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Sample records for clinical nurse specialist

  1. Advanced practice: the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Sparacino, P

    1992-01-01

    Historically, the clinically expert nurse who wanted to continue in direct patient care had few career options. That dilemma is changing in response to the recognised need for greater knowledge and clinical expertise in the domain of patient care. The clinical nurse specialist role is an answer to this concern. The clinical nurse specialist practices within a framework of theoretically-based knowledge and combines that knowledge with clinical expertise. The role is also pivotal in the promotion of patient care focused scientific inquiry and in the generation and refinement of nursing theories. Career options are more versatile than for the educator, researcher, or administrator. While the clinical nurse specialist is an essential person in influencing quality care in the traditional practice settings, there are now opportunities with clientele and practice settings which have expanded beyond the conventional boundaries. PMID:1528295

  2. Clinical nurse specialist regulation: the Maryland experience.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care will continue to be a driver in the evolution of today's health care environment. Ensuring effective, cost-conscious, quality care is the core of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice. The CNS practice varies by state, depending on each state's Nurse Practice Act. Some states have separate scopes of practice for CNSs, including prescriptive authority, whereas some states do not recognize CNS practice as different from the practice of the registered nurse. The journey to state recognition and title protection for the CNS role in the state of Maryland is described. PMID:25594481

  3. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... “physician” means a doctor of medicine or osteopathy, as set forth in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. (b... Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) doctoral degree; and (3) Be certified as a clinical nurse specialist...

  4. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... “physician” means a doctor of medicine or osteopathy, as set forth in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. (b... Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) doctoral degree; and (3) Be certified as a clinical nurse specialist...

  5. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the statutory exclusions; and (3) Performs them while working in collaboration with a physician. (i) Collaboration is a process in which a clinical nurse specialist works with one or more physicians to deliver... collaboration, collaboration is a process in which a clinical nurse specialist has a relationship with one...

  6. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the statutory exclusions; and (3) Performs them while working in collaboration with a physician. (i) Collaboration is a process in which a clinical nurse specialist works with one or more physicians to deliver... collaboration, collaboration is a process in which a clinical nurse specialist has a relationship with one...

  7. Clinical nurse specialists gain title protection in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in Pennsylvania will long remember the bright, sunny day of July 20, 2007. That was the day Governor Edward G. Rendell signed House Bill 1254 into law. Clinical nurse specialists in Pennsylvania finally gained title protection! What does this mean? How did it all come about? What are the implications for practice? PMID:18091127

  8. 42 CFR 410.76 - Clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clinical nurse specialists' services. 410.76... § 410.76 Clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Definition. As used in this section, the term “physician” means a doctor of medicine or osteopathy, as set forth in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act....

  9. The role of the clinical nurse specialist in tissue viability.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, M

    The development of tissue viability clinical nurse specialists in the UK has occurred rapidly and haphazardly over the last decade. Lack of role definition has created ambiguity and additional demands which are not so apparent within more established specialist nurse roles. Many specialist nurses in tissue viability are currently practising without adequate supervision frameworks which may compromise both personal and professional role satisfaction. Evaluation of the specific contribution of tissue viability specialist nurses is problematic for a variety of reasons. These, together with the identification of those factors thought to contribute to role conflict, will be discussed. PMID:8845674

  10. Sustaining excellence: clinical nurse specialist practice and magnet designation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Anne C; Hujcs, Marianne; Dubendorf, Phyllis; Harrington, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialist practice is essential in providing the clinical expertise, leadership, and organizational influence necessary for attaining the excellence in care reflected by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Magnet designation. Clinical nurse specialists, prepared as advanced practice nurses, bring clinical expertise, knowledge of advanced physiology, and pathology and a system-wide vision for process improvements. This unique curriculum specifically prepares clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to immediately practice as leaders of interdisciplinary groups to improve outcomes. Clinical nurse specialist graduates possess an understanding of complex adaptive systems theory, advanced physical assessment, and pathophysiology and knowledge of optimal learning modalities, all applicable to improving the health care environment. Their practice specifically links complex clinical data with multidisciplinary partnering and understanding of organizational systems. The basis for optimal clinical practice change and sustained process improvement, foundational to Magnet designation, is grounded in the combined educational preparation and systems impact of CNS practice. This article describes the role of the CNS in achieving and sustaining Magnet designation in an urban, academic quaternary care center. Using the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists model of spheres of influence, focus is on the CNS's contribution to improving clinical outcomes, nurse satisfaction, and patient satisfaction. Exemplars demonstrating use of a champion model to implement practice improvement and rapid adoption of optimal practice guidelines are provided. These exemplars reflect improved and sustained patient care outcomes, and implementation strategies used to achieve these improvements are discussed. PMID:20716978

  11. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional..., and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their...

  12. Developing an empirical base for clinical nurse specialist education.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Arleen M; Nardi, Deena; Lewandowski, Margaret A

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the design of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) education program using National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) CNS competencies to guide CNS program clinical competency expectations and curriculum outcomes. The purpose is to contribute to the development of an empirical base for education and credentialing of CNSs. The NACNS CNS core competencies and practice competencies in all 3 spheres of influence guided the creation of clinical competency grids for this university's practicum courses. This project describes the development, testing, and application of these clinical competency grids that link the program's CNS clinical courses with the NACNS CNS competencies. These documents guide identification, tracking, measurement, and evaluation of the competencies throughout the clinical practice portion of the CNS program. This ongoing project will continue to provide data necessary to the benchmarking of CNS practice competencies, which is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of direct practice performance and the currency of graduate nursing education. PMID:18438164

  13. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  14. The role of the clinical nurse specialist in home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating clinical nurse specialists (CNS) into home healthcare models is crucial for agencies that want to be on the leading edge of healthcare. As an advanced practice nurse, the CNS adds value by working with patients, home healthcare clinicians, and systems to improve patient outcomes. The CNS is a change agent who directly impacts the client during transitions in and out of home care, throughout the course of chronic disease management, and by assuring quality care is delivered by field clinicians. PMID:25654346

  15. Clinical nurse leader and clinical nurse specialist role delineation in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Patricia; Lulham, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    More than 90 members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and 190 practice sites have partnered to develop the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role. The partnership has created synergy between education and practice and nurtured innovation and diffusion of learning on a national basis. In this ongoing department, the editor, Jolene Tornabeni, MA, RN, FAAN, FACHE, showcases a variety of nurse leaders who discuss their new patient care delivery models in preparation for the CNL role and CNLs who highlight partnerships with their clinical colleagues to improve patient care. In this article, the authors explore differences and similarities between the CNL and the clinical nurse specialist roles, describing the working strategies between a CNL and clinical nurse specialist, and role delineations that have resulted from their cooperation, collaboration, and planning. PMID:17914287

  16. Clinical nurse specialists: state of the profession and challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Heitkemper, Margaret M; Bond, Eleanor F

    2004-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are enjoying a rebirth. As health science and healthcare increase in complexity, it is critical that nurse experts provide leadership to improve patient care, advance nursing practice, and strengthen healthcare delivery systems. CNSs with specialty expertise combined with competencies in patient care, nursing practice, and healthcare delivery systems are essential to translating the products of our vast research enterprise into policies and practices that serve the patient. Many challenges loom. New diseases have emerged; treatments change constantly. We are newly aware of the gravity of the perils posed by natural and man-made disasters. Patients use complimentary and alternative health practices but we do not understand the power and risks of these approaches. Information technology makes possible new approaches to educating nurses and patients and tracking clinical outcomes. CNSs are vital to building a healthcare system that is evidence based, patient centered, outcome effective, safe, ethical, interdisciplinary, and cost-effective. PMID:15360045

  17. Clinical nurse specialists driving research and practice through Research Roundtables.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Schafer, Deborah J

    2009-01-01

    Providing patient care based on the best evidence is a priority for healthcare institutions across the country to improve practice and patient outcomes. Creating a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) within an organization can be a challenging task. Literature has identified numerous barriers to EBP including negative attitudes and perceptions among nurses and lack of organizational support, time, resources, and confidence with these skills. Creating programs that help nurses appreciate the value and importance of nursing research for practice can be an effective approach in changing the culture. Research Roundtable is a collaborative partnership between a healthcare system and a baccalaureate nursing program to promote EBP and research skills in nurses and nursing students. Initial goals of the program focused on increasing the nurses' knowledge base of the research process and applying research to actual clinical problems. Over the course of 3 years, Roundtable evolved from development and implementation of research projects to concentrating on the identification of clinical problems that could be analyzed and solved through the use of EBP processes. The program has resulted in the completion of research studies, implementation of practice changes based on evidence uncovered in group work, and the approval of research projects in data collection phases. The positive impacts of Roundtable have been identified at the level of the staff nurse and the organization as a whole. This article describes the role of the clinical nurse specialist in the development and implementation of the Research Roundtable. PMID:19858901

  18. Using a scorecard to demonstrate clinical nurse specialists' contributions.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have the expertise to influence change at the patient, nurse, and system levels. They are clinical experts who understand the challenges of the current health care environment: decreasing costs, ensuring high-quality care, and achieving outcomes. Evidence has demonstrated CNSs' influence on improving patient outcomes. Although CNSs often lead the work, they can be invisible when the outcomes are presented. A scorecard to display this work could be invaluable to the CNS role, as it would bring transparency to the evidence-based work done. This article describes the development of a CNS scorecard in a 627-bed tertiary hospital. PMID:25594479

  19. Changing roles for psychiatric clinical nurse specialists: prescriptive privileges.

    PubMed

    Rufli, G M

    1996-01-01

    Interest was expressed at the mental health center in expanding the role of psychiatric clinical nurse specialists to include prescribing medications. There is a definite need for this expanded prescriptive role. The goals of improving patient access to care, offering quality service and cost effectiveness can be met by the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist certified by ANA. The functions of a CNS in a collaborative role with psychiatrists would involve promotion and health maintenance, evaluation, intake screening, health teaching, community action, and advanced psychobiological interventions including the prescribing of pharmacological agents. The ARNP, CS could alleviate the case load for pharmacological evaluation for the psychiatrists and enhance access to pharmacological management. The change in the Kentucky law giving prescriptive privileges to ARNPs makes this role feasible. PMID:9416059

  20. What are the roles of clinical nurses and midwife specialists?

    PubMed

    Wickham, Sheelagh

    Research shows the increasing part the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) plays in healthcare today. But what does a CNS actually do in their day-to day-work? This study, set in the Republic of Ireland, aimed to explore the CNS and clinical midwife specialist (CMS) roles in practice. Quantitative methodology was used to explore the roles and activities of the CNS and CMS. Following ethics approval, a valid and reliable questionnaire was circulated to the total population of CNS/CMS in Ireland. The data were analysed using SPSS. This study articulates the individual role elements and activity level. The findings show the CNS/CMS to be active in the roles of researcher, educator, communicator, change agent, leader and clinical specialist, but the level of activity varies between different roles and individual role elements. The CNS/CMS is seen as a valuable resource in health care today and has potential to have a positive effect on patient care. The majority of CNS/CMSs are active in varying roles but the analysis shows lesser activity in some areas, such as research. The findings merit further study on role activity and possible variables that influence role activity. PMID:24005657

  1. A phenomenological investigation into the role of the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Bousfield, C

    1997-02-01

    This research study adopts a phenomenological approach to investigate how a group of clinical nurse specialists think and experience their role. It reviews the literature on the clinical nurse specialist from 1943, when Frances Reiter first coined the phrase "nurse clinician', to the present time, when individuals are committed to a range of initiatives aimed at improving the quality of the British National Health Service and patient care. The study investigates and analyses their views and conveys the personal meaning of clinical nurse specialists' "lived experience' in the role. Findings of the study suggest that clinical nurse specialists are experienced practitioners who strive to be in positions in which they influence patient care and utilize advanced knowledge, expertise and leadership skills in a multidisciplinary environment. The literature proposes that for the role to be recognized and accepted individuals need to be educated at an advanced level, demonstrate practice based in research and have a firm base as a specialist in nursing. The findings clearly suggest that while the role of the clinical nurse specialist can be influenced in a positive manner by the organization and guided by the individual, it is important to acknowledge that the role is in a transitional phase. Finally, the research suggests the importance of establishing a clear role definition in a creative and supportive environment allowing for autonomy, professional growth and the development of individuals as clinically competent nurse specialists. PMID:9043997

  2. The clinical nurse specialist's role as coach in a clinical practice development model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C K

    1996-06-01

    Over the past 5 years, nursing leadership at St. Luke's Medical Center in Milwaukee has been considering various mechanisms in response to recurrent comments from nursing staff regarding our career ladder. A lack of satisfaction with our career ladder led to the adoption of a new model for nursing. This shift from a career ladder to a clinical ladder has taken place over many years. In April 1994 all staff nurses were staged and transitioned to a clinical practice development model (CPDM). The CPDM is based solely on nursing practice. Our new model was developed from more than 100 narratives of clinical practice submitted by nurses at St. Luke's. Narratives are first-person accounts of an actual clinical experience. The model is based on research conducted by Patricia Benner, PhD, RN, which focused on how nurses acquired their clinical skills and what characteristics are embedded in nurses' practice. This article describes the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role as a "coach" in facilitating nursing staff transition from a career ladder to a CPDM. The CNS is in a unique position to contribute directly to quality patient care, and also indirectly by fostering professional growth and development of staff nurses. CPDM supports staff development along a continuum. The challenge for the CNS role is to further develop the coaching role to move staff along the continuum. PMID:8900771

  3. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care. PMID:18663640

  4. Improving Heart Failure Outcomes: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    PubMed

    Coen, Jennifer; Curry, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies and explains barriers to optimal outcomes of heart failure and the role of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these obstacles, improving patient outcomes and quality of life. In recent years, advances in heart failure management have increased survival rates, and as a result, the number of patients requiring services to manage disease progression and the complex array of symptoms associated with end-stage heart disease. Management of the heart failure patient is dependent on the severity of the disease and wide range of available treatment regimens. Disease progression can be unpredictable and treatment regimens increasingly complex. The authors present a typical case of a patient with heart failure, identify the barriers to optimal outcomes in managing heart failure, as well as describe the roles of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these barriers within 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist influence: patient, health care provider, and health care systems. The clinical nurse specialist role is ideally suited to positively affect heart failure outcomes. These positive effects are drawn from the dynamic and unique nature of the clinical nurse specialist role and are perpetrated through the 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist practice: patient, health care provider, and heath care system. PMID:27575796

  5. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families. PMID:24863582

  6. Role of the clinical nurse specialist in the journey to magnet recognition.

    PubMed

    Hanson, M Dave

    2015-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) work with and through other nurses as well as interprofessional team members to advance nursing practice, improve outcomes, and provide clinical expertise to effect system-wide changes to improve programs of care. They practice across the continuum and through 3 spheres of influence, encompassing the patient, nurse, and system. Clinical nurse specialists possess expertise in developing and refining structures, strategies, and processes to optimize outcomes at both the unit (micro) level and the organization or system (macro) level. This unique vantage point positions CNSs as ideal individuals to assume several key roles when a health care organization makes the decision to embark on the Magnet journey and to maintain Magnet recognition. The competence and competencies of CNSs and a health care organization's desire to achieve and/or maintain Magnet recognition represent a synergistic match. PMID:25594480

  7. Difficult Hypertension Clinic Utilizing a Nurse Specialist: A Cost-Efficient Model for the Modern Era?

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Walter; van der Merwe, Veronica

    2015-09-01

    In the modern era in New Zealand, there has been a lack of specialist hypertension clinics where family practitioners might refer patients with difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. A new specialist referral hypertension clinic was established in 2009 at North Shore Hospital, Auckland, employing a model of care where much of the follow-up work is done by a nurse specialist. The authors review data from the first 1000 patients discharged from the clinic. Mean (treated) blood pressure improved by -26/12 mm Hg over an average of three visits, two thirds of which were to nurse specialist clinics. The authors propose this as a cost-efficient model that could easily be duplicated in other centers. PMID:25991503

  8. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical... ending December 31, 1997, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse practitioner or a clinical...

  9. The Clinical Nurse Specialist in the School Setting: Case Management of Migrant Children with Dental Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Mary Ellen

    This paper presents strategies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in the school setting to use in case management of migrant children with dental disease. Although dental disease is the major health problem of all school-age children in the nation, the problem is even more severe for children of migrant farmworkers. Leininger's transcultural…

  10. A sociotechnical approach to successful electronic health record implementation: five best practices for clinical nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Taya; Barton, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Rising healthcare costs coupled with patient safety considerations and quality of care have become major concerns for healthcare purchasers, providers, and policymakers. Health information technology, particularly the electronic health record (EHR), is posed as a solution to address these concerns by delivering greater efficiencies and improved quality of care. Despite the national movement toward EHR adoption, successful EHR implementation continues to be challenging for many healthcare organizations, both large and small. This article uses sociotechnical systems theory as a framework to discuss 5 best practice guidelines for EHR implementation and outlines what clinical nurse specialists can do to make the process successful. PMID:24107749

  11. The role of the clinical nurse specialist in MS: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Corry, Margarita; McKenna, Martina; Duggan, Marguerite

    The purpose of this review was to determine the role of nurse specialists in multiple sclerosis (NSMS) in providing care for carers of people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). The databases searched from inception to April 2010 include: CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, PubMed, AMED, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library Database, Web of Knowledge, Ovid Nursing Database, Social Science Index, and Joanna Briggs Institute. Eighteen articles were included in the review. However, only three research-based articles were found that evaluated the role of the NSMS. The remaining articles were discussion-based and provided insight into the contribution of the NSMS to service provision. The review highlights the continuing lack of research evaluating the impact of the role of the nurse specialist in multiple sclerosis and in particular, the lack of recognition of the support role that nurse specialists provide for carers of PwMS. PMID:21278655

  12. Expanding acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist education: invasive procedure training and human simulation in critical care.

    PubMed

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Tuite, Patricia; Baldisseri, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Programs educating advanced practice nurses (APNs), including acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may struggle with the degree to which technical and cognitive skills necessary and unique to the care of critically ill patients should be incorporated within training programs, and the best ways these skills can be synthesized and retained for clinical practice. This article describes the critical care technical skills training mechanisms and use of a High-Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Laboratory in the ACNP and CNS programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The mechanisms for teaching invasive procedures are reviewed including an abbreviated course syllabus and documentation tools. The use of HFHS is discussed as a measure to provide students with technical and cognitive preparation to manage critical incidents. The HFHS Laboratory, scenario development and implementation, and the debriefing process are discussed. Critical care technical skills training and the use of simulation in the curriculum have had a favorable response from students and preceptors at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and have enhanced faculty's ability to prepare APNs. PMID:15714021

  13. Clinical nurse specialists in Canada: why are some not working in the role?

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; DiCenso, Alba; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Ritchie, Judith A; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are advanced practice nurses. They contribute to the quality and safety of patient care by providing an advanced level of clinical care to patients and families and by supporting healthcare team members to deliver evidence-based care. CNSs help to reduce healthcare costs when the roles are fully deployed and all the dimensions of the CNS role are implemented. The dimensions of the CNS role include clinical care, organizational leadership, research, education, professional development and consultation to provide patient care. There is a paucity of research on CNSs in Canada. We conducted the first Canada-wide survey of CNSs and asked each nursing regulatory body to identify the CNSs in their registration database. One-quarter (n=196/776) of the regulator-identified CNS respondents whom we contacted for the study were no longer or had never been a CNS. Currently, adequate mechanisms are lacking to identify and track CNSs in Canada, and little is known about the factors that influence CNSs' decisions to leave their role. The non-employed CNS respondents in our survey highlighted that the lack of role clarity, their inability to find employment as a CNS and the inability to implement all the dimensions of the CNS role were key factors in their decision not to work as a CNS. These findings have important implications, given that these factors are potentially modifiable and amenable to decisions made by nursing leaders in organizations and regulatory bodies. Mechanisms to identify and track CNSs in Canada are needed to develop an effective workforce plan and maximize the integration of CNSs in the workforce. PMID:24809425

  14. Community palliative care clinical nurse specialists' descriptions of stress in their work.

    PubMed

    Newton, J; Waters, V

    2001-11-01

    This study analysed the lived experiences of work stress of 21 community palliative care clinical nurse specialists from four centres in urban Essex, UK. Data were collected using an open-ended questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Three major themes emerged: pressure of workload; relationships with health professionals; and the impact of the sadness of the client group. The pressure of workload was associated with nine sub-themes including staff shortages, client's or professionals' misperceptions of role, changing role, and erosion of normal support systems at work or at home. Relationships with some general practitioners seemed to cause most difficulty and social services seemed to have different priorities and to respond slowly. The impact of the sadness of the client group was only seen in four distinct situations. An overwork stress spiral is described that provides a salutary warning for managers, but also offers interesting solutions. PMID:11775928

  15. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... exceed the following limits: (1) For services furnished in a hospital (including assistant-at-surgery...-at-surgery services) furnished beginning January 1, 1998, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse... the service. For assistant-at-surgery services, allowed amounts for the services of a...

  16. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following limits: (1) For services furnished in a hospital (including assistant-at-surgery services), 75...-at-surgery services) furnished beginning January 1, 1998, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse... the service. For assistant-at-surgery services, allowed amounts for the services of a...

  17. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... exceed the following limits: (1) For services furnished in a hospital (including assistant-at-surgery...-at-surgery services) furnished beginning January 1, 1998, allowed amounts for the services of a nurse... the service. For assistant-at-surgery services, allowed amounts for the services of a...

