Sample records for clinical practice recommendations

  1. Evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation: Recommendations for clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith D. Cicerone; Cynthia Dahlberg; Kathleen Kalmar; Donna M. Langenbahn; James F. Malec; Thomas F. Bergquist; Thomas Felicetti; Joseph T. Giacino; J. Preston Harley; Douglas E. Harrington; Jean Herzog; Sally Kneipp; Linda Laatsch; Philip A. Morse

    2000-01-01

    Cicerone KD, Dahlberg C, Kalmar K, Langenbahn DM, Malec JF, Bergquist TF, Felicetti T, Giacino JT, Harley JP, Harrington DE, Herzog J, Kneipp S, Laatsch L, Morse PA. Evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation: recommendations for clinical practice. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2000;81:1596-615. Objective: To establish evidence-based recommendations for the clinical practice of cognitive rehabilitation, derived from a methodical review of the scientific

  2. Pharmacogenetics-based therapeutic recommendations — ready for clinical practice?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uwe Fuhr; Jürgen Brockmöller; Julia Kirchheiner

    2005-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in basic pharmacogenetic research, less has been demonstrated in the application of pharmacogenetics (PGx)-based diagnostics to drug development and in clinical practice. There are drugs that are currently used in the clinic for which individualized therapy could be beneficial based on PGx data. However, specific, actionable recommendations on how to implement individualized therapy —

  3. Recommendations on the use of exercise testing in clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Palange; S. A. Ward; K. H. Carlsen; R. Casaburi; C. G. Gallagher; R. Gosselink; D. E. O'Donnell; L. Puente-Maestu; A. M. Schols; S. Singh; B. J. Whipp

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based recommendations on the clinical use of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in lung and heart disease are presented, with reference to the assessment of exercise intolerance, prognostic assessment and the evaluation of therapeutic interventions (e.g. drugs, supplemental oxygen, exercise training). A commonly used grading system for recommendations in evidence-based guidelines was applied, with the grade of recommendation ranging from A,

  4. Crop Management Diagnostic Clinics: Impact on Advisors Recommendations and Producer Practices

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Crop Management Diagnostic Clinics: Impact on Advisors Recommendations and Producer Practices exercises for genetic improvement and management of crops, soil fertility and water, weeds, diseases Charles Wortmann, Keith Glewen, and Susan N. Williams, University of Nebraska­Lincoln Extension Crop

  5. Pain Assessment in the Nonverbal Patient: Position Statement with Clinical Practice Recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keela Herr; Patrick J. Coyne; Tonya Key; Renee Manworren; Margo McCaffery; Sandra Merkel; Jane Pelosi-Kelly; Lori Wild

    2006-01-01

    The article presents the position statement and clinical practice recommendations for pain assessment in the nonverbal patient developed by an appointed Task Force and approved by the ASPMN Board of Directors.

  6. Opioid Detoxification and Naltrexone Induction Strategies: Recommendations for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sigmon, Stacey C.; Bisaga, Adam; Nunes, Edward V.; O'Connor, Patrick G.; Kosten, Thomas; Woody, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioid dependence is a significant public health problem associated with high risk for relapse if treatment is not ongoing. While maintenance on opioid agonists (i.e., methadone, buprenorphine) often produces favorable outcomes, detoxification followed by treatment with the ?-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone may offer a potentially useful alternative to agonist maintenance for some patients. Method Treatment approaches for making this transition are described here based on a literature review and solicitation of opinions from several expert clinicians and scientists regarding patient selection, level of care, and detoxification strategies. Conclusion Among the current detoxification regimens, the available clinical and scientific data suggest that the best approach may be using an initial 2–4 mg dose of buprenorphine combined with clonidine, other ancillary medications, and progressively increasing doses of oral naltrexone over 3–5 days up to the target dose of naltrexone. However, more research is needed to empirically validate the best approach for making this transition. PMID:22404717

  7. Vitamin D and musculoskeletal health, cardiovascular disease, autoimmunity and cancer: Recommendations for clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Claude Souberbielle; Jean-Jacques Body; Joan M. Lappe; Mario Plebani; Yehuda Shoenfeld; Thomas J. Wang; Heike A. Bischoff-Ferrari; Etienne Cavalier; Peter R. Ebeling; Patrice Fardellone; Sara Gandini; Damien Gruson; Alain P. Guérin; Lene Heickendorff; Bruce W. Hollis; Sofia Ish-Shalom; Guillaume Jean; Philipp von Landenberg; Alvaro Largura; Tomas Olsson; Charles Pierrot-Deseilligny; Stefan Pilz; Angela Tincani; Andre Valcour; Armin Zittermann

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundThere is increasing evidence that, in addition to the well-known effects on musculoskeletal health, vitamin D status may be related to a number of non-skeletal diseases. An international expert panel formulated recommendations on vitamin D for clinical practice, taking into consideration the best evidence available based on published literature today. In addition, where data were limited to smaller clinical trials

  8. Recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support and knowledge management in community settings: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support (CDS) development and implementation and for knowledge management (KM) processes in ambulatory clinics and community hospitals using commercial or locally developed systems in the U.S. Methods Guided by the Multiple Perspectives Framework, the authors conducted ethnographic field studies at two community hospitals and five ambulatory clinic organizations across the U.S. Using a Rapid Assessment Process, a multidisciplinary research team: gathered preliminary assessment data; conducted on-site interviews, observations, and field surveys; analyzed data using both template and grounded methods; and developed universal themes. A panel of experts produced recommended practices. Results The team identified ten themes related to CDS and KM. These include: 1) workflow; 2) knowledge management; 3) data as a foundation for CDS; 4) user computer interaction; 5) measurement and metrics; 6) governance; 7) translation for collaboration; 8) the meaning of CDS; 9) roles of special, essential people; and 10) communication, training, and support. Experts developed recommendations about each theme. The original Multiple Perspectives framework was modified to make explicit a new theoretical construct, that of Translational Interaction. Conclusions These ten themes represent areas that need attention if a clinic or community hospital plans to implement and successfully utilize CDS. In addition, they have implications for workforce education, research, and national-level policy development. The Translational Interaction construct could guide future applied informatics research endeavors. PMID:22333210

  9. Is traditional Chinese medicine recommended in Western medicine clinical practice guidelines in China? A systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Li, Xun; Sun, Jin; Han, Mei; Yang, Guo-Yan; Li, Wen-Yuan; Robinson, Nicola; Lewith, George; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine promotes and relies on the use of evidence in developing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). The Chinese healthcare system includes both traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine, which are expected to be equally reflected in Chinese CPGs. Objective To evaluate the inclusion of TCM-related information in Western medicine CPGs developed in China and the adoption of high level evidence. Methods All CPGs were identified from the China Guideline Clearinghouse (CGC), which is the main Chinese organisation maintaining the guidelines issued by the Ministry of Health of China, the Chinese Medical Association and the Chinese Medical Doctors’ Association. TCM-related contents were extracted from all the CPGs identified. Extracted information comprised the institution issuing the guideline, date of issue, disease, recommendations relating to TCM, evidence level of the recommended content and references supporting the recommendations. Results A total of 604 CPGs were identified, only a small number of which (74/604; 12%) recommended TCM therapy and only five guidelines (7%) had applied evidence grading. The 74 CPGs involved 13 disease systems according to the International Classification of Diseases 10th edition. TCM was mainly recommended in the treatment part of the guidelines (73/74, 99%), and more than half of the recommendations (43/74, 58%) were related to Chinese herbal medicine (single herbs or herbal treatment based on syndrome differentiation). Conclusions Few Chinese Western medicine CPGs recommend TCM therapies and very few provide evidence grading for the TCM recommendation. We suggest that future guideline development should be based on systematic searches for evidence to support CPG recommendations and involve a multidisciplinary approach including TCM expertise. PMID:26041487

  10. The discrepancy between recommendations and clinical practice for viscosupplementation in osteoarthritis: mind the gap!

    PubMed

    Migliore, A; Bizzi, E; Herrero-Beaumont, J; Petrella, R J; Raman, R; Chevalier, X

    2015-04-01

    Recently AAOS, ACR and OARSI revised their recommendations for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and for hand, knee and hip joints. During ISIAT (International Symposium on Intra-Articular Treatments) 2013 round table on recommendations about the use of intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid (IAHA) in OA, several considerations were elaborated by the ISIAT Technical Expert Panel (TEP) regarding discrepancy between recommendations and clinical practice. The ISIAT TEP gathered the following eight suggestions regarding the drawing of recommendations on the use of IAHA in OA and its comparison with other treatments. It is necessary to merge data coming from both RCTs and registers. Only studies with a strong level of evidence should be taken into account. A common threshold of efficacy should be assessed for comparing treatments. Evaluation of hard outcomes is essential. The effect size of placebo as comparator should be attentively considered in RCTs. Particular attention should be given to different phenotypes of OA that may possibly respond differently to each treatment. Compliance and long-term side effects of different therapeutic approaches should be evaluated. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation should be performed on the long term. PMID:25912569

  11. Management of primary ciliary dyskinesia in European children: recommendations and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Frischer, Thomas; Barbato, Angelo; Snijders, Deborah; Maurer, Elisabeth; Lucas, Jane S A; Eber, Ernst; Karadag, Bulent; Pohunek, Petr; Zivkovic, Zorica; Escribano, Amparo; O'Callaghan, Chris; Bush, Andrew; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2012-06-01

    The European Respiratory Society Task Force on primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) in children recently published recommendations for diagnosis and management. This paper compares these recommendations with current clinical practice in Europe. Questionnaires were returned by 194 paediatric respiratory centres caring for PCD patients in 26 countries. In most countries, PCD care was not centralised, with a median (interquartile range) of 4 (2-9) patients treated per centre. Overall, 90% of centres had access to nasal or bronchial mucosal biopsy. Samples were analysed by electron microscopy (77%) and ciliary function tests (57%). Nasal nitric oxide was used for screening in 46% of centres and saccharine tests in 36%. Treatment approaches varied widely, both within and between countries. European region, size of centre and the country's general government expenditure on health partly defined availability of advanced diagnostic tests and choice of treatments. In conclusion, we found substantial heterogeneity in management of PCD within and between countries, and poor concordance with current recommendations. This demonstrates how essential it is to standardise management and decrease inequality between countries. Our results also demonstrate the urgent need for research: to simplify PCD diagnosis, to understand the natural history and to test the effectiveness of interventions. PMID:22282549

  12. Review of trace mineral requirements for preterm infants: what are the current recommendations for clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Finch, Carolyn Weiglein

    2015-02-01

    Inadequate nutrient stores at birth are an inevitable consequence of being born prematurely. Preterm infants also have high nutrient requirements, which increase with earlier gestational ages. As a result, early nutrition intervention is required to prevent further deficits that, if not corrected, can affect growth and long-term outcomes. Preterm infants often require several weeks of parenteral nutrition (PN) support, which includes trace mineral supplementation. Trace minerals are considered essential nutrients, unable to be synthesized in the human body. Deficiencies of trace minerals have been reported, yet evidence-based guidelines for assessment and supplementation have not been clearly defined. Food and Drug Administration-approved parenteral trace mineral intake guidelines are more than 30 years old. In an effort to more clearly define trace mineral supplementation and monitoring guidelines for preterm infants, a review of literature was performed with the purpose to (1) summarize trace mineral roles in preterm infants, (2) describe clinical signs of deficiency and toxicity, and (3) present intake recommendations and considerations for preterm infants based on current available literature. Review of literature was completed using PubMed and Cochrane databases to find relevant studies specific to trace mineral requirements for preterm infants, trace mineral supplementation of PN, human milk fortifiers, and preterm infant formulas. Review of literature supports that trace mineral depletion can lead to clinical compromise in preterm infants; therefore, suggesting that every effort be made to ensure adequate provision of trace minerals is given to preterm infants. Practical considerations for the clinical nutrition management of preterm infants were also identified in this review. PMID:25527182

  13. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Undergraduate Teaching Clinics: A Systematic Review and Recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara B. Werb; David W. Matear

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project was to identify an effective methodology of approaching and implementing evidence- based principles in undergraduate teaching clinics to promote evidence-based dentistry in future clinical practice. A systematic review was undertaken to examine evidence-based clinical teaching and faculty continuing education. Research published from 1996 to 2002 was retrieved by searching several databases and the Internet, along

  14. Monitoring adverse events of low-dose glucocorticoid therapy: EULAR recommendations for clinical trials and daily practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. van der Goes; J. W. G. Jacobs; M. Boers; T. Andrews; M. A. M. Blom-Bakkers; F. Buttgereit; N. Caeyers; M. Cutolo; J. A. P. Da Silva; L. Guillevin; J. R. Kirwan; J. Rovensky; G. Severijns; S. Webber; R. Westhovens; J. W. J. Bijlsma

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveTo develop recommendations on monitoring for adverse events (AEs) of low-dose glucocorticoid (GC) therapy (?7.5 mg prednisone or equivalent daily) in clinical trials and daily practice.MethodsLiterature was searched for articles containing information on incidence and monitoring of GC-related AEs using PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. Second, the authors searched for broad accepted guidelines on the monitoring of certain AEs (eg,

  15. Recommendations from the Italian Interdisciplinary Working Group (AIMN, AIP, SINDEM) for the utilization of amyloid imaging in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Ugo Paolo; Nobili, Flavio Mariano; Padovani, Alessandro; Perani, Daniela; Pupi, Alberto; Sorbi, Sandro; Trabucchi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of brain amyloid is a technology that has been approved by Food and Drug Administration and European Medical Agency, but its clinical utility in medical practice requires careful definition. To provide guidance to italian dementia care practitioners, patients, and caregivers, a group of experts from "Associazione Italiana di Medicina Nucleare" (AIMN), "Associazione Italiana di Psicogeriatria" (AIP) and "Società Italiana per lo Studio delle Demenze" (SINDEM) convened the Italian Interdisciplinary Working Group on Amyloid Imaging. The Working Group considered a range of clinical scenarios in which amyloid PET should be recommended. Peer-reviewed, published literature was searched to ascertain available evidence relevant to these recommendations. Although empirical evidence of impact on clinical outcomes is not yet available, a set of specific recommended use criteria were agreed to define the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used. Both correct and incorrect uses were considered and formulated. Because both dementia care and amyloid-PET technology are in active development, these recommendations will require periodic reassessment. PMID:25616445

  16. Clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of invasive Aspergillus infections in adults in the Middle East region: Expert panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdely, Hail M; Alothman, Adel F; Salman, Jameela Al; Al-Musawi, Tariq; Almaslamani, Muna; Butt, Adeel A; Al Thaqafi, Abdulhakeem O; Raghubir, Nirvana; Morsi, Waleed El; Yared, Nadine A

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of invasive Aspergillus infections in the Middle East continues to rise with the increase in the number of immunocompromised patients, and carries significant morbidity and mortality. A panel of experts analysed the evidence from the most recent international guidelines and relevant published literature to reach consensus and develop clear clinical practice guidelines to aid diagnosis and treatment of invasive Aspergillus infections in the Middle East. Disease-specific recommendations were provided for the management of invasive aspergillosis. The expert panel acknowledged that these guidelines should be followed as closely as possible but used alongside clinical judgement. PMID:24029495

  17. How to translate therapeutic recommendations in clinical practice guidelines into rules for critiquing physician prescriptions? Methods and application to five guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Baptiste Lamy; Vahid Ebrahiminia; Christine Riou; Brigitte Seroussi; Jacques Bouaud; Christian Simon; Stéphane Dubois; Antoine Butti; Gérard Simon; Madeleine Favre; Hector Falcoff; Alain Venot

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines give recommendations about what to do in various medical situations, including therapeutical recommendations for drug prescription. An effective way to computerize these recommendations is to design critiquing decision support systems, i.e. systems that criticize the physician's prescription when it does not conform to the guidelines. These systems are commonly based on a list of \\

  18. [Recommendations on the use of belimumab in systemic lupus erythematosus. GEAS-SEMI Clinical Practice Guide].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Casals, M; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Jiménez-Alonso, J; Khamashta, M A

    2013-01-01

    Biological therapies are based on the administration of various types of synthetic molecules related to the immune response. Their use has spread in recent years to the field of systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Until 2011, these diseases were not included in the therapeutic indications approved by international regulatory agencies. Therefore, the use of biological therapies was restricted to clinical trials and to compassionate use for cases refractory to standard treatments (off-label use), which require the approval of the Health Ministry. In 2011, belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to the soluble form of the protein human B lymphocyte stimulator BlyS, was approved for use in patients with SLE. Because the clinical information on the use of this new drug in patients with SLE has only been obtained from the results of randomized trials, the Study Group of Autoimmune Diseases (GEAS) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has developed therapeutic guidelines. These guidelines are based on the current scientific evidence on the use of belimumab in SLE patients in the clinical practice. PMID:23266125

  19. [HER2 and gastric cancer. Recommendations for clinical practice in 2011].

    PubMed

    Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Bouché, Olivier; Emile, Jean-François; Bibeau, Frédéric; Metges, Jean-Philippe; André, Thierry; Monges, Geneviève

    2011-04-01

    Trastuzumab in combination with capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin has been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) for the treatment of patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive (immunohistochemistry [IHC] 3+ or IHC 2+/ fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH]-positive or IHC 2+/ silver in situ hybridization [SISH]-positive) metastatic adenocarcinoma of the stomach or gastro-esophageal (GE) junction. HER2 testing in gastric cancer (GC) differs from testing in breast cancer (BC) due to major differences in the tumor biology; as the disease is progressing rapidely, we recommend to test every GC at diagnosis and to offer a rapid testing (less than five days) in the metastatic setting. IHC should be the initial testing methodology and FISH or SISH should be used to retest IHC 2+ samples. As GC more frequently shows incomplete membrane staining and focal staining for HER2, HER2 testing guidelines have been adapted from BC protocols. The scoring system is slightly different in respect to the characteristics of GC. For in situ hybridization, SISH should be used in order to identify heterogeneous staining with a higher accuracy than FISH. Enrollment in training and quality assurance programs is highly recommended. In case of negativity on biopsy, it is recommended to retest for HER2, when possible, on surgical specimens and/or metastasis. This will ensure accurate and consistent HER2 testing results, which will allow the appropriate selection of patients eligible for treatment with trastuzumab. PMID:21601111

  20. Evidence-Based Assessment of Child Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Recommendations for Clinical Practice and Treatment Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam B. Lewin; John Piacentini

    2010-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) presents heterogeneously and can be difficult to assess in youth. This review focuses\\u000a on research-supported assessment approaches for OCD in childhood. Content areas include pre-visit screening, diagnostic establishment,\\u000a differential diagnosis, assessment of comorbid psychiatric conditions, tracking symptom severity, determining psychosocial\\u000a functioning, and evaluating clinical improvement. Throughout this review, similarities and differences between assessment\\u000a approaches geared towards clinical

  1. The Role of Spirituality in the Treatment of Trauma and Eating Disorders: Recommendations for Clinical Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E. Berrett; Randy K. Hardman; Kari A. OGrady; P. Scott Richards

    2007-01-01

    The relationships among trauma, eating disorders, and spirituality are complex. Both trauma and eating disorders can distance women from their own spirituality, which undermines a potentially important treatment resource. In this article, we offer suggestions based on our clinical experience for helping eating disorder patients who have suffered trauma to rediscover their faith and spirituality. We describe how spirituality can

  2. Tibolone: clinical recommendations and practical guidelines. A report of the International Tibolone Consensus Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Kenemans; L. Speroff

    2005-01-01

    An international multidisciplinary panel of experts in the management of the menopause met at the 4th Amsterdam Menopause Symposium in October 2004 to determine the specific place of tibolone, a synthetic steroid with a unique clinical profile, within the wide range of currently available postmenopausal therapy options. The consensus was that tibolone is a valuable treatment option for women with

  3. Improving clinical practice guidelines for practicing cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Dwyer, Edward M; Eberly, Shirley; Francis, Charles; Gillespie, John A; Goldstein, Robert E; Greenberg, Henry; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald J; Klein, Helmut; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Marcus, Frank I; Moss, Arthur J; Oakes, David; Ryan, Daniel H; Bloch Thomsen, Poul E; Zareba, Wojciech

    2015-06-15

    Cardiac-related clinical practice guidelines have become an integral part of the practice of cardiology. Unfortunately, these guidelines are often long, complex, and difficult for practicing cardiologists to use. Guidelines should be condensed and their format upgraded, so that the key messages are easier to comprehend and can be applied more readily by those involved in patient care. After presenting the historical background and describing the guideline structure, we make several recommendations to make clinical practice guidelines more user-friendly for clinical cardiologists. Our most important recommendations are that the clinical cardiology guidelines should focus exclusively on (1) class I recommendations with established benefits that are supported by randomized clinical trials and (2) class III recommendations for diagnostic or therapeutic approaches in which quality studies show no benefit or possible harm. Class II recommendations are not evidence based but reflect expert opinions related to published clinical studies, with potential for personal bias by members of the guideline committee. Class II recommendations should be published separately as "Expert Consensus Statements" or "Task Force Committee Opinions," so that both majority and minority expert opinions can be presented in a less dogmatic form than the way these recommendations currently appear in clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25918027

  4. Italian Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AME) & Italian Association of Clinical Diabetologists (AMD) Position Statement : Diabetes mellitus and thyroid disorders: recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Aglialoro, Alberto; Aiello, Antimo; Ianni, Lucia; Maccario, Mauro; Zini, Michele; Giorda, Carlo; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Betterle, Corrado; Attanasio, Roberto; Borretta, Giorgio; Garofalo, Piernicola; Papini, Enrico; Castello, Roberto; Ceriello, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus, the most common disorders in endocrine practice, are not infrequently associated in the same subject. An altered thyroid function may affect glucose tolerance and worsen metabolic control in patients with diabetes. Thyrotoxicosis increases the risk of hyperglycemic emergencies, while a clinically relevant hypothyroidism may have a detrimental effect on glycemic control in diabetic patients. The association of alterations in thyroid function with diabetes mellitus may adversely affect the risk of cardiovascular and microvascular complications resulting from diabetes. Moreover, the treatments used for both diabetes and thyroid disease, respectively, can impact one other. Finally, multinodular goiter, but not thyroid carcinoma, was shown to be more prevalent in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Aim of the present Position Statement is to focus on the evidence concerning the association of thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus and to provide some practical suggestions for an updated clinical management. PMID:25403287

  5. Recommendations for clinical practice and research in severe brain injury in intensive rehabilitation: the Italian Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    De Tanti, A; Zampolini, M; Pregno, S

    2015-02-01

    The paper reports the final statements of the jury of a National Consensus Conference organized in November 2010 at Salsomaggiore (Parma) to draw up recommendations on the rehabilitation programs for acquired brain injury (sABI) patients in the intensive hospital phase. Because of the few clinical studies of good quality found by means of the literature research we choose a mixed approach: a systematic review of the published studies and a consensus conference in order to obtain recommendations that come from the clinical evidence and the expert opinion. The final recommendations of the jury, based on the best available evidence combined with clinical expertise and the experience of persons with disabilities and other stakeholders, cover 13 topics: 1) Management of paroxysmal manifestations (sympathetic storms); 2) management of neuroendocrine problems; 3) nutrition; 4) swallowing; 5) ventilation/respiration, 6) clinical and instrument diagnosis and prognosis of vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS), 7) rehabilitative and pharmacological facilitation of renewed contact with surroundings; 8) neurosurgical complications and hydrocephalus; 9) sensorimotor impairment and disability; 10) rehabilitation methods; 11) assessment and treatment of cognitive-behavioural impairment and disability; 12) methodology and organization of care; 13) involving family and caregivers in rehabilitation. PMID:25184800

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of invasive Candida infections in adults in the Middle East region: Expert panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Alothman, Adel F; Al-Musawi, Tariq; Al-Abdely, Hail M; Salman, Jameela Al; Almaslamani, Muna; Yared, Nadine; Butt, Adeel A; Raghubir, Nirvana; Morsi, Waleed El; Al Thaqafi, Abdulhakeem O

    2014-02-01

    Invasive Candida infections contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in patients with healthcare-associated infections. They represent a major burden on the public health system, and are challenging to diagnose and treat. A multidisciplinary expert panel critically reviewed available evidence to provide consensus recommendations for the management of invasive Candida infections in the Middle East. Based on diagnosis, recommendations were provided for the management of Candida infections in non-neutropenic and neutropenic patients. Polyenes (amphotericin B-deoxycholate [AmB-d] and lipid formulations amphotericin B [LFAmB]), triazoles (fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole), echinocandins (caspofungin, anidulafungin, and micafungin) and flucytosine are the recommended categories of antifungal agents for treatment of Candida infections. Echinocandins are preferred for treatment of proven and suspected Candida infections, especially in critically ill patients or those with previous exposure to azoles. Recommendations were also provided for infections caused by specific Candida species as well as management of different disease conditions. The experts highlighted that the guidelines should be used along with clinical judgment. Given the paucity of published data from the region, research in the form of randomized clinical trials should be given priority. PMID:24035607

  7. Clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hanaa El-Karaksy; Mohmmad Rashed; Rokaya El-Sayed; Mona El-Raziky; Nehal El-Koofy; Manal El-Hawary; Osama Al-Dirbashi

    2010-01-01

    Four patients with tyrosinemia type 1 (ages 6–32 months) were treated with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexandion\\u000a (NTBC) at Cairo University Children’s Hospital, Egypt and followed up for 12–27 months. The recommended average dose of NTBC\\u000a is 1 mg\\/kg\\/day. They were started on the following doses: 0.8, 0.58, 0.5, and 0.625 mg\\/kg\\/day, respectively. Two months after\\u000a start of therapy, succinylacetone was undetectable in patients 1, 2, and 4,

  8. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design. PMID:25587128

  9. Clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ioannis M. Vlastos; John K. Hajiioannou

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children is a relatively common problem, presenting in various ways, from primary\\u000a snoring, without an apparent decrease in quality of life, to obstructive sleep apnea with cognitive, cardiac, and growth abnormalities.\\u000a History, clinical examination, radiologic evaluations, sleep studies, and other diagnostic modalities are reviewed. Since\\u000a application and interpretation of these methods are not consistent in studies

  10. Recommendations for the clinical use of somatosensory-evoked potentials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Cruccu; M. J. Aminoff; G. Curio; J. M. Guerit; R. Kakigi; F. Mauguiere; P. M. Rossini; R.-D. Treede; L. Garcia-Larrea

    2008-01-01

    The International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology (IFCN) is in the process of updating its Recommendations for clinical practice published in 1999. These new recommendations dedicated to somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) update the methodological aspects and general clinical applications of standard SEPs, and introduce new sections dedicated to the anatomical–functional organization of the somatosensory system and to special clinical applications, such as

  11. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Pancotti, Anthony; Haag, Thomas; King, Scott; Walker, Mitchell; Blakely, Joseph; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, direct measurement of thrust or impulse is one of the most critical elements of electric thruster characterization, and one of the most difficult measurements to make. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has started an initiative to develop standards for many important measurement processes in electric propulsion, including thrust measurements. This paper summarizes recommended practices for the design, calibration, and operation of pendulum thrust stands, which are widely recognized as the best approach for measuring micro N- to mN-level thrust and micro Ns-level impulse bits. The fundamentals of pendulum thrust stand operation are reviewed, along with its implementation in hanging pendulum, inverted pendulum, and torsional balance configurations. Methods of calibration and recommendations for calibration processes are presented. Sources of error are identified and methods for data processing and uncertainty analysis are discussed. This review is intended to be the first step toward a recommended practices document to help the community produce high quality thrust measurements.

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines in Psychiatry: More Confusion Than Clarity? A Critical Review and Recommendation of a Unified Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of psychiatry has a plethora of guidelines, designed to serve the needs of the clinician. Yet, even a cursory glance is enough to discern the differences between the various guidelines. This paper reviews the current standard guidelines being followed across the world and proposes a unified guideline on the backbone of current evidence and practice being followed. The algorithm for pharmacological and psychosocial treatment for bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia is formulated after cross-comparison across four different guidelines and recent meta-analytical evidence. For every disorder, guidelines have different suggestions. Hence, based on the current status of evidence, algorithms have been combined to form a unified guideline for management. Clinical practice guidelines form the basis of standard clinical practice for all disciplines of medicine, including psychiatry. Yet, they are often not read or followed because of poor quality or because of barriers to implementation due to either lack of agreement or ambiguity. A unified guideline can go a long way in helping clear some of the confusion that has crept in due to the use of different guidelines across the world. PMID:25006523

  13. Conflicts of interest and clinical recommendations: comparison of two concurrent clinical practice guidelines for primary immune thrombocytopenia developed by different methods.

    PubMed

    George, James N; Vesely, Sara K; Woolf, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    The growing influence of practice guidelines has increased concern for potential sources of bias. Two recent guidelines for primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) provided a unique opportunity for a systematic comparison of different methods of practice guideline development. One guideline (International Consensus Report [ICR]) was supported by pharmaceutical companies that produce products for ITP. The ICR panel members were selected for expertise in ITP; 16 (73%) reported associations with pharmaceutical companies. The other guideline was sponsored by the American Society of Hematology (ASH); panel members were selected for lack of conflicts and for expertise in guideline development as well as for ITP. Discrepancies were conspicuous when the guidelines addressed treatment. In contrast to the ASH guideline, the ICR gave stronger recommendations for agents manufactured by companies from which the ICR or its panel members received support. These data provide direct evidence that differences in financial support and methods of evidence evaluation can influence recommendations. PMID:23550214

  14. Recommendations for using TNF? antagonists and French Clinical Practice Guidelines endorsed by the French National Authority for Health.

    PubMed

    Goëb, Vincent; Ardizzone, Marc; Arnaud, Laurent; Avouac, Jérôme; Baillet, Athan; Belot, Alexandre; Bouvard, Béatrice; Coquerelle, Pascal; Dadoun, Sabrina; Diguet, Alain; Launay, David; Lebouc, Danielle; Loulergue, Pierre; Mahy, Sophie; Mestat, Pascal; Mouterde, Gaël; Terrier, Benjamin; Varoquier, Coralie; Verdet, Mathieu; Puéchal, Xavier; Sibilia, Jean

    2013-12-01

    The use of TNF? antagonists must follow specific guidelines to ensure optimal effectiveness and safety. The French Society for Rheumatology (SFR) and Task Force on Inflammatory Joint Diseases (CRI), in partnership with several French learned societies, asked the French National Authority for Health (HAS) to develop and endorse good practice guidelines for the prescription and monitoring of TNF? antagonist therapy by physicians belonging to various specialties. These guidelines were developed, then, validated by two multidisciplinary panels of experts based on an exhaustive review of the recent literature and in compliance with the methodological rules set forth by the HAS. They pertain to the initial prescription of TNF? antagonists and to a variety of clinical situations that can arise during the follow-up of patients receiving TNF? antagonists (infections, malignancies, pregnancy, vaccination, paradoxical adverse events, surgery, use in older patients, and vasculitides). PMID:24176736

  15. A qualitative study of the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support: recommended practices for success

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S; Erickson, Jessica L; Wasserman, Joe; Bunce, Arwen; Stanescu, Ana; St Hilaire, Daniel; Panzenhagen, Morgan; Gebhardt, Eric; McMullen, Carmit; Middleton, Blackford; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support (CDS) at leading sites. Materials and methods We conducted ethnographic observations at seven diverse sites with a history of excellence in CDS using the Rapid Assessment Process and analyzed the data using a series of card sorts, informed by Linstone's Multiple Perspectives Model. Results We identified 18 activities and grouped them into four areas. Area 1: Fostering relationships across the organization, with activities (a) training and support, (b) visibility/presence on the floor, (c) liaising between people, (d) administration and leadership, (e) project management, (f) cheerleading/buy-in/sponsorship, (g) preparing for CDS implementation. Area 2: Assembling the system with activities (a) providing technical support, (b) CDS content development, (c) purchasing products from vendors (d) knowledge management, (e) system integration. Area 3: Using CDS to achieve the organization's goals with activities (a) reporting, (b) requirements-gathering/specifications, (c) monitoring CDS, (d) linking CDS to goals, (e) managing data. Area 4: Participation in external policy and standards activities (this area consists of only a single activity). We also identified a set of recommendations associated with these 18 activities. Discussion All 18 activities we identified were performed at all sites, although the way they were organized into roles differed substantially. We consider these activities critical to the success of a CDS program. Conclusions A series of activities are performed by sites strong in CDS, and sites adopting CDS should ensure they incorporate these activities into their efforts. PMID:23999670

  16. Food and dietary pattern-based recommendations: an emerging approach to clinical practice guidelines for nutrition therapy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sievenpiper, John L; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2013-02-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for the nutritional management of diabetes mellitus have evolved considerably over the last 25 years. As major diabetes associations have focussed on the individualization of nutrition therapy, there has been a move toward a broader more flexible macronutrient distribution that emphasizes macronutrient quality over quantity. There is now a call for the integration of food- and dietary pattern-based approaches into diabetes association CPGs. The main argument has been that an approach that focuses on nutrients alone misses important nutrient interactions oversimplifying the complexity of foods and dietary patterns, both of which have been shown to have a stronger influence on disease risk than nutrients alone. Although cancer and heart associations have begun to integrate this approach into their dietary guidelines, diabetes associations have not yet adopted this approach. We provide a rationale for the adoption of this approach for The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) 2013 CPGs for nutrition therapy. The systematic review for the development of these guidelines revealed emerging evidence to support the use of vegetarian, Mediterranean, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary patterns as well as specific foods such as dietary pulses and nuts in people with diabetes. Popular and conventional weight loss diets were also found to have similar advantages in people with diabetes, although poor dietary adherence remains an issue with these diets. The CDA 2013 CPGs will support an even greater individualization of nutrition therapy for people with diabetes and appeal to a broader range of practice styles of health professionals. PMID:24070749

  17. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge. PMID:24679179

  18. Grading evidence and recommendations for clinical practice guidelines in nephrology. A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Uhlig; A MacLeod; J Craig; J Lau; A S Levey; A Levin; L Moist; E Steinberg; R Walker; C Wanner; N Lameire; G Eknoyan

    2006-01-01

    Considerable variation in grading systems used to rate the strength of guideline recommendations and the quality of the supporting evidence in Nephrology highlights the need for a uniform, internationally accepted, rigorous system. In 2004, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) commissioned a methods expert group to recommend an approach for grading in future nephrology guidelines. This position statement by KDIGO

  19. Clinical management of drug-induced hypertension: 2013 Practical Recommendations of the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA).

