldable) and because the brain consists of systems that are hierarchically organised, it is possible to stimulate and improve neuro-physiological processing and integration and thereby increase learning capacity.…

  9. Syntax as a Reflex: Neurophysiological Evidence for Early Automaticity of Grammatical Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulvermuller, Friedemann; Shtyrov, Yury; Hasting, Anna S.; Carlyon, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    It has been a matter of debate whether the specifically human capacity to process syntactic information draws on attentional resources or is automatic. To address this issue, we recorded neurophysiological indicators of syntactic processing to spoken sentences while subjects were distracted to different degrees from language processing. Subjects…

  10. Neurophysiologic Analysis of the Effects of Interactive Tailored Health Videos on Attention to Health Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung A.

    2011-01-01

    Web-based tailored approaches hold much promise as effective means for delivering health education and improving public health. This study examines the effects of interactive tailored health videos on attention to health messages using neurophysiological changes measured by Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Electrocardiogram (EKG). Sixty-eight…

  11. Understanding in an Instant: Neurophysiological Evidence for Mechanistic Language Circuits in the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulvermuller, Friedemann; Shtyrov, Yury; Hauk, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    How long does it take the human mind to grasp the idea when hearing or reading a sentence? Neurophysiological methods looking directly at the time course of brain activity indexes of comprehension are critical for finding the answer to this question. As the dominant cognitive approaches, models of serial/cascaded and parallel processing, make…

  12. Adaptive Optics at Optical Wavelengths: Test Observations of Kyoto 3DII Connected to Subaru Telescope AO188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Akita, A.; Hattori, T.; Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) enables us to observe objects with high spatial resolution, which is important in most astrophysical observations. Most AO systems are operational at near-infrared wavelengths but not in the optical range, because optical observations require a much higher performance to obtain the same Strehl ratio as near-infrared observations. Therefore, to enable AO-assisted observations at optical wavelengths, we connected the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II (Kyoto 3DII), which can perform integral field spectroscopy, to the second generation AO system of the Subaru Telescope (AO188). We developed a new beam-splitter that reflects light below 594 nm for the wavefront sensors of AO188 and transmits above 644 nm for Kyoto 3DII. We also developed a Kyoto 3DII mount at the Nasmyth focus of the Subaru Telescope. In test observations, the spatial resolution of the combined AO188–Kyoto 3DII was higher than that in natural seeing conditions, even at 6500 Å. The full width at half maximum of an undersampled (1.5 spaxels) bright guide star (7.0 mag in the V-band) was 0.″12.

  13. Understanding in an instant: Neurophysiological evidence for mechanistic language circuits in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Shtyrov, Yury; Hauk, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    How long does it take the human mind to grasp the idea when hearing or reading a sentence? Neurophysiological methods looking directly at the time course of brain activity indexes of comprehension are critical for finding the answer to this question. As the dominant cognitive approaches, models of serial/cascaded and parallel processing, make conflicting predictions on the time course of psycholinguistic information access, they can be tested using neurophysiological brain activation recorded in MEG and EEG experiments. Seriality and cascading of lexical, semantic and syntactic processes receives support from late (latency ∼1/2 s) sequential neurophysiological responses, especially N400 and P600. However, parallelism is substantiated by early near-simultaneous brain indexes of a range of psycholinguistic processes, up to the level of semantic access and context integration, emerging already 100–250 ms after critical stimulus information is present. Crucially, however, there are reliable latency differences of 20–50 ms between early cortical area activations reflecting lexical, semantic and syntactic processes, which are left unexplained by current serial and parallel brain models of language. We here offer a mechanistic model grounded in cortical nerve cell circuits that builds upon neuroanatomical and neurophysiological knowledge and explains both near-simultaneous activations and fine-grained delays. A key concept is that of discrete distributed cortical circuits with specific inter-area topographies. The full activation, or ignition, of specifically distributed binding circuits explains the near-simultaneity of early neurophysiological indexes of lexical, syntactic and semantic processing. Activity spreading within circuits determined by between-area conduction delays accounts for comprehension-related regional activation differences in the millisecond range. PMID:19664815

  14. Cerebellar Structure and Function in Male Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) rat strain may model some of the behavioral features associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have shown that, in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning, WKHA emit eyeblink CRs with shortened onset latencies. To further characterize the shortened CR onset latencies seen in WKHA rats, we examined 750-ms delay conditioning with either a tone CS or a light CS, we extended acquisition training, and we included Wistar rats as an additional, outbred control strain. Our results indicated that WKHAs learned more quickly and showed a shortened CR onset latency to a tone CS compared to both Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) and Wistars. WKHAs and Wistars show a lengthening of CR onset latency over conditioning with a tone CS and an increasing confinement of CRs to the later part of the tone CS (inhibition of delay). WKHAs learned more quickly to a light CS only in comparison to WKHTs and showed a shortened CR onset latency only in comparison to Wistars. Wistars showed an increasing confinement of CRs to the late part of the light CS over conditioning. We used unbiased stereology to estimate the number of Purkinje and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex of the three strains. Our results indicated that WKHAs have more granule cells than Wistars and WKHTs and more Purkinje cells than Wistars. Results are discussed in terms of CS processing and cerebellar cortical contributions to EBC. PMID:23398437

  15. Impacts of the Kyoto protocol on U.S. energy markets and economic activity

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Program in 1988 to assess the available scientific, technical, and socioeconomic information in the field of climate change. The most recent report of the IPCC concluded that ``Our ability to quantify the human influence on global climate is currently limited because the expected signal is still emerging from the noise of natural variability, and because there are uncertainties in key factors. These include the magnitudes and patterns of long-term variability and the time-evolving pattern of forcing by, and response to, changes in concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and land surface changes. Nevertheless the balance of evidence suggests that there is a discernible human influence on global climate. The first and second Conference of the Parties in 1995 and 1996 agreed to address the issue of greenhouse gas emissions for the period beyond 2000, and to negotiate quantified emission limitations and reductions for the third Conference of the Parties. On December 1 through 11, 1997, representatives from more than 160 countries met in Kyoto, Japan, to negotiate binding limits on greenhouse gas emissions for developed nations. The resulting Kyoto Protocol established emissions targets for each of the participating developed countries--the Annex 1 countries--relative to their 1990 emissions levels. 114 refs., 138 figs., 33 tabs.

  16. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit: Lesion Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit impairment is recognized clinically by the presence of saccadic tracking of a small object and quantified by reduction in pursuit gain, the ratio of smooth eye movement velocity to the velocity of a foveal target. Correlation of the site of brain lesions, identified by imaging or neuropathological examination, with defective smooth…

  17. Clinical and neurophysiological studies of aldose reductase inhibitor ponalrestat in chronic symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Florkowski, C M; Rowe, B R; Nightingale, S; Harvey, T C; Barnett, A H

    1991-01-01

    Increased flux through the polyol pathway mediated by the enzyme aldose reductase may be associated with the development of diabetic neuropathy. Fifty-four diabetic patients (median age 56 yr, range 25-65 yr) with chronic neuropathic symptoms were randomly allocated to placebo or aldose reductase inhibition (300 or 600 mg ponalrestat ICI 128436) groups for 24 wk. Patients with vibration perception thresholds (VPTs) greater than 35 V at the great toe or thermal difference thresholds (TTs) greater than 10 degrees C on the dorsum of the foot were excluded from the trial. No significant changes were observed in symptoms of pain, numbness, or paresthesia between ponalrestat and placebo groups, and there were no improvements in VPT or TT at several sites. Posterior tibial nerve conduction velocity changed from 35.3 +/- 4.9 m/s at baseline to 33.4 +/- 4.0 m/s at 24 wk (NS) with placebo compared with 37.6 +/- 5.6 vs. 37.2 +/- 8.7 m/s (NS) with 300 mg ponalrestat and 34.5 +/- 6.1 vs. 36.2 +/- 6.8 m/s (NS) with 600 mg ponalrestat. Further studies are indicated with intervention at an earlier stage in the evolution of neuropathy and for longer periods. PMID:1901808

  18. Economic Impacts of the Kyoto Protocol. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, March 25, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This hearing focuses on the economic impact of the Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change. In the Kyoto Protocol, which was completed in December 1997, the administration agreed to legally binding obligations to reduce US greenhouse gas emissions to seven percent below 1990 levels during the years 2008--2011. This climate treaty does not subject developing countries to emission targets.

  19. [Preliminary treatment of congenital hip dislocation using physical therapy based on neurophysiology].

    PubMed

    Niethard, F U

    1987-01-01

    Adductor tightness is a typical symptom in CDH. In cases of subluxation and complete dislocation even a rigid abduction contracture can occur, preventing reduction and favouring redislocation. The contracture of the hip joint is the result of neurophysiological disorders, which can be treated by an exercise program on a neurophysiological basis. 62 children with 73 severely contracted and 5 hypotonic hip dislocations have been treated by the so-called "Vojta-program" before reduction. In a prospective study over 5 years this kind of treatment has been very successful: the incidence of necrosis of the femoral head could be reduced to 4%, long-lasting traction was not necessary anymore and the rigid hip joints required open reduction only in 2 cases. PMID:3577341

  20. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological effects of strengthening exercise for early dementia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, Vadim; Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Hogan, Michael J; Dunnam, Mina; Huber, Daniel; Osborne, Sandra; Shulan, Mollie

    2012-01-01

    Research demonstrates a positive effect of aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning in older adults. Unfortunately, aerobic exercise is often contraindicated for older adults due to cardiovascular and functional limitations. Low-intensity strengthening exercise may offer a practical alternative, but the neuropsychological benefits and potential neurophysiological mechanisms are less well understood. The current study evaluated the effects of a 10-week strengthening exercise intervention on cognitive functioning and EEG in a sample of 13 older adults with early dementia, and 9 normative controls. Results revealed beneficial effects of strengthening exercise on verbal memory coupled with frontal beta and delta power asymmetries and N200 amplitude asymmetry. Results point to increased cognitive efficiency following 10 weeks of strengthening exercise. The findings suggest it is feasible to conduct a strengthening intervention with early dementia patients, and to gather neuropsychological and neurophysiological data to evaluate outcomes. Strengthening exercise may serve as a useful alternative to aerobic exercise. PMID:22136405

  1. Assessing fitness-for-duty and predicting performance with cognitive neurophysiological measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael E.; Gevins, Alan

    2005-05-01

    Progress is described in developing a novel test of neurocognitive status for fitness-for-duty testing. The Sustained Attention & Memory (SAM) test combines neurophysiologic (EEG) measures of brain activation with performance measures during a psychometric test of sustained attention and working memory, and then gauges changes in neurocognitive status relative to an individual"s normative baseline. In studies of the effects of common psychoactive substances that can affect job performance, including sedating antihistamines, caffeine, alcohol, marijuana, and prescription medications, test sensitivity was greater for the combined neurophysiological and performance measures than for task performance measures by themselves. The neurocognitive effects of overnight sleep deprivation were quite evident, and such effects predicted subsequent performance impairment on a flight simulator task. Sensitivity to diurnal circadian variations was also demonstrated. With further refinement and independent validation, the SAM Test may prove useful for assessing readiness-to-perform in high-asset personnel working in demanding, high risk situations.

  2. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K; Ujeno, Y; Ishida, M R

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described. PMID:2176458

  3. Design study of multi-imaging plate system for BNCT irradiation field at Kyoto university reactor.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Endo, Satoru

    2016-09-01

    The converter configuration for a multi-imaging plate system was investigated for the application of quality assurance in the irradiation field profile for boron neutron capture therapy. This was performed by the simulation calculation using the PHITS code in the fields at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. The converter constituents investigated were carbon for gamma rays, and polyethylene with and without LiF at varied (6)Li concentration for thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. Consequently, potential combinations of the converters were found for two components, gamma rays and thermal neutrons, for the standard thermal neutron mode and three components of gamma rays, epithermal neutrons, and thermal or fast neutrons, for the standard mixed or epithermal neutron modes, respectively. PMID:27423022

  4. A post-Kyoto partner: Considering the Montreal Protocol as a tool to manage nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauzerall, D. L.; Kanter, D.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Grabiel, P.; Moomaw, W.; Galloway, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    While nitrous oxide (N2O) was recently identified as the largest remaining anthropogenic threat to the stratospheric ozone layer, it is currently regulated under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol due to its simultaneous ability to warm the climate. The threat N2O poses to the stratospheric ozone layer, coupled with the uncertain future of the international climate regime, motivates our exploration of issues that could be relevant to the Parties to the 1987 Montreal Protocol if they decide to take measures to manage N2O in the future. There are clear legal avenues for the Montreal Protocol and its parent treaty, the 1985 Vienna Convention, to regulate N2O, as well as several ways to share authority with the existing and future international climate treaties. N2O mitigation strategies exist to address its most significant anthropogenic sources, including agriculture, where behavioral practices and new technologies could contribute significantly to mitigation efforts. Existing policies managing N2O and other forms of reactive nitrogen could be harnessed and built upon by the Montreal Protocol's existing bodies to implement N2O controls. Given the tight coupling of the nitrogen cycle, such controls would likely simultaneously reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen and hence have co-benefits for ecosystems and public health. Nevertheless, there are at least three major regulatory challenges that are unique and central to N2O control: food security, equity, and the nitrogen cascade. The possible inclusion of N2O in the Montreal Protocol need not be viewed as a sign of the Kyoto Protocol's failure to adequately deal with climate change, given the complexity of the issue. Rather, it could represent an additional tool in the field of sustainable development diplomacy.lt;img border=0 src="images/B43K-06_B.jpg">

  5. CONSISTENT INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS) DURING FALL SEASON IN WISTAR-KYOTO RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONSISTENT INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPs) DURING FALL SEASON IN WISTAR-KYOTO RATS.
    UP Kodavanti, MC Schladweiler, AD Ledbetter, LC Walsh, PS Gilmour, MI Gilmour, WP Watkinson, JP Nolan, JH Richards, D Andrews, DL Costa. US EPA...

  6. Cognitive and physical training for the elderly: evaluating outcome efficacy by means of neurophysiological synchronization.

    PubMed

    Frantzidis, Christos A; Ladas, Aristea-Kiriaki I; Vivas, Ana B; Tsolaki, Magda; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2014-07-01

    Recent neuroscientific research has demonstrated that both healthy and pathological aging induces alterations in the co-operative capacity of neuronal populations in the brain. Both compensatory and neurodegenerative mechanisms contribute to neurophysiological synchronization patterns, which provide a valuable marker for age-related cognitive decline. In this study, we propose that neuroplasticity-based training may facilitate coherent interaction of distant brain regions and consequently enhance cognitive performance in elderly people. If this is true, this would make neurophysiological synchronization a valid outcome measure to assess the efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions to prevent or delay age-related cognitive decline. The present study aims at providing an objective, synchronization-based tool to assess cognitive and/or physical interventions, adopting the notion of Relative Wavelet Entropy. This mathematical model employs a robust and parameter-free synchronization metric. By using data mining techniques, a distance value was computed for all participants so as to quantify the proximity of their individual profile to the mean group synchronization increase. In support of our hypothesis, results showed a significant increase in synchronization, for four electrode pairs, in the intervention group as compared to the active control group. It is concluded that the novel introduction of neurophysiological synchronization features could be used as a valid and reliable outcome measure; while the distance-based analysis could provide a reliable means of evaluating individual benefits. PMID:24472698

  7. The homemade alternative: teaching human neurophysiology with instrumentation made (almost) from scratch.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, Stephen; Du Bois, Katherine; Johnson, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Recording human neurophysiological data in the teaching laboratory generally requires expensive instrumentation. From our experience in developing inexpensive equipment used in teaching neurophysiology laboratory exercises, we offer a strategy for the development of affordable and safe recording of human neurophysiological parameters. There are many resources available to guide the design and construction of electronic equipment that will record human biopotentials. An important consideration is subject safety, and the electrical characteristics of any equipment must meet strict galvanic isolation standards. Wireless data gathering offers the most complete isolation from 120VAC current. As an example, we present a homemade electrocardiogram recording circuit using only inexpensive and readily available components. We outline the feasibility of constructing equipment that meets the needs of the student laboratory for good data collection, and we consider the obstacles likely to be encountered in these projects. If students actively participate in the equipment design and construction, the process can also be a teaching tool. Students may gain a deeper understanding of the human neurobiology by making the electronic data acquisition and its presentation more transparent. PMID:23493343

  8. The Homemade Alternative: Teaching Human Neurophysiology with Instrumentation Made (Almost) from Scratch

    PubMed Central

    Hauptman, Stephen; Du Bois, Katherine; Johnson, Bruce R.

    2012-01-01

    Recording human neurophysiological data in the teaching laboratory generally requires expensive instrumentation. From our experience in developing inexpensive equipment used in teaching neurophysiology laboratory exercises, we offer a strategy for the development of affordable and safe recording of human neurophysiological parameters. There are many resources available to guide the design and construction of electronic equipment that will record human biopotentials. An important consideration is subject safety, and the electrical characteristics of any equipment must meet strict galvanic isolation standards. Wireless data gathering offers the most complete isolation from 120VAC current. As an example, we present a homemade electrocardiogram recording circuit using only inexpensive and readily available components. We outline the feasibility of constructing equipment that meets the needs of the student laboratory for good data collection, and we consider the obstacles likely to be encountered in these projects. If students actively participate in the equipment design and construction, the process can also be a teaching tool. Students may gain a deeper understanding of the human neurobiology by making the electronic data acquisition and its presentation more transparent. PMID:23493343

  9. Neurophysiological mechanisms of emotion regulation for subtypes of externalizing children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieben, James

    Children referred for externalizing behavior problems may not represent a homogeneous population. The objective of this study was to assess the neural mechanisms of emotion regulation that might distinguish subtypes of externalizing children from each other and from their typically developing age-mates. Children with pure externalizing (EXT) problems were compared with children comorbid for externalizing and internalizing (MIXED) problems and with age-matched controls. Only boys were included in the analysis because so few girls were referred for treatment. A go/no-go task with a negative emotion induction was used to examine dense-array EEG data together with behavioral measures of performance. Four event-related potential (ERP) components tapping inhibitory control or self-monitoring were assessed including the inhibitory N2, the error-related negativity (ERN), the error positivity (Pe) and the frontal inhibitory P3 (iP3). Source models were constructed estimating the cortical generators of these components. The MIXED children's N2s increased in response to the emotion induction, resulting in greater amplitudes than EXT children in the following trial block. MIXED and EXT children showed increased N2 latencies compared to controls. ERN amplitudes were greatest for control children and smallest for EXT children with MIXED children in between, but only prior to the emotion induction. N2 component latencies were shorter for controls but only before and after the induction block with a significantly faster N2 for controls only in block C relative to MIXED children. Latencies for the ERN component were longer for the EXT children in blocks A and B relative to both MIXED and controls. Mixed results were found for both the Pe and frontal P3 amplitude. Pe amplitudes were smallest for control children in blocks A and B relative to both clinical groups. Pe latencies were consistent across groups with the exception of block B where EXT children showed an increase in

  10. Circadian Mechanisms Underlying Reward-Related Neurophysiology and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Puja K.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from clinical and preclinical research provides an undeniable link between disruptions in the circadian clock and the development of psychiatric diseases, including mood and substance abuse disorders. The molecular clock, which controls daily patterns of physiological and behavioral activity in living organisms, when desynchronized, may exacerbate or precipitate symptoms of psychiatric illness. One of the outstanding questions remaining in this field is that of cause and effect in the relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and psychiatric disease. Focus has recently turned to uncovering the role of circadian proteins beyond the maintenance of homeostatic systems and outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker region of the brain. In this regard, several groups, including our own, have sought to understand how circadian proteins regulate mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter signaling in mesocorticolimbic brain regions, which are known to be critically involved in reward processing and mood. This regulation can come in the form of direct transcriptional control of genes central to mood and reward, including those associated with dopaminergic activity in the midbrain. It can also be seen at the circuit level through indirect connections of mesocorticolimbic regions with the SCN. Circadian misalignment paradigms as well as genetic models of circadian disruption have helped to elucidate some of the complex interactions between these systems and neural activity influencing behavior. In this review, we explore findings that link circadian protein function with synaptic adaptations underlying plasticity as it may contribute to the development of mood disorders and addiction. In light of recent advances in technology and sophisticated methods for molecular and circuit-level interrogation, we propose future directions aimed at teasing apart mechanisms through which the circadian system modulates mood and reward

  11. Circadian Mechanisms Underlying Reward-Related Neurophysiology and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Puja K; McClung, Colleen A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from clinical and preclinical research provides an undeniable link between disruptions in the circadian clock and the development of psychiatric diseases, including mood and substance abuse disorders. The molecular clock, which controls daily patterns of physiological and behavioral activity in living organisms, when desynchronized, may exacerbate or precipitate symptoms of psychiatric illness. One of the outstanding questions remaining in this field is that of cause and effect in the relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and psychiatric disease. Focus has recently turned to uncovering the role of circadian proteins beyond the maintenance of homeostatic systems and outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker region of the brain. In this regard, several groups, including our own, have sought to understand how circadian proteins regulate mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter signaling in mesocorticolimbic brain regions, which are known to be critically involved in reward processing and mood. This regulation can come in the form of direct transcriptional control of genes central to mood and reward, including those associated with dopaminergic activity in the midbrain. It can also be seen at the circuit level through indirect connections of mesocorticolimbic regions with the SCN. Circadian misalignment paradigms as well as genetic models of circadian disruption have helped to elucidate some of the complex interactions between these systems and neural activity influencing behavior. In this review, we explore findings that link circadian protein function with synaptic adaptations underlying plasticity as it may contribute to the development of mood disorders and addiction. In light of recent advances in technology and sophisticated methods for molecular and circuit-level interrogation, we propose future directions aimed at teasing apart mechanisms through which the circadian system modulates mood and reward

  12. The medical-irradiation characteristics for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    At the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor, the mix irradiation of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, and the solo irradiation of epi-thermal neutrons are available additionally to the thermal neutron irradiation, and then the neutron capture therapy (NCT) at this facility became more flexible, after the update in 1996. The estimation of the depth dose distributions in NCT clinical irradiation, were performed for the standard irradiation modes of thermal, mixed and epi-thermal neutrons, from the both sides of experiment and calculation. On the assumption that the 10B concentration in tumor part was 40 ppm and the ratio of tumor to normal tissue was 3.5, the advantage depth were estimated to 5.4, 6.0, and 8.0, for the respective standard irradiation modes. It was confirmed that the various irradiation conditions can be selected according to the target-volume conditions, such as size, depth, etc. Besides, in the viewpoint of the radiation shielding for patient, it was confirmed that the whole-body exposure is effectively reduced by the new clinical collimators, compared with the old one. PMID:12408307

  13. Global SF6 emission estimates inferred from atmospheric observations - a test case for Kyoto reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, I.; Naegler, T.

    2009-04-01

    Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the strongest greenhouse gases per molecule in the atmosphere. SF6 emissions are also one of the six greenhouse gases targeted for reduction under the Kyoto Protocol. Here we present a long-term data set of globally distributed high-precision atmospheric SF6 observations which show an increase in mixing ratios from near zero in the 1970s to a global mean value of 6.3 ppt by the end of 2007. Because of its long atmospheric lifetime of around 3000 years, the accumulation of SF6 in the atmosphere is a direct measure of its global emissions: Analysis of our long-term data records implies a decrease of global SF6 sources after 1995, most likely due to emission reductions in industrialised countries. However, after 1998 the global SF6 source increases again, which is probably due to enhanced emissions from transition economies such as in China and India. Moreover, observed north-south concentration differences in SF6 suggest that emissions calculated from statistical (bottom-up) information and reported by Annex II parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) may be too low by up to 50%. This clearly shows the importance and need for atmospheric (top-down) validation of Kyoto reporting which is only feasible with a dense world-wide observational network for greenhouse and other trace gases. Other members of the Global SF6 Trends Team: R. Heinz (1), D. Osusko (1), E. Cuevas (2), A. Engel (3), J. Ilmberger (1), R.L. Langenfelds (4), B. Neininger (5), C.v. Rohden (1), L.P. Steele (4), A. Varlagin (6), R. Weller (7), D.E. Worthy (8), S.A. Zimov (9) (1) Institut für Umweltphysik, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, (2) Centro de Investigación Atmosférica de Izaña, Instituto Nacional de Meteorología (INM), 38071 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain, (3) Institut für Atmosphäre und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universität Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt/Main, Germany, (4) Centre for Australian Weather and

  14. APFBC repowering could help meet Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction goals[Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.E.; Tonnemacher, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Clinton Administration signed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol agreement that would limit US greenhouse gas emissions, of which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the most significant. While the Kyoto Protocol has not yet been submitted to the Senate for ratification, in the past, there have been few proposed environmental actions that had continued and wide-spread attention of the press and environmental activists that did not eventually lead to regulation. Since the Kyoto Protocol might lead to future regulation, its implications need investigation by the power industry. Limiting CO{sub 2} emissions affects the ability of the US to generate reliable, low cost electricity, and has tremendous potential impact on electric generating companies with a significant investment in coal-fired generation, and on their customers. This paper explores the implications of reducing coal plant CO{sub 2} by various amounts. The amount of reduction for the US that is proposed in the Kyoto Protocol is huge. The Kyoto Protocol would commit the US to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions to 7% below 1990 levels. Since 1990, there has been significant growth in US population and the US economy driving carbon emissions 34% higher by year 2010. That means CO{sub 2} would have to be reduced by 30.9%, which is extremely difficult to accomplish. The paper tells why. There are, however, coal-based technologies that should be available in time to make significant reductions in coal-plant CO{sub 2} emissions. Th paper focuses on one plant repowering method that can reduce CO{sub 2} per kWh by 25%, advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) technology, based on results from a recent APFBC repowering concept evaluation of the Carolina Power and Light Company's (CP and L) L.V. Sutton steam station. The replacement of the existing 50-year base of power generating units needed to meet proposed Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction commitments would be a massive undertaking. It is

  15. The neurophysiology of language processing shapes the evolution of grammar: evidence from case marking.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Balthasar; Witzlack-Makarevich, Alena; Choudhary, Kamal K; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Do principles of language processing in the brain affect the way grammar evolves over time or is language change just a matter of socio-historical contingency? While the balance of evidence has been ambiguous and controversial, we identify here a neurophysiological constraint on the processing of language that has a systematic effect on the evolution of how noun phrases are marked by case (i.e. by such contrasts as between the English base form she and the object form her). In neurophysiological experiments across diverse languages we found that during processing, participants initially interpret the first base-form noun phrase they hear (e.g. she…) as an agent (which would fit a continuation like … greeted him), even when the sentence later requires the interpretation of a patient role (as in … was greeted). We show that this processing principle is also operative in Hindi, a language where initial base-form noun phrases most commonly denote patients because many agents receive a special case marker ("ergative") and are often left out in discourse. This finding suggests that the principle is species-wide and independent of the structural affordances of specific languages. As such, the principle favors the development and maintenance of case-marking systems that equate base-form cases with agents rather than with patients. We confirm this evolutionary bias by statistical analyses of phylogenetic signals in over 600 languages worldwide, controlling for confounding effects from language contact. Our findings suggest that at least one core property of grammar systematically adapts in its evolution to the neurophysiological conditions of the brain, independently of socio-historical factors. This opens up new avenues for understanding how specific properties of grammar have developed in tight interaction with the biological evolution of our species. PMID:26267884

  16. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Study of Olfactory Perception and Learning in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Sandoz, Jean Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The honeybee Apis mellifera has been a central insect model in the study of olfactory perception and learning for more than a century, starting with pioneer work by Karl von Frisch. Research on olfaction in honeybees has greatly benefited from the advent of a range of behavioral and neurophysiological paradigms in the Lab. Here I review major findings about how the honeybee brain detects, processes, and learns odors, based on behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological approaches. I first address the behavioral study of olfactory learning, from experiments on free-flying workers visiting artificial flowers to laboratory-based conditioning protocols on restrained individuals. I explain how the study of olfactory learning has allowed understanding the discrimination and generalization ability of the honeybee olfactory system, its capacity to grant special properties to olfactory mixtures as well as to retain individual component information. Next, based on the impressive amount of anatomical and immunochemical studies of the bee brain, I detail our knowledge of olfactory pathways. I then show how functional recordings of odor-evoked activity in the brain allow following the transformation of the olfactory message from the periphery until higher-order central structures. Data from extra- and intracellular electrophysiological approaches as well as from the most recent optical imaging developments are described. Lastly, I discuss results addressing how odor representation changes as a result of experience. This impressive ensemble of behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological data available in the bee make it an attractive model for future research aiming to understand olfactory perception and learning in an integrative fashion. PMID:22163215

  17. Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in spine surgery. Developments and state of the art in France in 2011.

    PubMed

    Gavaret, M; Jouve, J L; Péréon, Y; Accadbled, F; André-Obadia, N; Azabou, E; Blondel, B; Bollini, G; Delécrin, J; Farcy, J-P; Fournet-Fayard, J; Garin, C; Henry, P; Manel, V; Mutschler, V; Perrin, G; Sales de Gauzy, J

    2013-10-01

    Intraoperative spinal cord monitoring consists in a subcontinuous evaluation of spinal cord sensory-motor functions and allows the reduction the incidence of neurological complications resulting from spinal surgery. A combination of techniques is used: somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), neurogenic motor evoked potentials (NMEP), D waves, and pedicular screw testing. In absence of intraoperative neurophysiological testing, the intraoperative wake-up test is a true form of monitoring even if its latency long and its precision variable. A 2011 survey of 117 French spinal surgeons showed that only 36% had neurophysiological monitoring available (public healthcare facilities, 42%; private facilities, 27%). Monitoring can be performed by a neurophysiologist in the operating room, remotely using a network, or directly by the surgeon. Intraoperative alerts allow real-time diagnosis of impending neurological injury. Use of spinal electrodes, moved along the medullary canal, can determine the lesion level (NMEP, D waves). The response to a monitoring alert should take into account the phase of the surgical intervention and does not systematically lead to interruption of the intervention. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring, in presence of a neurophysiologist, in collaboration with the anesthesiologist, is the most reliable technique available. However, no monitoring technique can predict a delayed-onset paraplegia that appears after the end of surgery. In cases of preexisting neurological deficit, monitoring contributes little. Monitoring of the L1-L4 spinal roots also shows low reliability. Therefore, monitoring has no indication in discal and degenerative surgery of the spinal surgery. However, testing pedicular screws can be useful. All in all, thoracic and thoracolumbar vertebral deviations, with normal preoperative neurological examination are currently the essential indication for spinal cord monitoring. Its absence in this

  18. Sex Differences in Neurophysiological Activation Patterns During Phonological Input Processing: An Influencing Factor for Normative Data.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Annelies; van Mierlo, Pieter; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Santens, Patrick; De Letter, Miet

    2015-11-01

    In the context of neurophysiological normative data, it has been established that aging has a significant impact on neurophysiological correlates of auditory phonological input processes, such as phoneme discrimination (PD) and word recognition (WR). Besides age, sex is another demographic factor that influences several language processes. We aimed to disentangle whether sex has a similar effect on PD and WR. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in 20 men and 24 women. During PD, three phonemic contrasts (place and manner of articulation and voicing) were compared using the attentive P300 and pre-attentive Mismatch Negativity. To investigate WR, real words were contrasted with pseudowords in a pre-attentive oddball task. Women demonstrated a larger sensitivity to spectrotemporal differences, as evidenced by larger P300 responses to the place of articulation (PoA) contrast and larger P300 and MMN responses than men in PoA-based PD. Men did not display such sensitivity. Attention played an important role, considering that women needed more attentional resources to differentiate between PoA and the other phonemic contrasts. During WR, pseudowords evoked larger amplitudes already 100 ms post-stimulus independent of sex. However, women had decreased P200 latencies, but longer N400 latencies in response to pseudowords, whereas men showed increased N400 latencies compared to women in response to real words. The current results demonstrate significant sex-related influences on phonological input processes. Therefore, existing neurophysiological normative data for age should be complemented for the factor sex. PMID:26014826

  19. The Neurophysiology of Language Processing Shapes the Evolution of Grammar: Evidence from Case Marking

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Balthasar; Witzlack-Makarevich, Alena; Choudhary, Kamal K.; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Do principles of language processing in the brain affect the way grammar evolves over time or is language change just a matter of socio-historical contingency? While the balance of evidence has been ambiguous and controversial, we identify here a neurophysiological constraint on the processing of language that has a systematic effect on the evolution of how noun phrases are marked by case (i.e. by such contrasts as between the English base form she and the object form her). In neurophysiological experiments across diverse languages we found that during processing, participants initially interpret the first base-form noun phrase they hear (e.g. she…) as an agent (which would fit a continuation like … greeted him), even when the sentence later requires the interpretation of a patient role (as in … was greeted). We show that this processing principle is also operative in Hindi, a language where initial base-form noun phrases most commonly denote patients because many agents receive a special case marker ("ergative") and are often left out in discourse. This finding suggests that the principle is species-wide and independent of the structural affordances of specific languages. As such, the principle favors the development and maintenance of case-marking systems that equate base-form cases with agents rather than with patients. We confirm this evolutionary bias by statistical analyses of phylogenetic signals in over 600 languages worldwide, controlling for confounding effects from language contact. Our findings suggest that at least one core property of grammar systematically adapts in its evolution to the neurophysiological conditions of the brain, independently of socio-historical factors. This opens up new avenues for understanding how specific properties of grammar have developed in tight interaction with the biological evolution of our species. PMID:26267884

  20. Daytime mother-calf relationships in reticulated giraffes (Giraffa cameloparadalis reticulate) at the Kyoto City Zoo.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Masayuki; Murata, Chisa; Eto, Ryo; Takagi, Naoko; Yamada, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    The present study quantitatively assesses the relationships between a reticulated giraffe mother and her first- and second-born calves during the first 22 months of the older calf's and the first 12 months of the younger calf's life at the Kyoto City Zoo, Japan. The mother permitted her calves to suckle at over 70% of their suckling attempts in the first month after their births, and the calves ceased suckling spontaneously in 65 to 70% of the suckling bouts. From the second month on, she showed a clear tendency to reject the calves' suckling attempts and terminated almost all of their suckling bouts, which resulted in approximately 60 sec or less of suckling duration per bout. The frequency of proximity between the mother and her calves remained at 20 to 30% throughout the first year, with no apparent developmental changes being evident. The mother was mainly responsible for terminating proximity by walking away from her calves throughout their first year after birth, while both calves were mainly responsible for attempting proximity by approaching their mother after reaching 2 months of age. Our study also showed that the giraffe mother became pregnant again while nursing her calves and ceased lactation (i.e., weaned the calves) before the fetus's growth started accelerating. PMID:25678184

  1. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M.; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  2. Political and technical issues of coal fire extinction in the Kyoto framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Chen-Brauchler, D.; Rüter, H.; Fischer, C.; Bing, K.

    2009-04-01

    It is a highly desirable effort to extinguish as much coal fires as possible in short time to prevent large losses of energy resources and to minimise CO2 and other exhaust gas releases from such sources. Unfortunately, extinguishing coal fires needs massive financial investments, skilled man power, suited technology and a long time. Even mid to small scale coal fires need several months of extinguishing measures and of monitoring time after extinction resulting in expenditures of a minimum of several hundred thousand Euros. Large companies might be willing to spend money for coal fire extinction measures but smaller holdings or regional governments might not have the monetary resources for it. Since there is no law in China that demands coal fire extinction, measures under the Kyoto framework may be applied to sell CO2 certificates for prevented emissions from extinguished coal fires and thus used as a financial stimulus for coal fire extinction activities. The set-up for methodologies and project designs is especially complex for coal fire extinction measures and thus for necessary exploration, evaluation and monitoring using geophysical and remote sensing methods. A brief overview of most important formal and technical aspects is given to outline the conditions for a potentially successful CDM application on coal fires based on geophysical observations and numerical modelling.

  3. Cocaine self-administration in Wistar-Kyoto rats: a behavioral and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Joanna; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Szumiec, Łukasz; Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Haduch, Anna; Smaga, Irena; Bystrowska, Beata; Daniel, Wladyslawa A; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-10-15

    Depression and cocaine abuse disorders are common concurrent diagnoses. In the present study, we employed Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats that showed a depressive-like phenotype to study intravenous cocaine self-administration and extinction/reinstatement procedures. We also investigated the basal tissue level of neurotransmitters, their metabolites and plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations in WKY rats, bulbectomized (OBX) rats, and control rats. The WKY rats exhibited an attenuation of the cocaine-associated lever presses and cocaine intake during the acquisition/maintenance of cocaine self-administration only under specific conditions. Active lever presses exhibited by the WKY rats and control animals did not differ during the extinction training and cocaine-seeking behaviors. The WKY rats demonstrated alterations in the basal levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin in selected brain structures involved in depression and drug addiction. The changes in the level of neurotransmitters in these animals refer not only to the control (Wistar) rats but also to bulbectomized animals, which represent another depression model. Furthermore, we identified unchanged levels of CORT in the WKY and OBX rats during the light phase and free-stress conditions. This finding suggests that WKY rats should not be used to investigate the co-occurrence of depression and cocaine addiction, as this rat strain does not show an enhanced risk of relapse. PMID:26192911

  4. Cofiring fossil fuels with renewable energy in addressing global climate change and the Kyoto Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.L.; Hoppe, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    In addressing the issue of Global Climate Change, the use of renewable energy resources and energy efficiency has been traditionally touted as the most effective way to mitigate the production of greenhouse gases and to sequester carbon-based emissions resulting from the use of fossil fuels for the worldwide production of power. The goal set by the Kyoto Protocol of ``stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the atmosphere`` will not be met unless the predictions for world energy production based on the use of oil, gas and coal are considered in using renewable energy resources. The use of renewable energy in the US amounted to 7.4 quads in 1997 which was only 7.8% of total domestic gross energy demand. In the US alone the biomass renewable energy economically accessible resource base is estimated at 14 quads per year which can be considered for use in addressing predicted increases in electric power demand. In 1990 the biomass generated power was 3.1 quads in the US alone, and renewable energy accounted for 14.7% of the total world power production allowing for significant increases in the future. The most significant use of renewable energy other than the power sector is the use of biofuels (principally from wood) in the industrial sector which accounts for 21% of the total renewable demand of 7.432 quads in 1997.

  5. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminaryin vitroandin vivoimaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  6. The Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II on Subaru and the University of Hawaii 88 in Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, H.; Hattori, T.; Kawai, A.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, T.; Ishigaki, T.; Ishii, M.; Ohtani, H.; Shimono, A.; Okita, Y.; Matsubayashi, K.; Kosugi, G.; Sasaki, M.; Takeyama, N.

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate physical conditions of ionized gas in galaxies, as well as its kinematics, we have developed the Kyoto tridimensional spectrograph II. It is a multimode optical instrument, including integral field spectrograph (IFS) and Fabry-Perot imager modes. We have designed it compact so that we can mount it on 2 m class telescopes as well as on the 8.2 m Subaru telescope. Special care was taken to obtain high-quality calibrations in the IFS mode. In order to remove the chromatic aberration of micropupil images produced by a lenslet array, we have introduced a corrector lens system behind the lenslet array. The internal calibration system simulates the telescope optics so that the system provides micropupil images identical to those produced by the telescope. The rigidness of the instrument provides the positional stability of micropupil images. We have succeeded in test observations of all the modes on Subaru and the University of Hawaii 88 in (UH88) telescopes and have verified the performance of the instrument. This includes the instrument efficiencies as well as the effective sky background subtraction and the minimization of crosstalk effects in the IFS mode. In the IFS mode a spatial resolution of 0.4'' was obtained in good seeing conditions. Each of 37 × 37 lenslets subtends 0.1'' in Subaru's case. This samples the image size well. A wider field of view is emphasized in the case of UH88.