  18. The impact of expanding the numbers of clinical nurse specialists in cancer care: a United Kingdom case study.

    PubMed

    Hill, A

    2000-12-01

    In the last few years there has been an increase in the number of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) working in cancer care throughout the UK. This paper examines the issues raised by the proliferation of site-specific cancer CNS posts, developed to give a 'nursing lead' for a particular tumour type. The issues common to all CNS posts are exacerbated when a number of specialists are involved in the cancer journey, causing potential fragmentation and confusion. Key issues need to be addressed if the role is to remain credible, and ensure clarity for patients and the multiprofessional team. These include role clarification, sensitive integration, interface with other cancer CNSs and the multiprofessional team, evaluation, cost, education and training, recruitment and succession planning and the 'career cul-de-sac'. Cancer nursing's response to these challenges will set the professional agenda for education, training and future models of service delivery. PMID:12849018

  19. The role of nursing leadership in integrating clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners in healthcare delivery in Canada.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nancy; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Donald, Faith; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Harbman, Patricia; Bourgeault, Ivy; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    Supportive nursing leadership is important for the successful introduction and implementation of advanced practice nursing roles in Canadian healthcare settings. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe and explore organizational leadership in planning and implementing advanced practice nursing roles. Leadership strategies that optimize successful role integration include initiating systematic planning to develop the roles based on patient and community needs, engaging stakeholders, using established Canadian role implementation toolkits, ensuring utilization of all dimensions of the role, communicating clear messages to increase awareness about the roles in the organization, creating networks and facilitating mentorship for those in the role, and negotiating role expectations with physicians and other members of the healthcare team. Leaders face challenges in creating and securing sustainable funding for the roles and providing adequate infrastructure support. PMID:21478692

  20. The role of a clinical nurse consultant dementia specialist: A qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Duane, Fleur M; Goeman, Dianne P; Beanland, Chris J; Koch, Susan H

    2015-07-01

    Delay in diagnosis and difficulties in accessing appropriate health care services plague dementia care delivery in the community setting, potentiating the risk for misdiagnosis, inappropriate management, poor psychological adjustment and reduced coping capacity and ability to forward plan. We evaluated a clinical nurse consultant role with a speciality in dementia to provide person-centred pre-diagnosis support in the community. Clients, with a six-month history of cognitive and functional decline in the absence of delirium but no formal diagnosis of dementia, were recruited from a Home Care Nursing Service and an Aged Care Assessment Service located in the Western Suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The role of a clinical nurse consultant was highly regarded by clients and other health professionals. This paper discussing the CNC role and the outcomes of the role suggests it was successful in providing timely assistance and support for consumers and support for other health professionals. PMID:24339107

  1. Federal Support for the Preparation of the Clinical Nurse Specialist Workforce through Title VIII. Report to the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    This document presents the findings of the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice regarding the role, education, and supply of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). The first section of the report examines the following eight background issues: (1) early development of the CNS; (2) current CNS supply; (3) roles and impact of the…

  2. A Clinical Nurse Specialist-Directed Initiative to Reduce Postoperative Urinary Retention in Spinal Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Nicole; Bradway, Christine

    2016-08-01

    : Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is the inability to void when the bladder is full after surgery. It is a common complication in postoperative patients, especially in patients undergoing spinal surgery. At our institution, patients who were discharged from the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) to the inpatient surgical unit typically had bladder distention and a bladder volume of more than 450 mL. In an effort to address this situation, an interprofessional group of advanced practice RNs and physicians formed a team, reviewed the existing literature, examined the PACU nursing practice guideline for evaluating and managing POUR, and devised a quality improvement (QI) project to raise the PACU nursing staff's awareness of the potential for POUR among postoperative patients and to develop an updated nursing practice algorithm for the evaluation and management of POUR in spinal surgery patients. A description of the QI process, including the revised algorithm and pre- and postintervention results, is reported here. In the preintervention group (n = 42), 19 indwelling urinary catheterizations were documented in patient records; no use of intermittent catheterization was documented. In the postintervention group (n = 43), seven indwelling urinary catheterizations were documented in patient records; the use of intermittent catheterization was documented in 11. As a result of our intervention, we decreased the number of indwelling urinary catheters inserted in the PACU, and supported the PACU nursing staff in more frequent and appropriate use of intermittent catheterization in patients undergoing spinal surgery. PMID:27466926

  3. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Katrin; Butz, Stefanie; Bentzel, Jenny; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Lühmann, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate. PMID:23755088

  4. A Systematic Review of the Cost-Effectiveness of Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Nurse Specialists: What Is the Quality of the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Marshall, Deborah A.; Donald, Erin E.; Yost, Jennifer; Hubley, Pamela; Laflamme, Célyne; Campbell–Yeo, Marsha; Price, Sheri; Boyko, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background. Improved quality of care and control of healthcare costs are important factors influencing decisions to implement nurse practitioner (NP) and clinical nurse specialist (CNS) roles. Objective. To assess the quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating NP and CNS cost-effectiveness (defined broadly to also include studies measuring health resource utilization). Design. Systematic review of RCTs of NP and CNS cost-effectiveness reported between 1980 and July 2012. Results. 4,397 unique records were reviewed. We included 43 RCTs in six groupings, NP-outpatient (n = 11), NP-transition (n = 5), NP-inpatient (n = 2), CNS-outpatient (n = 11), CNS-transition (n = 13), and CNS-inpatient (n = 1). Internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool; 18 (42%) studies were at low, 17 (39%) were at moderate, and eight (19%) at high risk of bias. Few studies included detailed descriptions of the education, experience, or role of the NPs or CNSs, affecting external validity. Conclusions. We identified 43 RCTs evaluating the cost-effectiveness of NPs and CNSs using criteria that meet current definitions of the roles. Almost half the RCTs were at low risk of bias. Incomplete reporting of study methods and lack of details about NP or CNS education, experience, and role create challenges in consolidating the evidence of the cost-effectiveness of these roles. PMID:25258683

  5. The role of the nurse specialist in the care of patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Susie

    2005-01-01

    Successful management of patients with diabetic foot ulcers requires a multidisciplinary approach in which team members use their unique skills to achieve wound healing and prevent wound recurrence. This article describes the role of the nurse specialist and defines the roles of the baccalaureate-prepared wound care nurse specialist and the master's-prepared wound care nurse specialist. A case presentation highlights the role of the nurse practitioner in the outpatient wound clinic setting. PMID:15680114

  6. Using specialist nurse mentors to boost placement capacity.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Bill; Bailey, Elaine

    Mentors play a pivotal role in assessing and supporting nursing students. This can be rewarding but stressful. With increasing numbers of students requiring clinical placements, ward mentors are becoming overloaded. This article examines a new method of supporting senior nursing students in placement while alleviating the pressures on overworked mentors. It recommends the use of specialist nurses to support pre-registration students through a structured learning pathway. The scheme also opens up new areas for clinical allocations. This is a summary: the full paper can be accessed at nursingtimes.net. PMID:17193776

  7. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-01

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study. PMID:27479854

  8. A comprehensive review of clinical nurse specialist-led peripherally inserted central catheter placement in Korea: 4101 cases in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Yun; Kim, Hyun Lim

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are expected to be convenient and reliable venous access devices. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical nurse specialist (CNS)-led PICC placement and to describe its growth in a tertiary hospital. A computerized database identified 3508 patients who had PICCs placed between November 2001 and June 2010. One thousand, eight hundred ninety-eight of the 4101 PICCs were available for complete follow-up, and 791 of 1898 PICCs were still in place. The mean dwell time of 1898 PICCs was 27.4 days (1∼422 days). Most PICCs were removed after the completion of infusion therapy; the remainder were removed following death, occlusion, suspected infection, or phlebitis, or were removed by the patient. The study found that CNS-led PICC placement for infusion therapies was effective and safe with relatively low complication rates and that CNSs played important roles in the increased use of PICCs. PMID:25723834

  9. The Enigma of Graduate Nursing Education: Advanced Generalist? Specialist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Suellen B.; Hoffman, Sharon E.

    1986-01-01

    To pin down the appropriate parameters for graduate nursing education, the authors say we must explore the meanings of advanced generalist and specialist. They discuss the focus, scope, and depth of the community health major, psychiatric mental health nursing, nursing care of children, maternity nursing, medical-surgical nursing, and nursing…

  10. Specialization in nursing: the need for nurses to be sexuality specialists.

    PubMed

    Martin, N

    1991-01-01

    Sexuality specialists in Alberta, Canada have been mandated since January, 1990 to place their Career and Life Management Curricula in the high schools, with a sexuality component. The author recommends the use of sexuality specialists who educate, counsel, and provide clinical care. The emphasis for a nurse sexuality specialist is on relationships, not on sex education per se, in order to reduce teen pregnancies, abortions, and sexually transmitted disease (STD). The Canadian Nurses Association supports family planning and nursing education, which includes reproductive anatomy and physiology and psychology but does not promote sexuality education. The author believes nurse know that identity equals sexuality and a good self-concept, and adolescent development means egocentricism or the imaginary audience (THEY are watching us), and Personal Fable (we are protected from danger and will not grow old and die). Passage through adolescence involves 1) physical development and change in body image, 2) intellectual development, 3) mastery over drive 4) a sense of identity, 5) capacity for intimacy, 6) the ability to make commitments, 7) ego development, 8) a shift from family to peer group and other adult figures. Current sexuality programs for all Edmonton Public Schools are reactive, or at the request for services at the Edmonton Birth Control (EBCC), Planned Parenthood and the STD Clinic, the Edmonton Board of Health (EBH), and a pilot program emphasizing opening up channels of communication. None of Edmonton's public health nurses are sexuality specialists except for the 15 hour training of training of the nurse in the EBH pilot program. Calgary which has sexuality clinics scattered throughout the area has 1/2 the teen pregnancies and STD's of Edmonton. The only Edmonton resources are the out of way EBCC, Planned Parenthood with a broader philosophy but not specific to adolescents, and an STD clinic. Resources are insufficient and the author encourages nurses to

  11. Perspectives on specialist nursing in Saudi Arabia: a national model for success.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Denise; Al-Sanea, Nasser A; Balens, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    In many parts of the world, vulnerable patient populations may be cared for by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS). Nurses desiring to develop themselves professionally in the clinical arena, within the specialty of their choice, have the opportunity to obtain the knowledge, skills, experience and qualifications necessary to attain advanced practice positions such as CNS or nurse consultant (NC). Although studies have demonstrated the benefits of such roles and while the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends it, advanced nursing practice is not yet integrated into the health care culture in Saudi Arabia. The reasons for this are multiple, but the most important is the poor image of clinical nursing throughout the country. This article aims to share a perspective on CNS practice, while casting light on some of the obstacles encountered within Saudi Arabia. A model is proposed representing specialist nurse-physician collaborative practice for implementation nationally. The model has been implemented in the care of the colorectal and stoma patient populations while taking into consideration patient population needs and local health care culture. This model is based on the concepts of holistic "patient-centered care", specialist nurse-physician collaborative practice, and the four practice domains for NCs (expert practice, leadership, research and education) as indicated by the Department of Health in the United Kingdom. We suggest this model will enable the introduction of advanced specialist nursing and collaborative partnerships in Saudi Arabia with benefits for patients, physicians, health care organizations and the nursing profession as a whole. PMID:22156643

  12. The Health Systems Nurse Specialist Curriculum: Collaborating across Specialties To Prepare Nurse Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, Donna; Hays, Bevely J.

    2002-01-01

    The Health Systems Nurse specialist program is an innovative master's curriculum in community health nursing, nursing administration, and nursing informatics. Students learn to work collaboratively to determine health priorities, develop and implement interventions, and monitor and improve patient outcomes. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  13. Think Stoma Nurse: a tool to trigger referral to specialist care.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Judy; Adams, Jane

    This article describes the initial development and subsequent evolution of a simple referral assessment tool for stoma care. The first author's personal experience identified that there was widespread inconsistency in perceptions of local multidisciplinary teams as to when it was appropriate to refer to specific specialist nursing teams. This resulted in both inappropriate and delayed referrals. A 'Think Specialist Nurse' initiative was developed across the author's trust, building on the traffic light template from the 'ThinkGlucose' tool, to facilitate referrals to clinical nurse specialists. The stoma-care specific tool, 'Think Stoma Nurse', has subsequently evolved beyond its initial audience, and has been adapted into materials aimed at patients and carers. PMID:26419813

  14. Role of the specialist nurse in caring for patients with myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lobban, Lois; Perkins, Sue

    Myeloma is a rare, heterogeneous cancer of the bone marrow. It is characterised by a range of comorbidities and clinical complications, including bone fractures, anaemia and kidney damage. Myeloma is an individual cancer both in terms of the symptoms and complications patients can experience and in their response to treatment. This means that patients require individual management and care from specialist nurses who provide information, education, and social and psychological support, as well as direct patient care. The different combinations of treatment include complicated chemotherapy and anti-myeloma regimens. These treatments result in an accumulation of toxicities in patients, which specialist nurses play a vital role in monitoring and managing. The support and care given by specialist nurses have an effect both on the patient experience and patient outcomes. PMID:24093415

  15. Development of a structured on-site nursing program for training nurse specialists in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Roussou, Euthalia; Iacovou, Caroline; Georgiou, Louisa

    2012-06-01

    There is currently no structured system for nurses or allied health professionals to undertake further training to become a nurse specialist (NSp) or nurse practitioner (NP) in rheumatology on-site, while working in a district general hospital setting. These shortcomings have prompted us to develop a structured pathway that could be followed by staff nurses who wish to become NSp in rheumatology. The proposed pathway aims to assist the nurses or therapists (physiotherapists, psychologists, occupational therapist, podiatrists, etc.) to develop a sound knowledge based on the rationale, safety, and high quality clinical care when monitoring of patients taking disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) to ensure they acquire skills enabling them to provide safe, evidence-based effective patient-centered care. Near the end of the pathway, the trainee would be expected to have an understanding of the particularities of chronic arthritis conditions as well as screening, assessment, and monitoring of patients receiving DMARDs and biological agents. Tests for competencies are included and certification may be considered. PMID:21431287

  16. Clinical research nurse or nurse researcher?

    PubMed

    Jones, Helen Claire

    This article gives an overview of two research-related roles that can form part of a nurse's career path: clinical research nurse and nurse researcher. It highlights the influences on both roles, and the skills and differences within them, as well as offering advice on how nurses can access either role. PMID:26182597

  17. Is seeing a specialist nurse associated with positive experiences of care? The role and value of specialist nurses in prostate cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Carolyn; Sinfield, Paul; Agarwal, Shona; Baker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background Specialist nurses may play an important role in helping to improve the experiences of patients with prostate cancer, however there is concern that the specialist nurse role is under threat in the UK due to financial pressures in the NHS. This study explored the role and value of specialist nurses in prostate cancer care via a survey and patient interviews. Methods This paper reports findings from two studies. A survey of patients from three hospitals across the UK (289/481, 60%), investigated whether patients who saw a specialist nurse had different experiences of information provision and involvement in decision-making, to those who did not. Qualitative interviews were also carried out with 35 men recently tested or treated for prostate cancer, recruited from two hospitals in the UK. Interviews explored patients' views on the role and value of the specialist nurse. Results Survey findings indicated that patients who saw a specialist nurse had more positive experiences of receiving written information about tests and treatment, and about sources of advice and support, and were more likely to say they made the treatment decision themselves. In interviews, patients described specialist nurse input in their care in terms of providing information and support immediately post-diagnosis, as well as being involved in ongoing care. Two key aspects of the specialist nurse role were seen as unique: their availability to the patient, and their ability to liaise between the patient and the medical system. Conclusion This study indicates the unique role that specialist nurses play in the experience of patients with prostate cancer, and highlights the importance of maintaining specialist nurse roles in prostate cancer care. PMID:18371192

  18. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists. PMID:25993451

  19. The Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric as a Framework to Enhance Clinical Judgment in Novice and Experienced Nurses.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Robbin; Asselin, Marilyn E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical judgment has been identified as a critical component of professional nursing practice and enables nurses to deliver safe patient care with optimal outcomes. Nurses, particularly those transitioning into clinical practice, may require assistance to enhance their clinical judgment skills. This article presents the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, which has primarily been used in the academic setting, as a framework for nursing professional development specialists to enhance the clinical judgment skills of novice and experienced nurses. PMID:26381339

  20. Specialist nurse training programme: dealing with asking for organ donation.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, G

    1998-08-01

    The issue of cadaveric organ transplantation is by its very nature emotional as it is associated with the very traumatic time of a loved one's death. Making a request for organs needs to be handled very sensitively by health professionals when discussing the issue with a family. Those nurses working in critical care areas are most likely to confront this issue and need to be equipped for dealing with ensuing events. The major challenge for the nurse is to address the concerns with brain death and organ donation in an environment of grief and sadness. Asking for organ consent is the most important element of all and needs to be done in the most sensitive manner, providing appropriate support to the donor family. To facilitate this process specialist training programmes in the nursing curriculum are imperative. Education programmes should incorporate presentations, role play situations and discussions based upon past experiences of organ requests. This would hopefully result in increased rates of donor consent and thereby a reduction in transplant waiting lists. PMID:9725739

  1. The informatics nurse specialist as change agent. Application of innovation-diffusion theory.

    PubMed

    Hilz, L M

    2000-01-01

    The informatics nurse specialist (INS) is often the primary change agent in facilitating the implementation of clinical information systems (CIS) in healthcare settings. The INS has a unique understanding of the nursing issues that can affect the change process, and thus is in a key position to facilitate positive implementation outcomes. Innovation-diffusion theory is particularly useful in its application to the change agent role of the INS. With this theoretical knowledge, the INS can design CIS training interventions according to the psychological phenomena of Rogers' Innovation-Decision Process. An understanding of the decision-making process and the distribution of different rates of innovation adoption within a given population enable the INS to anticipate and address influential factors that affect the implementation process. Thus, Innovation-Diffusion Theory may be used as a powerful cognitive tool for the INS in facilitating the diffusion process and nurses' adoption of the technology in practice. PMID:11105401

  2. Embracing technology: patients', family members' and nurse specialists' experience of communicating using e-mail.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Amanda; Moore, Sally; Plant, Hilary

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the usefulness of e-mail as a means of communication between nurse specialists and patients with lung cancer and their families. The study involved two lung cancer nurse specialists and 16 patients and family members who used e-mail with them during the 6-month study period. Data were collected from three sources: (1) e-mail contact between the nurse specialists and patients/family members, (2) patient/family member questionnaire and (3) a focus group/reflective session with the nurse specialists. Quantitative data collected from the e-mails and the questionnaires were analysed descriptively and are presented as summary statistics. Text data from the questionnaires and e-mails were analysed using content analysis. Findings suggest that e-mail can be an effective and convenient means of communication between nurse specialists, and patients and family members. Patients and family members reported high levels of satisfaction with this method of communication. It was found to be quick and easy, and patients and family members were satisfied with both the response and the speed of response from the nurse specialists. Nurse specialists were also positive about e-mail use and found that the benefits of using e-mail with patients/family members outweighed any disadvantages. Further investigation is recommended involving other health care professionals and different patient groups to ensure the safe and appropriate use of e-mail within health care. PMID:18406667

  3. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  4. The integration of a nurse model to increase clinical excellence.

    PubMed

    Harris, Karen; Spinweber, Carol; Doherty, Marie; Milligan, Lorraine; Addy, Linda; Hydo, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the integration of a nurse model into practice. The goal of the model was to formulate a well-developed professional self-concept, enabling nurses to articulate the facets of nursing. The facets provide a basis for evaluations and a foundation for clinical nurse specialists to use for professional development during rounds and inservice programs. Various activities were conducted to ensure a comprehensive model that was effective, thereby creating an environment of clinical excellence. PMID:17259815

  5. Auditing paediatric diabetes care and the impact of a specialist nurse trained in paediatric diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, F; Warner, J; Lowes, L; Riberio, J; Gregory, J

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 13 May 1997
 AIMS—To define outcome measures for auditing the clinical care of children and adolescents with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and to assess the benefit of appointing a dedicated paediatric trained diabetes specialist nurse (PDSN).
METHODS—Retrospective analysis of medical notes and hospital records. Glycaemic control, growth, weight gain, microvascular complications, school absence, and the proportion of children undergoing an annual clinical review and diabetes education session were assessed. The effect of the appointment of a PDSN on the frequency of hospital admission, length of inpatient stay, and outpatient attendance was evaluated.
RESULTS—Children with IDDM were of normal height and grew well for three years after diagnosis, but grew suboptimally thereafter. Weight gain was above average every year after diagnosis. Glycaemic control was poor at all ages with only 16% of children having an acceptable glycated haemoglobin. Eighty five per cent of patients underwent a formal annual clinical review, of whom 16% had background retinopathy and 20% microalbuminuria in one or more samples. After appointing the PDSN the median length of hospital stay for newly diagnosed patients decreased from five days to one day, with 10of 24 children not admitted. None of the latter was admitted during the next year. There was no evidence of the PDSN affecting the frequency of readmission or length of stay of children with established IDDM. Non-attendance at the outpatient clinic was reduced from a median of 19 to 10%.
CONCLUSIONS—Outcome measures for evaluating the care of children with IDDM can be defined and evaluated. Specialist nursing support markedly reduces the length of hospital stay of newly diagnosed patients without sacrificing the quality of care.