    PubMed

    Virdis, Agostino; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Taddei, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Results from recent observational studies conducted in our country and including approximately 160,000 patients with hypertension, reported that only 37 % of patients achieve effective blood pressure control under treatment. These data confirm that blood pressure control amongst the hypertensive population is still largely unsatisfactory in Italy. For this reason, the Italian Society of Hypertension aims to generate a number of interventions to improve blood pressure control in Italy, including integrated actions with General Practitioners, the implementation of hypertension awareness in the general population, a larger use of home blood pressure measurements, and a survey aimed at identifying all clinical and excellence centers for hypertension diagnosis and treatment throughout the whole national territory. Many therapeutic agents or chemical substances can induce a persistent or transient increase in blood pressure or interfere with the effect of antihypertensive drugs, causing sodium retention and expansion of the extra-cellular volume, activating the sympathetic nervous system and inducing vasoconstriction. This aspect represents one of the most common cause of secondary forms of hypertension, which often is under-evaluated by the physicians. In this review article, the potential causes of secondary forms of hypertension caused by use/abuse of drugs or substances are summarized. PMID:24535939

  20. Clinical practice guideline: otitis media with effusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard M Rosenfeld; Larry Culpepper; Karen J Doyle; Kenneth M Grundfast; Alejandro Hoberman; Margaret A Kenna; Allan S Lieberthal; Martin Mahoney; Richard A Wahl; Charles R Woods; Barbara Yawn

    2004-01-01

    The clinical practice guideline on otitis media with effusion (OME) provides evidence-based recommendations on diagnosing and managing OME in children. This is an update of the 1994 clinical practice guideline “Otitis Media With Effusion in Young Children,” which was developed by the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research (now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). In contrast to the

  1. Medication recommendations vs. peer practice in pediatric levothyroxine dosing : a study of collective intelligence from a clinical data warehouse as a potential model for clinical decision support

    E-print Network

    Scheufele, Elisabeth Lee

    2009-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are developed primarily from knowledge gleaned from evidence-based research, guidelines, trusted resources and domain experts. While these resources generally represent information ...

  2. Supporting Clinical Research Practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Brett; Diane Arnold-Reed; Robert Moorhead

    2007-01-01

    The notion of developing a network of general practices capable of undertaking clinical research is both intriguing and elusive. This paper outlines efforts to support research practices as an integral part of the Notre Dame PHC RED research capacity building program and indicates some cautious optimism is warranted.\\u000aThe recruitment and support of three general practices involved in the Fremantle

  3. Clinical Psychology Center Center Review Recommendation

    E-print Network

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    through annual audits and performance evaluations." Comments: The Clinical Psychology Center's dedicationClinical Psychology Center Center Review Recommendation B. Review and Approval Process 2 to address issues of common interest. The purpose of the Clinical Psychology Center (CPC) is to serve

  4. Training Research: Practical Recommendations for Maximum Impact

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Koerner, Kelly; Weingardt, Kenneth R.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This review offers practical recommendations regarding research on training in evidence-based practices for mental health and substance abuse treatment. When designing training research, we recommend: (a) aligning with the larger dissemination and implementation literature to consider contextual variables and clearly defining terminology, (b) critically examining the implicit assumptions underlying the stage model of psychotherapy development, (c) incorporating research methods from other disciplines that embrace the principles of formative evaluation and iterative review, and (d) thinking about how technology can be used to take training to scale throughout all stages of a training research project. An example demonstrates the implementation of these recommendations. PMID:21380792

  5. Recommendations for Practice: Justifying Claims of Generalizability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2013-01-01

    Recommendations for practice are routinely included in articles that report educational research. Robinson et al. suggest that reports of primary research should not routinely do so. They argue that single primary research studies seldom have sufficient external validity to support claims about practice policy. In this article, I draw on recent…

  6. Nutrition for Tennis: Practical Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ranchordas, Mayur K.; Rogersion, David; Ruddock, Alan; Killer, Sophie C.; Winter, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Tennis is a pan-global sport that is played year-round in both hemispheres. This places notable demands on the physical and psychological preparation of players and included in these demands are nutritional and fluid requirements both of training and match- play. Thus, the purpose of this article is to review nutritional recommendations for tennis. Notably, tennis players do not excel in any particular physiological or anthropometric characteristic but are well adapted in all areas which is probably a result of the varied nature of the training demands of tennis match play. Energy expenditures of 30.9 ± 5.5 and 45.3 ± 7.3 kJ·min-1 have been reported in women and men players respectively regardless of court surface. Tennis players should follow a habitually high carbohydrate diet of between 6-10 g·kg-1·d-1 to ensure adequate glycogen stores, with women generally requiring slightly less than men. Protein intake guidelines for tennis players training at a high intensity and duration on a daily basis should be ~1.6 g·kg-1·d-1 and dietary fat intake should not exceed 2 g·kg-1·d-1. Caffeine in doses of 3 mg·kg-1 provides ergogenic benefit when taken before and/or during tennis match play. Depending on environmental conditions, sweat rates of 0.5 to and over 5 L·hr-1 and sodium losses of 0.5 - 1.8 g have been recorded in men and women players. 200 mL of fluid containing electrolytes should be consumed every change-over in mild to moderate temperatures of < 27°C but in temperatures greater than 27°C players should aim for ? 400 mL. 30-60 g·hr-1 of carbohydrate should be ingested when match play exceeds 2 hours. Key Points Tennis players should follow a habitually high carbohydrate diet of between 6-10 g·kg-1 to ensure adequate glycogen stores, with women generally requiring slightly less than men. Protein intake guidelines for tennis players training at a high intensity and duration on a daily basis should be ~1.6 g·kg-1·d-1. Dietary fat intake should not exceed 2 g·kg-1·d-1. Caffeine in doses of 3 mg·kg-1 can provide ergogenic benefit when taken before and/or during tennis match play. 200 mL of fluid containing electrolytes should be consumed every change-over in mild to moderate temperatures of < 27°C but in temperatures greater than 27°C players should aim for ? 400 mL. 30-60 g·hr-1 of carbohydrate should be ingested when match play exceeds 2 hours. During periods of travel, specific dietary requirements can be communicated with agencies and hotels prior to arrival and in the event that suitably nutritious foods are not available in the host country, players can bring or send non-perishable foods and goods where customs and quarantine laws allow. PMID:24149799

  7. Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) Interpretation: Practice Recommendations From a Survey of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs Accredited by the American Psychological Association

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward D. Rossini; Robert J. Moretti

    1997-01-01

    Surveys of academic psychologists have suggested that the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) is a diminished aspect of graduate training despite its popularity in practice. The authors surveyed training directors of clinical psychology doctoral programs accredited by the American Psychological Association to determine how the TAT was taught. Results indicated that TAT interpretation is a modest aspect of most respondents’ programs.

  8. Aseptic practice recommendations for circulating operating theatre nurses.

    PubMed

    Aholaakko, Teija-Kaisa; Metsälä, Eija

    2015-07-01

    Aseptic practices prevent exposure of a surgical wound to microbes, operating theatre environment and personnel. The circulating nurse assists the operating theatre personnel and supervises aseptic practices preventing surgical site infections. In the absence of analytical tools, few studies exist on intraoperative nursing-related aseptic practices. This study introduces recommendations to assess the role of the circulating nurse in aseptic practices. The authors used international recommendations and research findings to construct a 20-item self-report instrument with a demonstrated reliability across the scale. The authors structured the scale based on three phases: establishment; maintenance; and disestablishment of a sterile operating field. The tool was tested among operating theatre and day surgery nurses, and compared the differences in the mean acceptance rates of aseptic practice recommendations based on background characteristics. College-level nurses and nurses with 15 or more years' work experience accepted the recommendations at higher levels than bachelor-level nurses and nurses with less work experience. Continual assessment of the evidence base and comprehensive evaluation represent important components in further developing the tool. A reasonable number of items covering clinical practice are necessary for assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of aseptic practices, and a larger response rate is needed to validate the tool in future. PMID:26153805

  9. Practical Recommendations for Robot-Assisted Treadmill Therapy (Lokomat) in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Indications, Goal Setting, and Clinical Implementation within the WHO-ICF Framework.

    PubMed

    Warken, Birgit; Graser, Judith V; Ulrich, Thilo; Borggraefe, Ingo; Heinen, Florian; Meyer-Heim, Andreas; van Hedel, Hubertus J A; Schroeder, A Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Active participation and the highest level of independence during daily living are primary goals in neurorehabilitation. Therefore, standing and walking are key factors in many rehabilitation programs. Despite inconclusive evidence considering the best application and efficacy of robotic tools in the field of pediatric neurorehabilitation, robotic technologies have been implemented to complement conventional therapies in recent years. A group of experienced therapists and physicians joined in an "expert panel." They compared their clinical application protocols, discussed recurring open questions, and developed experience-based recommendations for robot-assisted treadmill therapy (exemplified by the Lokomat, Hocoma, Volketswil, Switzerland) with a focus on children with cerebral palsy. Specific indications and therapeutic goals were defined considering the severity of motor impairments and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework (ICF). After five meetings, consensus was found and recommendations for the implementation of robot-assisted treadmill therapy including postsurgery rehabilitation were proposed. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview on therapeutical applications in a fast developing field of medicine, where scientific evidence is still scarce. These recommendations can help physicians and therapists to plan the child's individual therapy protocol of robot-assisted treadmill therapy. PMID:26011438

  10. Implementing AORN recommended practices for environmental cleaning.

    PubMed

    Allen, George

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have developed an increasing awareness of the role of the environment in the development of health care-associated infections. AORN's "Recommended practices for environmental cleaning" is an evidence-based document that provides specific guidance for cleaning processes, for the selection of appropriate cleaning equipment and supplies, and for ongoing education and quality improvement. This updated recommended practices document has an expanded focus on the need for health care personnel to work collaboratively to accomplish adequately thorough cleanliness in a culture of safety and mutual support. Perioperative nurses, as the primary advocates for patients while they are being cared for in the perioperative setting, should help ensure that a safe, clean environment is reestablished after each surgical procedure. PMID:24766919

  11. Thiamin in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Frank, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    Thiamin is a water-soluble vitamin also known as vitamin B1. Its biologically active form, thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), is a cofactor in macronutrient metabolism. In addition to its coenzyme roles, TPP plays a role in nerve structure and function as well as brain metabolism. Signs and symptoms of thiamin deficiency (TD) include lactic acidosis, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, and ocular changes (eg, nystagmus). More advanced symptoms include confabulation and memory loss and/or psychosis, resulting in Wernicke's encephalopathy and/or Wernicke's Korsakoff syndrome, respectively. The nutrition support clinician should be aware of patients who may be at risk for TD. Risk factors include those patients with malnutrition due to 1 or more nutrition-related etiologies: decreased nutrient intake, increased nutrient losses, or impaired nutrient absorption. Clinical scenarios such as unexplained heart failure or lactic acidosis, renal failure with dialysis, alcoholism, starvation, hyperemesis gravidarum, or bariatric surgery may increase the risk for TD. Patients who are critically ill and require nutrition support may also be at risk for TD, especially those who are given intravenous dextrose void of thiamin repletion. Furthermore, understanding thiamin's role as a potential therapeutic agent for diabetes, some inborn errors of metabolism, and neurodegenerative diseases warrants further research. This tutorial describes the absorption, digestion, and metabolism of thiamin. Issues pertaining to thiamin in clinical practice will be described, and evidence-based practice suggestions for the prevention and treatment of TD will be discussed. PMID:25564426

  12. Developing Federal Clinical Care Recommendations for Men.

    PubMed

    Marcell, Arik V; Gavin, Loretta E; Moskosky, Susan B; McKenna, Robert; Rompalo, Anne M

    2015-08-01

    U.S. men experience substantial sexual and reproductive health needs across the life span. A significant barrier for providers in serving men in family planning, primary care, and sexually transmitted disease clinics has been the lack of standards for men's sexual and reproductive health care. The goal of this synthesis paper is to describe the development of clinical recommendations for the delivery of family planning services for men that were developed and published by CDC and the U.S. Office of Population Affairs. This paper is intended to describe the process used from 2011 to 2014 to develop the recommendations for the delivery of comprehensive reproductive healthcare services to men, and the rationale underpinning them. PMID:26190843

  13. Good laboratory practices for waived testing sites: survey findings from testing sites holding a certificate of waiver under the clinical laboratory improvement amendments of 1988 and recommendations for promoting quality testing.

    PubMed

    Howerton, Devery; Anderson, Nancy; Bosse, Diane; Granade, Sharon; Westbrook, Glennis

    2005-11-11

    Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA), simple, low-risk tests can be waived and performed with no routine regulatory oversight in physicians' offices and various other locations. Since CLIA was implemented, waived testing has steadily increased in the United States. Surveys conducted during 1999-2004 by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and studies funded by CDC during 1999-2003 evaluated testing practices in sites holding a CLIA Certificate of Waiver (CW). Although study findings indicate CW sites generally take measures to perform testing correctly, they raise quality concerns about practices that could lead to errors in testing and poor patient outcomes. These issues are probably caused, in part, by high personnel turnover rates, lack of understanding about good laboratory practices, and inadequate training. This report summarizes study findings and provides recommendations developed by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee for conducting quality waived testing. These recommendations include considerations before introducing waived testing, such as management responsibility for testing, regulatory requirements, safety, physical and environmental requirements, benefits and costs, staffing, and documentation. They also cover good laboratory practices for the three phases of testing: 1) before testing (test ordering and specimen collection), 2) during testing (control testing, test performance, and result interpretation and recording), and 3) after testing (result reporting, documentation, confirmatory testing, and biohazard waste disposal). They are intended to be used by those who would benefit from improving their knowledge of good laboratory practices. Continued monitoring of waived testing, with a focus on personnel education and training, is needed to improve practices and enhance patient safety as waived testing continues to increase. PMID:16280973

  14. Clinical practice guideline: allergic rhinitis executive summary.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Michael D; Gurgel, Richard K; Lin, Sandra Y; Schwartz, Seth R; Baroody, Fuad M; Bonner, James R; Dawson, Douglas E; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hackell, Jesse M; Han, Joseph K; Ishman, Stacey L; Krouse, Helene J; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Mims, James Whit W; Omole, Folashade S; Reddy, William D; Wallace, Dana V; Walsh, Sandra A; Warren, Barbara E; Wilson, Meghan N; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2015-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Allergic Rhinitis. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 14 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with allergic rhinitis, including performing and interpretation of diagnostic testing and assessment and documentation of chronic conditions and comorbidities. It will then focus on the recommendations to guide the evaluation and treatment of patients with allergic rhinitis, to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for patients with allergic rhinitis. PMID:25645524

  15. Lesbians grieving the death of a partner: recommendations for practice.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Debra J; Birbilis, Jean M; Steger, Michael F

    2008-01-01

    Spousal loss is a common event that has been associated with risk of depression, anxiety, and loneliness. Practitioners working with lesbians need comprehensive clinical guidelines that integrate research about lesbian partner loss with contemporary views of grief and bereavement. Using this literature, we make recommendations for clinical practice that address the possible contributions of several factors--social support, emotional closeness, relationship satisfaction, disclosure or non-disclosure of sexual identity and the relationship, faith and/or spirituality, and meaning-making--to the grieving process and positive psychological adjustment of lesbians grieving the death of a partner. PMID:19042734

  16. Evidence-based analysis of physical therapy in Parkinson's disease with recommendations for practice and research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samyra H. J. Keus; Bastiaan R. Bloem; Erik J. M. Hendriks; Alexandra B. Bredero-Cohen; Marten Munneke

    2007-01-01

    Physical therapy is often prescribed in Parkinson's disease. To facilitate the uniformity and efficacy of this intervention, we analyzed current evidence and developed practice recommendations. We carried out an evidence-based literature review. The results were supplemented with clinical expertise and patient values and translated into practice recommendations, developed according to international standards for guideline development. A systematic literature search yielded

  17. Cannabinoids in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E M; Evans, F J

    2000-12-01

    Cannabis has a potential for clinical use often obscured by unreliable and purely anecdotal reports. The most important natural cannabinoid is the psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC); others include cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG). Not all the observed effects can be ascribed to THC, and the other constituents may also modulate its action; for example CBD reduces anxiety induced by THC. A standardised extract of the herb may be therefore be more beneficial in practice and clinical trial protocols have been drawn up to assess this. The mechanism of action is still not fully understood, although cannabinoid receptors have been cloned and natural ligands identified. Cannabis is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for muscle spasm and pain, and in an experimental model of MS low doses of cannabinoids alleviated tremor. Most of the controlled studies have been carried out with THC rather than cannabis herb and so do not mimic the usual clincal situation. Small clinical studies have confirmed the usefulness of THC as an analgesic; CBD and CBG also have analgesic and antiinflammatory effects, indicating that there is scope for developing drugs which do not have the psychoactive properties of THC. Patients taking the synthetic derivative nabilone for neurogenic pain actually preferred cannabis herb and reported that it relieved not only pain but the associated depression and anxiety. Cannabinoids are effective in chemotherapy-induced emesis and nabilone has been licensed for this use for several years. Currently, the synthetic cannabinoid HU211 is undergoing trials as a protective agent after brain trauma. Anecdotal reports of cannabis use include case studies in migraine and Tourette's syndrome, and as a treatment for asthma and glaucoma. Apart from the smoking aspect, the safety profile of cannabis is fairly good. However, adverse reactions include panic or anxiety attacks, which are worse in the elderly and in women, and less likely in children. Although psychosis has been cited as a consequence of cannabis use, an examination of psychiatric hospital admissions found no evidence of this, however, it may exacerbate existing symptoms. The relatively slow elimination from the body of the cannabinoids has safety implications for cognitive tasks, especially driving and operating machinery; although driving impairment with cannabis is only moderate, there is a significant interaction with alcohol. Natural materials are highly variable and multiple components need to be standardised to ensure reproducible effects. Pure natural and synthetic compounds do not have these disadvantages but may not have the overall therapeutic effect of the herb. PMID:11152013

  18. Clinical practice guidelines to inform evidence-based clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Stuart Wolf; Heddy Hubbard; Martha M. Faraday; John B. Forrest

    2011-01-01

    Background  With the volume of medical research currently published, any one practitioner cannot independently review the literature to\\u000a determine best evidence-based medical care. Additionally, non-specialists usually do not have the experience to know best\\u000a practice for all of the frequent clinical circumstances for which there is no good evidence. Clinical practice guidelines\\u000a (CPGs) help clinicians to address these problems because they

  19. RECOMMENDATION FORM TO APPOINT POSTDOCTORAL CLINICAL FELLOWS (TRAINEES)

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    University campus: End Date:Dates of School of Medicine (OPA) Appointment: Start Date: Postdoctoral ClinicalRECOMMENDATION FORM TO APPOINT POSTDOCTORAL CLINICAL FELLOWS (TRAINEES) STANFORD UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF POSTDOCTORAL AFFAIRS http://postdocs.stanford.edu/admin/pdf-forms/Recommendation_Form_for_Clinical

  20. Mindfulness Meditation in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Paul; Sephton, Sandra; Weissbecker, Inka; Hoover, Katherine; Ulmer, Christi; Studts, Jamie L.

    2004-01-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into contemporary clinical psychology. Based in Buddhist philosophy and subsequently integrated into Western health care in the contexts of psychotherapy and stress management, mindfulness meditation is evolving as a systematic clinical intervention. This article describes…

  1. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jodie A Trafton; Susana B Martins; Martha C Michel; Dan Wang; Samson W Tu; David J Clark; Jan Elliott; Brigit Vucic; Steve Balt; Michael E Clark; Charles D Sintek; Jack Rosenberg; Denise Daniels; Mary K Goldstein

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. METHODS: Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the

  2. Code of practice for clinical proton dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Vynckier, S; Bonnett, D E; Jones, D T

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this document is to make recommendations for the determination of absorbed dose to tissue for clinical proton beams and to achieve uniformity in proton dosimetry. A Code of Practice has been chosen, providing specific guidelines for the choice of the detector and the method of determination of absorbed dose for proton beams only. This Code of Practice is confined specifically to the determination of absorbed dose and is not concerned with the biological effects of proton beams. It is recommended that dosimeters be calibrated by comparison with a calorimeter. If this is not available, a Faraday cup, or alternatively, an ionization chamber, with a 60Co calibration factor should be used. Physical parameters for determining the dose from tissue-equivalent ionization chamber measurements are given together with a worksheet. It is recommended that calibrations be carried out in water at the centre of the spread-out-Bragg-peak and that dose distributions be measured in a water phantom. It is estimated that the error in the calibrations will be less than +/- 5% (1 S.D.) in all cases. Adoption and implementation of this Code of Practice will facilitate the exchange of clinical information. PMID:2020756

  3. Neonatal circumcision: new recommendations & implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth; Carstensen, Jean; Murphy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal male circumcision is the most common surgical procedure performed on pediatric patients. While the rate of neonatal circumcision in the United States has been dropping, circumcision continues to be frequent, ranging from 42% to 80% among various populations. While the cultural debate over circumcision continues, recent evidence of medical benefits led to a revision of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) circumcision policy statement. In contrast to the 1999 AAP policy statement, the 2012 policy asserts that the preventive benefits of neonatal circumcision outweigh the risk of the procedure, which is well tolerated when performed by trained professionals, under sterile conditions, and with appropriate pain management. This Circumcision Policy Statement has also been endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and a similar policy statement is in place from the American Urologic Association. Despite the new recognized health benefits found by the 2012 Task Force of Circumcision (TFOC), circumcision remains controversial even among medical professionals. Other well recognized medical organizations including The American Academy of Family Practice and some international pediatric societies have not adopted such a strong endorsement of circumcision. The policy statements from these organizations continue to more closely resemble the 1999 AAP policy statement that stated, "Existing scientific evidence demonstrates potential medical benefits of newborn male circumcision; however, these data are not sufficient to recommend routine neonatal circumcision." In this review we will summarize historical, cultural and ethical factors in neonatal circumcision and briefly compare common surgical techniques including anesthesia. In addition, we will discuss recent information regarding the benefits and risks of neonatal circumcision. Finally, we will discuss the financial reimbursement of practitioners and the benefits of standardized circumcision curriculum for trainees. PMID:25011345

  4. Clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with mantle cell lymphoma. Recommendations from the GEL/TAMO Spanish Cooperative Group.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Dolores; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Martín, Alejandro; Arranz-Sáez, Reyes; Giné, Eva; López, Andrés; González-Barca, Eva; Canales, Miguel Ángel; González-Díaz, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered a distinct type of B-cell lymphoma genetically characterized by the t(11;14) translocation and cyclin D1 overexpression. There is also a small subset of tumors negative for cyclin D1 expression that are morphologically and immunophenotypically indistinguishable from conventional MCL. Although in the last decades, the median overall survival of patients with MCL has improved significantly, it is still considered as one of the poorest prognoses diseases among B-cell lymphomas. Election of treatment for patients with MCL is complex due to the scarcity of solid evidence. Current available data shows that conventional chemotherapy does not yield satisfactory results as in other types of B-cell lymphomas. However, the role of other approaches such as autologous or allogenic stem cell transplantation, immunotherapy, the administration of consolidation or maintenance schedules, or the use of targeted therapies still lack clear indications. In view of this situation, the Spanish Group of Lymphomas/Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation has conducted a series of reviews on different aspects of MCL, namely its diagnosis, prognosis, first-line and salvage treatment (both in young and elderly patients), new targeted therapies, and detection of minimal residual disease. On the basis of the available evidence, a series of recommendations have been issued with the intention of providing guidance to clinicians on the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of patients with MCL. PMID:23716187

  5. Bone scanning in clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelman, I. (Guys Hospital, London (GB))

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include the history of bone scanning, mechanisms of uptake of diphosphonate in bone, the normal bone scan, and the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. The aim of this book is to provide a source of reference relating to bone scan imaging for all those who are interested in the skeleton.

  6. The validity of recommendations from clinical guidelines: a survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    García, Laura Martínez; Sanabria, Andrea Juliana; Álvarez, Elvira García; Trujillo-Martín, Maria Mar; Etxeandia-Ikobaltzeta, Itziar; Kotzeva, Anna; Rigau, David; Louro-González, Arturo; Barajas-Nava, Leticia; del Campo, Petra Díaz; Estrada, Maria-Dolors; Solà, Ivan; Gracia, Javier; Salcedo-Fernandez, Flavia; Lawson, Jennifer; Haynes, R. Brian; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical guidelines should be updated to maintain their validity. Our aim was to estimate the length of time before recommendations become outdated. Methods: We used a retrospective cohort design and included recommendations from clinical guidelines developed in the Spanish National Health System clinical guideline program since 2008. We performed a descriptive analysis of references, recommendations and resources used, and a survival analysis of recommendations using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: We included 113 recommendations from 4 clinical guidelines with a median of 4 years since the most recent search (range 3.9–4.4 yr). We retrieved 39 136 references (range 3343–14 787) using an exhaustive literature search, 668 of which were related to the recommendations in our sample. We identified 69 (10.3%) key references, corresponding to 25 (22.1%) recommendations that required updating. Ninety-two percent (95% confidence interval 86.9–97.0) of the recommendations were valid 1 year after their development. This probability decreased at 2 (85.7%), 3 (81.3%) and 4 years (77.8%). Interpretation: Recommendations quickly become outdated, with 1 out of 5 recommendations being out of date after 3 years. Waiting more than 3 years to review a guideline is potentially too long. PMID:25200758

  7. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements IEPC-2013-440

    E-print Network

    Walker, Mitchell

    Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA 93523 Concept Innovation Methods Chief, JPL Haag , Scott King§ , Mitchell Walker¶ , Joseph Blakelyk , John Ziemer Accurate, direct measurement thrust stands based on experience from the community. These recommendations include best practices

  8. Practical recommendations for ethnically and racially sensitive hospice services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Lyke; Merydawilda Colón

    2004-01-01

    Hospice providers have long understood that hospice services are disproportionately utilized by Caucasians compared with racial and ethnic minorities. In fact, it is clear that this disparity is increasing with time1despite the development of literature that recommends making services more culturally sensitive and accessible to minority groups. This suggests a need for more concrete and practical recommendations to make hospice

  9. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  10. Reflections in the clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Carrió, F; Hernández-Clemente, J C

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze some models of expert decision and their impact on the clinical practice. We have analyzed decision-making considering the cognitive aspects (explanatory models, perceptual skills, analysis of the variability of a phenomenon, creating habits and inertia of reasoning and declarative models based on criteria). We have added the importance of emotions in decision making within highly complex situations, such as those occurring within the clinical practice. The quality of the reflective act depends, among other factors, on the ability of metacognition (thinking about what we think). Finally, we propose an educational strategy based on having a task supervisor and rectification scenarios to improve the quality of medical decision making. PMID:24468001

  11. Ethnic-Sensitive Practice: Contradictions and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iglehart, Alfreda P.; Becerra, Rosina M.

    2008-01-01

    This article identifies some of the contradictions at the theoretical, attitudinal, and behavioral levels that are inherent in current approaches to ethnic-sensitive practice, including: (1) diversity and the history of the profession; (2) ethnicity as a credential; (3) the differential status of minority groups; and (4) the reliance on…

  12. Recommended Practice on Lighting for Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illuminating Engineering Society, New York, NY.

    The aims of this document are: (1) to enable school and college administrators to brief their architects on appropriate provision of lighting, and (2) to enable lighting designers to check that the criteria they apply are consistent with good current practice. The scope is restricted to learning and study activities and associated circulation.…

  13. Practical Recommendations on Crawling Online Social Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minas Gjoka; Maciej Kurant; Carter T. Butts; Athina Markopoulou

    2011-01-01

    Our goal in this paper is to develop a practical framework for obtaining a uniform sample of users in an online social network (OSN) by crawling its social graph. Such a sample allows to estimate any user property and some topological properties as well. To this end, ?rst, we consider and compare several candidate crawling techniques. Two approaches that can

  14. Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual/Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual/Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Background ­ Assessment ­ Recommendation. It is an evidence based communication model that assists patient care is "handed-off" from one provider to another (i.e., nursing staff shift report) or from one

  15. Can research influence clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2007-06-01

    After briefly reviewing the unfavourable reception accorded empirical research by parts of the psychoanalytic community, as well as some of the benefits to clinical practice of analysts being involved in research activities, the author examines whether the findings of process and outcome research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis can help identify the most appropriate forms of intervention for producing therapeutic change, given the specific condition of the patient and the relationship that the individual establishes with the analyst. He argues that research findings can influence clinical practice on various levels and in different areas, and goes on to examine a number of related issues: the specificity of therapeutic interventions versus the relevance of common curative factors; the dyadic conception of technique and ways of understanding the therapeutic action of the treatment alliance; and the strategic or heuristic conception in psychoanalytic therapy. Finally, the author presents clinical material with the aim of illustrating how the knowledge acquired through research can be applied to psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:17537698

  16. Capturing the clinical utility of genomic testing: medical recommendations following pediatric microarray.

    PubMed

    Hayeems, Robin Z; Hoang, Ny; Chenier, Sebastien; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Pu, Shuye; Weksberg, Rosanna; Shuman, Cheryl

    2014-12-10

    Interpretation of pediatric chromosome microarray (CMA) results presents diagnostic and medical management challenges. Understanding management practices triggered by CMA will inform clinical utility and resource planning. Using a retrospective cohort design, we extracted clinical and management-related data from the records of 752 children with congenital anomalies and/or developmental delay who underwent CMA in an academic pediatric genetics clinic (2009-2011). Frequency distributions and relative rates (RR) of post-CMA medical recommendations in children with reportable and benign CMA results were calculated. Medical recommendations were provided for 79.6% of children with reportable results and 62.0% of children with benign results. Overall, recommendations included specialist consultation (40.8%), imaging (32.5%), laboratory investigations (17.2%), surveillance (4.6%), and family investigations (4.9%). Clinically significant variants and variants of uncertain clinical significance were associated with higher and slightly higher rates of management recommendations, respectively, compared with benign/no variants (RR=1.34; 95% CI (1.22-1.47); RR=1.23; 95% CI (1.09-1.38)). Recommendation rates for clinically significant versus uncertain results depended upon how uncertainty was classified (RRbroad=1.09; 95% CI (0.99-1.2); RRnarrow=1.12; 95% CI (1.02-1.24)). Recommendation rates also varied by the child's age and provider type. In conclusion, medical recommendations follow CMA for the majority of children. Compared with benign CMA results, clinically significant CMA variants are a significant driver of pediatric medical recommendations. Variants of uncertain clinical significance drive recommendations, but to a lesser extent. As a broadening range of specialists will need to respond to CMA results, targeted capacity building is warranted.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 10 December 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.260. PMID:25491637

  17. New evidence-based diabetes nutrition recommendations: correcting myths and updating practice.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Linda C

    2003-04-01

    This article summarizes the evidence-based nutrition recommendations for diabetes published first in 2002 by the ADA, and identifies diet information that now should be recognized as misconception or myth. Home care clinicians must become cognizant of evidence-based guidelines and update clinical practices, care paths, and teaching materials accordingly. PMID:12695698

  18. Elevated blood glucose recommendation guidelines that produce positive maternal and perinatal outcomes at the University of Kansas Obstetrics Clinic

    E-print Network

    Plumberg, Erin M.