  7. Neurophysiological mechanisms in acceptance and commitment therapy in opioid-addicted patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Rachel F; Potter, Jennifer S; Robin, Donald A

    2016-04-30

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been effectively utilized to treat both chronic pain and substance use disorder independently. Given these results and the vital need to treat the comorbidity of the two disorders, a pilot ACT treatment was implemented in individuals with comorbid chronic pain and opioid addiction. This pilot study supported using neurophysiology to characterize treatment effects and revealed that, following ACT, participants with this comorbidity exhibited reductions in brain activation due to painful stimulus and in connectivity at rest. PMID:27107155

  8. [The neurophysiological basis of exercise physical therapy in patients with central hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Hummelsheim, H; Mauritz, K H

    1993-06-01

    According to everyday experience in rehabilitation, stroke patients suffering from central hemiparesis physiotherapy is efficacious in reducing the degree of motor impairment. This paper describes the various therapeutic techniques used in the traditional physiotherapeutic concepts (Rood, Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, Vojta) and their basic neurophysiological mechanisms, as far as they are known today. Furthermore, the significant role of treating impaired sensation and perception for movement execution is discussed and various therapeutic concepts (traditional sensibility training, methods according to Affolter and Perfetti, forced use) are described. PMID:8330831

  9. Response facilitation: implications for perceptual theory, psychotherapy, neurophysiology, and earthquake prediction.

    PubMed

    Medici, R G; Frey, A H; Frey, D

    1985-04-01

    There have been numerous naturalistic observations and anecdotal reports of abnormal animal behavior prior to earthquakes. Basic physiological and behavioral data have been brought together with geophysical data to develop a specific explanation to account for how animals could perceive and respond to precursors of impending earthquakes. The behavior predicted provides a reasonable approximation to the reported abnormal behaviors; that is, the behavior appears to be partly reflexive and partly operant. It can best be described as agitated stereotypic behavior. The explanation formulated has substantial implications for perceptual theory, psychotherapy, and neurophysiology, as well as for earthquake prediction. Testable predictions for biology, psychology, and geophysics can be derived from the explanation. PMID:3997385

  10. Report from the 29th World Congress of Endourology and SWL (November 30-December 3, 2011 - Kyoto, Japan).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2012-02-01

    Kyoto is a city of surprises: from the most beautiful castles and temples known far and wide across the world, to the humblest temples, as beautiful as those appearing in all tourist guides, just hidden away in small lanes among busy traffic of bicycles and pedestrians shopping in markets or attending to their daily business. Add the innumerable tourists busily exploring the city's attractions, although this was not the reason for visiting Kyoto, which was the site of this year's World Congress of Endourology and SWL. Nevertheless, maybe as a compensation, the meeting was held in Kokusaikaikan, literally the International Conference Centre, which is a modern facility in the city outskirts, actually adjoining the Takaragaike park, with a beautiful lake and the mountains, brightly led by the trees' red leaves, just visible through the main hall windows. PMID:22384455

  11. Promoting Health During the American Occupation of Japan The Public Health Section, Kyoto Military Government Team, 1945-1949

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Sey

    2008-01-01

    During the American occupation of Japan (1945–1952), young public health officers from the US Army Medical Corps were posted in local US Army military government teams. These young doctors (aged 25 to 27 years), who had not absorbed the strong anti-Japanese tradition of the US military during World War II, seem to have alleviated the initial resentment felt by the Japanese toward the new governors of their homeland. The case of the Kyoto Military Government Team illustrates the Kyoto citizenry’s positive view of some American-directed public health measures. The team’s services helped to counter widely held negative views on colonialism, occupation, and public health; lessened resentment toward the unilateral command structure of the occupation forces; and contributed to improved relations between the United States and Japan at the local level. PMID:18235076

  12. [Dr. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University, and his achievements (Part 6: Studying abroad of Dr. Matsuoka and opening to public, reputation and achievement of the department)].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2011-03-01

    Dr. Michiharu Matsuoka studied orthopaedic surgery in Germany, Austria and other countries during the period from August, 1902 to May, 1906. He visited many university pathological institutes and surgical and orthopaedic clinics to study pathology and to learn the practice of orthopaedic surgery. After that, he started his practice at the newly established Department of Orthopaedic Surgery in the Medical School of Kyoto Imperial University in June, 1906. The department was opened in 1907 and in 1911 it was opened to all citizens and practical doctors in Kyoto City and exhibited many orthopaedic specimens and instruments. In particular, the x-ray apparatus of the Department was so well equipped that a German radiologist who visited the Department admired it in his article that was published in the journal of radiology in 1911. The Department was not surpassed by others for the number of patients with the dislocation of the hip and tuberculous spondylitis as well as the advanced quality and variety of roentgenological and pathological researches on these diseases. PMID:21797054

  13. Existential neuroscience: neurophysiological correlates of proximal defenses against death-related thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Eva; Kronbichler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of evidence suggests that reminders of mortality increase ingroup support and worldview defense, presumably in order to deal with the potential for anxiety that roots in the knowledge that death is inevitable. Interestingly, these effects are obtained solely when thoughts of death are not in the focus of consciousness. When conscious, death-related thoughts are usually defended against using proximal defenses, which entail distraction or suppression. The present study aimed at demonstrating neurophysiological correlates of proximal defenses. We focused on the late positive potential (LPP), which is thought to reflect an increased allocation of attention toward, and processing of, motivationally relevant stimuli. Our prediction was that the LPP should be increased for death-related relative to death-unrelated, but equally unpleasant stimulus words. In Experiment 1, this prediction was confirmed. This finding was replicated in Experiment 2, which used a target word detection task. In Experiment 2, both death-related and pleasant words elicited an enhanced LPP, presumably because during the less demanding task, people might have distracted themselves from the mortality reminders by focusing on pleasant words. To summarize, we were able to identify a plausible neurophysiological marker of proximal defenses in the form of an increased LPP to death-related words. PMID:22267519

  14. Neurophysiological effects of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) on isolated rat intestines.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, M; Ivetic, V; Popovic, M; Mimica-Dukic, N; Veljkovic, S

    2006-05-01

    Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) is well known as a medicine from ancient times and the earliest notes. Today it is used as a remedy. The aim of this research was to examine the effects of mistletoe extracts and their components on some neurophysiological parameters in rat intestines. The tonus and contractile responses of isolated intestinal segments (duodenum, ileum and distal colon) were analysed. The experiment was carried out in three groups. In the first group (control group) different concentrations of acetylcholine were added into the organ bath (10-50 nmol/L). In the second group, mistletoe extracts were added into the organ bath with increasing concentrations and in the third group, atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist, was added into the organ bath (concentration 10(-7) mol/L) and after atropine plant extracts were administered. The results obtained suggest that extracts from different parts of mistletoe have neurophysiological effects and change intestinal contractions. The results also suggest that the effects of mistletoe extracts on intestinal contractility act via cholinergic pathways, activating muscarinic receptors in the intestines. However, in order to establish the subtype of receptors, further investigations are necessary where selective antagonists of muscarinic cholinergic receptors should be used. PMID:16619366

  15. Neurophysiologic evaluation of infants with congenital hypothyroidism before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Katzos, George; Rousso, Israel; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    We performed a systematic neurophysiological evaluation of newborns-infants newly diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism and started on replacement therapy, in order to document the maturation of visual, auditory and somesthetic pathways and to evaluate the influence of treatment. Twenty-one patients (9 boys, 12 girls) were studied. They underwent neurophysiological evaluation consisting of visual, auditory, and somatosensory evoked potentials at diagnosis, as well as 6 and 12 months after initiation of treatment. At the time of diagnosis, 47.61 % of the patients had abnormal evoked potentials, with visual evoked potentials being most commonly abnormal. Twelve months after the onset of treatment, abnormal evoked potentials were detected in 33.3 % of the patients. In newly diagnosed infants with congenital hypothyroidism there is a high relevance of abnormal evoked potentials (47.61 %) at the time of diagnosis, declining with time and not correlating with the severity of the disease at diagnosis, the time of diagnosis or the initial dose of thyroxine. PMID:25052510

  16. A quarter-long exercise that introduces general education students to neurophysiology and scientific writing.

    PubMed

    Krilowicz, B I; Henter, H; Kamhi-Stein, L

    1997-06-01

    Providing large numbers of general education students with an introduction to science is a challenge. To meet this challenge, a quarter-long neurophysiology project was developed for use in an introductory biology course. The primary goals of this multistep project were to introduce students to the scientific method, scientific writing, on-line scientific bibliographic databases, and the scientific literature, while improving their academic literacy skills. Students began by collecting data on their own circadian rhythms in autonomic, motor, and cognitive function, reliably demonstrating the predicted circadian changes in heart rate, eye-hand coordination, and adding speed. Students wrote a journal-style article using pooled class data. Students were prepared to write the paper by several methods that were designed to improve academic language skills, including a library training exercise, "modeling" of the writing assignment, and drafting of subsections of the paper. This multistep neurophysiology project represents a significant commitment of time by both students and instructors, but produces a valuable finished product and ideally gives introductory students a positive first experience with science. PMID:9227647

  17. Sound transmission and directional hearing in field crickets: neurophysiological studies outdoors

    PubMed Central

    Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Römer, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Many studies provide detailed behavioural and neurophysiological information on the ability of crickets to localize a sound source under ideal acoustic conditions, but very little is known about how they perform in real habitats. We investigated directional hearing of crickets in the field using a neurophysiological approach, by recording the activity of the two prominent, bilaterally homologous AN1 neurons simultaneously in a cricket’s habitat. The discharge and latency differences of the pair of neurons in response to conspecific chirps presented at different distances and directions were taken as a measure of directional information. The maximum hearing distance differed between individuals and weather conditions from 1 to 15 m (mean 9.2 m). Although the AN1 activity generally decreased with increasing distance, large fluctuations in the magnitude of responses occurred with distance, indicating that the intensity gradient over distance is often irregular. The directional information provided in the discharge differences of the two neurons also varied with distance. Again, there was no simple directional gradient on the transmission channel; rather, with decreasing distance to the source there were receiver locations providing suprathreshold responses, but no directional information. The consequences for the ability of field crickets to communicate acoustically close to the ground are discussed. PMID:20652707

  18. Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence for increased cognitive flexibility in late childhood.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Nicole; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions, like the capacity to control and organize thoughts and behavior, develop from childhood to young adulthood. Although task switching and working memory processes are known to undergo strong developmental changes from childhood to adulthood, it is currently unknown how task switching processes are modulated between childhood and adulthood given that working memory processes are central to task switching. The aim of the current study is therefore to examine this question using a combined cue- and memory-based task switching paradigm in children (N = 25) and young adults (N = 25) in combination with neurophysiological (EEG) methods. We obtained an unexpected paradoxical effect suggesting that memory-based task switching is better in late childhood than in young adulthood. No group differences were observed in cue-based task switching. The neurophysiological data suggest that this effect is not due to altered attentional selection (P1, N1) or processes related to the updating, organization, and implementation of the new task-set (P3). Instead, alterations were found in the resolution of task-set conflict and the selection of an appropriate response (N2) when a task has to be switched. Our observation contrasts findings showing that cognitive control mechanisms reach their optimal functioning in early adulthood. PMID:27349808

  19. [Medical, educational and neurophysiological prerequisites to the formation of the motivation to exercises in students].

    PubMed

    Khramtsov, P I; Sedova, A S; Berezina, N O; Viatleva, O A

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the life activity of modern children and adolescents is the couch potato, mostly "sedentary" lifestyle. Biomedical and psychosocial significance of motor activity (MA) stipulates the necessity of the substantiation of scientific and methodological approaches to the formation of the motivation to exercises and sports in children. The purpose of the study was in the scientific substantiation and the delivery of medical, pedagogical and neurophysiological prerequisites for the formation of the motivation to increase MA in students in current conditions of their life activity. There were examined 189 students from 2-5th and 9th classes, out of them 65 students were observed in the dynamics of the school year; 585 students from the 1st-11th classes participated in the survey. Results of the study allowed to reveal the relation of students to the lessons of physical training, to evaluate the impact of a new educational program on the functional possibilities of the body of children from the special medical group "A" and to reveal the neurophysiological features of adolescents with different needs in motion. PMID:26031049

  20. Perceptual conflict during sensorimotor integration processes - a neurophysiological study in response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Witold X; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A multitude of sensory inputs needs to be processed during sensorimotor integration. A crucial factor for detecting relevant information is its complexity, since information content can be conflicting at a perceptual level. This may be central to executive control processes, such as response inhibition. This EEG study aims to investigate the system neurophysiological mechanisms behind effects of perceptual conflict on response inhibition. We systematically modulated perceptual conflict by integrating a Global-local task with a Go/Nogo paradigm. The results show that conflicting perceptual information, in comparison to non-conflicting perceptual information, impairs response inhibition performance. This effect was evident regardless of whether the relevant information for response inhibition is displayed on the global, or local perceptual level. The neurophysiological data suggests that early perceptual/ attentional processing stages do not underlie these modulations. Rather, processes at the response selection level (P3), play a role in changed response inhibition performance. This conflict-related impairment of inhibitory processes is associated with activation differences in (inferior) parietal areas (BA7 and BA40) and not as commonly found in the medial prefrontal areas. This suggests that various functional neuroanatomical structures may mediate response inhibition and that the functional neuroanatomical structures involved depend on the complexity of sensory integration processes. PMID:27222225

  1. Perceptual conflict during sensorimotor integration processes - a neurophysiological study in response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Witold X.; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A multitude of sensory inputs needs to be processed during sensorimotor integration. A crucial factor for detecting relevant information is its complexity, since information content can be conflicting at a perceptual level. This may be central to executive control processes, such as response inhibition. This EEG study aims to investigate the system neurophysiological mechanisms behind effects of perceptual conflict on response inhibition. We systematically modulated perceptual conflict by integrating a Global-local task with a Go/Nogo paradigm. The results show that conflicting perceptual information, in comparison to non-conflicting perceptual information, impairs response inhibition performance. This effect was evident regardless of whether the relevant information for response inhibition is displayed on the global, or local perceptual level. The neurophysiological data suggests that early perceptual/ attentional processing stages do not underlie these modulations. Rather, processes at the response selection level (P3), play a role in changed response inhibition performance. This conflict-related impairment of inhibitory processes is associated with activation differences in (inferior) parietal areas (BA7 and BA40) and not as commonly found in the medial prefrontal areas. This suggests that various functional neuroanatomical structures may mediate response inhibition and that the functional neuroanatomical structures involved depend on the complexity of sensory integration processes. PMID:27222225

  2. Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence for increased cognitive flexibility in late childhood

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nicole; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions, like the capacity to control and organize thoughts and behavior, develop from childhood to young adulthood. Although task switching and working memory processes are known to undergo strong developmental changes from childhood to adulthood, it is currently unknown how task switching processes are modulated between childhood and adulthood given that working memory processes are central to task switching. The aim of the current study is therefore to examine this question using a combined cue- and memory-based task switching paradigm in children (N = 25) and young adults (N = 25) in combination with neurophysiological (EEG) methods. We obtained an unexpected paradoxical effect suggesting that memory-based task switching is better in late childhood than in young adulthood. No group differences were observed in cue-based task switching. The neurophysiological data suggest that this effect is not due to altered attentional selection (P1, N1) or processes related to the updating, organization, and implementation of the new task-set (P3). Instead, alterations were found in the resolution of task-set conflict and the selection of an appropriate response (N2) when a task has to be switched. Our observation contrasts findings showing that cognitive control mechanisms reach their optimal functioning in early adulthood. PMID:27349808

  3. Environmental manipulation affects depressive-like behaviours in female Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Mileva, Guergana R; Bielajew, Catherine

    2015-10-15

    While the efficacy of pharmacological interventions to treat depression has been well-studied in animal models, much less work has been done to shed light on how changes in the immediate environment can impact behaviour. Furthermore, most studies have focused on male rodents despite the prevalence of mood disorders in women. In this study, 36 Wistar Kyoto (validated animal model of depression) and 36 Wistar (control) female rats were used to examine the effects of environmental manipulation on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviours. Animals were assigned to one of three groups: standard (3 rats/cage), enriched (6 rats/cage plus physical enrichment), and isolation (1 rat/cage) housing. The elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST) were conducted prior to, and four weeks after environmental assignment to measure anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviours, respectively. Sucrose preference assessed anhedonia both before and after environmental assignment. Weight was measured every week to monitor weight-gain over time. Post-environment sucrose preference was significantly increased in animals in enriched housing as compared to those in isolated housing in both strains. While there were significant differences between strains in measures of open arm duration in the EPM and immobility in the FST, there appeared to be no differences between environmental groups. The results of this study highlight the importance of environmental factors in the expression of anhedonia. Enrichment appears to reduce anhedonia while isolation increases anhedonia. These effects should be studied further to assess whether longer periods of social and physical enrichment alleviate other symptoms of depression. PMID:26215574

  4. Interleukin-6 Modulates Colonic Transepithelial Ion Transport in the Stress-Sensitive Wistar Kyoto Rat

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Dervla; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological challenge stimulates secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6, resulting in variety of biological responses. In the gastrointestinal tract, IL-6 modulates the excitability of submucosal neurons and stimulates secretion into the colonic lumen. When considered in the context of the functional bowel disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where plasma levels of IL-6 are elevated, this may reflect an important molecular mechanism contributing to symptom flares, particularly in the diarrhea-predominant phenotype. In these studies, colonic ion transport, an indicator of absorption and secretion, was assessed in the stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat model of IBS. Mucosa-submucosal colonic preparations from WKY and control Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were mounted in Ussing chambers and the basal short circuit current (ISC) was electrophysiologically recorded and compared between the strains. Exposure to IL-6 (1 nM) stimulated a secretory current of greater amplitude in WKY as compared to SD samples. Furthermore, the observed IL-6-mediated potentiation of secretory currents evoked by veratridine and capsaicin in SD rats was blunted in WKY rats. Exposure to IL-6 also stimulated an increase in transepithelial resistance in both SD and WKY colonic tissue. These studies demonstrate that the neuroexcitatory effects of IL-6 on submucosal plexi have functional consequences with alterations in both colonic secretory activity and permeability. The IL-6-induced increase in colonic secretory activity appears to neurally mediated. Thus, local increases in IL-6 levels and subsequent activation of enteric neurons may underlie alterations in absorpto-secretory function in the WKY model of IBS. PMID:23162465

  5. Kyoto digital database of 44-year synoptic observation of solar chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitai, Reizaburo; Asai, Ayumi; Hayashi, Hiroo; Ueno, Satoru

    2012-07-01

    Solar activity is known to cyclically change in 11 years. However, the amplitude of the variation is not constant but modulated in long term span. The long term variation of solar activity is thought as one of the origin of the global warming or cooling of the earth. In Kyoto University, a continuous synoptic observation of solar chromospheres in CaIIK monochromatic light had been done during the years 1926-1969. CaIIK spectroheliographic images and white light images had been taken on daily base. All the images were recorded in photographic plates. In view of the long term span of the data and the uniqueness of full solar disk images, we think that the data is scientifically a very valuable one. Since we have a risk of aging and degradation of these old photographic plates, we have started a project to digitize all the plates and develop a digital image database for public use via IUGONET (Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork) system. Our plan of the project consists of six stages. (1) Compilation of meta-database and its publication. (2) Digitization of all the plates and development of image database. (3) Visualization of long term solar chromospheric variation. (4) Measurement of solar plage area and brightness. (5) Comparative study between variations of sunspot number and plage activity. (6) Study on the long term character of terrestrial upper atmosphere heating with the solar plage activity as a proxy of solar EUV irradiation. In the present paper, we will give the basic plan, the present status of our project and some preliminary scientific results.

  6. Surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors: the role of intraoperative (neurophysiological) monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Bricolo, Albino; Faccioli, Franco; Lanteri, Paola; Gerosa, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    In spite of advancements in neuro-imaging and microsurgical techniques, surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors (ISCT) remains a challenging task. The rationale for using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) is in keeping with the goal of maximizing tumor resection and minimizing neurological morbidity. For many years, before the advent of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), only somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were monitored. However, SEPs are not aimed to reflect the functional integrity of motor pathways and, nowadays, the combined used of SEPs and MEPs in ISCT surgery is almost mandatory because of the possibility to selectively injury either the somatosensory or the motor pathways. This paper is aimed to review our perspective in the field of IOM during ISCT surgery and to discuss it in the light of other intraoperative neurophysiologic strategies that have recently appeared in the literature with regards to ISCT surgery. Besides standard cortical SEP monitoring after peripheral stimulation, both muscle (mMEPs) and epidural MEPs (D-wave) are monitored after transcranial electrical stimulation (TES). Given the dorsal approach to the spinal cord, SEPs must be monitored continuously during the incision of the dorsal midline. When the surgeon starts to work on the cleavage plane between tumor and spinal cord, attention must be paid to MEPs. During tumor removal, we alternatively monitor D-wave and mMEPs, sustaining the stimulation during the most critical steps of the procedure. D-waves, obtained through a single pulse TES technique, allow a semi-quantitative assessment of the functional integrity of the cortico-spinal tracts and represent the strongest predictor of motor outcome. Whenever evoked potentials deteriorate, temporarily stop surgery, warm saline irrigation and improved blood perfusion have proved useful for promoting recovery, Most of intraoperative neurophysiological derangements are reversible and therefore IOM is able to

  7. The crossroads of anxiety: distinct neurophysiological maps for different symptomatic groups

    PubMed Central

    Gerez, Montserrat; Suárez, Enrique; Serrano, Carlos; Castanedo, Lauro; Tello, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the devastating impact of anxiety disorders (ADs) worldwide, long-lasting debates on causes and remedies have not solved the clinician’s puzzle: who should be treated and how? Psychiatric classifications conceptualize ADs as distinct entities, with strong support from neuroscience fields. Yet, comorbidity and pharmacological response suggest a single “serotonin dysfunction” dimension. Whether AD is one or several disorders goes beyond academic quarrels, and the distinction has therapeutic relevance. Addressing the underlying dysfunctions should improve treatment response. By its own nature, neurophysiology can be the best tool to address dysfunctional processes. Purpose To search for neurophysiological dysfunctions and differences among panic disorder (PD), agoraphobia-social-specific phobia, obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) and generalized anxiety disorder. Methods A sample population of 192 unmedicated patients and 30 aged-matched controls partook in this study. Hypothesis-related neurophysiological variables were combined into ten independent factors: 1) dysrhythmic patterns, 2) delta, 3) theta, 4) alpha, 5) beta (whole-head absolute power z-scores), 6) event-related potential (ERP) combined latency, 7) ERP combined amplitude (z-scores), 8) magnitude, 9) site, and 10) site of hyperactive networks. Combining single variables into representative factors was necessary because, as in all real-life phenomena, the complexity of interactive processes cannot be addressed through single variables and the multiplicity of potentially implicated variables would demand an extremely large sample size for statistical analysis. Results The nonparametric analysis correctly classified 81% of the sample. Dysrhythmic patterns, decreased delta, and increased beta differentiated AD from controls. Shorter ERP latencies were found in several individual patients, mostly from the OCD group. Hyperactivities were found at the right frontorbital

  8. Relevance of a Neurophysiological Marker of Attention Allocation for Children's Learning-Related Behaviors and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, Cynthia J.; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M.; Bierman, Karen L.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Segalowitz, Sidney J.

    2015-01-01

    Learning-related behaviors are important for school success. Socioeconomic disadvantage confers risk for less adaptive learning-related behaviors at school entry, yet substantial variability in school readiness exists within socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Investigation of neurophysiological systems associated with learning-related…

  9. Targeting the neurophysiology of cognitive systems with transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS)

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio; Sellers, Kristin K.; Cordle, Asa L.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment represents one of the most debilitating and most difficult symptom to treat of many psychiatric illnesses. Human neurophysiology studies have suggested specific pathologies of cortical network activity correlate with cognitive impairment. However, we lack (1) demonstration of causal relationships between specific network activity patterns and cognitive capabilities and (2) treatment modalities that directly target impaired network dynamics of cognition. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), a novel non-invasive brain stimulation approach, may provide a crucial tool to tackle these challenges. We here propose that tACS can be used to elucidate the causal role of cortical synchronization in cognition and, eventually, to enhance pathologically weakened synchrony that may underlie cognitive deficits. To accelerate such development of tACS as a treatment for cognitive deficits, we discuss studies on tACS and cognition (all performed in healthy participants) according to the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) of the National Institute of Mental Health. PMID:25547149

  10. A maximum linear separation criterion for the analysis of neurophysiological data.

    PubMed

    Marroquin, Jose L; Mendoza-Montoya, Omar; Biscay, Rolando J; Ruiz-Correa, Salvador; Harmony, Thalia; Fernandez, Thalia

    2013-04-15

    In this paper we propose an approach for the extraction of features that differentiate two populations or two experimental conditions in a neurophysiological experiment. These features consist of summarizing variables defined as total activity (e.g., total normalized log-power), computed over sets of sites in a discrete domain, such as the time-frequency-topography space. These sets are obtained as those that maximize the linear separation between the two populations, and the corresponding maps provide information that may complement that obtained by standard procedures, such as statistical parametric mapping. It is shown experimentally, using both simulated and real data, that the proposed approach may provide useful information even when the standard procedures fail, due to the conservative nature of the multiple comparison correction that must be applied in the later case. PMID:23416134

  11. Fabrication of nanoelectrodes for neurophysiology: cathodic electrophoretic paint insulation and focused ion beam milling

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Chen, Jie; Guo, Xiaoli; Cantrell, Donald; Ruoff, Rodney; Troy, John

    2005-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of tungsten nanoelectrodes insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint is described together with their application within the field of neurophysiology. The tip of a 127 μm diameter tungsten wire was etched down to less than 100 nm and then insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint. Focused ion beam (FIB) polishing was employed to remove the insulation at the electrode’s apex, leaving a nanoscale sized conductive tip of 100–1000 nm. The nanoelectrodes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their electrochemical properties characterized by steady state linear sweep voltammetry. Electrode impedance at 1 kHz was measured too. The ability of a 700 nm tipped electrode to record well-isolated action potentials extracellularly from single visual neurons in vivo was demonstrated. Such electrodes have the potential to open new populations of neurons to study. PMID:16467926

  12. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder; Vogel, Richard W; Lober, Robert M; Doan, Adam T; Matsumoto, Craig I; Kenning, Tyler J; Evans, James J

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route. PMID:27293965

  13. Hippocampal Neurophysiologic Changes after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Potential Neuromodulation Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Fady; Pace, Jonathan; Sweet, Jennifer; Miller, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in individuals below age 45, and five million Americans live with chronic disability as a result. Mild TBI (mTBI), defined as TBI in the absence of major imaging or histopathological defects, is responsible for a majority of cases. Despite the lack of overt morphological defects, victims of mTBI frequently suffer lasting cognitive deficits, memory difficulties, and behavioral disturbances. There is increasing evidence that cognitive and memory dysfunction is related to subtle physiological changes that occur in the hippocampus, and these impact both the phenotype of deficits observed and subsequent recovery. Therapeutic modulation of physiological activity by means of medications commonly used for other indications or brain stimulation may represent novel treatment approaches. This review summarizes the present body of knowledge regarding neurophysiologic changes that occur in the hippocampus after mTBI, as well as potential targets for therapeutic modulation of neurologic activity. PMID:26903824

  14. A Multimodal, SU-8 - Platinum - Polyimide Microelectrode Array for Chronic In Vivo Neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Márton, Gergely; Orbán, Gábor; Kiss, Marcell; Fiáth, Richárd; Pongrácz, Anita; Ulbert, István

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of polymers as insulator and bulk materials of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) makes the realization of flexible, biocompatible sensors possible, which are suitable for various neurophysiological experiments such as in vivo detection of local field potential changes on the surface of the neocortex or unit activities within the brain tissue. In this paper the microfabrication of a novel, all-flexible, polymer-based MEA is presented. The device consists of a three dimensional sensor configuration with an implantable depth electrode array and brain surface electrodes, allowing the recording of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals with laminar ones, simultaneously. In vivo recordings were performed in anesthetized rat brain to test the functionality of the device under both acute and chronic conditions. The ECoG electrodes recorded slow-wave thalamocortical oscillations, while the implanted component provided high quality depth recordings. The implants remained viable for detecting action potentials of individual neurons for at least 15 weeks. PMID:26683306

  15. Contribution of neurophysiological endophenotype, individual frequency of EEG alpha oscillations, to mechanisms of emotional reactivity.

    PubMed

    Tumyalis, A V; Aftanas, L I

    2014-04-01

    We studied the relationship between individual alpha frequency (IAF) of EEG (neurophysiological endophenotype reflecting individual predisposition to efficacious cognitive and creative activity) and individual emotional reactivity. The psychophysiological study included healthy men in two models of evoked emotions - anxious apprehension (awaiting of inescapable aversive punishment) and discrete (opposite) emotions. Analysis of self-report, multichannel EEG, galvanic skin response, and cardiovascular reactivity showed that individuals with high IAF are characterized by predominance of parasympathetic influences in autonomic regulation circuit, proactive strategies of coping with inescapable threat, higher activity of positive emotional attitude and availability of memory traces about positive experience. Individuals with low IAF demonstrate predominance of sympathetic influences and maladaptive avoidance-like coping with inescapable threat and insufficiency of positive emotional activation mechanisms. It is suggested that IAF participates in the formation of individual emotional space and strategies of coping with emotional challenges. PMID:24824678

  16. A Multimodal, SU-8 - Platinum - Polyimide Microelectrode Array for Chronic In Vivo Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Márton, Gergely; Orbán, Gábor; Kiss, Marcell; Fiáth, Richárd; Pongrácz, Anita; Ulbert, István

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of polymers as insulator and bulk materials of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) makes the realization of flexible, biocompatible sensors possible, which are suitable for various neurophysiological experiments such as in vivo detection of local field potential changes on the surface of the neocortex or unit activities within the brain tissue. In this paper the microfabrication of a novel, all-flexible, polymer-based MEA is presented. The device consists of a three dimensional sensor configuration with an implantable depth electrode array and brain surface electrodes, allowing the recording of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals with laminar ones, simultaneously. In vivo recordings were performed in anesthetized rat brain to test the functionality of the device under both acute and chronic conditions. The ECoG electrodes recorded slow-wave thalamocortical oscillations, while the implanted component provided high quality depth recordings. The implants remained viable for detecting action potentials of individual neurons for at least 15 weeks. PMID:26683306

  17. Neurophysiological Mechanisms of Auditory Information Processing in Adolescence: A Study on Sex Differences.

    PubMed

    Bakos, Sarolta; Töllner, Thomas; Trinkl, Monika; Landes, Iris; Bartling, Jürgen; Grossheinrich, Nicola; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Greimel, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    To date, little is known about sex differences in the neurophysiological correlates underlying auditory information processing. In the present study, auditory evoked potentials were evoked in typically developing male (n = 15) and female (n = 14) adolescents (13-18 years) during an auditory oddball task. Girls compared to boys displayed lower N100 and P300 amplitudes to targets. Larger N100 amplitudes in adolescent boys might indicate higher neural sensitivity to changes of incoming auditory information. The P300 findings point toward sex differences in auditory working memory and might suggest that adolescent boys might allocate more attentional resources when processing relevant auditory stimuli than adolescent girls. PMID:27379950

  18. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide

    PubMed Central

    Lober, Robert M.; Doan, Adam T.; Matsumoto, Craig I.; Kenning, Tyler J.; Evans, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route. PMID:27293965

  19. Fabrication of nanoelectrodes for neurophysiology: cathodic electrophoretic paint insulation and focused ion beam milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yi; Chen, Jie; Guo, Xiaoli; Cantrell, Donald; Ruoff, Rodney; Troy, John

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication and characterization of tungsten nanoelectrodes insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint is described together with their application within the field of neurophysiology. The tip of a 127 µm diameter tungsten wire was etched down to less than 100 nm and then insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint. Focused ion beam (FIB) polishing was employed to remove the insulation at the electrode's apex, leaving a nanoscale sized conductive tip of 100-1000 nm. The nanoelectrodes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their electrochemical properties characterized by steady state linear sweep voltammetry. Electrode impedance at 1 kHz was measured too. The ability of a 700 nm tipped electrode to record well-isolated action potentials extracellularly from single visual neurons in vivo was demonstrated. Such electrodes have the potential to open new populations of neurons to study.

  20. Neurophysiological processing of emotion and parenting interact to predict inhibited behavior: an affective-motivational framework

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, Ellen M.; Huselid, Rebecca F.; DeCicco, Jennifer M.; Dennis, Tracy A.

    2013-01-01

    Although inhibited behavior problems are prevalent in childhood, relatively little is known about the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that predict a child's ability to regulate inhibited behavior during fear- and anxiety-provoking tasks. Inhibited behavior may be linked to both disruptions in avoidance-related processing of aversive stimuli and in approach-related processing of appetitive stimuli, but previous findings are contradictory and rarely integrate consideration of the socialization context. The current exploratory study used a novel combination of neurophysiological and observation-based methods to examine whether a neurophysiological measure sensitive to approach- and avoidance-oriented emotional processing, the late positive potential (LPP), interacted with observed approach- (promotion) and avoidance- (prevention) oriented parenting practices to predict children's observed inhibited behavior. Participants were 5- to 7-year-old (N = 32) typically-developing children (M = 75.72 months, SD = 6.01). Electroencephalography was continuously recorded while children viewed aversive, appetitive, or neutral images, and the LPP was generated to each picture type separately. Promotion and prevention parenting were observed during an emotional challenge with the child. Child inhibited behavior was observed during a fear and a social evaluation task. As predicted, larger LPPs to aversive images predicted more inhibited behavior during both tasks, but only when parents demonstrated low promotion. In contrast, larger LPPs to appetitive images predicted less inhibited behavior during the social evaluative task, but only when parents demonstrated high promotion; children of high promotion parents showing smaller LPPs to appetitive images showed the greatest inhibition. Parent-child goodness-of-fit and the LPP as a neural biomarker for emotional processes related to inhibited behavior are discussed. PMID:23847499

  1. The Impact of Moderate Sleep Loss on Neurophysiologic Signals during Working-Memory Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael E.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Gevins, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Study Objectives This study examined how sleep loss affects neurophysiologic signals related to attention and working memory. Design Subjective sleepiness, resting-state electroencephalogram, and behavior and electroencephalogram during performance of working-memory tasks were recorded in a within-subject, repeated-measures design. Setting Data collection occurred in a computerized laboratory setting. Participants Sixteen healthy adults (mean age, 26 years; 8 female) Interventions Data from alert daytime baseline tests were compared with data from tests during a late-night, extended-wakefulness session that spanned up to 21 hours of sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results Alertness measured both subjectively and electrophysiologically decreased monotonically with increasing sleep deprivation. A lack of alertness-related changes in electroencephalographic measures of the overall mental effort exerted during task execution indicated that participants attempted to maintain high levels of performance throughout the late-night tests. Despite such continued effort, responses became slower, more variable, and more error prone within 1 hour after participants' normal time of sleep onset. This behavior failure was accompanied by significant degradation of event-related brain potentials related to the transient focusing of attention. Conclusions Moderate sleep loss compromises the function of neural circuits critical to subsecond attention allocation during working-memory tasks, even when an effort is made to maintain wakefulness and performance. Multivariate analyses indicate that combinations of working-memory-related behavior and neurophysiologic measures can be sensitive enough to permit reliable detection of such effects of sleep loss in individuals. Similar methods might prove useful for assessment of functional alertness in patients with sleep disorders. PMID:12405615

  2. Multiple Frequency Audio Signal Communication as a Mechanism for Neurophysiology and Video Data Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Topper, Nicholas C.; Burke, S.N.; Maurer, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Current methods for aligning neurophysiology and video data are either prepackaged, requiring the additional purchase of a software suite, or use a blinking LED with a stationary pulse-width and frequency. These methods lack significant user interface for adaptation, are expensive, or risk a misalignment of the two data streams. NEW METHOD A cost-effective means to obtain high-precision alignment of behavioral and neurophysiological data is obtained by generating an audio-pulse embedded with two domains of information, a low-frequency binary-counting signal and a high, randomly changing frequency. This enabled the derivation of temporal information while maintaining enough entropy in the system for algorithmic alignment. RESULTS The sample to frame index constructed using the audio input correlation method described in this paper enables video and data acquisition to be aligned at a sub-frame level of precision. COMPARISONS WITH EXISTING METHOD Traditionally, a synchrony pulse is recorded on-screen via a flashing diode. The higher sampling rate of the audio input of the camcorder enables the timing of an event to be detected with greater precision. CONCLUSIONS While On-line analysis and synchronization using specialized equipment may be the ideal situation in some cases, the method presented in the current paper presents a viable, low cost alternative, and gives the flexibility to interface with custom off-line analysis tools. Moreover, the ease of constructing and implements this set-up presented in the current paper makes it applicable to a wide variety of applications that require video recording. PMID:25256648

  3. Behavioural and neurophysiological evidence for face identity and face emotion processing in animals

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Andrew J; Fischer, Hanno; Leigh, Andrea E; Kendrick, Keith M

    2006-01-01

    Visual cues from faces provide important social information relating to individual identity, sexual attraction and emotional state. Behavioural and neurophysiological studies on both monkeys and sheep have shown that specialized skills and neural systems for processing these complex cues to guide behaviour have evolved in a number of mammals and are not present exclusively in humans. Indeed, there are remarkable similarities in the ways that faces are processed by the brain in humans and other mammalian species. While human studies with brain imaging and gross neurophysiological recording approaches have revealed global aspects of the face-processing network, they cannot investigate how information is encoded by specific neural networks. Single neuron electrophysiological recording approaches in both monkeys and sheep have, however, provided some insights into the neural encoding principles involved and, particularly, the presence of a remarkable degree of high-level encoding even at the level of a specific face. Recent developments that allow simultaneous recordings to be made from many hundreds of individual neurons are also beginning to reveal evidence for global aspects of a population-based code. This review will summarize what we have learned so far from these animal-based studies about the way the mammalian brain processes the faces and the emotions they can communicate, as well as associated capacities such as how identity and emotion cues are dissociated and how face imagery might be generated. It will also try to highlight what questions and advances in knowledge still challenge us in order to provide a complete understanding of just how brain networks perform this complex and important social recognition task. PMID:17118930

  4. Predicting Mental Imagery-Based BCI Performance from Personality, Cognitive Profile and Neurophysiological Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jeunet, Camille; N’Kaoua, Bernard; Subramanian, Sriram; Hachet, Martin; Lotte, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Mental-Imagery based Brain-Computer Interfaces (MI-BCIs) allow their users to send commands to a computer using their brain-activity alone (typically measured by ElectroEncephaloGraphy—EEG), which is processed while they perform specific mental tasks. While very promising, MI-BCIs remain barely used outside laboratories because of the difficulty encountered by users to control them. Indeed, although some users obtain good control performances after training, a substantial proportion remains unable to reliably control an MI-BCI. This huge variability in user-performance led the community to look for predictors of MI-BCI control ability. However, these predictors were only explored for motor-imagery based BCIs, and mostly for a single training session per subject. In this study, 18 participants were instructed to learn to control an EEG-based MI-BCI by performing 3 MI-tasks, 2 of which were non-motor tasks, across 6 training sessions, on 6 different days. Relationships between the participants’ BCI control performances and their personality, cognitive profile and neurophysiological markers were explored. While no relevant relationships with neurophysiological markers were found, strong correlations between MI-BCI performances and mental-rotation scores (reflecting spatial abilities) were revealed. Also, a predictive model of MI-BCI performance based on psychometric questionnaire scores was proposed. A leave-one-subject-out cross validation process revealed the stability and reliability of this model: it enabled to predict participants’ performance with a mean error of less than 3 points. This study determined how users’ profiles impact their MI-BCI control ability and thus clears the way for designing novel MI-BCI training protocols, adapted to the profile of each user. PMID:26625261