 PMID:9301347

  6. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed. PMID:27118546

  7. Impact of a nurse managed clinic in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wahlquist, G I

    1984-08-01

    This article indicates the importance of evaluation in the practice of professional nursing. In the chronically ill neurological population both process (what the nurse actually does) and outcome measures need to be considered when formulating the objectives and scope of service to be provided by the clinical nurse specialist. For this population, morbidity was a natural evaluative measure for the nurse to employ as an index of intervention effectiveness. This does not mean to imply that nurses are the sole persons who can manage this type of outpatient clinic, but rather that nursing can play a pivotal part in the promotion of health for this particular group of neurologically disabled individuals. For this population, a consistent caregiver is important in implementing a rehabilitative approach to manage the interdisciplinary effort needed to help these individuals and their families maintain or improve health. PMID:6565749

  8. DOD Health Care. Issues Involving Military Nurse Specialists. Report to the Honorable Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Selected Department of Defense (DOD) policies were examined concerning nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, particularly in regard to the extent to which these nurse specialists are allowed an independent scope of practice in military hospitals and the degree of physician supervision they require. Discussions were held with…

  9. Advanced nurse practitioner-led referral for specialist care and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mashlan, Wendy; Hayes, Julie; Thomas, Ceri

    2016-02-01

    In response to the need for appropriate and timely care of frail older patients admitted to hospital, a dedicated advanced nurse practitioner (ANP)-led referral service was developed. The service has continued to evolve over the 13 years since its implementation in accordance with changing service demands. This article describes the role of the ANP in care of the elderly/rehabilitation medicine and focuses on one area of clinical practice developed by the team: an ANP-led referral service. The aim of developing the service was to ensure that patients who required specialist care and rehabilitation could be identified and assessed as soon as possible after admission, with the premise that they could be transferred to a bed in care of the elderly medical wards. This was perceived by the ANPs to be advantageous for patients, who would receive care from a specialist team, and for care of the elderly staff who could use their knowledge and skills appropriately and safely. PMID:26938608

  10. Communicating clinical nursing issues through the newspaper.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, B J; Kalisch, P A

    1981-01-01

    The information quality of nursing news is a critical factor in gaining public support for the acquisition of scarce resources necessary to undergird clinical nursing practice. A content analysis of 3,098 newspaper articles about nursing in 1978 was employed to examine the treatment of clinical nursing news. Among the variables studied were practice settings, educational levels, role clarity, professional activities, nurse-physician relationships, and degree of favorable image. Results revealed that the quality of news about clinical nursing varied by specialties, with maternity nursing and pediatric nursing news shown to be more progressive and community health nursing and medical-surgical nursing revealed as quite traditional. Psychiatric nursing received an inordinately low level of news coverage. Recommendations are offered to assist improvement in the amount and quality of news treatment of clinical nursing. PMID:6908956

  11. Computers in Hospital Clinical Nursing: Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Thomas, Sister

    The use of computers in hospital clinical nursing and implications for the education of nurses were studied with a sample of 130 hospitals. Of concern was how computers were used, which hospital personnel used computers in health care, costs to educate staff nurses, and who teaches nurses about computers. Questionnaires completed by hospital data…

  12. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges. PMID:15952970

  13. Evaluating Nursing Students' Clinical Performance.

    PubMed

    Koharchik, Linda; Weideman, Yvonne L; Walters, Cynthia A; Hardy, Elaine

    2015-10-01

    This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes aspects of the student evaluation process, which should involve regular feedback and clearly stated performance expectations. PMID:26402292

  14. Case study: factors in defining the nurse informatics specialist role.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations, consultant groups, vendor companies, and academic institutions feel the challenge to enhance user experiences with information systems. To meet this challenge, organizations and companies are looking to better understand and utilize a variety of informatics roles to further marketing, business, or healthcare goals. Nursing is one practice area that can support the successful integration of information systems development, implementation, support, and user experience. However, the definition and development of such a role or position has met with mixed success. This article explores some of the issues and influences related to the role's development. The issues, impacts, and influences have been identified based on healthcare business assessment, job description analysis, employment and project evaluations, and professional standards set by the American Nurses Association. PMID:16669586

  15. [Domains in the clinical practice of Clinical Nursing Experts in Germany and their correspondence with the internationally described "Advanced Nursing Practice"].

    PubMed

    Mendel, Simon; Feuchtinger, Johanna

    2009-06-01

    In spite of a growing trend toward academic education and increasing numbers of "nursing experts" functioning as change agents in Germany, actual nursing experts as in the internationally described Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP) are scarce. Drawing from a ten-year experience in implementing the international concept, the University Hospital Freiburg (UKF), Germany, constitutes a notable exception, as it presently employs ten clinically practicing nursing experts. Based on this background of educating nursing experts, this presentation aims at describing the implementation of the nursing expert's role and its fit and conformance with the international ANP. A 3-stage Delphi design was used for interviewing all the nursing experts at the hospital (n = 10) about their expert opinions; in addition, all nursing managers (n = 7) as well as unit and team leaders (n = 49) were asked about their opinion to relevant functions and domains of nursing experts. The following clinical practice domains of nursing experts were identified: Direct patient care, patient education, support and supervision of nurses, maintenance and expansion of professional skills and knowledge of the nursing staff, counselling of managers, quality assurance and organizational development, theory to practice transfer, nursing research, maintenance of own professional skills and knowledge and continuing education, and publicity work. Additionally, a three-year nursing education, a longer lasting professional experience, a degree in nursing science or nursing education, and specialist skills in the respective area of expertise were identified as credentials for nursing expert practice. The nursing expert concept at UKF shows elements of the international ANP with similarities to the role of a Clinical Nurse Specialist. PMID:19496033

  16. The clinical nurse educator as leader.

    PubMed

    Adelman-Mullally, Theresa; Mulder, Cindy K; McCarter-Spalding, Deborah E; Hagler, Debra A; Gaberson, Kathleen B; Hanner, Mary Beth; Oermann, Marilyn H; Speakman, Elizabeth T; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Young, Patricia K

    2013-01-01

    The National League for Nursing recognizes leadership as an important aspect of the educator role. The purpose of this article is to describe leadership in the context of clinical nursing education and how clinical nurse educators enact leadership. The article identifies particular nursing practice skills and strengths that clinicians bring to nursing education that enhance leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities. After review of several leadership models, we identified five overarching themes that demonstrate how clinical nurse educators exemplify the various models including role modeling, providing vision, helping students to learn, challenging the system or status quo, and seeking relational integrity. We explicate the themes with examples affirming the leadership potential of clinical nurse educators, and suggest ways in which nursing faculty members and administrators might draw on the leadership capital of clinical nurse educators. PMID:22854312

  17. An evidence-based specialist breast nurse role in practice: a multicentre implementation study.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Barbara; Parle, Michael; Roberts, Celia; Redman, Sally; Carrick, Sue; Gallagher, Jillian; Simpson, Judy; Ng, Kitty; Khan, M Asaduzzaman; White, Kate; Salkeld, Glenn; Lewis, Meg; Olver, Ian; Gill, Grantly; Marchant, Mary; Coates, Alan; North, Robert; Akers, Gina; Cannon, Andrea; Gray, Christine; Liebelt, Jeanette; Rodger, Alan; Henderson, Michael; Stoney, David; Hickey, Pat; Archer, Stephen; Metcalf, Cecily; Trotter, James

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility, implementation, acceptability and impact of an evidence-based specialist breast care nurse (SBN) model of care in Australia. Primary data were collected from four diverse Australian breast cancer treatment centres over a 12-month period. The design was a multicentre demonstration project. Information about the provision of care and patient needs was collected through prospective logs. Structured interviews were conducted with women who received the SBN intervention (N = 167) and with a control group of women treated prior to the intervention period (N = 133). Health professionals (N = 47) were interviewed about their experience of the SBN. Almost all women had contact with an SBN at five scheduled consultations and 67% of women in the intervention group requested at least one additional consultation with the SBN. Women in the intervention group were more likely to receive hospital fact sheets and to be told about and participate in clinical trials. Ninety-eight per cent of women reported that the availability of an SBN would affect their choice of hospital, with 48% indicating that they would recommend only a hospital with a SBN available. Health professionals reported that SBNs improved continuity of care, information and support for the women, and resulted in more appropriate referrals and use of the time of other members of the team. In conclusion, the SBN model is feasible and acceptable within diverse Australian treatment centres; there is evidence that some aspects of care were improved by the SBN. PMID:12641561

  18. Lung cancer treatment rates and the role of the lung cancer nurse specialist: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Judy; McDonnell, Ann; Borthwick, Diana; White, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This qualitative study examines how the Lung Cancer Nurse Specialist (LCNS) role operates and why they may be able to increase access to treatment. Setting 4 Hospital NHS Foundation Trusts in England. Design A multiple case study design using semistructured interviews, observation and Framework Analysis techniques. Participants Four LCNSs, comprised the ‘cases’. Twenty four clinicians who worked with the LCNS participated in individual interviews. Six LCNSs took part in a group interview and 60 lung cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) members and co-ordinators were observed in the MDT meeting. Results The LCNS is crucial within the MDT and can act as a catalyst to patient access to treatment. The study identified the clinical activity (assessment, managing symptoms, psychological support and information provision) and role characteristics that can facilitate treatment access. These characteristics are the LCNS's presence across the patient pathway, acting as the ‘hub’ of the MDT, maintaining a holistic patient focus and working to an advanced level of practice. The findings indicate how factors may have a cumulative impact on treatment access. Conclusions If UK patient with lung cancer survival rates are to improve in line with comparable countries, we need to employ every advantage. This study demonstrates how the LCNS role may open doors to positive patient outcomes, including treatment. Further research is required to explore patients’ experiences, decision-making and attitudes to treatment. PMID:26685023

  19. Associations between Stroke Mortality and Weekend Working by Stroke Specialist Physicians and Registered Nurses: Prospective Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Benjamin D.; Ayis, Salma; Campbell, James; Cloud, Geoffrey C.; James, Martin; Hoffman, Alex; Tyrrell, Pippa J.; Wolfe, Charles D. A.; Rudd, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported higher mortality for patients admitted on weekends. It is not known whether this “weekend effect” is modified by clinical staffing levels on weekends. We aimed to test the hypotheses that rounds by stroke specialist physicians 7 d per week and the ratio of registered nurses to beds on weekends are associated with mortality after stroke. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective cohort study of 103 stroke units (SUs) in England. Data of 56,666 patients with stroke admitted between 1 June 2011 and 1 December 2012 were extracted from a national register of stroke care in England. SU characteristics and staffing levels were derived from cross-sectional survey. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of 30-d post-admission mortality, adjusting for case mix, organisational, staffing, and care quality variables. After adjusting for confounders, there was no significant difference in mortality risk for patients admitted to a stroke service with stroke specialist physician rounds fewer than 7 d per week (adjusted HR [aHR] 1.04, 95% CI 0.91–1.18) compared to patients admitted to a service with rounds 7 d per week. There was a dose–response relationship between weekend nurse/bed ratios and mortality risk, with the highest risk of death observed in stroke services with the lowest nurse/bed ratios. In multivariable analysis, patients admitted on a weekend to a SU with 1.5 nurses/ten beds had an estimated adjusted 30-d mortality risk of 15.2% (aHR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07–1.29) compared to 11.2% for patients admitted to a unit with 3.0 nurses/ten beds (aHR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77–0.93), equivalent to one excess death per 25 admissions. The main limitation is the risk of confounding from unmeasured characteristics of stroke services. Conclusions Mortality outcomes after stroke are associated with the intensity of weekend staffing by registered nurses but not 7-d/wk ward rounds by stroke

  20. An evaluation of a specialist nursing service for adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Richard; McLaren, Susan; Corrigan, Philomena; Filer, Lynda

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate grown-up congenital heart (GUCH) patients' experiences and satisfaction with the delivery of a nurse specialist service, including perceived priorities and recommendations for future service delivery. A service evaluation utilizing descriptive, cross-sectional survey principles was conducted over a 2 year period. Postal questionnaires were sent to three patient cohorts (general adult n = 747; pregnancy n = 202; learning disability n = 72). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. The majority of respondents were satisfied with the nursing care provided, including information provision, time made available to discuss needs, emotional support, well-being, self-management and symptom distress. Priority areas included timely information and advice; specialist knowledge and expertise; effective care coordination, monitoring and support. Accessibility, contact and responsiveness were dominant. A majority of patients agreed that their first, second and third-rated priorities had been met. Findings identified strong commitment, support and satisfaction with the GUCH nurse specialist service. PMID:25307531

  1. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them. PMID:17950499

  2. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn. PMID:8576492

  3. Clinical Nursing Instructor Perception of the Influence of Engagement in Bedside Nursing Practice on Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experiences are an integral component of nursing education. Because the amount of time that a student spends in clinical experiences can be as many as twelve to sixteen hours per week, the clinical instructor plays a significant role in the nursing student's development of nursing knowledge. Many nurse educators attempt to balance dual…

  4. Evaluation of specialists' outreach clinics in general practice in England: process and acceptability to patients, specialists, and general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, A; Stramer, K; Dickinson, E; Windsor, J; Bond, M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The wider study aimed to evaluate specialists' outreach clinics in relation to their costs, processes, and effectiveness, including patients' and professionals' attitudes. The data on processes and attitudes are presented here. DESIGN: Self administered questionnaires were drawn up for patients, their general practitioners (GPs) and specialists, and managers in the practice. Information was sought from hospital trusts. The study formed a pilot phase prior to a wider evaluation. SETTING: Nine outreach clinics in general practices in England, each with a hospital outpatient department as a control clinic were studied. SUBJECTS: The specialties included were ear, nose, and throat surgery; rheumatology; and gynaecology. The subjects were the patients who attended either the outreach clinics or hospital outpatients clinics during the study period, the outreach patients' GPs, the outreach patients' and outpatients' specialists, the managers in the practices, and the NHS trusts which employed the specialists. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Process items included waiting lists, waiting times in clinics, number of follow up visits, investigations and procedures performed, treatment, health status, patients' and specialists' travelling times, and patients' and doctors' attitudes to, and satisfaction with, the clinic. RESULTS: There was no difference in the health status of patients in relation to the clinic site (ie, outreach and hospital outpatients' clinics) at baseline, and all but one of the specialists said there were no differences in casemix between their outreach and outpatients' clinics. Patients preferred, and were more satisfied with, care in specialists' outreach clinics in general practice, in comparison with outpatients' clinics. The outreach clinics were rated as more convenient than outpatients' clinics in relation to journey times; those outreach patients in work lost less time away from work than outpatients' clinic patients due to the clinic attendance

  5. Specialist nurse support for patients with stroke in the community: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, A.; Young, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate whether specialist nurse visits enhance the social integration and perceived health of patients with stroke or alleviate stress in carers in longer term stroke care. DESIGN--Stratified randomised controlled trial; both groups assessed at time of recruitment and at 3, 6, and 12 months. SETTING--Patients with disability related to new stroke who lived in their own homes in the Bradford Metropolitan District. SUBJECTS--240 patients aged 60 years or over, randomly allocated to control group (n = 120) or intervention group (n = 120). Intervention--Visits by specialist outreach nurses over 12 months to provide information, advice, and support; minimum of six visits during the first six months. The control group received no visits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The Barthel index (functional ability), the Frenchay activities index (social activity), the Nottingham health profile (perceived health status). Stress among carers was indicated by the general health questionnaire-28 (28 items). The nurses recorded their interventions in trial diaries. RESULTS--There were no significant differences in perceived health, social activities, or stress among carers between the treatment and control groups at any of the assessments points. A subgroup of mildly disabled patients with stroke (Barthel index 15-19) had an improved social outcome at six months (Frenchay activities index, Median difference 3 (95% confidence interval 0 to 6; P = 0.03) and for the full 12 months of follow up (analysis of covariance P = 0.01) compared with the control group. CONCLUSIONS--The specialist nurse intervention resulted in a small improvement in social activities only for the mildly disabled patients. No proved strategy yet exists that can be recommended to address the psychosocial difficulties of patients with stroke and their families. PMID:8664717

  6. Perspectives on developing, marketing, and implementing a new clinical specialist position.

    PubMed

    Ball, G B

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) who is involved in setting up a new position. The article describes the use of marketing strategies as a means of introducing the role to a prospective employer. Three guidelines are proposed as a framework for successful development of a new position. They are: (1) clearly defined purposes, goals, and role responsibilities, (2) mutual agreement of role expectations, and (3) self-confidence of clinical knowledge and ability. The article discusses the issues of unrealistic expectations, credibility, and role competition as potential difficulties in implementing a new position and offers suggestions to assist the CNS to realize success in implementing a new position. The key to success in setting up a new position is to develop the function that makes the CNS most valuable to the employer. PMID:2317720

  7. Using Computerized Clinical Nursing Data Bases for Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail, Lillian M.; Lange, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the recognition of differences between clinical and research data in using computerized clinical nursing databases and the issues of privacy and confidentiality for patients whose records are involved. Describes procedures for assessing the quality and usability of these data for nursing research. (SK)

  8. A Facility Specialist Model for Improving Retention of Nursing Home Staff: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda; Henderson, Charles, Jr.; Robison, Julie; Hegeman, Carol; Graham, Edwin; Schultz, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a randomized, controlled intervention study designed to reduce employee turnover by creating a retention specialist position in nursing homes. Design and Methods: We collected data three times over a 1-year period in 30 nursing homes, sampled in stratified random manner from facilities in New York State and…

  9. The Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart-Siddall, Sandra; And Others

    The Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Center (RCNP) was begun in Chico, California, in 1975 to develop, implement, evaluate, and disseminate a model of a rural internship program in an effort to attract nurses to rural communities. Run by a director, clinical coordinator, full-time secretary, and half-time typist, the program places BS/RN degree…

  10. Prisons: Logical, Innovative Clinical Nursing Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Honore Culleton

    1991-01-01

    The nursing faculty at Mercy College (New York) affiliated with several prison facilities to provide clinical experiences for senior nursing students. An ideal setting for the clinical group leadership course, the prison affiliations also helped students develop social awareness and advocacy strategies for this at-risk population. (SK)

  11. [Exploring moral distress among clinical nurses].

    PubMed

    Lovato, Sabrina; Lovato, Liliana; Cunico, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Moral distress in nursing practice is described as a suffering situation that arises when the nurse is unable to act her/his ethical choices, when institutional constraints interfere with acting in the way she/he believes to be right. The aim is to describe nursing practice situations causing moral distress resulting from the recognition of the ethical appropriate actions combined with the impossibility to pursue it; to describe how nurses manage moral distress situations and the strategies to cope with them. A focus group was conducted in three wards of a large teaching-hospital in the north of Italy. In another ward the nurses were asked to write a moral distress experience. A total of 40 nurses were involved and 50 experiences collected. The experiences' analysis has shown 5 source areas of moral distress: 1) clinical decision; 2) nursing competences; 3) nurse-physician collaboration; 4) organization of care; 5) safe care. For each area the most frequent themes were highlighted.Areas of clinical decision, nursing competences, nurse-physician collaboration involve nurse leaders in identification and implementation of strategies for managing moral distress. PMID:23121880

  12. Nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education

    PubMed Central

    HEIDARI, MOHAMMAD REZA; NOROUZADEH, REZA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students’ perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were selected randomly from nursing and midwifery schools (Tehran). Data collection instrument was a researcher made questionnaire consisting of five domains: objective and curricula, instructor, feedback to student in clinical field, clinical environment, supervision and evaluation. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for each item, using SPSS, ver.14. Chi- square test was used to compare the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education based on age, sex and the work experience. The significance level was considered 0.05. Results: Mean age of the students was 21.58±26.97 students (66%) were male. 44 students (30.1%) had work experience (3.58±6.48 month). Male and female students had different perceptions in domains of clinical education (p<0.05). Nursing student had different perceptions as to objectives and curricula (p=0.039), how to deal with students in the clinical environment (p=0.032), supervision, and evaluation (p<0.001) with respect to their work experience duration. The most positive responses were in clinical instructor (81.5%) and the most negative ones were the clinical environment (33.66%), respectively. Conclusion: Providing an optimal clinical environment and improving the supervision and evaluation of student practice should prioritized in schools of nursing and midwifery. PMID:25587554

  13. The Nephrology Clinical Research Nurse Role: Potential Role Conflicts.

    PubMed

    Micklos, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is becoming more visible to nephrology professionals. As more nephrology practices and units are participating in clinical trials, clinical research nursing is gaining interest as a career niche among nephrology nurses. This unique specialty requires that nephrology clinical nurse nurses (CRNs) reconcile the roles of nurse as caregiver and nurse as researcher, which may result in a role conflict. Nephrology nurses should be aware that they may experience this role conflict when transitioning from patient care to a position as a clinical research nurse. These nurses can rely on the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics for Nurses and the Oncology Nursing Society's Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse Competencies to help reconcile the potential role conflict. PMID:27501633

  14. Exploring how nurse lecturers maintain clinical credibility.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Melanie T

    2005-01-01

    The role of the nurse lecturer is changing. There is growing pressure from the government and professionals alike to recruit nurse teachers who posses both practical and recent experience of nursing [Department of Health, 1999. Making a Difference: Strengthening the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Contribution to Health and Health Care. DOH, London; UKCC, 2000. Standards for the Preparation of Teachers of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting. UKCC, London]. Whilst much of the literature available suggests a growing concern amongst practitioners, students and nurse educationalists themselves about the importance of being ;clinically credible', what is not clear is how tangible it is to maintain currency and clinical credibility. In addition, the term ;clinical credibility' is in itself ill-defined. An exploratory study was undertaken within one higher education institution which sought to seek the views of nurse lecturers. The principles of ethnography were applied to this research. The sample included six of the most recently appointed nurse lecturers within one academic faculty who taught predominantly on pre-registration programmes. Data from individual and focus group interviews was analysed using a thematic content analysis approach. The findings are discussed which embrace the concepts of: working ;hands on' in the clinical area, clinical currency, transferability of skills, clinical visibility and role development. Recommendations for the development of professional practice are offered. PMID:19038175

  15. Partnering to Promote Evidence-Based Practice in a Community Hospital: Implications for Nursing Professional Development Specialists.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Martha E F; Collier, Andrea; Collins, Mara; Crowley, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Nursing professional development specialists working in community hospitals face significant barriers to evidence-based practice that academic medical centers do not. This article describes 7 years of a multifaceted, service academic partnership in a large, urban, community hospital. The partnership has strengthened the nursing professional development role in promoting evidence-based practice across the scope of practice and serves as a model for others. PMID:27187827

  16. Educating nursing students in clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Ailey, Sarah; Lamb, Karen; Friese, Tanya; Christopher, Beth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    One of the goals of nursing education is to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning skills who are capable of improving outcomes in complex healthcare systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Nursing Leadership, generalist entry graduate nursing students at Rush University in Chicago, part of a large academic medical centre with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice, are educated using a curriculum based on the clinical nurse leader (CNL) competencies. This article presents a case study that demonstrates how the model is used to provide experiences for learning the CNL role. The students learn leadership in practice through their involvement in ongoing efforts at the medical centre to improve the care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The case study provides lessons in teaching CNL leadership competencies through efforts to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients. PMID:25629348

  17. Wireless Handhelds to Support Clinical Nursing Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our implementation and evaluation of a wireless handheld learning environment used to support a clinical nursing practicum course. The learning environment was designed so that nursing students could use handhelds for recording information, organizing ideas, assessing patients, and also for interaction and collaboration with…

  18. Preceptor Handbook: Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart-Siddall, Sandra; Haberlin, Jean

    This handbook provides Rural Clinical Nurse Placement Program (RCNP) preceptors with a program overview and practical suggestions to apply during student placement. An introductory section describes how the program addresses the maldistribution of nurses by raising awareness about the rural experience, adding a needed perspective to the urban bias…

  19. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  20. Roles and Responsibilities of Clinical Nurse Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchhoff, Karin T.; Mateo, Magdelena A.