    2013-05-31

    and management practices at the University of Kansas Obstetrics (KUMC OB) clinic in regard to perinatal outcomes, and adherence to recommendations from the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). Design: In this retrospective...

  19. The development of clinical leadership through supported reflective practice.

    PubMed

    McCormack, B; Hopkins, E

    1995-05-01

    The notion of clinical leadership is significant in current nursing practice, particularly since recommendations made by the Department of Health in 'The Strategy for Nursing'. However, while it is a concept that many nurses aspire to implement, in reality the operationalizing of such a concept is fraught with difficulty. This paper aims to explore the issue of clinical leadership through a collegiate model developed in a particular practice area. The development of this collegiate relationship is articulated through the mediums of reflective practice and clinical supervision. A model of collegiality is offered as an approach to the integration of the spheres of clinical leadership. If reflective practice is to be a reality then it is essential that both clinical leaders and practitioners engage in such processes within a supportive culture. PMID:7773525

  20. Rubella prevention. Recommendations of the Immunization Practices Advisory Committee (ACIP).

    PubMed

    1990-11-23

    These revised Immunization Practices Advisory Committee (ACIP) recommendations for the prevention of rubella update the previous recommendations (MMWR 1984;33:301-10,315-8) to include implementation of a new two-dose schedule for measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Current information about vaccine effectiveness, duration of immunity, vaccination in pregnancy, and progress in controlling congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is also included. PMID:2174498

  1. Recommendations for enhancing clinical trials education: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Karen A; Gonzalez, Amy P; Dorsey, Vivian S; Frye, Debra K; Pyle, Nita D; Smith, Regina F; Throckmorton, Terry A; Villejo, Louise A; Cantor, Scott B

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to apply the evidence-based practice (EBP) process to determine the factors that influence patients' understanding of, participation in, and satisfaction with clinical trials, the informed consent process, and treatment decisions and to make recommendations for improving clinical trials education. Beginning with evidence retrieval, the authors identified key search terms and searched MEDLINE--Ovid, MEDLINE--PubMed, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature to identify articles published between July 2001 and July 2006 that highlighted clinical trials education. The articles were reviewed for clinical trials patient education information, clinician methods of communicating clinical trial information to patients, and patient satisfaction with the clinical trials process, including the informed consent process. As a result, practice changes were recommended for the patient/family, staff/community, and institution. From the literature review, 81 articles were identified. Recurring themes included decision-making, patient education, staff education, and pediatrics. Most articles focused on methods and strategies aimed at improving education at the patient/family, staff/community, and institutional levels. The issues surrounding clinical trial education are complex due to multiple variables interfering with poor patient understanding of, participation in, and satisfaction with clinical trial treatment decisions. On the basis of our findings, we recommend that clinicians involved in educating patients, families, staff, and communities about clinical trials have an awareness of and understanding for very complex issues. PMID:20862574

  2. Recommendations for the Clinical Evaluation of Men and Women with Sexual Dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitrios Hatzichristou; Raymond C. Rosen; Leonard R. Derogatis; Wah Yun Low; Eric J. H. Meuleman; Richard Sadovsky; Tara Symonds

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. The challenge in the field of sexual medicine is to develop evidence-based principles for clinical evaluation and create a uniform, widely accepted diagnostic and treatment approach for all sexual problems and dysfunctions, for both genders. Aim. To provide recommendations for the broad approach for assessing sexual problems in a medical practice setting; to develop an evidence-based diagnostic and treatment

  3. Implementing Cancer Prevention into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Parichart; Bernstein, Leslie; Bispeck, M. Katherine; Hawk, Ernest; Krawiec, Virginia; O'Donnell, Joseph F.; Silverman, Sol

    2014-01-01

    Cancer prevention has been associated with decreased rates of cancer incidence and increased survival. Cancer prevention, however, can have a greater impact if barriers to implementing cancer prevention into practice are removed and opportunities are both fostered and seized. The purpose of this article is to identify barriers and opportunities to cancer prevention in clinical practice and provide recommendations for the future. A multidisciplinary team participated in “The Future Directions Cancer Prevention and Control: Workforce Implications for Training, Practice and Policy” workshop on October 17-18, 2009 at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. During the meeting, the team discussed barriers and opportunities for the implementation of cancer prevention into clinical practice. Further data were collected from peer-reviewed journals and published government and cancer agencies reports. Several issues were identified: 1) The funding allocated to basic cancer prevention research and application is not optimal and less than that for cancer treatment; 2) Participation in cancer prevention behaviors and screening practices are lower than desired, especially among the uninsured; 3) A shortage in healthcare professionals is a major challenge in meeting the future needs of cancer prevention; 4) Demands on medical schools to balance increased enrollment, incorporate cancer prevention in an already crowded curriculum, and develop faculty are daunting; and 5) Healthcare reforms in 2010 provide both opportunities and additional challenges for cancer prevention. Based on the current state of cancer prevention, we formed six recommendations: 1) Additional funding for cancer prevention research with a focus on implementation into practice; 2) Improved tracking of cancer prevention research funding and the outcomes associated with it; 3) Continued monitoring of cancer prevention services participation with emphasis on closing the gap in health disparities; 4) Financial and technical assistance to healthcare professional schools for incorporating cancer prevention into curricula; 5) Assessment of the current state of technology in cancer prevention care; and 6) The use of effective multidisciplinary teams in cancer prevention care. Improved delivery of cancer prevention services can have a tremendous impact on cancer incidence and survival rates. PMID:22367592

  4. Recommendations for Enhancing Clinical Trials Education: a Review of the Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen A. Stepan; Amy P. Gonzalez; Vivian S. Dorsey; Debra K. Frye; Nita D. Pyle; Regina F. Smith; Terry A. Throckmorton; Louise A. Villejo; Scott B. Cantor

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to apply the evidence-based practice (EBP) process to determine the factors that influence patients’ understanding\\u000a of, participation in, and satisfaction with clinical trials, the informed consent process, and treatment decisions and to\\u000a make recommendations for improving clinical trials education. Beginning with evidence retrieval, the authors identified key\\u000a search terms and searched MEDLINE—Ovid, MEDLINE—PubMed, and the Cumulative Index

  5. Management of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in Latin America: practical recommendations for treatment optimization.

    PubMed

    Correale, Jorge; Abad, Patricio; Alvarenga, Regina; Alves-Leon, Soniza; Armas, Elizabeth; Barahona, Jorge; Buzó, Ricardo; Corona, Teresa; Cristiano, Edgardo; Gracia, Fernando; Bonitto, Juan García; Macías, Miguel Angel; Soto, Arnoldo; Vizcarra, Darwin; Freedman, Mark S

    2014-04-15

    The Latin American MS Experts' Forum has developed practical recommendations on the initiation and optimization of disease-modifying therapies in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The recommendations reflect the unique epidemiology of MS and the clinical practice environment in Latin American countries. Treatment response may be evaluated according to changes in relapses; progression, as assessed by the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the Timed 25-foot Walk; and lesion number on magnetic resonance imaging. Follow-up assessments are recommended every six months, or annually for stable patients. Cognitive function should be evaluated in all RRMS patients at baseline and annually thereafter. These recommendations are intended to assist clinicians in Latin America in developing a rational approach to treatment selection and sequencing for their RRMS patients. PMID:24607335

  6. Renewable Energy Training: Best Practices and Recommended Guidelines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) has provided this document highlighting best practices for renewable energy training. The document includes training guidelines, types of educational programs, essential steps of designing a training course and recommended resources and textbooks. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

  7. Skin Care Recommendations during Radiotherapy: A Survey of Canadian Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda Bolderston

    2003-01-01

    A semi-structured telephone survey was used to gather data on skin care practices from twenty-six radiotherapy departments across Canada. Questions were asked about the department's recommendations on washing the irradiated area (with or without soap), using deodorant (if the axilla is in or near the treatment fields), use of creams or other products on the skin and the management of

  8. A Synthesis of Clinical Recommendations and Primary Research for Survivors of Prostate or Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Melanie; Wenzel, Jennifer; Jones, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Studies have documented the efficacy of cancer treatments available, specifically for patients with prostate or breast cancer, but few articles have compared prostate or breast cancer recommendations from the patient’s perspective. In this article, the authors compare and contrast published clinical recommendations for advanced practice RNs who treat patients with prostate or breast cancer to qualitative studies that explore the experiences of cancer survivors. Treatment options, along with recommendations and resources, are included. The nurse clinician’s role in caring for patients with prostate or breast cancer is diverse and complex, and evidence supports the role of the nurse clinician in improving patient care. Implementing findings from qualitative studies that focus on patients’ perspectives in conjunction with clinical recommendations is essential when developing care plans for patients with cancer. PMID:25427700

  9. Vision Screening for Children 36 to <72 Months: Recommended Practices

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Susan A.; Cyert, Lynn A.; Miller, Joseph M.; Quinn, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose This article provides recommendations for screening children aged 36 to younger than 72 months for eye and visual system disorders. The recommendations were developed by the National Expert Panel to the National Center for Children’s Vision and Eye Health, sponsored by Prevent Blindness, and funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, United States Department of Health and Human Services. The recommendations describe both best and acceptable practice standards. Targeted vision disorders for screening are primarily amblyopia, strabismus, significant refractive error, and associated risk factors. The recommended screening tests are intended for use by lay screeners, nurses, and other personnel who screen children in educational, community, public health, or primary health care settings. Characteristics of children who should be examined by an optometrist or ophthalmologist rather than undergo vision screening are also described. Results There are two current best practice vision screening methods for children aged 36 to younger than 72 months: (1) monocular visual acuity testing using single HOTV letters or LEA Symbols surrounded by crowding bars at a 5-ft (1.5 m) test distance, with the child responding by either matching or naming, or (2) instrument-based testing using the Retinomax autorefractor or the SureSight Vision Screener with the Vision in Preschoolers Study data software installed (version 2.24 or 2.25 set to minus cylinder form). Using the Plusoptix Photoscreener is acceptable practice, as is adding stereoacuity testing using the PASS (Preschool Assessment of Stereopsis with a Smile) stereotest as a supplemental procedure to visual acuity testing or autorefraction. Conclusions The National Expert Panel recommends that children aged 36 to younger than 72 months be screened annually (best practice) or at least once (accepted minimum standard) using one of the best practice approaches. Technological updates will be maintained at http://nationalcenter.preventblindness.org. PMID:25562476

  10. WAIS practice effects in clinical neuropsychology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark W. Shatz

    1981-01-01

    A recent review (Matarazzo, Carmody, & Jacobs, 1980) has focused attention on the issue of WAIS practice effects in clinical practice. Available literature suggests that WAIS practice effects in many samples of patients with neuropsychological dysfunction are minimal. Data relevant to this hypothesis are reviewed. Practical guidelines for the interpretation of test-retest changes on the WAIS in neuropsychological assessment are

  11. Interpreting the Clinical Importance of Treatment Outcomes in Chronic Pain Clinical Trials: IMMPACT Recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Dworkin; Dennis C. Turk; Kathleen W. Wyrwich; Dorcas Beaton; Charles S. Cleeland; John T. Farrar; Jennifer A. Haythornthwaite; Mark P. Jensen; Robert D. Kerns; Deborah N. Ader; Nancy Brandenburg; Laurie B. Burke; David Cella; Julie Chandler; Penny Cowan; Rozalina Dimitrova; Raymond Dionne; Sharon Hertz; Alejandro R. Jadad; Nathaniel P. Katz; Henrik Kehlet; Lynn D. Kramer; Donald C. Manning; Cynthia McCormick; Michael P. McDermott; Henry J. McQuay; Sanjay Patel; Linda Porter; Steve Quessy; Bob A. Rappaport; Christine Rauschkolb; Dennis A. Revicki; Margaret Rothman; Kenneth E. Schmader; Brett R. Stacey; Joseph W. Stauffer; Thorsten von Stein; Richard E. White; James Witter; Stojan Zavisic

    2008-01-01

    A consensus meeting was convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) to provide recommendations for interpreting clinical importance of treatment outcomes in clinical trials of the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic pain treatments. A group of 40 participants from universities, governmental agencies, a patient self-help organization, and the pharmaceutical industry considered methodologic issues

  12. Legislating Clinical Practice: Counselor Responses to an Evidence-Based Practice Mandate

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Traci; Bergmann, Luke; Rasplica, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    The demand to connect research findings with clinical practice for patients with substance use disorders has accelerated state and federal efforts focused on implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). One unique state driven strategy is Oregon’s Evidence-Based Practice mandate, which ties state funds to specific treatment practices. Clinicians play an essential role in implementation of shifts in practice patterns and use of EBPs, but little is understood about how legislative efforts impact clinicians’ sentiments and decision-making. This study presents longitudinal data from focus groups and interviews completed during the planning phase (n = 66) and early implementation of the mandate (n = 73) to investigate provider attitudes toward this policy change. Results reflect three emergent themes: (1) concern about retaining individualized treatment and clinical latitude, (2) distrust of government involvement in clinical care, and (3) the need for accountability and credibility for the field. We conclude with recommendations for state agencies considering EBP mandates. PMID:22185037

  13. Clinical Instruction for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Greg; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Willeford, K. Sean; Levy, Linda S.; Barnum, Mary G.; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the principles of adult learning and mentoring to help clinical instructors better educate athletic training students (ATSs) during their clinical experiences, with the end result being a better prepared, competent entry-level practitioner. Background: The principles of adult learning must be applied to ATS clinical education…

  14. The Essentials ofThe Essentials of Good Clinical Practice (GCP)Good Clinical Practice (GCP)

    E-print Network

    Carmichael, Owen

    importance in conducting safe, ethical, and sound clinical research #12;3 Objectives (Continued) DiscussThe Essentials ofThe Essentials of Good Clinical Practice (GCP)Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Daniel Redline, BA, CCRP Director, Pre-Market Clinical Affairs Volcano Corporation June 17, 2011 #12;2 Objectives

  15. Can clinical practice guide a research agenda?

    PubMed

    Marder, Stephen R

    2002-01-01

    Articles from this issue of the Bulletin indicate that clinicians are frequently adopting clinical practices that have not been supported by an evidence base. Examples of these practices are prescribing more than one antipsychotic and reserving clozapine for patients who have had multiple antipsychotic trials. This commentary suggests that these practices can be used to define important research questions. PMID:12047012

  16. Clinical guideline for pharmacological management of cancer pain: the Japanese Society of Palliative Medicine recommendations.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Shima, Yasuo; Morita, Tatsuya; Hosoya, Miki; Matoba, Motohiro

    2013-09-01

    Pain is the most frequent and distressing symptom in cancer patients. As part of a worldwide effort to improve the quality of pain control, several clinical guidelines for the management of cancer pain have been published and revised in the last decade. The Japanese Society of Palliative Medicine first published a Japanese clinical guideline for the management of cancer pain in 2000. Since then, many clinical studies concerning cancer pain management have been conducted, new drugs have become available in Japan and the methodology of developing a guideline has been refined. Therefore, we decided to develop a novel clinical guideline. This review paper summarizes the recommendations and the rationales of this new clinical guideline for the pharmacological management of cancer pain. In addition, a short summary of the clinical guideline development process is provided. This new Japanese Society of Palliative Medicine guideline highlights the importance of conducting well-designed studies to identify the best practices in cancer pain management. PMID:23885114

  17. Clinical research within the chiropractic profession: status, needs and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, C; Haas, M; Nelson, C; Elkington, W

    1997-01-01

    In the current climate of accountability, health care financing reform and the demand on all health professions for evidence, there is an urgent need to expand clinical research activity within the profession. Those randomized clinical trials that have been reported in the literature have focused primarily on low back and headache pain. Only recently have studies been initiated to investigate the effectiveness of chiropractic interventions for conditions other than back pain. The ability of chiropractic colleges to develop research infrastructures and productive clinical research programs depends on removing or minimizing a number of impediments. A shortage of chiropractic clinicians who have the experience and training to conduct clinical research is compounded by a dependency on tuition revenue, limited external funding and a lack of institutional emphasis on research. The profession generally, and chiropractic colleges specifically, must address the impediments that limit the growth of research capacity. We present several recommendations and the action steps required to achieve specific outcomes. PMID:9127255

  18. ASFNR Recommendations for Clinical Performance of MR Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Imaging of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Welker, K; Boxerman, J; Kalnin, A; Kaufmann, T; Shiroishi, M; Wintermark, M

    2015-06-01

    MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. PMID:25907520

  19. Sepsis guidelines: Clinical practice implications.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Karen D; Thiessen, Kellie

    2015-06-11

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012 Guidelines offer recommendations for the care of severely septic patients. These guidelines are appraised and summarized briefly in this article, and a case example illustrates the integration process. These guidelines are important for multidisciplinary team members working together toward the common goal of reducing sepsis mortality. PMID:25968978

  20. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Su Yen; Ang, Seng Bin; Bee, Yong Mong; Chen, Richard YT; Gardner, Daphne; Ho, Emily; Adaikan, Kala; Lee, Alvin; Lee, Chung Horn; Lim, Fong Seng; Lim, Hwee Boon; Lim, Su Chi; Seow, Julie; Soh, Abel Wah Ek; Sum, Chee Fang; Tai, E Shyong; Thai, Ah Chuan; Wong, Tien Yin; Yap, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) have updated the clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for diabetes mellitus. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:25017409

  1. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Leslie; Chan, Hong Ngee; Chew, Peng Hoe; Chua, Sze Ming; Ho, Carolyn; Kwek, Seow Khee Daniel; Lee, Tih Shih; Loh, Patricia; Lum, Alvin; Tan, Yong Hui Colin; Wan, Yi Min; Woo, Matthew; Yap, Hwa Ling

    2015-01-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) has developed the clinical practice guidelines on Anxiety Disorders to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on anxiety disorders, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  2. Clinical challenges in patients with cancer-associated thrombosis: Canadian expert consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Carrier, M; Lazo-Langner, A; Shivakumar, S; Tagalakis, V; Gross, P L; Blais, N; Butts, C A; Crowther, M

    2015-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication in cancer patients, and thromboembolism is the second most common cause of death after cancer progression. A number of clinical practice guidelines provide recommendations for the management of cancer-associated thrombosis. However, the guidelines lack recommendations covering commonly encountered clinical challenges (for example, thrombocytopenia, recurrent venous thromboembolism, etc.) for which little or no evidence exists. Accordingly, recommendations were developed to provide expert guidance to medical oncologists and other health care professionals caring for patients with cancer-associated thrombosis. The current expert consensus was developed by a team of 21 clinical experts. For each identified clinical challenge, the literature in medline, embase, and Evidence Based Medicine Reviews was systematically reviewed. The quality of the evidence was assessed, summarized, and graded. Consensus statements were generated, and the experts voted anonymously using a modified Delphi process on their level of agreement with the various statements. Statements were progressively revised through separate voting iterations and were then finalized. Clinicians using these recommendations and suggestions should tailor patient management according to the risks and benefits of the treatment options, patient values and preferences, and local cost and resource allocations. PMID:25684988

  3. Clinical challenges in patients with cancer-associated thrombosis: Canadian expert consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, M.; Lazo–Langner, A.; Shivakumar, S.; Tagalakis, V.; Gross, P.L.; Blais, N.; Butts, C.A.; Crowther, M.

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication in cancer patients, and thromboembolism is the second most common cause of death after cancer progression. A number of clinical practice guidelines provide recommendations for the management of cancer-associated thrombosis. However, the guidelines lack recommendations covering commonly encountered clinical challenges (for example, thrombocytopenia, recurrent venous thromboembolism, etc.) for which little or no evidence exists. Accordingly, recommendations were developed to provide expert guidance to medical oncologists and other health care professionals caring for patients with cancer-associated thrombosis. The current expert consensus was developed by a team of 21 clinical experts. For each identified clinical challenge, the literature in medline, embase, and Evidence Based Medicine Reviews was systematically reviewed. The quality of the evidence was assessed, summarized, and graded. Consensus statements were generated, and the experts voted anonymously using a modified Delphi process on their level of agreement with the various statements. Statements were progressively revised through separate voting iterations and were then finalized. Clinicians using these recommendations and suggestions should tailor patient management according to the risks and benefits of the treatment options, patient values and preferences, and local cost and resource allocations. PMID:25684988

  4. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lane, N E; Hochberg, M C; Nevitt, M C; Simon, L S; Nelson, A E; Doherty, M; Herontin, Y; Flechsenhar, K

    2015-05-01

    The ability to assess the efficacy and effectiveness of an intervention for the treatment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) requires strong clinical trial methodology. This consensus paper provides recommendations based on a narrative literature review and best judgment of the members of the committee for clinical trials of hip OA. We provide recommendations on clinical trial design, outcome measures, including structural (radiography), and patient and physician global assessments, performance based measures, molecular markers and experimental endpoints including MRI imaging. This information can be utilized by sponsors of trials for new therapeutic agents for hip OA. PMID:25952347

  5. Recommendations for the Successful Pursuit of Scholarship by Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Jan K.; Speedie, Marilyn K.; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly

    2015-01-01

    Scholarship has long been a basic expectation of faculty members at institutions of higher learning in the United States and elsewhere. This expectation is no less assumed in academic pharmacy. A number of organizations have verbalized and enforced this precept over the years.1-3 For example, this expectation is spoken to directly in the American Council for Pharmacy Education’s Accreditation Standards and Guidelines.4 This expectation is further emphasized in the draft document of the accreditation standards to be implemented in 2016, in Standard 20. Specifically, Element 20.2 states: “The college or school must create an environment that both requires and promotes scholarship, and must also develop mechanisms to assess both the quantity and quality of faculty scholarly productivity.”5 The successful pursuit of scholarship by clinical faculty members (those engaged in both clinical practice and teaching, without regard to tenure or clinical track status) is challenging. 6-10 Thus, faculty member job descriptions or models should be designed so clinical faculty members can successfully meet all academic job expectations, including productive and meaningful scholarship. In 2012, an AACP Section of Teachers of Pharmacy Practice task force was charged with examining this issue and providing recommendations for models for clinical faculty members that would allow the successful pursuit of scholarship. The task force gathered information relating to the current state of affairs at a number of colleges and reviewed relevant literature. This information, along with personal experiences and much discussion and contemplation, led to some general observations as well as specific recommendations. This paper reiterates the task force’s observations and recommendations and provides further detail regarding our interpretation of the findings and basis for the eventual recommendations to the section. PMID:25741020

  6. Clinical practice guideline use by oncology advanced practice nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Regina S. Cunningham

    2006-01-01

    Understanding how clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are utilized and the effects of their implementation on outcomes is an important goal. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if oncology advanced practice nurse (APN) interventions provided to men with prostate cancer were consistent with Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research CPGs regarding pain [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

  7. Family practice clinics. Survey of family practice residents' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, H.; Levitt, C.

    1993-01-01

    All residents of McGill University's Department of Family Medicine were surveyed by mail about their family practice clinic experience. Residents were generally satisfied with their training site and their supervision, but noted problems with volume and diversity of patients, learning certain procedures, and knowledge of community resources. They did not want more family medicine clinic time. PMID:8219838

  8. Applying ‘science’ in chiropractic clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Jennifer R

    1990-01-01

    The chiropractic profession is increasingly expressing the sentiment that chiropractic clinical intervention should rest upon a scientific foundation. Before ‘scientific research’ can become meaningful in chiropractic clinical practice, it is necessary that field practitioners be conversant with research terminology. If chiropractic clinical practice is to achieve credibility as a scientific mode of health care and if the benefits of a ‘scientific’ practice model are to enhance patient care, then future chiropractic practitioners must be familiar with a currently accredited scientific frame of reference. A survey of final year chiropractic students at Phillip Institute of Technology found that respondents appreciation of the strength of diverse clinical research methodologies and their ranking of criteria for ascertaining a cause-effect association bears some similarity (RHO = 0.97 and 0.98 respectively, p < 0.05) to that of the ‘scientific’ clinical community.

  9. Consensus Recommendations to Accelerate Clinical Trials for Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Kalamarides, Michel; Hunter-Schaedle, Kim; Blakeley, Jaishri; Allen, Jeffrey; Babovic-Vuskanovic, Dusica; Belzberg, Allan; Bollag, Gideon; Chen, Ruihong; DiTomaso, Emmanuelle; Golfinos, John; Harris, Gordon; Jacob, Abraham; Kalpana, Ganjam; Karajannis, Matthias; Korf, Bruce; Kurzrock, Razelle; Law, Meng; McClatchey, Andrea; Packer, Roger; Roehm, Pamela; Rubenstein, Allan; Slattery, William; Tonsgard, James H.; Welling, D. Bradley; Widemann, Brigitte; Yohay, Kaleb

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associated primarily with bilateral schwannomas seen on the superior vestibular branches of the eighth cranial nerves. Significant morbidity can result from surgical treatment of these tumors. Meningiomas, ependymomas, and other benign central nervous system tumors are also common in NF2. The lack of effective treatments for NF2 marks an unmet medical need. Experimental Design Here, we provide recommendations from a workshop, cochaired by Drs. D. Gareth Evans and Marco Giovannini, of 36 international researchers, physicians, representatives of the biotechnology industry, and patient advocates on how to accelerate progress toward NF2 clinical trials. Results Workshop participants reached a consensus that, based on current knowledge, the time is right to plan and implement NF2 clinical trials. Obstacles impeding NF2 clinical trials and how to address them were discussed, as well as the candidate therapeutic pipeline for NF2. Conclusions Both phase 0 and phase II NF2 trials are near-term options for NF2 clinical trials. The number of NF2 patients in the population remains limited, and successful recruitment will require ongoing collaboration efforts between NF2 clinics. PMID:19671848

  10. Digital Clinical Photography: Practical Tips

    PubMed Central

    Mutalik, Sharad

    2010-01-01

    Photographs are the most preferred and easiest way of documentation of patient visual features. In aesthetic and cutaneous surgery, there is an increased need for proper photographic documentation, from a medicolegal view point. This article discusses the basic aspects of camera and photography which a dermatologist should be aware before he/she starts with clinical photography. PMID:20606997

  11. A manual of recommended practices for hydrogen energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, W.; Leach, S. [W. Hoagland and Associates, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Technologies for the production, distribution, and use of hydrogen are rapidly maturing and the number and size of demonstration programs designed to showcase emerging hydrogen energy systems is expanding. The success of these programs is key to hydrogen commercialization. Currently there is no comprehensive set of widely-accepted codes or standards covering the installation and operation of hydrogen energy systems. This lack of codes or standards is a major obstacle to future hydrogen demonstrations in obtaining the requisite licenses, permits, insurance, and public acceptance. In a project begun in late 1996 to address this problem, W. Hoagland and Associates has been developing a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Systems intended to serve as an interim document for the design and operation of hydrogen demonstration projects. It will also serve as a starting point for some of the needed standard-setting processes. The Manual will include design guidelines for hydrogen procedures, case studies of experience at existing hydrogen demonstration projects, a bibliography of information sources, and a compilation of suppliers of hydrogen equipment and hardware. Following extensive professional review, final publication will occur later in 1997. The primary goal is to develop a draft document in the shortest possible time frame. To accomplish this, the input and guidance of technology developers, industrial organizations, government R and D and regulatory organizations and others will be sought to define the organization and content of the draft Manual, gather and evaluate available information, develop a draft document, coordinate reviews and revisions, and develop recommendations for publication, distribution, and update of the final document. The workshop, Development of a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Energy Systems, conducted on March 11, 1997 in Alexandria, Virginia, was a first step.

  12. Invasive candidiasis in critical care setting, updated recommendations from "Invasive Fungal Infections-Clinical Forum", Iran.

    PubMed

    Elhoufi, Ashraf; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Asnaashari, Amir Mohammad Hashem; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali; Bidgoli, Behrooz Farzanegan; Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Abbasi, Saeed; El-Sobky, Malak; Ghaziani, Ali; Jarrahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrami, Reza; Shirazian, Farzad; Soltani, Farhad; Yazdinejad, Homeira; Zand, Farid

    2014-11-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) bears a high risk of morbidity and mortality in the intensive care units (ICU). With the current advances in critical care and the use of wide-spectrum antibiotics, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) and IC in particular, have turned into a growing concern in the ICU. Further to blood cultures, some auxiliary laboratory tests and biomarkers are developed to enable an earlier detection of infection, however these test are neither consistently available nor validated in our setting. On the other hand, patients' clinical status and local epidemiology data may justify the empiric antifungal approach using the proper antifungal option. The clinical approach to the management of IC in febrile, non-neutropenic critically ill patients has been defined in available international guidelines; nevertheless such recommendations need to be customized when applied to our local practice. Over the past three years, Iranian experts from intensive care and infectious diseases disciplines have tried to draw a consensus on the management of IFI with a particular focus on IC in the ICU. The established IFI-clinical forum (IFI-CF), comprising the scientific leaders in the field, has recently come up with and updated recommendation on the same (June 2014). The purpose of this review is to put together literature insights and Iranian experts' opinion at the IFI-CF, to propose an updated practical overview on recommended approaches for the management of IC in the ICU. PMID:25374806

  13. Lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes. Relevance for clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stewart B.; Petrella, Robert J.; Leadbetter, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review evidence from literature on type 2 diabetes pertinent to physical activity and diet and lifestyle modification, and to determine the relevance of this evidence to clinical practice. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Direct (level I) evidence supports interventions for physical activity and diet modification for primary prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Few studies examine the effectiveness of primary health care providers' making such interventions. MAIN MESSAGE: Family physicians have an important role in identifying people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes and managing those diagnosed with the disease, yet they struggle to deliver practice-based interventions that promote sustainable behaviour change among their patients. CONCLUSION: It is evident that supporting patients to make changes in their physical activity and dietary habits can prevent onset of type 2 diabetes. Translating this finding into effective recommendations for clinical practice requires further effort and evaluation. PMID:14708927

  14. Mayo Clinic Jacksonville electronic radiology practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Richard L.; Berquist, Thomas H.; Rueger, Wolfgang

    1996-05-01

    We have begun a project to implement an Electronic (Filmless) Radiology Practice (ERP) at Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. This project is integrated with the implementation of a project (Automated Clinical Practice--ACP) to eliminate circulation and archival of the current paper Medical Record. The ERP will result in elimination of screen/film radiography and the transmittal of film throughout the institution by the end of 1996. In conjunction with the ACP, paper and film will not circulate within the clinic by the end of this year.

  15. Recommended Practice for Patch Management of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Tom; Dale Christiansen; Dan Berrett

    2008-12-01

    A key component in protecting a nation’s critical infrastructure and key resources is the security of control systems. The term industrial control system refers to supervisory control and data acquisition, process control, distributed control, and any other systems that control, monitor, and manage the nation’s critical infrastructure. Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) consists of electric power generators, transmission systems, transportation systems, dam and water systems, communication systems, chemical and petroleum systems, and other critical systems that cannot tolerate sudden interruptions in service. Simply stated, a control system gathers information and then performs a function based on its established parameters and the information it receives. The patch management of industrial control systems software used in CIKR is inconsistent at best and nonexistent at worst. Patches are important to resolve security vulnerabilities and functional issues. This report recommends patch management practices for consideration and deployment by industrial control systems owners.