  5. Neurophysiological processing of emotion and parenting interact to predict inhibited behavior: an affective-motivational framework.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Ellen M; Huselid, Rebecca F; Decicco, Jennifer M; Dennis, Tracy A

    2013-01-01

    Although inhibited behavior problems are prevalent in childhood, relatively little is known about the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that predict a child's ability to regulate inhibited behavior during fear- and anxiety-provoking tasks. Inhibited behavior may be linked to both disruptions in avoidance-related processing of aversive stimuli and in approach-related processing of appetitive stimuli, but previous findings are contradictory and rarely integrate consideration of the socialization context. The current exploratory study used a novel combination of neurophysiological and observation-based methods to examine whether a neurophysiological measure sensitive to approach- and avoidance-oriented emotional processing, the late positive potential (LPP), interacted with observed approach- (promotion) and avoidance- (prevention) oriented parenting practices to predict children's observed inhibited behavior. Participants were 5- to 7-year-old (N = 32) typically-developing children (M = 75.72 months, SD = 6.01). Electroencephalography was continuously recorded while children viewed aversive, appetitive, or neutral images, and the LPP was generated to each picture type separately. Promotion and prevention parenting were observed during an emotional challenge with the child. Child inhibited behavior was observed during a fear and a social evaluation task. As predicted, larger LPPs to aversive images predicted more inhibited behavior during both tasks, but only when parents demonstrated low promotion. In contrast, larger LPPs to appetitive images predicted less inhibited behavior during the social evaluative task, but only when parents demonstrated high promotion; children of high promotion parents showing smaller LPPs to appetitive images showed the greatest inhibition. Parent-child goodness-of-fit and the LPP as a neural biomarker for emotional processes related to inhibited behavior are discussed. PMID:23847499

  6. Neurophysiological activity underlying altered brain metabolism in epileptic encephalopathies with CSWS.

    PubMed

    De Tiège, Xavier; Trotta, Nicola; Op de Beeck, Marc; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Marty, Brice; Wens, Vincent; Nonclercq, Antoine; Goldman, Serge; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the neurophysiological correlate of altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism observed in children with epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) by using a multimodal approach combining time-sensitive magnetic source imaging (MSI) and positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Six patients (4 boys and 2 girls, age range: 4-8 years, 3 patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), 3 patients with atypical rolandic epilepsy (ARE)) were investigated by FDG-PET and MSI at the acute phase of CSWS. In all patients, the onset(s) of spike-waves discharges were associated with significant focal hypermetabolism. The propagation of epileptic discharges to other brain areas was associated with focal hypermetabolism (five patients), hypometabolism (one patient) or the absence of any significant metabolic change (one patient). Interestingly, most of the hypometabolic areas were not involved in the epileptic network per se. This study shows that focal hypermetabolism observed at the acute phase of CSWS are related to the onset or propagation sites of spike-wave discharges. Spike-wave discharges propagation can be associated to other types of metabolic changes, suggesting the occurrence of various neurophysiological mechanisms at the cellular level. Most of the hypometabolic areas are not involved in the epileptic network as such and are probably related to a mechanism of remote inhibition. These findings highlight the critical value of combining FDG-PET with time-sensitive functional neuroimaging approaches such as MSI to assess CSWS epileptic network when surgery is considered as a therapeutic approach. PMID:23561286

  7. Data-driven analysis of simultaneous EEG/fMRI reveals neurophysiological phenotypes of impulse control.

    PubMed

    Schmüser, Lena; Sebastian, Alexandra; Mobascher, Arian; Lieb, Klaus; Feige, Bernd; Tüscher, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Response inhibition is the ability to suppress inadequate but prepotent or ongoing response tendencies. A fronto-striatal network is involved in these processes. Between-subject differences in the intra-individual variability have been suggested to constitute a key to pathological processes underlying impulse control disorders. Single-trial EEG/fMRI analysis allows to increase sensitivity for inter-individual differences by incorporating intra-individual variability. Thirty-eight healthy subjects performed a visual Go/Nogo task during simultaneous EEG/fMRI. Of 38 healthy subjects, 21 subjects reliably showed Nogo-related ICs (Nogo-IC-positive) while 17 subjects (Nogo-IC-negative) did not. Comparing both groups revealed differences on various levels: On trait level, Nogo-IC-negative subjects scored higher on questionnaires regarding attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; on a behavioral level, they displayed slower response times (RT) and higher intra-individual RT variability while both groups did not differ in their inhibitory performance. On the neurophysiological level, Nogo-IC-negative subjects showed a hyperactivation of left inferior frontal cortex/insula and left putamen as well as significantly reduced P3 amplitudes. Thus, a data-driven approach for IC classification and the resulting presence or absence of early Nogo-specific ICs as criterion for group selection revealed group differences at behavioral and neurophysiological levels. This may indicate electrophysiological phenotypes characterized by inter-individual variations of neural and behavioral correlates of impulse control. We demonstrated that the inter-individual difference in an electrophysiological correlate of response inhibition is correlated with distinct, potentially compensatory neural activity. This may suggest the existence of electrophysiologically dissociable phenotypes of behavioral and neural motor response inhibition with the Nogo-IC-positive phenotype possibly providing

  8. Leg Regrowth in Blaberus discoidalis (Discoid Cockroach) following Limb Autotomy versus Limb Severance and Relevance to Neurophysiology Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Marzullo, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many insects can regenerate limbs, but less is known about the regrowth process with regard to limb injury type. As part of our neurophysiology education experiments involving the removal of a cockroach leg, 1) the ability of Blaberus discoidalis cockroaches to regenerate a metathoracic leg was examined following autotomy at the femur/trochanter joint versus severance via a transverse coxa-cut, and 2) the neurophysiology of the detached legs with regard to leg removal type was studied by measuring spike firing rate and microstimulation movement thresholds. Leg Regrowth Results First appearance of leg regrowth was after 5 weeks in the autotomy group and 12 weeks in the coxa-cut group. Moreover, regenerated legs in the autotomy group were 72% of full size on first appearance, significantly larger (p<0.05) than coxa-cut legs (29% of full size at first appearance). Regenerated legs in both groups grew in size with each subsequent molt; the autotomy-removed legs grew to full size within 18 weeks, whereas coxa-cut legs took longer than 28 weeks to regrow. Removal of the metathoracic leg in both conditions did not have an effect on mortality compared to matched controls with unmolested legs. Neurophysiology Results Autotomy-removed legs had lower spontaneous firing rates, similar marked increased firing rates upon tactile manipulation of tibial barbs, and a 10% higher electrical microstimulation threshold for movement. Summary It is recommended that neurophysiology experiments on cockroach legs remove the limb at autotomy joints instead of coxa cuts, as the leg regenerates significantly faster when autotomized and does not detract from the neurophysiology educational content. PMID:26824931

  9. The impact of economic activity in Asturias on greenhouse gas emissions: consequences for environmental policy within the Kyoto Protocol framework.

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Margarita; Benavides, Carmen; Junquera, Beatriz

    2006-11-01

    Climate change is one of the major worldwide environmental concerns. It is especially the case in many developed countries, where the greenhouse gas emissions responsible for this change are mainly concentrated. For the first time, the Kyoto Protocol includes an international agreement for the reduction of the net emissions of these gases. To fulfil this agreement measures designed to reduce or limit current emissions have to be brought into force. Consequently, fears have arisen about possible consequences on competitiveness and future development of manufacturing activities and the need for support mechanisms for the affected sectors is obvious. In this paper, we carry out a study of the emissions of gases responsible for climate change in Asturias (Spain), a region with an important economic presence of sectors with intensive emissions of CO(2), the chief greenhouse gas. To be precise, in the first place, the volumes of direct emissions of the said gases in 1995 were calculated, showing that the sectors most affected by the Kyoto Protocol in Asturias are iron and steel and electricity production. Secondly, input-output analysis was applied to determine the direct and indirect emissions and the direct, indirect and induced emissions of the different production sectors, respectively. The results derived from the direct and indirect emissions analysis and their comparison with the results of the former allow us to reach some conclusions and environmental policy implications. PMID:16556480

  10. ANTIDEPRESSANT-LIKE EFFECTS OF LOW KETAMINE DOSE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED HIPPOCAMPAL AMPA/NMDA RECEPTOR DENSITY RATIO IN FEMALE WISTAR-KYOTO RATS

    PubMed Central

    Tizabi, Yousef; Bhatti, Babur H; Manaye, Kebreten F; Das, Jharna R; Akinfiresoye, Luli

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical as well as limited clinical studies indicate that ketamine, a non-competitive glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist, may exert a quick and prolonged antidepressant effect. It has been postulated that ketamine action is due to inhibition of NMDA and stimulation of AMPA receptors. Here, we sought to determine whether ketamine would exert antidepressant effects in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative animal model of depression and whether this effect would be associated with changes in AMPA/NMDA receptor densities in the hippocampus. Adult female WKY rats and their control Wistar rats were subjected to acute and chronic ketamine doses and their locomotor activity (LMA) and immobility in the forced swim test (FST) were evaluated. Hippocampal AMPA and NMDA receptor densities were also measured following a chronic ketamine dose. Ketamine, both acutely (0.5–5.0 mg/kg ip) and chronically (0.5–2.5 mg/kg daily for 10 days) resulted in a dose-dependent and prolonged decrease in immobility in the FST in WKY rats only, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect in this model. Chronic treatment with an effective dose of ketamine also resulted in an increase in AMPA/NMDA receptor density ratio in the hippocampus of WKY rats. LMA was not affected by any ketamine treatment in either strain. These results indicate a rapid and lasting antidepressant-like effect of a low ketamine dose in WKY rat model of depression. Moreover, the increase in AMPA/NMDA receptor density in hippocampus could be a contributory factor to behavioral effects of ketamine. These findings suggest potential therapeutic benefit in simultaneous reduction of central NMDA and elevation of AMPA receptor function in treatment of depression. PMID:22521815

  11. Cell therapy clinical trials in Germany--Critical aspects of quality data content: Summary of meeting presentation.

    PubMed

    Renner, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    This article is summarizing a presentation given by the author at the International Alliance for Biological Standardization and Japan Science and Technology Agency (IABS-JST) Joint Workshop on "Challenges towards sound scientific regulation of cell therapy products" held at the Kyoto International Conference Center, Kyoto Japan on March 7-8, 2014. The main topics of the presentation were to give a short overview about the regulatory approval process for clinical trials in Germany and to summarize important manufacturing aspects of cell based medicinal products (CBMPs) which are intended to be studied in clinical trials in Germany. PMID:26044762

  12. Pain neurophysiology education improves cognitions, pain thresholds, and movement performance in people with chronic whiplash: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Truijen, Steven; Craps, Julie; Van den Keybus, Nick; Paul, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    Chronic whiplash is a debilitating condition characterized by increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, maladaptive illness beliefs, inappropriate attitudes, and movement dysfunctions. Previous work in people with chronic low back pain and chronic fatigue syndrome indicates that pain neurophysiology education is able to improve illness beliefs and attitudes as well as movement performance. This single-case study (A-B-C design) with six patients with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD) was aimed at examining whether education about the neurophysiology of pain is accompanied by changes in symptoms, daily functioning, pain beliefs, and behavior. Periods A and C represented assessment periods, while period B consisted of the intervention (pain neurophysiology education). Results showed a significant decrease in kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia), the passive coping strategy of resting (Pain Coping Inventory), self-rated disability (Neck Disability Index), and photophobia (WAD Symptom List). At the same time, significantly increased pain pressure thresholds and improved pain-free movement performance (visual analog scale on Neck Extension Test and Brachial Plexus Provocation Test) were established. Although the current results need to be verified in a randomized, controlled trial, they suggest that education about the physiology of pain is able to increase pain thresholds and improve pain behavior and pain-free movement performance in patients with chronic WAD. PMID:21328162

  13. PLDAPS: A Hardware Architecture and Software Toolbox for Neurophysiology Requiring Complex Visual Stimuli and Online Behavioral Control.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Kyler M; Huk, Alexander C

    2012-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies in awake, behaving primates (both human and non-human) have focused with increasing scrutiny on the temporal relationship between neural signals and behaviors. Consequently, laboratories are often faced with the problem of developing experimental equipment that can support data recording with high temporal precision and also be flexible enough to accommodate a wide variety of experimental paradigms. To this end, we have developed a MATLAB toolbox that integrates several modern pieces of equipment, but still grants experimenters the flexibility of a high-level programming language. Our toolbox takes advantage of three popular and powerful technologies: the Plexon apparatus for neurophysiological recordings (Plexon, Inc., Dallas, TX, USA), a Datapixx peripheral (Vpixx Technologies, Saint-Bruno, QC, Canada) for control of analog, digital, and video input-output signals, and the Psychtoolbox MATLAB toolbox for stimulus generation (Brainard, 1997; Pelli, 1997; Kleiner et al., 2007). The PLDAPS ("Platypus") system is designed to support the study of the visual systems of awake, behaving primates during multi-electrode neurophysiological recordings, but can be easily applied to other related domains. Despite its wide range of capabilities and support for cutting-edge video displays and neural recording systems, the PLDAPS system is simple enough for someone with basic MATLAB programming skills to design their own experiments. PMID:22319490

  14. Measuring neurophysiological signals in aircraft pilots and car drivers for the assessment of mental workload, fatigue and drowsiness.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Gianluca; Astolfi, Laura; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Mattia, Donatella; Babiloni, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews published papers related to neurophysiological measurements (electroencephalography: EEG, electrooculography EOG; heart rate: HR) in pilots/drivers during their driving tasks. The aim is to summarise the main neurophysiological findings related to the measurements of pilot/driver's brain activity during drive performance and how particular aspects of this brain activity could be connected with the important concepts of "mental workload", "mental fatigue" or "situational awareness". Review of the literature suggests that exists a coherent sequence of changes for EEG, EOG and HR variables during the transition from normal drive, high mental workload and eventually mental fatigue and drowsiness. In particular, increased EEG power in theta band and a decrease in alpha band occurred in high mental workload. Successively, increased EEG power in theta as well as delta and alpha bands characterise the transition between mental workload and mental fatigue. Drowsiness is also characterised by increased blink rate and decreased HR values. The detection of such mental states is actually performed "offline" with accuracy around 90% but not online. A discussion on the possible future applications of findings provided by these neurophysiological measurements in order to improve the safety of the vehicles will be also presented. PMID:23116991

  15. Neurophysiological and behavioural effects of dual-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation on the proximal upper limb.

    PubMed

    McCambridge, Alana B; Stinear, James W; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-06-01

    Dual-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation over the primary motor cortex (M1-M1 tDCS) is assumed to modulate neural excitability in a polarity-dependent manner and improve motor performance of the hand. In the proximal upper limb, the neurophysiological and behavioural after-effects of M1-M1 tDCS are not well known. This study investigated the after-effects of M1-M1 tDCS on contralateral, ipsilateral and transcallosal excitability to the proximal upper limb muscle biceps brachii (BB). Circle tracing was used to assess motor performance before and after tDCS as this task requires coordination of proximal and distal musculature. Sixteen healthy right-handed adults participated in the study, each receiving M1-M1 tDCS (1 mA, 15 min) or sham tDCS in separate sessions. The anode was positioned over right M1 and cathode over left M1. M1-M1 tDCS suppressed transcallosal inhibition from the M1 under the cathode (P < 0.045). No other neurophysiologic or behavioural effects were observed (P > 0.6). The study provides important information regarding inconsistent neurophysiological and behavioural changes following tDCS that have implications for future tDCS research on the motor system. PMID:26749182

  16. Neurophysiological markers of plastic brain reorganization following central and peripheral lesions.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Florinda; Guerra, Andrea; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence supporting the concept that adult brain has the remarkable ability to plastically reorganize itself. Brain plasticity involves distinct functional and structural components and plays a crucial role in reorganizing central nervous system's networks after central and peripheral lesions in order to partly or totally restore lost and/or compromised functions. This plastic rearrangement occurs in fact not only after a central nervous system injury but also following a peripheral lesion. Interestingly, the existence of a certain type of maladaptive plasticity was clearly recognized in the last decade, which gives reason for example to poor out- come performances or aberrant phenomena. In this review we analyze stroke and amputees studies, as illustrative conditions of central and peripheral nervous system damage, and discuss the adaptive as well maladaptive plastic brain changes following these lesions. The emerging possibility, through neuro-imaging and neurophysiological advanced techniques, to clarify some crucial issues underlying brain plasticity will give the chance to modulate these mechanisms in a highly personalized therapy. This approach may have a tremendous impact in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders opening a new era of restorative medicine. PMID:25987182

  17. Neurophysiological signals of ignoring and attending are separable and related to performance during sustained intersensory attention.

    PubMed

    Lenartowicz, Agatha; Simpson, Gregory V; Haber, Catherine M; Cohen, Mark S

    2014-09-01

    The ability to attend to an input selectively while ignoring distracting sensations is thought to depend on the coordination of two processes: enhancement of target signals and attenuation of distractor signals. This implies that attending and ignoring may be dissociable neural processes and that they make separable contributions to behavioral outcomes of attention. In this study, we tested these hypotheses in the context of sustained attention by measuring neurophysiological responses to attended and ignored stimuli in a noncued, continuous, audiovisual selective attention task. We compared these against responses during a passive control to quantify effects of attending and ignoring separately. In both sensory modalities, responses to ignored stimuli were attenuated relative to a passive control, whereas responses to attended stimuli were enhanced. The scalp topographies and brain activations of these modulatory effects were consistent with the sensory regions that process each modality. They also included parietal and prefrontal activations that suggest these effects arise from interactions between top-down and sensory cortices. Most importantly, we found that both attending and ignoring processes contributed to task accuracy and that these effects were not correlated--suggesting unique neural trajectories. This conclusion was supported by the novel observation that attending and ignoring differed in timing and in active cortical regions. The data provide direct evidence for the separable contributions of attending and ignoring to behavioral outcomes of attention control during sustained intersensory attention. PMID:24666167

  18. An Open Source 3-D Printed Modular Micro-Drive System for Acute Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Eskandar, Emad N.

    2014-01-01

    Current, commercial, electrode micro-drives that allow independent positioning of multiple electrodes are expensive. Custom designed solutions developed by individual laboratories require fabrication by experienced machinists working in well equipped machine shops and are therefore difficult to disseminate into widespread use. Here, we present an easy to assemble modular micro-drive system for acute primate neurophysiology (PriED) that utilizes rapid prototyping (3-d printing) and readily available off the shelf-parts. The use of 3-d printed parts drastically reduces the cost of the device, making it available to labs without the resources of sophisticated machine shops. The direct transfer of designs from electronic files to physical parts also gives researchers opportunities to easily modify and implement custom solutions to specific recording needs. We also demonstrate a novel model of data sharing for the scientific community: a publicly available repository of drive designs. Researchers can download the drive part designs from the repository, print, assemble and then use the drives. Importantly, users can upload their modified designs with annotations making them easily available for others to use. PMID:24736691

  19. Left-lateralized early neurophysiological response for Chinese characters in young primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohua; Li, Su; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Si'en; Weng, Xuchu

    2011-04-01

    Adult readers consistently show an enhanced early event-related potential (ERP) response, N170, for visual words compared with other stimuli at left posterior electrodes. Developmental studies with words in alphabetic languages showed that this neurophysiological specialization for print develops rapidly from 6 to 10-years of age and becomes established around 10-11 years of age. Here we report for the first time the development of the word-related N170 in Chinese children learning to read Chinese, a logographic writing system radically different from alphabetic scripts in visual and linguistic features. We recorded ERP responses elicited by Chinese characters and line drawings of common objects in three groups of primary school children at 7, 9, and 11 years of age as well as college students. Results showed that the amplitude of N170 evoked by Chinese characters in the 7-year-old group was significantly larger than that in the 11-year-old group and the adult readers. Remarkably, all four age groups - even the youngest group - showed an increased and left-lateralized N170 response for Chinese characters, as compared with line drawings, suggesting that a relatively specialized mechanism for processing Chinese characters is already emergent by as early as 7 years of age. Our results, combined with studies of non-Chinese child readers suggest that the developmental pattern of word-related N170 is highly similar across different scripts, possibly reflecting increased visual processing expertise that children acquire through everyday reading. PMID:21310213

  20. CUSTOM-FIT RADIOLUCENT CRANIAL IMPLANTS FOR NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL RECORDING AND STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, Grant H; Bichot, Narcisse P; Ghadooshahy, Azriel; Sharma, Jitendra; Kornblith, Simon; Philcock, Michael; Desimone, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Recording and manipulating neural activity in awake behaving animal models requires long-term implantation of cranial implants that must address a variety of design considerations, which include preventing infection, minimizing tissue damage, mechanical strength of the implant, and MRI compatibility. New Method Here we address these issues by designing legless, custom-fit cranial implants using structural MRI-based reconstruction of the skull and that are made from carbon-reinforced PEEK. Results We report several novel custom-fit radiolucent implant designs, which include a legless recording chamber, a legless stimulation chamber, a multi-channel microdrive and a head post. The fit to the skull was excellent in all cases, with no visible gaps between the base of the implants and the skull. The wound margin was minimal in size and showed no sign of infection or skin recession. Comparison with Existing Methods Cranial implants used for neurophysiological investigation in awake behaving animals often employ methyl methacrylate (MMA) to serve as a bonding agent to secure the implant to the skull. Other designs rely on radially extending legs to secure the implant. Both of these methods have significant drawbacks. MMA is toxic to bone and frequently leads to infection while radially extending legs cause the skin to recede away from the implant, ultimately exposing bone and proliferating granulation tissue. Conclusions These radiolucent implants constitute a set of technologies suitable for reliable long-term recording, which minimize infection and tissue damage. PMID:25542350

  1. Rhythm in joint action: psychological and neurophysiological mechanisms for real-time interpersonal coordination.

    PubMed

    Keller, Peter E; Novembre, Giacomo; Hove, Michael J

    2014-12-19

    Human interaction often requires simultaneous precision and flexibility in the coordination of rhythmic behaviour between individuals engaged in joint activity, for example, playing a musical duet or dancing with a partner. This review article addresses the psychological processes and brain mechanisms that enable such rhythmic interpersonal coordination. First, an overview is given of research on the cognitive-motor processes that enable individuals to represent joint action goals and to anticipate, attend and adapt to other's actions in real time. Second, the neurophysiological mechanisms that underpin rhythmic interpersonal coordination are sought in studies of sensorimotor and cognitive processes that play a role in the representation and integration of self- and other-related actions within and between individuals' brains. Finally, relationships between social-psychological factors and rhythmic interpersonal coordination are considered from two perspectives, one concerning how social-cognitive tendencies (e.g. empathy) affect coordination, and the other concerning how coordination affects interpersonal affiliation, trust and prosocial behaviour. Our review highlights musical ensemble performance as an ecologically valid yet readily controlled domain for investigating rhythm in joint action. PMID:25385772

  2. Psycho-physical and neurophysiological effects of qigong on depressed elders with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hector W H; Tsang, William W N; Jones, Alice Y M; Fung, Kelvin M T; Chan, Alan H L; Chan, Edward P; Au, Doreen W H

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the psychological, physical, and neurophysiological effects of a qigong exercise program on depressed elders with chronic medical illness. The experimental group (n = 21, 80 ± 7 years) was given a 12-week qigong exercise program, while the comparison group (n = 17, 81 ± 8 years) participated in a newspaper reading program with the same duration and frequency. Measurement of depression symptoms, psychosocial functioning, muscle strengths, salivary cortisol, and serum serotonin was conducted. At 12 weeks, the qigong group had significant reduction in depressive symptoms (F = 11.68; p < 0.025). Improvement in self-efficacy (F = 4.30; p < 0.050), self-concept of physical well-being (F = 6.82; p < 0.025), and right-hand grip strength (F = 5.25; p = 0.034) was also found when compared with the comparison group. A change in salivary cortisol level was found marginally insignificant between groups (F = 3.16; p = 0.087). However, a decreasing trend of cortisol level was observed. The results provided preliminary evidence for the hypotheses that the antidepressive effect of qigong exercise could be explained by improvement in psychosocial functioning and possibly down-regulation of hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:23072658

  3. Neurophysiological Tools to Investigate Consumer's Gender Differences during the Observation of TV Commercials

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Anton Giulio; Wasikowska, Barbara; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Graziani, Ilenia; Trettel, Arianna

    2014-01-01

    Neuromarketing is a multidisciplinary field of research whose aim is to investigate the consumers' reaction to advertisements from a neuroscientific perspective. In particular, the neuroscience field is thought to be able to reveal information about consumer preferences which are unobtainable through conventional methods, including submitting questionnaires to large samples of consumers or performing psychological personal or group interviews. In this scenario, we performed an experiment in order to investigate cognitive and emotional changes of cerebral activity evaluated by neurophysiologic indices during the observation of TV commercials. In particular, we recorded the electroencephalographic (EEG), galvanic skin response (GSR), and heart rate (HR) in a group of 28 healthy subjects during the observation of a series of TV advertisements that have been grouped by commercial categories. Comparisons of cerebral indices have been performed to highlight gender differences between commercial categories and scenes of interest of two specific commercials. Findings show how EEG methodologies, along with the measurements of autonomic variables, could be used to obtain hidden information to marketers not obtainable otherwise. Most importantly, it was suggested how these tools could help to analyse the perception of TV advertisements and differentiate their production according to the consumer's gender. PMID:25147579

  4. Rhythm in joint action: psychological and neurophysiological mechanisms for real-time interpersonal coordination

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Peter E.; Novembre, Giacomo; Hove, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Human interaction often requires simultaneous precision and flexibility in the coordination of rhythmic behaviour between individuals engaged in joint activity, for example, playing a musical duet or dancing with a partner. This review article addresses the psychological processes and brain mechanisms that enable such rhythmic interpersonal coordination. First, an overview is given of research on the cognitive-motor processes that enable individuals to represent joint action goals and to anticipate, attend and adapt to other's actions in real time. Second, the neurophysiological mechanisms that underpin rhythmic interpersonal coordination are sought in studies of sensorimotor and cognitive processes that play a role in the representation and integration of self- and other-related actions within and between individuals' brains. Finally, relationships between social–psychological factors and rhythmic interpersonal coordination are considered from two perspectives, one concerning how social-cognitive tendencies (e.g. empathy) affect coordination, and the other concerning how coordination affects interpersonal affiliation, trust and prosocial behaviour. Our review highlights musical ensemble performance as an ecologically valid yet readily controlled domain for investigating rhythm in joint action. PMID:25385772

  5. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep

    PubMed Central

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q.; Watson, Thomas C.; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L.; Palmer, David N.; Jones, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  6. Neurophysiological and behavioral correlates of cognitive control during low and moderate intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ryan L; Chang, Yu-Kai; Brush, Christopher J; Kwok, Andrea N; Gordon, Valentina X; Alderman, Brandon L

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine neurophysiological and behavioral correlates of cognitive control elicited by a modified flanker task while exercising at low and moderate intensities. A secondary aim was to examine cognitive control processes at several time points during an acute bout of exercise to determine whether cognition is selectively influenced by the duration of exercise. Twenty-seven healthy participants completed a modified version of the Eriksen flanker task while exercising on a cycle ergometer at 40% and 60% VO2 peak and during a no-exercise seated control across three separate days. During task performance, continuous EEG was collected to assess neurocognitive function using the N2 and P3 event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Neurocognitive performance was assessed at 5, 15, and 25min time points during steady-state exercise. Regardless of intensity, behavioral findings revealed impaired accuracy during both exercise conditions for the flanker task trials that require greater cognitive control. However, faster reaction times were found during moderate-intensity exercise. Neuroelectric measures revealed increased N2 and P3 amplitudes during both exercise conditions relative to rest. Together, these findings suggest divergent effects of exercise on behavioral performance measures accompanied by an upregulation of cognitive control during aerobic exercise. These impairments are discussed in terms of dual-task paradigms and the transient hypofrontality theory. PMID:26458515

  7. An open source 3-d printed modular micro-drive system for acute neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shaun R; Ghose, Kaushik; Eskandar, Emad N

    2014-01-01

    Current, commercial, electrode micro-drives that allow independent positioning of multiple electrodes are expensive. Custom designed solutions developed by individual laboratories require fabrication by experienced machinists working in well equipped machine shops and are therefore difficult to disseminate into widespread use. Here, we present an easy to assemble modular micro-drive system for acute primate neurophysiology (PriED) that utilizes rapid prototyping (3-d printing) and readily available off the shelf-parts. The use of 3-d printed parts drastically reduces the cost of the device, making it available to labs without the resources of sophisticated machine shops. The direct transfer of designs from electronic files to physical parts also gives researchers opportunities to easily modify and implement custom solutions to specific recording needs. We also demonstrate a novel model of data sharing for the scientific community: a publicly available repository of drive designs. Researchers can download the drive part designs from the repository, print, assemble and then use the drives. Importantly, users can upload their modified designs with annotations making them easily available for others to use. PMID:24736691

  8. Effects of Auditory Attention Training with the Dichotic Listening Task: Behavioural and Neurophysiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tallus, Jussi; Soveri, Anna; Hämäläinen, Heikki; Tuomainen, Jyrki; Laine, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Facilitation of general cognitive capacities such as executive functions through training has stirred considerable research interest during the last decade. Recently we demonstrated that training of auditory attention with forced attention dichotic listening not only facilitated that performance but also generalized to an untrained attentional task. In the present study, 13 participants underwent a 4-week dichotic listening training programme with instructions to report syllables presented to the left ear (FL training group). Another group (n = 13) was trained using the non-forced instruction, asked to report whichever syllable they heard the best (NF training group). The study aimed to replicate our previous behavioural results, and to explore the neurophysiological correlates of training through event-related brain potentials (ERPs). We partially replicated our previous behavioural training effects, as the FL training group tended to show more allocation of auditory spatial attention to the left ear in a standard dichotic listening task. ERP measures showed diminished N1 and enhanced P2 responses to dichotic stimuli after training in both groups, interpreted as improvement in early perceptual processing of the stimuli. Additionally, enhanced anterior N2 amplitudes were found after training, with relatively larger changes in the FL training group in the forced-left condition, suggesting improved top-down control on the trained task. These results show that top-down cognitive training can modulate the left-right allocation of auditory spatial attention, accompanied by a change in an evoked brain potential related to cognitive control. PMID:26439112

  9. God will forgive: reflecting on God's love decreases neurophysiological responses to errors.

    PubMed

    Good, Marie; Inzlicht, Michael; Larson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    In religions where God is portrayed as both loving and wrathful, religious beliefs may be a source of fear as well as comfort. Here, we consider if God's love may be more effective, relative to God's wrath, for soothing distress, but less effective for helping control behavior. Specifically, we assess whether contemplating God's love reduces our ability to detect and emotionally react to conflict between one's behavior and overarching religious standards. We do so within a neurophysiological framework, by observing the effects of exposure to concepts of God's love vs punishment on the error-related negativity (ERN)--a neural signal originating in the anterior cingulate cortex that is associated with performance monitoring and affective responses to errors. Participants included 123 students at Brigham Young University, who completed a Go/No-Go task where they made 'religious' errors (i.e. ostensibly exhibited pro-alcohol tendencies). Reflecting on God's love caused dampened ERNs and worse performance on the Go/No-Go task. Thinking about God's punishment did not affect performance or ERNs. Results suggest that one possible reason religiosity is generally linked to positive well-being may be because of a decreased affective response to errors that occurs when God's love is prominent in the minds of believers. PMID:25062839

  10. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q; Watson, Thomas C; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L; Palmer, David N; Jones, Matthew W; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  11. Perisaccadic Updating of Visual Representations and Attentional States: Linking Behavior and Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Alexandria C.; Mazer, James A.

    2016-01-01

    During natural vision, saccadic eye movements lead to frequent retinal image changes that result in different neuronal subpopulations representing the same visual feature across fixations. Despite these potentially disruptive changes to the neural representation, our visual percept is remarkably stable. Visual receptive field remapping, characterized as an anticipatory shift in the position of a neuron’s spatial receptive field immediately before saccades, has been proposed as one possible neural substrate for visual stability. Many of the specific properties of remapping, e.g., the exact direction of remapping relative to the saccade vector and the precise mechanisms by which remapping could instantiate stability, remain a matter of debate. Recent studies have also shown that visual attention, like perception itself, can be sustained across saccades, suggesting that the attentional control system can also compensate for eye movements. Classical remapping could have an attentional component, or there could be a distinct attentional analog of visual remapping. At this time we do not yet fully understand how the stability of attentional representations relates to perisaccadic receptive field shifts. In this review, we develop a vocabulary for discussing perisaccadic shifts in receptive field location and perisaccadic shifts of attentional focus, review and synthesize behavioral and neurophysiological studies of perisaccadic perception and perisaccadic attention, and identify open questions that remain to be experimentally addressed. PMID:26903820

  12. Neurophysiological assessment of perceived image quality using steady-state visual evoked potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, Sebastian; Acqualagna, Laura; Porbadnigk, Anne K.; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin; Wiegand, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    An approach to the neural measurement of perceived image quality using electroencephalography (EEG) is presented. 6 different images were tested on 6 different distortion levels. The distortions were introduced by a hybrid video encoder. The presented study consists of two parts: In a first part, subjects were asked to evaluate the quality of the test stimuli behaviorally during a conventional psychophysical test using a degradation category rating procedure. In a second part, subjects were presented undistorted and distorted texture images in a periodically alternating fashion at a fixed frequency. This alternating presentation elicits so called steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) as a brain response that can be measured on the scalp. The amplitude of modulations in the brain signals is significantly and strongly negatively correlated with the magnitude of visual impairment reported by the subjects. This neurophysiological approach to image quality assessment may potentially lead to a more objective evaluation, as behavioral approaches suffer from drawbacks such as biases, inter-subject variances and limitations to test duration.

  13. Microvascular decompression for glossopharyngeal neuralgia using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Takatani, Tsunenori; Park, Hun-Soo; Kotani, Yukiko; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Gurung, Pritam; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) is a rare functional disorder representing around 1% of cases of trigeminal neuralgia. Lancinating throat and ear pain while swallowing are the typical manifestations, and are initially treated using anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine. Medically refractory GN is treated surgically. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is reportedly effective against GN, superseding rhizotomy and tractotomy. Methods: We encountered three patients with medically refractory GN who underwent MVD using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). The offending vessels were the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries, which were confirmed intraoperatively via a transcondylar fossa approach to be affecting the root exit zones of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves. As IONM, facial motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were monitored during microsurgery in all three patients. Pharyngeal and vagal MEPs were added for two patients to avoid postoperative dysphagia. Results: GN disappeared immediately after surgery with complete preservation of hearing acuity and facial nerve function. Transient mild swallowing disturbance was observed in 1 patient without pharyngeal or vagal MEPs, whereas the remaining two patients with pharyngeal and vagal MEPs demonstrated no postoperative dysphagia. Conclusion: Although control of severe pain is expected in surgical intervention for GN, lower cranial nerves are easily damaged because of their fragility, even in MVD. IONM including pharyngeal and vagal MEPs appears very useful for avoiding postoperative sequelae during MVD for GN. PMID:26862458

  14. Neurophysiological evidence for the country-of-origin effect: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwangsu; Sung, Jungyeon; Cho, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Consumers often rely on observable cues that hint at the hidden quality of a product. The aim of this study was to investigate brain activities associated with the country-of-origin (COO) effect and consumer evaluation of a product design. Electroencephalogram recordings were used to observe event-related brain potentials associated with the COO effect and design evaluation. We found that the frontocentral N90 and parieto-occipital P220 amplitudes are involved in forming preference to design, whereas the COO effect is processed in the centroparietal P500 amplitude. We also found a significant interaction effect between COO and design preference with regard to reaction times. Specifically, participants tended to spend more time making a preference decision when they did not like the product design made in a country with a favorable COO. These results imply that the two cognitive processes, evaluation of COO and formation of design preference, are activated independently at an early stage. It also suggests that these two processes interact with each other toward the end of the decision phase. Together, the results of this study provide neuropsychological evidence supporting a significant role of COO in the formation of design preference. Future studies are required to further delve into other neurophysiological activities associated with the COO effect. PMID:24518230

  15. Neurophysiological tools to investigate consumer's gender differences during the observation of TV commercials.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Cherubino, Patrizia; Wasikowska, Barbara; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Latuszynska, Anna; Latuszynska, Malgorzata; Nermend, Kesra; Graziani, Ilenia; Leucci, Maria Rita; Trettel, Arianna; Babiloni, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Neuromarketing is a multidisciplinary field of research whose aim is to investigate the consumers' reaction to advertisements from a neuroscientific perspective. In particular, the neuroscience field is thought to be able to reveal information about consumer preferences which are unobtainable through conventional methods, including submitting questionnaires to large samples of consumers or performing psychological personal or group interviews. In this scenario, we performed an experiment in order to investigate cognitive and emotional changes of cerebral activity evaluated by neurophysiologic indices during the observation of TV commercials. In particular, we recorded the electroencephalographic (EEG), galvanic skin response (GSR), and heart rate (HR) in a group of 28 healthy subjects during the observation of a series of TV advertisements that have been grouped by commercial categories. Comparisons of cerebral indices have been performed to highlight gender differences between commercial categories and scenes of interest of two specific commercials. Findings show how EEG methodologies, along with the measurements of autonomic variables, could be used to obtain hidden information to marketers not obtainable otherwise. Most importantly, it was suggested how these tools could help to analyse the perception of TV advertisements and differentiate their production according to the consumer's gender. PMID:25147579

  16. Structural bases for neurophysiological investigations of amygdaloid complex of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Kalimullina, Liliya B.; Kalkamanov, Kh. A.; Akhmadeev, Azat V.; Zakharov, Vadim P.; Sharafullin, Ildus F.