    1996-01-01

    A follow-up survey of 142 nurse researchers employed in clinical settings (75% response) found that fewer than half have a budget, 52% have secretarial support, 82% have a research committee, and 71% report to the chief nurse executive. Although their positions were primarily research, the average time spent on research was 50%. (JOW)

  1. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by

  2. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application. PMID:25464952

  3. Course strategies for clinical nurse leader development.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Sally; Grossman, Sheila; Godfrey, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    The scope of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) is evolving in practice across the country. The preparation of this pivotal role in a complex healthcare environment has prompted the collaboration of nurse academics, nurse administrators, and clinicians to design unique educational experiences to maximize best practice. Knowledge attained regarding healthcare improvement and patient safety must not only be theoretical, but personal and application focused. Utilizing the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's CNL white paper and published resources faculty developed a clinical leadership course focused on active learning and reflection. Students explore concepts of improvement and quality related to business models of high functioning organizations including healthcare. Three key components of the course are described in detail; "quality is personal", executive interviews and the "5P" clinical microsystems assessment. Evaluation outcomes are discussed. Course content and innovative teaching/learning strategies for CNL are shared which may support the growth of CNL program development nationally. PMID:22640946

  4. Clinical misconduct among South Korean nursing students.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jun; Park, Seungmi; Jang, In-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the extent and predictors of unethical clinical behaviors among nursing students in South Korea. From survey data of 345 undergraduate nursing students, unethical clinical behaviors were examined with respect to 11 individual characteristics, frequency and perceived seriousness of classroom cheating, two factors of individual attitude, and four contextual factors. Qualitative data from two focus group interviews were analyzed to explore reasons for and contexts of unethical clinical behaviors. About sixty-six percent of the participants engaged in one or more unethical clinical behaviors over a one-semester period. The prevalence of such behaviors varied widely from 1.7% to 40.9% and was related to the type of nursing program, the number of clinical practicum semesters completed, ethical attitudes toward cheating behaviors, the frequency of cheating on assignments, the frequency of cheating on exams, the perceived prevalence of cheating by peers, and prior knowledge of academic integrity. According to the regression analysis, the last four variables explained 29.4% of the variance in the prevalence of unethical clinical behaviors. In addition, multiple reasons and possible interventions for clinical misconduct were reported during the focus group interviews. Unlike cheating in the classroom, clinical misconduct was strongly induced by clinical nurses and poor clinical practice environments. In sum, unethical clinical behaviors were widespread among the participants and need to be corrected. PMID:24837816

  5. Nurses' experiences of clinical commissioning group boards.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; O'Driscoll, Mike; Savage, Jan; Lee, Gay; Dixon, Roz

    2016-06-15

    Aim To explore the experience of governing body nurses appointed to clinical commissioning group (CCG) boards; how they perform their responsibilities; and their perceived effectiveness in ensuring safe, patient-centred care and the factors that influence their effectiveness. Method This was a small pilot study using a mixed methods approach. There were four phases of the study: literature review, qualitative data collection (interviews), quantitative data collection (survey), and final data analysis. Findings In the early stages of the formation of CCGs, few governing body nurses had relevant experience to meet the needs of a strategic role, and many of these nurses had no proper job description, too little time to carry out their responsibilities, little management support, and unequal access to training, development, formal support or supervision compared to GP colleagues. Two working patterns or models of work of governing body nurses emerged: the full-time integrated executive statutory role and the part-time non-executive statutory role. Quality and quality assurance were the most frequently cited roles or responsibilities of governing body nurses in CCGs, and their highest priority was to improve the population's health. Conclusion The role of governing body nurse has emerged at a time of organisational change, and following extensive criticism of nursing and nurses in the media. Nurses' roles and experiences are affected by these contextual events and by the emerging structures and diversity of CCGs. Further research is required into the leadership role of governing body nurses, succession planning, and the effectiveness of their relationships with other senior nurses. PMID:27305258

  6. The nurse-patient relationship in pre-hospital emergency care--from the perspective of Swedish specialist ambulance nursing students.

    PubMed

    Berntsson, Tommy; Hildingh, Cathrine

    2013-10-01

    The development of the Swedish ambulance service has resulted in three different competence levels in Swedish ambulance teams: specialist ambulance nurses, registered nurses and emergency medical technicians. A nursing scientific model developed by Peplau (Peplau, H., 1991. Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Springer Publishing Company, New York.) breaks down the nurse-patient relationship into a number of phases: an orientation, an identification, an exploitation and a resolution phase. This model has then been adapted to the pre-hospital emergency care by Suserud (Dahlberg, K., Segesten, K., Nyström, M., Suserud, B.-O., Fagerberg, I., 2003. Att förstå vårdvetenskap [To Understand Caring Science]. Studentlitteratur, Lund.). The purpose of this study was to explore, by direct content analysis, how the phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship described by Suserud (Dahlberg et al., 2003), emerge in 17 specialist ambulance nursing students descriptions of ambulance missions. The results show that the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship could be identified and each phase includes several different parts. Furthermore, the results show that the parts of each phase can vary depending on the patient's condition and the environmental circumstances of the ambulance mission. This improved understanding of the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship, and their parts, could be used by ambulance team members as a support during the pre-hospital caring process in ambulance missions. This new knowledge could also be used in education. PMID:23245810

  7. Nursing students' perceptions of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Windsor, A

    1987-04-01

    Senior nursing students were interviewed in this study to better understand the clinical learning experience from the students' point of view. Results of the study revealed that the nursing students were indeed learning in their clinical experience. The major categories of learning were classified as nursing skills, time management, and professional socialization. The quality of learning was reportedly affected by the quality of the student's preparation, characteristics of the instructor, and the variety of clinical opportunities to which students were exposed. The data also reflected a pattern of student development which was separated into three stages. The first stage was permeated with anxiety and obsession with the rules of task performance. The second stage was a difficult transition period where students struggled with identifying the roles of nurses. During the final stage, the students become more comfortable with performing nursing tasks and become interested in expanding their role and becoming more independent. As the students strived for independence, they identified more closely with staff nurses and withdrew from instructors. PMID:3035128

  8. Understanding clinical nursing education: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Sherry; O'Connor, Maureen; Hannesson, Teresa; Cheetham, Karleen

    2016-03-01

    Clinical experiences are recognized as a critical aspect of nursing education, highlighting the importance of the perspectives of those providing clinical instruction. The aim of this mixed methods descriptive study was to discover the knowledge and guidance needs of preceptors and clinical faculty who provide clinical instruction to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students. Fifteen clinical faculty and 17 preceptors were surveyed using a questionnaire developed and piloted by the researchers. Although preceptors and clinical faculty reported a high level of knowledge and confidence in their ability to guide student nurses, they also identified the need for additional support for their teaching roles. Analysis of the qualitative data provided insights into what helped and what hindered clinical instruction, as well as what could enhance clinical instruction. The development, implementation, and evaluation of formal education and mentorship processes for preceptors and clinical faculty are recommended in order to meet these knowledge and guidance gaps. Further research is also needed to explore how to clinical instruction could be tailored to the capacity of those engaged in the experiences and to clinical environments. PMID:26775165

  9. The uniqueness of elderly care: registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-04-01

    The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses' experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments. PMID:23954003

  10. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  11. Role of clinical nurse leadership in improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jill; Quillinan, Bernie; Carolan, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Leadership in nursing plays a crucial part in the provision of good patient care. However, the terms 'nursing leadership' and 'nursing management' are often confused. This article discusses the difficulties in defining 'clinical leadership', outlines its development in the Republic of Ireland, and identifies issues that must be addressed if clinical nurse leaders are to be effective. PMID:20050482

  12. A new mode of community continuing care service for COPD patients in China: participation of respiratory nurse specialists

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pingdong; Gong, Yucui; Zeng, Guangqiao; Ruan, Liang; Li, Guifen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study explored a community nursing service mode in which respiratory nurse specialists cared for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a 12-week period after hospital discharge, with the aim of better preventing acute exacerbations, improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and reducing medical expenses in these patients. Methods: We carried out a prospective randomized controlled study in which 68 COPD patients discharged were recruited from a general hospital in Guangzhou, China, were randomized divided into two groups. The control group underwent conventional nursing care, and the intervention group received community continuing care by respiratory nurse specialists. The observation period was 12 weeks. The results of intervention were evaluated using the Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire (SOLDQ) and the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). In addition, the frequency of acute exacerbations, emergency treatments or hospitalizations, and medical expenses were recorded in the 12-week observation period. Results: After six weeks, the total and subscale scores (P < 0.05) of SOLDQ and CSES significantly improved compared to the baseline ones in the intervention group. The control group had significantly higher scores in the treatment satisfaction (TS) of SOLDQ, the total score, and the weather/environment and behavioral risk factors of CSES. After 12 weeks, the total and subscale scores of SOLDQ and CSES showed a sustained and significant growth in the intervention group (P < 0.05). The control group had significantly higher scores only in the weather/environment risk factor of CSES. During the 12-week observation, the intervention group had significantly fewer acute exacerbations, emergency treatments or re-hospitalizations and significantly lower average medical expenses than the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Community continuing care by respiratory nurse specialists may improve HRQOL, increase self

  13. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care: Survey of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Patra, Lipika; Usha Rani, MR; Lohitashva, SO; Rao, Raghavendra; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Vallath, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Palliative care is usually delivered late in the course of illness trajectory. This precludes patients on active disease modifying treatment from receiving the benefit of palliative care intervention. A survey was conducted to know the opinion of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients about the role of early specialist palliative care in cancer. Methods: A nonrandomized descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary cancer care center in India. Thirty oncologists, sixty oncology nurses, and sixty patients were surveyed. Results: Improvement in symptom control was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to pain (Z = −4.10, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.84, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.20, P = 0.001); nausea and vomiting (Z = −3.75, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.3, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.1, P = 0.001); constipation (Z = −3.29, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.96, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.49, P = 0.001); breathlessness (Z = −3.57, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.03, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.99, P = 0.001); and restlessness (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.23, P = 0.001), (Z = −3.22, P = 0.001). Improvement in end-of-life care management was appreciated by oncologists and oncology nurses with respect to communication of prognosis (Z = −4.04, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.20, P = 0.001); discussion on limitation of life-sustaining treatment (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.53, P = 0.001); end-of-life symptom management (Z = −4.17, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.59, P = 0.001); perimortem care (Z = −3.86, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.80, P = 0.001); and bereavement support (Z = −3-80, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.95, P = 0.001). Improvement in health-related communication was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to communicating health related information in a sensitive manner (Z = −3.74, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.47, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.12, P = 0.001); conducting family meeting (Z = −3.12, P = 0.002), (Z = −4.60, P = 0

  14. Clinical reasoning for the infectious disease specialist: a primer to recognize cognitive biases.

    PubMed

    Vick, Amanda; Estrada, Carlos A; Rodriguez, J Martin

    2013-08-01

    Infectious disease specialists are frequently consulted for diagnostic and therapeutic advice on challenging cases. When evaluating patients, the infectious disease specialist is well positioned to offer an appropriate diagnostic approach but is also at risk of not recognizing the correct diagnosis for a variety of reasons. We believe it is important to provide infectious disease specialists and trainees with a fundamental understanding of diagnostic errors, clinical reasoning, and cognitive biases. We present 2 cases demonstrating common cognitive biases leading to diagnostic errors, and we reflect on strategies that may aid in their prevention. We hope to provide knowledge and tools that may help prevent diagnostic errors in the future. PMID:23595833

  15. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting. PMID:18590978

  16. Recognizing and defining clinical nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Stanley, David

    This article addresses the issue of clinical leadership and how it is defined. The concepts and definitions of clinical leadership are considered as well as the results of new research that suggests that clinical leaders can be seen as experts in their field, and because they are approachable and are effective communicators, are empowered to act as a role model, motivating others by matching their values and beliefs about nursing and care to their practice. This is supported by a new leadership theory, congruent leadership, proposed as the most appropriate leadership theory to support an understanding of clinical leadership. Congruent leaders (clinical nurse leaders) are followed because there is a match between the leader's values and beliefs and their actions. PMID:16493288

  17. Paediatric Low-Vision Assessment and Management in a Specialist Clinic in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Julie; Harper, Robert; Biswas, Sus; Lloyd, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a survey of the demographical, educational and visual functional characteristics of children attending a specialist paediatric low-vision assessment clinic at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Comprehensive data were collected retrospectively from children attending the paediatric low-vision clinic between January 2003 and…

  18. Engaging Clinical Nurses in Quality Improvement Projects.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-10-01

    Clinical nurses have the knowledge and expertise required to provide efficient and proficient patient care. Time and knowledge deficits can prevent nurses from developing and implementing quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. This article reviews a process for professional development of clinical nurses that helped them to define, implement, and analyze quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. The purpose of this project was to educate advanced clinical nurses to manage a change project from inception to completion, using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) Change Acceleration Process as a framework. One-to-one mentoring and didactic in-services advanced the knowledge, appreciation, and practice of advanced practice clinicians who completed multiple change projects. The projects facilitated clinical practice changes, with improved patient outcomes; a unit cultural shift, with appreciation of quality improvement and evidence-based projects; and engagement with colleagues. Project outcomes were displayed in poster presentations at a hospital exposition for knowledge dissemination. PMID:26430867

  19. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Methods: Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Results: Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Conclusions and Recommendations: Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior. PMID:15858624

  20. Studies on nursing risks and measures of clinical medication.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Bai, Jie; Huang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the cause analysis of clinical medication nursing risks and propose relevant nursing measures, so as to control and reduce the clinical nursing risks and reach the physical and mental safety of patients and nurses. Clinical nursing risk events with 30 cases in TCM Hospital of Zhengzhou City from June 2010 to April 2012 were underwent statistical analyses. The risk of medication error ranked the first in the direct reasons of nursing risks, accounting for a higher ratio. Moreover, the reasons of nursing risks were also involved in nonstandard operation, disease observation and other relative factors. Nurses must fully understand the relative factors of medication nursing risks, regarding the patients as their own family and always permeating the consciousness of nursing risks into the working process. PMID:26525028

  1. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  2. Partnering for the Clinical Preparation of Education Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Suzanne; Cote, Debra

    2016-01-01

    NCATE's (2010) "Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel" calls for a shift toward clinical preparation and partnerships as a means of adequately preparing new teachers for the 21st century classroom. Looking at special education teacher preparation, there exist few model programs that have paved the road for others in implementing new clinical…

  3. A study on specialist or special disease clinics based on big data.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhuyuan; Fan, Xiaowei; Chen, Gong

    2014-09-01

    Correlation analysis and processing of massive medical information can be implemented through big data technology to find the relevance of different factors in the life cycle of a disease and to provide the basis for scientific research and clinical practice. This paper explores the concept of constructing a big medical data platform and introduces the clinical model construction. Medical data can be collected and consolidated by distributed computing technology. Through analysis technology, such as artificial neural network and grey model, a medical model can be built. Big data analysis, such as Hadoop, can be used to construct early prediction and intervention models as well as clinical decision-making model for specialist and special disease clinics. It establishes a new model for common clinical research for specialist and special disease clinics. PMID:25186249

  4. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

  5. Clinical nurses' characterizations of patient coping problems.

    PubMed

    Becket, N

    1991-01-01

    The author reports the findings from a qualitative study of diagnostic data obtained and interpreted by hospital nurses on the coping of adult patients and their families. Clinical data taken from taped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory and analytic induction techniques. The data were then compared with diagnoses accepted for testing by NANDA. The phenomena described by the research did not match the NANDA constructs for individual and family coping problems. Nurses' assessments of coping response, however, fit within transactional theory. The use of the term "ineffective" to qualify coping was generally avoided. Ineffective coping, suggesting an outcome or product of coping, was not often considered applicable to the coping responses nurses found appropriate at specific times in specific situations. PMID:1873103

  6. Multi-institutional Collaboration to Promote Undergraduate Clinical Research Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Spencer, Becky; Beal, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is distinct from nursing research and includes the coordination and delivery of care for patients enrolled in clinical research trials. An innovative elective in clinical research nursing was developed collaboratively by stakeholders at a university, research institute, and national organization to provide experiential learning for undergraduate nursing students. The multi-institutional collaborative process, course overview, and precepted experience are described. PMID:26164323

  7. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience. PMID:27295244

  8. Understanding Clinical Expertise: Nurse Education, Experience, and the Hospital Context

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Lake, Eileen T.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nursing expertise is central to quality patient care. Research on factors that contribute to expertise has focused largely on individual nurse characteristics to the exclusion of contextual factors. To address this, we examined effects of hospital contextual factors and individual nurse education and experience on clinical nursing expertise in a cross-sectional analysis of data from 8,611 registered nurses. In a generalized ordered logistic regression analysis, the composition of the hospital staff, particularly the proportion of nurses with at least a bachelor of science in nursing degree, was associated with significantly greater odds of a nurse reporting a more advanced expertise level. Our findings suggest that, controlling for individual characteristics, the hospital context significantly influences clinical nursing expertise. PMID:20645420

  9. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Clinical Specialist, 10-17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These lesson plans and student materials--handouts and workbook--for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for clinical specialists are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Purpose stated for the 105-hour course is to provide…

  10. Survey of US chiropractors' perceptions about their clinical role as specialist or generalist

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Monica; Carber, Lynne A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to provide new information that describes chiropractors' professional identity relative to their perceived clinical role as specialist or generalist. Methods A pragmatic, descriptive, cross-sectional survey was performed of randomly sampled state-board licensed chiropractors in the United States during the period 2002–2003 to assess the chiropractors' perceptions of how their chiropractic patients see them, and how they see themselves, as specialist or generalist. For this exploratory study, we anchored the terms “back pain specialist,” “musculoskeletal specialist,” and “primary care generalist” to brief generic reference definitions in our survey instrument. Results Of our 2598 valid survey contacts, 1343 chiropractors returned their surveys either partially or fully completed, and a total of 720 chiropractor surveys were used in this study. Most of these chiropractors perceived that their new patients viewed them as “back pain specialists.” Chiropractors believed that their established patients (80%), more so than their new patients (58%), were likely to view them as a primary care generalist. Chiropractors described themselves as both specialist and generalist, and they expressed a greater capability to diagnose, rather than to treat, health disorders that were not musculoskeletal. Conclusion Chiropractic physician perceptions as reported in this study suggest that the nature of certain chiropractor-patient relationships may evolve profoundly over time, particularly as patients transition from new to established patients within the chiropractic practice. Understanding the complex nature of chiropractic health care provision may carry implications for advancing evidence-based chiropractic practice and clinical training, enhancing successful and comprehensive management of the complex health concerns of chiropractic patients, fostering beneficial sustained partnerships between chiropractors and their

  11. Competencies within a professional clinical ladder: differences in understanding between nurse managers and staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Erin L; Meucci, Joanne H

    2015-01-01

    Clinical ladders provide a framework for professional nursing development and have shown increased personal and professional satisfaction. This article describes a standardized approach for clinical ladder implementation. Managers' and staff nurses' knowledge of the model must align for important stakeholders to perceive the clinical ladder as valuable. Understanding differences and perspectives can be useful as the basis for education and further clinical ladder refinement augmenting the potential for increased nursing satisfaction and professional development. PMID:25790360

  12. Roles and responsibilities of clinical nurse researchers.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, K T; Mateo, M A

    1996-01-01

    A follow-up survey of 142 nurse researchers employed in clinical settings (NRECS) was conducted 10 years after the first one conducted by Knafl, Bevis, and Kirchhoff in which only 34 individuals qualified for inclusion. An 80-item questionnaire included items about the structure of the position, processes used, variables that may influence outcomes, and outside activities. When ineligible persons were excluded, the response rate was 75 per cent. Most commonly NRECS had positions in clinical settings only (55.7 per cent), offices (75.5 per cent), some staff (72.6 per cent), and secretarial support (52.8 per cent), and they usually reported to the chief nurse executives (71.7 per cent). Although the majority of NRECS reported responsibility for research activities, the average time spent on research is only 50 per cent. Most (82 per cent) have a nursing research committee, but NRECS also sit on other research-related committees in the department or hospital. Details about salary, responsibilities, and processes will be helpful to those preparing themselves or others for this role, for those who wish to start such a position for themselves or another, or for those in the role wanting to know how other NRECS perform. PMID:8632106

  13. New Brunswick nurses' views on nursing research, and factors influencing their research activities in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    New Brunswick became the first province in Canada to require a baccalaureate degree in nursing as the entry to practice, yet nursing research in hospital settings remains quite low. This study examined clinical nurses' views on nursing research, and identified some contributing factors to the research-practice gap. This descriptive, cross-sectional multicenter study involved 1081 nurses working in the Francophone Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick, Canada. Nurses were eager to identify nursing-care problems to improve patient care (92.9%), and to be involved in collecting data for nursing research studies (95.2%). However, without research supervision, few had engaged in basic research activities, such as formulating or refining research questions (24.5%), presenting at research conferences (6.9%), or changing their practice based on research findings (27.2%). Younger, more educated nurses, nurse managers, and educators participated more readily in research. Sharing research and clinical expertise, as well as infrastructures between academic and clinical institutions is the key to enduring successful patient-centered nursing research in clinical settings. Concrete actions are proposed to build clinical nursing research. PMID:26822438

  14. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool. PMID:27235568

  15. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  16. Strengthening Preceptors' Competency in Thai Clinical Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingpun, Renu; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Jumpamool, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of lack of nurses can be solved by employing student nurses. Obviously, nurse instructors and preceptors have to work extremely hard to train student nurses to meet the standard of nursing. The preceptorship model is yet to be explored as to what it means to have an effective program or the requisite skills to be an effective…

  17. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls. PMID:27332171

  18. [Construction of terminology subsets: contributions to clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; de Freitas, Maria Célia; Guedes, Maria Vilaní Cavalcante; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) is a classification system that unifies the elements of nursing practice (diagnoses, interventions and outcomes), enabling elucidation of elements of a specific nursing language through the construction of terminology subsets. In this reflective essay, aspects relevant to the construction of ICNP® terminology subsets are highlighted, as well as their contributions to clinical nursing practice. The development of subsets as a tool that contributes to making nursing language universal, facilitates the communication process, as well as the scientific and technological advancement of the profession, is discussed. Therefore, its use by nurses worldwide is encouraged. PMID:24310697