  16. Concordance with clinical practice guidelines for dementia in general practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Wilcock; Steve Iliffe; Stephen Turner; Michelle Bryans; Ronan O’Carroll; John Keady; Enid Levin; Murna Downs

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dementia is said to be under-recognized and sub-optimally managed in primary care, but there is little information about actual processes of diagnosis and clinical care.Aim: To determine general practitioners’ concordance with clinical guidelines on the diagnosis and management of patients with dementia.Design: Unblinded, cluster randomized pre-test–post-test controlled trial involving 35 practices in the UK.Methods: Patients with a diagnosis of

  17. Romanian national guidelines and practical recommendations on liver elastography.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Ioan; Bota, Simona; S?ftoiu, Adrian; ?irli, Roxana; Gradin?ru-Ta?c?u, Oana; Popescu, Alina; Lup?or Platon, Monica; Fierbinteanu-Braticevici, Carmen; Gheonea, Dan Ionu?; S?ndulescu, Larisa; Badea, Radu

    2014-06-01

    The use of liver elastography has substantially developed in the past few years; the introduction of novel elastographic methods (Transient Elastography, point Shear Wave Elastography, Real Time Shear Wave Elastography, Strain Elastography) has changed the perspective in the evaluation of liver disease. The ongoing research in this area is mainly focused on diffuse liver diseases and for predicting liver cirrhosis complication. This guideline created under the auspice of Romanian Society of Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology is intended to accustomize the clinician with the current practical use of liver elastography and has been issued to help in maximizing the clinical benefit for the patients with chronic liver diseases. PMID:24791844

  18. Narcissistic disorders in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Britton, Ronald

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, the concept of narcissism in the psychoanalytic literature is reviewed and three uses of the term are defined, firstly, clinical narcissism, secondly, an innate force or tendency opposed to relationships and thirdly, narcissistic personality disorders. The latter can be further differentiated on the basis of the transference/countertransference into borderline (thin-skinned), aloof (thick-skinned) and as-if (false-self) narcissistic disorders. The characteristics of each of these patterns are described. The author suggests that narcissistic disorders arise when there is a failure of containment in infancy and childhood that gives rise to an ego-destructive super-ego leading to the evolving of a narcissistic organization. The libidinal defensive organization arises when parental failure of containment is the primary factor and destructive organization when the infant has an excess of object-hostility. Two case descriptions are given to illustrate the distinction between a predominantly destructive and a predominantly libidinal narcissistic disorder and the author suggests that both arise from the production, by projective identification, of a narcissistic relationship with an ego ideal in order to evade a relationship with a destructive parental super-ego. PMID:15317528

  19. Regulating the placebo effect in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tracey E

    2015-01-01

    Recent research and ethical analysis have forced a clinical and ethical reappraisal of the utility of placebos in medical practice. The main concern of ethics and law is that using placebos in health care involves deception, which is antithetical to patient autonomy and trust in the physician-patient relationship. This article reviews the various, more nuanced scientific conceptions of the placebo effect, and evaluates the ethical and legal objections to deploying placebos in clinical practice. It argues that the placebo effect may be legitimately accommodated on the basis that it does not engage the requirement for material or quasi-fiduciary disclosures of information, and may also be justified by therapeutic privilege. In addition, this reconceptualisation of the placebo effect offers a new justification for therapeutic privilege in these contexts. Notwithstanding this, using the placebo effect in clinical practice raises regulatory issues that will require special regulatory supervision. PMID:25227708

  20. Melatonergic drugs in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hardeland, Rüdiger; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Srinivasan, Venkataramanujan; Trakht, Ilya; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin (CAS 73-31-4) has both hypnotic and sleep/wake rhythm regulating properties. These sleep promoting actions, which are already demonstrable in healthy humans, have been found useful in subjects suffering from circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) like delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), jet lag and shift-work sleep disorder. Low nocturnal melatonin production and secretion have been documented in elderly insomniacs, and exogenous melatonin has been shown to be beneficial in treating sleep disturbances of these patients. In comparison to a number of sleep-promoting compounds that are usually prescribed, such as benzodiazepines and z-drugs (zolpidem and zopiclon belonging to the latter ones), melatonin has several advantages of clinical value: it does not cause hangover nor withdrawal effects and is devoid of any addictive potential. However, recent meta-analyses revealed that melatonin is not sufficiently effective in treating most primary sleep disorders. Some of the reasons for a limited efficacy of this natural hormone are related to its extremely short half-life in the circulation, and to the fact that sleep maintenance is also regulated by mechanisms downstream of primary melatonergic actions. Hence, there is an urgent need for the development of melatonin receptor agonists with a longer half-life, which could be suitable for a successful treatment of insomnia. Such requirements are fulfilled by ramelteon (CAS 196597-26-9), which possesses a high affinity for the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 present in the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Ramelteon also has a substantially longer half-life than melatonin. This new drug has been successfully used in treating elderly insomniacs without any adverse effects reported, and is promising for treating patients with primary insomnia and also those suffering from CRSD. Since sleep disturbances constitute the most prevalent symptoms of various forms of depression, the need for the development of an ideal antidepressant was felt, which would both improve sleep and mitigate depressive symptoms. Since most of the currently used antidepressants, including the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors worsen the sleep disturbances of depressive patients, another novel melatonergic drug, agomelatine (CAS 138112-76-2), holds some promise because of its particular combination of actions: it has a high affinity for MT1 and MT2 receptors in the SCN, but it acts additionally as a 5-HT(2C) antagonist [5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C antagonist]. The latter property, which is decisive for the antidepressive action, would not favor but potentially antagonize sleep, but this is overcome during night by the melatonergic, sleep-promoting effect. This drug has been found beneficial in treating patients with major depressive and seasonal affective disorders. Unlike the other antidepressants, agomelatine improves both sleep and clinical symptoms of depressive illness and does not have any of the side effects on sleep seen with other compounds in use. This property seems to be of particular value because of the aggravating effects of disturbed sleep in the development of depressive symptoms. Based on these facts, agomelatine seems to be a drug of superior efficacy with a promising future in the treatment of depressive disorders. However, long-term safety studies are required for both ramelteon and agomelatine, with a consideration of the pharmacology of their metabolites, their effects on redox metabolism, and of eventual undesired melatonergic effects, e. g., on reproductive functions. According to current data, both compounds seem to be safe during short-term treatment PMID:18368944

  1. Clinical Engineering: Experiences of assisted professional practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langone, Luis; Vanetta, Marcos; Vazquez, Marcelo; Rotger, Viviana; Olivera, Juan Manuel

    2007-11-01

    In the curricula of the Biomedical Engineering career of the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología of the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argenitna, there are the Assisted Professional Practices. Within this framework, the students have the possibility of performing practices in the clinic Sanatorio 9 de Julio. One of the objectives of these practices is to apply the concepts, methods and procedures studied along the career in the field work under real work conditions. From the point of view of the host institution, the objective is to improve the performance of the different services and areas applying the tools of Biomedical Engineering. The present work shows an example of such practices where an equipment preliminary analysis was made, its use and maintenance corresponding to the surgical unit of the clinic.

  2. Using data mining techniques to explore physicians' therapeutic decisions when clinical guidelines do not provide recommendations: methods and example for type 2 diabetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Massoud Toussi; Jean-Baptiste Lamy; Philippe Le Toumelin; Alain Venot

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines carry medical evidence to the point of practice. As evidence is not always available, many guidelines do not provide recommendations for all clinical situations encountered in practice. We propose an approach for identifying knowledge gaps in guidelines and for exploring physicians' therapeutic decisions with data mining techniques to fill these knowledge gaps. We demonstrate our method by

  3. Clinical practice guidelines. New-to-practice family physicians' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, B. M.; Woodward, C. A.; Cohen, M.; Williams, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the attitudes toward clinical practice guidelines of a group of family physicians who had recently entered practice in Ontario, and to compare them with the attitudes of a group of internists from the United States. DESIGN: Mailed questionnaire survey of all members of a defined cohort. SETTING: Ontario family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Certificants of the College of Family Physicians of Canada who received certification in 1989, 1990, and 1991 and who were practising in Ontario. Of 564-cohort members, 395 (70%) responded. Men (184) and women (211) responded at the same rate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of agreement with 10 descriptive statements about practice guidelines and analyses of variance of these responses for several physician characteristics. RESULTS: Of respondents in independent practice, 80% were in group practice. Women were more likely to have chosen group practice, in which they were more likely to use practice guidelines than men. Generally favourable attitudes toward guidelines were observed. Physician characteristics occasionally influenced agreement with the descriptors. The pattern of agreement was similar to that noted in the study of American internists, but, in general, Ontario physicians were more supportive. CONCLUSIONS: This group of relatively new-to-practice Ontario family physicians shows little resistance to guidelines and appears to read less threat of external control in them than does the US group. PMID:8616286

  4. Why don't physicians adhere to guideline recommendations in practice? An analysis of barriers among Dutch general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Zegers-van Schaick, Judith M; Westert, Gert P; Burgers, Jako S

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite wide distribution and promotion of clinical practice guidelines, adherence among Dutch general practitioners (GPs) is not optimal. To improve adherence to guidelines, an analysis of barriers to implementation is advocated. Because different recommendations within a guideline can have different barriers, in this study we focus on key recommendations rather than guidelines as a whole, and explore the barriers to implementation perceived by Dutch GPs. Methods A qualitative study using six focus groups was conducted, in which 30 GPs participated, with an average of seven per session. Fifty-six key recommendations were derived from twelve national guidelines. In each focus group, barriers to the implementation of the key recommendations of two clinical practice guidelines were discussed. Focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data was analysed by using an existing framework of barriers. Results The barriers varied largely within guidelines, with each key recommendation having a unique pattern of barriers. The most perceived barriers were lack of agreement with the recommendations due to lack of applicability or lack of evidence (68% of key recommendations), environmental factors such as organisational constraints (52%), lack of knowledge regarding the guideline recommendations (46%), and guideline factors such as unclear or ambiguous guideline recommendations (43%). Conclusion Our study findings suggest a broad range of barriers. As the barriers largely differ within guidelines, tailored and barrier-driven implementation strategies focusing on key recommendations are needed to improve adherence in practice. In addition, guidelines should be more transparent concerning the underlying evidence and applicability, and further efforts are needed to address complex issues such as comorbidity in guidelines. Finally, it might be useful to include focus groups in continuing medical education as an innovative medium for guideline education and implementation. PMID:19674440

  5. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hand osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Kraus, V B; Cicuttini, F; Doherty, M; Dreiser, R-L; Henrotin, Y; Jiang, G-L; Mandl, L; Martel-Pelletier, J; Nelson, A E; Neogi, T; Pelletier, J-P; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R; Simon, L S; Wang, S

    2015-05-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a very frequent disease, but yet understudied. However, a lot of works have been published in the past 10 years, and much has been done to better understand its clinical course and structural progression. Despite this new knowledge, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in hand OA. The last OARSI recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA dates back to 2006. The present recommendations aimed at updating previous recommendations, by incorporating new data. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide evidence-based guidance on the design, execution and analysis of clinical trials in hand OA, where published evidence is available, supplemented by expert opinion, where evidence is lacking, to perform clinical trials in hand OA, both for symptom and for structure-modification. They indicate core outcome measurement sets for studies in hand OA, and list the methods and instruments that should be used to measure symptoms or structure. For both symptom- and structure-modification, at least pain, physical function, patient global assessment, HR-QoL, joint activity and hand strength should be assessed. In addition, for structure-modification trials, structural progression should be measured by radiographic changes. We also provide a research agenda listing many unsolved issues that seem to most urgently need to be addressed from the perspective of performing "good" clinical trials in hand OA. These updated OARSI recommendations should allow for better standardizing the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA in the next future. PMID:25952348

  6. Development of EULAR recommendations for the reporting of clinical trial extension studies in rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Maya H; Silva-Fernandez, Lucia; Carmona, Loreto; Aletaha, Daniel; Christensen, Robin; Combe, Bernard; Emery, Paul; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Guillemin, Francis; Kvien, Tore K; Landewe, Robert; Pavelka, Karel; Saag, Kenneth; Smolen, Josef S; Symmons, Deborah; van der Heijde, Désirée; Welling, Joep; Wells, George; Westhovens, Rene; Zink, Angela; Boers, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our initiative aimed to produce recommendations on post-randomised controlled trial (RCT) trial extension studies (TES) reporting using European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) standard operating procedures in order to achieve more meaningful output and standardisation of reports. Methods We formed a task force of 22 participants comprising RCT experts, clinical epidemiologists and patient representatives. A two-stage Delphi survey was conducted to discuss the domains of evaluation of a TES and definitions. A ‘0–10’ agreement scale assessed each domain and definition. The resulting set of recommendations was further refined and a final vote taken for task force acceptance. Results Seven key domains and individual components were evaluated and led to agreed recommendations including definition of a TES (100% agreement), minimal data necessary (100% agreement), method of data analysis (agreement mean (SD) scores ranging between 7.9 (0.84) and 9.0 (2.16)) and reporting of results as well as ethical issues. Key recommendations included reporting of absolute numbers at each stage from the RCT to TES with reasons given for drop-out at each stage, and inclusion of a flowchart detailing change in numbers at each stage and focus (mean (SD) agreement 9.9 (0.36)). A final vote accepted the set of recommendations. Conclusions This EULAR task force provides recommendations for implementation in future TES to ensure a standardised approach to reporting. Use of this document should provide the rheumatology community with a more accurate and meaningful output from future TES, enabling better understanding and more confident application in clinical practice towards improving patient outcomes. PMID:24827533

  7. Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Patients: Review and Recommendations for Current Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Ravi; Hahn, Gabriele; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Kim, Myung-Joon; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Olsen, Øystein E.; Stokland, Eira; Triulzi, Fabio; Vazquez, Elida

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), frequently with contrast enhancement, is the preferred imaging modality for many indications in children. Practice varies widely between centers, reflecting the rapid pace of change and the need for further research. Guide-line changes, for example on contrast-medium choice, require continued practice reappraisal. This article reviews recent developments in pediatric contrast-enhanced MRI and offers recommendations on current best practice. Nine leading pediatric radiologists from internationally recognized radiology centers convened at a consensus meeting in Bordeaux, France, to discuss applications of contrast-enhanced MRI across a range of indications in children. Review of the literature indicated that few published data provide guidance on best practice in pediatric MRI. Discussion among the experts concluded that MRI is preferred over ionizing-radiation modalities for many indications, with advantages in safety and efficacy. Awareness of age-specific adaptations in MRI technique can optimize image quality. Gadolinium-based contrast media are recommended for enhancing imaging quality. The choice of most appropriate contrast medium should be based on criteria of safety, tolerability, and efficacy, characterized in age-specific clinical trials and personal experience. PMID:25114547

  8. Building a Vita for the Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    Vita review is used by most prospective employers to determine which applicants will be interviewed for a particular position opening in clinical practice. Most graduate students have little knowledge and no training in this topic, which is vital for professional development. Specific examples of vitae construction are provided for one of the…

  9. Current social work perspectives on clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Max Siporin

    1985-01-01

    Several forms of progress in the development of clinical practice theory and method are identified. There is a renewed positive valuation of psychodynamic approaches, a general acceptance of a systems framework, and a greater operationalization of procedures. The current controversy between the social work scientists and artists concerning research strategies is discussed. Three promising new perspectives—of morality, spirituality, and hermeneutics-are

  10. The shortcomings of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Leier, Carl V; Geleris, Paraschos; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of medical knowledge related to diagnosis and management over the last 5-6 decades has altered the course of diseases, improved clinical outcomes and increased survival. Thus, it has become difficult for the practicing physician to evaluate the long-term effects of a particular therapy on survival of an individual patient. Further, the approach by each physician to an individual patient with the same disease is not always uniform. In an attempt to assist physicians in applying newly acquired knowledge to patients, clinical practice guidelines were introduced by various scientific societies. Guidelines assist in facilitating the translation of new research discoveries into clinical practice; however, despite the improvements over the years, there are still several issues related to guidelines that often appear ‘lost in translation'. Guidelines are based on the results of randomized clinical trials, other nonrandomized studies, and expert opinion (i.e. the opinion of most members of the guideline committees). The merits and limitations of randomized clinical trials, guideline committees, and presentation of guidelines will be discussed. In addition, proposals to improve guidelines will be presented. PMID:25790843

  11. Evidenced based practice: classroom to clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Landin, Cecelia W

    2013-01-01

    Evidence based practice (EBP) can be incorporated into the curriculum of Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) Programs. Current components of curriculum can include EBP in pre-analytic, analytic, and post-analytic topics. Discussion of EBP topics in the classroom using practices assessed through the Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative (LMBP) of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will give students a clear understanding of EBP and how it is used in the clinical laboratory for improved health care quality. Student involvement in Quality Improvement projects to improve laboratory performance and patient outcomes can be developed through capstone projects. Examples of clinical projects and application of EBP into the MLS curriculum are discussed. PMID:24432516

  12. Experience with fingolimod in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Carrie M; Hara-Cleaver, Claire; Rudick, Richard A; Cohen, Jeffrey A; Bermel, Robert A; Ontaneda, Daniel

    2014-10-29

    Aim: To report experience with fingolimod in clinical practice. Design/Methods: Patients in an academic medical center who were prescribed fingolimod from October 2010 to August 2011 were identified through the electronic medical record and followed for 12 months after fingolimod initiation. Adverse effects (AEs), clinical measures, MRI data, and quality of life measures were assessed. Results: Three hundred seventeen patients started fingolimod. Eleven patients were treatment naïve (3.5%) and 76 (24.0%) had remote disease modifying therapy (DMT) use prior to fingolimod. One hundred fifty-one (47.6%) switched because of patient preference and 79 (24.9%) switched because of breakthrough disease. About 11.6% transitioned from natalizumab. Follow-up data were available for 306 patients (96.5%) with mean follow-up time 332 days. Fingolimod was discontinued in 76 of 306 patients (24.8%) at mean 248 days after fingolimod start. Discontinuation most often was due to AEs (n = 40) or breakthrough disease (n = 22). Among patients who started fingolimod with available 12 month follow-up data, 267 (87.3%) remained relapse free and 256 (83.7%) had no relapses or gadolinium enhancement. Time to first relapse occurred at mean 282 days after fingolimod initiation. Quality of life measures remained stable at follow-up. Conclusions Fingolimod was discontinued at a higher rate in clinical practice than in clinical trials. Discontinuation was primarily due to AEs or breakthrough disease. Disease activity was adequately controlled in most patients who started fingolimod. This clinical practice cohort is consistent with efficacy data from phase 3 trials and describes the most common tolerability issues in clinical practice. PMID:25271798

  13. Enhancing reflective practice through online learning: impact on clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sim, J; Radloff, A

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, radiographers and radiation therapists function in a workplace environment that is protocol-driven with limited functional autonomy. The workplace promotes a culture of conformity and discourages practitioners from reflective and critical thinking, essential attributes for continuing learning and advancing workplace practices. As part of the first author’s doctoral study, a continuing professional development (CPD) educational framework was used to design and implement an online module for radiation therapists’ CPD activities. The study aimed to determine if it is possible to enhance healthcare practitioners’ reflective practice via online learning and to establish the impact of reflective learning on clinical practice. Materials and methods The objectives of the online module were to increase radiation therapists’ knowledge in planning for radiation therapy for the breast by assisting them engage in reflective practice. The cyclical process of action research was used to pilot the module twice with two groups of volunteer radiation therapists (twenty-six participants) from Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Results The online module was evaluated using Kirkpatrick’s four-level evaluation model. Evidence indicated that participants were empowered as a result of participation in the module. They began reflecting in the workplace while assuming a more proactive role and increased clinical responsibilities, engaged colleagues in collaborative reflections and adopted evidence-based approaches in advancing clinical practices. Conclusion The study shows that it is possible to assist practitioners engage in reflective practice using an online CPD educational framework. Participants were able to apply the reflective learning they had developed in their workplace. As a result of their learning, they felt empowered to continue to effect changes in their workplace beyond the cessation of the online module. PMID:21614319

  14. Drug testing of adolescents in general medical clinics, in school and at home: physician attitudes and practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon Levy; Sion K. Harris; Lon Sherritt; Michelle Angulo; John R. Knight

    2006-01-01

    PurposeTo determine (1) whether physicians agree with recommendations for home and school drug screening, (2) under what circumstances physicians recommend urine drug tests for adolescents, and (3) how physicians manage adolescent patients with positive results. Few clinical practice guidelines have been published on urine drug testing of adolescents, and it is not known when physicians recommend this procedure or how

  15. Neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy for resectable esophageal cancer: a clinical practice guideline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A Malthaner; Rebecca KS Wong; R Bryan Rumble; Lisa Zuraw

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carcinoma of the esophagus is an aggressive malignancy with an increasing incidence. Its virulence, in terms of symptoms and mortality, justifies a continued search for optimal therapy. A clinical practice guideline was developed based on a systematic review investigating neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy on resectable thoracic esophageal cancer. METHODS: A systematic review with meta-analysis was developed and clinical recommendations

  16. Cold tolerance of bed bugs and practical recommendations for control.

    PubMed

    Olson, Joelle F; Eaton, Marc; Kells, Stephen A; Morin, Victor; Wang, Changlu

    2013-12-01

    Bed bugs were exposed to freezing temperatures for various exposure times to determine cold tolerance and mortality estimates for multiple life stages. The mean supercooling point for all bed bug life stages ranged from -21.3 degrees C to -30.3 degrees C, with the egg stage reporting the lowest value. A probit analysis provided a lower lethal temperature (LLT99) of -31.2 degrees C when estimates from all life stages were combined, demonstrating that all stages of bed bugs are not capable of surviving temperatures below body freezing and are therefore freeze intolerant. At conditions above the LLT99, bed bug mortality depended on temperature and exposure time at temperatures above LLT99. Based on our model estimates, survival was estimated for temperatures above -12 degrees C even after 1 wk of continuous exposure. However, exposure to temperatures below -13 degrees C will result in 100% mortality in d to ensure mortality of all life stages. Unfortunately, sublethal exposure to lower temperatures did not prevent subsequent feeding behavior in surviving stages. Practical recommendations for management of potentially infested items are discussed. PMID:24498745

  17. A manual of recommended practices for hydrogen energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, W.; Leach, S. [W. Hoagland and Associates, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In June 1992, the first plenary meeting of the International Standards Organization Technical Committee No. 197 (ISO TC 197) was held in Paris, initiating a valuable international effort to develop standards for hydrogen energy systems. Several standards are under development, but it takes an average of five to eight years to develop each new standard. A number of hydrogen projects (demonstrations, integrated experiments, field tests, scale-up, or proof of concept) are now in progress or are contemplated in the next two to three years, but formal codes and standards are not available. This is a major barrier to the success of new demonstration projects. Local permitting officials have different concerns in approving applications for projects when there are neither formal standards nor extensive operating experience. Permitting officials and insuring organizations want reassurances that their approval of a project is reasonable, prudent and defensible. At the same time, developers of hydrogen systems should not have to reinvent the wheel with each new project, but should build on current knowledge and experience. To meet these needs, W. Hoagland and Associates is developing, under subcontract to the US Department of Energy, a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Energy Systems comprised of a compendium of current knowledge and recent experience as well as guidelines for the design and operation of hydrogen demonstration projects. The Manual will be comprehensive in nature, reviewed and approved by credible organizations, and is intended to serve in the interim while a more formal standards process progresses.

  18. Incorporation of Pharmacogenomics into Routine Clinical Practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline Development Process

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Kelly E.; Klein, Teri E.; Hoffman, James M.; Müller, Daniel J.; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F.; Schwab, Matthias; Agúndez, José A.G.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Crews, Kristine R.; Scott, Stuart A.; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Stein, C. Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V.; Williams, Marc S.; Johnson, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine’s Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines. PMID:24479687

  19. Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline development process.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Kelly E; Klein, Teri E; Hoffman, James M; Muller, Daniel J; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F; Schwab, Matthias; Agundez, Jose A G; Freimuth, Robert R; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F; Crews, Kristine R; Scott, Stuart A; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Stein, C Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V; Williams, Marc S; Johnson, Samuel G

    2014-02-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines. PMID:24479687

  20. Clinical prediction rules in practice: review of clinical guidelines and survey of GPs

    PubMed Central

    Plüddemann, Annette; Wallace, Emma; Bankhead, Clare; Keogh, Claire; Van der Windt, Danielle; Lasserson, Daniel; Galvin, Rose; Moschetti, Ivan; Kearley, Karen; O’Brien, Kirsty; Sanders, Sharon; Mallett, Susan; Malanda, Uriell; Thompson, Matthew; Fahey, Tom; Stevens, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background The publication of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) studies has risen significantly. It is unclear if this reflects increasing usage of these tools in clinical practice or how this may vary across clinical areas. Aim To review clinical guidelines in selected areas and survey GPs in order to explore CPR usefulness in the opinion of experts and use at the point of care. Design and setting A review of clinical guidelines and survey of UK GPs. Method Clinical guidelines in eight clinical domains with published CPRs were reviewed for recommendations to use CPRs including primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke, diabetes mellitus, fracture risk assessment in osteoporosis, lower limb fractures, breast cancer, depression, and acute infections in childhood. An online survey of 401 UK GPs was also conducted. Results Guideline review: Of 7637 records screened by title and/or abstract, 243 clinical guidelines met inclusion criteria. CPRs were most commonly recommended in guidelines regarding primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (67%) and depression (67%). There was little consensus across various clinical guidelines as to which CPR to use preferentially. Survey: Of 401 responders to the GP survey, most were aware of and applied named CPRs in the clinical areas of cardiovascular disease and depression. The commonest reasons for using CPRs were to guide management and conform to local policy requirements. Conclusion GPs use CPRs to guide management but also to comply with local policy requirements. Future research could focus on which clinical areas clinicians would most benefit from CPRs and promoting the use of robust, externally validated CPRs. PMID:24686888

  1. Guidelines on Good Clinical Laboratory Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ezzelle, J.; Rodriguez-Chavez, I. R.; Darden, J. M.; Stirewalt, M.; Kunwar, N.; Hitchcock, R.; Walter, T.; D’Souza, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    A set of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) standards that embraces both the research and clinical aspects of GLP were developed utilizing a variety of collected regulatory and guidance material. We describe eleven core elements that constitute the GCLP standards with the objective of filling a gap for laboratory guidance, based on IND sponsor requirements, for conducting laboratory testing using specimens from human clinical trials. These GCLP standards provide guidance on implementing GLP requirements that are critical for laboratory operations, such as performance of protocol-mandated safety assays, peripheral blood mononuclear cell processing and immunological or endpoint assays from biological interventions on IND-registered clinical trials. The expectation is that compliance with the GCLP standards, monitored annually by external audits, will allow research and development laboratories to maintain data integrity and to provide immunogenicity, safety, and product efficacy data that is repeatable, reliable, auditable and that can be easily reconstructed in a research setting. PMID:18037599

  2. Human papillomavirus vaccination: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Lauri E; Dunne, Eileen F; Saraiya, Mona; Chesson, Harrell W; Curtis, C Robinette; Gee, Julianne; Bocchini, Joseph A; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-08-29

    This report summarizes the epidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) and associated diseases, describes the licensed HPV vaccines, provides updated data from clinical trials and postlicensure safety studies, and compiles recommendations from CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for use of HPV vaccines. Persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can cause cervical cancer in women as well as other anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers in women and men. HPV also causes genital warts. Two HPV vaccines are licensed in the United States. Both are composed of type-specific HPV L1 protein, the major capsid protein of HPV. Expression of the L1 protein using recombinant DNA technology produces noninfectious virus-like particles (VLPs). Quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4) contains four HPV type-specific VLPs prepared from the L1 proteins of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18. Bivalent HPV vaccine (HPV2) contains two HPV type-specific VLPs prepared from the L1 proteins of HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines are administered in a 3-dose series. ACIP recommends routine vaccination with HPV4 or HPV2 for females aged 11 or 12 years and with HPV4 for males aged 11 or 12 years. Vaccination also is recommended for females aged 13 through 26 years and for males aged 13 through 21 years who were not vaccinated previously. Males aged 22 through 26 years may be vaccinated. ACIP recommends vaccination of men who have sex with men and immunocompromised persons (including those with HIV infection) through age 26 years if not previously vaccinated. As a compendium of all current recommendations for use of HPV vaccines, information in this report is intended for use by clinicians, vaccination providers, public health officials, and immunization program personnel as a resource. ACIP recommendations are reviewed periodically and are revised as indicated when new information and data become available. PMID:25167164

  3. Clinically Relevant Pharmacogenomic Testing in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Korbel, Lindsey; George, Mathew; Kitzmiller, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and patients continue to convey interest in personalized medicine. The objective of personalized medicine is to improve healthcare by tailoring disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for individuals based on their unique clinical history and genetic composition. This article offers an overview of pharmacogenomics, discusses caveats specific to pharmacogenomics in pediatric populations, provides evidence-based recommendations for pediatric clinicians, and offers insight regarding the future role of pharmacogenomics testing in pediatric medicine. Reviews of the current literature and thoughtful discussions are presented regarding the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants, codeine and oncologic, asthma, and immunomodulatory pharmacotherapies. PMID:24803633

  4. Key clinical activities for quality asthma care. Recommendations of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Williams, Seymour G; Schmidt, Diana K; Redd, Stephen C; Storms, William

    2003-03-28

    In 1997, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP), coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, published the second Expert Panel Report (EPR-2): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Expert Panel Report 2: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 1997; publication no. 97-4051. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/ asthma/asthgdln.pdf). Subsequently, the NAEPP Expert Panel identified key questions regarding asthma management that were submitted to an evidence practice center of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to conduct a systematic review of the evidence. The resulting evidence report was used by the Expert Panel to update recommendations for clinical practice on selected topics. These recommendations (EPR-Update 2002) were published in 2002. (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma--update on selected topics 2002. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2002;110[November 2002, part 2]. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/index.htm). To improve the implementation of these guidelines, a working group of the Professional Education Subcommittee of the NAEPP extracted key clinical activities that should be considered as essential for quality asthma care in accordance with the EPR-2 guidelines and the EPR-Update 2002. The purpose was to develop a report that would help purchasers and planners of health care define the activities that are important to quality asthma care, particularly in reducing symptoms and preventing exacerbations, and subsequently reducing the overall national burden of illness and death from asthma. This report is intended to help employer health benefits managers and other health-care planners make decisions regarding delivery of health care for persons with asthma. Although this report is based on information directed to clinicians; it is not intended to substitute for recommended clinical practices for caring for persons with asthma, nor is it intended to replace the clinical decision-making required to meet individual patient needs. Readers are referred to the EPR-2 for the full asthma guidelines regarding diagnosis and management of asthma or to the abstracted Practical Guide (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Practical guide for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 1997; publication no. 97-4053. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/practgde.htm) and to the EPR-Update 2002. The 1997 EPR-2 guidelines and EPR-Update 2002 were derived from a consensus of leading asthma researchers from academic, clinical, federal and voluntary institutions and based on scientific evidence supported by the literature. The 10 key activities highlighted here correspond to the four recommended-as-essential components of asthma management: assessment and monitoring, control of factors contributing to asthma severity, pharmacotherapy and education for a partnership in care. The key clinical activities are not intended for acute or hospital management of patients with asthma but rather for the preventive aspects of managing asthma long term. This report was developed as a collaborative activity between CDC and the NAEPP. PMID:12696781

  5. Integrating breast cancer genetics into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Abhik; Rakha, Emad A

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer prognosis and treatment is guided by traditional clinicopathological parameters and individual molecular markers. Despite the remarkable advances in our scientific understanding of breast cancer genetics, the impact of such information on medical care has, to date, been modest. Although the use of simple genetics is already in vogue in clinical practice, the concept of molecular profiling and multiparameter gene classifiers was raised after the introduction of the high-throughput gene expression microarrays. This technology, in addition to highlighting the molecular heterogeneity of breast cancer, has led to the development of prognostic and predictive gene signatures. Studies are underway to assess the clinical validity and clinical utility of these multigene assays and their incorporation into clinical practice. This article reviews the current status and projected future use of genetics and genomics in breast cancer management and their impact on the refinement of risk stratification to permit individualized and patient-tailored therapy. Limitations based on our current scientific understanding and realistic expectations are also explored. PMID:22171779

  6. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van der Molen, Thys; Miravitlles, Marc; Kocks, Janwillem WH

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients’ everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed. PMID:24143085

  7. Recommended Practice: Creating Cyber Forensics Plans for Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Cornelius; Mark Fabro

    2008-08-01

    Cyber forensics has been in the popular mainstream for some time, and has matured into an information-technology capability that is very common among modern information security programs. The goal of cyber forensics is to support the elements of troubleshooting, monitoring, recovery, and the protection of sensitive data. Moreover, in the event of a crime being committed, cyber forensics is also the approach to collecting, analyzing, and archiving data as evidence in a court of law. Although scalable to many information technology domains, especially modern corporate architectures, cyber forensics can be challenging when being applied to non-traditional environments, which are not comprised of current information technologies or are designed with technologies that do not provide adequate data storage or audit capabilities. In addition, further complexity is introduced if the environments are designed using proprietary solutions and protocols, thus limiting the ease of which modern forensic methods can be utilized. The legacy nature and somewhat diverse or disparate component aspects of control systems environments can often prohibit the smooth translation of modern forensics analysis into the control systems domain. Compounded by a wide variety of proprietary technologies and protocols, as well as critical system technologies with no capability to store significant amounts of event information, the task of creating a ubiquitous and unified strategy for technical cyber forensics on a control systems device or computing resource is far from trivial. To date, no direction regarding cyber forensics as it relates to control systems has been produced other than what might be privately available from commercial vendors. Current materials have been designed to support event recreation (event-based), and although important, these requirements do not always satisfy the needs associated with incident response or forensics that are driven by cyber incidents. To address these issues and to accommodate for the diversity in both system and architecture types, a framework based in recommended practices to address forensics in the control systems domain is required. This framework must be fully flexible to allow for deployment into any control systems environment regardless of technologies used. Moreover, the framework and practices must provide for direction on the integration of modern network security technologies with traditionally closed systems, the result being a true defense-in-depth strategy for control systems architectures. This document takes the traditional concepts of cyber forensics and forensics engineering and provides direction regarding augmentation for control systems operational environments. The goal is to provide guidance to the reader with specifics relating to the complexity of cyber forensics for control systems, guidance to allow organizations to create a self-sustaining cyber forensics program, and guidance to support the maintenance and evolution of such programs. As the current control systems cyber security community of interest is without any specific direction on how to proceed with forensics in control systems environments, this information product is intended to be a first step.