    2015-01-01

    Amygdala (Am) as a part of limbic system of the brain defines such important functions as adaptive behavior of animals, formation of emotions and memory, regulation of endocrine and visceral functions. We worked out, with the help of mathematic modelling of the pattern recognition theory, principles for organization of neurophysiological and neuromorphological studies of Am nuclei, which take into account the existing heterogeneity of its formations and optimize, to a great extent, the protocol for carrying out of such investigations. The given scheme of studies of Am’s structural-functional organization at its highly-informative sections can be used as a guide for precise placement of electrodes’, cannulae’s and microsensors into particular Am nucleus in the brain with the registration not only the nucleus itself, but also its extensions. This information is also important for defining the number of slices covering specific Am nuclei which must be investigated to reveal the physiological role of a particular part of amygdaloid complex. PMID:26608527

  17. Intraoperative neurophysiological mapping and monitoring in spinal tumor surgery: sirens or indispensable tools?

    PubMed

    Scibilia, Antonino; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Raffa, Giovanni; Morelli, Adolfo; Esposito, Felice; Mallamace, Raffaella; Buda, Gaetano; Conti, Alfredo; Quartarone, Angelo; Germanò, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    Spinal tumor (ST) surgery carries the risk of new neurological deficits in the postoperative period. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring and mapping (IONM) represents an effective method of identifying and monitoring in real time the functional integrity of both the spinal cord (SC) and the nerve roots (NRs). Despite consensus favoring the use of IONM in ST surgery, in this era of evidence-based medicine, there is still a need to demonstrate the effective role of IONM in ST surgery in achieving an oncological cure, optimizing patient safety, and considering medicolegal aspects. Thus, neurosurgeons are asked to establish which techniques are considered indispensable. In the present study, the authors focused on the rationale for and the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of IONM in ST surgery in light of more recent evidence in the literature, with specific emphasis on the role of IONM in reducing the incidence of postoperative neurological deficits. This review confirms the role of IONM as a useful tool in the workup for ST surgery. Individual monitoring and mapping techniques are clearly not sufficient to account for the complex function of the SC and NRs. Conversely, multimodal IONM is highly sensitive and specific for anticipating neurological injury during ST surgery and represents an important tool for preserving neuronal structures and achieving an optimal postoperative functional outcome. PMID:27476842

  18. Effects of Auditory Attention Training with the Dichotic Listening Task: Behavioural and Neurophysiological Evidence.

    PubMed

    Tallus, Jussi; Soveri, Anna; Hämäläinen, Heikki; Tuomainen, Jyrki; Laine, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Facilitation of general cognitive capacities such as executive functions through training has stirred considerable research interest during the last decade. Recently we demonstrated that training of auditory attention with forced attention dichotic listening not only facilitated that performance but also generalized to an untrained attentional task. In the present study, 13 participants underwent a 4-week dichotic listening training programme with instructions to report syllables presented to the left ear (FL training group). Another group (n = 13) was trained using the non-forced instruction, asked to report whichever syllable they heard the best (NF training group). The study aimed to replicate our previous behavioural results, and to explore the neurophysiological correlates of training through event-related brain potentials (ERPs). We partially replicated our previous behavioural training effects, as the FL training group tended to show more allocation of auditory spatial attention to the left ear in a standard dichotic listening task. ERP measures showed diminished N1 and enhanced P2 responses to dichotic stimuli after training in both groups, interpreted as improvement in early perceptual processing of the stimuli. Additionally, enhanced anterior N2 amplitudes were found after training, with relatively larger changes in the FL training group in the forced-left condition, suggesting improved top-down control on the trained task. These results show that top-down cognitive training can modulate the left-right allocation of auditory spatial attention, accompanied by a change in an evoked brain potential related to cognitive control. PMID:26439112

  19. Central pattern generators for social vocalization: Androgen-dependent neurophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2008-01-01

    Historically, most studies of vertebrate central pattern generators (CPGs) have focused on mechanisms for locomotion and respiration. Here, we highlight new results for ectothermic vertebrates, namely teleost fish and amphibians, showing how androgenic steroids can influence the temporal patterning of CPGs for social vocalization. Investigations of vocalizing teleosts show how androgens can rapidly (within minutes) modulate the neurophysiological output of the vocal CPG (fictive vocalizations that mimic the temporal properties of natural vocalizations) inclusive of their divergent actions between species, as well as intraspecific differences between male reproductive morphs. Studies of anuran amphibians (frogs) demonstrate that long-term steroid treatments (wks) can masculinize the fictive vocalizations of females, inclusive of its sensitivity to rapid modulation by serotonin. Given the conserved organization of vocal control systems across vertebrate groups, the vocal CPGs of fish and amphibians provide tractable models for identifying androgen-dependent events that are fundamental to the mechanisms of vocal motor patterning. These basic mechanisms can also inform our understanding of the more complex CPGs for vocalization, and social behaviors in general, that have evolved among birds and mammals. PMID:18262186

  20. Free will: reconciling German civil law with Libet's neurophysiological studies on the readiness potential.

    PubMed

    Kawohl, Wolfram; Habermeyer, Elmar

    2007-01-01

    The free will debate widely exceeds the neuroscientific and philosophical fields due to profound implications for legislation, case law and psychiatric expert opinion. Data from Benjamin Libet's experiments on the readiness potential have been used as an argument against personal responsibility and for changes in the law. Due to the explicit use of the term "free will" in German civil law, the psychiatrist as an expert witness is confronted with this debate. In this article we outline the role of this crucial term in German civil law and we describe the neurophysiologic challenge in the form of Libet's experiments, which is led on three levels: the correctness of the data, the impact on the question of whether free will exists and possible consequences for the law. We conclude that the problem of free will cannot be debated on the basis of the data provided by Libet's experiments and that doubts about the existence of a free will must not lead to changes in the law or in psychiatric expert testimony. Therefore, advice for the psychiatrist as an expert witness is offered on the basis of a psychopathological approach that takes into account cognitive and motivational preconditions and the structure of values and personality. PMID:17393400

  1. Neurophysiology of spectrotemporal cue organization of spoken language in auditory memory

    PubMed Central

    Moberly, Aaron C.; Bhat, Jyoti; Welling, D. Bradley; Shahin, Antoine J.

    2014-01-01

    Listeners assign different weights to spectral dynamics, such as formant rise time (FRT), and temporal dynamics, such as amplitude rise time (ART), during phonetic judgments. We examined the neurophysiological basis of FRT and ART weighting in the /bα/-/wα/ contrast. Electroencephalography was recorded for thirteen adult English speakers during a mismatch negativity (MMN) design using synthetic stimuli: a /ba/ with /bα/-like FRT and ART; a /wa/ with /w α/-like FRT and ART; and a /ba/wa with /bα/-like FRT and /wα/-like ART. We hypothesized that because of stronger reliance on FRT, subjects would encode a stronger memory trace and exhibit larger MMN during the FRT than the ART contrast. Results supported this hypothesis. The effect was most robust in the later portion of MMN. Findings suggest that MMN is generated by multiple sources, differentially reflecting acoustic change detection (earlier MMN, bottom-up process) and perceptual weighting of ART and FRT (later MMN, top-down process). PMID:24576808

  2. On the investigation of the neurophysiological correlates of knowledge worker mental fatigue using the EEG signal.

    PubMed

    Okogbaa, O G; Shell, R L; Filipusic, D

    1994-12-01

    Technological trends and advances in automation have underscored the importance of task performance of certain jobs requiring mental functions such as information processing and decision analyses. Most experts agree that such work environments produce increased mental activities, with profound implications for mental fatigue and stress. Consequently, productivity measurement and improvement for white collar or 'knowledge worker' occupations remains a major challenge and concern. This investigation defines an experimental approach that examines the neurophysiological correlates of white collar worker mental fatigue using the EEG signal. A 6 h laboratory experiment was conducted to simulate work output. The methods of assessing fatigue employed were mental tests and physiological measurements. The experiment involved reading of standardized texts, finding solutions to arithmetic-logical problems and a combination of both task types. Two primary performance measures were obtained, work output and brain waves. Fast Fourier transform and correlation analyses are used to quantify the relationship between certain brain waves and mental fatigue. This research is a major step towards the development of a model that explores the relationship between mental fatigue and factors associated with output performance, optimal recuperation periods and related variables. Such a model would be useful in human reliability prediction based on task parameters and worker profiles. PMID:15676987

  3. Biomechanical and neurophysiological studies on audition in eared and earless harlequin frogs (Atelopus).

    PubMed

    Lindquist, E D; Hetherington, T E; Volman, S F

    1998-08-01

    Tissue displacement of various body surfaces and the auditory midbrain sensitivities to sound were measured in Atelopus species with or without a tympanic middle ear ("eared" and "earless", respectively). Tissue displacement (vibration) of body regions was measured by laser Doppler vibrometer. The body wall directly overlying the lung is most dramatically displaced by sound pressure in all species tested. The otic (lateral head) region showed low displacement in earless species, but significant displacement to high-frequency sound in eared species. Peak tissue displacement of the body wall occurred within the frequency range of each species' advertisement vocalization. Peak tissue displacement of the otic region of the eared species also occurred within these frequencies. Multi-unit neurophysiological recordings of the auditory midbrain (torus semicircularis) also were obtained. Auditory sensitivity curves showed three distinct regions of sensitivity at low, middle, and high frequencies, the latter located within the frequency range of each species' advertisement vocalization. The correlation between auditory midbrain sensitivity and tissue displacement of the body wall region at advertisement vocalization frequencies, suggests that the body wall/lungs serve as the route of sound transfer to the inner ear in earless species and possibly in the eared species as well. PMID:9693994

  4. A liquid-delivery device that provides precise reward control for neurophysiological and behavioral experiments.

    PubMed

    Mitz, Andrew R

    2005-10-15

    Behavioral neurophysiology and other kinds of behavioral research often involve the delivery of liquid rewards to experimental subjects performing some kind of operant task. Available systems use gravity or pumps to deliver these fluids, but such methods are poorly suited to moment-to-moment control of the volume, timing, and type of fluid delivered. The design described here overcomes these limitations using an electronic control unit, a pressurized reservoir unit, and an electronically controlled solenoid. The control unit monitors reservoir pressure and provides precisely timed solenoid activation signals. It also stores calibration tables and does on-the-fly interpolation to support computer-controlled delivery calibrated directly in milliliters. The reservoir provides pressurized liquid to a solenoid mounted near the subject. Multiple solenoids, each supplied by a separate reservoir unit and control unit, can be stacked in close proximity to allow instantaneous selection of which liquid reward is delivered. The precision of droplet delivery was verified by weighing discharged droplets on a commercial analytical balance. PMID:16168492

  5. From Phenomenology to Neurophysiological Understanding of Hallucinations in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Jardri, Renaud; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A.; Debbané, Martin; Jenner, Jack A.; Kelleher, Ian; Dauvilliers, Yves; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Demeulemeester, Morgane; David, Christopher N.; Rapoport, Judith; Dobbelaere, Dries; Escher, Sandra; Fernyhough, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Typically reported as vivid, multisensory experiences which may spontaneously resolve, hallucinations are present at high rates during childhood. The risk of associated psychopathology is a major cause of concern. On the one hand, the risk of developing further delusional ideation has been shown to be reduced by better theory of mind skills. On the other hand, ideas of reference, passivity phenomena, and misidentification syndrome have been shown to increase the risk of self-injury or heteroaggressive behaviors. Cognitive psychology and brain-imaging studies have advanced our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these early-onset hallucinations. Notably, specific functional impairments have been associated with certain phenomenological characteristics of hallucinations in youths, including intrusiveness and the sense of reality. In this review, we provide an update of associated epidemiological and phenomenological factors (including sociocultural context, social adversity, and genetics, considered in relation to the psychosis continuum hypothesis), cognitive models, and neurophysiological findings concerning hallucinations in children and adolescents. Key issues that have interfered with progress are considered and recommendations for future studies are provided. PMID:24936083

  6. Auditory frequency-following response: a neurophysiological measure for studying the "cocktail-party problem".

    PubMed

    Du, Yi; Kong, Lingzhi; Wang, Qian; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2011-11-01

    How do we recognize what one person is saying when others are speaking at the same time? The "cocktail-party problem" proposed by Cherry (1953) has puzzled scientific societies for half a century. This puzzle will not be solved without using appropriate neurophysiological investigation that should satisfy the following four essential requirements: (1) certain critical speech characteristics related to speech intelligibility are recorded; (2) neural responses to different speech sources are differentiated; (3) neural correlates of bottom-up binaural unmasking of responses to target speech are measurable; (4) neural correlates of attentional top-down unmasking of target speech are measurable. Before speech signals reach the cerebral cortex, some critical acoustic features are represented in subcortical structures by the frequency-following responses (FFRs), which are sustained evoked potentials based on precisely phase-locked responses of neuron populations to low-to-middle-frequency periodical acoustical stimuli. This review summarizes previous studies on FFRs associated with each of the four requirements and suggests that FFRs are useful for studying the "cocktail-party problem". PMID:21645541

  7. Tetrahydrocurcumin exerts protective effect on vincristine induced neuropathy: Behavioral, biochemical, neurophysiological and histological evidence.

    PubMed

    Greeshma, N; Prasanth, K G; Balaji, Bhaskar

    2015-08-01

    Hyperalgesia, allodynia, delayed motor nerve conduction velocity, oxidative stress and axonal damage are signs and symptoms of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Present treatment/preventive strategies of CIPN are futile and the neuropathy may even lead to discontinuation of chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) 40 and 80mg/kg in experimental vincristine induced neuropathy in rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed by hot plate (thermal), Randall-Selitto (mechanical) test, allodynia was assessed by cold plate (thermal) test, functional loss was measured by sciatic function index, nociception was evaluated by formalin test. Neurophysiological recordings were carried out to assess motor nerve conduction velocity. Total calcium levels, oxidative stress and TNF-α was measured in sciatic nerve tissue homogenate to assess neuropathy. Histopathological changes was observed on sciatic nerve to assess the protective effect of THC against the vincristine. Pregabalin was used as a standard in this study. Rats administered with THC at 80mg/kg significantly attenuated the vincristine induced neuropathic pain manifestations which may be due to its multiple actions including anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, calcium inhibitory and antioxidant effect. This study delineates that THC can be a promising candidate for the prevention of CIPN by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26102012

  8. Return of the living dead: Re-reading Pierre Flourens' contributions to neurophysiology and literature.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Sharman

    2013-01-01

    Historians of neurophysiology remember Marie Jean Pierre Flourens (1794-1867) for his experimental approach to nineteenth-century debates on cortical localization and, in particular, for his successful attacks on Frantz Joseph Gall's (1758-1828) phrenology (Gall and Spurzheim, 1810-19). Whereas Gall and his colleague, Johann Gaspar Spurzheim (1776-1832), posited correlations between features of the skull and brain development and claimed to have localized character traits, competencies and temperaments in specific cortical regions, Flourens advocated cerebral equipotentiality and provided empirical as well as philosophical grounds for his theories. Flourens has also been recognized for his contributions to the understanding of the cerebellum's role in the coordination of movement, the localization of a respiratory center in the medulla oblongata, the relationship between the semicircular canals and balance, the role of the periosteum in bone growth and regeneration, and finally, the anesthetic properties of chloroform. Less known to historians of neuroscience is the fact that Pierre Flourens was not only a neurophysiologist and Secrétaire Perpetuel of the French Académie des Sciences, he was also a member of the Académie Française, France's most prestigious literary academy. Examining Flourens' contributions as a writer and, at the same time, a prime target for criticism and caricature from journalists, yields a particularly interesting example of the problematic relations between different genres of science writing and their respective publics in mid-nineteenth-century France. PMID:24290264

  9. Perisaccadic Updating of Visual Representations and Attentional States: Linking Behavior and Neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Marino, Alexandria C; Mazer, James A

    2016-01-01

    During natural vision, saccadic eye movements lead to frequent retinal image changes that result in different neuronal subpopulations representing the same visual feature across fixations. Despite these potentially disruptive changes to the neural representation, our visual percept is remarkably stable. Visual receptive field remapping, characterized as an anticipatory shift in the position of a neuron's spatial receptive field immediately before saccades, has been proposed as one possible neural substrate for visual stability. Many of the specific properties of remapping, e.g., the exact direction of remapping relative to the saccade vector and the precise mechanisms by which remapping could instantiate stability, remain a matter of debate. Recent studies have also shown that visual attention, like perception itself, can be sustained across saccades, suggesting that the attentional control system can also compensate for eye movements. Classical remapping could have an attentional component, or there could be a distinct attentional analog of visual remapping. At this time we do not yet fully understand how the stability of attentional representations relates to perisaccadic receptive field shifts. In this review, we develop a vocabulary for discussing perisaccadic shifts in receptive field location and perisaccadic shifts of attentional focus, review and synthesize behavioral and neurophysiological studies of perisaccadic perception and perisaccadic attention, and identify open questions that remain to be experimentally addressed. PMID:26903820

  10. Episodic memory decay along the adult lifespan: a review of behavioral and neurophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Cansino, Selene

    2009-01-01

    The ability to learn and remember new information declines along life. Empirical evidence reveals that this deficit occurs unevenly with different types of memory. Episodic memory, which is referred to as the ability to remember our own experiences in a determined temporal and spatial context, is especially vulnerable to aging. Episodic information can be retrieved with or without the context information that took place when the episodic event was encoded. There is agreement that, with advancing age, the source information related to an episodic event is more susceptible to be forgotten than the event; however, there is no consensus regarding the age at which this decline begins, the speed of source-memory decline along life or the possible changes, due to aging, in neurophysiological activity during encoding of source information that is subsequently correctly retrieved. In an attempt to answer the first two issues, a behavioral study with 552 subjects from 20 to 80 years of age was conducted, which provided evidence of the exact age at which source memory starts to decline and of the speed of this memory loss along life. To address the last question, event-related potentials were recorded while young and old adults encoded source information, to investigate whether older adults generate memory traces different from young adults during encoding. PMID:18725253

  11. Face recognition in schizophrenia disorder: A comprehensive review of behavioral, neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Bortolon, Catherine; Capdevielle, Delphine; Raffard, Stéphane

    2015-06-01

    Facial emotion processing has been extensively studied in schizophrenia patients while general face processing has received less attention. The already published reviews do not address the current scientific literature in a complete manner. Therefore, here we tried to answer some questions that remain to be clarified, particularly: are the non-emotional aspects of facial processing in fact impaired in schizophrenia patients? At the behavioral level, our key conclusions are that visual perception deficit in schizophrenia patients: are not specific to faces; are most often present when the cognitive (e.g. attention) and perceptual demands of the tasks are important; and seems to worsen with the illness chronification. Although, currently evidence suggests impaired second order configural processing, more studies are necessary to determine whether or not holistic processing is impaired in schizophrenia patients. Neural and neurophysiological evidence suggests impaired earlier levels of visual processing, which might involve the deficits in interaction of the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways impacting on further processing. These deficits seem to be present even before the disorder out-set. Although evidence suggests that this deficit may be not specific to faces, further evidence on this question is necessary, in particularly more ecological studies including context and body processing. PMID:25800172

  12. Structural bases for neurophysiological investigations of amygdaloid complex of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalimullina, Liliya B.; Kalkamanov, Kh. A.; Akhmadeev, Azat V.; Zakharov, Vadim P.; Sharafullin, Ildus F.

    2015-11-01

    Amygdala (Am) as a part of limbic system of the brain defines such important functions as adaptive behavior of animals, formation of emotions and memory, regulation of endocrine and visceral functions. We worked out, with the help of mathematic modelling of the pattern recognition theory, principles for organization of neurophysiological and neuromorphological studies of Am nuclei, which take into account the existing heterogeneity of its formations and optimize, to a great extent, the protocol for carrying out of such investigations. The given scheme of studies of Am’s structural-functional organization at its highly-informative sections can be used as a guide for precise placement of electrodes’, cannulae’s and microsensors into particular Am nucleus in the brain with the registration not only the nucleus itself, but also its extensions. This information is also important for defining the number of slices covering specific Am nuclei which must be investigated to reveal the physiological role of a particular part of amygdaloid complex.

  13. Neurophysiological evidence of an association between cognitive control and defensive reactivity processes in young children

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Sharon L.; Schroder, Hans S.; Moran, Tim P.; Durbin, C. Emily; Moser, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cognitive control and affective processes, such as defensive reactivity, are intimately involved in healthy and unhealthy human development. However, cognitive control and defensive reactivity processes are often studied in isolation and rarely examined in early childhood. To address these gaps, we examined the relationships between multiple neurophysiological measures of cognitive control and defensive reactivity in young children. Specifically, we assessed two event-related potentials thought to index cognitive control processes – the error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) – measured across two tasks, and two markers of defensive reactivity processes – startle reflex and resting parietal asymmetry – in a sample of 3- to 7-year old children. Results revealed that measures of cognitive control and defensive reactivity were related such that evidence of poor cognitive control (smaller ERN) was associated with high defensive reactivity (larger startle and greater right relative to left parietal activity). The strength of associations between the ERN and measures of defensive reactivity did not vary by age, providing evidence that poor cognitive control relates to greater defensive reactivity across early childhood years. PMID:26386550

  14. God will forgive: reflecting on God’s love decreases neurophysiological responses to errors

    PubMed Central

    Inzlicht, Michael; Larson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    In religions where God is portrayed as both loving and wrathful, religious beliefs may be a source of fear as well as comfort. Here, we consider if God’s love may be more effective, relative to God’s wrath, for soothing distress, but less effective for helping control behavior. Specifically, we assess whether contemplating God’s love reduces our ability to detect and emotionally react to conflict between one’s behavior and overarching religious standards. We do so within a neurophysiological framework, by observing the effects of exposure to concepts of God’s love vs punishment on the error-related negativity (ERN)—a neural signal originating in the anterior cingulate cortex that is associated with performance monitoring and affective responses to errors. Participants included 123 students at Brigham Young University, who completed a Go/No-Go task where they made ‘religious’ errors (i.e. ostensibly exhibited pro-alcohol tendencies). Reflecting on God’s love caused dampened ERNs and worse performance on the Go/No-Go task. Thinking about God’s punishment did not affect performance or ERNs. Results suggest that one possible reason religiosity is generally linked to positive well-being may be because of a decreased affective response to errors that occurs when God’s love is prominent in the minds of believers. PMID:25062839

  15. A simple method for monitoring mutagenicity of river water. Mutagens in Yodo River system, Kyoto-Osaka

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Hayatsu, Hikoya )

    1990-04-01

    Blue cotton is a cotton preparation, bearing copper phthalocyanine trisulfonate as a covalently linked ligand, and is an adsorbent specific for compounds with three or greater number of fused rings. Due to this special property, blue cotton has been used for extracting mutagenic polycyclic compounds from crude materials. In early work, the authors gave a brief account of the results of monitoring river-water mutagenicity with blue cotton. Recently they have improved the quality of the adsorbent; rayon in place of cotton was employed as the support for the ligand, and a more powerful adsorbent, blue rayon, which contains 2-3 times greater amount of the ligand than blue cotton, was prepared. In this paper the authors report the use of the blue-rayon method to detect mutagenic compounds in the Yodo river, which flows through the cities of Kyoto and Osaka and is a major source of drinking water for the 10 million people in the area.

  16. Dorsal midbrain syndrome associated with persistent neck extension: Clinical and diagnostic imaging findings in 2 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Sara; Baroni, Massimo; Falzone, Cristian; De Benedictis, Giulia M.; Bernardini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Two young dogs were evaluated for an acute onset of abnormal head posture and eye movement. Neurological examination was characterized mostly by permanent neck extension, abnormalities of pupils, and eye movement. A mesencephalic mass lesion was detected on magnetic resonance imaging in both cases. Neurophysiological pathways likely responsible for this peculiar clinical presentation are discussed. PMID:26663922

  17. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  18. Sixty years of clinical electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Karbowski, K

    1990-01-01

    As a result of painstaking studies carried out over a period of almost 30 years, the German neurologist and psychiatrist Hans Berger, of Jena, published the first paper on the human electroencephalogram (Uber das Elektrenkephalogramm des Menschen') in 1929. Clinical electroencephalography, which reached a zenith in the 1950s and 1960s, increased the range of diagnostic techniques available for a series of brain diseases and revolutionized the study of epilepsy. Today, conventional electroencephalography no longer yields startling scientific discoveries. Nor can it complete with computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the diagnosis of structural disorders of the brain. In spite of this, the scope of its uses continues to increase and it remains an indispensable instrument of neurophysiological diagnosis, especially in its capacity as a 'seismograph' of the brain. The trend that is apparent throughout the world to cut back clinical electroencephalographic units in favor of other neurophysiological investigative techniques is both unjustified and dangerous. If it continues, it will inevitably lead to a decline in epileptology, which is an essential part of the work of many different medical specialists both in practice and in hospitals. PMID:2192889

  19. Impact of Spectral Notch Width on Neurophysiological Plasticity and Clinical Effectiveness of the Tailor-Made Notched Music Training.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Robert; Lau, Pia; Stein, Alwina; Engell, Alva; Wollbrink, Andreas; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, the ringing in the ears that is unrelated to any external source, causes a significant loss in quality of life, involving sleep disturbance and depression for 1 to 3% of the general population. While in the first place tinnitus may be triggered by damage to the inner ear cells, the neural generators of subjective tinnitus are located in central regions of the nervous system. A loss of lateral inhibition, tonotopical reorganization and a gain-increase in response to the sensory deprivation result in hypersensitivity and hyperactivity in certain regions of the auditory cortex. In the tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT) patients listen to music from which the frequency spectrum of the tinnitus has been removed. This evokes strong lateral inhibition from neurons tuned to adjacent frequencies onto the neurons involved in the tinnitus percept. A reduction of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related neural activity was achieved with TMNMT in previous studies. As the effect of lateral inhibition depends on the bandwidth of the notch, in the current study we altered the notch width to find the most effective notch width for TMNMT. We compared 1-octave notch width with ½-octave and ¼-octave. Participants chose their favorite music for the training that included three month of two hours daily listening. The outcome was measured by means of standardized questionnaires and magnetoencephalography. We found a general reduction of tinnitus distress in all administered tinnitus questionnaires after the training. Additionally, tinnitus-related neural activity was reduced after the training. Nevertheless, notch width did not have an influence on the behavioral or neural effects of TMNMT. This could be due to a non-linear resolution of lateral inhibition in high frequencies. PMID:26406446

  20. Impact of Spectral Notch Width on Neurophysiological Plasticity and Clinical Effectiveness of the Tailor-Made Notched Music Training

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Robert; Lau, Pia; Stein, Alwina; Engell, Alva; Wollbrink, Andreas; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, the ringing in the ears that is unrelated to any external source, causes a significant loss in quality of life, involving sleep disturbance and depression for 1 to 3% of the general population. While in the first place tinnitus may be triggered by damage to the inner ear cells, the neural generators of subjective tinnitus are located in central regions of the nervous system. A loss of lateral inhibition, tonotopical reorganization and a gain-increase in response to the sensory deprivation result in hypersensitivity and hyperactivity in certain regions of the auditory cortex. In the tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT) patients listen to music from which the frequency spectrum of the tinnitus has been removed. This evokes strong lateral inhibition from neurons tuned to adjacent frequencies onto the neurons involved in the tinnitus percept. A reduction of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related neural activity was achieved with TMNMT in previous studies. As the effect of lateral inhibition depends on the bandwidth of the notch, in the current study we altered the notch width to find the most effective notch width for TMNMT. We compared 1-octave notch width with ½-octave and ¼-octave. Participants chose their favorite music for the training that included three month of two hours daily listening. The outcome was measured by means of standardized questionnaires and magnetoencephalography. We found a general reduction of tinnitus distress in all administered tinnitus questionnaires after the training. Additionally, tinnitus-related neural activity was reduced after the training. Nevertheless, notch width did not have an influence on the behavioral or neural effects of TMNMT. This could be due to a non-linear resolution of lateral inhibition in high frequencies. PMID:26406446

  1. Neurophysiological effects of sleep deprivation in healthy adults, a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Klumpers, Ursula M H; Veltman, Dick J; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Kloet, Reina W; Boellaard, Ronald; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Hoogendijk, Witte J G

    2015-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) may induce fatigue, neurocognitive slowing and mood changes, which are partly compensated by stress regulating brain systems, resulting in altered dopamine and cortisol levels in order to stay awake if needed. These systems, however, have never been studied in concert. At baseline, after a regular night of sleep, and the next morning after TSD, 12 healthy subjects performed a semantic affective classification functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task, followed by a [11C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Saliva cortisol levels were acquired at 7 time points during both days. Affective symptoms were measured using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Index (STAI) and visual analogue scales. After TSD, perceived energy levels, concentration, and speed of thought decreased significantly, whereas mood did not. During fMRI, response speed decreased for neutral words and positive targets, and accuracy decreased trendwise for neutral words and for positive targets with a negative distracter. Following TSD, processing of positive words was associated with increased left dorsolateral prefrontal activation. Processing of emotional words in general was associated with increased insular activity, whereas contrasting positive vs. negative words showed subthreshold increased activation in the (para)hippocampal area. Cortisol secretion was significantly lower after TSD. Decreased voxel-by-voxel [11C]raclopride binding potential (BPND) was observed in left caudate. TSD induces widespread cognitive, neurophysiologic and endocrine changes in healthy adults, characterized by reduced cognitive functioning, despite increased regional brain activity. The blunted HPA-axis response together with altered [11C]raclopride binding in the basal ganglia indicate that sustained wakefulness requires involvement of additional adaptive biological systems. PMID:25608023

  2. Principal components of hand kinematics and neurophysiological signals in motor cortex during reach to grasp movements

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vikram; Thakor, Nitish V.; Schieber, Marc H.

    2014-01-01

    A few kinematic synergies identified by principal component analysis (PCA) account for most of the variance in the coordinated joint rotations of the fingers and wrist used for a wide variety of hand movements. To examine the possibility that motor cortex might control the hand through such synergies, we collected simultaneous kinematic and neurophysiological data from monkeys performing a reach-to-grasp task. We used PCA, jPCA and isomap to extract kinematic synergies from 18 joint angles in the fingers and wrist and analyzed the relationships of both single-unit and multiunit spike recordings, as well as local field potentials (LFPs), to these synergies. For most spike recordings, the maximal absolute cross-correlations of firing rates were somewhat stronger with an individual joint angle than with any principal component (PC), any jPC or any isomap dimension. In decoding analyses, where spikes and LFP power in the 100- to 170-Hz band each provided better decoding than other LFP-based signals, the first PC was decoded as well as the best decoded joint angle. But the remaining PCs and jPCs were predicted with lower accuracy than individual joint angles. Although PCs, jPCs or isomap dimensions might provide a more parsimonious description of kinematics, our findings indicate that the kinematic synergies identified with these techniques are not represented in motor cortex more strongly than the original joint angles. We suggest that the motor cortex might act to sculpt the synergies generated by subcortical centers, superimposing an ability to individuate finger movements and adapt the hand to grasp a wide variety of objects. PMID:24990564

  3. NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF MODERATE ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION IN OLDER AND YOUNGER SOCIAL DRINKERS

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ben; Boissoneault, Jeff; Gilbertson, Rebecca; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nearly 40% of adults aged 65 and older in the United States consume alcohol. Research in older adults has largely examined potential health effects of a moderate drinking lifestyle. Examination of acute effects in this population is generally lacking. To investigate alcohol-induced alteration of electrophysiological correlates of attention in this population, we employed a covert attentional task. We hypothesized that moderate alcohol administration as well as older age would reduce P3 amplitude and increase latency. We anticipated an interaction such that, relative to their age-matched controls, older adults receiving alcohol would be more affected than their younger counterparts. Methods Participants included healthy older (aged 50–67; n = 20; 9 men) and younger (aged 25–35; n = 12; 5 men) moderate drinkers. Participants received either a moderate dose of alcohol (breath alcohol concentration [BrAC] ~50 mg/dl) or a placebo beverage. Following absorption, the task was administered and neurophysiological measures were obtained. P3 amplitude and latency were separately subjected to ANOVA across cue conditions using age and dose as independent variables. Results As predicted, P3 amplitude in older adults was significantly lower than younger adults across cue conditions. An age by alcohol interaction was detected, revealing that older adults receiving alcohol showed lower P3 amplitudes than any other group. An age effect for P3 latency was found, with older adults having longer latencies than their younger counterparts. A significant age by alcohol interaction for P3 latency was detected, revealing that older adults receiving alcohol displayed delayed P3 latencies relative to older adults receiving placebo. In contrast, younger adults receiving alcohol had reduced latency compared to those receiving placebo although this effect did not reach significance. Conclusions Results suggest that older adults demonstrated alcohol related shifts in P3

  4. Neurophysiological Effects of Sleep Deprivation in Healthy Adults, a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Ursula M. H.; Veltman, Dick J.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Kloet, Reina W.; Boellaard, Ronald; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) may induce fatigue, neurocognitive slowing and mood changes, which are partly compensated by stress regulating brain systems, resulting in altered dopamine and cortisol levels in order to stay awake if needed. These systems, however, have never been studied in concert. At baseline, after a regular night of sleep, and the next morning after TSD, 12 healthy subjects performed a semantic affective classification functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task, followed by a [11C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Saliva cortisol levels were acquired at 7 time points during both days. Affective symptoms were measured using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Index (STAI) and visual analogue scales. After TSD, perceived energy levels, concentration, and speed of thought decreased significantly, whereas mood did not. During fMRI, response speed decreased for neutral words and positive targets, and accuracy decreased trendwise for neutral words and for positive targets with a negative distracter. Following TSD, processing of positive words was associated with increased left dorsolateral prefrontal activation. Processing of emotional words in general was associated with increased insular activity, whereas contrasting positive vs. negative words showed subthreshold increased activation in the (para)hippocampal area. Cortisol secretion was significantly lower after TSD. Decreased voxel-by-voxel [11C]raclopride binding potential (BPND) was observed in left caudate. TSD induces widespread cognitive, neurophysiologic and endocrine changes in healthy adults, characterized by reduced cognitive functioning, despite increased regional brain activity. The blunted HPA-axis response together with altered [11C]raclopride binding in the basal ganglia indicate that sustained wakefulness requires involvement of additional adaptive biological systems. PMID:25608023

  5. Neurophysiological correlates of embodiment and motivational factors during the perception of virtual architectural environments.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Jelic, Andrea; Tieri, Gaetano; Maglione, Anton Giulio; De Matteis, Federico; Babiloni, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    The recent efforts aimed at providing neuroscientific explanations of how people perceive and experience architectural environments have largely justified the initial belief in the value of neuroscience for architecture. However, a systematic development of a coherent theoretical and experimental framework is missing. To investigate the neurophysiological reactions related to the appreciation of ambiances, we recorded the electroencephalographic (EEG) signals in an immersive virtual reality during the appreciation of interior designs. Such data have been analyzed according to the working hypothesis that appreciated environments involve embodied simulation mechanisms and circuits mediating approaching stimuli. EEG recordings of 12 healthy subjects have been performed during the perception of three-dimensional interiors that have been simulated in a CAVE system and judged according to dimensions of familiarity, novelty, comfort, pleasantness, arousal and presence. A correlation analysis on personal judgments returned that scores of novelty, pleasantness and comfort are positively correlated, while familiarity and novelty are in negative way. Statistical spectral maps reveal that pleasant, novel and comfortable interiors produce a de-synchronization of the mu rhythm over left sensorimotor areas. Interiors judged more pleasant and less familiar generate an activation of left frontal areas (theta and alpha bands), along an involvement of areas devoted to spatial navigation. An increase in comfort returns an enhancement of the theta frontal midline activity. Cerebral activations underlying appreciation of architecture could involve different mechanisms regulating corporeal, emotional and cognitive reactions. Therefore, it might be suggested that people's experience of architectural environments is intrinsically structured by the possibilities for action. PMID:26224275

  6. Neurophysiological evidence for whole form retrieval of complex derived words: a mismatch negativity study

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Jeff; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Complex words can be seen as combinations of elementary units, decomposable into stems and affixes according to morphological rules. Alternatively, complex forms may be stored as single lexical entries and accessed as whole forms. This study uses an event-related potential brain response capable of indexing both whole-form retrieval and combinatorial processing, the Mismatch Negativity (MMN), to investigate early brain activity elicited by morphologically complex derived words in German. We presented complex words consisting of stems “sicher” (secure), or “sauber” (clean) combined with abstract nominalizing derivational affixes -heit or -keit, to form either congruent derived words: “Sicherheit” (security) and “Sauberkeit” (cleanliness), or incongruent derived pseudowords: *“Sicherkeit”, and *“Sauberheit”. Using this orthogonal design, it was possible to record brain responses for -heit and -keit in both congruent and incongruent contexts, therefore balancing acoustic variance. Previous research has shown that incongruent combinations of symbols elicit a stronger MMN than congruent combinations, but that single words or constructions stored as whole forms elicit a stronger MMN than pseudowords or non-existent constructions. We found that congruent derived words elicited a stronger MMN than incongruent derived words, beginning about 150 ms after perception of the critical morpheme. This pattern of results is consistent with whole-form storage of morphologically complex derived words as lexical units, or mini-constructions. Using distributed source localization methods, the MMN enhancement for well-formed derivationally complex words appeared to be most prominent in the left inferior anterior-temporal, bilateral superior parietal and bilateral post-central, supra-marginal areas. In addition, neurophysiological results reflected the frequency of derived forms, thus providing further converging evidence for whole form storage and against a

  7. Effects of 0. 6-Gy prenatal X irradiation on postnatal neurophysiologic development in the Wistar rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1986-04-01

    Forty-one pregnant Wistar strain rats were irradiated with 0.6-Gy X rays or were sham irradiated on the 9th or 17th days of gestation to determine if this dosage level would result in alterations in postnatal neurophysiologic development. Half of the mothers were sacrificed at term, and the developmental status of 221 newborns was evaluated. The remaining mothers delivered and raised their litters. The 161 offspring were observed for the age of attainment of the following physiologic parameters: pinna detachment, eye opening, testes opening. Offspring were also tested for the acquisition of the following selected reflexes: surface righting, negative geotaxis, auditory startle, air righting, and visual placing. Term fetal weight was lower than the controls in the group irradiated on the 9th day but was recuperable postnatally. None of the 9 developmental tests performed postnatally were abnormal in the animals irradiated on the 9th day. Thus, at least with regard to these measures, the surviving embryos exposed during the all-or-none period could not be differentiated from the controls. Offspring irradiated on the 17th day exhibited retarded growth which persisted during neonatal life. The three-day-mean neonatal weight was significantly lower in the group irradiated on the 17th day compared to controls. There were no significant maternal body weight or organ/weight differences between the groups. Rats exposed in utero on the 17th day had a significantly delayed acquisition of air righting. These results demonstrate that 0.6-Gy in utero irradiation on the 17th day of gestation can cause subtle alterations in growth and development of the Wistar strain rat during postnatal life.