  19. Reshaping Clinical Nursing Education: An Academic-Service Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Claudia; Dean-Baar, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A nursing school-clinic partnership was designed to teach nursing students community health practice skills. A longitudinal evaluation is being conducted to ensure that it meets the goals of baccalaureate education and urban health nursing and that it follows a multilevel process model of organizational socialization. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  20. Diploma Nursing Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatric Nursing, Role Models, and Clinical Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holder, Elizabeth; Mark, Tony

    A study was conducted at Humber College to investigate the attitudes of college-prepared diploma nursing students towards psychiatric nursing. Specifically, the study sought to determine the effect of psychiatric nursing role models on student attitudes, and whether a relationship existed between clinical placement and student attitudes. The study…

  1. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients’ health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  2. Practicing nurses perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence–based nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing. Methods Naturalistic inquiry informed the method. Using an interpretative approach 18 practicing nurses from Australia, Canada and England were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories and the components of clinical scholarship described by the participants compared to the scholarship framework of Boyer [JHEOE 7:5-18, 2010]. Results Clinical scholarship is difficult to conceptualise. Two of the essential elements of clinical scholarship are vision and passion. The other components of clinical scholarship were building and disseminating nursing knowledge, sharing knowledge, linking academic research to practice and doing practice-based research. Conclusion Academic scholarship dominated the discourse in nursing. However, in order for nursing to develop and to impact on health care, clinical scholarship needs to be explored and theorised. Nurse educators, hospital-based researchers and health organisations need to work together with academics to achieve this goal. Frameworks of scholarship conceptualised by nurse academics are reflected in the findings of this study with their emphasis on reading and doing research and translating it

  3. Aesthetic Leadership: Its Place in the Clinical Nursing World.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-05-01

    Clinical leadership has been identified as crucial to positive patient/client outcomes, across all clinical settings. In the new millennium, transformational leadership has been the dominant leadership style and in more recent times, congruent leadership theory has emerged to explain clinical leadership in nursing. This article discusses these two leadership models and identifies some of the shortcomings of them as models for clinical leadership in nursing. As a way of overcoming some of these limitations, aesthetic leadership is proposed as a style of leadership that is not antithetical to either model and reflects nursing's recognition of the validity of art and aesthetics to nursing generally. Aesthetic leadership is also proposed as a way to identify an expert clinical leader from a less experienced clinical leader, taking a similar approach to the way Benner (1984) has theorised in her staging of novice to expert clinical nurse. PMID:26091400

  4. Community-based care in cystic fibrosis: role of the cystic fibrosis nurse specialist and implications for patients and families.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, J; Burrows, E

    1998-01-01

    Improved survival for cystic fibrosis has rapidly increased over the past four decades, with patients now living well into adult life. With changes in the structure of the National Health Service and the formation of provider units and general practitioner (GP) fund-holding practices, it is important to strengthen links between the hospital and community teams to ensure that the CF patient receives adequate care. Increasingly, treatment is being carried out at home, and this emphasis on home-based therapy demands that parents/carers and patients must acquire the skills and knowledge of complex therapies in order to optimize health. It is the role of the CF nurse specialist (NS) to educate those who will deliver the care, co-ordinate the provision of services at home, liaise with the CF team and community health-care professionals and to support the patient and their carers. PMID:9637934

  5. Cost analysis of Periodontitis management in public sector specialist dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this paper is to quantify the cost of periodontitis management at public sector specialist periodontal clinic settings and analyse the distribution of cost components. Methods Five specialist periodontal clinics in the Ministry of Health represented the public sector in providing clinical and cost data for this study. Newly-diagnosed periodontitis patients (N = 165) were recruited and followed up for one year of specialist periodontal care. Direct and indirect costs from the societal viewpoint were included in the cost analysis. They were measured in 2012 Ringgit Malaysia (MYR) and estimated from the societal perspective using activity-based and step-down costing methods, and substantiated by clinical pathways. Cost of dental equipment, consumables and labour (average treatment time) for each procedure was measured using activity-based costing method. Meanwhile, unit cost calculations for clinic administration, utilities and maintenance used step-down approach. Patient expenditures and absence from work were recorded via diary entries. The conversion from MYR to Euro was based on the 2012 rate (1€ = MYR4). Results A total of 2900 procedures were provided, with an average cost of MYR 2820 (€705) per patient for the study year, and MYR 376 (€94) per outpatient visit. Out of this, 90% was contributed by provider cost and 10% by patient cost; 94% for direct cost and 4% for lost productivity. Treatment of aggressive periodontitis was significantly higher than for chronic periodontitis (t-test, P = 0.003). Higher costs were expended as disease severity increased (ANOVA, P = 0.022) and for patients requiring surgeries (ANOVA, P < 0.001). Providers generally spent most on consumables while patients spent most on transportation. Conclusions Cost of providing dental treatment for periodontitis patients at public sector specialist settings were substantial and comparable with some non-communicable diseases. These findings

  6. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting. PMID:27209870

  7. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    PubMed

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation. PMID:25928758

  8. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  9. The Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinnick, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Public health relies on well trained nurses and clinical experience is an important component of that training. However, clinical experience training for student nurses also has significant challenges, as it can place patients at risk. Also it is difficult to schedule/predict patient conditions and procedures. Human patient simulation (HPS) can…

  10. Physician's Orders, Use of Nursing Resources, and Subsequent Clinical Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griner, Paul F.; Vautrain, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    Orders written by medical residents to be carried out on newly-hospitalized patients were reviewed to determine the frequency of vital signs orders. Subsequent clinical events requiring nurses to contact house officers were determined. Data suggest that physicians should request nurses to use more efficient methods of clinical observation.…

  11. How to set up a nurse-led clinic.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Richard

    2016-05-11

    Nurse-led clinics are a vital part of UK health care. They are diverse and are therefore hard to define, but they involve nurses having their own patient caseload and increased autonomy, often using advanced clinical skills such as physical assessment, diagnosis and medicines management. PMID:27206209

  12. Adult-health/medical-surgical nurses' perceptions of students' contributions to clinical agencies.

    PubMed

    Grindel, Cecelia Gatson; Patsdaughter, Carol A; Medici, Geraldine; Babington, Lynn M

    2003-04-01

    The nursing shortage and accompanying increase in nurses' workloads could suggest that the presence of nursing students on clinical units would further increase nurses' responsibilities. Counterbalancing this concern is the need to adequately prepare the next generation of dedicated and skilled nurses. The question arises as to whether nursing students are an asset or liability to clinical agencies. PMID:12736931

  13. [Clinical nursing research. New standards for quality assurance for nursing and patient].

    PubMed

    Evers, G C

    2000-06-01

    Nursing as a health-service has a long tradition, nursing research however, a relatively short history. Florence Nightingale was the first to publish about nursing research in the year 1858. Since Nightingale, the need to study and improve the efficacy and efficiency of nursing has steadily increased. More than ever before, society needs nursing based on scientific knowledge and not just on unchallenged rituals and traditions. This scientific knowledge base can be acquired by clinical research. Within multidisciplinary clinical research it is necessary to focus on nursing's unique function. Virginia Henderson (1955) and Dorothea Orem (1959) have clearly explicated this function. Designs for clinical nursing research can be (quasi-) experimental, correlational or descriptive. Descriptive research can be qualitative or quantitative. Effects of nursing interventions on decrease of self-care problems and improvement of self-care capability and behaviors, should be investigated by experimental or quasi-experimental studies. Some examples of clinical nursing research are given. The first example demonstrates the effect of quantity and quality of nursing staff on patient's capabilities for hygiene self-care. The second example explicates the relation between self-care and quality of life with breast-cancer patients under chemotherapy treatment. The last example shows the effect of diabetes education on self-care behaviour and metabolic control. The examples given demonstrate the importance of clinical research focused on nursing's unique function. In order to accomplish this, programs of research are needed as well as close co-operation with nursing services, physicians and hospitals. Only when research findings are discussed and implemented in multidisciplinary teams, nursing will become more evidence-based. PMID:10969578

  14. Clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy in a specialist neuropsychiatry service.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adam; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-05-01

    Neuropsychiatry services provide specialist input into the assessment and management of behavioral symptoms associated with a range of neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Despite the centrality of epilepsy to neuropsychiatry and the recent expansion of neuropsychiatry service provision, little is known about the clinical characteristics of patients with epilepsy who are routinely seen by a specialist neuropsychiatry service. This retrospective study filled this gap by retrospectively evaluating a naturalistic series of 60 consecutive patients with epilepsy referred to and assessed within a neuropsychiatry setting. Fifty-two patients (86.7%) had active epilepsy and were under the ongoing care of the referring neurologist for seizure management. The majority of patients (N=42; 70.0%) had a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy, with temporal lobe epilepsy as the most common epilepsy type (N=37; 61.7%). Following clinical assessment, 39 patients (65.0%) fulfilled formal diagnostic criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder; nonepileptic attack disorder (N=37; 61.7%), major depression (N=23; 38.3%), and generalized anxiety disorder (N=16; 26.7%) were the most commonly diagnosed comorbidities. The clinical characteristics of patients seen in specialist neuropsychiatry settings are in line with the results from previous studies in neurology clinics in terms of both epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidity. Our findings confirm the need for the development and implementation of structured care pathways for the neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy, with focus on comorbid nonepileptic attacks and affective and anxiety symptoms. This is of particular importance in consideration of the impact of behavioral symptoms on patients' health-related quality of life. PMID:27057744

  15. A day in the life of a specialist perineal care clinic.

    PubMed

    Shore, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    The specialist perineal care clinic has been running at Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust for over three years. This article tells of a quest to further improve perineal care for women in our care and demonstrates the process from conception to birth of the clinic, as well as the journey taken in order for this service to be set up and run efficiently. Prior to this clinic most women saw different people throughout their care, which was obviously confusing for them, as conflicting advice could be on offer. This clinic has provided consistency and continuity which has improved women's experiences and, in turn, yielded improved outcomes. It has empowered the women to further play a part in their own care from antenatal methods of reducing the chance of perineal trauma to postnatal recovery after perineal breakdown and infection. Both women and staff have benefited from this service as there is always a central point of contact. PMID:26336760

  16. [Documented nursing diagnoses for medical clinic patients].

    PubMed

    Fontes, Cassiana Mendes Bertoncello; da Cruz, Diná Almeida Lopes Monteiro

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports a descriptive study, based on nursing records, of nursing diagnoses documented three months after the implementation of the NANDA-I classification at the University of São Paulo's Hospital Universitário (HU-USP) and proposes outcomes and interventions for the 3 most frequent diagnoses. The convenience sample (34% of the month's admissions) consisted of 30 charts of patients admitted in the Medical Clinic in August of 2004 (60% female, average age 60.9 +/- 23.1 years, mean length of stay = 5.8 +/- 2.7 days). The diagnoses documented on the admission day were manually transcribed from the charts and analyzed according to their frequency. There were 144 diagnoses (31 categories), with an average of 4.8 +/- 4.0 diagnoses per patient (range = 1-10). The most frequent were: acute pain (66.7%), impaired tissue integrity (63.3%), ineffective airway clearance (43.3%), risk of impaired skin integrity (36.7%), and impaired skin integrity (33.3%). The proposed outcomes and interventions are presented. PMID:17977375

  17. The effects of clinical decision making on nurse practitioners' clinical productivity.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, N R; Geller, J M; Weier, A W

    2000-09-01

    The degree of clinical decision making and clinical productivity among nurse practitioners (NPs) is of great interest to policy makers and planners involved in providing appropriate outpatient primary care services. The authors performed a statewide mailed survey of all NPs practicing either full-time or part-time in Wisconsin (response rate of 72.1%) to address the following research questions: Do the demographic characteristics, practice attributes, and primary practice settings of NPs impact their level of clinical decision making (e.g., the autonomy to order laboratory and radiological tests or to refer a patient to a physician specialist other than their collaborating physician)? Do NPs' levels of clinical decision making correlate with their outpatient clinical productivity, adjusting for demographic characteristics, practice attributes, and primary practice settings? The multiple linear regression results indicated that having more years in practice as an NP, practicing in the family specialty area (vs. a combined other category, which included pediatrics, acute care, geriatrics, neonatal, and school), treating patients according to clinical guidelines, practicing in settings with a fewer number of physicians, and practicing in a multispecialty group practice versus a single-specialty group practice were associated with greater levels of clinical decision making. However, NPs who primarily practiced in a hospital/facility-based practice, as compared with a single-specialty group practice, had lower levels of clinical decision making. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, practice attributes, and primary practice settings, NPs with greater clinical decision-making authority had greater outpatient clinical productivity. The conclusions discuss the policy implications of the findings. PMID:11067192

  18. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed. PMID:27487750

  19. Building an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: Cooperative Roles for Pharmacists, Infectious Diseases Specialists, and Clinical Microbiologists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Craft, David W; Katzman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to optimize the use of antimicrobial agents, referred to as antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs), are increasingly becoming part of the clinical enterprise at big and small hospitals. Such programs aim to achieve the synergistic goals of improving patient outcomes, limiting the unintended consequences of drug resistance and superinfections, and reducing health care expenditures. This article will review the need for antimicrobial stewardship and the key components of setting up a program; then, it will describe the ASP at one medical center to underscore how attention to acceptance by the clinical staff is crucial to changing the culture of antimicrobial use. Although the details may differ for each institution, the foundation of a successful stewardship program is support from hospital leadership and the cooperative interaction among the pharmacy, infectious diseases specialists, and clinical microbiologists. PMID:26283698

  20. Examination of the Teaching Styles of Nursing Professional Development Specialists, Part II: Correlational Study on Teaching Styles and Use of Adult Learning Theory.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-07-16

    This article, the second in a two-part series, details a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables (graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, nursing professional development [NPD] certification, and NPD specialist experience) on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development. Using the Principles of Adult Learning Scale, 114 NPD specialists tested the hypothesis that NPD specialists with graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, NPD certification, and NPD experience would use higher levels of adult learning theory in their teaching practices to guide curriculum development than those without these attributes. This hypothesis was rejected as regression analysis revealed only one statistically significant predictor variable, NPD certification, influenced the use of adult learning theory. In addition, analysis revealed NPD specialists tended to support a teacher-centered rather than a learner-centered teaching style, indicating NPD educators are not using adult learning theory to guide teaching practices and curriculum development. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2014;45(8):xxx-xxx. PMID:25019255

  1. Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part II: correlational study on teaching styles and use of adult learning theory.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-08-01

    This article, the second in a two-part series, details a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables (graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, nursing professional development [NPD] certification, and NPD specialist experience) on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development. Using the Principles of Adult Learning Scale, 114 NPD specialists tested the hypothesis that NPD specialists with graduate degrees in nursing education, professional development training in adult learning theory, NPD certification, and NPD experience would use higher levels of adult learning theory in their teaching practices to guide curriculum development than those without these attributes. This hypothesis was rejected as regression analysis revealed only one statistically significant predictor variable, NPD certification, influenced the use of adult learning theory. In addition, analysis revealed NPD specialists tended to support a teacher-centered rather than a learner-centered teaching style, indicating NPD educators are not using adult learning theory to guide teaching practices and curriculum development. PMID:25081125

  2. Attributes of clinical leadership in contemporary nursing: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2013-08-01

    Effective clinical leadership is offered as the key to healthy, functional and supportive work environments for nurses and other health professionals. However, as a concept it lacks a standard definition and is poorly understood. This paper reports on an integrative review undertaken to uncover current understandings of defining attributes of contemporary clinical leadership in nursing. Data collection involved a search of relevant electronic databases for a 10-year period. Keywords for the search were 'clinical leadership' and 'nursing'. Ten research papers met the inclusion criteria for the integrative review. Analysis of these studies indicated clinical leadership attributes had a clinical focus, a follower/team focus or a personal qualities focus; attributes necessary to sustain supportive workplaces and build the capacity and resilience of nursing workforces. The small number of research-based studies yielded for the review indicates the need for further research in the area of clinical leadership. PMID:24099222

  3. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources. PMID:25585469

  4. Impact of managed clinical networks on NHS specialist neonatal services in England: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Gale, C; Santhakumaran, S; Nagarajan, S; Statnikov, Y

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of reorganisation of neonatal specialist care services in England after a UK Department of Health report in 2003. Design A population-wide observational comparison of outcomes over two epochs, before and after the establishment of managed clinical neonatal networks. Setting Epoch one: 294 maternity and neonatal units in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 1 September 1998 to 31 August 2000, as reported by the Confidential Enquiry into Stillbirths and Sudden Deaths in Infancy Project 27/28. Epoch two: 146 neonatal units in England contributing data to the National Neonatal Research Database at the Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. Participants Babies born at a gestational age of 27+0-28+6 (weeks+days): 3522 live births in epoch one; 2919 babies admitted to a neonatal unit within 28 days of birth in epoch two. Intervention The national reorganisation of neonatal services into managed clinical networks. Main outcome measures The proportion of babies born at hospitals providing the highest volume of neonatal specialist care (≥2000 neonatal intensive care days annually), having an acute transfer (within the first 24 hours after birth) and/or a late transfer (between 24 hours and 28 days after birth) to another hospital, assessed by change in distribution of transfer category (“none,” “acute,” “late”), and babies from multiple births separated by transfer. For acute transfers in epoch two, the level of specialist neonatal care provided at the destination hospital (British Association of Perinatal Medicine criteria). Results After reorganisation, there were increases in the proportions of babies born at 27-28 weeks’ gestation in hospitals providing the highest volume of neonatal specialist care (18% (631/3495) v 49% (1325/2724); odds ratio 4.30, 95% confidence interval 3.83 to 4.82; P<0.001) and in acute and late postnatal transfers (7% (235) v 12% (360) and 18% (579) v 22% (640), respectively

  5. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction. PMID:23325095

  6. Science without meritocracy. Discrimination among European specialists in infectious diseases and clinical microbiology: a questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Poljak, Mario; Cacace, Marina; Caiati, Giovanni; Benzonana, Nur; Nagy, Elisabeth; Kortbeek, Titia

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 2009, in a European survey, around a quarter of Europeans reported witnessing discrimination or harassment at their workplace. The parity committee from the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) designed a questionnaire survey to investigate forms of discrimination with respect to country, gender and ethnicity among medical professionals in hospitals and universities carrying out activities in the clinical microbiology (CM) and infectious diseases (ID) fields. Design The survey consisted of 61 questions divided into five areas (sociodemographic, professional census and environment, leadership and generic) and ran anonymously for nearly 3 months on the ESCMID website. Subjects European specialists in CM/ID. Results Overall, we included 1274 professionals. The majority of respondents (68%) stated that discrimination is present in medical science. A quarter of them reported personal experience with discrimination, mainly associated with gender and geographic region. Specialists from South-Western Europe experienced events at a much higher rate (37%) than other European regions. The proportion of women among full professor was on average 46% in CM and 26% in ID. Participation in high-level decision-making committees was significantly (>10 percentage points) different by gender and geographic origin. Yearly gross salary among CM/ID professionals was significantly different among European countries and by gender, within the same country. More than one-third of respondents (38%) stated that international societies in CM/ID have an imbalance as for committee member distribution and speakers at international conferences. Conclusions A quarter of CM/ID specialists experienced career and research discrimination in European hospitals and universities, mainly related to gender and geographic origin. Implementing proactive policies to tackle discrimination and improve representativeness and balance in career among CM

  7. Novices in clinical practice settings: student nurses stories of learning the practice of nursing.

    PubMed

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Wilhelem, Dalit

    2005-08-01

    Drawing on 24 stories of clinical practice in an apprenticeship context of training in Israel, this qualitative study examined student nurses' perspectives towards learning to become a nurse, as revealed through the language and content of their written stories of clinical practice. As our findings suggest, student nurses' stories of learning to become a nurse in practice settings, are characterized by procedural language, by medical rather than nursing terminology, and by a focus on actions rather than on interactions. We have learned that, despite the rich content that characterizes clinical practice settings, the apprenticeship orientation of the training program, combined with student nurses' state of being a novice, yielded representations of the experience of learning to nurse which were characterized by an instrumental perspective towards the practice. We interpret these findings through four interrelated insights that emerge from the study: (1) an 'instrumental practice' orientation in the setting of caring, (2) knowledge of clinical facts-not knowledge of clinical principles, (3) the fragmented character of novices' learning to nurse in practice, and (4) rich content of practice alone does not yield rich content of learning. PMID:16005116

  8. Predictors of Successful Clinical Performance in Associate Degree Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rice, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy and emotional intelligence (EI) as predictors for successful clinical performance in nursing students. Students (n = 56) from 5 associate degree in nursing (ADN) schools in 2 Northeastern states participated in the study. Findings demonstrated significant relationships among EI, self-efficacy, and student-rated clinical competence. The findings from this study support the importance of fostering clinical self-efficacy and building EI abilities in ADN students. PMID:25628244

  9. Mentoring Clinical Nurses to Write for Publication: Strategies for Success.

    PubMed

    Oman, Kathleen S; Mancuso, Mary P; Ceballos, Kirtley; Makic, MaryBeth Flynn; Fink, Regina M

    2016-05-01

    : Clinical nurses often find writing a challenge, but it's important to disseminate clinical practice initiatives that result in notable patient outcomes. Nurses have a responsibility to share what they do to improve patient care. The increased emphasis on the development and evaluation of evidence-based practice has made it necessary for nurses to share best practices that are associated with improved patient outcomes. We developed a six-month Writing for Publication workshop series designed to teach clinical nurses about the writing process and mentor them through the stages of preparing a manuscript to submit for publication. This successful program helped novice nurse authors become published professionals and had a great impact on our organization. PMID:27123630

  10. Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses’ clinicians’ views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses’ understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Results Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge. Conclusion There are distinct markers for the roles of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Nurses working in one or more of these roles need to work together to improve patient care. An ‘ideal nurse’ may be a blending of all three constructs. As nursing is a practice discipline its scholarship should be predominantly based on clinical scholarship. Nurses need to be encouraged to go beyond their roles as clinical leaders and experts to use their position to challenge and change through the propagation of knowledge to their community. PMID:23587282

  11. Undergraduate Nurse Variables that Predict Academic Achievement and Clinical Competence in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Ian; Hall, Margaret; Darmawan, I Gusti Ngurah.