  8. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting. PMID:18590978

  9. Adaptation of Clinical Practice Guidelines Perry GROOT 1

    E-print Network

    Groot, Perry

    evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for promoting standards of medical care. Worldwide process of clinical practice guidelines through a systematic appraisal of available evidence is costlyAdaptation of Clinical Practice Guidelines Perry GROOT 1 , Arjen HOMMERSOM, and Peter LUCAS Radboud

  10. Forum for Injection Technique (FIT), India: The Indian recommendations 2.0, for best practice in Insulin Injection Technique, 2015.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nikhil; Kalra, Sanjay; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Baruah, Manash P; Chadha, Manoj; Chandalia, Hemraj B; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Jothydev, Kesavadev; Kumar, Prasanna K M; V, Madhu S; Mithal, Ambrish; Modi, Sonal; Pitale, Shailesh; Sahay, Rakesh; Shukla, Rishi; Sundaram, Annamalai; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G; Wangnoo, Subhash K

    2015-01-01

    As injectable therapies such as human insulin, insulin analogs, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists are used to manage diabetes, correct injection technique is vital for the achievement of glycemic control. The forum for injection technique India acknowledged this need for the first time in India and worked to develop evidence-based recommendations on insulin injection technique, to assist healthcare practitioners in their clinical practice. PMID:25932385

  11. High-sensitivity cardiac troponins in everyday clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays are increasingly being used in many countries worldwide, however, a generally accepted definition of high-sensitivity is still pending. These assays enable cTn measurement with a high degree of analytical sensitivity with a low analytical imprecision at the low measuring range of cTn assays (coefficient of variation of < 10% at the 99th percentile upper reference limit). One of the most important advantages of these new assays is that they allow novel, more rapid approaches to rule in or rule out acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) than with previous cTn assay generations which are still more commonly used in practice worldwide. hs-cTn is also more sensitive for the detection of myocardial damage unrelated to acute myocardial ischemia. Therefore, the increase in early diagnostic sensitivity of hs-cTn assays for ACS comes at the cost of a reduced ACS specificity, because more patients with other causes of acute or chronic myocardial injury without overt myocardial ischemia are detected than with previous cTn assays. As hs-cTn assays are increasingly being adopted in clinical practice and more hs-cTn assays are being developed, this review attempts to synthesize the available clinical data to make recommendations for their everyday clinical routine use. PMID:24772257

  12. Parkinson's Disease: From Genetics to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Clarimón, Jordi; Kulisevsky, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in genetics over the last decade have radically advanced our understanding of the etiological basis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although much research remains to be done, the main genetic causes of this neurodegenerative disorder are now partially unraveled, allowing us to feel more confident that our knowledge about the genetic architecture of PD will continue to increase exponentially. How and when these discoveries will be introduced into general clinical practice, however, remains uncertain. In this review, we provide a general summary of the progress in the genetics of PD and discuss how this knowledge will contribute to the diagnosis and clinical management of patients with, or at risk of this disorder. PMID:24532987

  13. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    PubMed Central

    Fracchiolla, Nicola S.; Artuso, Silvia; Cortelezzi, Agostino

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice. PMID:23673681

  14. Forum for Injection Techniques, India: The First Indian Recommendations for Best Practice in Insulin Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Baruah, Manash P.; Chadha, Manoj; Chandalia, Hemraj B.; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Kumar, K. M. Prasanna; Modi, Sonal; Pitale, Shailesh; Shukla, Rishi; Sahay, Rakesh; Sundaram, Annamalai; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Wangnoo, Subhash K.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of diabetes have led to an increase in the number of injectable therapies, such as human insulin, insulin analogues, and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues. The efficacy of injection therapy in diabetes depends on correct injection technique, among many other factors. Good injection technique is vital in achieving glycemic control and thus preventing complications of diabetes. From the patients’ and health-care providers’ perspective, it is essential to have guidelines to understand injections and injection techniques. The abridged version of the First Indian Insulin Injection technique guidelines developed by the Forum for Injection Technique (FIT) India presented here acknowledge good insulin injection techniques and provide evidence-based recommendations to assist diabetes care providers in improving their clinical practice. PMID:23226630

  15. Using Principles of Evidence-Based Practice to Improve Prescriptive Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory; Patall, Erika A.

    2013-01-01

    We draw on the evidence-based practice (EBP) literature to consider the relationship between empirical results reported in primary research journals and prescriptive recommendations for practice based on those results. We argue that the relationship between individual empirical findings and practice should be mediated by two additional steps in…

  16. Taking PDT into mainstream clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, Stephen G.

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals in the field are frustrated by the slow progress getting PDT established in mainstream clinical practice. The five key reasons are: 1. Lack of adequate evidence of safety and efficacy and optimization of dosimetry. These are fundamental. The number of randomized controlled studies is still small. For some cancer applications, it is difficult to get patients to agree to be randomised, so different approaches must be taken. Anecdotal results are not acceptable to sceptics and regulators. 2. The regulatory processes. The rules get more complex every day, but there is no choice, they must be met. The full bureaucratic strength of the pharmaceutical industry is needed to address these issues. 3. Conservatism of the medical profession. Established physicians are reluctant to change practice, especially if it means referring patients to different specialists. 4. Lack of education. It is amazing how few physicians have even heard of PDT and many that have, are sceptical. The profile of PDT to both the medical profession and the general public needs to be raised dramatically. Patient demand works wonders! 5. Money. Major investment is required to run clinical trials. Pharmaceutical companies may see PDT as a threat (eg reduced market for chemotherapy agents). Licensed photosensitisers are expensive. Why not reduce the price initially, to get the technique established and stimulate demand? PDT has the potential for enormous cost savings for health service providers. With appropriate motivation and resources these problems can be addressed. Possible routes forward will be suggested.

  17. Ethical Dilemmas in Sport Psychology: Discussion and Recommendations for Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zella E. Moore

    2003-01-01

    The practice demands required of sport psychologists often complicate the direct and specific fulfillment of several ethical regulations. Many practitioners face specific issues of confidentiality and the appropriate use of informed consent, challenges to practicing within areas of competence, issues regarding termination, and challenges that arise from multiorganizational demands and the formation of multiple relationships. Although ethical guidelines established by

  18. Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    . Initiate transfusion. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards Committee Transfusion Committee Director of Transfusion Medicine #12;Clinical Procedure Page 2 of 2 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital

  19. Recommendations for practices utilizing gestational carriers: a committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This document provides the latest recommendations for evaluation of gestational carriers and intended parents. It incorporates recent information from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gestational carrier services must be thoroughly familiar. This document replaces the previous document of the same name, last published in 2012. PMID:25481637

  20. News Note: Not all doctors comply with practice guidelines for recommending colorectal cancer screenings

    Cancer.gov

    A study of nearly 1,300 primary care physicians in the United States found that only about 20 percent of those doctors recommend colorectal cancer (CRC) screenings tests to their patients in accordance with current practice guidelines.

  1. Predictors of Adherence to Multiple Clinical Preventive Recommendations among Adults with Diabetes in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Esteban-Hernández, Jesus; Hernández-Barrera, Valentin; Carrasco Garrido, Pilar; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; Cardenas-Valladolid, Juan; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to describe adherence to seven clinical preventive services among Spanish adults with diabetes, to compare adherence with people without diabetes and to identify predictor of adherence to multiple practices among adults with diabetes. Design Cross-sectional study based on data obtained from the European Health Survey for Spain 2009 and the Spanish National Health Survey 2011. We analyzed those aged 40-69 years (n= 20,948). Diabetes status was self-reported. The study variables included adherence to blood pressure (BP) checkup, cholesterol measurement, influenza vaccination, dental examination, fecal occult blood test (FOBT), mammography and cytology. Independent variables included socio-demographic characteristics, variables related to health status and lifestyle factors. Results The study sample included 1,647 subjects with diabetes and 19,301 without. Over 90% had measured their BP and cholesterol in the last year, 44.4% received influenza immunization, 36.4% had a dental checkup within the year and only 8.1% underwent a FOBT. Among diabetic women 75.4% had received a mammography and 52.4% a cytology in the recommended periods. The adherence to BP and cholesterol measurements and influenza vaccination was significantly higher among those suffering diabetes and cytology and dental checkup were lower. Only 63.4% of people with diabetes had fulfilled half or more of the recommended practices. Female sex, higher educational level, being married or cohabiting, higher number of chronic conditions and number of physician visits increased the adherence to multiple preventive practices. For each unhealthy lifestyle reported the probability of having a higher adherence level decreased. Conclusions Acceptable adherence is found for BP and cholesterol checkups and mammography. Unacceptably low rates were found for influenza vaccine, dental care, cytology and FOBT. Moreover, preventive services are provided neither equitably nor efficiently so future research needs to identify individual and organizational factors that allow interventions to reach these subjects with diabetes. PMID:26121575

  2. Respiratory microbiota: addressing clinical questions, informing clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; Shaw, Dominick; Marsh, Robyn L; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances have revolutionised efforts to understand the role played by microbes in airways disease. With the application of ever more sophisticated techniques, the literature has become increasingly inaccessible to the non-specialist reader, potentially hampering the translation of these gains into improvements in patient care. In this article, we set out the key principles underpinning microbiota research in respiratory contexts and provide practical guidance on how best such studies can be designed, executed and interpreted. We examine how an understanding of the respiratory microbiota both challenges fundamental assumptions and provides novel clinical insights into lung disease, and we set out a number of important targets for ongoing research. PMID:25035125

  3. [Clinical practice guidelines and knowledge management in healthcare].

    PubMed

    Ollenschläger, Günter

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are key tools for the translation of scientific evidence into everyday patient care. Therefore guidelines can act as cornerstones of evidence based knowledge management in healthcare, if they are trustworthy, and its recommendations are not biased by authors' conflict of interests. Good medical guidelines should be disseminated by means of virtual (digital/electronic) health libraries - together with implementation tools in context, such as guideline based algorithms, check lists, patient information, a.s.f. The article presents evidence based medical knowledge management using the German experiences as an example. It discusses future steps establishing evidence based health care by means of combining patient data, evidence from medical science and patient care routine, together with feedback systems for healthcare providers. PMID:24326702

  4. Managing type 1 diabetes in school: Recommendations for policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Sarah E; Cummings, Elizabeth A; Pacaud, Danièle; Lynk, Andrew; Metzger, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes requiring insulin is increasingly common and likely to impact students in most, if not all, schools. Diabetes and its complications have major personal, social and economic impact, and improved diabetes control reduces the risk of both short- and long-term complications. Evidence shows that more intensive management of diabetes - through frequent blood glucose monitoring, insulin administration with injections and/or insulin pumps, and careful attention to diet and exercise - leads to better control. Since children spend 30 to 35 hours per week at school, effectively managing their diabetes while there is integral to their short- and long-term health. The Canadian Paediatric Society and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group recommend that minimum standards for supervision and care be established across Canada to support children and youth with type 1 diabetes in schools. These recommendations are derived from evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, with input from diabetes care providers from across Canada, and are consistent with the Canadian Diabetes Association's Guidelines for the Care of Students Living with Diabetes at School. PMID:25722642

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnostic approaches in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Burbige, Eugene J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a functional gastrointestinal disorder long considered a diagnosis of exclusion, has chronic symptoms that vary over time and overlap with those of non-IBS disorders. Traditional symptom-based criteria effectively identify IBS patients but are not easily applied in clinical practice, leaving >40% of patients to experience symptoms up to 5 years before diagnosis. Objective: To review the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected IBS, strengths and weaknesses of current methodologies, and newer diagnostic tools that can augment current symptom-based criteria. Methods: The peer-reviewed literature (PubMed) was searched for primary reports and reviews using the limiters of date (1999–2009) and English language and the search terms irritable bowel syndrome, diagnosis, gastrointestinal disease, symptom-based criteria, outcome, serology, and fecal markers. Abstracts from Digestive Disease Week 2008–2009 and reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Results: A disconnect is apparent between practice guidelines and clinical practice. The American Gastroenterological Association and American College of Gastroenterology recommend diagnosing IBS in patients without alarm features of organic disease using symptom-based criteria (eg, Rome). However, physicians report confidence in a symptom-based diagnosis without further testing only up to 42% of the time; many order laboratory tests and perform sigmoidoscopies or colonoscopies despite good evidence showing no utility for this work-up in uncomplicated cases. In the absence of diagnostic criteria easily usable in a busy practice, newer diagnostic methods, such as stool-form examination, fecal inflammatory markers, and serum biomarkers, have been proposed as adjunctive tools to aid in an IBS diagnosis by increasing physicians’ confidence and changing the diagnostic paradigm to one of inclusion rather than exclusion. Conclusion: New adjunctive testing for IBS can augment traditional symptom-based criteria, improving the speed and safety with which a patient is diagnosed and avoiding unnecessary, sometimes invasive, testing that adds little to the diagnostic process in suspected IBS. PMID:21694856

  6. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

  7. Pharmacogenomics in clinical practice and drug development.

    PubMed

    Harper, Andrew R; Topol, Eric J

    2012-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of responses to drugs, including clopidogrel, pegylated-interferon and carbamazepine, have led to the identification of specific patient subgroups that benefit from therapy. However, the identification and replication of common sequence variants that are associated with either efficacy or safety for most prescription medications at odds ratios (ORs) >3.0 (equivalent to >300% increased efficacy or safety) has yet to be translated to clinical practice. Although some of the studies have been completed, the results have not been incorporated into therapy, and a large number of commonly used medications have not been subject to proper pharmacogenomic analysis. Adoption of GWAS, exome or whole genome sequencing by drug development and treatment programs is the most striking near-term opportunity for improving the drug candidate pipeline and boosting the efficacy of medications already in use. PMID:23138311

  8. Reboxetine in clinical practice: a review.

    PubMed

    Sepede, G; Corbo, M; Fiori, F; Martinotti, G

    2012-07-01

    Reboxetine is a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NaRI), the first drug of a new antidepressant class. Reboxetine has been approved for the treatment of Major Depression in many European countries, but the application for approval was rejected in the United States. It has been found useful in Narcolepsy, ADHD, Panic Attack Disorder, treatment of depression in patients with Parkinson' s Disease. Moreover reboxetine has been proposed as an effective and safe therapeutic option for Cocaine Dependence Disorder. Despite a large number of studies have documented that reboxetine was equally effective in treating major depressive illness compared to other antidepressants, recent reports argue reboxetine to be ineffective and potentially harmful for the treatment of acute depression. Aim of the present review is to summarize and discuss the last literature findings, comparing risks and benefits of reboxetine usage in everyday clinical practice. PMID:23007832

  9. [Management of aflibercept in routine clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Cabrera López, F

    2015-03-01

    Aflibercept is a new anti-vegf drug that, unlike ranibizumab and bevacizumab blocks both vegf-A and placental growth factor. Moreover, it binds with much greater strength and affinity to human VEGF-A165 than other endogenous vegf receptors, conferring it with a more extended effect and allowing a lower frequency of intravitreal injections. This facilitates the adoption of fixed treatment regimens other than monthly or individual regimens such as "treat and extend". Aflibercept is indicated for the treatment of neovascular (exudative) age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), visual alteration due to macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and visual alteration due to diabetic macular edema (DME). The present article reviews the management of aflibercept in routine clinical practice, based on the specifications of its new core data sheet, which includes all the therapeutic indications in which its use has been approved and evaluating the distinct alternatives and treatment regimens after the initial loading doses. PMID:25925049

  10. Microethics: the ethics of everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Truog, Robert D; Brown, Stephen D; Browning, David; Hundert, Edward M; Rider, Elizabeth A; Bell, Sigall K; Meyer, Elaine C

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several decades, medical ethics has gained a solid foothold in medical education and is now a required course in most medical schools. Although the field of medical ethics is by nature eclectic, moral philosophy has played a dominant role in defining both the content of what is taught and the methodology for reasoning about ethical dilemmas. Most educators largely rely on the case-based method for teaching ethics, grounding the ethical reasoning in an amalgam of theories drawn from moral philosophy, including consequentialism, deontology, and principlism. In this article we hope to make a case for augmenting the focus of education in medical ethics. We propose complementing the traditional approach to medical ethics with a more embedded approach, one that has been described by others as "microethics," the ethics of everyday clinical practice. PMID:25600383

  11. Pharmacogenomics in clinical practice and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Andrew R; Topol, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of responses to drugs, including clopidogrel, pegylated-interferon and carbamazepine, have led to the identification of specific patient subgroups that benefit from therapy. However, the identification and replication of common sequence variants that are associated with either efficacy or safety for most prescription medications at odds ratios (ORs) >3.0 (equivalent to >300% increased efficacy or safety) has yet to be translated to clinical practice. Although some of the studies have been completed, the results have not been incorporated into therapy, and a large number of commonly used medications have not been subject to proper pharmacogenomic analysis. Adoption of GWAS, exome or whole genome sequencing by drug development and treatment programs is the most striking near-term opportunity for improving the drug candidate pipeline and boosting the efficacy of medications already in use. PMID:23138311

  12. Assessing Cognitive Function in Bipolar Disorder: Challenges and Recommendations for Clinical Trial Design

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Katherine E.; Ketter, Terence A.; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neurocognitive impairment in schizophrenia has been recognized for more than a century. In contrast, only recently have significant neurocognitive deficits been recognized in bipolar disorder. Converging data suggest the importance of cognitive problems in relation to quality of life in bipolar disorder, highlighting the need for treatment and prevention efforts targeting cognition in bipolar patients. Future treatment trials targeting cognitive deficits will be met with methodological challenges due to the inherent complexity and heterogeneity of the disorder, including significant diagnostic comorbidities, the episodic nature of the illness, frequent use of polypharmacy, cognitive heterogeneity, and a lack of consensus regarding measurement of cognition and outcome in bipolar patients. Guidelines for use in designing future trials are needed. PARTICIPANTS The members of the consensus panel (each of the bylined authors) were selected based upon their expertise in bipolar disorder. Dr. Burdick is a neuropsychologist who has studied cognition in this illness for 15 years; Drs. Ketter, Calabrese, and Goldberg each bring considerable expertise in the treatment of bipolar disorder both within and outside of controlled clinical trials. This consensus statement was derived from work together at scientific meetings (e.g. symposium presention at the 2014 Annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology, among others) and ongoing discussions by conference call. With the exception of the public presentations on this topic, these meetings were closed to outside participants. EVIDENCE A literature review was undertaken by the authors to identify illness-specific challenges relevant to the design and conduct of treatment trials targeting neurocognition in bipolar disorder. Expert opinion from each of the authors guided the consensus recommendations. CONSENSUS PROCESS Consensus recommendations, reached by unanimous opinion of the authors, are provided here as a preliminary guide for future trial design. Recommendations comprise exclusion of certain syndromal level comorbid diagnoses and current affective instability, restrictions on numbers and types of medications, and use of pre-screening assessment to ensure enrollment of subjects with adequate objective evidence of baseline cognitive impairment. CONCLUSIONS Clinical trials to address cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder face distinctive design challenges. As such trials move from proof-of-concept to confirmation of clinical efficacy, it will be important to incorporate distinctive design modifications to adequately address these challenges and increase the likelihood of demonstrating cognitive remediation effects. The field is now primed to address these challenges and a comprehensive effort to formalize best practice guidelines will be a critically important next step. PMID:25830456

  13. Long-term Mechanical Circulatory Support System reliability recommendation by the National Clinical Trial Initiative subcommittee.

    PubMed

    Lee, James

    2009-01-01

    The Long-Term Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS) System Reliability Recommendation was published in the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs (ASAIO) Journal and the Annals of Thoracic Surgery in 1998. At that time, it was stated that the document would be periodically reviewed to assess its timeliness and appropriateness within 5 years. Given the wealth of clinical experience in MCS systems, a new recommendation has been drafted by consensus of a group of representatives from the medical community, academia, industry, and government. The new recommendation describes a reliability test methodology and provides detailed reliability recommendations. In addition, the new recommendation provides additional information and clinical data in appendices that are intended to assist the reliability test engineer in the development of a reliability test that is expected to give improved predictions of clinical reliability compared with past test methods. The appendices are available for download at the ASAIO journal web site at www.asaiojournal.com. PMID:19861890

  14. Teaching reflective practice in practice settings: students' perceptions of their clinical educators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franziska Trede; Megan Smith

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice potential not being realised. This study explored final year physiotherapy students' perceptions of clinical educators as

  15. An Electronic Protocol for Translation of Research Results to Clinical Practice: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Alan H.; Orme, James; Rocha, Beatriz H.; Holmen, John; Clemmer, Terry; Nelson, Nancy; Allen, Jode; Jephson, Al; Sorenson, Dean; Sward, Kathy; Warner, Homer

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated the feasibility of using an electronic protocol developed for research use (Research-eProtocol-insulin) for blood glucose management in usual intensive care unit clinical practice. Methods We implemented the rules of Research-eProtocol-insulin in the electronic medical record of the Intermountain Healthcare hospital system (Clinical-eProtocol-insulin) for use in usual clinical practice. We evaluated the performance of Clinical-eProtocol-insulin rules in the intensive care units of seven Intermountain Healthcare hospitals and compared this performance with the performance of Research-eProtocol-insulin at the LDS Hospital Shock/Trauma/Respiratory Intensive Care Unit. Results Clinician (nurse or physician) compliance with computerized protocol recommendations was 95% (of 21,325 recommendations) with Research-eProtocol-insulin and 92% (of 109,458 recommendations) with Clinical-eProtocol-insulin. The blood glucose distribution in clinical practice (Clinical-eProtocol-insulin) was similar to the research use distribution (Research-eProtocol-insulin); however, the mean values (119 mg/dl vs 113 mg/dl) were statistically different (P = 0.0001). Hypoglycemia rates in the research and practice settings did not differ: the percentage of measurements ?40 mg/dl (0.11% vs 0.1%, P = 0.65) and the percentage of patients with at least one blood glucose ?40 mg/dl (4.2% vs 3%, P = 0.23) were not statistically significantly different. Conclusion Our electronic blood glucose protocol enabled translation of a research decision-support tool (Research-eProtocol-insulin) to usual clinical practice (Clinical-eProtocol-insulin). PMID:19885263

  16. Clinical Understanding of Spasticity: Implications for Practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Spasticity is a poorly understood phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to understand the effect of spasticity on daily life and identify bedside strategies that enhance patient's function and improve comfort. Spasticity and clonus result from an upper motor neuron lesion that disinhibits the tendon stretch reflex; however, they are differentiated in the fact that spasticity results in a velocity dependent tightness of muscle whereas clonus results in uncontrollable jerks of the muscle. Clinical strategies that address function and comfort are paramount. This is a secondary content analysis using a qualitative research design. Adults experiencing spasticity associated with neuromuscular disorder were asked to participate during inpatient acute rehabilitation. They were asked to complete a semistructured interview to explain and describe the nature of their experienced spasticity on daily basis. Spasticity affects activities of daily living, function, and mobility. Undertreated spasticity can lead to pain, immobility, and risk of falls. There were missed opportunities to adequately care for patients with spasticity. Bedside care strategies identified by patients with spasticity are outlined. Uses of alternative therapies in conjunction with medications are needed to better manage spasticity. Patient reports on spasticity are important and should be part of clinical evaluation and practice. PMID:25276432

  17. Clinical Laboratory Quality Practices When Hemolysis Occurs.

    PubMed

    Howanitz, Peter J; Lehman, Christopher M; Jones, Bruce A; Meier, Frederick A; Horowitz, Gary L

    2015-07-01

    Context .- Hemolyzed specimens delay clinical laboratory results, proliferate unnecessary testing, complicate physician decisions, injure patients indirectly, and increase health care costs. Objective .- To determine quality improvement practices when hemolysis occurs. Design .- We used the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Survey Program to distribute a Q-Probes-type questionnaire about hemolysis practices to CAP Chemistry Survey participants. Results .- Of 3495 participants sent the questionnaire, 846 (24%) responded. Although 85%, 69%, and 55% of participants had written hemolysis policies for potassium, lactate dehydrogenase, and glucose, respectively, only a few (46%, 40%, and 40%) had standardized hemolysis reports between their primary and secondary chemistry analyzers for these 3 analytes. Most participants (70%) had not attempted to validate the manufacturers' hemolysis data for these 3 analytes; however, essentially all who tried, succeeded. Forty-nine percent of participants had taken corrective action to reduce hemolysis during the past year and used, on average, 2.4 different actions, with collection and distribution of hemolysis data to administrative leadership (57%), troubleshooting outliers (55%), retraining phlebotomist (53%), and establishment of quality improvement teams among the laboratory and at problem locations (37%) being the most common actions. When asked to assess their progress in reducing hemolysis, 70% noted slow to no progress, and 2% gave up on improvement. Upon measuring potassium, lactate dehydrogenase, and glucose, approximately 60% of participants used the same specimen flag for hemolysis as for lipemia and icterus. Conclusions .- Hemolysis decreases the quality and increases the cost of health care. Practices for measuring, reporting, and decreasing hemolysis rates need improvement. PMID:26125430

  18. Evidence-Centered Design: Recommendations for Implementation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Amy; Ewing, Maureen; Kaliski, Pamela; Huff, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-centered design (ECD) is an orientation towards assessment development. It differs from conventional practice in several ways and consists of multiple activities. Each of these activities results in a set of useful documentation: domain analysis, domain modeling, construction of the assessment framework, and assessment…

  19. Recommended Best Practices for Mold Investigations in Minnesota Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul.

    The Minnesota Department of Health developed this guidance at the request of the Minnesota Department of Children, Families and Learning. The goal of the document is to assist school district staff of Minnesota public schools in responding to problems related to indoor mold. Its focus is on practical, cost-effective methods to identify indoor mold…

  20. SMARTWheel: From concept to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rory A

    2009-09-01

    Wheelchair prescription is complex with thousands of choices and options. Theoretically, a higher quality or innovative wheelchair that is appropriately matched to the user and their unique needs will increase participation. It is well accepted that there is an alarmingly high incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome, and rotator cuff injuries among manual wheelchair users. Since the initial conceptualization, the SMART(Wheel) was intended to better understand the physiological and physical effects of wheelchair propulsion on the body. Initially, little was known about wheelchair propulsion and the SMART(Wheel) transformed the nascent field of wheelchair propulsion biomechanics. Although still an important area of clinical research, the SMART(Wheel) has been critical to the study of the relationship between the type of wheelchair, set-up, activity, technique, anatomy, and physiology and repetitive strain injury. There has been growing evidence that the wheelchair-user interaction explains a substantial portion of the risk of developing a degenerative injury and on community participation. A noteworthy contribution of this work was the release of the clinical practice guideline, entitled, Preservation of Upper Limb Function Following Spinal Cord Injury in 2005. The SMART(Wheel) has been used by other scientists in areas that were not originally envisioned to be applications. It has been used to support the design of tools for developing a trail mapping rating and description system. It has also supported the design of accessible pedestrian walkways standards, accessible playground surfaces, and to evaluate carpets for wheelchair accessibility. It is likely that there are more new areas of exploration to emerge. This article describes the evolution of the SMART(Wheel) as new technologies became available and its applications in the field of wheelchair biomechanics and clinical service delivery. PMID:19658010

  1. Electronic health records and transgender patients-practical recommendations for the collection of gender identity data.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Madeline B; Buchholz, David

    2015-06-01

    Transgender (Trans, Trans*) persons may have a gender identity and a preferred name that differ from those assigned at birth, and/or those listed on their current legal identification (Gender ID, Birth-assigned Sex, Legal Sex). Transgender people who are referred to in a clinical setting using the wrong pronoun or name may suffer distress, ridicule or even assault by others in the waiting area, and may not return for further care. Furthermore, failure to accurately document (and therefore count) transgender identities has negative implications on quality improvement and research efforts, funding priorities and policy activities. The recent announcement that gender identity data may be included in Meaningful Use Stage 3 has accelerated the need for guidance for both vendors and local implementation teams on how to best record and store these data. A recent study demonstrated wide variation in current practices. This manuscript provides a description of identifiers associated with gender identity, and makes practical and evidence based recommendations for implementation and front-end functionality. PMID:25560316

  2. Basic recommended practices for handling, installation, and operations of submergible pumping equipment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Riling

    1982-01-01

    The handling, installation, and after-operations are important factors to insure successful submergible pumping operations. This work recommends the basic practices to follow for each of these subjects. It is felt that if these practices are followed, it will result in successful submergible operations for the user. The bottom line is that the producing company must be the major contributor who

  3. Parents' Evaluation of the Usability of a Web Site on Recommended Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert S.; Rule, Sarah; Mariger, Heather

    2003-01-01

    This article describes 21 parents' evaluation of a Web site intended to provide practical information about recommended practices such as activity-based or embedded instruction to families whose young children have disabilities or are at developmental risk. The parent group found the Web site, SPIES for Parents, to be helpful, useful, and…

  4. Recommended Feeding and Dietary Practices To Improve Infant and Maternal Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    The LINKAGES Project is intended to improve breastfeeding and related complementary feeding and maternal dietary practices. The project, in consultation with technical experts and program managers, identified a set of recommended feeding and dietary practices intended to break the cycle of poor health and nutrition that passes from generation to…

  5. Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines: Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Su-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu Young; Park, Su Eun; Chun, Young Myung; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Park, Shi-Nae; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) are common infections in children, and their diagnosis and treatment have significant impacts on the health of children and the costs of providing national medical care. In 2009, the Korean Otologic Society organized a committee composed of experts in the field of otolaryngology, pediatrics, and family medicine to develop Korean clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for otitis media in children with the goal of meeting regional medical and social needs in Korea. For this purpose, the committee adapted existing guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2004 to 2009 using medical search engines including data from Korea. A draft was written after a national questionnaire survey and several public audits, and it was editorially supervised by senior advisors before publication of the final report. These evidence-based guidelines for the management of otitis media in children provide recommendations to primary practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of children younger than 15 yr old with uncomplicated AOM and OME. The guidelines include recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment options, prevention and parent education, medical records, referral, and complementary/alternative medicine for treating pediatric otitis media. PMID:22876048

  6. Using Evidence-Based Principles in Clinical Practice

    E-print Network

    Storkel, Holly Lynn

    2004-01-01

    To help students better understand how to use evidence-based principles in clinical practice, Prof. Storkel is revising her SPLH 880 course so that students can access evidence from clinical research and apply it to specific patients....

  7. The practice-unit centered clinical database--the implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Bryner, U. M.

    1991-01-01

    A clinical database system under the name ClinTrac has been developed for the purpose of acquiring, processing, storing, analyzing, and communicating clinical information. The core of this system consists of a practice-unit centered database. PMID:1807752

  8. Characteristics and clinical practices of rural marriage and family therapists.

    PubMed

    Morris, James

    2007-10-01

    This report presents a subset of data collected from the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Practice Research Network project conducted in 2002. A sample of 47 clinical members of AAMFT who indicated they practiced in a rural community provided descriptive information on demographic characteristics, training, clinical practices, and treatment of substance abuse disorders. Similarities and differences with the demographic characteristics and practice patterns of the overall sample of 285 are discussed. PMID:17935528

  9. Pharmacist recommendations in an intensive care unit: three-year clinical activities

    PubMed Central

    Fideles, Giovanni Montini Andrade; de Alcântara-Neto, José Martins; Peixoto Júnior, Arnaldo Aires; de Souza-Neto, Paulo José; Tonete, Taís Luana; da Silva, José Eduardo Gomes; Neri, Eugenie Desirèe Rabelo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical activities performed and the accepted pharmacist recommendations made by a pharmacist as a part of his/her daily routine in an adult clinical intensive care unit over a period of three years. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive, and exploratory study was conducted at a tertiary university hospital from June 2010 to May 2013, in which pharmacist recommendations were categorized and analyzed. Results A total of 834 pharmacist recommendations (278 per year, on average) were analyzed and distributed across 21 categories. The recommendations were mainly made to physicians (n = 699; 83.8%) and concerned management of dilutions (n = 120; 14.4%), dose adjustment (n = 100; 12.0%), and adverse drug reactions (n = 91; 10.9%). A comparison per period demonstrated an increase in pharmacist recommendations with larger clinical content and a reduction of recommendations related to logistic aspects, such as drug supply, over time. The recommendations concerned 948 medications, particularly including systemic anti-infectious agents. Conclusion The role that the pharmacist played in the intensive care unit of the institution where the study was performed evolved, shifting from reactive actions related to logistic aspects to effective clinical participation with the multi-professional staff (proactive actions).