  8. Resting-state quantitative electroencephalography reveals increased neurophysiologic connectivity in depression.

    PubMed

    Leuchter, Andrew F; Cook, Ian A; Hunter, Aimee M; Cai, Chaochao; Horvath, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are hypothesized to arise from dysfunction in brain networks linking the limbic system and cortical regions. Alterations in brain functional cortical connectivity in resting-state networks have been detected with functional imaging techniques, but neurophysiologic connectivity measures have not been systematically examined. We used weighted network analysis to examine resting state functional connectivity as measured by quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) coherence in 121 unmedicated subjects with MDD and 37 healthy controls. Subjects with MDD had significantly higher overall coherence as compared to controls in the delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta (12-20 Hz) frequency bands. The frontopolar region contained the greatest number of "hub nodes" (surface recording locations) with high connectivity. MDD subjects expressed higher theta and alpha coherence primarily in longer distance connections between frontopolar and temporal or parietooccipital regions, and higher beta coherence primarily in connections within and between electrodes overlying the dorsolateral prefrontal cortical (DLPFC) or temporal regions. Nearest centroid analysis indicated that MDD subjects were best characterized by six alpha band connections primarily involving the prefrontal region. The present findings indicate a loss of selectivity in resting functional connectivity in MDD. The overall greater coherence observed in depressed subjects establishes a new context for the interpretation of previous studies showing differences in frontal alpha power and synchrony between subjects with MDD and normal controls. These results can inform the development of qEEG state and trait biomarkers for MDD. PMID:22384265

  9. From Positivity to Negativity Bias: Ambiguity Affects the Neurophysiological Signatures of Feedback Processing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Henning; Schnuerch, Robert; Stahl, Jutta

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies on the neurophysiological underpinnings of feedback processing almost exclusively used low-ambiguity feedback, which does not fully address the diversity of situations in everyday life. We therefore used a pseudo trial-and-error learning task to investigate ERPs of low- versus high-ambiguity feedback. Twenty-eight participants tried to deduce the rule governing visual feedback to their button presses in response to visual stimuli. In the blocked condition, the same two feedback words were presented across several consecutive trials, whereas in the random condition feedback was randomly drawn on each trial from sets of five positive and five negative words. The feedback-related negativity (FRN-D), a frontocentral ERP difference between negative and positive feedback, was significantly larger in the blocked condition, whereas the centroparietal late positive complex indicating controlled attention was enhanced for negative feedback irrespective of condition. Moreover, FRN-D in the blocked condition was due to increased reward positivity (Rew-P) for positive feedback, rather than increased (raw) FRN for negative feedback. Our findings strongly support recent lines of evidence that the FRN-D, one of the most widely studied signatures of reinforcement learning in the human brain, critically depends on feedback discriminability and is primarily driven by the Rew-P. A novel finding concerned larger frontocentral P2 for negative feedback in the random but not the blocked condition. Although Rew-P points to a positivity bias in feedback processing under conditions of low feedback ambiguity, P2 suggests a specific adaptation of information processing in case of highly ambiguous feedback, involving an early negativity bias. Generalizability of the P2 findings was demonstrated in a second experiment using explicit valence categorization of highly emotional positive and negative adjectives. PMID:26765948

  10. A systematic review of the neurophysiology of mindfulness on EEG oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Tim; Ivtzan, Itai; Fu, Cynthia H Y

    2015-10-01

    Mindfulness meditation has been purported to be a beneficial practice for wellbeing. It would therefore be expected that the neurophysiology of mindfulness would reflect this impact on wellbeing. However, investigations of the effects of mindfulness have generated mixed reports of increases, decreases, as well as no differences in EEG oscillations in comparison with a resting state and a variety of tasks. We have performed a systematic review of EEG studies of mindfulness meditation in order to determine any common effects and to identify factors which may impact on the effects. Databases were reviewed from 1966 to August 2015. Eligibility criteria included empirical quantitative analyses of mindfulness meditation practice and EEG measurements acquired in relation to practice. A total of 56 papers met the eligibility criteria and were included in the systematic review, consisting of a total 1715 subjects: 1358 healthy individuals and 357 individuals with psychiatric diagnoses. Studies were principally examined for power outcomes in each bandwidth, in particular the power differentials between mindfulness and a control state, as well as outcomes relating to hemispheric asymmetry and event-related potentials. The systematic review revealed that mindfulness was most commonly associated with enhanced alpha and theta power as compared to an eyes closed resting state, although such outcomes were not uniformly reported. No consistent patterns were observed with respect to beta, delta and gamma bandwidths. In summary, mindfulness is associated with increased alpha and theta power in both healthy individuals and in patient groups. This co-presence of elevated alpha and theta may signify a state of relaxed alertness which is conducive to mental health. PMID:26441373

  11. Investigation on neurotoxicity of occupational exposure to cyclohexane: a neurophysiological study.

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, J; Kishi, R; Eguchi, T; Harabuchi, I; Kawai, T; Ikeda, M; Sugimoto, R; Matsumoto, H; Miyake, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of occupational exposure to cyclohexane on the peripheral nervous system. METHODS: A nerve conduction study was performed on 18 workers exposed to cyclohexane in a luggage factory and on age and sex matched occupationally unexposed controls. 12 workers had been exposed to n-hexane (median 2.8 years) before the start of exposure to cyclohexane. To confirm the effect of exposure, a follow up study was performed on nine workers one year after the first study. The mean exposure to cyclohexane was 1.2 years in the first study. A symptom survey was performed. The exposure was measured by air sampling of the breathing zone of each worker. The urinary metabolite cyclohexanol was also monitored. RESULTS: The concentration of airborne cyclohexane ranged from 5 to 211 ppm. The urinary concentration of cyclohexanol ranged from 0.12 to 1.51 mg/l. There was a strong correlation between the cyclohexane exposure in personal air and urinary cyclohexanol. No differences were found in nerve conduction velocities (NCV) between workers exposed to cyclohexane and age and sex matched controls. The results of the follow up study showed significant improvements in peroneal motor NCV (P < 0.01) and sural sensory NCV (P < 0.05) and in ulnar motor distal latency (MDL, P < 0.05) and peroneal MDL (P < 0.05) compared with the first study. Although the past n-hexane exposure affected the first neurophysiological study, the effect had disappeared in the second study, one year later. CONCLUSION: Occupational exposure to the concentrations of cyclohexane experienced in this study had no adverse effects on the peripheral nervous system. PMID:8704858

  12. Resting-State Quantitative Electroencephalography Reveals Increased Neurophysiologic Connectivity in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Leuchter, Andrew F.; Cook, Ian A.; Hunter, Aimee M.; Cai, Chaochao; Horvath, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are hypothesized to arise from dysfunction in brain networks linking the limbic system and cortical regions. Alterations in brain functional cortical connectivity in resting-state networks have been detected with functional imaging techniques, but neurophysiologic connectivity measures have not been systematically examined. We used weighted network analysis to examine resting state functional connectivity as measured by quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) coherence in 121 unmedicated subjects with MDD and 37 healthy controls. Subjects with MDD had significantly higher overall coherence as compared to controls in the delta (0.5–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz), and beta (12–20 Hz) frequency bands. The frontopolar region contained the greatest number of “hub nodes” (surface recording locations) with high connectivity. MDD subjects expressed higher theta and alpha coherence primarily in longer distance connections between frontopolar and temporal or parietooccipital regions, and higher beta coherence primarily in connections within and between electrodes overlying the dorsolateral prefrontal cortical (DLPFC) or temporal regions. Nearest centroid analysis indicated that MDD subjects were best characterized by six alpha band connections primarily involving the prefrontal region. The present findings indicate a loss of selectivity in resting functional connectivity in MDD. The overall greater coherence observed in depressed subjects establishes a new context for the interpretation of previous studies showing differences in frontal alpha power and synchrony between subjects with MDD and normal controls. These results can inform the development of qEEG state and trait biomarkers for MDD. PMID:22384265

  13. Neurophysiological correlates of age-related changes in working memory capacity.

    PubMed

    Mattay, Venkata S; Fera, Francesco; Tessitore, Alessandro; Hariri, Ahmad R; Berman, Karen F; Das, Saumitra; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Goldberg, Terry E; Callicott, Joseph H; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive abilities such as working memory (WM) capacity decrease with age. To determine the neurophysiological correlates of age-related reduction in working memory capacity, we studied 10 young subjects (<35 years of age; mean age=29) and twelve older subjects (>55 years of age; mean age=59) with whole brain blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) fMRI on a 1.5 T GE MR scanner using a SPIRAL FLASH pulse sequence (TE=24 ms, TR=56 ms, FA=60 degrees , voxel dimensions=3.75 mm(3)). Subjects performed a modified version of the "n" back working memory task at different levels of increasing working memory load (1-Back, 2-Back and 3-Back). Older subjects performed as well as the younger subjects at 1-Back (p=0.4), but performed worse than the younger subjects at 2-Back (p<0.01) and 3-Back (p=0.06). Older subjects had significantly longer reaction time (RT) than younger subjects (p<0.04) at all levels of task difficulty. Image analysis using SPM 99 revealed a similar distribution of cortical activity between younger and older subjects at all task levels. However, an analysis of variance revealed a significant group x task interaction in the prefrontal cortex bilaterally; within working memory capacity, as in 1-Back when the older subjects performed as well as the younger subjects, they showed greater prefrontal cortical (BA 9) activity bilaterally. At higher working memory loads, however, when they performed worse then the younger subjects, the older subjects showed relatively reduced activity in these prefrontal regions. These data suggest that, within capacity, compensatory mechanisms such as additional prefrontal cortical activity are called upon to maintain proficiency in task performance. As cognitive demand increases, however, they are pushed past a threshold beyond which physiological compensation cannot be made and, a decline in performance occurs. PMID:16213083

  14. A possible neurophysiological correlate of audiovisual binding and unbinding in speech perception

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Attigodu C.; Berthommier, Frédéric; Vilain, Coriandre; Sato, Marc; Schwartz, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Audiovisual (AV) speech integration of auditory and visual streams generally ends up in a fusion into a single percept. One classical example is the McGurk effect in which incongruent auditory and visual speech signals may lead to a fused percept different from either visual or auditory inputs. In a previous set of experiments, we showed that if a McGurk stimulus is preceded by an incongruent AV context (composed of incongruent auditory and visual speech materials) the amount of McGurk fusion is largely decreased. We interpreted this result in the framework of a two-stage “binding and fusion” model of AV speech perception, with an early AV binding stage controlling the fusion/decision process and likely to produce “unbinding” with less fusion if the context is incoherent. In order to provide further electrophysiological evidence for this binding/unbinding stage, early auditory evoked N1/P2 responses were here compared during auditory, congruent and incongruent AV speech perception, according to either prior coherent or incoherent AV contexts. Following the coherent context, in line with previous electroencephalographic/magnetoencephalographic studies, visual information in the congruent AV condition was found to modify auditory evoked potentials, with a latency decrease of P2 responses compared to the auditory condition. Importantly, both P2 amplitude and latency in the congruent AV condition increased from the coherent to the incoherent context. Although potential contamination by visual responses from the visual cortex cannot be discarded, our results might provide a possible neurophysiological correlate of early binding/unbinding process applied on AV interactions. PMID:25505438

  15. Success rate of motor evoked potentials for intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring: effects of age, lesion location, and preoperative neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Sterio, Djordje; Ming, Xu; Para, Devaki D; Butusova, Marri; Tong, Teresa; Beric, Aleksandar

    2007-06-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation with myogenic motor evoked potential (MEP) recording was used for intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in 341 consecutive "high-risk" neurosurgical or orthopedic procedures. Overall, the success rate for establishing reliable MEP response was 94.8% for upper extremities and 66.6% for lower extremities. The rate was only 39.1% for lower extremities in patients with preoperative motor deficit and up to 81% in neurologically intact adults. Further analysis demonstrated that extremes of age or the presence of a lesion in the spinal cord and motor deficit contributed to failure in obtaining reliable MEPs. PMID:17545833

  16. Neurophysiological and Behavioral Responses to Music Therapy in Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States

    PubMed Central

    O’Kelly, Julian; James, L.; Palaniappan, R.; Taborin, J.; Fachner, J.; Magee, W. L.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of awareness for those with disorders of consciousness is a challenging undertaking, due to the complex presentation of the population. Debate surrounds whether behavioral assessments provide greatest accuracy in diagnosis compared to neuro-imaging methods, and despite developments in both, misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy may be effective in the assessment and rehabilitation with this population due to effects of musical stimuli on arousal, attention, and emotion, irrespective of verbal or motor deficits. However, an evidence base is lacking as to which procedures are most effective. To address this, a neurophysiological and behavioral study was undertaken comparing electroencephalogram (EEG), heart rate variability, respiration, and behavioral responses of 20 healthy subjects with 21 individuals in vegetative or minimally conscious states (VS or MCS). Subjects were presented with live preferred music and improvised music entrained to respiration (procedures typically used in music therapy), recordings of disliked music, white noise, and silence. ANOVA tests indicated a range of significant responses (p ≤ 0.05) across healthy subjects corresponding to arousal and attention in response to preferred music including concurrent increases in respiration rate with globally enhanced EEG power spectra responses (p = 0.05–0.0001) across frequency bandwidths. Whilst physiological responses were heterogeneous across patient cohorts, significant post hoc EEG amplitude increases for stimuli associated with preferred music were found for frontal midline theta in six VS and four MCS subjects, and frontal alpha in three VS and four MCS subjects (p = 0.05–0.0001). Furthermore, behavioral data showed a significantly increased blink rate for preferred music (p = 0.029) within the VS cohort. Two VS cases are presented with concurrent changes (p ≤ 0.05) across measures indicative of discriminatory responses to both music therapy

  17. Neurophysiological assessment of sympathetic cardiovascular activity after loss of postganglionic neurons in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Matthew R; Liu, Chang-Ning; Okerberg, Carlin V; Opsahl, Alan C; Bobrowski, Walter F; Somps, Chris J

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the degree of sympathetic postganglionic neuronal loss required to impair cardiovascular-related sympathetic activity. To produce neuronal loss separate groups of rats were treated daily with guanethidine for either 5days or 11days, followed by a recovery period. Sympathetic activity was measured by renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Stereology of thoracic (T13) ganglia was performed to determine neuronal loss. Despite loss of more than two thirds of neurons in T13 ganglia in both treated groups no effect on resting blood pressure (BP) or heart rate (HR) was detected. Basal RSNA in rats treated for 5days (0.61±0.10μV∗s) and 11days (0.37±0.08μV∗s) was significantly less than vehicle-treated rats (0.99±0.13μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA by baroreceptor unloading were significantly lower in 5-day (1.09±0.19μV∗s) and 11-day treated rats (0.59±0.11μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (1.82±0.19μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA to chemoreceptor stimulation were significantly lower in 5-day treated rats (1.54±0.25μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (2.69±0.23μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA in 11-day treated rats were significantly lower (0.75±0.15μV∗s, p<0.05) compared with both vehicle-treated and 5-day treated rats. A positive correlation of neurons to sympathetic responsiveness but not basal activity was detected. These data suggest that diminished capacity for reflex sympathetic responsiveness rather than basal activity alone must be assessed for complete detection of neurophysiological cardiovascular impairment. PMID:27085835

  18. Role of Multimodality Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring during Embolisation of a Spinal Cord Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Sala, F.; Niimi, Y.; Berenstein, A.; Deletis, V.

    2000-01-01

    Summary The decision whether or not to embolise during endovascular procedures for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the spinal cord under general anesthesia, relies primarily on neurophysiological results of provocative tests with Lidocaine and short-acting barbiturates. Because of the complex haemodynamics of spinal AVMs, when either sensory (CSEPs) or muscle motor evoked potentials (mMEPs) are used independently, they can mislead the interpretation of provocative tests. This report illustrates the specific but complementary role played by provocative tests using CSEPs and mMEPs during embolisation of a low thoracic spinal cord AVM. We present the case of a 46 year old male with six year history of right lower extremity weakness. At that time, Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging of the spine disclosed an intramedullary AVM at Til. He remained neurologically stable up to seven months before admission, when he developed sudden onset of low back pain, followed by progressive paraparesis, numbness in lower extremities, urinary retention and fecal incontinence. A new MR imaging study indicated venous thrombosis of the AVM. A two-stage embolisation was performed. During the first procedure, after provocative tests did not affect either CSEPs or mMEPs, an embolisation was performed through a sulcocommisure feeder from the anterior spinal artery (ASA) at T9. Conversely, provocative tests with Lidocaine performed from a right posterior spinal artery (PSA) feeder to the AVM nidus resulted in a significant (>50%) decrease of CSEPs, while mMEPs remained unchanged. The repeatedly positive tests warranted further investigation of the vascular anatomy which disclosed a normal right PSA distal to the nidus; the distal normal PSA was protected with coils. A repeated Lidocaine test was negative and the posterior feeder was embolised with no subsequent changes in CSEPs or mMEPs. After the procedure, the patient experienced only a mild transitory increase in right leg numbness, but

  19. A post-Kyoto partner: Considering the stratospheric ozone regime as a tool to manage nitrous oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, David; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Daniel, John S.; Portmann, Robert W.; Grabiel, Peter M.; Moomaw, William R.; Galloway, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the largest known remaining anthropogenic threat to the stratospheric ozone layer. However, it is currently only regulated under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol because of its simultaneous ability to warm the climate. The threat N2O poses to the stratospheric ozone layer, coupled with the uncertain future of the international climate regime, motivates our exploration of issues that could be relevant to the Parties to the ozone regime (the 1985 Vienna Convention and its 1987 Montreal Protocol) should they decide to take measures to manage N2O in the future. There are clear legal avenues to regulate N2O under the ozone regime as well as several ways to share authority with the existing and future international climate treaties. N2O mitigation strategies exist to address the most significant anthropogenic sources, including agriculture, where behavioral practices and new technologies could contribute significantly to reducing emissions. Existing policies managing N2O and other forms of reactive nitrogen could be harnessed and built on by the ozone regime to implement N2O controls. There are several challenges and potential cobenefits to N2O control which we discuss here: food security, equity, and implications of the nitrogen cascade. The possible inclusion of N2O in the ozone regime need not be viewed as a sign of failure of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to adequately deal with climate change. Rather, it could represent an additional valuable tool in sustainable development diplomacy. PMID:23440192

  20. A post-Kyoto partner: considering the stratospheric ozone regime as a tool to manage nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Kanter, David; Mauzerall, Denise L; Ravishankara, A R; Daniel, John S; Portmann, Robert W; Grabiel, Peter M; Moomaw, William R; Galloway, James N

    2013-03-19

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the largest known remaining anthropogenic threat to the stratospheric ozone layer. However, it is currently only regulated under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol because of its simultaneous ability to warm the climate. The threat N2O poses to the stratospheric ozone layer, coupled with the uncertain future of the international climate regime, motivates our exploration of issues that could be relevant to the Parties to the ozone regime (the 1985 Vienna Convention and its 1987 Montreal Protocol) should they decide to take measures to manage N2O in the future. There are clear legal avenues to regulate N2O under the ozone regime as well as several ways to share authority with the existing and future international climate treaties. N2O mitigation strategies exist to address the most significant anthropogenic sources, including agriculture, where behavioral practices and new technologies could contribute significantly to reducing emissions. Existing policies managing N2O and other forms of reactive nitrogen could be harnessed and built on by the ozone regime to implement N2O controls. There are several challenges and potential cobenefits to N2O control which we discuss here: food security, equity, and implications of the nitrogen cascade. The possible inclusion of N2O in the ozone regime need not be viewed as a sign of failure of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to adequately deal with climate change. Rather, it could represent an additional valuable tool in sustainable development diplomacy. PMID:23440192

  1. Changes in the use and management of forests for abating carbon emissions: issues and challenges under the Kyoto Protocol.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sandra; Swingland, Ian R; Hanbury-Tenison, Robin; Prance, Ghillean T; Myers, Norman

    2002-08-15

    The global carbon cycle is significantly influenced by changes in the use and management of forests and agriculture. Humans have the potential through changes in land use and management to alter the magnitude of forest-carbon stocks and the direction of forest-carbon fluxes. However, controversy over the use of biological means to absorb or reduce emissions of CO(2) (often referred to as carbon 'sinks') has arisen in the context of the Kyoto Protocol. The controversy is based primarily on two arguments: sinks may allow developed nations to delay or avoid actions to reduce fossil fuel emissions, and the technical and operational difficulties are too threatening to the successful implementation of land use and forestry projects for providing carbon offsets. Here we discuss the importance of including carbon sinks in efforts to address global warming and the consequent additional social, environmental and economic benefits to host countries. Activities in tropical forest lands provide the lowest cost methods both of reducing emissions and reducing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. We conclude that the various objections raised as to the inclusion of carbon sinks to ameliorate climate change can be addressed by existing techniques and technology. Carbon sinks provide a practical available method of achieving meaningful reductions in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide while at the same time contribute to national sustainable development goals. PMID:12460486

  2. Opiate antagonist binding sites in discrete brain regions of spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.H.; Gulati, A.; Bhargava, H.N. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of {sup 3}H-naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, to membranes of discrete brain regions and spinal cord of 10 week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats was determined. The brain regions examined were hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midbrain and cortex. {sup 3}H-Naltrexone bound to membranes of brain regions and spinal cord at a single high affinity site with an apparent dissociation constant value of 3 nM. The highest density of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding sites were in hippocampus and lowest in the cerebral cortex. The receptor density (B{sub max}value) and apparent dissociation constant (K{sub d} value) values of {sup 3}H-naltrexone to bind to opiate receptors on the membranes of amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midgrain, cortex and spinal cord of WKY and SHR rates did not differ. The B{sub max} value of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding to membranes of hypothalamus of SHR rates was 518% higher than WKY rats but the K{sub d} values in the two strains did not differ. It is concluded that SHR rats have higher density of opiate receptors labeled with {sup 3}H-naltrexone in the hypothalamus only, in comparison with WKY rats, and that such a difference in the density of opiate receptors may be related to the elevated blood pressure in SHR rats.

  3. Preoperative systemic therapy in locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the Kyoto Breast Cancer Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Toi, Masakazu; Benson, John R; Winer, Eric P; Forbes, John F; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Golshan, Mehra; Robertson, John F R; Sasano, Hironobu; Cole, Bernard F; Chow, Louis W C; Pegram, Mark D; Han, Wonshik; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Ikeda, Tadashi; Kanao, Shotaro; Lee, Eun-Sook; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Ohno, Shinji; Partridge, Ann H; Rouzier, Roman; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Sugie, Tomoharu; Yamauchi, Akira; Inamoto, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Data reviewed at the Kyoto Breast Cancer Consensus Conference (KBCCC) showed that preoperative systemic therapy (PST) could optimize surgery through the utilization of information relating to pre- and post-PST tumor stage, therapeutic sensitivity, and treatment-induced changes in the biological characteristics of the tumor. As such, it was noted that the biological characteristics of the tumor, such as hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, histological grade, cell proliferative activity, mainly defined by the Ki67 labeling index, and the tumor's multi-gene signature, should be considered in the planning of both systemic and local therapy. Furthermore, the timing of axillary sentinel lymph node diagnosis (i.e., before or after the PST) was also noted to be critical in that it may influence the likelihood of axillary preservation, even in node positive cases. In addition, axillary diagnosis with ultrasound and concomitant fine needle aspiration cytology or core needle biopsy (CNB) was reported to contribute to the construction of a treatment algorithm for patient-specific or individualized axillary surgery. Following PST, planning for breast surgery should therefore be based on tumor subtype, tumor volume and extent, therapeutic response to PST, and patient preference. Nomograms for predicting nodal status and drug sensitivity were also recognized as a tool to support decision-making in the selection of surgical treatment. Overall, review of data at the KBCCC showed that PST increases the likelihood of patients receiving localized surgery and individualized treatment regimens. PMID:23143284

  4. beta. -adrenergic receptor binding characteristics and responsiveness in cultured Wistar-Kyoto rat arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, A.; Meyer, W.J. III

    1988-01-01

    The tone of arterial blood vessels is regulated by the catecholamines through their receptors on arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC). ..beta..-/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors of ASMC mediate vasodilation through agonist mediated c-AMP production. Previous reports have described these receptors on freshly isolated blood vessels. This study demonstrates the presence of ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors on cultured rat ASMC and that these receptors are functional. ..beta..-adrenergic receptor binding was measured using (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding to the membrane of cultured ASMC from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. The ASMC ..beta..-adrenergic receptors have a Kd of 0.56 +/- 0.16 nM and a Bmax of 57.2 +/- 21.7 fmol/mg protein. Competition binding studies revealed a much greater affinity of these receptors for epinephrine than norepinephrine, indicating the preponderance of a ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype. Isoproterenol stimulation of cultured ASMC resulted in a 14 +/- 7 fold increase in intracellular c-AMP content of these cells indicating these receptors are functional. ..beta..-adrenergic receptors of cultured ASMC provide an excellent system in which the association between hypertension and observed ..beta..-adrenergic receptor differences can be further explored.

  5. Experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system at the Kyoto Univ. critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pyeon, C. H.; Yagi, T.; Lim, J. Y.; Misawa, T.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system (ADS) is conducted in the Kyoto Univ. Critical Assembly (KUCA). The experiments are carried out in both the critical and subcritical states for attaining the reaction rates of the thorium capture and fission reactions. In the critical system, the thorium plate irradiation experiment is carried out for the thorium capture and fission reactions. From the results of the measurements, the thorium fission reactions are obtained apparently in the critical system, and the C/E values of reaction rates show the accuracy of relative difference of about 30%. In the ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV protons, the subcritical experiments are carried out in the thorium-loaded cores to obtain the capture reaction rates through the measurements of {sup 115}In(n, {gamma}){sup 116m}In reactions. The results of the experiments reveal the difference between the reaction rate distributions for the change in not only the neutron spectrum but also the external neutron source. The comparison between the measured and calculated reaction rate distributions demonstrates a discrepancy of the accuracy of reaction rate analyses of thorium capture reactions through the thorium-loaded ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons. Hereafter, kinetic experiments are planned to be carried out to deduce the delayed neutron decay constants and subcriticality using the pulsed neutron method. (authors)

  6. Combined bio-engineering and neurophysiological in vivo technologies allow studying rat brain metabolism and neuronal activities in vivo in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F.; Donini, M.; Bandera, A.; Congestri, F.; Heidbreder, C.; Rovati, L.

    2006-04-01

    Franz Joebsis first used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool for the in vivo monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Today, NIRS instruments are more and more used in clinical environments since these systems are now easy to use, sensitive, robust, give rapid analysis and have multiple measuring points. In the present work, optic fibre probes were used as optical head of a CW-NIR instrument adapted for in vivo NIRS measurements in the brain of rodents. This prototype was designed for non-invasive analysis of the two main forms of haemoglobin: oxy-haemoglobin (HbO II) and deoxy-haemoglobin (Hb), chromophores present in biological tissues. In the present experiments it was applied to measure non- invasively HbO II and Hb levels in the rat brain; that are markers of the degree of tissue oxygenation, thus providing an index of blood levels and therefore of brain metabolism. In addition, the same animals set for central NIRS studies, were also surgically prepared for electrophysiological monitoring of cell firing in discrete brain areas. These are raphe dorsalis nucleus, locus coeruleus, ventral tegmental area that are defined as main serotoninergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic cell containing regions of the CNS and therefore involved in the major cerebral syndromes. Then, following a control recording period, exogenous oxygen (O2, 0.1bar, 2min) or carbon dioxide (CO2 0.1bar, 20min) was inflated orally. The data gathered indicate an original relationship between NIRS analysis of brain metabolism and electrical changes in three major nuclei of CNS involved in neurophysiologic and pathologic activities.

  7. TMS-EEG: A window into the neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation in non-motor brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hill, Aron T; Rogasch, Nigel C; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Hoy, Kate E

    2016-05-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) techniques are able to induce changes in cortical excitability and plasticity through the administration of weak currents to the brain and are currently being used to manipulate a vast array of cognitive processes. Despite the widespread use of tES technologies within both research and remedial settings, their precise neurophysiological mechanisms of action are not well established outside of the motor cortex. The expanding use of tES within non-motor brain regions highlights the growing need for a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of stimulation across a diversity of cortical locations. The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) provides a method of directly probing both local and widespread changes in brain neurophysiology, through the recording of TMS-evoked potentials and cortical oscillations. In this review we explore TMS-EEG as a tool for examining the impact of tES on cortical function and argue that multimodal approaches which combine tES with TMS-EEG could lead to a deeper understanding of the mechanisms which underlie tES-induced cognitive modulation. PMID:26959337

  8. Relevance of a neurophysiological marker of attention allocation for children's learning-related behaviors and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Willner, Cynthia J; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M; Bierman, Karen L; Greenberg, Mark T; Segalowitz, Sidney J

    2015-08-01

    Learning-related behaviors are important for school success. Socioeconomic disadvantage confers risk for less adaptive learning-related behaviors at school entry, yet substantial variability in school readiness exists within socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Investigation of neurophysiological systems associated with learning-related behaviors in high-risk populations could illuminate resilience processes. This study examined the relevance of a neurophysiological measure of controlled attention allocation, amplitude of the P3b event-related potential, for learning-related behaviors and academic performance in a sample of socioeconomically disadvantaged kindergarteners. The sample consisted of 239 children from an urban, low-income community, approximately half of whom exhibited behavior problems at school entry (45% aggressive/oppositional; 64% male; 69% African American, 21% Hispanic). Results revealed that higher P3b amplitudes to target stimuli in a go/no-go task were associated with more adaptive learning-related behaviors in kindergarten. Furthermore, children's learning-related behaviors in kindergarten mediated a positive indirect effect of P3b amplitude on growth in academic performance from kindergarten to 1st grade. Given that P3b amplitude reflects attention allocation processes, these findings build on the scientific justification for interventions targeting young children's attention skills in order to promote effective learning-related behaviors and academic achievement within socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. PMID:26053149

  9. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to copper: Neurophysiological and histological effects on the olfactory system

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.A.; Rose, J.D.; Jenkins, R.A.; Gerow, K.G.; Bergman, H.L.

    1999-09-01

    Olfactory epithelial structure and olfactory bulb neurophysiological responses were measured in chinook salmon and rainbow trout in response to 25 to 300 {micro}g copper (Cu)/L. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, the number of olfactory receptors was significantly reduced in chinook salmon exposed to {ge}50 {micro}g Cu/L and in rainbow trout exposed to {ge}200 {micro}g cu/L for 1 h. The number of receptors was significantly reduced in both species following exposure to 25 {micro}g Cu/L for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy of olfactory epithelial tissue indicated that the loss of receptors was from cellular necrosis. Olfactory bulk electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to 10{sup {minus}3} M L-serine were initially reduced by all Cu concentrations but were virtually eliminated in chinook salmon exposed to {ge}50 {micro}g Cu/L and in rainbow trout exposed to {ge}200 {micro}g Cu/L within 1 h of exposure. Following Cu exposure, EEG response recovery rates were slower in fish exposed to higher Cu concentrations. The higher sensitivity of the chinook salmon olfactory system to Cu-induced histological damage and neurophysiological impairment parallels the relative species sensitivity observed in behavioral avoidance experiments. This difference in species sensitivity may reduce the survival and reproductive potential of chinook salmon compared with that of rainbow trout in Cu-contaminated waters.

  10. Neurophysiological Strategies for the Diagnosis of Disorders of the Neuromuscular Junction in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The disorders of the neuromuscular junction seen in children, the congenital myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune myasthenia gravis, are very rare. Their clinical symptoms and signs may be variable, most notably in the neonate and infant. They should enter the differential diagnosis of many different clinical presentations, such as "floppy infant"…

  11. Nuclear orphan receptor Nor-1 contributes to depressive behavior in the Wistar-Kyoto rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Daniel J; Tunc-Ozcan, Elif; Shukla, Pradeep K; Volenec, Andreja; Redei, Eva E

    2010-11-29

    The current study explored the effects of prolonged antidepressant treatment on mRNA levels of two nuclear receptors in specific brain regions of an animal model of depression, the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. Both nuclear receptors have been implicated in the development or treatment of depression. The expression of nuclear orphan receptor-1 (Nor-1), a member of the NR4A nuclear orphan receptor family, is induced by electroconvulsive shock, an effective treatment for depression. Deficit in the levels or function of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) found in depressed patients has been causally implicated in depression, as this deficit is normalized by antidepressant treatments. Baseline levels of amygdalar Nor-1 and GR mRNA were higher in the WKYs compared to the comparison control Sprague-Dawley rats (SD). Prolonged treatment with the antidepressant desipramine (DMI) decreased the expression of both transcripts in the WKY strain concomitantly with decreased immobility in the forced swim test (FST) of depressive behavior. Using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted against Nor-1, we investigated the direct contribution of elevated Nor-1 expression in the amygdala of WKY to their exaggerated depressive behavior in the FST. After validating the shRNA targeting of Nor-1 in vitro, Nor-1 shRNA containing vector was infused intracerebroventricularly, using a linear polyethylenimine (PEI)-containing in vivo gene delivery system. Repeated administration of Nor-1 shRNA ameliorated the depressive behavior of WKYs in the FST and decreased amygdalar Nor-1 mRNA levels without affecting GR mRNA levels. These data demonstrate that brain region-specific changes in GR expression in response to DMI are strain dependent and that elevated amygdalar Nor-1 expression can contribute to depressive behavior in the WKY model of depression. PMID:20851110

  12. The α1 adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin enhances sleep continuity in fear-conditioned Wistar-Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    Laitman, Benjamin M.; Gajewski, Nicholas D.; Mann, Graziella L.; Kubin, Leszek; Morrison, Adrian R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Fragmentation of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is well described in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and likely has significant functional consequences. Fear-conditioned rodents may offer an attractive model of the changes in sleep that characterize PTSD. Following fear conditioning (FC), Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a strain known to be particularly stress-sensitive, have increased REMS fragmentation that can be quantified as a shift in the distribution of REMS episodes towards the more frequent occurrence of sequential REMS (inter-REMS episode interval ≤ 3 min) vs. single REMS (interval > 3 min). The α1 adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin has demonstrated efficacy in normalizing sleep in PTSD. To determine the utility of fear-conditioned WKY rats as a model of sleep disturbances typical of PTSD and as a platform for the development of new treatments, we tested the hypothesis that prazosin would reduce REMS fragmentation in fear-conditioned WKY rats. Sleep parameters and freezing (a standard measure of anxiety in rodents) were quantified at baseline and on days 1, 7, and 14 following FC, with either prazosin (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle injections administered prior to testing in a between-group design. Fear conditioning was achieved by pairing tones with a mild electric foot shock (1.0 mA, 0.5 s). One, 7, and 14 days following FC, prazosin or vehicle was injected, the tone was presented, freezing was measured, and then sleep was recorded from 11 AM to 3 PM. WKY rats given prazosin, compared to those given vehicle, had a lower amount of seq-REMS relative to total REMS time 14 days after FC. They also had a shorter non-REMS latency and fewer non-REMS arousals at baseline and on days 1 and 7 after FC. Thus, in FC rats, prazosin reduced both REMS fragmentation and non-REMS discontinuity. PMID:24246572

  13. The influence of pharmacogenetics on fatty liver disease in the wistar and kyoto rats: a combined transcriptomic and metabonomic study.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Julian L; Scott, James; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2007-01-01

    Although fatty liver disease is caused by a number of toxicological insults and the metabolic syndrome, the exact mechanisms by which many of these pathophysiological stimulii induce fatty liver are unknown. The rapid and profound steatosis caused by orotic acid, resulting from an impairment in the production of ApoB, has been investigated in the Wistar strain rat using a combined transcriptomic and metabonomic/metabolomic approach. Analysis of liver tissue from rats exposed to orotic acid for 1, 3, and 14 days was performed by DNA microarrays and high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy based metabonomics of both tissue extracts and intact tissue (n = 3). Data were analyzed using a combination of ANOVA and principal components analysis, used as a data reduction tool to visualize the most perturbed transcripts and metabolites. Orotic acid produced a profound 8-fold increase in total lipids, and in particular increases in resonances associated with polyunsaturated fats (CH=CH and CH2CH=CH groups). This was accompanied by increases in the concentrations of trimethylamine-oxide (TMAO), betaine, choline, and phosphocholine, as well as a relative decrease in glucose and glycogen. At the transcriptional level, perturbations were detected in both oxidative stress and osmoregulation/pH homeostasis. However, this contrasts with a previous transcriptomic/metabolic study of fatty liver disease in a combined data set of Wistar (out-bred) and Kyoto (in-bred) strains of rats, with only 4 transcripts being found to be in common between the two analyses. This emphasizes the need to understand how strain background interacts with a given toxic lesion or genetic modification. PMID:17203948

  14. Detrimental effects of acute nicotine on the response-withholding performance of spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Gabriel J.; Wood-Isenberg, Gabriel; Watterson, Elizabeth; Sanabria, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is associated with a higher prevalence of smoking, which may be related to potential therapeutic effects of nicotine on ADHD symptoms. Whereas nicotine offers robust improvements in sustained attention, the effects of nicotine on impulsivity are unclear. Objectives The present study examined the effects of nicotine on the response inhibition capacity of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), an animal model of ADHD, compared to that of a normotensive control Wistar Kyoto (WKY) using the Fixed Minimum Interval (FMI) schedule of reinforcement. Methods Tests were conducted following acute injections of subcutaneous nicotine (0.1 – 0.6 mg/kg). On each FMI trial, the first lever press initiated an inter-response time (IRT); a head entry into a food receptacle terminated the IRT. IRTs longer than 6 s were intermittently reinforced with sucrose. Results A model that assumes that only a proportion of IRTs are sensitive to the timing contingencies of the FMI provided a close fit to the data, regardless of strain or treatment. No baseline difference in FMI performance was observed between SHR and WKY. Nicotine reduced the duration of timed IRTs and the duration of latencies to the IRT-initiating lever press similarly for both strains. Nicotine dose-dependently increased the proportion of timed IRTs; the dose-response curve was shifted leftwards in SHR relative to WKY. Conclusions These results suggest that nicotine (a) reduces response-inhibition capacity (b) enhances the reinforcement efficacy of sucrose, and (c) dose-dependently enhances attention-like sensitivity to contingencies of reinforcement, through mechanisms that are yet unknown. PMID:24414609

  15. Effect of renal sympathetic nerve on adrenergically and angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction in normal Wistar-Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the effect of renal sympathetic innervation on adrenergically and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced renal vasoconstriction in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Methods Forty-eight WKY rats were treated with either losartan (10 mg/kg/day p.o.) or carvedilol (5 mg/kg/day p.o.) or a combination of them (10 mg/kg/day + 5 mg/kg/day p.o.) for 7 days. On day 8, the rats were anaesthetized, and renal vasoconstrictor experiments were carried out. A group of rats was subjected to acute unilateral renal denervation during the acute study. Changes in the renal vasoconstrictor responses were determined in terms of reductions in renal blood flow caused by Ang II, noradrenaline (NA), and methoxamine (ME). Results In normal animals, losartan decreased (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but not to NA or ME. Carvedilol treatment, however, blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Combination of losartan and carvedilol blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but augmented the responses to NA and ME (all P < 0.05). Interestingly, when denervated rats were treated with the same combination, there was a reduction (P < 0.05) in the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Conclusions Data suggest that the renal sympathetic nerve contributes to adrenergic agonist-mediated renal vasoconstrictions in normal rats. The data further indicate an interactive relationship between renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems in modulating adrenergically and Ang II-induced renal vasoconstriction in WKY rats. PMID:21047287

  16. Test observations of the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II at the University of Hawaii 88-in and Subaru Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Hattori, Takashi; Kawai, Atsushi; Ozaki, Shinobu; Kosugi, George; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tadashi; Ishigaki, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Motomi; Sasaki, Minoru; Shimono, Atsushi; Okita, Yoshiko; Sudo, Jun; Takeyama, Norihide

    2004-09-01

    In order to investigate the physical conditions of ionized gas in galaxies, as well as its kinematics, we have developed the Kyoto tridimensional spectrograph II (3DII). It is a multi-mode instrument designed for Cassegrain focus, including integral field spectrograph (IFS) and Fabry-Perot imager modes. We have designed it compact so that we can mount it at 2-m class telescopes as well as at 8-m Subaru telescope. We have succeeded in test observations of the 3DII. In the IFS mode the spatial resolution of ~ 0".5 and 0".4 was obtained in 30-minute exposures at University of Hawaii 88-inch (UH88) and Subaru, respectively, in relatively good weather conditions. Each of 37 × 37 microlenses subtends ~ 0".1 in Subaru's case. This samples well the image size. A wider field of view is emphasized in the case of UH88. Because our micropupil spectroscopy is free from a slit effect, we have reached the accuracy of an order of one tenth of a pixel for deriving velocity fields in terms of velocity center while the full width at half maximum of the instrumental profile corresponds to two pixels. At Subaru we have used a container designed in a collaboration with National Astronomical Observatory, Japan: it fits with a robotic instrument exchanger. The containerincludes two heat exchangers to keep its surface cool and void degrading the image quality. We have established effective observational equences by realizing a software interface with Subaru operating system. ome results from target observations are shown.