    2007-01-01

    A hypothetical model was formulated to explore factors that influenced academic and clinical achievement for undergraduate nursing students. Sixteen latent variables were considered including the students' background, gender, type of first language, age, their previous successes with their undergraduate nursing studies and status given for…

  12. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach. PMID:26792305

  13. Toward data standards for clinical nursing information.

    PubMed Central

    Ozbolt, J G; Fruchtnicht, J N; Hayden, J R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Develop standard terms and codes for recording nursing care information in patient records to permit relevant data to be abstracted into a shared database for effectiveness research. DESIGN: A collaborative effort by the University of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, and the University Hospital Consortium to develop a set of terms to represent specific examples of nursing diagnoses/patient care problems, nursing interventions/patient care activities, and patient outcomes. Terms found in standards of care are being compiled, classified, and coded. RESULTS: Standard terminology and codes have been developed for 209 nursing diagnoses/patient care problems, 122 expected patient outcomes, and 545 interventions/patient care activities. The terms come from five nursing units in one hospital and from two units in a second hospital. Preliminary findings suggest that in the specialty areas for which terms have been developed, the terms are adequate to capture these types of nursing data in the patient record. PMID:7719798

  14. Recruiting and retaining competent clinical nurses. The Clinical Promotion Project Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Grantham, M; Ross, S E; MacKay, R; Banfield, V; Brown, J; Beanlands, H

    1989-06-01

    A career advancement program for nurses has been developed and implemented at the Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, as part of a manpower planning strategy for recruitment and retention of clinical nurses. A competency based performance appraisal system was developed and implemented as part of the program. This system identifies four levels of clinical expertise. Progression through each level indicates that a nurse has achieved a certain level of skill, knowledge and abilities. Demonstrated competence in one level is a prerequisite to promotion to the next level of practice. Implementation of this system provides clinical career opportunities for nurses in direct patient care. This article will provide the nurse administrator with an insight into the development and implementation of a clinical career advancement program. Future articles will described the research evaluation of the Clinical Performance Appraisal System and clinical nurses' reactions to the new system. PMID:2486680

  15. Impact of Proactive Case Management by Multiple Sclerosis Specialist Nurses on Use of Unscheduled Care and Emergency Presentation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Debbie; Bowen, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects approximately 100,000 people in the United Kingdom, with rising emergency admissions to the hospital. The multiple sclerosis specialist nurse plays a pivotal role in managing MS care in the United Kingdom, and there is anecdotal evidence that this role can help avoid emergency presentations and unnecessary hospital admissions. Methods: A retrospective service evaluation took place in one established MS nursing service. The impact of the introduction of proactive nurse-led management and a rapid response service on rates of emergency presentation, hospital admission, and bed use was examined. The primary intervention was the introduction of extra nursing hours (6 hours per week) and the reallocation of some routine administrative duties, which allowed the service to move to a proactive management model aimed at avoiding the need for unplanned care. In addition, a care pathway was implemented in the emergency department for patients with MS who did present. Results: Reduction in utilization was from a mean of 2700 bed-days per year (2002–2006) to a mean of 198 bed-days per year (2007–2013). Conclusions: During a 10-year period, moving from reactive management to proactive management demonstrated an increase in complex specialist nursing interventions and led to a decrease in emergency presentation and bed use at the local acute-care center. PMID:26300701

  16. The Problem of Competing Clinical and Research Goals in the Conduct of Clinical Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dover, Leslie J.

    Because the science of nursing is still at an early stage of development, nurses involved in clinical research often find that no appropriate measures are available to sample the theoretical construct of interest. Researchers often must design and test new instruments before proceeding to test theory. A study of the effect of nurse-client…

  17. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: II clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mason, T; Coyle, D; Lovell, A

    2008-03-01

    This study reports on research undertaken to identify the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses working in secure psychiatric services in the UK. The rationale for this research is the lack of clarity in the role definition of nurses working in these environments and the specific content that may underscore the curriculum for training forensic nurses. Over 3300 questionnaires were distributed to forensic psychiatric nurses, non-forensic psychiatric nurses and other disciplines and information obtained on (1) the perceived clinical problems that give forensic nurses the most difficulty; (2) the skills best suited to overcome those problems; and (3) the priority aspects of clinical nursing care that needs to be developed. A 35% response rate was obtained with 1019 forensic psychiatric nurses, 110 non-forensic psychiatric nurses and 43 other disciplines. The results highlighted a 'top ten' list of main problems with possible solutions and main areas for development. The conclusions drawn include a focus on skills and competencies regarding the management of personality disorders and the management of violence and aggression. PMID:18211560

  18. Experiences of Iranian Nurses that Intent to Leave the Clinical Nursing: a Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Habibzadeh, Hosein; Alilu, Leyla; Gillespie, Mark; Shakibi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the current shortage of nurses, it is important to know the reasons nurses want to leave the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses who intend to leave clinical nursing. Methods: In a qualitative content analysis study, data obtained from 13 in-depth face-to-face semi-structured interviews with nurses working in hospitals affiliated to the Tabriz and Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran, selected through purposive sampling. A conventional content analysis was used for data analysis. Results: Four categories and eleven subcategories emerged during data analysis. The extracted categories and sub categories consisted of (I) Entry routes into nursing (implicitly entry, targeted entry), (II) Defects in dignity (lack of professional vision toward the nurses, social status of nurses), (III) Work in non-ideal working environment (lack of support, discrimination, conflict, lack of opportunities for advancement), and (IV) Dissatisfaction with working conditions (heavy workload, lack of power, unusual working hours). Conclusion: The findings of this qualitative study reflect professional turnover as a complex, ongoing, multidimensional process. By identifying the factors responsible, it could be possible to retain nurses in the field. PMID:27354981

  19. Nursing education in gerontological clinical settings: What do elderly patients think of student-rendered care?

    PubMed

    Mossop, Margaret; Wilkinson, Tim

    2006-06-01

    Gerontological units are commonly used as clinical placements for first year nursing students, but the ethics of sending novice nursing students to gerontological units for their first clinical placement is often challenged. Although this environment allows student learning at a slower pace, some believe that students are practicing on a captive population and that this undervalues the specialist knowledge and skills required to care for older patients. This qualitative study explores the perspectives of 12 older patients in long-term care hospitals who had first-year nursing students involved in their care. Data were gathered using face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis of data then identified themes and patterns used by older adults to describe their perspectives of student-rendered care. Findings revealed that with the exception of one patient, this group of older patients found first-year student-nurse-rendered care to be a positive experience. The emergent themes indicated that patients enjoyed the extra care, attention, and the increased social opportunities the students provided. The patients also demonstrated an interest in participating in student learning. The findings are discussed in relation to social exchange theory and the concept of reciprocity. PMID:16773863

  20. Clinical Translational Science Awards: opportunities and challenges for nurse scientists.

    PubMed

    Knafl, Kathleen; Grey, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    On October 12, 2005, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a request for applications entitled "Institutional Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA)," calling for proposals that "would assist institutions to form a uniquely transformative, novel, and integrative academic home for Clinical and Translational Science." The CTSA initiative challenged investigators from a broad array of disciplines, including nursing, to reconsider how they conduct research. The call for CTSA proposals emphasized the need for greater interaction and collaboration across disciplines. Twelve CTSA centers were funded in October of 2006, nine of which had schools of nursing. There is much to be learned from the experiences of the schools of nursing at universities that were recipients of the first round of CTSA funding. In this manuscript, we describe the role of nurse investigators in the development and subsequent implementation of the first round of CTSA grants. In addition to describing the various ways nurse researchers are participating in the currently funded CTSAs, we address the challenges and opportunities the CTSA initiative offers for advancing nursing science and the contributions of nurse researchers to interdisciplinary research teams. Data for the presentation come from a number of sources. In addition to reviewing the CTSA website for each of the funded centers, we obtained information from nursing faculty at the 9 CTSA centers with a school of nursing. Through e-mail exchanges and telephone conversations, we elicited data on the varying ways nursing faculty and administrators have been involved in the CTSA initiative, including proposal development and implementation. We also elicited information on notable successes and unique challenges of nurse investigators, as well as the advice that recipients would have for future schools of nursing involved in the CTSA initiative. PMID:18501751

  1. Student nurses experience of learning in the clinical environment.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Tsangari, Haritini; Saarikoski, Mikko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2010-05-01

    The clinical learning environment is a complex social entity that influences student learning outcomes in the clinical setting. Exploration of this environment gives insight into the educational functioning of the clinical areas and allows nurse teachers to enhance students' opportunities for learning. Since Cyprus is undergoing major reforms in nursing education, building on the experience and knowledge gained, this study aims to explore the present clinical situation and how this would impact on nursing education moves to the university. As nursing education would take on a different approach, it is assumed the learning approach would also be different, and so utilization of the clinical environment would also be improved. Six hundred and forty five students participated in the study. Data were collected by means of the clinical learning environment and supervision instrument. A statistically significant correlation was found between the sub-dimensions "premises of nursing care" and "premises of learning" indicating that students are relating learning environment with the quality of nursing care and patient relationships. The ward atmosphere and the leadership style of the manager were rated as less important factors for learning. The majority of students experienced a group supervision model, but the more satisfied students were those with a "personal mentor" that was considered as the most successful mentor relationship. The findings suggest more thorough examination and understanding of the characteristics of the clinical environment that are conductive to learning. PMID:19700368

  2. Staff nurses revitalize a clinical ladder program through shared governance.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Susan A; Fickley, Sharon; Knight, Diane; Richards, Kimberley; Rosson, Joy; Rumbley, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    After 20 years of a static clinical ladder program at our institution, the clinical ladder program was completely redesigned using a staff nurse-led shared governance structure to re-envision the program as an innovative, staff leadership model to meet our organizational nursing mission and vision strategic plans around retention and professional development. The literature demonstrated a lack of outcome-driven findings on the sustainability of hospital-based clinical ladder programs. The authors cover the rationale for our clinical ladder model, the process used for revision, the implementation strategies, and the specific outcomes tracked regarding nurse satisfaction, affiliation, retention, and participation of staff nurses advancing to the optional upper levels of the ladder. PMID:21263275

  3. Science, technology, and innovation: nursing responsibilities in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Grady, Christine; Edgerly, Maureen

    2009-12-01

    Clinical research is a systematic investigation of human biology, health, or illness involving human beings. It builds on laboratory and animal studies and often involves clinical trials, which are specifically designed to test the safety and efficacy of interventions in humans. Nurses are critical to the conduct of ethical clinical research and face clinical, ethical, and regulatory challenges in research in many diverse roles. Understanding and addressing the ethical challenges that complicate clinical research is integral to upholding the moral commitment that nurses make to patients, including protecting their rights and ensuring their safety as patients and as research participants. PMID:19850183

  4. Effectiveness of structured, hospital-based, nurse-led atrial fibrillation clinics: a comparison between a real-world population and a clinical trial population

    PubMed Central

    Qvist, Ina; Hendriks, Jeroen M L; Møller, Dorthe S; Albertsen, Andi E; Mogensen, Helle M; Oddershede, Gitte D; Odgaard, Annette; Mortensen, Leif Spange; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Frost, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective A previous randomised trial showed that structured, nurse-led atrial fibrillation (AF) care is superior to conventional AF care, although further research is needed to determine the outcomes of such care in a real-world setting. We compared the outcomes of patients in real-world, nurse-led, structured hospital AF clinics with the outcomes of a randomised trial of the efficacy of a nurse-led AF clinic, with respect to a composite outcome of cardiovascular-related hospitalisation and death. Methods All patients were referred to the AF nurse specialist by cardiologists. The AF nurse specialist provided patient education, risk-factor control and stimulated empowerment and compliance. During follow-up, treatment was adjusted according to clinical guidelines. Patient education was repeated, and compliance with medical treatment was controlled. The study size was powered as a non-inferiority study. Outcome measures were adjudicated by the same principles in both cohorts. Results A total of 596 patients from the real world and 356 patients from a clinical trial were included in this study. No significant difference between groups with respect to age, type of AF or CHA2DS2VASc score was found. The composite primary end point occurred with an incidence rate of 8.0 (95% CI 6.1 to 10.4) per 100 person-years in the real-world population and 8.3 (95% CI 6.3 to 10.9) per 100 person-years in the clinical trial, with a crude HR of 0.83 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.23). Conclusions Structured, nurse-led, hospital-based AF care appears to be effective, and patient outcomes in an actual, hospital-based, structured AF care are as least as good as those in trial settings. PMID:26835143

  5. Philosophic analysis of a theory of clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Schafer, P J

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge in nursing requires development of theories that address both the science and art of the professional practice discipline. "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" was analyzed to explicate the epistemologic dimensions within an historic perspective. Epistemologic dimensions defined by the philosophy of science--approaches to theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology--were characterized from two perspectives, scientific inquiry and historicism. The major perspectives in the scientific mode, namely, mechanism, empiricism, logical positivism, and logical empiricism, were analyzed along the three dimensions of theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology. Trends in theoretical developments in nursing were related to the scientific and historic perspectives and to the epistemologic dimensions. Juxtaposing the diversity of knowledge required for nursing science and practice, and the values systems of the practitioners, revealed the inadequacy of the scientific model. Nursing knowledge explication required several modes of inquiry to articulate the scientific basis of the discipline and the art of delivery of the practice. The historicist approach framed scientific work with the prevailing World View. The Rubin theory was located within the matrix of approaches to inquiry and perspectives in nursing science. Labeled by the theorist as both a nursing research and a nursing care model, "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" represented a transition model of nursing, undergirded by the major conceptualizations and methodologies of field, psychoanalytic, and social behaviorist traditions, but implicitly coalescing the art with the science of nursing. The theory addressed core concepts of person, situation, and nursing care, as well as major process themes of change and interaction. Nursing theories of a more narrow range, such as maternal role attainment and maternal identity, nested within the theory, while subsequent theoretical clarifications and

  6. Delphi survey of priorities in clinical nursing research.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, C A

    1975-01-01

    Using the Delphi technique, a panel of 433 nurse and nonnurse experts was surveyed regarding priorities for clinical research in nursing. Of these, 341 completed all four Delphi survey rounds. Three questions were studied: 1) Is this an area in which nursing should assume primary research responsibility? 2) How important is research on this topic for the profession of nursing? 3) What is the likelihood of change in patient welfare because of research on the topic? Although the nature and amount of data produced prohibited interpretation of the data or delineation of succinct conclusions about priorities for clinical nursing research, responses to the three questions supported these statements: The majority of research areas identified in the questionnaire are areas in which nursing should take research leadership. Although there is some overlap, priorities for professional significance and social or patient welfare relevance are different. In terms of professional significance, highest priority was given to items regarding measuring the quality of care, role, nursing process, and the research process. In terms of patient welfare, several programs of research are discernible in the items ranked in the top ten percent; these include nursing interventions related to stress, care of the aged, pain, and patient education. The Delphi technique also is described. PMID:1042714

  7. Clinical Audit of Gastrointestinal Conditions Occurring among Adults with Down Syndrome Attending a Specialist Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robyn A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adults with Down syndrome (DS) are predisposed to syndromic and environmental gastrointestinal conditions. Method: In a hospital-based clinic for adults with DS, a chart audit was conducted to assess the range and frequency of gastrointestinal conditions. Results: From January 2003 to March 2005, 57 patients attended the clinic,…

  8. Vaccination uptake by vaccine-hesitant parents attending a specialist immunization clinic in Australia.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas A; McMinn, Alissa; Crawford, Nigel; Leask, Julie; Danchin, Margie

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy (VH) is an issue of global concern. The quality of communication between healthcare providers and parents can influence parental immunization acceptance. We aimed to describe immunization uptake following specialist immunization clinic (SIC) consultation for Australian children of VH parents as a cohort, and according to pre-clinic parental position on immunization. At a single tertiary pediatric SIC (RCH, Melbourne) a retrospective descriptive study classified VH families according to 3 proposed parental positions on immunization at initial clinic attendance. Immunization status at follow up was ascertained via the Australian Children's Immunization Register and National HPV Program Register and compared between groups. Of the VH cohort, 13/38 (34%) families were classified as hesitant, 21 (55%) as late/selective vaccinators and 4 (11%) as vaccine refusers. Mean follow up post-SIC attendance was 14.5 months. For the overall VH cohort, the majority chose selective immunization (42%) following SIC consultation. When analyzed by pre-clinic parental position on immunization, there was a trend for hesitant families to proceed with full immunization, selective families to continue selective immunization and refusing families to remain unimmunised (p < 0.0001). The most commonly omitted vaccines were hepatitis B (66%) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (55%), followed by the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (53%) and measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (53%). Immunization outcome appears to correlate with pre-clinic parental position on immunization for the majority of families attending a SIC in Australia, with selective immunization the most common outcome. Tailored communication approaches based on parental position on immunization may optimise clinic resources and engagement of families, but require prospective research evaluation. PMID:26366978

  9. The Relationship of Nursing Faculty Clinical Teaching Behaviors to Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kube, Marcia L.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical experience is the most important component of nursing education (Gaberson & Oermann, 2007; Walker, 2005). As part of the clinical learning environment, the clinical teaching behaviors of nursing faculty have significant potential to influence students' learning. Nurse educators have a responsibility to provide nursing students with…

  10. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students. PMID:19631065

  11. Helping novice nurses make effective clinical decisions: the situated clinical decision-making framework.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Mary; Peterson, Barbara L

    2009-01-01

    The nature of novice nurses' clinical decision-making has been well documented as linear, based on limited knowledge and experience in the profession, and frequently focused on single tasks or problems. Theorists suggest that, with sufficient experience in the clinical setting, novice nurses will move from reliance on abstract principles to the application of concrete experience and to view a clinical situation within its context and as a whole. In the current health care environment, novice nurses frequently work with few clinical supports and mentors while facing complex patient situations that demand skilled decision-making. The Situated Clinical Decision-Making Framework is presented for use by educators and novice nurses to support development of clinical decision-making. It provides novice nurses with a tool that a) assists them in making decisions; b) can be used to guide retrospective reflection on decision-making processes and outcomes; c) socializes them to an understanding of the nature of decision-making in nursing; and d) fosters the development of their knowledge, skill, and confidence as nurses. This article provides an overview of the framework, including its theoretical foundations and a schematic representation of its components. A case exemplar illustrates one application of the framework in assisting novice nurses in developing their decision-making skills. Future directions regarding the use and study of this framework in nursing education are considered. PMID:19606659

  12. Enacting a Vision for a Master's Entry Clinical Nurse Leader Program: Rethinking Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Frank D; Rosenberg, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The need to educate nurses at the graduate level and provide them with a different skill set that broadens their view of health and nursing is clearly articulated by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Consequently, the role of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) was born. Responding to the need for providing a highly educated and credentialed professional at the bedside, Rush University College of Nursing made the bold move to phase out baccalaureate education and enact a prelicensure, master's entry CNL program. Although there is a clear need for this type of graduate, there is little in the literature to provide guidance to institutions that wish to develop this type of program. This paper describes the factors that came into play in making that decision, the process of curriculum development and implementation, the challenges encountered in implementing this type of program, and the outcomes that the program has evidenced since its inception. PMID:26802590

  13. The impact on nurses and nurse managers of introducing PEPFAR clinical services in urban government clinics in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Improving provider performance is central to strengthening health services in developing countries. Because of critical shortages of physicians, many clinics in sub-Saharan Africa are led by nurses. In addition to clinical skills, nurse managers need practical managerial skills and adequate resources to ensure procurement of essential supplies, quality assurance implementation, and productive work environment. Giving nurses more autonomy in their work empowers them in the workplace and has shown to create positive influence on work attitudes and behaviors. The Infectious Disease Institute, an affiliate of Makerere University College of Health Science, in an effort to expand the needed HIV services in the Ugandan capital, established a community-university partnership with the Ministry of Health to implement an innovative model to build capacity in HIV service delivery. This paper evaluates the impact on the nurses from this innovative program to provide more health care in six nurse managed Kampala City Council (KCC) Clinics. Methods A mixed method approach was used. The descriptive study collected key informant interviews from the six nurse managers, and administered a questionnaire to 20 staff nurses between September and December 2009. Key themes were manually identified from the interviews, and the questionnaire data were analyzed using SPSS. Results Introducing new HIV services into six KCC clinics was positive for the nurses. They identified the project as successful because of perceived improved environment, increase in useful in-service training, new competence to manage patients and staff, improved physical infrastructure, provision of more direct patient care, motivation to improve the clinic because the project acted on their suggestions, and involvement in role expansion. All of these helped empower the nurses, improving quality of care and increasing job satisfaction. Conclusions This community-university HIV innovative model was successful

  14. Performance of Clinical Nurse Educators in Teaching Pharmacology and Medication Management: Nursing Students’ Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Ghamari Zare, Zohre; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacological knowledge and medication management skills of student nurses greatly depend on the clinical nurse educators’ performance in this critical issue. However, the Iranian nurse educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management are not adequately studied. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the nursing students’ perceptions on the status of clinical pharmaceutical and medication management education. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on all 152 nursing students registered in the seventh and eighth semesters at the Qom and Naragh branches of Islamic Azad University, and Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2013 - 2014 academic year. The students’ perceptions on the performance of clinical nurse educators in teaching pharmacology and medication management were assessed using a researcher made questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 31 items regarding clinical educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management and two questions about students’ satisfaction with their level of knowledge and skills in pharmacology and medication management. Descriptive statistics was employed and analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean of scores of teaching pharmacology and medication management in the three universities. Results Among a total of 152 subjects, 82.9% were female and their mean age was 22.57 ± 1.55 years. According to the students, instructors had the weakest performance in the three items of teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the students’ learning needs, teaching medication management through a patient-centered method and teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the course plan. The students’ satisfaction regarding their own knowledge and skill of pharmacology and medication management was at medium level. Conclusions Nursing students gave a relatively low score in several aspects of