  10. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroto; Kusano, Motoyasu; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Joh, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Nakada, Koji; Nagahara, Akihito; Futagami, Seiji; Manabe, Noriaki; Inui, Akio; Haruma, Ken; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Yakabi, Koji; Hongo, Michio; Uemura, Naomi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-02-01

    General interest in functional gastrointestinal disorders is increasing among Japanese doctors as well as patients. This increase can be attributed to a number of factors, including recent increased interest in quality of life and advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease. Japan recently became the world's first country to list "functional dyspepsia" as a disease name for national insurance billing purposes. However, recognition and understanding of functional dyspepsia (FD) remain poor, and no standard treatment strategy has yet been established. Accordingly, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) developed an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for FD, consisting of five sections: concept, definition, and epidemiology; pathophysiology; diagnosis; treatment; and prognosis and complications. This article summarizes the Japanese guideline, with particular focus on the treatment section. Once a patient is diagnosed with FD, the doctor should carefully explain the pathophysiology and benign nature of this condition, establish a good doctor-patient relationship, and then provide advice for daily living (diet and lifestyle modifications, explanations, and reassurance). The proposed pharmacological treatment is divided into two steps: initial treatment including an acid inhibitory drug (H2RA or PPI) or prokinetics, (strong recommendation); second-line treatment including anxiolytics, antidepressants, and Japanese traditional medicine (weak recommendation). H. pylori eradication, strongly recommended with a high evidence level, is positioned separately from other treatment flows. Conditions that do not respond to these treatment regimens are regarded as refractory FD. Patients will be further examined for other organic disorders or will be referred to specialists using other approaches such as psychosomatic treatment. PMID:25586651

  11. Legislating Clinical Practice: Counselor Responses to an Evidence-Based Practice Mandate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Traci Rieckmann; Luke Bergmann; Caitlin Rasplica

    2011-01-01

    The demand to connect research findings with clinical practice for patients with substance use disorders has accelerated state and federal efforts focused on implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). One unique state driven strategy is Oregon's Evidence-Based Practice mandate, which ties state funds to specific treatment practices. Clinicians play an essential role in implementation of shifts in practice patterns and use

  12. Indices of serum tonicity in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rohrscheib, Mark; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Argyropoulos, Christos; Glew, Robert H; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-06-01

    Although disturbances of serum tonicity (effective osmolality) may have dire consequences, only surrogate indices of tonicity are available in practice. This report identifies the appropriate index for expressing clinical states of dystonicity. Serum sodium concentration ([Na]S) and osmolality ([Osm]S) may be incongruent. When the tonicity state shown by [Osm]S is higher than [Na]S and the difference between the 2 indices is caused by an excess of solute that distributes in total body water, tonicity is described by [Na]S. When this difference results from a gain of solute with extracellular distribution like mannitol or a decrease in serum water content, causing a falsely low measurement of [Na]S, [Osm]S accurately reflects tonicity. Two indices of tonicity are applicable during hyperglycemia: the tonicity formula (2·[Na]S + [Glucose]S/18) and the corrected [Na]S ([Na]S corrected to a normal [Glucose]S using an empirically derived coefficient). Clinicians should understand the uses and limitations of the tonicity indices. PMID:26002851

  13. [Proper use of apixaban: an outline for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Albaladejo, P; Deplanque, D; Fossati, F; Mahagne, M H; Mismetti, P; Nguyen, P; Roy, P; Touze, E; Mourad, J-J

    2014-12-01

    Apixaban is a direct inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa. Superior efficacy over aspirin and antivitamin K has been shown in the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism during non-valvular atrial fibrillation with a more favorable safety profile, even though the risk of hemorrhage cannot be ignored, considering its mechanism of action. The recommended dose is 5mg twice daily which can be reduced to 2.5mg depending on the individual risk. Apixaban is also indicated for the treatment of venous thromboembolism but reimbursement has not yet been accepted in France for this indication. As with all direct oral anticoagulants, no routine biological monitoring is required, nevertheless their use may have an impact on all coagulation tests, eventually hampering interpretation. In particular clinical circumstances where a measure of anticoagulant efficacy is deemed necessary, specific assay of anti-Xa activity is appropriate, the result being expressed as concentration of the anticoagulant used. It is therefore necessary to state the name of the medicine for which the assay is requested. With these new anticoagulants, management of hemorrhagic events can be more difficult due to the lack of a specific antidote. Pro-hemostatic substances have exhibited efficacy in animal models but results are still insufficiently documented in clinical practice. Local or locoregional hemostasis measurements, when possible, are an essential factor in the treatment of hemorrhagic events. PMID:25451020

  14. Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Nutrition-Related Management of Children and Adults with Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency: Results of a Systematic Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginia A. Stallings; Lori J. Stark; Karen A. Robinson; Andrew P. Feranchak; Hebe Quinton

    2008-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation established a process of systematic review of evidence to inform the development of clinical care guidelines and encourage evidence-based practice. The Subcommittee on Growth and Nutrition reviewed the evidence in two areas: energy intake and dosing for pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. Evidence-based recommendations are presented here. Also, an ad hoc working group conducted a review of

  15. From Clinical Practice Guideline to Clinical Pathway Issues of Reference Model-Based Approach

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    From Clinical Practice Guideline to Clinical Pathway­ Issues of Reference Model-Based Approach Guidelines, Clinical Pathways 1 Introduction Hospitals in Europe especially in Germany are exposed a more these challenges. Actually, the main instrument for documentation and managing of clinical processes are Clinical

  16. Prevention and Treatment of Postoperative Infections after Sinus Elevation Surgery: Clinical Consensus and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Testori, Tiziano; Drago, Lorenzo; Wallace, Steven S.; Capelli, Matteo; Galli, Fabio; Zuffetti, Francesco; Parenti, Andrea; Deflorian, Matteo; Fumagalli, Luca; Weinstein, Roberto L.; Maiorana, Carlo; Di Stefano, Danilo; Valentini, Pascal; Giannì, Aldo B.; Chiapasco, Matteo; Vinci, Raffaele; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Mantovani, Mario; Torretta, Sara; Pipolo, Carlotta; Felisati, Giovanni; Padoan, Giovanni; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Mattina, Roberto; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Maxillary sinus surgery is a reliable and predictable treatment option for the prosthetic rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla. Nevertheless, these interventions are not riskless of postoperative complications with respect to implant positioning in pristine bone. Aim. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a clinical consensus of experts (periodontists, implantologists, maxillofacial surgeons, ENT, and microbiology specialists) on several clinical questions and to give clinical recommendations on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat postoperative infections. Materials and Methods. A panel of experts in different fields of dentistry and medicine, after having reviewed the available literature on the topic and taking into account their long-standing clinical experience, gave their response to a series of clinical questions and reached a consensus. Results and Conclusion. The incidence of postop infections is relatively low (2%–5.6%). A multidisciplinary approach is advisable. A list of clinical recommendation are given. PMID:22927851

  17. [Psychocardiology: clinically relevant recommendations regarding selected cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Albus, C; Ladwig, K-H; Herrmann-Lingen, C

    2014-03-01

    Psychosocial risk factors (work stress, low socioeconomic status, impaired social support, anger, anxiety and depression), certain personality traits (e.g. hostility) and post-traumatic stress disorders may negatively influence the incidence and course of multiple cardiovascular disease conditions. Systematic screening for these factors may help to adequately assess the psychosocial risk pattern of a given patient and may also contribute to the treatment of these patients. Recommendations for treatment are based on current guidelines. The physician-patient interaction should basically follow the principle of a patient centered communication and should gender and age specific aspects into consideration. Integrated biopsychosocial care is an effective, low threshold option to treat psycho-social risk factors and should be offered on a regular basis. Patients with high blood pressure may profit from relaxation programs and biofeedback procedures (however with moderate success). An individually adjusted multimodal treatment strategy should be offered to patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure and after heart surgery. It may incorporate educational tools, exercise therapy, motivational modules, relaxation and stress management programs. In case of affective comorbidity, psychotherapy may be indicated. Anti-depressant pharmacotherapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the first line should only be offered to patients with at least moderate severe depressive episodes. Psychotherapy and SSRIs, particularly sertraline, have been proven to be safe and effective with regard to improvements of the patient's quality of life. A prognostic benefit has not been clearly proven so far. Patients with an implanted cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) should receive psychosocial support on a regular basis. Concomitant psychotherapy and/or psychopharmacotherapy (SSRIs) should be offered in case of a severe mental comorbidity. Generally, tricyclic antidepressants should be avoided in cardiac patients because of adverse side effects. PMID:24619718

  18. Kidney function and clinical recommendations of drug dose adjustment in geriatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In elderly patients chronic kidney disease often limits drug prescription. As several equations for quick assessment of kidney function by estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and several different clinical recommendations for drug dose adjustment in renal failure are published, choosing the correct approach for drug dosage is difficult for the practitioner. The aims of our study were to quantify the agreement between eGFR-equations grouped by creatinine-based or cystatin C-based and within the groups of creatinine and cystatin C-based equations and to investigate whether use of various literature and online references results in different recommendations for drug dose adjustment in renal disease in very elderly primary care patients. Methods We included 108 primary care patients aged 80 years and older from 11 family practices into a cross-sectional study. GFR was estimated using two serum creatinine-based equations (Cockroft-Gault, MDRD) and three serum cystatin C-based equations (Grubb, Hoek, Perkins). Concordance between different equations was quantified using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Essential changes in drug doses or discontinuation of medication were documented and compared in terms of estimated renal function as a consequence of the different eGFR-equations using five references commonly used in the US, Great Britain and Germany. Results In general, creatinine-based equations resulted in lower eGFR-estimation and in higher necessity of drug dose adjustment than cystatin C-based equations. Concordance was high between creatinine-based equations alone (ICCs 0.87) and between cystatin C-based equations alone (ICCs 0.90 to 0.96), and moderate between creatinine-based equations and cystatin C-based equations (ICCs 0.54 to 0.76). When comparing the five different references consulted to identify necessary drug dose adjustments we found that the numbers of drugs that necessitate dose adjustment in the case of renal impairment differed considerably. The mean number of recommended changes in drug dosage ranged between 1.9 and 2.5 per patient depending on the chosen literature reference. Conclusions Our data suggest that the choice of the literature source might have even greater impact on drug management than the choice of the equation used to estimate GFR alone. Efforts should be deployed to standardize methods for estimating kidney function in geriatric patients and literature recommendations on drug dose adjustment in renal failure. PMID:24020893

  19. What is Correctional about Clinical Practice in Corrections?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip R. Magaletta; Marc W. Patry; Erik F. Dietz; Robert K. Ax

    2007-01-01

    It is clear that adequate academic and continuing education\\/training for correctional mental health professionals is imperative if their practice is to be effective. To help shape such training, the clinical and correctional knowledge ranked most meaningful and relevant by psychologists practicing in federal prisons is determined. Overall, results suggest nine core bodies of knowledge representing a mix of clinical (e.g.,

  20. Learning Styles of Radiography Students during Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, L. Patrice

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Quantitative, descriptive research methodology identified the learning styles of radiography students. A single self-report questionnaire, developed to assess learning styles in clinical practice, was administered…

  1. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Esguevillas, Gara; Amo, Gemma; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing is useful for patient selection, but final dosing adjustment should be carried out on the basis of clinical or analytical parameters rather than on pharmacogenomic information. Patient selection may seem a modest objective, but it constitutes a crucial improvement with regard to the pre-pharmacogenomics situation and it saves patients’ lives. However, we should not overstate the current power of pharmacogenomics. At present the pharmacogenomics of anticancer drugs is not sufficiently developed for dose adjustments based on pharmacogenomics only, and no current guidelines recommend such adjustments without considering clinical and/or analytical parameters. This objective, if ever attained, would require the use of available guidelines, further implementation with clinical feedback, plus a combination of genomics and phenomics knowledge. PMID:25191268

  2. Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines Related to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Cheng, Chuang; Yan, Weiping; Xu, Guanghui; Feng, Jinzhou; Wang, Tianzhu; Chen, Cindy Si; Qin, Xinyue

    2014-01-01

    Background High quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) can provide clinicians with explicit recommendations on how to manage health conditions and bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. Unfortunately, the quality of CPGs for multiple sclerosis (MS) has not been evaluated. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of CPGs on MS using the AGREE II instrument. Methods According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, we searched four databases and two websites related to CPGs, including the Cochrane library, PubMed, EMBASE, DynaMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC), and Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM). The searches were performed on September 20th 2013. All CPGs on MS were evaluated by the AGREE II instrument. The software used for analysis was SPSS 17.0. Results A total of 27 CPGs on MS met inclusion criteria. The overall agreement among reviews was good or substantial (ICC was above 0.70). The mean scores for each of all six domains were presented as follows: scope and purpose (mean ± SD: 59.05±16.13), stakeholder involvement (mean ± SD: 29.53±17.67), rigor of development (mean ± SD: 31.52±21.50), clarity of presentation (mean ± SD: 60.39±13.73), applicability (mean ± SD: 27.08±17.66), editorial independence (mean ± SD: 28.70±22.03). Conclusions The methodological quality of CPGs for MS was acceptable for scope, purpose and clarity of presentation. The developers of CPGs need to pay more attention to editorial independence, applicability, rigor of development and stakeholder involvement during the development process. The AGREE II instrument should be adopted by guideline developers. PMID:25302678

  3. International adaptations of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Larsen, Jonathan K; McClure, Joan; Fitzgerald, C Lyn; Venook, Alan P; Benson, Al B; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2014-05-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) are evidence- and consensus-based clinical practice guidelines addressing malignancies that affect more than 97% of all patients with cancer in the United States. The NCCN Guidelines are used extensively in the United States and globally. Use of the guidelines outside the United States has driven the need to adapt the guidelines based on local, regional, or national resources. The NCCN Guidelines Panels created, vetted, and continually update the NCCN Guidelines based on published scientific data on cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment efficacy. The guidelines are developed within the context of commonly available resources, methods of payment, societal and cultural expectations, and governmental regulations as they exist in the United States. Although many of the cancer management recommendations contained in the NCCN Guidelines apply broadly from a global perspective, not all do. Disparities in availability and access to health care exist among countries, within countries, and among different social groups in the same country, especially regarding resources for cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment. In addition, different drug approval and payment processes result in regional variation in availability of and access to cancer treatment, especially highly expensive agents and radiation therapy. Differences in cancer risk, predictive biomarker expression, and pharmacogenetics exist across ethnic and racial groups, and therefore across geographic locations. Cultural and societal expectations and requirements may also require modification of NCCN Guidelines for use outside the United States. This article describes the adaptation process, using the recent Latin American adaptation of the 2013 NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer as an example. PMID:24812133

  4. Methods to investigate coronary microvascular function in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Gaetano A; Camici, Paolo G; Galiuto, Leonarda; Niccoli, Giampaolo; Pizzi, Carmine; Di Monaco, Antonio; Sestito, Alfonso; Novo, Salvatore; Piscione, Federico; Tritto, Isabella; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Bugiardini, Raffaele; Crea, Filippo; Marzilli, Mario

    2013-01-01

    A growing amount of data is increasingly showing the relevance of coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMVD) in several clinical contexts. This article reviews techniques and clinical investigations of the main noninvasive and invasive methods proposed to study coronary microcirculation and to identify CMVD in the presence of normal coronary arteries, also trying to provide indications for their application in clinical practice. PMID:23222188

  5. Using carbohydrate counting in diabetes clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, S J; Kulkarni, K D; Daly, A E

    1998-08-01

    Carbohydrate counting is a meal planning approach used with clients who have diabetes that focuses on carbohydrate as the primary nutrient affecting postprandial glycemic response. The concept of carbohydrate counting has been around since the 1920s, but it received renewed interest after being used as 1 of 4 meal planning approaches in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. In the trial, carbohydrate counting was found to be effective in meeting outcome goals and allowed flexibility in food choices. Recent practice pattern surveys have shown an increasing interest in and use of carbohydrate counting for medical nutrition therapy for persons with diabetes. Carbohydrate counting can be used by clients with type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Three levels of carbohydrate counting have been identified based on increasing levels of complexity. Level 1, or basic, introduces clients to the concept of carbohydrate counting and focuses on carbohydrate consistency. Level 2, or intermediate, focuses on the relationships among food, diabetes medications, physical activity, and blood glucose level and introduces the steps needed to manage these variables based on patterns of blood glucose levels. Level 3, or advanced, is designed to teach clients with type 1 diabetes who are using multiple daily injections or insulin infusion pumps how to match short-acting insulin to carbohydrate using carbohydrate-to-insulin ratios. All 3 levels emphasize portion control and offer opportunities for using creative teaching methods, such as "food labs," and use of a variety of carbohydrate resource tools and publications. In this article, glycemic effects of protein, fat, and fiber intake are discussed for persons with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Decision trees are introduced for each level of carbohydrate counting and show the usual progression through each level. Carbohydrate counting as a meal planning approach offers variability of food choices with the potential for improving glycemic control. Research opportunities are available for those interested in comparing carbohydrate counting with other meal planning approaches for clients with diabetes and the effects on clinical outcomes. PMID:9710660

  6. Photodynamic Therapy: Occupational Hazards and Preventative Recommendations for Clinical Administration by Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Steven E.; Vesper, Benjamin J.; Paradise, William A.; Radosevich, James A.; Colvard, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a medical treatment for cancers is an increasing practice in clinical settings, as new photosensitizing chemicals and light source technologies are developed and applied. PDT involves dosing patients with photosensitizing drugs, and then exposing them to light using a directed energy device in order to manifest a therapeutic effect. Healthcare professionals providing PDT should be aware of potential occupational health and safety hazards posed by these treatment devices and photosensitizing agents administered to patients. Materials and methods: Here we outline and identify pertinent health and safety considerations to be taken by healthcare staff during PDT procedures. Results: Physical hazards (for example, non-ionizing radiation generated by the light-emitting device, with potential for skin and eye exposure) and chemical hazards (including the photosensitizing agents administered to patients that have the potential for exposure via skin, subcutaneous, ingestion, or inhalation routes) must be considered for safe use of PDT by the healthcare professional. Conclusions: Engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment controls are recommendations for the safe use and handling of PDT agents and light-emitting technologies. PMID:23859750

  7. Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Delirium ­ Care, aneurysm, dementia) h. Acute psychiatric disorders, particularly depression, and other affective disorders

  8. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daniel SS; Lim, Choon Guan; Wong, John Chee Meng; Ng, Koon Hock; Cheok, Christopher Cheng Soon; Kiing, Jennifer Sie Hee; Chong, Shang Chee; Lou, June; Daniel, Mary Lourdes; Ong, Desmond; Low, Charity; Aljunied, Sharifah Mariam; Choi, Pui Meng; Mehrotra, Kala; Kee, Carolyn; Leung, Ivy; Yen, Lee Chen; Wong, Geraldine; Lee, Poh Yin; Chin, Bella; Ng, Hwee Chien

    2014-01-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and the Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for ADHD. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on ADHD, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:25189301

  9. Development of Hypertension Management Mobile Application based on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Park, H A

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop and evaluate a mobile application for hypertension management based on Clinical Practice Guidelines. The application was developed according to Web-Roadmap methodology. In planning phase, we defined the tasks and product of each phase, selected clinical practice guidelines and extracted intervention items for hypertension management. In analysis phase, we analysed intervention items and made data dictionary, rules, use-case diagram, hypertension management ontology and tailored recommendations for the application. In design phase, we developed an entity-relations diagram, algorithm, and user interface and coded them in the implementation phase. In evaluation phase, first, the knowledge-base was evaluated for its accuracy by experts and they proposed three more detailed recommendations, which were added to the application. Second, mobile heuristics were evaluated. The evaluators pointed out 33 usability-related problems on mobile heuristics items. Out of these, three problems were solved by reflecting evaluators' comments. PMID:25991219

  10. [Clinical practice guideline on bipolar disorder: drug and psychosocial therapy. Asociación Española de Neuropsiquiatría].

    PubMed

    Bravo, Maria Fe; Lahera, Guillermo; Lalucat, Lluis; Fernández-Liria, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic and recurrent mood disorder, which may severely impact on the patient's global functioning. It has been estimated that approximately 1.6% of the population is affected. A long delay in diagnosis and an excessive disparity in the treatment of these patients have been detected. Within the Quality Plan of the Spanish National Health System, one of the key strategies is to improve clinical practice through the development and use of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). In this context, the CPG on bipolar disorder arises from an agreement between the Ministry of Health and the University of Alcalá, involving the Spanish Association of Neuropsychiatry as developer and project manager. Its main objective is to develop recommendations on the diagnostic, therapeutic and rehabilitative care for patients with bipolar disorder, primarily applicable in the public mental health services. In this paper we present the main recommendations on pharmacological and psychosocial interventions in bipolar disorder. PMID:23891130

  11. Best Clinical Practices for Male Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: “Do No Harm”

    PubMed Central

    Gallo-Silver, Les; Anderson, Christopher M; Romo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The health care literature describes treatment challenges and recommended alterations in practice procedures for female survivors of childhood sexual abuse, a subtype of adverse childhood experiences. Currently, there are no concomitant recommendations for best clinical practices for male survivors of childhood sexual abuse or other adverse clinical experiences. Anecdotal information suggests ways physicians can address the needs of adult male survivors of childhood sexual abuse by changes in communication, locus of control, and consent/permission before and during physical examinations and procedures. The intent of this article is to act as a catalyst for improved patient care and more research focused on the identification and optimal responses to the needs of men with adverse childhood experiences in the health care setting. PMID:25106042

  12. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mauro Giovanni Carta; Matteo Balestrieri; Andrea Murru; Maria Carolina Hardoy

    Background: Adjustment Disorder is a condition strongly tied to acute and chronic stress. Despite clinical suggestion of a large prevalence in the general population and the high frequency of its diagnosis in the clinical settings, there has been relatively little research reported and, consequently, very few hints about its treatments. Methods: the authors gathered old and current information on the

  13. Recommended practice for earthquake resistant design of medium and low pressure gas pipelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Saito; T. Katayama; N. Nishio

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the Recommended Practice for Earthquake Resistant Design of Medium and Low Pressure Gas Pipeline. It proposes the method of judging earthquake resistance of pipeline by evaluating the degree of flexibility of an arbitrary pipeline element under two types of simplified ground displacements - horizontal and vertical displacements. The degree of flexibility is expressed in terms of the

  14. SOLAR MAGNETIC TRACKING. I. SOFTWARE COMPARISON AND RECOMMENDED PRACTICES C. E. DeForest

    E-print Network

    DeForest, Craig

    SOLAR MAGNETIC TRACKING. I. SOFTWARE COMPARISON AND RECOMMENDED PRACTICES C. E. DeForest Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 400, Boulder, CO 80302; deforest@boulder.swri.edu H. J & Deforest 2003) is intended to drive semi- empirical MHD models of the quiet Sun, and YAFTA (Welsch

  15. Recommended Practices for Promoting Physical Activity in Early Childhood Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Paul M.; Stork, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although the importance of physical development as an integrated part of early childhood education is well understood, many early childhood teachers lack the specific background and training in this area. To fill this gap, this article presents a framework of recommended practices and a corresponding assessment tool. The Head Start Body Start…

  16. Information sheets and informed consent forms for clinical study participants: towards standardised recommendations?

    PubMed

    Chassany, Olivier; Bernard-Harlaut, Micheline; Guy, Gilles; Billon, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Subjects taking part in biomedical research must be provided with legible and intelligible information enabling them to freely give their informed consent. At present, sponsors tend to provide many different types of information, not all of which is directly connected with or indeed really informative about studies for those taking part.As a result of this observation, a round table was convened during the Clinical Pharmacology meetings to deliberate on the creation of a charter concerning the drafting of information documents for biomedical research participants as well as a code of good practice for the preparation of such documents.Recommendations were made based on the efforts of the various working groups concerned, such as the French National Conference of Ethics Committees (CNCP), users' representatives, patients associations and the French industrial and institutional sponsors association (CPI), together with proposals contained in the literature.The deliberations of the round table may be subsumed under the following 3 categories and 14 points: 1) Format: design, drafting rules, layout, table of contents, glossary. 2) CONTENT: introductory page, description of the study, risks, benefits. 3) Regulatory aspects: legal aspects, CNIL message (data protection), financial aspects, conflict of interests, model and varied signatures. This document should help make research in France more attractive and it was decided after the Clinical Pharmacology meeting to submit the charter and related documents for approval by the various actors involved: DGS (Direction Générale de la Santé), Afssaps (Agence Française de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé), CNCP, CPI and LEEM (Les entreprises du médicament). Once the charter has been validated, it will be made available to Sponsors and Ethics Committees in order to ensure greater uniformity and legibility regarding information given to study subjects. PMID:19671429

  17. Application of Recommended Design Practices for Conceptual Nuclear Fusion Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Craig H.

    2004-01-01

    An AIAA Special Project Report was recently produced by AIAA's Nuclear and Future Flight Propulsion Technical Committee and is currently in peer review. The Report provides recommended design practices for conceptual engineering studies of nuclear fusion space propulsion systems. Discussion and recommendations are made on key topics including design reference missions, degree of technological extrapolation and concomitant risk, thoroughness in calculating mass properties (nominal mass properties, weight-growth contingency and propellant margins, and specific impulse), and thoroughness in calculating power generation and usage (power-flow, power contingencies, specific power). The report represents a general consensus of the nuclear fusion space propulsion system conceptual design community and proposes 15 recommendations. This paper expands on the Report by providing specific examples illustrating how to apply each of the recommendations.

  18. Copper Intrauterine Device for Emergency Contraception: Clinical Practice Among Contraceptive Providers

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Cynthia C.; Speidel, J. Joseph; Drey, Eleanor A.; Trussell, James; Blum, Maya; Darney, Philip D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The copper intrauterine device (IUD) is the most effective emergency contraceptive available but is largely ignored in clinical practice. We examined clinicians’ recommendation of the copper IUD for emergency contraception in a setting with few cost obstacles. Methods We conducted a survey among clinicians (n=1,246; response rate 65%) in a California State family planning program, where U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved contraceptives are available at no cost to low-income women. We used multivariable logistic regression to measure the association of intrauterine contraceptive training and evidence-based knowledge with having recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception. Results The large majority of clinicians (85%) never recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception, and most (93%) required two or more visits for an IUD insertion. Multivariable analyses showed insertion skills were associated with having recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception, but the most significant factor was evidence-based knowledge of patient selection for IUD use. Clinicians who viewed a wide range of patients as IUD candidates were twice as likely to have recommended the copper IUD for emergency contraception. While over 93% of obstetrician–gynecologists were skilled in inserting the copper IUD, they were no more likely to have recommended it for emergency contraception than other physicians or advance practice clinicians. Conclusion Recommendation of the copper IUD for emergency contraception is rare, despite its high efficacy and long-lasting contraceptive benefits. Recommendation would require clinic flow and scheduling adjustments to allow same-day IUD insertions. Patient-centered and high-quality care for emergency contraception should include a discussion of the most effective method. PMID:22270272

  19. Cancer and thrombosis: implications of published guidelines for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Khorana, A A

    2009-10-01

    Cancer is a frequent finding in patients with thrombosis, and thrombosis is much more prevalent in patients with cancer, with important clinical consequences. Thrombosis is the second most common cause of death in cancer patients. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer is also associated with a high rate of recurrence, bleeding, a requirement for long-term anticoagulation, and worsened quality of life. Risk factors for cancer-associated VTE include particular cancer types, chemotherapy (with or without antiangiogenic agents), the use of erythropoietin-stimulating agents, the presence of central venous catheters, and surgery. Novel risk factors include platelet and leukocyte counts and tissue factor. A risk model for identifying cancer patients at highest risk for VTE has recently been developed. Anticoagulant therapy is safe and efficacious for prophylaxis and treatment of VTE in patients with cancer. Available anticoagulants include warfarin, heparin, and low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs). LMWHs represent the preferred therapeutic option for VTE prophylaxis and treatment. Their use may be associated with improved survival in cancer, although this issue requires further study. Despite the significant burden imposed by VTE and the availability of effective anticoagulant therapies, many oncology patients do not receive appropriate VTE prophylaxis as recommended by practice guidelines. Improved adherence to guidelines could substantially reduce morbidity, decrease resource use, enhance quality of life, and improve survival in these patients. PMID:19561038

  20. Implementing clinical outcomes assessment in everyday school mental health practice.

    PubMed

    Bohnenkamp, Jill Haak; Glascoe, Tracy; Gracey, Kathy A; Epstein, Richard A; Benningfield, Margaret M

    2015-04-01

    Evidence-based assessment (EBA) has been shown to improve clinical outcomes, but this practice is frequently not implemented in school mental health practice. This article reviews potential barriers to implementation and offers practical strategies for addressing these challenges. Several valid and reliable tools for assessment are reviewed, and information is provided on clinical use. Case examples of EBA implementation in school mental health settings are provided to illustrate how these tools can be used in everyday practice by school mental health clinicians. PMID:25773332

  1. Amyloid imaging for dementia in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, John T; Herholz, Karl

    2015-01-01

    In vivo imaging of brain amyloid using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is widely used in research studies of dementia, with three amyloid PET ligands being licenced for clinical use. The main clinical use of PET is to help confirm or exclude the likely diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in challenging cases, where diagnostic uncertainty remains after current clinical and investigative work up. Whilst diagnostically valuable in such select cases, much wider clinical adoption, especially for very early disease, will be limited by both cost and the lack of a currently effective disease-modifying treatment that requires such early case identification. The use of amyloid imaging to appropriately stratify subjects for prognostic studies and therapeutic trials should increase the efficiency and potentially shorten the time of such studies, and its use combined with other biomarkers and genetics will likely lead to new ways of defining and classifying the dementias. PMID:26170121

  2. Family building using donated gametes and embryos in the UK: recommendations for policy and practice on behalf of the British Infertility Counselling Association and the British Fertility Society in collaboration with the Association of Clinical Embryologists and the Royal College of Nurses Fertility Nurses Forum.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Ruth; McTavish, Alison; Crawshaw, Marilyn

    2014-03-01

    The UK Department of Health's consultation on the future of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) presented an opportunity to review current practice in relation to donor conception (DC) and make recommendations for improving services to those seeking fertility treatment, to families with donor conceived children and those of donors, and to those seeking later information. The year 2023 marks the start of post-2005 donor conceived adults having statutory access to identifying information about their donor(s); some adults with pre-2005 donors will have access sooner if the donor(s) re-registers as 'willing to be identified'. This paper examines current practice in UK licensed treatment centres in collecting and disseminating donor information and in supporting donors and prospective parents. Further, it considers current HFEA functions concerning DC including its responsibilities for the Register of Information and Donor Sibling Link and its approach to policy making, regulation and the release of information from these Registers to applicants. Proposals for how these functions could be carried out in the future are set out together with recommendations for national support and intermediary services. The key evidence available to support these recommendations is outlined. PMID:24329028

  3. Primary Care Physicians’ Cancer Screening Recommendation Practices and Perceptions of Cancer Risk of Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians’ perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information. PMID:23679307

  4. Recommended Screening and Preventive Practices for Long-term Survivors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Lee, Stephanie J; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda J; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri- and post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:22178693

  5. Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet Singh; Rizzo, James Douglas; Lee, Stephanie Joi; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda Jean; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John Reid; Tichelli, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, periand post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:23049402

  6. Recommended Screening and Preventive Practices for Long-term Survivors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Lee, Stephanie J; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda J; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri- and post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:22446607

  7. Recommended Screening and Preventive Practices for Long-term Survivors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Rizzo, J Douglas; Lee, Stephanie J; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bonfim, Carmem; Burns, Linda J; Chaudhri, Naeem; Davies, Stella; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Seber, Adriana; Socie, Gerard; Szer, Jeff; Lint, Maria Teresa Van; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) technology and supportive care techniques have led to improvements in long-term survival after HCT. Emerging indications for transplantation, introduction of newer graft sources (e.g. umbilical cord blood) and transplantation of older patients using less intense conditioning regimens have also contributed to an increase in the number of HCT survivors. These survivors are at risk for developing late complications secondary to pre-, peri- and post-transplant exposures and risk-factors. Guidelines for screening and preventive practices for HCT survivors were published in 2006. An international group of transplant experts was convened in 2011 to review contemporary literature and update the recommendations while considering the changing practice of transplantation and international applicability of these guidelines. This review provides the updated recommendations for screening and preventive practices for pediatric and adult survivors of autologous and allogeneic HCT. PMID:22395764