  17. /sup 22/Na+ and /sup 86/Rb+ transport in vascular smooth muscle of SHR, Wistar Kyoto, and Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, S.; Denny, T.N.; Aviv, A.

    1988-06-01

    To gain further insight into differences in cellular Na+ and K+ regulation between the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), Wistar Kyoto (WKY), and American Wistar (W) rats, 22Na+ and 86Rb+ washouts were performed under steady-state conditions in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells from the three rat strains. SHR vascular smooth muscle cells showed significantly higher bumetanide sensitive 86Rb+ washout rate constant (x 10(-4)/min; mean +/- SEM) than WKY cells (-38.6 +/- 2.84 and -23.8 +/- 3.58, respectively; p less than 0.005). SHR vascular smooth muscle cells also exhibited significantly higher values than WKY cells in the total 22Na+ washout rate constant (x 10(-2)/min) (-61.0 +/- 1.57 vs. -53.8 +/- 1.24; p less than 0.005). The amiloride sensitive component of the 22Na+ washout rate constant accounted for these differences (-18.6 +/- 1.04 for SHR and -12.1 +/- 2.00 for WKY; p less than 0.05). There were no apparent differences in cellular Na+ concentrations between WKY and SHR cells. In general, the 86Rb+ and 22Na+ washout parameters of W rat cells were quite similar to those of cells from SHR. We conclude that the bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ washout (the Na+ K+-cotransport), the overall, and the amiloride-sensitive 22Na+ washout (the latter primarily represents the Na+/H+ antiport) are higher in SHR than WKY rat vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings indicate innate differences in cellular Na+ and K+ transport in vascular smooth muscle cells of the SHR and WKY rat. The mechanisms responsible for these differences are yet to be determined.

  18. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. PMID:24247983

  19. An investigation of the neurophysiologic effect of tone-reducing AFOs on reflex excitability in subjects with spasticity following stroke while standing.

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Aileen; Bach, Timothy; Rogers, Douglas; Bernhardt, Julie

    2010-06-01

    Tone-reducing ankle-foot orthoses (TRAFOs) are said to improve the control and functioning of spastic lower limbs by their biomechanic and neurophysiologic effects. Unfortunately, there is limited evidence in literature to support the theory that TRAFOs can effectively decrease spasticity in the foot and ankle neurophysiologically. The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine the neurophysiologic effect of TRAFOs on soleus muscle reflex excitability in subjects with spasticity following stroke while standing. A repeated-measures intervention study was conducted on 15 adult subjects with stroke who were recruited from the community. Custom-made articulated ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) and TRAFOs with orthokinetic compression garments (OCGs) were fabricated for each subject. Five conditions were tested: (1) Shoes only, (2) AFO, (3) TRAFO, (4) TRAFO with OCG, (5) shoes only, to determine if the TRAFOs were most effective in decreasing spasticity as assessed by the ratio of maximum Hoffmann reflex amplitude to maximum muscle response amplitude (Hmax:Mmax ratio) of the soleus. The results found that there were no significant treatment effects for the interventions (F = 0.992, df = 2.167, p = 0.388), however, when analysed subject-by-subject, four subjects displayed significant increases in their Hmax:Mmax ratios to at least one treatment condition. Overall, the results demonstrated that the tone-reducing devices had no significant neurophysiologic effect on soleus reflex excitability in subjects with spasticity, however individual responses showed that the TRAFOs increased spasticity in some individuals. PMID:20184503

  20. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Reflexive and Volitional Saccades as Revealed by Lesion Studies with Neurological Patients and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muri, Rene M.; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses the neurophysiology and neuroanatomy of the cortical control of reflexive and volitional saccades in humans. The main focus is on classical lesion studies and studies using the interference method of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). To understand the behavioural function of a region, it is essential to assess…

  1. The neurophysiological aspects of Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity: in honor of the 150th anniversary of Pavlov's birth.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, D L; Windholz, G

    2000-08-01

    Whereas Ivan P. Pavlov (1849-1936) is well-known for his work on classical conditioning, his contribution to neuroscience, particularly his interest in the function of neural centers in the central nervous system, is not as widely known. During the last three decades of his life, Pavlov explored cortical processes by salivary reflex conditioning, a method he used to develop his theory of higher nervous activity. This theory outlined the function of the brain in higher organisms in their interaction with the changing environmental contingencies. As early as 1908, Pavlov outlined a neurophysiological theory as the physiological basis of his theory of higher nervous activity. He maintained that the neural processes of excitation and inhibition irradiate and concentrate among the cortical neural centers. Most of all, he emphasized the plasticity of the cortex in higher organisms' in the Darwinian struggle for existence. PMID:11608939

  2. Neurophysiological analytics for all! Free open-source software tools for documenting, analyzing, visualizing, and sharing using electronic notebooks.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, David M; Horn, Charles C

    2016-08-01

    Neurophysiology requires an extensive workflow of information analysis routines, which often includes incompatible proprietary software, introducing limitations based on financial costs, transfer of data between platforms, and the ability to share. An ecosystem of free open-source software exists to fill these gaps, including thousands of analysis and plotting packages written in Python and R, which can be implemented in a sharable and reproducible format, such as the Jupyter electronic notebook. This tool chain can largely replace current routines by importing data, producing analyses, and generating publication-quality graphics. An electronic notebook like Jupyter allows these analyses, along with documentation of procedures, to display locally or remotely in an internet browser, which can be saved as an HTML, PDF, or other file format for sharing with team members and the scientific community. The present report illustrates these methods using data from electrophysiological recordings of the musk shrew vagus-a model system to investigate gut-brain communication, for example, in cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis. We show methods for spike sorting (including statistical validation), spike train analysis, and analysis of compound action potentials in notebooks. Raw data and code are available from notebooks in data supplements or from an executable online version, which replicates all analyses without installing software-an implementation of reproducible research. This demonstrates the promise of combining disparate analyses into one platform, along with the ease of sharing this work. In an age of diverse, high-throughput computational workflows, this methodology can increase efficiency, transparency, and the collaborative potential of neurophysiological research. PMID:27098025

  3. Immunosuppressive effects of the standardized extract of Phyllanthus amarus on cellular immune responses in Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ilangkovan, Menaga; Jantan, Ibrahim; Mesaik, Mohamed Ahmed; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Phyllanthus amarus (family: Euphorbiaceae) is of immense interest due to its wide spectrum of biological activities. In the present study, the standardized 80% ethanol extract of P. amarus was investigated for its modulatory activity on various cellular immune parameters, including chemotaxis of neutrophils, engulfment of Escherichia coli by neutrophils, and Mac-1 expression, in leukocytes isolated from treated/nontreated Wistar-Kyoto rats. The detailed cell-mediated activity of P. amarus was also investigated, including analysis of the effects on T- and B-cell proliferation and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell subsets in splenic mononuclear cells, and estimation of serum cytokine production by activated T-cells. The main components of the extract, phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, corilagin, geraniin, ellagic acid, and gallic acid were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts, using validated reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced neutrophils isolated from rats administered with the extract of P. amarus, at doses ranging from 100 to 400 mg/kg for 14 days, revealed a significant dose-dependent reduction in neutrophil migration (P<0.05). Similar patterns of inhibition were also observed in phagocytic activity and in fMLP-induced changes in expression of β2 integrin polymorphonuclear neutrophils. The results in P. amarus-treated rats also demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of both lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B-cell proliferation and concanavalin A-stimulated T-cell proliferation as compared with sensitized control. At a dose of 400 mg/kg (P<0.01), there was a significant decrease in the (%) expression of CD4(+) and CD8(+) in splenocytes and in serum cytokines of T helper (Th1) (IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4). In conclusion, P. amarus showed effective immunosuppressive activities in cellular immune response, by various immune regulatory mechanisms, and may be useful for

  4. Immunostimulatory effects of the standardized extract of Tinospora crispa on innate immune responses in Wistar Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waqas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Kumolosasi, Endang; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Tinospora crispa (TC) has been used in folkloric medicine for the treatment of various diseases and has been reported for several pharmacological activities. However, the effects of TC extract on the immune system are largely unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of a standardized 80% ethanol extract of the stem of TC on innate immune responses. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were treated daily at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 400 mg/kg doses of the extract for 21 days by oral gavage. The immunomodulatory potential of TC was evaluated by determining its effect on chemotaxis and phagocytic activity of neutrophils isolated from the blood of rats. To further elucidate the mechanism of action, its effects on the proliferation of T- and B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) and on the secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines were also monitored. The main components of the extracts, syringin and magnoflorine, were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts by using a validated reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method. It was observed that the chemotactic activity of neutrophils obtained from extract-treated rats increased as compared to controls. A dose-dependent increase in the number of migrated cells and phagocytosis activity of neutrophils was observed. Dose-dependent increase was also observed in the T- and B-lymphocytes proliferation stimulated with concanavalin A (5 μg/mL) and lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/mL), and was statistically significant at 400 mg/kg (P>0.01). Apart from cell-mediated immune response, the concentrations of Th1 (TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines were significantly increased in sera of rats treated with different doses as compared with the control group. From these findings, it can be concluded that TC possesses immunostimulatory activity and has therapeutic potential for the prevention of immune diseases. PMID:26089645

  5. Immunosuppressive effects of the standardized extract of Phyllanthus amarus on cellular immune responses in Wistar-Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    Ilangkovan, Menaga; Jantan, Ibrahim; Mesaik, Mohamed Ahmed; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Phyllanthus amarus (family: Euphorbiaceae) is of immense interest due to its wide spectrum of biological activities. In the present study, the standardized 80% ethanol extract of P. amarus was investigated for its modulatory activity on various cellular immune parameters, including chemotaxis of neutrophils, engulfment of Escherichia coli by neutrophils, and Mac-1 expression, in leukocytes isolated from treated/nontreated Wistar-Kyoto rats. The detailed cell-mediated activity of P. amarus was also investigated, including analysis of the effects on T- and B-cell proliferation and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in splenic mononuclear cells, and estimation of serum cytokine production by activated T-cells. The main components of the extract, phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, corilagin, geraniin, ellagic acid, and gallic acid were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts, using validated reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced neutrophils isolated from rats administered with the extract of P. amarus, at doses ranging from 100 to 400 mg/kg for 14 days, revealed a significant dose-dependent reduction in neutrophil migration (P<0.05). Similar patterns of inhibition were also observed in phagocytic activity and in fMLP-induced changes in expression of β2 integrin polymorphonuclear neutrophils. The results in P. amarus-treated rats also demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of both lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B-cell proliferation and concanavalin A–stimulated T-cell proliferation as compared with sensitized control. At a dose of 400 mg/kg (P<0.01), there was a significant decrease in the (%) expression of CD4+ and CD8+ in splenocytes and in serum cytokines of T helper (Th1) (IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4). In conclusion, P. amarus showed effective immunosuppressive activities in cellular immune response, by various immune regulatory mechanisms, and may be useful for

  6. Immunostimulatory effects of the standardized extract of Tinospora crispa on innate immune responses in Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Waqas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Kumolosasi, Endang; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Tinospora crispa (TC) has been used in folkloric medicine for the treatment of various diseases and has been reported for several pharmacological activities. However, the effects of TC extract on the immune system are largely unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of a standardized 80% ethanol extract of the stem of TC on innate immune responses. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were treated daily at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 400 mg/kg doses of the extract for 21 days by oral gavage. The immunomodulatory potential of TC was evaluated by determining its effect on chemotaxis and phagocytic activity of neutrophils isolated from the blood of rats. To further elucidate the mechanism of action, its effects on the proliferation of T- and B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) and on the secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines were also monitored. The main components of the extracts, syringin and magnoflorine, were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts by using a validated reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method. It was observed that the chemotactic activity of neutrophils obtained from extract-treated rats increased as compared to controls. A dose-dependent increase in the number of migrated cells and phagocytosis activity of neutrophils was observed. Dose-dependent increase was also observed in the T- and B-lymphocytes proliferation stimulated with concanavalin A (5 μg/mL) and lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/mL), and was statistically significant at 400 mg/kg (P>0.01). Apart from cell-mediated immune response, the concentrations of Th1 (TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines were significantly increased in sera of rats treated with different doses as compared with the control group. From these findings, it can be concluded that TC possesses immunostimulatory activity and has therapeutic potential for the prevention of immune diseases. PMID:26089645

  7. Neurophysiological Indices of Atypical Auditory Processing and Multisensory Integration Are Associated with Symptom Severity in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandwein, Alice B.; Foxe, John J.; Butler, John S.; Frey, Hans-Peter; Bates, Juliana C.; Shulman, Lisa H.; Molholm, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Atypical processing and integration of sensory inputs are hypothesized to play a role in unusual sensory reactions and social-cognitive deficits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reports on the relationship between objective metrics of sensory processing and clinical symptoms, however, are surprisingly sparse. Here we examined the relationship…

  8. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Effects of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke Patients after Motor Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    D'Agata, Federico; Peila, Elena; Cicerale, Alessandro; Caglio, Marcella M; Caroppo, Paola; Vighetti, Sergio; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Minuto, Alice; Campagnoli, Marcello; Salatino, Adriana; Molo, Maria T; Mortara, Paolo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two specific Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) paradigms, the repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Short and long term outcomes (after 3 and 6 months, respectively) were evaluated. We measured, at multiple time points, the manual dexterity using a validated clinical scale (ARAT), electroencephalography auditory event related potentials, and neuropsychological performances in patients with chronic stroke of middle severity. Thirty four patients were enrolled and randomized. The intervention group was treated with a NIBS protocol longer than usual, applying a second cycle of stimulation, after a washout period, using different techniques in the two cycles (rTMS/tDCS). We compared the results with a control group treated with sham stimulation. We split the data analysis into three studies. In this first study we examined if a cumulative effect was clinically visible. In the second study we compared the effects of the two techniques. In the third study we explored if patients with minor cognitive impairment have most benefit from the treatment and if cognitive and motor outcomes were correlated. We found that the impairment in some cognitive domains cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for rehabilitation with NIBS. ERP improved, related to cognitive and attentional processes after stimulation on the motor cortex, but transitorily. This effect could be linked to the restoration of hemispheric balance or by the effects of distant connections. In our study the effects of the two NIBS were comparable, with some advantages using tDCS vs. rTMS in stroke rehabilitation. Finally we found that more than one cycle (2-4 weeks), spaced out by washout periods, should be used, only in responder patients, to obtain clinical relevant results. PMID:27445730

  9. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Effects of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke Patients after Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    D'Agata, Federico; Peila, Elena; Cicerale, Alessandro; Caglio, Marcella M.; Caroppo, Paola; Vighetti, Sergio; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Minuto, Alice; Campagnoli, Marcello; Salatino, Adriana; Molo, Maria T.; Mortara, Paolo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two specific Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) paradigms, the repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Short and long term outcomes (after 3 and 6 months, respectively) were evaluated. We measured, at multiple time points, the manual dexterity using a validated clinical scale (ARAT), electroencephalography auditory event related potentials, and neuropsychological performances in patients with chronic stroke of middle severity. Thirty four patients were enrolled and randomized. The intervention group was treated with a NIBS protocol longer than usual, applying a second cycle of stimulation, after a washout period, using different techniques in the two cycles (rTMS/tDCS). We compared the results with a control group treated with sham stimulation. We split the data analysis into three studies. In this first study we examined if a cumulative effect was clinically visible. In the second study we compared the effects of the two techniques. In the third study we explored if patients with minor cognitive impairment have most benefit from the treatment and if cognitive and motor outcomes were correlated. We found that the impairment in some cognitive domains cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for rehabilitation with NIBS. ERP improved, related to cognitive and attentional processes after stimulation on the motor cortex, but transitorily. This effect could be linked to the restoration of hemispheric balance or by the effects of distant connections. In our study the effects of the two NIBS were comparable, with some advantages using tDCS vs. rTMS in stroke rehabilitation. Finally we found that more than one cycle (2–4 weeks), spaced out by washout periods, should be used, only in responder patients, to obtain clinical relevant results. PMID:27445730

  10. Amblyopia resulting from penalisation: neurophysiological studies of kittens reared with atropinisation of one or both eyes.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, H.; Tremain, K. E.

    1978-01-01

    Atropinisation of the eyes--a clinical method of treating strabismus called "penalisation"--in developing kittens caused a reduction in the spatial resolving power of cells in the lateral geniculate nucleus driven by the penalised eye, regardless of whether 1 eye or both eyes had been atropinised. However, binocularity of cells in the visual cortex was reduced only in monocularly penalised cats. It appears that sharply focused foveal images are important in the development of good visual acuity but synergy of the inputs to the 2 eyes is required for the development of binocular vision. PMID:629908

  11. Multivariate dynamical systems-based estimation of causal brain interactions in fMRI: Group-level validation using benchmark data, neurophysiological models and human connectome project data

    PubMed Central

    Ryali, Srikanth; Chen, Tianwen; Supekar, Kaustubh; Tu, Tao; Kochlka, John; Cai, Weidong; Menon, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Background Causal estimation methods are increasingly being used to investigate functional brain networks in fMRI, but there are continuing concerns about the validity of these methods. New Method Multivariate Dynamical Systems (MDS) is a state-space method for estimating dynamic causal interactions in fMRI data. Here we validate MDS using benchmark simulations as well as simulations from a more realistic stochastic neurophysiological model. Finally, we applied MDS to investigate dynamic casual interactions in a fronto-cingulate-parietal control network using Human Connectome Project (HCP) data acquired during performance of a working memory task. Crucially, since the ground truth in experimental data is unknown, we conducted novel stability analysis to determine robust causal interactions within this network. Results MDS accurately recovered dynamic causal interactions with an area under receiver operating characteristic (AUC) above 0.7 for benchmark datasets and AUC above 0.9 for datasets generated using the neurophysiological model. In experimental fMRI data, bootstrap procedures revealed a stable pattern of causal influences from the anterior insula to other nodes of the fronto-cingulate-parietal network. Comparison with Existing Methods MDS is effective in estimating dynamic causal interactions in both the benchmark and neurophysiological model based datasets in terms of AUC, sensitivity and false positive rates. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that MDS can accurately estimate causal interactions in fMRI data. Neurophysiological models and stability analysis provide a general framework for validating computational methods designed to estimate causal interactions in fMRI. The right anterior insula functions as a causal hub during working memory. PMID:27015792

  12. The right tool and the right place for the job: the importance of the field in experimental neurophysiology, 1880-1945.

    PubMed

    Muka, Samantha K

    2016-09-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to understandings of practice and place in the history of early American neurophysiology by exploring research with jellyfish at marine stations. Jellyfish became a particularly important research tool to experimental physiologists studying neurological subjects at the turn of the twentieth century. But their enthusiasm for the potential of this organism was constrained by its delicacy in captivity. The discovery of hardier species made experimentation at the shore possible and resulted in two epicenters of neurophysiological research on the American East Coast: the Marine Biological Laboratory and the Carnegie Institution's Dry Tortugas Laboratory. Work done in these locations had impacts on a wide range of physiological questions. These centers were short lived-researchers at the MBL eventually focused on the squid giant axon and the Tortugas lab closed after the death of Mayer-but the development of basic requirements and best practices to sustain these organisms paints an important picture of early experimental neurophysiology. Marine organisms and locations have played an integral role in the development of experimental life sciences in America. By understanding the earliest experimental research done at these locations, and the organisms that lured researchers from the campus to the coastline, we can begin to integrate marine stations into the larger historical narrative of American physiology. PMID:27338571

  13. Facts and philosophy in neurophysiology. The 200th anniversary of Johannes Müller (1801-1858).

    PubMed

    Lohff, B

    2001-12-01

    Johannes Müller was the founder of the first school of physiology in Germany. His anatomical, morphological and physiological research as well as his epistemological view of scientific medicine opened the way to a deeper understanding of the structure and the function of the organism. With important discoveries like the law of sense energy, the reflex movement and the definition of different organic stimuli, he enriched the knowledge of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and sensory physiology and smoothed the way to an experimental physiology. All his famous students like Hermann von Helmholtz, Emil Du Bois-Reymond, Ernst Brücke, Jakob Henle, Robert Remak, Rudolf Virchow and Ernst Haeckel solved many crucial research problems, which Müller identified and pointed out to them as open questions, due to the insufficient methods of investigation. Müller's research method, epistemological view of biological sciences, and his open-minded personal style encouraged the development of new methods adapted to particular problems. PMID:11770194

  14. What's the meaning of this? A behavioral and neurophysiological investigation into the principles behind the classification of visual emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Czekóová, Kristína; Shaw, Daniel J; Urbánek, Tomáš; Chládek, Jan; Lamoš, Martin; Roman, Robert; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were performed to investigate the principles by which emotional stimuli are classified on the dimensions of valence and arousal. In Experiment 1, a large sample of healthy participants rated emotional stimuli according to both broad dimensions. Hierarchical cluster analyses performed on these ratings revealed that stimuli were clustered according to their semantic content at the beginning of the agglomerative process. Example semantic themes include food, violence, nudes, death, and objects. Importantly, this pattern occurred in a parallel fashion for ratings on both dimensions. In Experiment 2, we investigated if the same semantic clusters were differentiated at the neurophysiological level. Intracerebral EEG was recorded from 18 patients with intractable epilepsy who viewed the same set of stimuli. Not only did electrocortical responses differentiate between these data-defined semantic clusters, they converged with the behavioral measurements to highlight the importance of categories associated with survival and reproduction. These findings provide strong evidence that the semantic content of affective material influences their classification along the broad dimensions of valence and arousal, and this principle of categorization exerts an effect on the evoked emotional response. Future studies should consider data-driven techniques rather than normative ratings to identify more specific, semantically related emotional images. PMID:27098919

  15. Fooling the kickers but not the goalkeepers: behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of fake action detection in soccer.

    PubMed

    Tomeo, Enzo; Cesari, Paola; Aglioti, Salvatore M; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2013-11-01

    Studies demonstrate that elite athletes are able to extract kinematic information of observed domain-specific actions to predict their future course. Little is known, however, on the perceptuo-motor processes and neural correlates of the athletes' ability to predict fooling actions. Combining psychophysics and transcranial magnetic stimulation, we explored the impact of motor and perceptual expertise on the ability to predict the fate of observed actual or fake soccer penalty kicks. We manipulated the congruence between the model's body kinematics and the subsequent ball trajectory and investigated the prediction performance and cortico-spinal reactivity of expert kickers, goalkeepers, and novices. Kickers and goalkeepers outperformed novices by anticipating the actual kick direction from the model's initial body movements. However, kickers were more often fooled than goalkeepers and novices in cases of incongruent actions. Congruent and incongruent actions engendered a comparable facilitation of kickers' lower limb motor representation, but their neurophysiological response was correlated with their greater susceptibility to be fooled. Moreover, when compared with actual actions, motor facilitation for incongruent actions was lower among goalkeepers and higher among novices. Thus, responding to fooling actions requires updation of simulative motor representations of others' actions and is facilitated by visual rather than by motor expertise. PMID:22941722

  16. Complementing Neurophysiology Education for Developing Countries via Cost-Effective Virtual Labs: Case Studies and Classroom Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Diwakar, Shyam; Parasuram, Harilal; Medini, Chaitanya; Raman, Raghu; Nedungadi, Prema; Wiertelak, Eric; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Achuthan, Krishnashree; Nair, Bipin

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-level neuroscience experiments vary from detailed protocols involving chemical, physiological and imaging techniques to computer-based modeling. The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is revolutionizing the current laboratory scenario in terms of active learning especially for distance education cases. Virtual web-based labs are an asset to educational institutions confronting economic issues in maintaining equipment, facilities and other conditions needed for good laboratory practice. To enhance education, we developed virtual laboratories in neuroscience and explored their first-level use in (Indian) University education in the context of developing countries. Besides using interactive animations and remotely-triggered experimental devices, a detailed mathematical simulator was implemented on a web-based software platform. In this study, we focused on the perceptions of technology adoption for a virtual neurophysiology laboratory as a new pedagogy tool for complementing college laboratory experience. The study analyses the effect of virtual labs on users assessing the relationship between cognitive, social and teaching presence. Combining feedback from learners and teachers, the study suggests enhanced motivation for students and improved teaching experience for instructors. PMID:24693260

  17. Theta-phase gamma-amplitude coupling as a neurophysiological marker of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Kang, Taewoong; Min, Kyung Joon; Han, Doug Hyun; Lee, Young Sik

    2015-08-31

    Theta-phase gamma-amplitude coupling (TGC) between slow and fast oscillations is considered to represent cortico-subcortical interactions. The purpose of this electroencephalographic (EEG) study was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of TGC by comparing the power spectra and TGC at rest between ADHD and control children. Nineteen-channel EEGs were recorded from 97 volunteers (including 53 subjects with ADHD attending a camp for hyperactive children). The EEG power spectra and TGC data were analyzed. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted on the quantitative EEG results between the groups to adjust for sex. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted to examine the discriminating ability of each parameter for ADHD diagnosis. The ADHD group exhibited significantly decreased TGC in multiple areas, including frontal (Fp1, F3, F7, F6), temporal (T3), and occipital (O2) areas, compared with the control group. The ROC analysis performed on the TGC data generated the most accurate result among the EEG measures, with an overall classification accuracy of 71.7%. TGC, which reflects the degree of neuronal interactions between functional systems, provides information about an individual's attentional network. Therefore, resting-state TGC is a promising neurophysiological marker of ADHD in children. PMID:26170246

  18. The 1932 and 1944 Nobel Prizes in physiology or medicine: rewards for ground-breaking studies in neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Grant, Gunnar

    2006-12-01

    In 1932 Sherrington and Adrian were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries regarding the functions of neurons" and in 1944 Erlanger and Gasser were awarded the same prize "for their discoveries relating to the highly differentiated functions of single nerve fibres." Sherrington made important discoveries on the reflex functions of the spinal cord, formulated the concept of the "synapse," defined the principle of the "final common path," studied "reciprocal innervation" and showed that central inhibition was an active phenomenon. He distinguished three types of receptors: extero-, intero-, and proprioceptive, studied the proprioceptive reflexes in the decerebrate animal and mapped their pathways in the spinal cord. Adrian made fundamental discoveries on the function of single nerve fibers, developed new techniques for the amplification of the weak signals and discovered that increased stimulation resulted in increased frequency of the impulses, the amplitude being unaffected. Erlanger and Gasser introduced the cathode-ray oscillograph and demonstrated the existence of three main groups of nerve fibers, A, B, and C, the conduction velocities of which were in approximately linear relationship with the fiber diameter, the A-fibers being the fastest and thickest and the C-fibers the slowest and having the finest diameter. Together the contributions by the four Laureates paved the way to modern neurophysiology. PMID:16997762

  19. Neurophysiological responses to unpleasant stimuli (acute electrical stimulations and emotional pictures) are increased in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Duval, Céline Z; Goumon, Yannick; Kemmel, Véronique; Kornmeier, Jürgen; Dufour, André; Andlauer, Olivier; Vidailhet, Pierre; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Salvat, Eric; Muller, André; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoé G; Schmidt-Mutter, Catherine; Giersch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have often been described as insensitive to nociceptive signals, but objective evidence is sparse. We address this question by combining subjective behavioral and objective neurochemical and neurophysiological measures. The present study involved 21 stabilized and mildly symptomatic patients with schizophrenia and 21 control subjects. We applied electrical stimulations below the pain threshold and assessed sensations of pain and unpleasantness with rating scales, and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs/EEG). We also measured attention, two neurochemical stress indices (ACTH/cortisol), and subjective VEPs/EEG responses to visual emotional stimuli. Our results revealed that, subjectively, patients' evaluations do not differ from controls. However, the amplitude of EEG evoked potentials was greater in patients than controls as early as 50 ms after electrical stimulations and beyond one second after visual processing of emotional pictures. Such responses could not be linked to the stress induced by the stimulations, since stress hormone levels were stable. Nor was there a difference between patients and controls in respect of attention performance and tactile sensitivity. Taken together, all indices measured in patients in our study were either heightened or equivalent relative to healthy volunteers. PMID:26935652

  20. Neurophysiological Correlates of Central Fatigue in Healthy Subjects and Multiple Sclerosis Patients before and after Treatment with Amantadine

    PubMed Central

    Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Rossi, Simone; Bartalini, Sabina; Cincotta, Massimo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Tatti, Elisa; Ulivelli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    In ten healthy subjects and in ten patients suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS), we investigated the cortical functional changes induced by a standard fatiguing repetitive tapping task. The Cortical Silent Period (CSP), an intracortical, mainly GABAB-mediated inhibitory phenomenon, was recorded by two different hand muscles, one acting as prime mover of the fatiguing index-thumb tapping task (First Dorsal Interosseous, FDI) and the other one not involved in the task but sharing largely overlapping central, spinal, and peripheral innervation (Abductor Digiti Minimi, ADM). At baseline, the CSP was shorter in patients than in controls. As fatigue developed, CSP changes involved both the “fatigued” FDI and the “unfatigued” ADM muscles, suggesting a cortical spread of central fatigue mechanisms. Chronic therapy with amantadine annulled differences in CSP duration between controls and patients, possibly through restoration of more physiological levels of intracortical inhibition in the motor cortex. These inhibitory changes correlated with the improvement of fatigue scales. The CSP may represent a suitable marker of neurophysiological mechanisms accounting for central fatigue generation either in controls or in MS patients, involving corticospinal neural pools supplying not only the fatigued muscle but also adjacent muscles sharing an overlapping cortical representation. PMID:26236509

  1. Towards real-time communication between in vivo neurophysiological data sources and simulator-based brain biomimetic models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Giljae; Matsunaga, Andréa; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Zhang, Wenjie; Lytton, William W; Francis, Joseph T; Fortes, José AB

    2015-01-01

    Development of more sophisticated implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) will require both interpretation of the neurophysiological data being measured and subsequent determination of signals to be delivered back to the brain. Computational models are the heart of the machine of BMI and therefore an essential tool in both of these processes. One approach is to utilize brain biomimetic models (BMMs) to develop and instantiate these algorithms. These then must be connected as hybrid systems in order to interface the BMM with in vivo data acquisition devices and prosthetic devices. The combined system then provides a test bed for neuroprosthetic rehabilitative solutions and medical devices for the repair and enhancement of damaged brain. We propose here a computer network-based design for this purpose, detailing its internal modules and data flows. We describe a prototype implementation of the design, enabling interaction between the Plexon Multichannel Acquisition Processor (MAP) server, a commercial tool to collect signals from microelectrodes implanted in a live subject and a BMM, a NEURON-based model of sensorimotor cortex capable of controlling a virtual arm. The prototype implementation supports an online mode for real-time simulations, as well as an offline mode for data analysis and simulations without real-time constraints, and provides binning operations to discretize continuous input to the BMM and filtering operations for dealing with noise. Evaluation demonstrated that the implementation successfully delivered monkey spiking activity to the BMM through LAN environments, respecting real-time constraints. PMID:26702394

  2. Social buffering suppresses fear-associated activation of the lateral amygdala in male rats: behavioral and neurophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Fuzzo, Felipe; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In social mammals, the presence of an affiliative conspecific reduces stress responses, a phenomenon referred to as “social buffering.”In a previous study, we found that the presence of a conspecific animal ameliorated a variety of stress responses to an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS), including freezing and Fos expression in the lateral amygdala (LA) of male rats. Although these findings suggest that the presence of a conspecific animal suppresses neural activity in the LA, direct neurophysiological evidence of suppressed activity in the LA during social buffering is still lacking. In the present study, we analyzed freezing behavior and local field potentials in the LA of fear-conditioned rats in response to the CS, in the presence or absence of a conspecific. After auditory aversive conditioning, the CS was presented to the conditioned rats in the presence or absence of a conspecific animal, on 2 successive days. The presence of a conspecific animal significantly decreased the mean peak amplitudes of auditory evoked field potentials, gamma oscillations (25–75 Hz) and high frequency oscillations (100–300 Hz) in the LA. Furthermore, magnitudes of these neural responses positively correlated with freezing duration of the fear-conditioned rats. The results provide the first electrophysiological evidence that social buffering suppresses CS-induced activation in the LA, which consequently reduces conditioned fear responses. PMID:25859179

  3. Neurophysiological and neurocognitive mechanisms underlying the effects of yoga-based practices: towards a comprehensive theoretical framework

    PubMed Central

    Schmalzl, Laura; Powers, Chivon; Henje Blom, Eva

    2015-01-01

    During recent decades numerous yoga-based practices (YBP) have emerged in the West, with their aims ranging from fitness gains to therapeutic benefits and spiritual development. Yoga is also beginning to spark growing interest within the scientific community, and yoga-based interventions have been associated with measureable changes in physiological parameters, perceived emotional states, and cognitive functioning. YBP typically involve a combination of postures or movement sequences, conscious regulation of the breath, and various techniques to improve attentional focus. However, so far little if any research has attempted to deconstruct the role of these different component parts in order to better understand their respective contribution to the effects of YBP. A clear operational definition of yoga-based therapeutic interventions for scientific purposes, as well as a comprehensive theoretical framework from which testable hypotheses can be formulated, is therefore needed. Here we propose such a framework, and outline the bottom-up neurophysiological and top-down neurocognitive mechanisms hypothesized to be at play in YBP. PMID:26005409

  4. A qualitative exploration of people's experiences of pain neurophysiological education for chronic pain: The importance of relevance for the individual.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Victoria; King, Richard; Ryan, Cormac G; Martin, Denis J

    2016-04-01

    Pain neurophysiology education (PNE) is a distinct form of patient education in pain management. The aims of this study were to explore the experience of PNE for people with chronic pain and to gain insight into their understanding of their pain after PNE. This was a qualitative study, based on Interpretive Phenomenology Analysis, using individual semi-structured interviews to collect data. We recruited a purposive sample of 10 adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain (men and women; mean age 48 years; with a mean pain duration of 9 years) who had recently completed PNE delivered as a single 2-h group session. The interview transcripts were analysed for emerging themes. We identified three themes: perceived relevance for the individual participant; perceived benefits for the individual participant; and evidence of reconceptualisation. An interlinking narrative was the importance of relevance. Eight participants viewed the session as relevant and reported benefits ranging from a better understanding of pain, improved ability to cope with the pain, and some suggested improved levels of physical activity. Four of these participants showed evidence of reconceptualisation, which we describe as partial and patchy. Two participants reported no benefit and did not perceive the material delivered within PNE to be relevant to themselves. Relevance to the individual needs of a person with chronic pain may be a key factor in the success of PNE, and this is a particular challenge when it is delivered in a group situation. PMID:26511524

  5. Temporal evolution of neurophysiological and behavioral features of synapsin I/II/III triple knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Monzani, Elena; Benfenati, Fabio; Comi, Giancarlo; Minicucci, Fabio; Valtorta, Flavia; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Deletion of one or more synapsin genes in mice results in a spontaneous epilepsy. In these animals, seizures can be evoked by opening or moving the cage. Aim of the present study was to characterize the evolution of the epileptic phenotype by neurophysiological examination and behavioral observation in synapsin triple knock-out (Syn-TKO) mice. Syn-TKO mice were studied from 20 postnatal days (PND) up to 6 months of age by video-EEG recording and behavioral observation. Background EEG spectral analysis was performed and data were compared to WT animals. Syn-TKO revealed rare spontaneous seizures and increased susceptibility to evoked seizures in mice from 60 to 100 PND. Spontaneous and evoked seizures presented similar duration and morphology. At times, seizures were followed by a post-ictal phase characterized by a 4 Hz rhythmic activity and immobility of the animal. Spectral analysis of background EEG evidenced a slowing of the theta-alpha peak in Syn-TKO mice compared to WT mice within the period from PND 40 to 100. These data indicate that Syn-TKO mice do not exhibit a linear progression of the epileptic phenotype, with the period corresponding to a higher susceptibility to evoked seizures characterized by background EEG slowing. This aspect might be connected to brain dysfunction often associated to epilepsy in the interictal period. PMID:22846639

  6. Complementing Neurophysiology Education for Developing Countries via Cost-Effective Virtual Labs: Case Studies and Classroom Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Diwakar, Shyam; Parasuram, Harilal; Medini, Chaitanya; Raman, Raghu; Nedungadi, Prema; Wiertelak, Eric; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Achuthan, Krishnashree; Nair, Bipin

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-level neuroscience experiments vary from detailed protocols involving chemical, physiological and imaging techniques to computer-based modeling. The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is revolutionizing the current laboratory scenario in terms of active learning especially for distance education cases. Virtual web-based labs are an asset to educational institutions confronting economic issues in maintaining equipment, facilities and other conditions needed for good laboratory practice. To enhance education, we developed virtual laboratories in neuroscience and explored their first-level use in (Indian) University education in the context of developing countries. Besides using interactive animations and remotely-triggered experimental devices, a detailed mathematical simulator was implemented on a web-based software platform. In this study, we focused on the perceptions of technology adoption for a virtual neurophysiology laboratory as a new pedagogy tool for complementing college laboratory experience. The study analyses the effect of virtual labs on users assessing the relationship between cognitive, social and teaching presence. Combining feedback from learners and teachers, the study suggests enhanced motivation for students and improved teaching experience for instructors. PMID:24693260

  7. Neurophysiological responses to unpleasant stimuli (acute electrical stimulations and emotional pictures) are increased in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Céline Z.; Goumon, Yannick; Kemmel, Véronique; Kornmeier, Jürgen; Dufour, André; Andlauer, Olivier; Vidailhet, Pierre; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Salvat, Eric; Muller, André; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoé G.; Schmidt-Mutter, Catherine; Giersch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have often been described as insensitive to nociceptive signals, but objective evidence is sparse. We address this question by combining subjective behavioral and objective neurochemical and neurophysiological measures. The present study involved 21 stabilized and mildly symptomatic patients with schizophrenia and 21 control subjects. We applied electrical stimulations below the pain threshold and assessed sensations of pain and unpleasantness with rating scales, and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs/EEG). We also measured attention, two neurochemical stress indices (ACTH/cortisol), and subjective VEPs/EEG responses to visual emotional stimuli. Our results revealed that, subjectively, patients’ evaluations do not differ from controls. However, the amplitude of EEG evoked potentials was greater in patients than controls as early as 50 ms after electrical stimulations and beyond one second after visual processing of emotional pictures. Such responses could not be linked to the stress induced by the stimulations, since stress hormone levels were stable. Nor was there a difference between patients and controls in respect of attention performance and tactile sensitivity. Taken together, all indices measured in patients in our study were either heightened or equivalent relative to healthy volunteers. PMID:26935652

  8. Neurophysiological assessment of auditory, peripheral nerve, somatosensory, and visual system functions after developmental exposure to ethanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Degn, Laura L; Martin, Sheppard A; Lyke, Danielle F; Hamm, Charles W; Herr, David W

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended gasoline entered the market in response to demand for domestic renewable energy sources, and may result in increased inhalation of ethanol vapors in combination with other volatile gasoline constituents. It is important to understand potential risks of inhalation of ethanol vapors by themselves, and also as a baseline for evaluating the risks of ethanol combined with a complex mixture of hydrocarbon vapors. Because sensory dysfunction has been reported after developmental exposure to ethanol, we evaluated the effects of developmental exposure to ethanol vapors on neurophysiological measures of sensory function as a component of a larger project evaluating developmental ethanol toxicity. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to target concentrations 0, 5000, 10,000, or 21,000 ppm ethanol vapors for 6.5h/day over GD9-GD20. Sensory evaluations of male offspring began between PND106 and PND128. Peripheral nerve function (compound action potentials, nerve conduction velocity (NCV)), somatosensory (cortical and cerebellar evoked potentials), auditory (brainstem auditory evoked responses), and visual evoked responses were assessed. Visual function assessment included pattern elicited visual evoked potentials (VEPs), VEP contrast sensitivity, and electroretinograms recorded from dark-adapted (scotopic), light-adapted (photopic) flashes, and UV flicker and green flicker. No consistent concentration-related changes were observed for any of the physiological measures. The results show that gestational exposure to ethanol vapor did not result in detectable changes in peripheral nerve, somatosensory, auditory, or visual function when the offspring were assessed as adults. PMID:24607749

  9. Neurophysiological Correlates of Central Fatigue in Healthy Subjects and Multiple Sclerosis Patients before and after Treatment with Amantadine.