  15. [Teaching and learning in the clinical field: perspective of teachers, nurses and nursing students].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Domingos, Selisvane Ribeiro da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; Ito, Thaís Norika

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative research, which used the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz approach. Its purpose was meeting and discussing the expectations of teachers, nurses and students about teaching in the clinical field. Nine teachers, eleven nurses and eleven students of the Nursing Graduation grade from a public university of São Paulo were included in this study. Data were collected in 2012. As the results showed, there are expectations about the link between theory and practice that clinical teaching can offer and also the desire that such instruction enable the learners to develop a pro-active and participatory attitude. The reciprocity of perspectives was evident and should be considered when academic projects focused on nursing education are developed. PMID:25271572

  16. Experience inheritance from famous specialists based on real-world clinical research paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanli; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Runshun; Liu, Baoyan; Zhou, Xuezhong; Zhou, Xiaji; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yufeng; Xue, Yanxing; Xu, Lili

    2014-09-01

    The current modes of experience inheritance from famous specialists in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) include master and disciple, literature review, clinical-epidemiology-based clinical research observation, and analysis and data mining via computer and database technologies. Each mode has its advantages and disadvantages. However, a scientific and instructive experience inheritance mode has not been developed. The advent of the big data era as well as the formation and practice accumulation of the TCM clinical research paradigm in the real world have provided new perspectives, techniques, and methods for inheriting experience from famous TCM specialists. Through continuous exploration and practice, the research group proposes the innovation research mode based on the real-world TCM clinical research paradigm, which involves the inheritance and innovation of the existing modes. This mode is formulated in line with its own development regularity of TCM and is expected to become the main mode of experience inheritance in the clinical field. PMID:25159993

  17. The Rural Clinical Option: An Implementation Handbook for Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddall, Sandra S.; And Others

    This how-to-do-it handbook is designed to help the potential rural clinical option (RCO) coordinator develop a program in which nursing students can have an in-depth clinical experience in a rural health facility. Separate sections detail how to: (1) determine the amount of release time and financial resources available to run the program; (2)…

  18. Registered nurses' perceptions of new nursing graduates' clinical competence: A systematic integrative review.

    PubMed

    Missen, Karen; McKenna, Lisa; Beauchamp, Alison

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, many questions have been raised about graduates' clinical competence and fitness for practice upon completion of their undergraduate education. Despite the significance of this issue, the perspectives of registered nurses have rarely been examined. This systematic review explores the perceptions of experienced registered nurses regarding the clinical competence of new nursing graduates. Original research studies published between 2004-2014 were identified using electronic databases, reference lists, and by searching "grey literature." Papers were critically reviewed and relevant data extracted and synthesized using an approach based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. From 153 studies initially identified, 15 original research papers were included. Four main research themes were identified: clinical/technical skills, critical thinking, interaction/communication, and overall readiness for practice. Areas of concern in relation to the clinical competence of new nursing graduates specifically related to two themes: critical thinking and clinical/technical skills. Further research is required on strategies identified within the literature with the ultimate aim of ensuring new nursing graduates are safe and competent practitioners. PMID:26592371

  19. Teaching style in clinical nursing education: a qualitative study of Iranian nursing teachers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Karimi Moonaghi; Fatemeh, Dabbaghi; Fatemeh, Oskouie Seid; Katri, Vehviläinen-Julkunen; Tahereh, Binaghi

    2010-01-01

    There are many studies about nursing clinical settings and their problems, but the teaching style as a whole has not been widely studied. Therefore, this study aimed to explore nursing teachers' perceptions about teaching style in the clinical settings in Iran. A grounded theory approach was used to conduct this study. Fifteen nursing teachers were interviewed individually, 2006-2007. The interviews were tape-recorded and later transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's method. Three main and 12 sub themes emerged from data and these could explain the nature of the teaching style in clinical education of the Mashhad Faculty of Nursing and probably others in Iran. The main themes included: multiplicity in teaching style, nature of clinical teaching, and control and adaptation in education atmosphere. Multiplicity in teaching style was the dominant concept in this study. Each educator had a personal and individualized style which was flexible according to the situation, type of the skill (course content), education environment and facilities, and level of the learner. This study can guide nurse educators to know more about teaching styles and use them appropriately in the clinical settings. Further research into the themes of this study are recommended. PMID:19251481

  20. Clinically Speaking: ESP for Refugee Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Adele G.; Marston, John

    A program designed to provide instruction in specialized English for Southeast Asian and other refugees redeveloping their skills as licensed practical nurses (LPNs) contained two language proficiency tracks and provided language instruction incorporating high school equivalency test practice material in the specialized English course. Technical…

  1. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  2. Do gerontology nurse specialists make a difference in hospitalization of long-term care residents? Results of a randomized comparison trial.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michal; Armstrong, Delwyn; Parker, Janet; Pilcher, Carole; Zhou, Lifeng; McKenzie-Green, Barbara; Connolly, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities have highly complex care needs and quality of care is of international concern. Maintaining resident wellness through proactive assessment and early intervention is key to decreasing the need for acute hospitalization. The Residential Aged Care Integration Program (RACIP) is a quality improvement intervention to support residential aged care staff and includes on-site support, education, clinical coaching, and care coordination provided by gerontology nurse specialists (GNSs) employed by a large district health board. The effect of the outreach program was evaluated through a randomized comparison of hospitalization 1 year before and after program implementation. The sample included 29 intervention facilities (1,425 residents) and 25 comparison facilities (1,128 residents) receiving usual care. Acute hospitalization rate unexpectedly increased for both groups after program implementation, although the rate of increase was significantly less for the intervention facilities. The hospitalization rate after the intervention increased 59% for the comparison group and 16% for the intervention group (rate ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-0.86, P < .001). Subgroup analysis showed a significantly lower rate change for those admitted for medical reasons for the intervention group (13% increase) than the comparison group (69% increase) (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82, P < .001). Conversely, there was no significant difference in the RR for surgical admissions between the intervention and comparison groups (RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.68-1.46, P = .99). The integration of GNS expertise through the RACIP intervention may be one approach to support staff to provide optimal care and potentially improve resident health. PMID:25283552

  3. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Satisfaction and Self-Confidence with Clinical Simulation Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omer, Tagwa

    2016-01-01

    Nursing and other health professionals are increasingly using simulation as a strategy and a tool for teaching and learning at all levels that need clinical training. Nursing education for decades used simulation as an integral part of nursing education. Recent studies indicated that simulation improves nursing knowledge, clinical practice,…

  4. Professional dignity in nursing in clinical and community workplaces.

    PubMed

    Stievano, Alessandro; Marinis, Maria Grazia De; Russo, Maria Teresa; Rocco, Gennaro; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to analyse nurses' professional dignity in their everyday working lives. We explored the factors that affect nursing professional dignity in practice that emerge in relationships with health professionals, among clinical nurses working in hospitals and in community settings in central Italy. The main themes identified were: (i) nursing professional dignity perceived as an achievement; (ii) recognition of dignity beyond professional roles. These two concepts are interconnected. This study provides insights into professional dignity in nursing being perceived as an achievement linked to the intrinsic dignity of every human being. The 'nursing professional dignity perceived as an achievement' was perceived as having declined in different social factors. Some factors of nursing professional dignity perceived as an achievement were attained more easily in community settings. 'Recognition of dignity beyond professional roles' underpins the intrinsic dignity as an expression of humanity, embedded in persons regardless of any profession, and values, such as: respect, moral integrity, humility, working conscientiously and kindness. PMID:22343309

  5. Integrative nursing: application of principles across clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2015-04-01

    While the essence of nursing has long been whole person (body, mind, and spirit) and whole system-focused, in reality the contemporary practice of nursing in many settings around the globe has become increasingly fragmented and de-stabilized. Nursing shortages in many parts of the world are significant, and hierarchies and bureaucracies often remove nurses from the point of care, be that the bedside, home, or clinic, replacing them with less skilled workers and filling their time with documentation and other administrative tasks. Integrative nursing is a framework for providing whole person/whole system care that is relationship-based and person-centered and focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers as well as those they serve. It is aligned with what is being called the "triple aim" in the United States-an effort focused on improving the patient experience (quality and satisfaction), improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care. The principles of integrative nursing offer clear and specific guidance that can shape and impact patient care in all clinical settings. PMID:25973268

  6. Integrative Nursing: Application of Principles Across Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    While the essence of nursing has long been whole person (body, mind, and spirit) and whole system-focused, in reality the contemporary practice of nursing in many settings around the globe has become increasingly fragmented and de-stabilized. Nursing shortages in many parts of the world are significant, and hierarchies and bureaucracies often remove nurses from the point of care, be that the bedside, home, or clinic, replacing them with less skilled workers and filling their time with documentation and other administrative tasks. Integrative nursing is a framework for providing whole person/whole system care that is relationship-based and person-centered and focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers as well as those they serve. It is aligned with what is being called the “triple aim” in the United States—an effort focused on improving the patient experience (quality and satisfaction), improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care. The principles of integrative nursing offer clear and specific guidance that can shape and impact patient care in all clinical settings. PMID:25973268

  7. Developing a nurse-led clinic using transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Gousy, Mamood; Green, Kim

    2015-03-25

    Nurses are at the forefront of implementing and managing change, given constantly changing healthcare services and the increase in demand for health care. Therefore, it is important to identify the best style of leadership to engage nurses in implementing service-led improvements. This article explores the effects of transformational leadership in bringing about service-led improvements in health care, using the example of setting up a nurse-led acupuncture clinic to optimise the care of patients with chronic pain. Transformational leadership was used throughout the project - from the initial local planning, training and development, through to liaising with the appropriate staff and deciding on an evaluation strategy. Transformational leadership proved to be an effective way to engage and empower nurses and other members of the chronic pain team to enable them to achieve the project aims. PMID:25804177

  8. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease among Patients Attending a Specialist Diabetes Clinic in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, TS; Tulloch-Reid, MK; Younger-Coleman, NO; Wright-Pascoe, RA; Boyne, MS; Soyibo, AK; Wilks, RJ

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients attending the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic and to determine the proportion of patients at high risk for adverse outcomes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients attending the UHWI Diabetes Clinic between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses administered a questionnaire, reviewed dockets, and performed urinalyses. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Albuminuria was assessed using urine test strips for protein and microalbumin. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2 or albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g creatinine. Risk of adverse outcome (all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and kidney failure) was determined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) 2012 prognosis grid. Results: Participants included 100 women and 32 men (mean age, 55.4 ± 12.9 years, mean duration of diabetes, 16.7 ± 11.7 years). Twenty-two per cent of participants had eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2. Moderate albuminuria (30–300 mg/g) was present in 20.5% of participants and severe albuminuria (> 300 mg/g) in 62.1%. Overall prevalence of CKD was 86.3% (95% CI 80.4%, 92.2%). Based on KDIGO risk categories, 50.8% were at high risk and 17.4% at very high risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion: Most patients at the UHWI Diabetes Clinic had CKD and were at high or very high risk of adverse outcomes. Further studies to determine the burden of CKD in other clinical settings and to identify the best strategies for preventing adverse outcomes in developing countries need to be conducted. PMID:26426170

  9. Professional issues associated with the clinical research nurse role.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Juliet; Hill, Gordon; Callister, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Clinical research nurses (CRNs) have a vital role in the conduct and governance of clinical trials. This article compares findings of an online survey conducted in 2012 by the Scottish Research Nurse and Coordinator's Network with two surveys undertaken ten years previously in a single Scottish Health Board, permitting analysis of the development of the CRN role. The findings show that CRNs are highly qualified and experienced. Many had access to professional development and support, while others continued to feel isolated. There is a need for a clear, flexible career structure for CRNs, with appropriate induction, training and continuous professional development. PMID:25467360

  10. Using simulations to teach clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Hanna, D R

    1991-01-01

    Incorporating play into formal teaching strategies was introduced in theory over 75 years ago by John Dewey and the Gestalt theorists. Play, in the form of simulations, has had a significant role in contemporary nursing education. Simulations can teach more than a skill or an idea, since they can be designed to teach the complexification of ideas. The author explores the theoretical and historical development, the advantages and disadvantages, and future uses of simulations. PMID:2011280

  11. Characteristics and associations of pain intensity in patients referred to a specialist cancer pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Paulo; Sabri, Elham; Lawlor, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled cancer pain (CP) may impair quality of life. Given the multidimensional nature of CP, its poor control is often attributed to poor assessment and classification. OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics and associations of pain intensity in a specialist CP clinic. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred to the CP clinic of the Portuguese Cancer Institute (Lisbon, Portugal) had standardized initial assessments and status documentation of the following: Brief Pain Inventory ratings for ‘pain now’ as the outcome variable; initial pain intensity (iPI) on a 0 to 10 scale; pain mechanism (using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 tool to assess neuropathic pain); episodic pain; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating; oral morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD); Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale and Emotional Thermometer scores; and cancer diagnosis, metastases, treatment and pain duration. Univariable analyses were conducted to test the association of independent variables with iPI. Variables with P<0.1 were entered into a multivariable regression model, using backward elimination and a cut-point of P=0.2 for final model selection. RESULTS: Of 371 participants, 285 (77%) had moderate (4 to 6) or severe (7 to 10) iPI. The initial median MEDD was relatively low (30 mg [range 20 mg to 60 mg]). In the multivariable model, higher income, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating 3 to 4, cancer diagnosis (head and neck, genitourinary and gastrointestinal), adjuvant use and initial MEDD were associated with iPI (P<0.05). The model’s R2 was 18.6, which explained only 19% of iPI variance. CONCLUSIONS: The diversity of factors associated with pain intensity and their limited explanation of its variance underscore the biopsychosocial complexity of CP. Adequacy of CP management warrants further exploration. PMID:26291125

  12. Automation in clinical biochemistry: core, peripheral, STAT, and specialist laboratories in Australia.

    PubMed

    Streitberg, George S; Angel, Lyndall; Sikaris, Kenneth A; Bwititi, Phillip T

    2012-10-01

    Pathology has developed substantially since the 1990s with the introduction of total laboratory automation (TLA), in response to workloads and the need to improve quality. TLA has enhanced core laboratories, which evolved from discipline-based laboratories. Work practices have changed, with central reception now loading samples onto the Inlet module of the TLA. It is important to continually appraise technology. This study looked at the impact of technology using a self-administered survey to seniors in clinical biochemistry in NATA GX/GY-classified laboratories in Australia. The responses were yes, no, or not applicable and are expressed as percentages of responses. Some of the questions sourced for descriptive answers. Eighty-one laboratories responded, and the locations were 63%, 33%, and 4% in capital cities, regional cities, and country towns, respectively. Forty-two percent were public and 58% private. Clinical biochemistry was in all core laboratories of various sizes, and most performed up to 20 tests per sample. Thirty percent of the 121 surveyed laboratories had plans to install an automated line. Fifty-eight percent had hematology and biochemistry instrumentations in their peripheral laboratory, and 16% had a STAT laboratory on the same site as the core laboratory. There were varied instruments in specialist laboratories, and analyzers with embedded computers were in all laboratories. Medium and large laboratories had workstations with integrated instruments, and some large laboratories had TLA. Technology evolution and rising demand for pathology services make it imperative for laboratories to embrace such changes and reorganize the laboratories to take into account point-of-care testing and the efficiencies of core laboratories and TLA. PMID:22661200

  13. Optimizing clinical environments for knowledge translation: strategies for nursing leaders.

    PubMed

    Scott, Shannon D; VandenBeld, Brenda; Cummings, Greta G

    2011-10-01

    Using findings from our recent study that found that a context of uncertainty in the work environment hindered nurses' research utilization, we suggest strategies for nurse managers and leaders to optimize clinical environments and support efforts to put research into clinical practice (knowledge translation). Two important sources of uncertainty were the complexity of teamwork and inconsistency in management and leadership styles. To reduce the uncertainty arising from teamwork, we propose (a) clarifying nurses' scopes of practice, (b) increasing knowledge sharing through supporting journal clubs and enhanced computer access and (c) creating safe venues for multidisciplinary dialogue. To reduce uncertainty arising from variations in management and leadership, we propose (a) developing policies that enhance the consistency of leadership and clarify the strategic direction of the management team, (b) clearly communicating those policies to nurses and (c) providing explicit rationales for treatment changes. Small, incremental steps can be taken to realize substantive changes in clinical environments in order to optimize nursing work environments for knowledge translation. PMID:22008623

  14. Understanding the clinical handoff perspective of pediatric emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Murray, John S; McGrath, Jody; Smith, Mary Fallon

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, The Joint Commission began requiring health care organizations to develop and implement a standardized approach to clinical handoff. The goal is to improve patient safety across the health care continuum. While accurate and complete handoff communication is essential in all areas of patient care, it is of critical importance where patients require the most complex care, such as in the emergency department. This quality improvement study used a focus group to begin to understand the clinical handoff perspective of pediatric emergency nurses. Eight nurses of varying levels of practice who work a variety of shifts participated to explore the clinical handoff process in the emergency department of a pediatric teaching hospital. Perceptions and beliefs regarding the process of clinical handoff (who is involved, what variations exist, where they occur) and barriers to the clinical handoff process were explored. Recurring themes included provider-directed handoff, interruptions--impediment to care, and envisioning the ideal process. PMID:24308090

  15. Online Clinical Post-Conference, Face-to-Face Clinical Postconference: Effects on Critical Thinking in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebersole-Berkstresser, Kristie Anne

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators, at every level of pre-licensure nursing education, are charged with developing critical thinking skills within their students. Post-clinical conference is one teaching strategy that nurse educators can employ to help promote the development of critical thinking skills in pre-licensure nursing students. However, traditional…

  16. Clarifying Clinical Nurse Consultant work in Australia: A phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew; Stasa, Helen; Gullick, Janice; Conway, Rae; Cunich, Michelle; Buckley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Nurse Consultant role in Australia is an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Role (APRN). This role has been conceptualized from the discrete pillars of research, education, practice, system support and leadership, articulated in the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. This conceptualization has been manifested in job descriptions, workforce. planning and course design. This paper explored whether there was a more refined way of conceptualizing the unique 'value add' of the role. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was employed to explore the lived experience of the role. It was identified that the pillars of education, practice, leadership and research are interconnected and expressed in the system work of the Clinical Nurse Consultant. The findings have implications for education and workforce planning. PMID:26775527

  17. Psychiatric nurses' self-rated competence.

    PubMed

    Ewalds-Kvist, Beatrice; Algotsson, Martina; Bergström, Annelie; Lützén, Kim

    2012-07-01

    This study explored the self-rated competence of 52 Swedish psychiatric nurses in three clinical environments: forensic psychiatry, general psychiatric inpatient care, and clinical non-residential psychiatric care. A questionnaire wtih 56 statements from nine areas of expertise was completed. Forensic nurses were more skilled in safety and quality and in dealing with violence and conflicts. Non-specialist nurses appreciated their skills more so than specialist nurses in health promotion and illness prevention and conduct, information, and education. Women were inclined to invite patients' relatives for education and information. Men attended to a patients' spiritual needs; they also coped with violence and managed conflicts. PMID:22757599

  18. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum. PMID:26636231

  19. Nursing students in clinical practice--developing a model for clinical supervision.

    PubMed

    Häggman-Laitila, Arja; Elina, Eriksson; Riitta, Meretoja; Kirsi, Sillanpää; Leena, Rekola

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model for clinical supervision to promote the clinical practice of nursing students. The study was implemented in Finland and it was carried out in three phases. Firstly, data were collected by means of a literature review and focus group interviews. Secondly, the data were analysed and described in expert groups, and finally the model itself was evaluated by 23 nursing experts. The data of literature review and focus group interviews consisted of 27 studies and four groups from three organisations: nurses (n=7), managers (n=6), teachers (n=8) and students (n=6). The data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The model devolved from the study includes the concepts describing prerequisites, content and influence of clinical supervision. The prerequisites are nursing skills, a holistic view of the nursing curriculum, pedagogical, organisational, development, cooperation and interaction competence and decision-making skills. The content of clinical supervision includes support of professional development, pedagogical competence, research and development activities and collaborative working. Clinical supervision has influence on students' professional and personal development and conception of the future of nursing profession, students' preparedness for career planning and the teacher's and preceptor's professional development. The model could unify the notions of all parties concerned of the prerequisites, content and influence of clinical supervision. Furthermore, the entire supervision process and its control could be clarified. The model may be utilised in selecting and educating preceptors and evaluating the quality of clinical supervision. PMID:17936544

  20. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of benign eyelid lesions: Is a dedicated nurse-led service safe and effective?

    PubMed

    Mohite, Abhijit A; Johnson, Andria; Rathore, Deepa S; Bhandari, Kamal; Crossman, Richard; Mehta, Purnima; Ahluwalia, Harpreet S

    2016-08-01

    This article compares an independent nurse-led benign lesion service with a doctor-led one, and assesses the impact of clinician seniority on diagnostic accuracy rates. Retrospective review of benign lesions referred to a teaching hospital and managed in either a doctor- or nurse-led lid service. All lesions were diagnosed clinically, excised and then sent for histological diagnosis. Lesions were categorized into subtypes. Pre-excision clinical diagnoses were compared with histological diagnoses. Sensitivity, specificity and missed malignancy rates were calculated for each subtype. Accuracy was compared between different grades of doctors and a specialist nurse. 264 and 332 lesions were managed in a doctor-led and nurse-led service, respectively. Rates of accurate sub-typing were 79.6% and 80.4% in the doctor- and nurse-led services, respectively (p > 0.05). Clinician seniority had no bearing. Missed malignancies or pre-malignancies accounted for 1.1% and 1.5% of lesions in the doctor and nurse-led services, respectively (p > 0.05). Overall, the remaining misdiagnoses were benign lesions of another subtype (13.6%) or non-specific histological findings (5.0%) and 98.6% of lesions were confirmed as benign on histology. Overall sensitivity and specificity values were: benign epithelial proliferations 95.6% and 92.2%, epidermal inclusion cysts 92.2% and 88.0%, xanthelasma 97.5% and 100.0%, cysts of Moll 66.7% and 96.6%, naevi 39.4% and 99.8% and molluscum 20.0% and 99.8%, respectively. A dedicated nurse-led service is as effective in managing a range of clinically benign lid lesions as a doctor-led one, and clinician seniority has little impact on the diagnostic accuracy of these lesions. PMID:27322204

  1. Thinking Processes Used by Nurses in Clinical Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higuchi, Kathryn A. Smith; Donald, Janet G.