  8. Breast tomosynthesis in clinical practice: initial results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hendrik J. Teertstra; Claudette E. Loo; Maurice A. A. J. van den Bosch; Harm van Tinteren; Emiel J. T. Rutgers; Sara H. Muller; Kenneth G. A. Gilhuijs

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential value of tomosynthesis in women with an abnormal screening mammogram\\u000a or with clinical symptoms. Mammography and tomosynthesis investigations of 513 woman with an abnormal screening mammogram\\u000a or with clinical symptoms were prospectively classified according to the ACR BI-RADS criteria. Sensitivity and specificity\\u000a of both techniques for the detection of cancer

  9. Schools as Clinics: Learning about Practice in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Robin; Rong, Yuhang

    2014-01-01

    The Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut is committed to the intentionality of interweaving course work and practice in its 5-year teacher preparation program, the Integrated Bachelor's and Master's program. It offers a wide range of field experiences to teacher candidates. Teacher candidates enter the program at the…

  10. Children and Youth with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Summary of Intervention Recommendations after Clinical Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirikowic, Tracy; Gelo, Julie; Astley, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) present with a wide range of developmental disabilities; however, clinical standards of care after a diagnosis are not well established. This retrospective review summarizes the types of intervention recommendations generated by an interdisciplinary FASD diagnostic team for 120 children ages…

  11. Evidence-based recommendations for the clinical use of recombinant human erythropoietin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman Muirhead; Joanne Bargman; Ellen Burgess; Kailash K. Jindal; Adeera Levin; Linda Nolin; Patrick Parfrey

    1995-01-01

    In an era of increasing scrutiny regarding use of health care resources, it is critical that physicians have rational, evidence-based guidelines for treatment decisions. This review of more than 200 published papers constitutes a comprehensive approach to evaluating the current evidence regarding the clinical use of recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in renal failure patients. After this review, specific recommendations are

  12. Integrating Clinical Practice Guidelines into Daily Practice: Impact of an Interactive Workshop on Drafting of a Written Action Plan for Asthma Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labelle, Martin; Beaulieu, Michele; Renzi, Paolo; Rahme, Elham; Thivierge, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Written action plans (WAPs) are instructions that enable asthmatics to manage their condition appropriately and are recommended by current asthma clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). However, general practitioners (GPs) rarely draft WAPs for their patients. An interactive, case-based workshop for asthma, combined with an objective…

  13. Agomelatine: clinical experience and adherence to EMA recommendations for a novel antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, C; Morris, M

    2013-02-01

    In 2009, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) granted marketing authorisation for the novel antidepressant agomelatine, with the recommendation that liver function tests (LFTs) are checked before, and 6, 12 and 24 weeks after, commencing the drug. This paper describes early clinical experience with agomelatine and audits physician adherence to EMA recommendations. A retrospective review of patients attending general adult psychiatry services in Carlow /Kilkenny (catchment population 120,000) over one year was performed. 62 patients were prescribed agomelatine. 32 patients (52%) had unipolar depression, and 43 (73%) were already established on antidepressant medication. 60 patients (97%) had LFTs measured before starting treatment with agomelatine, but half of patients (47%) did not have further LFTs as recommended. To increase adherence to EMA recommendations and ensure optimal patient safety, existing barriers to effective monitoring must be addressed. PMID:23472387

  14. Prevention of herpes zoster: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rafael; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Seward, Jane F

    2008-06-01

    These recommendations represent the first statement by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) on the use of a live attenuated vaccine for the prevention of herpes zoster (zoster) (i.e., shingles) and its sequelae, which was licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on May 25, 2006. This report summarizes the epidemiology of zoster and its sequelae, describes the zoster vaccine, and provides recommendations for its use among adults aged > or =60 years in the United States. Zoster is a localized, generally painful cutaneous eruption that occurs most frequently among older adults and immunocompromised persons. It is caused by reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) decades after initial VZV infection is established. Approximately one in three persons will develop zoster during their lifetime, resulting in an estimated 1 million episodes in the United States annually. A common complication of zoster is postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a chronic, often debilitating pain condition that can last months or even years. The risk for PHN in patients with zoster is 10%-18%. Another complication of zoster is eye involvement, which occurs in 10%-25% of zoster episodes and can result in prolonged or permanent pain, facial scarring, and loss of vision. Approximately 3% of patients with zoster are hospitalized; many of these episodes involved persons with one or more immunocompromising conditions. Deaths attributable to zoster are uncommon among persons who are not immunocompromised. Prompt treatment with the oral antiviral agents acyclovir, valacyclovir, and famciclovir decreases the severity and duration of acute pain from zoster. Additional pain control can be achieved in certain patients by supplementing antiviral agents with corticosteroids and with analgesics. Established PHN can be managed in certain patients with analgesics, tricyclic antidepressants, and other agents. Licensed zoster vaccine is a lyophilized preparation of a live, attenuated strain of VZV, the same strain used in the varicella vaccines. However, its minimum potency is at least 14-times the potency of single-antigen varicella vaccine. In a large clinical trial, zoster vaccine was partially efficacious at preventing zoster. It also was partially efficacious at reducing the severity and duration of pain and at preventing PHN among those developing zoster. Zoster vaccine is recommended for all persons aged > or =60 years who have no contraindications, including persons who report a previous episode of zoster or who have chronic medical conditions. The vaccine should be offered at the patient's first clinical encounter with his or her health-care provider. It is administered as a single 0.65 mL dose subcutaneously in the deltoid region of the arm. A booster dose is not licensed for the vaccine. Zoster vaccination is not indicated to treat acute zoster, to prevent persons with acute zoster from developing PHN, or to treat ongoing PHN. Before administration of zoster vaccine, patients do not need to be asked about their history of varicella (chickenpox) or to have serologic testing conducted to determine varicella immunity. PMID:18528318

  15. Development of Clinical Practice Standards for Nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce Waterman Taylor

    1991-01-01

    Nursing, with leadership from the American Nurses Association (ANA), has a long-standing com mitment to the development of standards. The first nursing practice standards were published in 1973. Since that time, both the ANA and specialty nursing organizations have developed standards. However, the proliferation of standards, reflecting a wide di vergence of intent, format, and scope, has limited their usefulness.

  16. A manifesto for clinical pharmacology from principles to practice

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2010-01-01

    1 This is a manifesto for UK clinical pharmacology. 2 A clinical pharmacologist is a medically qualified practitioner who teaches, does research, frames policy, and gives information and advice about the actions and proper uses of medicines in humans and implements that knowledge in clinical practice. Those without medical qualifications who practise some aspect of clinical pharmacology could be described as, say, ‘applied pharmacologists’. 3 Clinical pharmacology is operationally defined as a translational discipline in terms of the basic tools of human pharmacology (e.g. receptor pharmacology) and applied pharmacology (e.g. pharmacokinetics) and how they are used in drug discovery and development and in solving practical therapeutic problems in individuals and populations. 4 Clinical pharmacologists are employed by universities, health-care services, private organizations (such as drug companies), and regulatory agencies. They are • mentors and teachers, teaching laboratory science, clinical science, and all aspects of practical drug therapy as underpinned by the science of pharmacology; they write and edit didactic and reference texts; • researchers, covering research described by the operational definition; • clinicians, practising general medicine, clinical toxicology, other medical specialties, and general practice; • policy makers, framing local, national, and international medicines policy, including formularies, licensing of medicines and prescribing policies. 5 The future of clinical pharmacology depends on the expansion and maintenance of a central core of practitioners (employed by universities or health-care services), training clinical pharmacologists to practise in universities, health-care services, private organizations, and regulatory agencies, and training other clinicians in the principles and practice of clinical pharmacology. PMID:20642541

  17. Evidence-Based Diagnosis: Incorporating Diagnostic Instruments into Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doss, Amanda Jensen

    2005-01-01

    This article is intended to serve as a practical guide for practitioners interested in incorporating evidence-based diagnosis (EBD) instruments into their clinical practices to refine the diagnostic process. Three measures are used to illustrate this process, the DISC-IV (Shaffer et al., 2000), the Schedule for Affective Disorders and…

  18. Integration of Evidence-Based Practice into the University Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    The author explains different principles, which can be used for the integration of evidence-based practice into the university clinic. Research literature, systematic reviews and practice guidelines are shown to work as the evidence for the teachers, as well as the students.

  19. [From clinical practice evaluation programme to relevant transfusions].

    PubMed

    Devie, I

    2010-12-01

    Clinical practice evaluation programme is now a mandatory process for healthcare institutions. Integrative part of the certification procedures conducted by the French National Health Agency (Haute Autorité de Santé [HAS]), it has became a new major approach to improve both the quality and the safety of healthcare. It concerns also transfusional practices. PMID:21051265

  20. Practical oral sedation in dentistry. Part II--Clinical application of various oral sedatives and discussion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Winston I

    2006-09-01

    This article presents a practical approach for safe oral sedation in the dental practice. When used properly, oral sedation can provide comfort and a calming treatment environment for patients whose fear inhibits them from securing needed dental care. In Part I, the authors provided information on medico-legal aspects of sedation, patient treatment recommendations, counseling, evaluation, monitoring, documentation, and proper discharge procedures. In this part, the reliable sedatives that have undergone years of clinical trials and have good records of safety and predictable results are presented. For each sedative, the description, formulation and dosage, onset, duration of sedation, and side effects are discussed. PMID:17052039

  1. Utility of Structured Care Approaches in Education and Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Eileen S.; Dluhy, Nancy M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes structured care approaches, such as protocols, clinical pathways, and algorithms, which are being used increasingly to organize clinical knowledge and guide patient care. Reviews the types of structured care approaches available to the clinician and explores the value of structured care approaches in practice and education. (Contains 32…

  2. Clinical interview methods in mathematics education research and practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert P. Hunting

    1997-01-01

    Use of clinical interview methods in mathematics education research and as an assessment strategy in the mathematics classroom are contrasted. Differences and similarities between roles of researcher and practitioner are outlined. Uses of clinical interviews in research and practice are discussed by focusing on issues of how one prepares to administer an interview, kinds of tasks found to be most

  3. An Invitation to Social Workers in Clinical/Interpersonal Practice

    E-print Network

    Cinabro, David

    An Invitation to Social Workers in Clinical/Interpersonal Practice You are cordially invited:00 pm-7:00 pm Wayne State University Campus Alumni House 441 Ferry Mall Detroit, Michigan 48202 At this informal social gathering Dean Vroom will briefly describe a proposed new clinical track within the current

  4. Clinical practice guidelines for mild traumatic brain injury and persistent symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Shawn; Bayley, Mark; McCullagh, Scott; Velikonja, Diana; Berrigan, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To outline new guidelines for the management of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and persistent postconcussive symptoms (PPCS) in order to provide information and direction to physicians managing patients’ recovery from MTBI. Quality of evidence A search for existing clinical practice guidelines addressing MTBI and a systematic review of the literature evaluating treatment of PPCS were conducted. Because little guidance on the management of PPCS was found within the traumatic brain injury field, a second search was completed for clinical practice guidelines and systematic reviews that addressed management of these common symptoms in the general population. Health care professionals representing a range of disciplines from across Canada and abroad were brought together at an expert consensus conference to review the existing guidelines and evidence and to attempt to develop a comprehensive guideline for the management of MTBI and PPCS. Main message A modified Delphi process was used to create 71 recommendations that address the diagnosis and management of MTBI and PPCS. In addition, numerous resources and tools were included in the guideline to aid in the implementation of the recommendations. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline was developed to aid health care professionals in implementing evidence-based, best-practice care for the challenging population of individuals who experience PPCS following MTBI. PMID:22518895

  5. 'Bench to behavior': translating comparative effectiveness research into improved clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Avorn, Jerry; Fischer, Michael

    2010-10-01

    The new national emphasis on comparative effectiveness research is likely to generate an unprecedented volume of new findings. It is essential to anticipate the obstacles that front-line health care professionals will face in translating these results into better clinical decision making. We review the current barriers to the dissemination of evidence-based clinical recommendations, including problems with continuing medical education, provider incentives, and quality assurance. We then propose solutions, including more effective educational outreach programs, requirements for practitioners to master important findings, and alignment of incentives to encourage evidence-based practice. Such strategies can lead to policies that could encourage the uptake of new comparative effectiveness data and encourage their translation into better clinical practice. PMID:20921491

  6. Implementation of a clinical workstation for general practice.

    PubMed

    Lovell, N H; Celler, B G

    1995-01-01

    It is now well recognized that achieving international best practice in the primary health sector will require the development of methods based on a fundamental integration of communications and information technologies with clinical practice. This will have far reaching effects, both on the pattern of medical practice and domiciliary care and on patient outcomes. In the past, information and communications technology has been presented as a tool for management, rather than as a tool for supporting, improving, and making more efficient the professional practice of medicine and the delivery of health care to the patient and the community. In this paper, we propose that an essential element for the achievement of international best practice in the health sector is the development and widespread use of information, measurement, and communications technology targeted towards the clinical practice of medicine, the provision of health services and domiciliary care in the community, and the analysis of morbidity patterns and health care outcomes. A key element of this strategy is the development of an integrated Clinical Workstation specifically designed for the general practitioner, practice nurses, and domiciliary care nurses in their professional tasks of measurement, diagnosis, management, and delivery of health care to the community. We will present our work on the design of an integrated Clinical Workstation for Primary Health Care. The Workstation is Windows based, has a sophisticated user interface, and supports a wide range of computing platforms, from desktop to laptop to hand-held notebook computers. The Workstation will be modular and expandable, both in its software and hardware components, so that users may select only those modules appropriate to their own roles, clinical practice, and levels of expertise. The design will focus on the provision of clinical services and will integrate the following key components: Patient records and basic practice management; Clinical records. Based on ICD10, ICPC, or Read Code classifications; Clinical measurements. Blood pressure, spirometry, ECG, and basic hematology and biochemistry; Clinical decision support. Based on epidemiologic data, protocols, and medical expert systems; Domiciliary care and evaluation of the functional health status of the elderly; Communications and networks. Wireless LAN, modem, and fax; Clinical reporting. Morbidity profiles prescribing profiles, and laboratory services and procedures. Implementation of these requirements will ultimately take the form of an untethered, portable notepad computer supporting a communications link via modem, LAN, or wireless LAN, and removable instrumentation and clinical measurement modules. PMID:8591325

  7. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. PMID:23664251

  8. Yellow Fever Vaccine Booster Doses: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2015.

    PubMed

    Staples, J Erin; Bocchini, Joseph A; Rubin, Lorry; Fischer, Marc

    2015-06-19

    On February 26, 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted that a single primary dose of yellow fever vaccine provides long-lasting protection and is adequate for most travelers. ACIP also approved recommendations for at-risk laboratory personnel and certain travelers to receive additional doses of yellow fever vaccine (Box). The ACIP Japanese Encephalitis and Yellow Fever Vaccines Workgroup evaluated published and unpublished data on yellow fever vaccine immunogenicity and safety. The evidence for benefits and risks associated with yellow fever vaccine booster doses was evaluated using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) framework. This report summarizes the evidence considered by ACIP and provides the updated recommendations for yellow fever vaccine booster doses. PMID:26086636

  9. Genomics in the renal clinic - translating nephrogenetics for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mallett, Andrew; Corney, Christopher; McCarthy, Hugh; Alexander, Stephen I; Healy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic Renal Disease (GRD) presents to mainstream clinicians as a mixture of kidney-specific as well as multi-organ entities, many with highly variable phenotype-genotype relationships. The rapid increase in knowledge and reduced cost of sequencing translate to new and additional approaches to clinical care. Specifically, genomic technologies to test for known genes, the development of pathways to research potential new genes and the collection of registry data on patients with mutations allow better prediction of outcomes. The aim of such approaches is to maximise personal and health-system utility from genomics for those affected by nephrogenetic disorders. PMID:26104748

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation: Current Capabilities, Recommended Practices, and Future Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rizzetta, Donald P.; Fureby, Christer

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an activity by the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Working Group of the AIAA Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee to (1) address the current capabilities of LES, (2) outline recommended practices and key considerations for using LES, and (3) identify future research needs to advance the capabilities and reliability of LES for analysis of turbulent flows. To address the current capabilities and future needs, a survey comprised of eleven questions was posed to LES Working Group members to assemble a broad range of perspectives on important topics related to LES. The responses to these survey questions are summarized with the intent not to be a comprehensive dictate on LES, but rather the perspective of one group on some important issues. A list of recommended practices is also provided, which does not treat all aspects of a LES, but provides guidance on some of the key areas that should be considered.

  11. Recommendations for diagnosis of shiga toxin--producing Escherichia coli infections by clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gould, L Hannah; Bopp, Cheryl; Strockbine, Nancy; Atkinson, Robyn; Baselski, Vickie; Body, Barbara; Carey, Roberta; Crandall, Claudia; Hurd, Sharon; Kaplan, Ray; Neill, Marguerite; Shea, Shari; Somsel, Patricia; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Griffin, Patricia M; Gerner-Smidt, Peter

    2009-10-16

    Shiga toxin--producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a leading cause of bacterial enteric infections in the United States. Prompt, accurate diagnosis of STEC infection is important because appropriate treatment early in the course of infection might decrease the risk for serious complications such as renal damage and improve overall patient outcome. In addition, prompt laboratory identification of STEC strains is essential for detecting new and emerging serotypes, for effective and timely outbreak responses and control measures, and for monitoring trends in disease epidemiology. Guidelines for laboratory identification of STEC infections by clinical laboratories were published in 2006. This report provides comprehensive and detailed recommendations for STEC testing by clinical laboratories, including the recommendation that all stools submitted for routine testing from patients with acute community-acquired diarrhea (regardless of patient age, season of the year, or presence or absence of blood in the stool) be simultaneously cultured for E. coli O157:H7 (O157 STEC) and tested with an assay that detects Shiga toxins to detect non-O157 STEC. The report also includes detailed procedures for specimen selection, handling, and transport; a review of culture and nonculture tests for STEC detection; and clinical considerations and recommendations for management of patients with STEC infection. Improving the diagnostic accuracy of STEC infection by clinical laboratories should ensure prompt diagnosis and treatment of these infections in patients and increase detection of STEC outbreaks in the community. PMID:19834454

  12. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: secondary prevention of stroke guidelines, update 2014.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shelagh B; Wein, Theodore H; Lindsay, M Patrice; Buck, Brian; Cote, Robert; Ellis, Paul; Foley, Norine; Hill, Michael D; Jaspers, Sharon; Jin, Albert Y; Kwiatkowski, Brenda; MacPhail, Carolyn; McNamara-Morse, Dana; McMurtry, Michael S; Mysak, Tania; Pipe, Andrew; Silver, Karen; Smith, Eric E; Gubitz, Gord

    2015-04-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. The 2014 update of the Canadian Secondary Prevention of Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based recommendations for clinicians in a range of settings, who provide care to patients following stroke. Notable changes in this 5th edition include an emphasis on treating the highest risk patients who present within 48 h of symptom onset with transient or persistent motor or speech symptoms, who need to be transported to the closest emergency department with capacity for advanced stroke care; a recommendation for brain and vascular imaging (of the intra- and extracranial vessels) to be completed urgently using computed tomography/computed tomography angiography; prolonged cardiac monitoring for patients with suspective cardioembolic stroke but without evidence for atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram or holter monitoring; and de-emphasizing the need for routine echocardiogram. The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations include a range of supporting materials such as implementation resources to facilitate the adoption of evidence to practice, and related performance measures to enable monitoring of uptake and effectiveness of the recommendations using a standardized approach. The guidelines further emphasize the need for a systems approach to stroke care, involving an interprofessional team, with access to specialists regardless of patient location, and the need to overcome geographical barriers to ensure equity in access within a universal health-care system. PMID:25535808

  13. Recommended Practice for Pressure Measurements and Calculation of Effective Pumping Speeds During Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; Walker, Mitchell; Swiatek, Michael W.; Yim, John T.

    2013-01-01

    The electric propulsion community has been implored to establish and implement a set of universally applicable test standards during the research, development, and qualification of electric propulsion systems. Variability between facility-to-facility and more importantly ground-to-flight performance can result in large margins in application or aversion to mission infusion. Performance measurements and life testing under appropriate conditions can be costly and lengthy. Measurement practices must be consistent, accurate, and repeatable. Additionally, the measurements must be universally transportable across facilities throughout the development, qualification, spacecraft integration, and on-orbit performance. A recommended practice for making pressure measurements, pressure diagnostics, and calculating effective pumping speeds with justification is presented.

  14. Low Impact Development Practices: A Review of Current Research and Recommendations for Future Directions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E. Dietz

    2007-01-01

    The low impact development (LID) approach has been recommended as an alternative to traditional stormwater design. Research\\u000a on individual LID practices such as bioretention, pervious pavements, and grassed swales has increased in recent years. Bioretention\\u000a cells have been effective in retaining large volumes of runoff and pollutants on site, and consistently reduced concentrations\\u000a of certain pollutants such as metals. However,

  15. From the field to the web: implementing best-practice recommendations in documentary linguistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans Christian Boas

    2006-01-01

    New methods of documenting languages with digital technologies has led to a multitude of different formats that are difficult\\u000a to reuse over time. To overcome the problems surrounding the portability of digital language documentation, linguists are\\u000a in the process of formulating best-practice recommendations to increase the likelihood of their work's long-term survival.\\u000a This paper describes the implementation of a comprehensive

  16. Practice of home hemodialysis in dialysis clinic.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Kobin

    2012-01-01

    The number of dialysis patients in Japan was approximately 300,000 at the end of 2010. Among these patients, however, the number of those undergoing home hemodialysis (HHD) was only 279 (<0.1 %). It is clear that HHD is a superior treatment to in-center hemodialysis, because of the unlimited frequency and time of HHD, as well as its association with a higher QOL and greater improvement in complications (e.g. hypertension). However, there are still many challenges to be overcome in order to disseminate HHD. It has yet to become widely available, partially because of low-level recognition among dialysis patients and healthcare workers providing dialysis, rather than problems regarding medical technologies and the economy. Of the 16 HHD patients in this center, 10 are practicing overnight hemodialysis, and they are extremely satisfied with its advantages: prolonged treatment yields a better health condition, the dialysis time seems shorter than 1 h by practicing it during hours that include the sleeping time, their complexion becomes as favorable as that of healthy persons, their itchy sensation resolves, they feel as if their physical conditions have returned to a normal level, and their QOL surprisingly increases. Training for HHD is conducted in the dialysis unit along with other patients receiving dialysis treatment (three times a week). Such training lasts for approximately 3 months, during which time patients continue their work. After the initiation of HHD at home, patients and their caregivers can contact our center staff with a cellular phone at any time so they do not need to feel anxious. We hope that many patients will practice HHD in order to resume an active daily life. PMID:22613925

  17. Digital breast tomosynthesis and the challenges of implementing an emerging breast cancer screening technology into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Lehman, Constance D

    2013-12-01

    Emerging imaging technologies, including digital breast tomosynthesis, have the potential to transform breast cancer screening. However, the rapid adoption of these new technologies outpaces the evidence of their clinical and cost-effectiveness. The authors describe the forces driving the rapid diffusion of tomosynthesis into clinical practice, comparing it with the rapid diffusion of digital mammography shortly after its introduction. They outline the potential positive and negative effects that adoption can have on imaging workflow and describe the practice management challenges when incorporating tomosynthesis. The authors also provide recommendations for collecting evidence supporting the development of policies and best practices. PMID:24295940

  18. Optical coherence tomography: potentialities in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhov, Andrey; Terentjeva, Anna; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Streltzova, Olga; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Myakov, Alex

    2004-08-01

    Clinical studies using OCT involved 2000 patients in various fields of medicine such as gastroenterology, urology, laryngology, gynecology, dermatology, stomatology, etc. Layered high-contrast images were typical for benign epithelial conditions. OCT distinguish in mucosae: epithelium, connective tissue layer, and smooth-muscle layer. Various benign processes occurring in mucosa manifest in OCT images as changes in the epithelial height, scattering properties and the course of the basement membrane. Lack of the layered structural pattern is the main criterion for dysplastic / malignant images. In clinic: OCT data may be critical for choosing a tissue site for excisional biopsy, OCT can detect tumor borders and their linear dimensions, OCT can be used to plan a resection line in operations and to control adequacy of resection, to monitor whether reparative processes are timely and adequate. OCT sensitivity of the uterine cervix, urinary bladder and larynx is 82, 98, 77%, respectively, specificity - 78, 71, 96%, diagnostic accuracy - 81, 85, 87% with significantly good agreement index of clinicians kappa - 0.65, 0.79, 0.83 (confidence intervals: 0.57-0.73; 0.71-0.88; 0.74-0.91). Error in detection of high grade dysplasia and microinvasive cancer is 21.4% in average. Additional modification of OCT (cross-polarisation OCT, OCM), development of the procedure (biotissue compression, application of chemical agents) can improve the specificity and sensitivity of traditional modality.

  19. Nutritional aspects of detoxification in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cline, John C

    2015-05-01

    Detoxification is a vital cellular task that, if lacking, can lead to early morbidity and mortality. The process of detoxification involves the mobilization, biotransformation, and elimination of toxicants of exogenous and endogenous origin. This article discusses the phase I and phase II detoxification and biotransformation pathways and promotes using food to support these highly complex processes. The author identifies the comprehensive elimination diet as a useful therapeutic tool for clinicians and patients to use to achieve detoxification. Using this diet, the patient removes the most common allergenic foods and beverages from the diet and replaces them with nonallergenic choices for a period of 4 wk, gradually adding back the eliminated foods and observing their effects. Another effective clinical tool that the author discusses is the detox-focused core food plan, which identifies the variety of foods required to supply key nutrients that can maximize the effectiveness of detoxification. Finally, the author provides a case study in which these tools were used to help a patient suffering from major, debilitating illnesses that resulted from exposure to malathion, including severe vomiting and diarrhea, headaches, night sweats, severe arthralgias and myalgias, episcleritis, and shortness of breath. The article details the interventions used and the clinical results (ie, successful resolution of most issues after 3 mo). PMID:26026145

  20. Clinical Practice Guideline for Vitamin D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D and its metabolites have clinical significance because they play a critical function in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Although not all of the pathologic mechanisms have been adequately described, vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, as measured by low levels of 25-OH vitamin D, are associated with a variety of clinical conditions including osteoporosis, falls and fractures in the elderly, decreased immune function, bone pain, and possibly colon cancer and cardiovascular health.2 Apart from inadequate dietary intake, patients may present with low levels of vitamin D if they receive inadequate sunlight. The astronaut population is potentially vulnerable to low levels of vitamin D for several reasons. Firstly, they may train for long periods in Star City, Russia, which by virtue of its northern latitude receives less sunlight in winter months. Secondly, astronauts are deprived of sunlight while aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In addition, ISS crew members are exposed to microgravity for prolonged durations and are likely to develop low bone mineral density despite the use of countermeasures. Therefore, closely monitoring and maintaining adequate vitamin D levels is important for the astronaut corps.

  1. Practice nurse use of evidence in clinical practice: a descriptive survey.

    PubMed

    Prior, Patsy; Wilkinson, Jill; Neville, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    The role of practice nurses is a specific feature of the modernisation agenda of the New Zealand health service. Increasing importance is being placed on service improvement through effective decision making and enhanced clinical performance. To contribute to the development of primary health care it is crucial that nurses have the skills to appropriately implement research based and other evidence in practice. This study involved 55 West Auckland practice nurses working in the general practice setting. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practice, attitudes toward evidence-based practice and perceptions of their knowledge/skills associated with evidence-based practice. An additional aim was to determine the effect of educational preparation on practice, attitudes and knowledge/skills toward evidence-based practice. A descriptive survey design was selected for this study. The results demonstrated that nurses' attitudes toward evidence-based practice, knowledge and skills relevant to the implementation of evidence-based practice and the educational preparation of the nurses were important factors influencing the effective utilisation and application of research results in practice. Educational interventions are identified as an integral aspect of implementing evidence-based practice and enhancing practice nurses' knowledge and skill relevant to the use of evidence in practice. Further research is needed to assess the contextual factors which can inhibit or promote achievement of evidence-based practice by practice nurses. PMID:21032971

  2. NHMRC guidelines for clinical practice for ASD and PTSD.

    PubMed

    Ladd, Gary

    2008-03-01

    Dear Editor, Recently I described the case of a scuba instructor suffering from acute stress disorder (ASD), a type of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), following the death of one of her students. The treatment described was a combination of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) exposure based exercises. As it happens, in August the Australian Centre for Post Traumatic Mental Health published Australian clinical practice guidelines for ASD and PTSD. These have been endorsed by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The treatment described in the diver injury case is consistent with these guidelines. The NHMRC guidelines suggest that immediately following a traumatic episode (e.g., diver death or serious injury) the most helpful response is to offer psychological first aid. This includes providing information on traumatic stress reactions, encouraging self care and using available social support. It is recommended that the medical practitioner monitor the patient, watching for improvement, plateau or deterioration, and be ready to offer assistance or appropriate referral if needed. The guidelines recommend the use of trauma-focused psychological therapy as the first-line intervention for ASD and PTSD. EMDR, with in vivo exposure included, and CBT are considered the most effective treatments. If medication is required, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressants are considered the best choice. For the benefit and convenience of patients and practitioners, the NHMRC guidelines and a comprehensive set of information guides on ASD and PTSD are available online as pdf file downloads at http://www.acpmh.unimelb.edu.au. An update in Medical Journal of Australia provides traumatic stress information for medical practitioners including screening questions that can be used to identify patients suffering with ASD and PTSD. This article is available online at: http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/187_02_160707/for10467_fm.html. Brief articles and summary sheets specifically for divers on the subjects of traumatic stress reactions, death and panic are available at http://psychodiver.com. PMID:22692662

  3. Innovation in clinical pharmacy practice and opportunities for academic--practice partnership.

    PubMed

    Gubbins, Paul O; Micek, Scott T; Badowski, Melissa; Cheng, Judy; Gallagher, Jason; Johnson, Samuel G; Karnes, Jason H; Lyons, Kayley; Moore, Katherine G; Strnad, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has a rich history of advancing practice through innovation. These innovations helped to mold clinical pharmacy into a patient-centered discipline recognized for its contributions to improving medication therapy outcomes. However, innovations in clinical pharmacy practice have now waned. In our view, the growth of academic–practice partnerships could reverse this trend and stimulate innovation among the next generation of pioneering clinical pharmacists. Although collaboration facilitates innovation,academic institutions and health care systems/organizations are not taking full advantage of this opportunity. The academic–practice partnership can be optimized by making both partners accountable for the desired outcomes of their collaboration, fostering symbiotic relationships that promote value-added clinical pharmacy services and emphasizing continuous quality improvement in the delivery of these services. Optimizing academic–practice collaboration on a broader scale requires both partners to adopt a culture that provides for dedicated time to pursue innovation, establishes mechanisms to incubate ideas, recognizes where motivation and vision align, and supports the purpose of the partnership. With appropriate leadership and support, a shift in current professional education and training practices, and a commitment to cultivate future innovators, the academic–practice partnership can develop new and innovative practice advancements that will improve patient outcomes. PMID:24877189

  4. HIV-1 tropism testing and clinical management of CCR5 antagonists: Quebec review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Cécile; Hardy, Isabelle; Lalonde, Richard; Trottier, Benoit; Tsarevsky, Irina; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 tropism assays play a crucial role in determining the response to CCR5 receptor antagonists. Initially, phenotypic tests were used, but limited access to these tests prompted the development of alternative strategies. Recently, genotyping tropism has been validated using a Canadian technology in clinical trials investigating the use of maraviroc in both experienced and treatment-naive patients. The present guidelines review the evidence supporting the use of genotypic assays and provide recommendations regarding tropism testing in daily clinical management. PMID:24489562

  5. HIV-1 tropism testing and clinical management of CCR5 antagonists: Quebec review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Cécile; Hardy, Isabelle; Lalonde, Richard; Trottier, Benoit; Tsarevsky, Irina; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 tropism assays play a crucial role in determining the response to CCR5 receptor antagonists. Initially, phenotypic tests were used, but limited access to these tests prompted the development of alternative strategies. Recently, genotyping tropism has been validated using a Canadian technology in clinical trials investigating the use of maraviroc in both experienced and treatment-naive patients. The present guidelines review the evidence supporting the use of genotypic assays and provide recommendations regarding tropism testing in daily clinical management. PMID:24489562