    PubMed

    Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Rossi, Simone; Bartalini, Sabina; Cincotta, Massimo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Tatti, Elisa; Ulivelli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    In ten healthy subjects and in ten patients suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS), we investigated the cortical functional changes induced by a standard fatiguing repetitive tapping task. The Cortical Silent Period (CSP), an intracortical, mainly GABAB-mediated inhibitory phenomenon, was recorded by two different hand muscles, one acting as prime mover of the fatiguing index-thumb tapping task (First Dorsal Interosseous, FDI) and the other one not involved in the task but sharing largely overlapping central, spinal, and peripheral innervation (Abductor Digiti Minimi, ADM). At baseline, the CSP was shorter in patients than in controls. As fatigue developed, CSP changes involved both the "fatigued" FDI and the "unfatigued" ADM muscles, suggesting a cortical spread of central fatigue mechanisms. Chronic therapy with amantadine annulled differences in CSP duration between controls and patients, possibly through restoration of more physiological levels of intracortical inhibition in the motor cortex. These inhibitory changes correlated with the improvement of fatigue scales. The CSP may represent a suitable marker of neurophysiological mechanisms accounting for central fatigue generation either in controls or in MS patients, involving corticospinal neural pools supplying not only the fatigued muscle but also adjacent muscles sharing an overlapping cortical representation. PMID:26236509

  10. Early Electrophysiological Abnormalities and Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyllienmark, Lars; Alstrand, Nils; Jonsson, Björn; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Cooray, Gerald; Wahlberg-Topp, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to elucidate whether subclinical nerve dysfunction as reflected by neurophysiological testing predicts the development of clinical neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine patients were studied twice with neurophysiological measurements at baseline and at follow-up. At baseline, patients were 15.5 ± 3.22 years (range 7–22 years) of age, and duration of diabetes was 6.8 ± 3.3 years. At follow-up, patients were 20–35 years of age, and disease duration was 20 ± 5.3 years (range 10–31 years). RESULTS At baseline, patients showed modestly reduced nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes compared with healthy subjects, but all were free of clinical neuropathy. At follow-up, clinical neuropathy was present in nine (15%) patients. These patients had a more pronounced reduction in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV), median MCV, and sural sensory nerve action potential at baseline (P < 0.010–0.003). In simple logistic regression analyses, the predictor with the strongest association with clinical neuropathy was baseline HbA1c (R2 = 48%, odds ratio 7.9, P < 0.002) followed by peroneal MCV at baseline (R2 = 38%, odds ratio 0.6, P < 0.006). With the use of a stepwise forward analysis that included all predictors, first baseline HbA1c and then only peroneal MCV at baseline entered significantly (R2 = 61%). Neuropathy impairment assessment showed a stronger correlation with baseline HbA1c (ρ = 0.40, P < 0.002) than with follow-up HbA1c (ρ = 0.034, P < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Early defects in nerve conduction velocity predict the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the strongest predictor was HbA1c during the first years of the disease. PMID:23723354

  11. Randomness increases self-reported anxiety and neurophysiological correlates of performance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tullett, Alexa M; Kay, Aaron C; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Several prominent theories spanning clinical, social and developmental psychology suggest that people are motivated to see the world as a sensible orderly place. These theories presuppose that randomness is aversive because it is associated with unpredictability. If this is the case, thinking that the world is random should lead to increased anxiety and heightened monitoring of one's actions and their consequences. Here, we conduct experimental tests of both of these ideas. Participants read one of three passages: (i) comprehensible order, (ii) incomprehensible order and (iii) randomness. In Study 1, we examined the effects of these passages on self-reported anxiety. In Study 2, we examined the effects of the same manipulation on the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related brain potential associated with performance monitoring. We found that messages about randomness increased self-reported anxiety and ERN amplitude relative to comprehensible order, whereas incomprehensible order had intermediate effects. These results lend support to the theoretically important idea that randomness is unsettling because it implies that the world is unpredictable. PMID:25062840

  12. Maintaining the cornea and the general physiological environment in visual neurophysiology experiments.

    PubMed

    Metha, A B; Crane, A M; Rylander, H G; Thomsen, S L; Albrecht, D G

    2001-08-30

    Neurophysiologists have been investigating the responses of neurons in the visual system for the past half-century using monkeys and cats that are anesthetized and paralyzed, with the non-blinking eyelids open for prolonged periods of time. Impermeable plastic contact lenses have been used to prevent dehydration of the corneal epithelium, which would otherwise occur in minutes. Unfortunately, such lenses rapidly introduce a variety of abnormal states that lead to clouding of the cornea, degradation of the retinal image, and premature termination of the experiment. To extend the viability of such preparations, a new protocol for maintenance of corneal health has been developed. The protocol uses rigid gas permeable contact lenses designed to maximize gas transmission, rigorous sterile methods, and a variety of methods for sustaining and monitoring the overall physiology of the animal. The effectiveness of the protocol was evaluated clinically by ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the experiments, which lasted 8-10 days. Histopathology and quantitative histology were performed on the corneas following the experiment. Our observations showed that this protocol permits continuous contact lens wear without adversely affecting the corneas. Thus, it is possible to collect data 24 h each day, for the entire duration of the experiment. PMID:11513950

  13. Basic Principles and Recent Trends of Transcranial Motor Evoked Potentials in Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    TSUTSUI, Shunji; YAMADA, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs), which are muscle action potentials elicited by transcranial brain stimulation, have been the most popular method for the last decade to monitor the functional integrity of the motor system during surgery. It was originally difficult to record reliable and reproducible potentials under general anesthesia, especially when inhalation-based anesthetic agents that suppressed the firing of anterior horn neurons were used. Advances in anesthesia, including the introduction of intravenous anesthetic agents, and progress in stimulation techniques, including the use of pulse trains, improved the reliability and reproducibility of TcMEP responses. However, TcMEPs are much smaller in amplitude compared with compound muscle action potentials evoked by maximal peripheral nerve stimulation, and vary from one trial to another in clinical practice, suggesting that only a limited number of spinal motor neurons innervating the target muscle are excited in anesthetized patients. Therefore, reliable interpretation of the critical changes in TcMEPs remains difficult and controversial. Additionally, false negative cases have been occasionally encountered. Recently, several facilitative techniques using central or peripheral stimuli, preceding transcranial electrical stimulation, have been employed to achieve sufficient depolarization of motor neurons and augment TcMEP responses. These techniques might have potentials to improve the reliability of intraoperative motor pathway monitoring using TcMEPs. PMID:26935781

  14. Alcoholic Korsakoff's Psychosis: A Psychometric, Neuroradiological and Neurophysiological Investigation of Nine Cases

    PubMed Central

    Harbinson, Helen J.

    1984-01-01

    Nine patients who were admitted to Purdysburn Hospital with a clinical diagnosis of Korsakoff's psychosis were subjected to a series of psychometric tests, to electroencephalography (including P3 auditory evoked potential) and to computerised axial tomography. When compared with controls, the experimental group differed significantly in their psychometric scores in all but the comprehension, vocabulary and digit span subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. A significant negative correlation was found between scores on the Digit Symbol Subtest and the degree of temporal lobe atrophy (p < 0.01), and between Evans' Ratio and the Paired Associate Learning Test of the Wechsler Memory Scale (p < 0.05). The P3 auditory evoked potential correlated significantly with a poor performance on the Digit Symbol Subtest. In all cases, cortical atrophy co-existed with ventricular dilatation and in none was intellectual impairment confined to short-term memory. The traditional criteria used in arriving at a diagnosis of Korsakoff's psychosis are called into question. PMID:6531825

  15. Computational modeling of psychiatric illnesses via well-defined neurophysiological and neurocognitive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Siekmeier, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    A good deal of recent research has centered on the identification of biomarkers and endophenotypic measures of psychiatric illnesses using in vivo and in vitro studies. This is understandable, as these measures-as opposed to complex clinical phenotypes-may be more closely related to neurobiological and genetic vulnerabilities. However, instantiation of such biomarkers using computational models-in silico studies-has received less attention. This approach could become increasingly important, given the wealth of detailed information produced by recent basic neuroscience research, and increasing availability of high capacity computing platforms. The purpose of this review is to survey the current state of the art of research in this area. We discuss computational approaches to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's disease, fragile X syndrome and autism, and argue that it represents a promising and underappreciated research modality. In conclusion, we outline specific avenues for future research; also, potential uses of in silico models to conduct "virtual experiments" and to generate novel hypotheses, and as an aid in neuropsychiatric drug development are discussed. PMID:26432502

  16. Randomness increases self-reported anxiety and neurophysiological correlates of performance monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Aaron C.; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Several prominent theories spanning clinical, social and developmental psychology suggest that people are motivated to see the world as a sensible orderly place. These theories presuppose that randomness is aversive because it is associated with unpredictability. If this is the case, thinking that the world is random should lead to increased anxiety and heightened monitoring of one’s actions and their consequences. Here, we conduct experimental tests of both of these ideas. Participants read one of three passages: (i) comprehensible order, (ii) incomprehensible order and (iii) randomness. In Study 1, we examined the effects of these passages on self-reported anxiety. In Study 2, we examined the effects of the same manipulation on the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related brain potential associated with performance monitoring. We found that messages about randomness increased self-reported anxiety and ERN amplitude relative to comprehensible order, whereas incomprehensible order had intermediate effects. These results lend support to the theoretically important idea that randomness is unsettling because it implies that the world is unpredictable. PMID:25062840

  17. [Neurophysiological Features of Perception of Emotional Stimuli in Health and in Patients with Paranoid Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, A Yu; Strelets, V B

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive and emotional disorders, as far as is known, are the main syndromes of schizophrenia. Disorders of these functions are mainly determined by the clinical picture, as well as by psychophysiological correlates. The purpose of our study was to identify some psychophysiological factors which cause perceptual and emotional disturbances in patients with schizophrenia. These disorders of mental functions form the first rank (top) syndrome in patients with schizophrenia [1]. The studied patients had acute psychosis with a predominance of paranoid hallucinatory syndrome and did not receive antipsychotic therapy; i.e., the disturbances of sensory perception were most pronounced. The analysis of early component P100 and intermediate one N170 of event related potentials (ERPs) in the control group showed an increased level of excitation in response to emotionally threatening stimuli; the amplitude increased and the latency decreased in all leads. In contrast the analysis of components P100 and N170 in the group of patients with schizophrenia showed the increased latency and decreased amplitude. The obtained data provide evidence of pathological inhibition in the passive perception of emotionally significant stimuli. PMID:26485786

  18. Could autonomic system assessment be helpful in disorders of consciousness diagnosis? A neurophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Leo, Antonino; Naro, Antonino; Cannavò, Antonio; Pisani, Laura Rosa; Bruno, Rocco; Salviera, Carlo; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    patients. Such issue draws the attention to either DOC clinical diagnosis or adequate pain treatment in DOC patients. PMID:27016088

  19. Neurophysiological markers that predict and track treatment outcomes in childhood anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hum, Kathryn M; Manassis, Katharina; Lewis, Marc D

    2013-11-01

    The present study examined the cortical processes that mediate cognitive regulation in response to emotion-eliciting stimuli, before and after anxious children participated in a cognitive behavioral therapy program. Electroencephalographic activity was recorded from anxious children (n = 24, 8 males) and comparison children (n = 16, 7 males) at pre-and post-treatment sessions. The change in anxiety T-scores from pre- to post-treatment was used to signify clinical improvement among anxious children (Improvers: n = 11 vs. Non-improvers: n = 13). Event-related potential components were recorded while children performed a Go/No-go task using emotional facial expressions. For the P1 component, believed to reflect attention and/or arousal processes, Non-improvers had greater activation levels relative to Improver and comparison groups at both sessions. Greater P1 amplitudes at pre-treatment predicted non-improvement following treatment. For the frontal N2 component, thought to reflect cognitive control processing, Improvers recruited greater activation from pre- to post-treatment, a change in activation that was predictive of treatment outcome. Non-improvers showed increased cortical activation within the time window of the P1, whether at pre- or post-treatment. These data suggest that heightened perceptual vigilance may have led to poorer outcomes. Improvers showed increased prefrontal activation within the time window of the N2 from pre- to post-treatment. These data suggest that increased cognitive control may have led to improved treatment outcomes. In sum, P1 activation may serve as a predictor of treatment outcome, while N2 activation may serve as an indicator of treatment response. PMID:23690280

  20. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed. PMID:12408308

  1. Inter-Strain Differences in Default Mode Network: A Resting State fMRI Study on Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat and Wistar Kyoto Rat

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Min; Wu, Yi-Ling; Peng, Shin-Lei; Peng, Hsu-Hsia; Huang, Teng-Yi; Ho, Kung-Chu; Wang, Fu-Nien

    2016-01-01

    Genetic divergences among mammalian strains are presented phenotypically in various aspects of physical appearance such as body shape and facial features. Yet how genetic diversity is expressed in brain function still remains unclear. Functional connectivity has been shown to be a valuable approach in characterizing the relationship between brain functions and behaviors. Alterations in the brain default mode network (DMN) have been found in human neuropsychological disorders. In this study we selected the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY), two inbred rat strains with close genetic origins, to investigate variations in the DMN. Our results showed that the major DMN differences are the activities in hippocampal area and caudate putamen region. This may be correlated to the hyperactive behavior of the SHR strain. Advanced animal model studies on variations in the DMN may have potential to shed new light on translational medicine, especially with regard to neuropsychological disorders. PMID:26898170

  2. The Kyoto protocol and payments for tropical forest: An interdisciplinary method for estimating carbon-offset supply and increasing the feasibility of a carbon market under the CDM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfaff, Alexander S.P.; Kerr, Suzi; Hughes, R. Flint; Liu, Shuguang; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G. Arturo; Schimel, David; Tosi, Joseph; Watson, Vicente

    2000-01-01

    Protecting tropical forests under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) could reduce the cost of emissions limitations set in Kyoto. However, while society must soon decide whether or not to use tropical forest-based offsets, evidence regarding tropical carbon sinks is sparse. This paper presents a general method for constructing an integrated model (based on detailed historical, remote sensing and field data) that can produce land-use and carbon baselines, predict carbon sequestration supply to a carbon-offsets market and also help to evaluate optimal market rules. Creating such integrated models requires close collaboration between social and natural scientists. Our project combines varied disciplinary expertise (in economics, ecology and geography) with local knowledge in order to create high-quality, empirically grounded, integrated models for Costa Rica.

  3. Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean. A review of the Bonn and Marrakech decisions and their effect on the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiora, C. della

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this document is to present an overview of recent climate change developments, in particular with regards to carbon markets under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The document is divided into three sections. The first section describes the history of the climate change negotiations. Section two presents an overview of the recent decisions adopted at the last international meetings (Bonn Agreements and Marrakech Accord), which have improved the odds of ratification of the Kyoto Protocol by 2002. The third section analyzes the carbon credit market. The first part of this section briefly presents the available information regarding real carbon credit transactions, while the second section focuses on the literature review of several theoretical models and presents the theoretical estimates of the price and size of the carbon market.

  4. PREFACE: MEM05: The 3rd International Workshop on Mechano-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors (Kyoto, Japan, 17 20 July 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, Kozo; Hampshire, Damian

    2005-12-01

    One of the important challenges facing the international scientific community at the beginning of the third millennium is how to manage the world's energy resources properly. Superconductivity will provide one of the strategies employed to avoid an energy crisis. Of course the ITER Fusion Tokomak that is to be built in France provides an exciting focus for the whole superconductivity community. In parallel, we can expect that other key technologies for superconductivity such as large capacity transmission cables, energy storage systems, and generators and motors will have a real impact in technologically advanced countries. There is broadly a consensus that the prototype stage for high-current high-field superconducting applications is largely completed, and the required performance has been demonstrated. However, before we move to full industrialization of large-scale superconducting technologies, feasibility studies suggest there are two types of problem that remain. The first is the development of high performance and low cost materials which are fully optimized in terms of critical current, low ac loss and high strength. The second is the establishment of optimal procedures for system design accompanying scale up. As the system design is dependent on material development, there is a critical need to study the key issues for developing high performance superconducting materials. Under the activities of the NEDO Grant Project (Applied Superconductivity), MEM05 was organized by Professor Osamura (Kyoto University), Professor Itoh (NIMS), Professor Hojo (Kyoto University) and Professor Matsumoto (Kyoto University) and held in Kyoto, Japan. The focus for the workshop was the elimination of grain boundary weak links, the creation of strong flux pinning sites, the optimal arrangement of filaments and barriers for reducing ac losses, and the design of high strength strain tolerant composite conductors. Five subsessions were held at MEM05. • Mechanical properties of

  5. Differences in monthly variation, cause, and place of injury between femoral neck and trochanteric fractures: 6-year survey (2008–2013) in Kyoto prefecture, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Motoyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mikami, Yasuo; Ikeda, Takumi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiharu; Nagae, Masateru; Oka, Yoshinobu; Sawada, Koshiro; Kuriyama, Nagato; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The incidence of femoral neck and trochanteric fractures reportedly differ by age and regionality. We investigated differences in monthly variations of the occurrence of femoral neck and trochanteric fractures as well as place and cause of injury in the Kyoto prefecture over a 6-year period. Methods Fracture type (neck or trochanteric fracture), age, sex, place of injury, and cause of injury were surveyed among patients aged ≥ 65 years with hip fractures that occurred between 2008 and 2013 who were treated in 1 of 13 participating hospitals (5 in an urban area and 8 in a rural area). The proportion of sick beds in the participating hospitals was 24.7% (4,151/16,781). Monthly variations in the number of patients were investigated in urban and rural areas in addition to the entire Kyoto prefecture. Place of injury was classified as indoors or outdoors, and cause of injury was categorized as simple fall, accident, or uncertain. Results There were 2,826 patients with neck fractures (mean age, 82.1 years) and 3,305 patients with trochanteric fractures (mean age, 85.0 years). There were similarities in the monthly variation of the number of fractures in addition to the place and cause of injury between neck and trochanteric fractures. Indoors (approximately 74%) and simple falls (approximately 78%) were the primary place and cause of injury, respectively. The place of injury was not significantly different by fracture type with each age group. Significantly more patients with neck fracture had “uncertain” as the cause of injury than trochanteric fracture in all age groups. Conclusions Based on the results of the present study, the injury pattern might not have a great effect on the susceptibility difference between neck and trochanteric fractures. PMID:27252738

  6. Antidepressant-like activity and cardioprotective effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB694 in socially stressed Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Carnevali, Luca; Vacondio, Federica; Rossi, Stefano; Callegari, Sergio; Macchi, Emilio; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Rivara, Silvia; Mor, Marco; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    In humans, depression is often triggered by prolonged exposure to psychosocial stressors and is often associated with cardiovascular comorbidity. Mounting evidence suggests a role for endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of both emotional behavior and cardiovascular function. Here, we examined cardiac activity in a rodent model of social stress-induced depression and investigated whether pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which terminates signaling of the endocannabinoid anandamide, exerts antidepressant-like and cardioprotective effects. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were exposed to five weeks of repeated social stress or control procedure. Starting from the third week, they received daily administration of the selective FAAH inhibitor URB694 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle. Cardiac electrical activity was recorded by radiotelemetry. Repeated social stress triggered biological and behavioral changes that mirror symptoms of human depression, such as (i) reductions in body weight gain and sucrose solution preference, (ii) hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and (iii) increased immobility in the forced swim test. Moreover, stressed rats showed (i) alterations in heart rate daily rhythm and cardiac autonomic neural regulation, (ii) a larger incidence of spontaneous arrhythmias, and (iii) signs of cardiac hypertrophy. Daily treatment with URB694 (i) increased central and peripheral anandamide levels, (ii) corrected stress-induced alterations of biological and behavioral parameters, and (iii) protected the heart against the adverse effects of social stress. Repeated social stress in Wistar Kyoto rats reproduces aspects of human depression/cardiovascular comorbidity. Pharmacological enhancement of anandamide signaling might be a promising strategy for the treatment of these comorbid conditions. PMID:26391492

  7. The Spontaneously Hypertensive and Wistar Kyoto Rat Models of ADHD Exhibit Sub-Regional Differences in Dopamine Release and Uptake in the Striatum and Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Erin M.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Russell, Vivienne A.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Glaser, Paul E.A.

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR/NCrl), which best represents the combined subtype (ADHD-C). Recent evidence has revealed that a progenitor strain, the Wistar Kyoto from Charles River Laboratories (WKY/NCrl), is useful as a model of the inattentive subtype (ADHD-PI) and the Wistar Kyoto from Harlan Laboratories (WKY/NHsd) and the Sprague Dawley (SD) have been suggested as controls. Dopamine (DA) dysfunction in the striatum (Str) and nucleus accumbens core (NAc) is thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of ADHD but data obtained with the SHR is equivocal. Using high-speed chronoamperometric recordings with carbon fiber microelectrodes, we found that the SHR/NCrl displayed decreased KCl-evoked DA release versus the WKY/NCrl model of ADHD-PI in the dorsal Str. The WKY/NCrl and the WKY/NHsd control did not differ from each other; however, the control SD released less DA than the WKY/NCrl model of ADHD-PI in the dorsal Str and less than the control WKY/NHsd in the intermediate Str. The SHR/NCrl had faster DA uptake in the ventral Str and NAc versus both control strains, while the WKY/NCrl model of ADHD-PI exhibited faster DA uptake in the NAc versus the SD control. These results suggest that increased surface expression of DA transporters may explain the more rapid uptake of DA in the Str and NAc of these rodent models of ADHD. PMID:22960443

  8. Developmental change in the neurophysiological correlates of self-regulation in high- and low-emotion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Connie; Lewis, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important tasks of childhood is learning to self-regulate in the presence of negative emotions. Until recently, almost no research has examined the neurophysiological correlates of emotional self-regulation as it develops over childhood and adolescence. We were interested in plotting a fine-grained developmental profile of the neural underpinnings of self-regulation, in the context of negative emotion, for 7- to 14-year-old children. We predicted that children would recruit less cortical activation with age in the service of self-regulation, reflecting increased neural efficiency with development. We also predicted that children would recruit more cortical activation with increased negative emotion, possibly reflecting greater demand on cortical resources. We administered a go/nogo task with an emotion induction block and we measured the amplitude of the N2, an event-related potential associated with inhibitory control, as it varied with block and with age. Furthermore, we estimated activation for a ventral prefrontal region of interest (ROI; suggestive of orbital frontal, ventromedial prefrontal, or rostral anterior cingulate activation) and a dorsomedial prefrontal ROI (suggestive of dorsal anterior cingulate activation) frequently modeled as cortical generators underlying the N2. Results revealed a marginal decrease in mediofrontal scalp activation, but a more pronounced decrease in activation of the ventromedial prefrontal ROI, with age. There were no age-related changes in dorsomedial prefrontal ROI activation. Lastly, as predicted, we found increased ventral prefrontal ROI activation during the negative emotion induction, possibly reflecting greater recruitment of frontocortical resources underlying emotion regulation, but developmental change in this activation was no different than for the other conditions. Thus, both self-regulation in general and emotion regulation in particular recruited less cortical activation with age, suggesting more

  9. Cortical Suppression to Delayed Self-Initiated Auditory Stimuli in Schizotypy: Neurophysiological Evidence for a Continuum of Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Oestreich, Lena K L; Mifsud, Nathan G; Ford, Judith M; Roach, Brian J; Mathalon, Daniel H; Whitford, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    , these findings provide support for the existence of a neurophysiological "continuum of psychosis". PMID:25898988

  10. The Relationship Between Engagement and Neurophysiological Measures of Attention in Motion-Controlled Video Games: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Lauren; Nelson, Monica; Siow, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Video games and virtual environments continue to be the subject of research in health sciences for their capacity to augment practice through user engagement. Creating game mechanics that increase user engagement may have indirect benefits on learning (ie, engaged learners are likely to practice more) and may also have direct benefits on learning (ie, for a fixed amount of practice, engaged learners show superior retention of information or skills). Objective To manipulate engagement through the aesthetic features of a motion-controlled video game and measure engagement’s influence on learning. Methods A group of 40 right-handed participants played the game under two different conditions (game condition or sterile condition). The mechanics of the game and the amount of practice were constant. During practice, event-related potentials (ERPs) to task-irrelevant probe tones were recorded during practice as an index of participants’ attentional reserve. Participants returned for retention and transfer testing one week later. Results Although both groups improved in the task, there was no difference in the amount of learning between the game and sterile groups, countering previous research. A new finding was a statistically significant relationship between self-reported engagement and the amplitude of the early-P3a (eP3a) component of the ERP waveform, such that participants who reported higher levels of engagement showed a smaller eP3a (beta=−.08, P=.02). Conclusions This finding provides physiological data showing that engagement elicits increased information processing (reducing attentional reserve), which yields new insight into engagement and its underlying neurophysiological properties. Future studies may objectively index engagement by quantifying ERPs (specifically the eP3a) to task-irrelevant probes. PMID:27103052

  11. Intraindividual neurophysiological variability in ultra-high-risk for psychosis and schizophrenia patients: single-trial analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyung Soon; Kim, June Sic; Kim, Sung Nyun; Hong, Kyung Sue; O’Donnell, Brian F; Chung, Chun Kee; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraindividual variability in neurophysiological responses is an important factor in the study of schizophrenia. Interestingly, this variability strongly predicts individual differences in cognitive processing. Neurobiological abnormalities that present during the prodromal phase of schizophrenia are not well characterized. However, these symptoms may provide insight into the key circuits involved in the disorder. Aims: To investigate the variability in magnetoencephalographic responses at ultrahigh risk and schizophrenia patients. Methods: Twenty-four ultrahigh risk, 21 patients with schizophrenia and 28 healthy controls were evaluated. The intraindividual variability was estimated by calculating the s.d. of the across-trial amplitude in responses to deviant and standard stimuli. The degree of phase locking across trials was calculated by intertrial coherence. Results: Greater variability in the responses to deviant and standard tones was noted in the schizophrenia and ultrahigh risk groups compared with controls. Variability in response to standard stimuli was positively correlated with the amplitude for the standard stimuli in all of the groups. Moreover, schizophrenia patients displayed lower alpha and theta intertrial coherence compared with ultrahigh risk and controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was correlated with the alpha intertrial coherence in all groups. Taken together, the augmented variability and reduced inter-trial coherence provide empirical evidence for increased amplitude and phase inconsistencies in schizophrenia and ultrahigh risk. Conclusions: The results implicate widespread dysfunction in amplitude modulation and phase concentration in schizophrenia and ultrahigh risk, as well as evidence for early amplitude and phase disruption. These finding suggest intraindividual variability and intertrial coherence appear to be important indicators of pathophysiological processing. PMID:27336039

  12. Kinematic and Neurophysiological Consequences of an Assisted-Force-Feedback Brain-Machine Interface Training: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Silvoni, Stefano; Cavinato, Marianna; Volpato, Chiara; Cisotto, Giulia; Genna, Clara; Agostini, Michela; Turolla, Andrea; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Piccione, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In a proof-of-principle prototypical demonstration we describe a new type of brain-machine interface (BMI) paradigm for upper limb motor-training. The proposed technique allows a fast contingent and proportionally modulated stimulation of afferent proprioceptive and motor output neural pathways using operant learning. Continuous and immediate assisted-feedback of force proportional to rolandic rhythm oscillations during actual movements was employed and illustrated with a single case experiment. One hemiplegic patient was trained for 2 weeks coupling somatosensory brain oscillations with force-field control during a robot-mediated center-out motor-task whose execution approaches movements of everyday life. The robot facilitated actual movements adding a modulated force directed to the target, thus providing a non-delayed proprioceptive feedback. Neuro-electric, kinematic, and motor-behavioral measures were recorded in pre- and post-assessments without force assistance. Patient’s healthy arm was used as control since neither a placebo control was possible nor other control conditions. We observed a generalized and significant kinematic improvement in the affected arm and a spatial accuracy improvement in both arms, together with an increase and focalization of the somatosensory rhythm changes used to provide assisted-force-feedback. The interpretation of the neurophysiological and kinematic evidences reported here is strictly related to the repetition of the motor-task and the presence of the assisted-force-feedback. Results are described as systematic observations only, without firm conclusions about the effectiveness of the methodology. In this prototypical view, the design of appropriate control conditions is discussed. This study presents a novel operant-learning-based BMI-application for motor-training coupling brain oscillations and force feedback during an actual movement. PMID:24223567

  13. Neurophysiology of spontaneous facial expressions: I. Motor control of the upper and lower face is behaviorally independent in adults.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elliott D; Gupta, Smita S; Adnan, Asif M; Holden, Thomas L; Havlicek, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar

    2016-03-01

    Facial expressions are described traditionally as monolithic entities. However, humans have the capacity to produce facial blends, in which the upper and lower face simultaneously display different emotional expressions. This, in turn, has led to the Component Theory of facial expressions. Recent neuroanatomical studies in monkeys have demonstrated that there are separate cortical motor areas for controlling the upper and lower face that, presumably, also occur in humans. The lower face is represented on the posterior ventrolateral surface of the frontal lobes in the primary motor and premotor cortices and the upper face is represented on the medial surface of the posterior frontal lobes in the supplementary motor and anterior cingulate cortices. Our laboratory has been engaged in a series of studies exploring the perception and production of facial blends. Using high-speed videography, we began measuring the temporal aspects of facial expressions to develop a more complete understanding of the neurophysiology underlying facial expressions and facial blends. The goal of the research presented here was to determine if spontaneous facial expressions in adults are predominantly monolithic or exhibit independent motor control of the upper and lower face. We found that spontaneous facial expressions are very complex and that the motor control of the upper and lower face is overwhelmingly independent, thus robustly supporting the Component Theory of facial expressions. Seemingly monolithic expressions, be they full facial or facial blends, are most likely the result of a timing coincident rather than a synchronous coordination between the ventrolateral and medial cortical motor areas responsible for controlling the lower and upper face, respectively. In addition, we found evidence that the right and left face may also exhibit independent motor control, thus supporting the concept that spontaneous facial expressions are organized predominantly across the horizontal facial

  14. Neurophysiologic measures of auditory function in fish consumers: associations with long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Dziorny, Adam C.; Orlando, Mark S.; Strain, J. J.; Davidson, Philip W.; Myers, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Determining if associations exist between child neurodevelopment and environmental exposures, especially low level or background ones, is challenging and dependent upon being able to measure specific and sensitive endpoints. Psychometric or behavioral measures of CNS function have traditionally been used in such studies, but do have some limitations. Auditory neurophysiologic measures examine different nervous system structures and mechanisms, have fewer limitations, can more easily by quantified, and might be helpful testing additions. To date, their use in human epidemiological studies has been limited. We reviewed the use of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and otoacoustic emissions (OAE) in studies designed to determine the relationship of exposures to methyl mercury (MeHg) and nutrients from fish consumption with neurological development. We included studies of experimental animals and humans in an effort to better understand the possible benefits and risks of fish consumption. Objectives We reviewed the literature on the use of ABR and OAE to measure associations with environmental exposures that result from consuming a diet high in fish. We focused specifically on long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) and MeHg. Methods We performed a comprehensive review of relevant studies using web-based search tools and appropriate search terms. Results Gestational exposure to both LCPUFA and MeHg has been reported to influence the developing auditory system. In experimental studies supplemental LCPUFA is reported to prolong ABR latencies and human studies also suggest an association. Experimental studies of acute and gestational MeHg exposure are reported to prolong ABR latencies and impair hair cell function. In humans, MeHg exposure is reported to prolong ABR latencies, but the impact on hair cell function is unknown. Conclusion The auditory system can provide objective measures and may be useful in studying exposures to nutrients and toxicants

  15. Transscleral implantation and neurophysiological testing of subretinal polyimide film electrodes in the domestic pig in visual prosthesis development.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Helmut G; Schanze, Thomas; Brunner, Ursula; Sailer, Heiko; Wiesenack, Christoph

    2005-03-01

    Loss of photoreceptor function is responsible for a variety of blinding diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa. Advances in microtechnology have led to the development of electronic visual prostheses which are currently under investigation for the treatment of human blindness. The design of a subretinal prosthesis requires that the stimulation device should be implantable in the subretinal space of the eye. Current limitations in eye surgery have to be overcome to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach and to determine basic stimulation parameters. Therefore, polyimide film-bound electrodes were implanted in the subretinal space in anaesthetized domestic pigs as a prelude to electrical stimulation in acute experiments. Eight eyes underwent surgery to demonstrate the transscleral implantability of the device. Four of the eight eyes were stimulated electrically. In these four animals the cranium was prepared for epidural recording of evoked visual cortex responses, and stimulation was performed with sequences of current impulses. All eight subretinal implantation procedures were carried out successfully with polyimide film electrodes and each electrode was implanted beneath the outer retina of the posterior pole of the operated eyes. Four eyes were used for neurophysiological testing, involving recordings of epidural cortical responses to light and electrical stimulation. A light stimulus response, which occurred 40 ms after stimulation, proved the integrity of the operated eye. The electrical stimuli occurred about 20 ms after the onset of stimulation. The stimulation threshold was approximately 100 microA. Both the threshold and the cortical responses depended on the correspondence between retinal stimulation and cortical recording sites and on the number of stimulation electrodes used simultaneously. The subretinal implantation of complex stimulation devices using the transscleral procedure with consecutive subretinal stimulation is feasible in acute

  16. Python Executable Script for Estimating Two Effective Parameters to Individualize Brain-Computer Interfaces: Individual Alpha Frequency and Neurophysiological Predictor.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) aims to establish communication between the human brain and a computing system so as to enable the interaction between an individual and his environment without using the brain output pathways. Individuals control a BCI system by modulating their brain signals through mental tasks (e.g., motor imagery or mental calculation) or sensory stimulation (e.g., auditory, visual, or tactile). As users modulate their brain signals at different frequencies and at different levels, the appropriate characterization of those signals is necessary. The modulation of brain signals through mental tasks is furthermore a skill that requires training. Unfortunately, not all the users acquire such skill. A practical solution to this problem is to assess the user probability of controlling a BCI system. Another possible solution is to set the bandwidth of the brain oscillations, which is highly sensitive to the users' age, sex and anatomy. With this in mind, NeuroIndex, a Python executable script, estimates a neurophysiological prediction index and the individual alpha frequency (IAF) of the user in question. These two parameters are useful to characterize the user EEG signals, and decide how to go through the complex process of adapting the human brain and the computing system on the basis of previously proposed methods. NeuroIndeX is not only the implementation of those methods, but it also complements the methods each other and provides an alternative way to obtain the prediction parameter. However, an important limitation of this application is its dependency on the IAF value, and some results should be interpreted with caution. The script along with some electroencephalographic datasets are available on a GitHub repository in order to corroborate the functionality and usability of this application. PMID:27445783

  17. Python Executable Script for Estimating Two Effective Parameters to Individualize Brain-Computer Interfaces: Individual Alpha Frequency and Neurophysiological Predictor

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) aims to establish communication between the human brain and a computing system so as to enable the interaction between an individual and his environment without using the brain output pathways. Individuals control a BCI system by modulating their brain signals through mental tasks (e.g., motor imagery or mental calculation) or sensory stimulation (e.g., auditory, visual, or tactile). As users modulate their brain signals at different frequencies and at different levels, the appropriate characterization of those signals is necessary. The modulation of brain signals through mental tasks is furthermore a skill that requires training. Unfortunately, not all the users acquire such skill. A practical solution to this problem is to assess the user probability of controlling a BCI system. Another possible solution is to set the bandwidth of the brain oscillations, which is highly sensitive to the users' age, sex and anatomy. With this in mind, NeuroIndex, a Python executable script, estimates a neurophysiological prediction index and the individual alpha frequency (IAF) of the user in question. These two parameters are useful to characterize the user EEG signals, and decide how to go through the complex process of adapting the human brain and the computing system on the basis of previously proposed methods. NeuroIndeX is not only the implementation of those methods, but it also complements the methods each other and provides an alternative way to obtain the prediction parameter. However, an important limitation of this application is its dependency on the IAF value, and some results should be interpreted with caution. The script along with some electroencephalographic datasets are available on a GitHub repository in order to corroborate the functionality and usability of this application. PMID:27445783

  18. Transscleral implantation and neurophysiological testing of subretinal polyimide film electrodes in the domestic pig in visual prosthesis development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Helmut G.; Schanze, Thomas; Brunner, Ursula; Sailer, Heiko; Wiesenack, Christoph

    2005-03-01

    Loss of photoreceptor function is responsible for a variety of blinding diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa. Advances in microtechnology have led to the development of electronic visual prostheses which are currently under investigation for the treatment of human blindness. The design of a subretinal prosthesis requires that the stimulation device should be implantable in the subretinal space of the eye. Current limitations in eye surgery have to be overcome to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach and to determine basic stimulation parameters. Therefore, polyimide film-bound electrodes were implanted in the subretinal space in anaesthetized domestic pigs as a prelude to electrical stimulation in acute experiments. Eight eyes underwent surgery to demonstrate the transscleral implantability of the device. Four of the eight eyes were stimulated electrically. In these four animals the cranium was prepared for epidural recording of evoked visual cortex responses, and stimulation was performed with sequences of current impulses. All eight subretinal implantation procedures were carried out successfully with polyimide film electrodes and each electrode was implanted beneath the outer retina of the posterior pole of the operated eyes. Four eyes were used for neurophysiological testing, involving recordings of epidural cortical responses to light and electrical stimulation. A light stimulus response, which occurred 40 ms after stimulation, proved the integrity of the operated eye. The electrical stimuli occurred about 20 ms after the onset of stimulation. The stimulation threshold was approximately 100 µA. Both the threshold and the cortical responses depended on the correspondence between retinal stimulation and cortical recording sites and on the number of stimulation electrodes used simultaneously. The subretinal implantation of complex stimulation devices using the transscleral procedure with consecutive subretinal stimulation is feasible in acute

  19. Neurophysiology of timing in the hundreds of milliseconds: multiple layers of neuronal clocks in the medial premotor areas.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Hugo; Bartolo, Ramón; Pérez, Oswaldo; Méndez, Juan Carlos; Mendoza, Germán; Gámez, Jorge; Yc, Karyna; Prado, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The precise quantification of time in the subsecond scale is critical for many complex behaviors including music and dance appreciation/execution, speech comprehension/articulation, and the performance of many sports. Nevertheless, its neural underpinnings are largely unknown. Recent neurophysiological experiments from our laboratory have shown that the cell activity in the medial premotor areas (MPC) of macaques can represent different aspects of temporal processing during a synchronization-continuation tapping task (SCT). In this task the rhythmic behavior of monkeys was synchronized to a metronome of isochronous stimuli in the hundreds of milliseconds range (synchronization phase), followed by a period where animals internally temporalized their movements (continuation phase). Overall, we found that the time-keeping mechanism in MPC is governed by different layers of neural clocks. Close to the temporal control of movements are two separate populations of ramping cells that code for elapsed or remaining time for a tapping movement during the SCT. Thus, the sensorimotor loops engaged during the task may depend on the cyclic interplay between two neuronal chronometers that quantify in their instantaneous discharge rate the time passed and the remaining time for an action. In addition, we found MPC neurons that are tuned to the duration of produced intervals during the rhythmic task, showing an orderly variation in the average discharge rate as a function of duration. All the tested durations in the subsecond scale were represented in the preferred intervals of the cell population. Most of the interval-tuned cells were also tuned to the ordinal structure of the six intervals produced sequentially in the SCT. Hence, this next level of temporal processing may work as the notes of a musical score, providing information to the timing network about what duration and ordinal element of the sequence are being executed. Finally, we describe how the timing circuit can use a

  20. European Forest Carbon Mass Balances Estimated with Remote Sensing and the Production Efficiency Model C-Fix: A hot Future Unfolds for Kyoto Protocol Implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veroustraete, F.; Verstraeten, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Carbon emission and -fixation fluxes are key variables to guide climate change stakeholders in the use of remediation techniques as well as in the follow-up of the Kyoto protocol. A common approach to estimate forest carbon fluxes is based on the forest harvest inventory approach. However, harvest and logging inventories have their limitations in time and space. Moreover, carbon inventories are limited to the estimation of net primary productivity (NPP). Additionally, no information is available when applying inventory based methods, on the magnitude of water limitation. Finally, natural forest ecosystems are rarely included in inventory based methods. To develop a Kyoto Protocol policy support tool, a good perspective towards a generalised and methodologically consistent application is offered by expert systems based on satellite remote sensing. They estimate vegetation carbon fixation using a minimum of meteorological inputs and overcome the limitations mentioned for inventory based methods. The core module of a typical expert system is a production efficiency model. In our case we used the C-Fix model. C-Fix estimates carbon mass fluxes e.g, gross primary productivity (GPP), NPP and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for various spatial scales and regions of interest (ROI's). Besides meteorological inputs, the C-Fix model is fed with data obtained by vegetation RTF (Radiative Transfer Model) inversion. The inversion is based on the use of look-up tables (LUT's). The LUT allows the extraction of per pixel biome type (e.g. forests) frequencies and the value of a biophysical variable and its uncertainty at the pixel level. The extraction by RTF inversion also allows a land cover fuzzy classification based on six major biomes. At the same time fAPAR is extracted and its uncertainty quantified. Based on the biome classification, radiation use efficiencies are stratified according to biome type to be used in C-Fix. Water limitation is incorporated both at the GPP level

  1. Childhood Autism—A Review of the Clinical and Experimental Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, Edward M.