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with eight medical and surgical nurses and audits of patient charts investigated clinical decision-making processes. Predominant thinking processes were description of facts, selection of information, inference, syntheses, and verification, with differences between medical and surgical specialties. Exemplars of thinking processes…

  2. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking. PMID:25892366

  3. Key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Young; Noh, Wonjung

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we identified key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses. We used a literature review, focus group discussions, and a content validity index survey to develop key components of financial-analysis education. First, a wide range of references were reviewed, and 55 financial-analysis education components were gathered. Second, two focus group discussions were performed; the participants were 11 nurses who had worked for more than 3 years in a hospital, and nine components were agreed upon. Third, 12 professionals, including professors, nurse executive, nurse managers, and an accountant, participated in the content validity index. Finally, six key components of financial-analysis education were selected. These key components were as follows: understanding the need for financial analysis, introduction to financial analysis, reading and implementing balance sheets, reading and implementing income statements, understanding the concepts of financial ratios, and interpretation and practice of financial ratio analysis. The results of this study will be used to develop an education program to increase financial-management competency among clinical nurses. PMID:25917407

  4. A Clinical Librarian-Nursing Partnership to Bridge Clinical Practice and Research in an Oncology Setting.

    PubMed

    Ginex, Pamela K; Hernandez, Marisol; Vrabel, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Nurses today work in practice settings where the expectation is to "draw upon the best evidence to provide the care most appropriate to each patient" (Olsen, Goolsby, & McGinnis, 2009, p. 10) while caring for patients with high acuity in highly specialized settings. Within the nursing profession, the Magnet Recognition Program® advocates for exemplary professional practice and the generation of new knowledge through research and clinical innovation. Nurses working in a clinical setting are often the best resource to identify important clinical questions and gaps in practice, but a lack of resources presents challenges to nurses in fully developing their questions and identifying the most appropriate methods to answer them. These challenges often fall into three broad categories: individual nurse characteristics, organizational characteristics, and environmental characteristics (Dobbins, Ciliska, Cockerill, Barnsley, & DiCenso, 2002). Creating a dedicated partnership between nurses and library staff is one method that can overcome these challenges to use existing resources and support nurses who are asking and answering important clinical questions (DePalma, 2005; Vrabel, 2005). 
. PMID:27541547

  5. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. Methods This study was carried out in five phases: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines; and 5) evaluating the prototype system. Results We first generated 799 nursing statements describing nursing assessments, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes using entities, attributes, and value sets of detailed clinical models for perinatal care which we developed in a previous study. We then extracted 506 recommendations from nine clinical practice guidelines and created sets of nursing statements to be used for nursing documentation by grouping nursing statements according to these recommendations. Finally, we developed and evaluated a prototype electronic nursing record system that can provide nurses with recommendations for nursing practice and sets of nursing statements based on the recommendations for guiding nursing documentation. Conclusions The prototype system was found to be sufficiently complete, relevant, useful, and applicable in terms of content, and easy to use and useful in terms of system user interface. This study has revealed the feasibility of developing such an ENR system. PMID:22844649

  6. Developing a clinical academic career pathway for nursing.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Latter, Sue; Richardson, Alison

    Since the publication of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration's (UKRC, 2007) recommendations on careers in clinical research, interest has grown in the concept of clinical academic nursing careers, with increased debate on how such roles might be developed and sustained (Department of Health, 2012). To embed clinical academic nursing roles in the NHS and universities, a clear understanding and appreciation of the contribution that such posts might make to organisational objectives and outcomes must be developed. This paper outlines an initiative to define the potential practice and research contribution of clinical academic roles through setting out role descriptors. This exercise was based on our experience of a clinical academic career initiative at the University of Southampton run in partnership with NHS organisations. Role descriptors were developed by a group of service providers, academics and two clinical academic award-holders from the local programme. This paper outlines clinical academic roles from novice to professor and describes examples of role descriptors at the different levels of a career pathway. These descriptors are informed by clinical academic posts in place at Southampton as well as others at the planning stage. Understanding the nature of clinical academic posts and the contribution that these roles can make to healthcare will enable them to become embedded into organisational structures and career pathways. PMID:23123839

  7. A randomised controlled crossover trial of nurse practitioner versus doctor led outpatient care in a bronchiectasis clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, L; Edmunds, J; Bilton, D; Hollingworth, W; Caine, N; Keogan, M; Exley, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: With the decrease in junior doctor hours, the advent of specialist registrars, and the availability of highly trained and experienced nursing personnel, the service needs of patients with chronic respiratory diseases attending routine outpatient clinics may be better provided by appropriately trained nurse practitioners. Methods: A randomised controlled crossover trial was used to compare nurse practitioner led care with doctor led care in a bronchiectasis outpatient clinic. Eighty patients were recruited and randomised to receive 1 year of nurse led care and 1 year of doctor led care in random order. Patients were followed up for 2 years to ensure patient safety and acceptability and to assess differences in lung function. Outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), 12 minute walk test, health related quality of life, and resource use. Results: The mean difference in FEV1 was 0.2% predicted (95% confidence interval –1.6 to 2.0%, p=0.83). There were no significant differences in the other clinical or health related quality of life measures. Nurse led care resulted in significantly increased resource use compared with doctor led care (mean difference £1497, 95% confidence interval £688 to £2674, p<0.001), a large part of which resulted from the number and duration of hospital admissions. The mean difference in resource use was greater in the first year (£2625) than in the second year (£411). Conclusions: Nurse practitioner led care for stable patients within a chronic chest clinic is safe and is as effective as doctor led care, but may use more resources. PMID:12149523

  8. Clinical immersion: a residency model for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Plowfield, Lisa Ann; Herrman, Judith W

    2006-01-01

    The education of future generations of nurses is in need of philosophic and programmatic transformation in keeping with the rapidly changing health care delivery system. The Nurse Residency Model is one baccalaureate nursing program's response to calls for reform. Rooted in a spirit of collegiality and lifelong learning, the three facets of its philosophy include enhanced socialization, improved transition to practice, and increased student accountability. Students gain increased competency and demonstrate increased accountability with each progressive semester in the program, which culminates in clinical immersion in the senior year. Unique programmatic features of this model include field experiences, the simulation lab, and a work requirement. Additional benefits include resource efficiency and patient safety. Implementation remains an ongoing process. Outcome indicators are expected to yield valuable data on which to develop an evidence base in support of the model. PMID:16733969

  9. The interprofessional clinical experience: interprofessional education in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Kendra D; Ford, Channing R; Sawyer, Patricia; Foley, Kathleen T; Harada, Caroline N; Brown, Cynthia J; Ritchie, Christine S

    2015-03-01

    The interprofessional clinical experience (ICE) was designed to introduce trainees to the roles of different healthcare professionals, provide an opportunity to participate in an interprofessional team, and familiarize trainees with caring for older adults in the nursing home setting. Healthcare trainees from seven professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, nutrition, occupational therapy, optometry and social work) participated in ICE. This program consisted of individual patient interviews followed by a team meeting to develop a comprehensive care plan. To evaluate the impact of ICE on attitudinal change, the UCLA Geriatric Attitudes Scale and a post-experience assessment were used. The post-experience assessment evaluated the trainees' perception of potential team members' roles and attitudes about interprofessional team care of the older adult. Attitudes toward interprofessional teamwork and the older adult were generally positive. ICE is a novel program that allows trainees across healthcare professions to experience interprofessional teamwork in the nursing home setting. PMID:25140581

  10. Worksite Physical Activity Intervention for Ambulatory Clinic Nursing Staff.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sharon; Farrington, Michele; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M; Clark, M Kathleen; Dawson, Cindy; Quinn, Geralyn J; Laffoon, Trudy; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviors, including physical activity (PA), of registered nurses (RNs) and medical assistants (MAs) are suboptimal but may improve with worksite programs. Using a repeated-measures crossover design, the authors explored if integrating a 6-month worksite non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) intervention, with and without personalized health coaching via text messaging into workflow could positively affect sedentary time, PA, and body composition of nursing staff without jeopardizing work productivity. Two ambulatory clinics were randomly assigned to an environmental NEAT intervention plus a mobile text message coaching for either the first 3 months (early texting group, n = 27) or the last 3 months (delayed texting group, n = 13), with baseline 3-month and 6-month measurements. Sedentary and PA levels, fat mass, and weight improved for both groups, significantly only for the early text group. Productivity did not decline for either group. This worksite intervention is feasible and may benefit nursing staff. PMID:27143144

  11. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting. PMID:26066306

  12. Nursing students' perceptions about clinical learning environment in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Serçekuş, Pınar; Başkale, Hatice

    2016-03-01

    Clinical education has a vital role in nursing curriculum. Clinical education environment can be enhanced by feedbacks provided by students. The purpose of this research was to search factors that affect the clinical learning environment. A qualitative approach was used. 36 nursing students were recruited from school of nursing in Turkey. It was found that students are negatively affected by communication errors and feedbacks given in the presence of patients by instructors. The constant presence of instructors may be the source of stress for some students. Besides peer support and favourable communication with peers have a positive impact on student learning. Communication with hospital staff and instructors are important. The study revealed that student learning is affected by the level of confidence and support displayed by patients. In order to ensure the most favourable learning environment for students, it is essential that cooperation should be increased between school staff and clinical staff, instructor skills should be developed, and students should be supported in the clinical environment. PMID:26787194

  13. Developing emergency nursing competence.

    PubMed

    Proehl, Jean A

    2002-03-01

    Developing and maintaining the competence emergency nurses need is an important function of emergency clinical nurse specialists (CNS), educators, and other members of the emergency department (ED) leadership team. A thorough orientation is the first and most important step in developing the competence of emergency nurses. After orientation, the challenge is to maintain currency of practice in the face of incessant change such as new medications, new equipment, and new therapies in emergency care. This article focuses on the orientation of emergency nurses. A related article in this issue addresses assessment of competency. PMID:11818264

  14. Pain and nurses' emotion work in a paediatric clinic: treatment procedures and nurse-child alignments.

    PubMed

    Rindstedt, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of cancer in children, treatment procedures have been reported to be one of the most feared elements, as more painful than the illness as such. This study draws on a video ethnography of routine needle procedure events, as part of fieldwork at a paediatric oncology clinic documenting everyday treatment negotiations between nurses and young children. On the basis of detailed transcriptions of verbal and nonverbal staff-child interaction, the analyses focus on ways in which pain and anxiety can be seen as phenomena that are partly contingent on nurses' emotion work. The school-age children did not display fear. In the preschool group, though, pain and fear seemed to be phenomena that were greatly reduced through nurses' emotion work. This study focuses on three preschoolers facing potentially painful treatment, showing how the nurses engaged in massive emotion work with the children, through online commentaries, interactive formats (delegation of tasks, consent sequences, collaborative 'we'-formats), as well as solidarity-oriented moves (such as praise and endearment terms). Even a young toddler would handle the distress of needle procedures, when interacting with an inventive nurse who mobilized child participation through skilful emotion work. PMID:24851517

  15. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses and "how"…

  16. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  17. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    PubMed

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. PMID:26010165

  18. Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of clinical practicums is to help nursing students learn from real clinical experiences. In clinical settings, nursing instructors set-aside time at the end of each clinical day for reflective, debriefing discussions that are designed to draw the students' attention to relevant information and help them understand their beliefs and experiences. The students' competence and decision-making skills are enhanced when they are able to reflect on critical incidents or everyday practice events. It is sometimes difficult, however, for instructors to engage students meaningfully in discussions and promote reflection when students are fatigued. In this article, I argue that it is possible to refresh, support, and inspire undergraduate nursing students by engaging them in an activity designed to distract them and occupy their conscious attention, so that their more divergent and less accessible ideas are allowed to surface. Less accessible ideas are associated with the default network; regions in the brain that are most active when the brain is allowed to rest and wander. Congruent with the middle range theory of comfort, a distracting activity will provide comfort to students who are fatigued and/or distressed, and at the same time, will enhance their reflective capacities. A distracting activity that is enjoyable, not too demanding, and can be sustained for more than just a few minutes works best for idea generation and reflection. PMID:27428689

  19. Effect of monochromatic excimer light on palmoplantar pustulosis: a clinical study performed in a private clinic by a dermatological specialist.

    PubMed

    Fumimori, Takeaki; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) is currently treated with various modalities, including excimer light, a form of ultraviolet lamp. This study reports effect of excimer light treatment in 34 Japanese PPP patients treated at a private clinic by one doctor, who was certified as a dermatological specialist by the Japanese Dermatological Association. The statistical analyses were performed upon a collaborative basis with faculties in universities. Disease response scores were determined by response to excimer light treatment. Scores of 1, 2, 3 or 4 were assigned to patients whose palmoplantar pustular psoriasis area and severity index (PPPASI) decreased to 25% or less, 25.1-50%, 50.1-75% or more than 75.1% of pretreatment PPPASI, respectively. In this study, 44.1% PPP cases had scores of 1 or 2, and considered good responders to excimer light treatment. There were no statistical differences between males and females, and between older (≥40 years) and younger groups (≤39 years) in terms of disease response score. Disease duration did not show any significant difference among these scores. Treatment times, total amount of ultraviolet and total treatment duration showed significant differences between score 1 and score 4 groups (P = 0.0164, =0.0137 and =0.0267, respectively). Particular interest was paid to smoking habits. Smoking in male patients was significantly higher than that in female patients (P = 0.0169). There was no statistical difference between smokers and non-smokers in terms of response to excimer light. In conclusion, this study suggested that excimer light is useful for both initial regimen and suppression of exacerbation in treatments of PPP. PMID:24303875

  20. The Teaching Styles and Use of Adult Learning Theory among Nursing Professional Development Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    The American Nurses Association advocates for nursing professional development (NPD) specialists to have an earned graduate degree, as well as educational and clinical expertise. However, many NPD specialists have limited exposure to adult learning theory (ALT), and this lack of exposure may reduce organizational knowledge transfer (KT) and the…

  1. Student Contributions to Clinical Agencies: A Comparison of Adult Health and Psychiatric Staff Nurses' Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindel, Cecelia Gatson; Bateman, Anne L.; Patsdaughter, Carol A.; Babington, Lynn M.; Medici, Geraldine

    2001-01-01

    Adult health/medical-surgical nurses (n=54) and mental health/psychiatric nurses (n=54) were surveyed about contributions of nursing students in clinical placements. Students provided clinical staff with opportunities for mentoring, reciprocal learning, and professional development and made direct contributions to patient care. (SK)

  2. [Planning nursing teaching: educational purposes and clinical competence].

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Magda Cristina Queiroz; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue; Ide, Cilene Aparecida Costardi

    2009-06-01

    Thinking about nursing education implies articulating this issue with the expressions of theoretical frameworks, from the perspective of a pedagogical aspect that includes both constructivism and competencies. The objective was to characterize, from a longitudinal view, the construction of care competencies that exist in the teaching plans of nursing undergraduate programs. This exploratory-descriptive study used a qualitative approach. Documentary analysis was performed on the nine teaching plans of undergraduate care subjects. The ethical-legal aspects were guaranteed, so that data was collected only after the study had been approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The data evidenced a curriculum organization centered on subjects, maintaining internal rationales that seem to resist summative organizations. Signs emerge of hardly substantial links between any previous knowledge and the strengthening of critical judgment and clinical reasoning. As proposed, the study contributed with reconsiderations for the teaching-learning process and showed the influence of constructivism on the proposal of clinical competencies. PMID:19655664

  3. The role of the clinical trial nurse in the informed consent process.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Franca; Ells, Carolyn

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit information about the current practice of clinical trial nurses in the informed consent process. A 50-item self-administered anonymous questionnaire was completed by a sample of 95 nurses from hospitals affiliated with McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, who were members of a clinical trial research team whose principal investigator was a physician and whose research participants were competent adults. The nurses were all members of the provincial nurses' association. Clinical trial nurses were found to have an important role in the informed consent process and to experience conflict of interest and other ethical dilemmas as members of clinical trial research teams. There is a need to develop specific practical and ethical guidelines for nurses involved with clinical trial research and to develop educational programs for nurses working in clinical research. PMID:17679589

  4. Transition to nursing practice of accelerated second-degree baccalaureate students using clinical coaches.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Ruth Ann; Holden-Huchton, Patricia; Armstrong, Myrna L

    2013-05-01

    Among the challenges currently facing nursing is the need for new graduates who are competent to begin providing complex patient care. Innovations in nursing education must lead to outcomes that bridge the gap between nursing education and the beginning competencies that employers need in newly hired graduates. One method for preparing students for patient care is the clinical coach model. This model involves placing a student nurse with an experienced, baccalaureate-prepared staff nurse for 12 months of clinical experience. The student works the same schedule as the coach rather than with a series of preceptors on different units. Coaches attend training conducted by school of nursing faculty, using high-fidelity simulation with clinical scenarios. Coaches and students are supported through weekly visits by clinical faculty. This model of clinical education is one method that provides innovation for clinical nursing education and a foundation for further research. PMID:23458079

  5. Preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model: a qualitative study from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Supamanee, Treeyaphan; Krairiksh, Marisa; Singhakhumfu, Laddawan; Turale, Sue

    2011-12-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical nursing leadership competency perspectives of Thai nurses working in a university hospital. To collect data, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 23 nurse administrators, and focus groups were used with 31 registered nurses. Data were analyzed using content analysis, and theory development was guided by the Iceberg model. Nurses' clinical leadership competencies emerged, comprising hidden characteristics and surface characteristics. The hidden characteristics composed three elements: motive (respect from the nursing and healthcare team and being secure in life), self-concept (representing positive attitudes and values), and traits (personal qualities necessary for leadership). The surface characteristics comprised specific knowledge of nurse leaders about clinical leadership, management and nursing informatics, and clinical skills, such as coordination, effective communication, problem solving, and clinical decision-making. The study findings help nursing to gain greater knowledge of the essence of clinical nursing leadership competencies, a matter critical for theory development in leadership. This study's results later led to the instigation of a training program for registered nurse leaders at the study site, and the formation of a preliminary clinical nursing leadership competency model. PMID:22122346

  6. Nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical education models.

    PubMed

    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Hellström-Hyson, Eva; Persson, Elisabeth; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2014-08-01

    Preceptors play an important role in the process of developing students' knowledge and skills. There is an ongoing search for the best learning and teaching models in clinical education. Little is known about preceptors' perspectives on different models. The aim of the study was to describe nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical models of clinical education: peer learning and traditional supervision. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Eighteen preceptors from surgical and medical departments at two hospitals were interviewed, ten representing peer learning (student work in pairs) and eight traditional supervision (one student follows a nurse during a shift). The findings showed that preceptors using peer learning created room for students to assume responsibility for their own learning, challenged students' knowledge by refraining from stepping in and encouraged critical thinking. Using traditional supervision, the preceptors' individual ambitions influenced the preceptorship and their own knowledge was empathized as being important to impart. They demonstrated, observed and gradually relinquished responsibility to the students. The choice of clinical education model is important. Peer learning seemed to create learning environments that integrate clinical and academic skills. Investigation of pedagogical models in clinical education should be of major concern to managers and preceptors. PMID:24512652

  7. Using clinical nurses as preceptors to teach leadership and management to senior nursing students: a qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Lillibridge, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The preceptor model of clinical education uses nurses to fulfill the role of 'teacher' in a one-on-one relationship with students. The current nursing shortage, however, places increased demands on nurses and threatens their continuation in this role. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to gain a better understanding of the nurse preceptor's experience. Five themes evolved during data analysis: (1) making it worthwhile for the nurse, (2) making a difference, (3) engaging in the process, (4) "I love being a preceptor, but..., and (5) accepting the role, taking responsibility. Making it worthwhile for the nurse included how nurses saw personal and professional rewards and benefits in precepting. Making a difference described how nurses felt they made a difference in student learning. Engaging in the process described how nurses created learning opportunities for students by being a good role model and protecting students from negative experiences. "I love being a preceptor, but..." identified aspects of the precepting role that were difficult. Accepting the role, taking responsibility identified the different people involved in the complex precepting experience; the preceptor, nursing faculty, students, and the nurse manager that all had to work together if students were to have a good experience. Findings can be used to develop better support for preceptors as well as more structured and consistent orientation to the role. PMID:17689423

  8. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

  9. Preparing Dedicated Education Unit Staff Nurses for the Role of Clinical Teacher.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Susan A; Bonham, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Dedicated Education Units optimize the expertise of staff nurses to provide clinical instruction to nursing students, thereby creating a need to prepare staff nurses for the teaching role and educate them about clinical teaching strategies. A curriculum to educate Dedicated Education Unit staff nurses in the art of clinical instruction was created to fill this gap in staff development. This article describes the development of an innovative, interactive, evidence-based curriculum to prepare Dedication Education Unit staff nurses and strengthen an academic-practice partnership. PMID:27434320

  10. Opening our hearts and minds: the meaning of international clinical nursing electives in the personal and professional lives of nurses.

    PubMed

    Callister, Lynn Clark; Cox, Amy Harmer

    2006-06-01

    Although international opportunities are the hallmark of nursing education at a large private university, the meaning of participating in such clinical nursing electives has not been described. The purpose of this phenomenological study of nurses was to examine the personal and professional meaning of participating in international clinical nursing electives during their undergraduate nursing studies. Audiotaped interviews were conducted with 20 former nursing students who had had this opportunity. "Opening our hearts and minds" was described by the study's participants, with the following themes: increasing understanding of other cultures and peoples, increasing understanding of global sociopolitical and health issues, increasing the commitment to make a difference, experiencing personal and professional growth, contributing to professional development in the host country, making interpersonal connexions, and developing cultural competence. This study makes an important contribution to the documentation of the meaning of participating in international nursing clinical experiences. Data are being used for long-term curricular planning in the development and refinement of future international clinical nursing electives and to provide outcomes data for professional accreditation. There are broader implications for the movement beyond individual cultural competence to increasing global consciousness and the improvement of global health care. PMID:16764561