    1973-01-01

    This review of the literature on childhood autism discusses the clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the autistic behavioral syndrome from a developmental perspective. It includes a discussion of the influence of prenatal and perinatal antecedents, genetic and socio-familial factors, and epidemiologic considerations. Neurologic, electro-encephalographic and experimental neurophysiologic, metabolic, biochemical and hematologic investigations are reviewed. Special emphasis has been given to the changing clinical manifestations which accompany maturation and to the problems of recognition of childhood autism in the very young child. PMID:4120820

  2. Neurophysiology of perceived confidence.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Martin; Parra, Lucas C; Sigman, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    In a partial report paradigm, subjects observe during a brief presentation a cluttered field and after some time - typically ranging from 100 ms to a second - are asked to report a subset of the presented elements. A vast buffer of information is transiently available to be broadcasted which, if not retrieved in time, fades rapidly without reaching consciousness. An interesting feature of this experiment is that objective performance and subjective confidence is decoupled. This converts this paradigm in an ideal vehicle to understand the brain dynamics of the construction of confidence. Here we report a high-density EEG experiment in which we infer elements of the EEG response which are indicative of subjective confidence. We find that an early response during encoding partially correlates with perceived confidence. However, the bulk of the weight of subjective confidence is determined during a late, N400-like waveform, during the retrieval stage. This shows that we can find markers of access to internal, subjective states, that are uncoupled from objective response and stimulus properties of the task, and we propose that this can be used with decoding methods of EEG to infer subjective mental states. PMID:21096220

  3. Neurophysiology of pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2014-11-01

    This work explores the connection between the transition to turbulence in pipe flow and the dynamics of excitable media, as exemplified by nerve cells. The primary goal is to leverage years of extensive analysis of neural systems to understand the dynamics of transitional turbulence. To demonstrate the predictive nature of the approach, model simulations will be presented for puffs in pipe flow for cases not previously studied experimentally.

  4. Clinical and neuroradiological diagnostic aspects of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses disorders.

    PubMed

    Santavuori, P; Vanhanen, S L; Autti, T

    2001-01-01

    Early diagnosis is mandatory for avoiding further cases in families with hereditary metabolic brain disorders. This review lists the most important clinical symptoms and neuroradiological findings at the early stage of the seven most common childhood neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) types. In the infantile type the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can be seen even before the clinical signs. In the classic late infantile type (CLN2), MRI is less informative but in this and in the variant late infantile type CLN6 the characteristic neurophysiological findings are present at an early stage, although not in the Finnish variant CLN5. In the latter, the clinical diagnosis depends on ophthalmological and MRI findings. The combination of ophthalmological deficits and vacuolated lymphocytes is highly characteristic of the juvenile type (CLN3). A new NCL type, Northern epilepsy (CLN8), is also briefly reviewed. PMID:11588989

  5. A Neurophysiological Approach for Evaluating Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance: Calculating the Time Constant of the Dynamic Characteristics in the Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Tagusari, Junta; Matsui, Toshihito

    2016-04-01

    Chronic sleep disturbance induced by traffic noise is considered to cause environmental sleep disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and other stress-related diseases. However, noise indices for the evaluation of sleep disturbance are not based on the neurophysiological process of awakening regulated by the brainstem. In this study, through the neurophysiological approach, we attempted (1) to investigate the thresholds of awakening due to external stimuli in the brainstem; (2) to evaluate the dynamic characteristics in the brainstem and (3) to verify the validity of existing noise indices. Using the mathematical Phillips-Robinson model, we obtained thresholds of awakening in the brainstem for different durations of external stimuli. The analysis revealed that the brainstem seemed insensitive to short stimuli and that the response to external stimuli in the brainstem could be approximated by a first-order lag system with a time constant of 10-100 s. These results suggest that the brainstem did not integrate sound energy as external stimuli, but neuroelectrical signals from auditory nerve. To understand the awakening risk accumulated in the brainstem, we introduced a new concept of "awakening potential" instead of sound energy. PMID:27023587

  6. Exploring Neuro-Physiological Correlates of Drivers' Mental Fatigue Caused by Sleep Deprivation Using Simultaneous EEG, ECG, and fNIRS Data.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sangtae; Nguyen, Thien; Jang, Hyojung; Kim, Jae G; Jun, Sung C

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the neuro-physiological correlates of mental loads, or states, have attracted significant attention recently, as it is particularly important to evaluate mental fatigue in drivers operating a motor vehicle. In this research, we collected multimodal EEG/ECG/EOG and fNIRS data simultaneously to develop algorithms to explore neuro-physiological correlates of drivers' mental states. Each subject performed simulated driving under two different conditions (well-rested and sleep-deprived) on different days. During the experiment, we used 68 electrodes for EEG/ECG/EOG and 8 channels for fNIRS recordings. We extracted the prominent features of each modality to distinguish between the well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions, and all multimodal features, except EOG, were combined to quantify mental fatigue during driving. Finally, a novel driving condition level (DCL) was proposed that distinguished clearly between the features of well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions. This proposed DCL measure may be applicable to real-time monitoring of the mental states of vehicle drivers. Further, the combination of methods based on each classifier yielded substantial improvements in the classification accuracy between these two conditions. PMID:27242483

  7. Exploring Neuro-Physiological Correlates of Drivers' Mental Fatigue Caused by Sleep Deprivation Using Simultaneous EEG, ECG, and fNIRS Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sangtae; Nguyen, Thien; Jang, Hyojung; Kim, Jae G.; Jun, Sung C.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the neuro-physiological correlates of mental loads, or states, have attracted significant attention recently, as it is particularly important to evaluate mental fatigue in drivers operating a motor vehicle. In this research, we collected multimodal EEG/ECG/EOG and fNIRS data simultaneously to develop algorithms to explore neuro-physiological correlates of drivers' mental states. Each subject performed simulated driving under two different conditions (well-rested and sleep-deprived) on different days. During the experiment, we used 68 electrodes for EEG/ECG/EOG and 8 channels for fNIRS recordings. We extracted the prominent features of each modality to distinguish between the well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions, and all multimodal features, except EOG, were combined to quantify mental fatigue during driving. Finally, a novel driving condition level (DCL) was proposed that distinguished clearly between the features of well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions. This proposed DCL measure may be applicable to real-time monitoring of the mental states of vehicle drivers. Further, the combination of methods based on each classifier yielded substantial improvements in the classification accuracy between these two conditions. PMID:27242483

  8. A Neurophysiological Approach for Evaluating Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance: Calculating the Time Constant of the Dynamic Characteristics in the Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Tagusari, Junta; Matsui, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep disturbance induced by traffic noise is considered to cause environmental sleep disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and other stress-related diseases. However, noise indices for the evaluation of sleep disturbance are not based on the neurophysiological process of awakening regulated by the brainstem. In this study, through the neurophysiological approach, we attempted (1) to investigate the thresholds of awakening due to external stimuli in the brainstem; (2) to evaluate the dynamic characteristics in the brainstem and (3) to verify the validity of existing noise indices. Using the mathematical Phillips–Robinson model, we obtained thresholds of awakening in the brainstem for different durations of external stimuli. The analysis revealed that the brainstem seemed insensitive to short stimuli and that the response to external stimuli in the brainstem could be approximated by a first-order lag system with a time constant of 10–100 s. These results suggest that the brainstem did not integrate sound energy as external stimuli, but neuroelectrical signals from auditory nerve. To understand the awakening risk accumulated in the brainstem, we introduced a new concept of “awakening potential” instead of sound energy. PMID:27023587

  9. Microbial population dynamics during startup of a full-scale anaerobic digester treating industrial food waste in Kyoto eco-energy project.

    PubMed

    Ike, Michihiko; Inoue, Daisuke; Miyano, Tomoki; Liu, Tong Tong; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Kadoshin, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    The microbial community in a full-scale anaerobic digester (2300m3) treating industrial food waste in the Kyoto Eco-Energy Project was analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism for eubacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Both thermophilic and mesophilic sludge of treated swine waste were seeded to the digestion tank. During the 150-day startup period, coffee grounds as a main food waste, along with potato, kelp and boiled beans, tofu, bean curd lees, and deep-fried bean curd were fed to the digestion process step-by-step (max. 40t/d). Finally, the methane yield reached 360m3/t-feed with 40days' retention time, although temporary accumulation of propionate was observed. Eubacterial communities that formed in the thermophilic digestion tank differed greatly from both thermophilic and mesophilic types of seed sludge. Results suggest that the Actinomyces/Thermomonospora and Ralstonia/Shewanella were contributors for hydrolyzation and degradation of food waste into volatile fatty acids. Acetate-utilizing methanogens, Methanosaeta, were dominant in seed sludges of both types, but they decreased drastically during processing in the digestion tank. Methanosarcina and Methanobrevibacter/Methanobacterium were, respectively, possible main contributors for methane production from acetate and H2 plus CO2. PMID:20129780

  10. Effect of sodium depletion on the release of /sup 3/Hnorepinephrine from central and peripheral tissue of Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Meldrum, M.J.; Xue, C.S.; Badino, L.; Westfall, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    To study the relationship between sodium intake, the sympathetic nervous system, and hypertension, a study was made of the effects of a 7-9 day dietary restriction of sodium in three different ages of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Field-stimulated (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ( (/sup 3/H)NE) release was measured in portal vein, anterior hypothalamus, and the A2 region of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of 5- to 6-, 10- to 11-, and 28- to 30- week-old SHR and age-matched WKY. A low-sodium diet (0.05% Na+, control 0.5% Na+) significantly lowered stimulated (/sup 3/H)NE release from portal vein and anterior hypothalamus in SHR and WKY at all three ages. However, release from the A2 region was not altered by sodium restriction. The results of the present study suggest that lowered dietary sodium can selectively alter norepinephrine release in both the peripheral and central sympathetic nervous system of SHR and WKY. The results also suggest that the SHR at 5-6 weeks are more sensitive to altered dietary sodium than are age-matched WKY.

  11. Differential Responses to Blood Pressure and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Wistar-Kyoto Rats and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Effects of Antioxidant (Honey) Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Sulaiman, Siti A.; Wahab, Mohd Suhaimi Ab; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai N. S.; Salleh, Md Salzihan Md; Gurtu, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis and/or complications of hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. A combination of these disorders increases the risk of developing cardiovascular events. This study investigated the effects of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg; ip)-induced diabetes on blood pressure, oxidative stress and effects of honey on these parameters in the kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Diabetic WKY and SHR were randomized into four groups and received distilled water (0.5 mL) and honey (1.0 g/kg) orally once daily for three weeks. Control SHR had reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), catalase (CAT) activity, and total antioxidant status (TAS). SBP, activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) were elevated while TAS was reduced in diabetic WKY. In contrast, SBP, TAS, activities of GPx and GR were reduced in diabetic SHR. Antioxidant (honey) treatment further reduced SBP in diabetic SHR but not in diabetic WKY. It also increased TAS, GSH, reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, activities of GPx and GR in diabetic SHR. These data suggest that differences in types, severity, and complications of diseases as well as strains may influence responses to blood pressure and oxidative stress. PMID:21673929

  12. Climate change: The impact of the third conference of the parties at Kyoto on the U.S. Portland cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, D.; Nisbet, M.; O`Hare, A.

    1998-12-31

    The paper provides, as background, a brief review of the structure of the US cement industry. It outlines the growth trends of the industry over the last 20 years. It describes the sources and significance of cement imports in the US market, and the importance of exports to Canadian cement producers. The sources of CO{sub 2}, the primary greenhouse gas emitted in the cement manufacturing process, are explained and the impact of improved energy efficiency and fuel switching on CO{sub 2} emissions per ton of product are discussed. The aspects of the Kyoto Protocol relevant to the US cement industry are analyzed as are the types of impacts they can be expected to have on: cement trade, domestic cement production, long term growth of the US cement industry, and US cement industry CO{sub 2} emissions. The paper projects the US cement industry CO{sub 2} emissions to 2010, taking into account anticipated improvements in energy efficiency. It discusses manufacturing process and changes that could be made to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The paper also covers the types of product modifications that might be made to reduce the embodied CO{sub 2} content. Where possible the potential reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions from process and product changes are quantified.

  13. Pharmacologic analysis of 7-O-ethyl-fangchinoline-induced vasodilation properties in isolated perfused common carotid arteries of Wistar Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, M; Zenda, H; Chiba, S

    1991-10-01

    Using the cannula insertion method, we investigated vascular effects of 7-O-ethyl-fangchinoline (TJN-220) derived from tetrandrine in isolated and perfused common carotid arteries of Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A single dose of TJN-220 caused a vasodilation in a dose-related manner in arteries preconstricted by phenylephrine. The vasodilation was not inhibited by propranolol, a potent beta-adrenoceptor antagonist. A potent alpha-antagonist bunazosin inhibited the vasoconstriction to norepinephrine while TJN-220 did not modify the norepinephrine-induced constriction, indicating TJN-220 had no alpha-blocking activity. A potent calcium entry blocker, diltiazem, markedly attenuated the KCl-induced vasoconstriction, and TJN-220 slightly but significantly attenuated the KCl-induced one in large doses. The vasodilation of TJN-220 was not abolished after removing the endothelium by an intraluminal administration of saponin, although the ACh-induced dilation was completely abolished by it. A comparison of vascular responses in WKY and SHR revealed no significant differences. From these results, it is concluded that 1) a new tetrandrine derivative, TJN-220 has relatively long-lasting vasorelaxant properties, 2) the dilatory effects might not be related to adrenergic, muscarinic or endothelium-dependent mechanisms, and 3) the effects might partially be due to calcium entry antagonistic properties. PMID:1806292

  14. [Prof. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Kyoto University and his achievements in orthopaedic surgery in the Meiji era of Japan (Part 5, Faculty members and training of doctors from Nagoya)].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2010-09-01

    During the years when Dr. M. Matsuoka was professor of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University (June, 1907-January, 1914), seven doctors worked as his faculty members and founded the base of the current development and reputation of the Department. After resignation from their academic positions, they served in orthopaedic practice in several areas in Japan where orthopaedic surgery was not well recognized. In addition, Prof. Matsuoka trained three doctors from the Aichi Prefectural Medical College (School of Medicine, Nagoya University) in the orthopaedic practice, including x-ray technique and they contributed to the development of orthopaedic surgery in the areas of Nagoya city and Tokai. Backgrounds and achievements of these ten doctors are described. PMID:21560319

  15. Comparison of calcium import as a function of contraction in the aortic smooth muscle of Sprague-Dawley, Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, M A; DeGray, G; David, V; Ampy, F R; Jones, L

    1999-04-15

    Genetic variations of far-reaching consequences have been established between spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their controls, Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). The SHR strain is the most widely used model for the study of genetic hypertension. Calcium homeostasis in the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) is controlled by calcium channels and calcium pumps located in both VSM and the overlying endothelial cells that line the large blood vessels and the heart. Hypertension adversely affects calcium homeostasis. Investigations on the import of calcium from extracellular spaces with alpha1-adrenergic stimulation as a function of contractility of VSM cells in SHR and WKY were made and compared with the contractility observed in VSM cells of Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats. Experiments were performed on rings from thoracic aortas of three strains with endothelial lining intact or removed to discern the paracrine control of endothelium on contractility in response to calcium import. The internal stores of Ca2+ were depleted by repeated alpha 1-adrenergic stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) and refilling of these stores was prevented by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and/or thapsigargin (TG), two known inhibitors of Ca2+ATPase, the enzyme that drives sarcoplasmic calcium pumps. The two components of tonic muscular contraction, T I and T II, which are known to be due to the flow of Ca2+ from the extracellular gradient controlled via the poly-phosphoinositide cascade and nifedipine sensitive Ca2+ channels were found to be variable among these strains. Implications of these variations are discussed in this report PMID:10209059

  16. Prepro-thyrotropin releasing hormone 178-199 immunoreactivity is altered in the hypothalamus of the Wistar-Kyoto strain of rat.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Solberg, L C; Redei, E E; Handa, R J

    2001-09-21

    The rat prepro-thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) 178-199 is derived from prepro-TRH by the actions of the endopeptidases, prohormone convertase 1 (PC1) and PC2. PPTRH 178-199 attenuates the synthesis and secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting an inhibitory action on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. This peptide also acts centrally to increase activity and decrease anxiety related behaviors. To elucidate the involvement of this peptide in these functions, we have compared the expression of PPTRH 178-199, PPTRH mRNA, and PC1 and PC2 mRNAs in the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar strains of rat. WKY rats have been shown to possess neuroendocrine abnormalities (HPA hyper-activity) and hyper-emotional behavioral characteristics. Immunohistochemical analysis of PPTRH 178-199 demonstrated significant strain differences in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and the parastrial nucleus (PSN). WKY rats had significantly greater numbers of immunoreactive (IR) cell body profiles (P<0.0005) than Wistar rats in the PVN and a significantly lower fiber density (P<0.002) in the PSN. Levels of PPTRH, PC1, and PC2 mRNA were not different between strains in any brain region examined. These data suggest that altered levels of PPTRH 178-199 in WKY rats could cause, at least in part, the hyper-activity of the HPA axis and the hyper-emotional behavioral characteristics seen in this rat strain. Such data fit with the hypothesis that PPTRH 178-199 is involved in the regulation of the HPA axis and behavior. PMID:11549391

  17. The application of biomarkers in clinical trials for motor neuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Bowser, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The interest and research into disease-related biomarkers has greatly accelerated over the last 10 years. The potential clinical benefits for disease-specific biomarkers include a more rapid and accurate disease diagnosis, and potential reduction in size and duration of clinical drug trials, which would speed up drug development. The application of biomarkers into the clinical arena of motor neuron disease should both determine if a drug hits its proposed target and whether the drug alters the course of disease. This article will highlight the progress made in discovering suitable biomarker candidates from a variety of sources, including imaging, neurophysiology and proteomics. For biomarkers to have clinical utility, specific criteria must be satisfied. While there has been tremendous effort to discover biomarkers, very few have been translated to the clinic. The bottlenecks in the biomarker pipeline will be highlighted as well as lessons that can be learned from other disciplines, such as oncology. PMID:20406070

  18. Linear stochastic differential equations on the dual of a countably Hilbert nuclear space with applications to neurophysiology. Technical report, September 1984-August 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, S.K.

    1985-06-01

    Properties of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck on the dual of a nuclear space are derived; stationarity and existence of unique invariant measure is proved, Radon-Nikodym derivative exhibited and the OU process is investigated for flicker noise. Existence and uniqueness of solutions to linear stochastic differential equations on the dual of a nuclear spaces established, and general conditions for the weak convergence on Skorohod space of solutions are given. Moreover, solutions are shown to be CADLAG semimartingales (for appropriate initial conditions). The results are applicable to solving stochastic partial differential equations. Finally, the results are applied to giving a rigorous representation and solutions of models in neurophysiology as well as to deriving explicit results for the weak convergence of these solutions.

  19. CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

  20. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can get involved. Doing your own clinical research project? Then select the Guidance for Clinical Researchers link to learn more about the NICHD's clinical research processes and policies. Last Reviewed: 03/06/2012 ...

  1. Seizures induced by desloratadine, a second-generation antihistamine: clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Cerminara, Caterina; El-Malhany, Nadia; Roberto, Denis; Lo Castro, Adriana; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Some clinical experiences indicate that H1-antihistamines, especially first-generation H1-antagonists, occasionally provoke convulsions in healthy children as well as epileptic patients. Desloratadine is a frequently used second-generation antihistamine considered to be effective and safe for the treatment of allergic diseases. We describe four children who experienced epilepsy associated with the nonsedating H(1)-antagonist desloratadine and discuss the neurophysiologic role of the central histaminergic system in seizure susceptibility. In conclusion, we recommend caution in treating epileptic patients with the histamine H(1)-antagonists, including second- and third-generation drugs that are frequently referred because they are considered to be nonsedating antihistamines. PMID:23456992

  2. Clinical Preceptor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardipee, Sheila; Clemens, Glenna

    A clinical preceptor is an employed registered nurse in a clinical facility who supervises and evaluates a student's performance independent of a clinical instructor. This manual is intended to assist the clinical preceptor, especially the preceptor dealing with re-entry nursing students. It encompasses a practical approach with actual situations…

  3. Clinical, electrophysiological and magnetic resonance findings in a family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies caused by a novel PMP22 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yurrebaso, Izaskun; Casado, Oscar L; Barcena, Joseba; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Aguirre, Urko

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a disorder mainly caused by a 1.5-Mb deletion at 17p11.2-12 (and in some rare cases by point mutations) and clinically associated with recurrent painless palsies. Here, we performed electrophysiological (motor, sensory and terminal latency index), MRI and genetic studies in a family referred for ulnar neuropathy with pain. Surprisingly, we found typical neurophysiological features of HNPP (prolongation of distal motor latencies and diffuse SNCV slowing with significant slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities). Besides, the proband presented conduction block in left ulnar, left median and both peroneal nerves. MRI findings were consistent with an underlying neuropathy. Molecular studies identified a novel frameshift mutation in PMP22 confirming the diagnosis of HNPP. Our data suggest that neurophysiological studies are essential to characterize underdiagnosed HNPP patients referred for peripheral neuropathy. Our experience shows that MRI could be a complementary tool for the diagnosis of these patients. PMID:24239057

  4. Exposure to morphine-associated cues increases mu opioid receptor mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Torry S; Beck, Kevin D; Cominski, Tara P; Bobzean, Samara A M; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Servatius, Richard J; Perrotti, Linda I

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat has been proposed as a model of anxiety vulnerability as it exhibits pronounced behavioral inhibition, passive avoidance, exaggerated startle response, enhanced HPA-axis activation, and active avoidance that is resistant to extinction. Accumulating evidence suggests that WKY rats respond differently to rewarding stimuli when compared to outbred strains of rat. Conditioned responding to drug-associated cues is linked with alterations in the activation of mu opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa opioid receptors (KOR) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, alterations in KOR expression/activation in the NAc of WKY rats are implicated in the regulation of some of the components that make up the unique behavioral phenotype of this strain. The purpose of this study was to extend upon previous work from our laboratory by investigating conditioned morphine reward in adult male WKY and SD rats, and to examine levels of KOR mRNA and MOR mRNA in the NAc at baseline and after acquisition of morphine CPP. Our results demonstrate that SD rats displayed morphine-induced CPP to each of the six doses of morphine tested (0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10mg/kg). Interestingly, WKY rats demonstrated CPP for only the 1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg doses, yet no preference at the lowest (0.5mg/kg) or highest (7.5 and 10mg/kg) doses. qPCR analysis of MOR and KOR in the NAc revealed no strain differences in basal levels of MOR, but higher levels of KOR in WKY rats compared to those of SD rats. Interestingly, after completion of the CPP task, WKY rats had overall higher levels of NAc MOR mRNA compared to SD rats; the initial basal differences in NAc KOR levels persisted without change due to CPP in either strain. These results demonstrate that the WKY rat exhibits a unique pattern of behavioral responding to morphine and implicates differences in NAc KOR signaling as a potential source of aversion to higher doses of morphine. Additionally, the CPP-induced upregulation of

  5. Antiplatelet therapy discontinuation and the risk of serious cardiovascular events after coronary stenting: observations from the CREDO-Kyoto Registry Cohort-2.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hirotoshi; Morimoto, Takeshi; Natsuaki, Masahiro; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Kadota, Kazushige; Yamaji, Kyohei; Ando, Kenji; Shizuta, Satoshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Tada, Tomohisa; Tazaki, Junichi; Kato, Yoshihiro; Hayano, Mamoru; Abe, Mitsuru; Tamura, Takashi; Shirotani, Manabu; Miki, Shinji; Matsuda, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Mamoru; Ishii, Katsuhisa; Tanaka, Masaru; Aoyama, Takeshi; Doi, Osamu; Hattori, Ryuichi; Kato, Masayuki; Suwa, Satoru; Takizawa, Akinori; Takatsu, Yoshiki; Shinoda, Eiji; Eizawa, Hiroshi; Takeda, Teruki; Lee, Jong-Dae; Inoko, Moriaki; Ogawa, Hisao; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Horie, Minoru; Nohara, Ryuji; Kambara, Hirofumi; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Nobuyoshi, Masakiyo; Kita, Toru; Kastrati, Adnan; Kimura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Relation of antiplatelet therapy (APT) discontinuation with the risk of serious cardiovascular events has not been fully addressed yet. This study is aimed to evaluate the risk of ischemic event after APT discontinuation based on long-term APT status of large cohort. In the CREDO-Kyoto Registry Cohort-2 enrolling 15939 consecutive patients undergoing first coronary revascularization, 10470 patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention either with bare-metal stents (BMS) only (N=5392) or sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) only (N=5078). Proportions of patients taking dual-APT were 67.3% versus 33.4% at 1-year, and 48.7% versus 24.3% at 5-year in the SES and BMS strata, respectively. We evaluated daily APT status (dual-, single- and no-APT) and linked the adverse events to the APT status just 1-day before the events. No-APT as compared with dual- or single-APT was associated with significantly higher risk for stent thrombosis (ST) beyond 1-month after SES implantation (cumulative incidence rates beyond 1-month: 1.23 versus 0.15/0.29, P<0.001/P<0.001), while higher risk of no-APT for ST was evident only until 6-month after BMS implantation (incidence rates between 1- and 6-month: 8.43 versus 0.71/1.20, P<0.001/P<0.001, and cumulative incidence rates beyond 6-month: 0.31 versus 0.11/0.08, P=0.16/P=0.08). No-APT as compared with dual- or single-APT was also associated with significantly higher risk for spontaneous myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke regardless of the types of stents implanted. Single-APT as compared with dual-APT was not associated with higher risk for serious adverse events, except for the marginally higher risk for ST in the SES stratum. In conclusion, discontinuation of both aspirin and thienopyridines was associated with increased risk for serious cardiovascular events including ST, spontaneous MI and stroke beyond 1-month after coronary stenting. PMID:25853836

  6. Effects of prenatal irradiation with an accelerated heavy-ion beam on postnatal development in rats: II. Further study on neurophysiologic alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Murakami, M.; Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Nojima, K.; Shang, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, K.; Fujita, K.; Moreno, S. G.; Coffigny, H.; Hayata, I.

    Organogenesis is a highly radiosensitive period, study of prenatal exposure to high LET heavy ion beams on postnatal development is important for clarifying the radiation risk in space and promoting the evidence-based mechanism research. The effects from heavy ion irradiations are not well studied as those for low LET radiations such as X-rays in this field, even the ground-based investigations remain to be addressed. Using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and Wistar rats, postnatal neurophysiological development in offspring was investigated following exposure of pregnant rats to accelerated neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV/μm at a dose range from 0.1 to 2.0 Gy on the 15th day of gestation. The age for appearance of four physiologic markers and attainment of five neonatal reflexes, and gain in body weight were monitored. Male offspring were evaluated as young adults using two behavioral tests including open field and hole-board dipping tests. The effects of X-rays at 200 kVp measured for the same biological end points were studied for comparison. For most of the endpoints at early age, significant neurophysiological alteration was observed even in offspring receiving 0.1 Gy of accelerated neon ions but not X-rays. All offspring receiving 2.0 Gy of accelerated neon ions died prior to weaning. Offspring prenatally irradiated with neon ions generally showed higher incidences of prenatal death, increased preweaning mortality, markedly delayed accomplishment in physiological markers and reflexes, significantly lower body weight and reduced ratios of main organ weight to body weight, and altered behavior compared to those exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1 1.5 Gy. These findings indicate that irradiations with neon ions at 0.1 1.5 Gy on day 15 of gestation caused varied developmental alterations in offspring, and efficient dose leading to the detrimental effects seemed to be lower than that of X-rays.

  7. Paul Sollier: the first clinical neuropsychologist.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Paul Sollier (1861-1933) is perhaps the most unjustly forgotten follower of Jean-Martin Charcot. He studied with Désiré Bourneville, Charcot's second interne, and was considered by Léon Daudet as the cleverest collaborator of Charcot, along with Joseph Babinski. Charcot assigned him the task of summarizing the theories on memory, which led to two major books, in 1892 and 1900, that anticipated several contemporary concepts by several decades. In 1905-1906, the novelist Marcel Proust spent 6 weeks with Sollier in his sanatorium at Boulogne-Billancourt, and it is now obvious that several of Proust's ideas on involuntary memories which appear inside In Search of Lost Time (published 8 years later) had been inspired by Sollier's theories on the 'surge of reminiscences'. Sollier also designed the framework which led to the intellectual quotient (IQ) and made interesting studies on hysteria and behavioral issues in neurological diseases, activities that may make him the first modern clinical neuro psychologist. Sollier was also the first to correlate clinical findings with neurophysiological concepts, which makes him a precursor of our current approach to neurology and psychiatry. PMID:20938150

  8. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  9. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to ...

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  11. Combined Invasive Subcortical and Non-invasive Surface Neurophysiological Recordings for the Assessment of Cognitive and Emotional Functions in Humans.

    PubMed

    Trenado, Carlos; Elben, Saskia; Petri, David; Hirschmann, Jan; Groiss, Stefan J; Vesper, Jan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the success in applying non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG), magneto-encephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for extracting crucial information about the mechanism of the human brain, such methods remain insufficient to provide information about physiological processes reflecting cognitive and emotional functions at the subcortical level. In this respect, modern invasive clinical approaches in humans, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), offer a tremendous possibility to record subcortical brain activity, namely local field potentials (LFPs) representing coherent activity of neural assemblies from localized basal ganglia or thalamic regions. Notwithstanding the fact that invasive approaches in humans are applied only after medical indication and thus recorded data correspond to altered brain circuits, valuable insight can be gained regarding the presence of intact brain functions in relation to brain oscillatory activity and the pathophysiology of disorders in response to experimental cognitive paradigms. In this direction, a growing number of DBS studies in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) target not only motor functions but also higher level processes such as emotions, decision-making, attention, memory and sensory perception. Recent clinical trials also emphasize the role of DBS as an alternative treatment in neuropsychiatric disorders ranging from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC). Consequently, we focus on the use of combined invasive (LFP) and non-invasive (EEG) human brain recordings in assessing the role of cortical-subcortical structures in cognitive and emotional processing trough experimental paradigms (e.g. speech stimuli with emotional connotation or paradigms of cognitive control such as the Flanker task), for patients undergoing DBS treatment. PMID:27286467

  12. [Industry-Academia Collaboration in the Clinical Laboratory Field: Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Tohru; Ikemoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Industry-academia collaboration has become essential in contemporary medicine. Therefore, many institutes including university corporations have promoted the establishment of an endowed chair and/or performed collaborative research. This symposium was held to overview the present status of industry-academia collaboration in the clinical laboratory field. As a representative of the industry, Mr. Taniguchi (Sysmex) presented the development process of M2BP Glycosylation Isomer, a new marker for liver fibrosis. Mr. Saitoh (Horiba) introduced the achievements of joint collaborative research with Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, especially the practical realization of an automated hematology analyzer capable of simultaneously measuring C-reactive protein. Mr. Setoyama (LSI Medience) presented on the characteristic collaboration between academia and commercial laboratories such as Tsukuba Medical Laboratory of Education and Research (TMER). On the other hand, as a representative of academia, Associate Prof. Imai (Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine) summarized the necessity of clinical laboratories spread regenerative medicine. Finally, Prof. Koshiba (Hyogo College of Medicine) presented on the industry-academia collaboration in routine laboratory work in his institute. PMID:27192804

  13. [The post-discectomy syndrome: clinical and electroneuromyographic characteristics and methods of treatment].

    PubMed

    Musaev, A V; Guseĭnova, S G; Musaeva, I R

    2008-01-01

    The data of the Azerbaijan Neurosurgical Center, including 2618 case-reports of patients operated on for low back discal hernia between 1997 and 2002, have been analyzed. The retrospective analysis of the data reveals that 26,4% of patients need further restorative treatment due to the presence of various neurological disturbances: pain syndromes of different intensity, motor deficits (pareses), sensory disorders and functional disorders of pelvic organs. The retrospective analysis of the data reveals that 26,4% of patients need further restorative treatment due to the presence of various neurological disturbances: pain syndromes of different intensity, motor deficits (pareses), sensory disorders and functional disorders of pelvic organs. Along with these data, the results of our own clinical and neurophysiological study of 110 patients have been summarized as well. Along with these data, the results of our own clinical and neurophysiological study of 110 patients have been summarized as well. A high effectiveness of electrostimulation and naphthalan therapy alone and in combination with massage and medical gymnastics has been revealed. A high effectiveness of electrostimulation and naphthalan therapy alone and in combination with massage and medical gymnastics has been revealed. Electroneuromyographic data revealing the positive dynamics as a result of the treatment of patients with the post-discectomy syndrome are presented. Electroneuromyographic data revealing the positive dynamics as a result of the treatment of patients with the post-discectomy syndrome are presented. PMID:18689008

  14. Clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Questions for this month's clinical challenge are based on articles in this issue. The clinical challenge is endorsed by the RACGP Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development (QI&CPD) program and has been allocated four Category 2 points (Activity ID:59922). Answers to this clinical challenge are available immediately following successful completion online at http://gplearning.racgp.org.au. Clinical challenge quizzes may be completed at any time throughout the 2014-16 triennium; therefore, the previous months' answers are not published. Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by four suggested answers or completions. Select the most appropriate statement as your answer. PMID:27606376

  15. Characterization of neurophysiological and behavioral changes, MRI brain volumetry and 1H MRS in zQ175 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Taneli; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; Vartiainen, Nina; Puoliväli, Jukka; Hendricks, Susan J; Glaser, Jack R; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Wadel, Kristian; Touller, Chrystelle; Kontkanen, Outi; Yrjänheikki, Juha M; Buisson, Bruno; Howland, David; Beaumont, Vahri; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Park, Larry C

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by severe behavioral, cognitive, and motor deficits. Since the discovery of the huntingtin gene (HTT) mutation that causes the disease, several mouse lines have been developed using different gene constructs of Htt. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI) mouse, was developed (see description by Menalled et al, [1]) in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. Here we confirm the behavioral phenotypes reported by Menalled et al [1], and extend the characterization to include brain volumetry, striatal metabolite concentration, and early neurophysiological changes. The overall reproducibility of the behavioral phenotype across the two independent laboratories demonstrates the utility of this new model. Further, important features reminiscent of human HD pathology are observed in zQ175 mice: compared to wild-type neurons, electrophysiological recordings from acute brain slices reveal that medium spiny neurons from zQ175 mice display a progressive hyperexcitability; glutamatergic transmission in the striatum is severely attenuated; decreased striatal and cortical volumes from 3 and 4 months of age in homo- and heterozygous mice, respectively, with whole brain volumes only decreased in homozygotes. MR spectroscopy reveals decreased concentrations of N-acetylaspartate and increased concentrations of glutamine, taurine and creatine + phosphocreatine in the striatum of 12-month old homozygotes, the latter also measured in 12-month-old heterozygotes. Motor, behavioral, and cognitive deficits in homozygotes occur concurrently with the structural and metabolic changes observed. In sum, the zQ175 KI model has robust behavioral, electrophysiological, and histopathological features that may be valuable in both furthering our understanding of HD-like pathophyisology and the evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies to

  16. Neurophysiologic and neurobehavioral evidence of beneficial effects of prenatal omega-3 fatty acid intake on memory function at school age123

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Olivier; Burden, Matthew J; Muckle, Gina; Saint-Amour, Dave; Ayotte, Pierre; Dewailly, Eric; Nelson, Charles A; Jacobson, Sandra W

    2011-01-01

    Background: The beneficial effects of prenatal and early postnatal intakes of omega-3 (n−3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on cognitive development during infancy are well recognized. However, few studies have examined the extent to which these benefits continue to be evident in childhood. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relation of n−3 PUFAs and seafood-contaminant intake with memory function in school-age children from a fish-eating community. Design: In a prospective, longitudinal study in Arctic Quebec, we assessed Inuit children (n = 154; mean age: 11.3 y) by using a continuous visual recognition task to measure 2 event-related potential components related to recognition memory processing: the FN400 and the late positive component (LPC). Children were also examined by using 2 well-established neurobehavioral assessments of memory: the Digit span forward from Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children, 4th edition, and the California Verbal Learning Test–Children's Version. Results: Repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed that children with higher cord plasma concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is an important n−3 PUFA, had a shorter FN400 latency and a larger LPC amplitude; and higher plasma DHA concentrations at the time of testing were associated with increased FN400 amplitude. Cord DHA–related effects were observed regardless of seafood-contaminant amounts. Multiple regression analyses also showed positive associations between cord DHA concentrations and performance on neurobehavioral assessments of memory. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiologic and neurobehavioral evidence of long-term beneficial effects of n−3 PUFA intake in utero on memory function in school-age children. PMID:21389181

  17. Characterization of Neurophysiological and Behavioral Changes, MRI Brain Volumetry and 1H MRS in zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Ta