  6. Development, use, and evaluation of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Harris, J S

    1997-01-01

    The development and use of practice guidelines, if framed as recommendations for best practices in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of occupationally related health concerns and disability, can improve the quality of occupational medical practice and worker health and well being. Adherence to guidelines should improve the efficiency and effectiveness of prevention, care, and disability management by reducing the present wide variance in practices and then by moving the mean or median of process and outcome statistics toward recommended levels. The information developed for guidelines can also be used for patient discussion and expectation management. Practicing in evidence-based, agreed-upon ways should also make occupational medical practices more defensible. Guidelines should be explicit, be based on a review of the available evidence and benefits vs risks, have clear medical logic, link findings to diagnosis to treatment ot prevention, be time-based, and avoid recommending unproven approaches as a last resort. If possible, they should be reviewed and tested for usability. Guidelines that start with common occupational health concerns are best suited to prevention and outpatient care, because patients present in this way. The contents of a useful occupational health guideline would include a statement of purpose and scope, the method of development; the authors' and reviewers names and affiliations; an analysis of the specificity, sensitivity, and predictive power of mechanisms of illness or injury, symptoms, signs and tests; findings that point to a serious or emergent condition requiring immediate referral or treatment; diagnostic criteria; and initial treatment, including work with the patient in a therapeutic partnership. The guideline should also present information on factors known to be associated with work, and predictors of delayed recovery. Disability-duration statistics and methods of matching job requirements with worker abilities are also helpful. Guidelines should then outline reassessment of those patients whose health concerns remain after a reasonable recovery period. The recommendations should again be evidence-based and conform to the other attributes listed above. A discussion of management after reassessment, including behavioral referral, further testing, and procedures, is also quite useful. Recommendations for restoration of function and return to work complete guidelines focused on diagnosing, treating, and resolving activity limitations among workers. Simply developing and publishing guidelines has not resulted in improvement in practice. However, if used as the basis for peer-group interactions and actions by occupational health opinion leaders, guidelines can contribute to marked improvements in quality, worker satisfaction, and worker health. PMID:9029428

  7. Replacing manual sphygmomanometers with automated blood pressure measurement in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G

    2014-01-01

    1. Conventional manual measurement of blood pressure (BP) in clinical practice is no longer considered to be the best method for evaluating a patient's BP status. Home BP and 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring are now recommended for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. ?2. Recent studies provide an alternative to conventional office BP, namely automated office (AO) BP, which involves multiple BP readings taken with a fully automated device with the patient resting quietly alone. Automated office BP is preferable to routine manual office BP in that it exhibits improved accuracy and a stronger relationship to both ambulatory BP and target organ damage. 3. Having the patient alone eliminates conversation between the patient and the observer, a cause of 'white coat hypertension'. The use of an automated device improves accuracy, reduces digit preference, minimizes observer bias and facilitates the recording of multiple BP readings. ?4. Comparative BP data obtained in clinical studies in both research settings and routine community practice support the use of a cut-off point of 135/85 mmHg for defining hypertension using AOBP, which is the same cut-off point currently recommended for awake ambulatory BP and home BP. 5. Reduction of the white coat response using AOBP should reduce the need to monitor patients with ambulatory BP and home BP after initiation of antihypertensive therapy. There is now sufficient evidence to consider replacing manual office BP with AOBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:23819734

  8. HBsAg Quantification in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Avnish K

    2012-01-01

    Several standardized commercial assays for quantification of hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) are now available. Studies on HBsAg kinetics from Asia and Europe have demonstrated that HBsAg levels are highest during the immune-tolerant phase, become lower during immune-clearance phase and are the lowest in hepatitis B ‘e’ antigen (HBeAg)-negative inactive low-replicative phase with a rise during HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Combined use of hepatitis B virus-deoxyribonucleic acid (HBV-DNA) and HBsAg levels may help in differentiating true inactive carrier state from HBeAg-negative CHB. Several retrospective studies have demonstrated a role for decline in HBsAg level for predicting response and nonresponse to therapy. In HBeAg-positive patients treated with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN), a lack of decline of qHBsAg at week 12 predicts nonresponders while a decline of qHBsAg at week 24 predicts responders to PEG-IFN. In HBeAg-negative patients, if at week 12, there is no decline in qHBsAg and the HBV-DNA decline is < 2 log, the patient is unlikely to respond, then stopping of PEG-IFN should be considered. With nucleos(t)ide analogs, the decline in HBsAg is lower than that with PEG-IFN and more marked in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis, with elevated alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), thus suggesting that active immune response against HBV is required to lower HBsAg. In patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis, fall in HBsAg may help in developing stopping rules to reduce the need for lifelong therapy. Information provided by HBsAg is complementary to HBV-DNA and cannot replace the same. Prospective studies on HBsAg kinetics from all regions of the world are required to define optimum time of testing and cutoff levels before stopping rules can be recommended. PMID:25755408

  9. Systemic therapy for recurrent, persistent, or metastatic cervical cancer: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Hirte, H.; Kennedy, E.B.; Elit, L.; Fung Kee Fung, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic therapy options are needed for women with recurrent, metastatic, or persistent cervical cancer. This systematic review and clinical practice guideline were developed to address that need, and to update a 2007 guideline from Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care. Methods The literature between 2006 and April 2014 in the medline and embase databases, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Issue 4, 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 3, 2014), relevant guideline databases, and conference proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (2007–2013) was searched. A working group developed draft guidelines and incorporated comments and feedback from internal and external reviewers. Results Four phase iii randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria for the review and provided the basis for draft recommendations. Feedback was obtained from Ontario practitioners and others abroad, which led to modifications to the draft recommendations. Three key recommendations were developed. Conclusions The working group concluded that all patients should be offered the opportunity to participate in appropriate randomized clinical trials. Cisplatin–paclitaxel, cisplatin–vinorelbine, cisplatin–gemcitabine, and cisplatin–topotecan are recommended combinations for this patient population. The substitution of carboplatin for cisplatin in the foregoing combinations can also be recommended because carboplatin is associated with fewer adverse effects and greater ease of administration. Selection of combination chemotherapy will depend on the toxicity profile, patient preference, and other factors. Finally, bevacizumab in combination with cisplatin–paclitaxel or carboplatin–paclitaxel is recommended for a specific subset of the target population as outlined in Gynecologic Oncology Group study 0240.

  10. [Proposed recommendations for the practical use of internal quality controls (IQC) in a medical biology laboratory].

    PubMed

    Giannoli, Jean-Marc; Szymanowicz, Anton

    2011-01-01

    We propose a set of recommendations and practices to optimize the use of quality control of medical biology examinations. The fundamentals are reviewed: definition of a series of analysis, IQC at one or more level, Westgard alert rules and rejection, practical remedial actions to take for the technician, corrective and preventive actions to be implemented by the biologist. We have also formalized three flowcharts to guide the technician in their daily practice to ensure analytical quality of investigations carried out. These decision trees are the result of the experience submitted by an accredited and professional laboratory attentive to the ongoing improvement of IQC. This article can provide useful assistance to biologists for accreditation but also aims to foster collaboration reliable medical biology laboratory at the appropriate management of patients. PMID:21896419

  11. Compellingness: assessing the practical relevance of clinical research results.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Mark R

    2012-10-01

    While the critical appraisal of clinical research has generally focused on aspects of study design and statistical analysis, other features of clinical studies appear to be more important to clinicians for assessing the value of a particular study in the care of particular patients. These features relate to the quality of the knowledge derived from the research, the value of the results to the care of individual patients, and the responsibility of clinicians to be stewards of limited resources. Twelve features of clinical research studies that affect how compelling individual clinicians find the results are proposed and examined here. By better understanding what makes clinical research compelling enough to alter or reinforce clinical practice, clinical researchers can design future studies to better serve the needs of clinicians and patients. PMID:22994992

  12. [Application of good clinical practices. An example of organization].

    PubMed

    Nys, V; Terrier, J L; Certain, B; Costantini, D

    1999-11-01

    The quality of clinical trials is guaranteed by good clinical practices (GCP). An evaluation of data and patient safety is evaluated for each procedure making up GCP. Compliance to GCP is required for clinical trials performed in France to gain international recognition. Several pharmaceutical firms have modified their trial procedures in order to assure application of GCP. Key posts for monitors and clinical research assistants have been created. They play a major role in following up clinical trials and control the application of pre-established standardized procedure. Follow-up documents provide written proof of how GPC were applied and also add credibility to the trial during an audit or inspection. In the hospital setting, clinics, research centres, pharmaceutical units, and dispensaries are also largely implicated in the quality of the trial. Each must have adequate means of applying GCP with the aim of improving the signification of medical observation during therapeutic trials. PMID:10605153

  13. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by more than half of the nursing students. Half of them suggested ensuring the interest in the topic from the ward. PMID:17064819

  14. Influences on clinical practice: the case of glue ear

    PubMed Central

    Dopson, S.; Miller, R.; Dawson, S.; Sutherland, K.

    1999-01-01

    A case study of clinical practice in children with glue ear is presented. The case is part of a larger project, funded by the North Thames Research and Development Programme, that sought to explore the part played by clinicians in the implementation of research and development into practice in two areas: adult asthma and glue ear in children. What is striking about this case is the differences found in every area of the analysis. That is, diversity was found in views about diagnosis and treatment of glue ear; the organisation of related services; and in the reported practice of our interviewees, both between particular groupings of clinical staff and within these groupings. The challenge inherent in the case is to go beyond describing the complexity and differences that were found, and look for patterns in the accounts of practice and tease out why such patterns may occur. PMID:10557674

  15. Clinical oncology practice 2015: preparing for the future.

    PubMed

    Kosty, Michael P; Acheson, Anupama Kurup; Tetzlaff, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    The clinical practice of oncology has become increasingly complex. An explosion of medical knowledge, increased demands on provider time, and involved patients have changed the way many oncologists practice. What was an acceptable practice model in the past may now be relatively inefficient. This review covers three areas that address these changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) National Oncology Census defines who the U.S. oncology community is, and their perceptions of how practice patterns may be changing. The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-ASCO Teams in Cancer Care Project explores how best to employ team science to improve the efficiency and quality of cancer care in the United States. Finally, how physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) might be best integrated into team-based care in oncology and the barriers to integration are reviewed. PMID:25993232

  16. Evidence-based practice: a model for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Rice, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Health care reform authorized by the Affordable Care Act is based on the belief that evidence-based practice (EBP) generates cost savings due to the delivery of more effective care. Published meta-analyses and systematic reviews provide clear, unbiased evidence on the effectiveness of specific interventions. Yet translating the interventions into the practice setting requires additional clinical skills and judgments extending beyond the scientific assessment of the EBP literature. Effective use of EBP interventions requires clinicians effectively answering an additional set of questions specific to the case and clinical context. These questions focus on correctly identifying the problem and increased level of specificity for any given situation. Using a clinical application of the PICO model, the clinician and the patient should be able to achieve a higher level of clinical outcomes. PMID:23950547

  17. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions – the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1–13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols. PMID:25077519

  18. Comparison of appropriateness of cholesterol testing in general practice with the recommendations of national guidelines: an audit of patient records in 20 general practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T van der Weijden; A Dansen; B J Schouten; J A Knottnerus; R P Grol

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the profiles of those patients selected by general practitioners for measurement of serum cholesterol with the recommended profiles for opportunistic cholesterol testing described in the national practice guidelines published by the Dutch College of General Practitioners. DESIGN: Retrospective audit of general practitioners' records. MATERIALS: Practice records of 3577 adult patients systematically sampled from 20 general practices. MAIN

  19. [Measurement of renal function in clinical practice: principles and limitations].

    PubMed

    Prigent, A

    2011-04-01

    Methods for measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (clearance in plasma, urine or both of an « exogenous » tracer, usually radio labeled) often are considered impractical from a clinical standpoint. Alternate methods proposed to estimate the GFR are based on plasma levels of « endogenous » tracers (creatinine, cystatin C). These methods are so imprecise that they provide little if any true reassurance with regards to warnings and recommended GFR values for the use of iodinated and gadolinium based contrast agents. PMID:21549883

  20. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  1. The Promise of Mindfulness for Clinical Practice Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annemarie Gockel

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the recent trend in mindfulness-based psychotherapies and explores the utility of mindfulness training for clinical practice education. It presents the current literature and evidence suggesting that mindfulness training may provide a vehicle to foster essential clinical skills and attitudes, increase self-care and reduce the impact of occupational stress, and prepare students to understand and use mindfulness-based interventions

  2. Immmunotherapy of cancer: from vision to standard clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph H. Huber; Thomas Wölfel

    2004-01-01

    Until the end of the 19th century the possibility that a tumor could be rejected merely by the body’s immune defense was no more than a vision. After more than 100 years of preclinical and clinical research in the field, the vision of cancer immunotherapy became real and has, with multiple tools, successfully entered clinical standard practice. Non-specific mediators of immune

  3. Evidence-Based Practice, Person-in-Environment, and Clinical Social Work: Issues of Practical Concern

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beverly M. Simmons

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a movement that has gained recent momentum in social work following the tradition of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Use of EBP as a guiding philosophy of clinical social work practice has been debated among academics, researchers, and clinicians for more than a decade. An area of complexity within EBP involves selecting the best available evidence while accounting

  4. Evidence based practice: the practicalities of keeping abreast of clinical evidence while in training

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Phillips; P Glasziou

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives a practical account of why and how to learn to practise evidence based medicine while still in clinical training. It highlights practical benefits to learning the skills (such as passing exams, coping with information overload and helping patients), and explains how to manage each of the four essential steps (asking questions, acquiring information, appraising evidence, and applying

  5. Practice nurse involvement in general practice clinical care: policy and funding issues need resolution.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Karnon, Jonathan; Beilby, Justin; Gray, Jodi; Holton, Christine; Banham, David

    2014-06-01

    In Australia, primary care-based funding initiatives have been implemented to encourage general practices to employ practice nurses. The aim of this paper is to discuss limitations of the current funding and policy arrangements in enhancing the clinical role of practice nurses in the management of chronic conditions. This paper draws on the results of a real-world economic evaluation, the Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP). The PCSIP linked routinely collected clinical and resource use data to undertake a risk-adjusted cost-effectiveness analysis of increased practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of diabetes and obesity. The findings of the PCSIP suggested that the active involvement of practice nurses in collaborative clinical-based activities is cost-effective, as well as addressing general practice workforce issues. Although primary healthcare organisations (e.g. Medicare Locals) can play a key role in supporting enhanced practice nurse roles, improvements to practice nurse funding models could further encourage more efficient use of an important resource. PMID:24870661

  6. A National Cancer Clinical Trials Network: Recommendations from the Institute of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nass, Sharyl J.; Balogh, Erin; Mendelsohn, John

    2010-01-01

    Oncology has become one of the most active areas of drug discovery, with more than 800 cancer therapeutics in development. This presents an unprecedented opportunity to improve the outcome for patients with cancer, but also requires an effective and efficient clinical trials network to generate the evidence necessary for regulatory approval and optimal integration of new treatments into clinical care. The Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program supported by the National Cancer Institute has been instrumental in establishing standards of care in oncology over the last 50 years, but it currently faces numerous challenges that threaten its ability to undertake the large-scale, multi-institutional trials that advance patient care. The Institute of Medicine recently appointed a consensus study committee to assess the organization and operation of the Cooperative Group Program and recommend ways to improve the quality of cancer clinical trials conducted by the Groups and others. The committee developed a set of recommendations, summarized here, that aim to improve the speed and efficiency of trials; incorporate innovative science and trial design; improve prioritization, selection, and support of trials; and increase participation by patients and physicians. PMID:21326081

  7. Evidence-based clinical practice: dispelling the myths.

    PubMed

    Hise, Mary E; Kattelmann, Kendra; Parkhurst, Melissa

    2005-06-01

    Evidence-based practice merges the best and most relevant clinical research data with clinician experience, pathophysiology of disease state, and the specifics of individual patient care. Currently, there is a significant gap between the best research evidence in healthcare and application of this evidence to clinician practices. Consistent with this finding, nutrition support is not always applied effectively or consistently, despite available scientific evidence that could be used to enhance a given treatment protocol. Cited obstacles that prevent the incorporation of research evidence into daily practice include lack of time, inadequate research skills, and information overload. Identification and application of the most valid primary research and evidence summaries (clinical guides to practice and meta-analyses) should, however, be an integral part of appropriate nutrition care. Consequently, it is important that clinicians develop and improve upon the basic skills required to allow efficient and accurate searches and evaluations of the literature. This review describes the basic and practical components of evidence-based medicine and provides tools to determine whether current nutrition practices are based upon an analysis of valid clinical evidence or anecdotal nutrition traditions and myths. PMID:16207666

  8. Diabetic Clinics Today and Tomorrow: Mini-clinics in General Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Thorn; R. G. Russell

    1973-01-01

    In the belief that there was need for diabetic clinics in general practice, 14 of them have been started in the Wolverhampton area. Provided that patients with diabetes that is difficult to control, or who need extra care, remain the responsibility of the hospital diabetic department, this system is an advantage for the hospital department, general practice, and the patient.

  9. Reflections on Speech-Language Therapists' Talk: Implications for Clinical Practice and Education. Clinical Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Alison; Armstrong, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Research into the practices of speech-language therapists in clinical sessions is beginning to identify the way communication in clinical interactions both facilitates and potentially impedes the achievement of therapy goals. Aims: This target article aims to raise the issues that arise from critical reflections on the communication of…

  10. Improving cardiovascular clinical trials conduct in the United States: recommendation from clinicians, researchers, sponsors, and regulators.

    PubMed

    Butler, Javed; Fonarow, Gregg C; O'Connor, Christopher; Adams, Kirkwood; Bonow, Robert O; Cody, Robert J; Collins, Sean P; Dunnmon, Preston; Dinh, Wilfried; Fiuzat, Mona; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Grant, Stephen; Kim, So-Young; Kupfer, Stuart; Lefkowitz, Martin; Mentz, Robert J; Misselwitz, Frank; Pitt, Bertram; Roessig, Lothar; Schelbert, Erik; Shah, Monica; Solomon, Scott; Stockbridge, Norman; Yancy, Clyde; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-03-01

    Advances in medical therapies leading to improved patient outcomes are in large part related to successful conduct of clinical trials that offer critical information regarding the efficacy and safety of novel interventions. The conduct of clinical trials in the United States, however, continues to face increasing challenges with recruitment and retention. These trends are paralleled by an increasing shift toward more multinational trials where most participants are enrolled in countries outside the United States, bringing into question the generalizability of the results to the American population. This manuscript presents the perspectives and recommendations from clinicians, researchers, sponsors, and regulators who attended a meeting facilitated by the Food and Drug Administration to improve upon the current clinical trial trends in the United States. PMID:25728719

  11. Management of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC): Clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jó?wiak, Sergiusz; Nabbout, Rima; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-07-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a type of brain tumour that develops in 10-15% of individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). SEGAs can be unilateral or bilateral, developing from benign subependymal nodules (hamartomas) located near the foramen of Monro. These are usually slow-growing, glialneuronal tumours that develop within the first 2 decades of life. Traditionally, the management of SEGA involved monitoring using periodic neuroimaging, and surgical resection of tumours that exhibited growth and/or caused clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. Recent clinical research has demonstrated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors can induce partial regression of SEGA associated with TSC and so might provide an acceptable alternative to neurosurgery for these tumours. This report summarizes the clinical recommendations for the management of SEGA made by a panel of European experts in March 2012. Current treatment options and outstanding questions are outlined. PMID:23391693

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Delirium Management: Potential Application in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Shirley H.; Bruera, Eduardo; Lawlor, Peter G.; Kanji, Salmaan; Davis, Daniel H.J.; Agar, Meera; Wright, David; Hartwick, Michael; Currow, David C.; Gagnon, Bruno; Simon, Jessica; Pereira, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium occurs in patients across a wide array of health care settings. The extent to which formal management guidelines exist or are adaptable to palliative care is unclear. Objectives This review aims to 1) source published delirium management guidelines with potential relevance to palliative care settings, 2) discuss the process of guideline development, 3) appraise their clinical utility, and 4) outline the processes of their implementation and evaluation and make recommendations for future guideline development. Methods We searched PubMed (1990–2013), Scopus, U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse, Google, and relevant reference lists to identify published guidelines for the management of delirium. This was supplemented with multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other relevant stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. Results There is a paucity of high-level evidence for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in the management of delirium in palliative care. However, multiple delirium guidelines for clinical practice have been developed, with recommendations derived from “expert opinion” for areas where research evidence is lacking. In addition to their potential benefits, limitations of clinical guidelines warrant consideration. Guidelines should be appraised and then adapted for use in a particular setting before implementation. Further research is needed on the evaluation of guidelines, as disseminated and implemented in a clinical setting, focusing on measurable outcomes in addition to their impact on quality of care. Conclusion Delirium clinical guidelines are available but the level of evidence is limited. More robust evidence is required for future guideline development. PMID:24766743

  13. Simple Equipment Used in Clinical Practice for Evaluation of Locomotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Pedotti

    1977-01-01

    A new simple procedure for analyzing and evaluating human gait that can be easily performed in clinical practice is presented. Signals proportional to forces produced by a subject walking along a walkway are registered by a common force plate and processed by a specially made hybrid computer.

  14. Prototypes for Content-Based Image Retrieval in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Fischer, Benedikt; Müller, Henning; Deserno, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) has been proposed as key technology for computer-aided diagnostics (CAD). This paper reviews the state of the art and future challenges in CBIR for CAD applied to clinical practice. We define applicability to clinical practice by having recently demonstrated the CBIR system on one of the CAD demonstration workshops held at international conferences, such as SPIE Medical Imaging, CARS, SIIM, RSNA, and IEEE ISBI. From 2009 to 2011, the programs of CADdemo@CARS and the CAD Demonstration Workshop at SPIE Medical Imaging were sought for the key word “retrieval” in the title. The systems identified were analyzed and compared according to the hierarchy of gaps for CBIR systems. In total, 70 software demonstrations were analyzed. 5 systems were identified meeting the criterions. The fields of application are (i) bone age assessment, (ii) bone fractures, (iii) interstitial lung diseases, and (iv) mammography. Bridging the particular gaps of semantics, feature extraction, feature structure, and evaluation have been addressed most frequently. In specific application domains, CBIR technology is available for clinical practice. While system development has mainly focused on bridging content and feature gaps, performance and usability have become increasingly important. The evaluation must be based on a larger set of reference data, and workflow integration must be achieved before CBIR-CAD is really established in clinical practice. PMID:21892374

  15. Heart Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice: Doing What Works

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elias Zerhouni; Russell H. Morgan; Martin Donner

    Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death in the United States. Although most cardiovascular disease (CVD) is preventable, proven prevention approaches are not being ade- quately applied in clinical practice. 1 This editorial discusses the major opportunities for preventing CVD in the primary care setting, focusing on 3 highly prevalent and treatable conditions: hypertension, high blood cholesterol,

  16. The ethics of the placebo in clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Lichtenberg; U Heresco-Levy; U Nitzan

    2004-01-01

    While discussions of the ethics of the placebo have usually dealt with their use in a research context, the authors address here the question of the placebo in clinical practice. It is argued, firstly, that the placebo can be an effective treatment. Secondly, it is demonstrated that its use does not always entail deception. Finally guidelines are presented according to

  17. The Use of Bone Age in Clinical Practice – Part 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David D. Martin; Jan M. Wit; Ze’ev Hochberg; Lars Sävendahl; Rick R. van Rijn; Oliver Fricke; Noël Cameron; Janina Caliebe; Thomas Hertel; Daniela Kiepe; Kerstin Albertsson-Wikland; Hans Henrik Thodberg; Gerhard Binder; Michael B. Ranke

    2011-01-01

    This review examines the role of skeletal maturity (‘bone age’, BA) assessment in clinical practice. BA is mainly used in children with the following conditions: short stature (addressed in part 1 of this review), tall stature, early or late puberty, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (all addressed in part 2). Various manual and automatic methods of BA assessment have been developed.

  18. Chronic Pain: Treatment Barriers and Strategies for Clinical Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Myra Glajchen

    Background: Chronic pain is a clinical challenge for the practicing physician. Lack of knowledge about opioids, negative attitudes toward prescribing opioids, and inadequate pain-assessment skills combine to create major barriers to pain relief. Patient-related barriers, such as lack of communication and un- warranted fears of addiction, further complicate pain assessment and treatment. The health care system itself can hinder pain

  19. Good Practices for Adaptive Clinical Trials in Pharmaceutical Product Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brenda Gaydos; Keaven M. Anderson; Donald Berry; Nancy Burnham; Christy Chuang-Stein; Jennifer Dudinak; Parvin Fardipour; Paul Gallo; Sam Givens; Roger Lewis; Jeff Maca; José Pinheiro; Yili Pritchett; Michael Krams

    2009-01-01

    This article is a summary of good adaptive practices for the planning and implementation of adaptive designs compiled from experiences gained in the pharmaceutical industry. The target audience is anyone involved in the planning and execution of clinical trials. The first step prior to planning an adaptive design is to assess the appropriateness of its use. Hence, strategic points to

  20. Knowledge taxonomy for Clinical Practice Guidelines - Implications for Computerization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Marie Lyng

    Much effort has been put into developing clinical practice guidelines (CPG's), but yet the effect of CPG's is limited. A path for better practitioner adherence to CPG's could be to offer IT-based process support, based on CPG's To accomplish this it is necessary to transform existing narrative CPG's into a computer-readable format. Based on an analysis of a corpus of

  1. Queering know-how: clinical skill acquisition as ethical practice.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cressida J; Thachuk, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers' theoretical knowledge of "cultural competency" and patients' experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner's Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronormative principles expressed in interviews and the relative absence of skilled anti-heteronormative clinical practice can be understood as a failure to grasp the field of practice as a whole. Moving from "knowing-that" to "knowing-how" in terms of anti-heteronormative clinical skills is not only a desirable epistemological trajectory, we argue, but also a way of understanding better and worse ethical practice. PMID:25037245

  2. Implementing AORN recommended practices for care of patients undergoing pneumatic tourniquet-assisted procedures.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W; Denholm, Bonnie

    2013-10-01

    Perioperative nurses are likely to encounter the use of pneumatic tourniquets in a variety of operative and invasive extremity procedures. Use of a pneumatic tourniquet offers an opportunity to obtain a near-bloodless surgical field; however, the use of tourniquets is not without risk. Unfavorable outcomes include pain, thrombotic events, nerve compression injuries, and disruption of skin integrity. Perioperative nurses should be familiar with the indications, contraindications, and changes in physiology associated with pneumatic tourniquet use. The revised AORN "Recommended practices for care of patients undergoing pneumatic tourniquet-assisted procedures" is focused on the perioperative nurse's role in patient care and provides guidance for developing, implementing, and evaluating practices that promote patient safety and improve the likelihood of positive outcomes. PMID:24075334

  3. Larynx Preservation Clinical Trial Design: Key Issues and Recommendations-A Consensus Panel Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, Jean-Louis [Departement de Cancerologie Cervico-Faciale, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France)], E-mail: jl-lefebvre@o-lambret.fr; Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To develop guidelines for the conduct of Phase III clinical trials of larynx preservation in patients with locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary international consensus panel developed recommendations after reviewing results from completed Phase III randomized trials, meta-analyses, and published clinical reports with updates available through November, 2007. The guidelines were reviewed and approved by the panel. Results: According to the recommendations, the trial population should include patients with T2 or T3 laryngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma not considered for partial laryngectomy and exclude those with laryngeal dysfunction or age greater than 70 years. Functional assessments should include speech and swallowing. Voice should be routinely assessed with a simple, validated instrument. The primary endpoint should capture survival and function. The panel created a new endpoint: laryngo-esophageal dysfunction-free survival. Events are death, local relapse, total or partial laryngectomy, tracheotomy at 2 years or later, or feeding tube at 2 years or later. Recommended secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival, locoregional control, time to tracheotomy, time to laryngectomy, time to discontinuation of feeding tube, and quality of life/patient-reported outcomes. Correlative biomarker studies for near-term trials should include estimated glomerular filtration rate, excision repair cross-complementary-1 gene, E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin, epiregulin and amphiregulin, and TP53 mutation. Conclusions: Revised trial designs in several key areas are needed to advance the study of larynx preservation. With consistent methodologies, clinical trials can more effectively evaluate and quantify the therapeutic benefit of novel treatment options for patients with locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

  4. Good clinical practice in resource-limited settings: translating theory into practice.

    PubMed

    Tinto, Halidou; Noor, Ramadhani A; Wanga, Charles L; Valea, Innocent; Mbaye, Maimouna Ndour; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Ravinetto, Raffaella M

    2013-04-01

    A Good Clinical Practices (GCPs) course, based on the combination of theoretical modules with a practical training in real-life conditions, was held in 2010 in Burkina Faso. It was attended by 15 trainees from nine African, Asian, and Latin American countries. There were some discrepancies between the average good results at the end of the theoretical phase and the GCP application during the first days of the practical phase, underlying the difficulties of translating theoretical knowledge into good practices. Most of the findings were not unexpected and reflected the challenges commonly faced by clinical investigators in resource-poor contexts (i.e., the high workload at peripheral health facilities, the need to conciliate routine clinical activities with clinical research, and the risk of creating a double standard among patients attending the same health facility [free care for recruited patients versus user fees for non-recruited patients with the same medical condition]). Even if limited in number and time, these observations suggest that a theoretical training alone may not be sufficient to prepare trainees for the challenges of medical research in real-life settings. Conversely, when a practical phase immediately follows a theoretical one, trainees can immediately experience what the research methodology implicates in terms of work organization and relationship with recruited and non-recruited patients. This initial experience shows the complexity of translating GCP into practice and suggests the need to rethink the current conception of GCP training. PMID:23553224

  5. Recommended Radiation Protection Practices for Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D. E.; Hooker, C. D.; Herrington, W. N.; Gilchrist, R. L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in estsblishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) dis- posal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW dis- posal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control , internal exposure control , respiratory protection, survei 1 - lance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupa- tionally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61.

  6. Clinical and practical considerations in the pharmacologic management of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael J; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Despite published treatment recommendations and the availability of approved and off-label pharmacologic therapies for narcolepsy, the clinical management of this incurable, chronic neurologic disorder remains challenging. While treatment is generally symptomatically driven, decisions regarding which drug(s) to use need to take into account a variety of factors that may affect adherence, efficacy, and tolerability. Type 1 narcolepsy (predominantly excessive daytime sleepiness with cataplexy) or type 2 narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy) may drive treatment decisions, with consideration given either to a single drug that targets multiple symptoms or to multiple drugs that each treat a specific symptom. Other drug-related characteristics that affect drug choice are dosing regimens, tolerability, and potential drug-drug interactions. Additionally, the patient should be an active participant in treatment decisions, and the main symptomatic complaints, treatment goals, psychosocial setting, and use of lifestyle substances (ie, alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and cannabis) need to be discussed with respect to treatment decisions. Although there is a lack of narcolepsy-specific instruments for monitoring therapeutic effects, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness (eg, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test) can be used to provide guidance on whether treatment goals are being met. These considerations are discussed with the objective of providing clinically relevant recommendations for making treatment decisions that can enhance the effective management of patients with narcolepsy. PMID:25458251

  7. Ethical Behaviours in Clinical Practice Among Mexican Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Martínez, Edith; Lavielle, Pilar; Bedolla, Miguel; Squires, Allison

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the cultural domain of ethical behaviours in clinical practice as defined by health care providers in Mexico. Structured interviews were carried out with 500 health professionals employed at the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Mexico City. The Smith Salience Index was used to evaluate the relevance of concepts gathered from the free listings of the interviewees. Cluster analysis and factor analysis facilitated construction of the conceptual categories, which the authors refer to as ‘dimensions of ethical practice’. Six dimensions emerged from the analysis to define the qualities that comprise ethical clinical practice for Mexican health care providers: overall quality of clinical performance; working conditions that favour quality of care; use of ethical considerations as prerequisites for any health care intervention; values favouring teamwork in the health professional–patient relationship; patient satisfaction scores; and communication between health care providers and patients. The findings suggest that improved working conditions and management practices that promote the values identified by the study’s participants would help to improve quality of care. PMID:18849364

  8. Canadian?Stroke?Best?Practice?Recommendations: Hyperacute Stroke Care Guidelines, Update 2015.

    PubMed

    Casaubon, Leanne K; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Blacquiere, Dylan; Boucher, Scott; Brown, Kyla; Goddard, Tom; Gordon, Jacqueline; Horton, Myles; Lalonde, Jeffrey; LaRivière, Christian; Lavoie, Pascale; Leslie, Paul; McNeill, Jeanne; Menon, Bijoy K; Moses, Brian; Penn, Melanie; Perry, Jeff; Snieder, Elizabeth; Tymianski, Dawn; Foley, Norine; Smith, Eric E; Gubitz, Gord; Hill, Michael D; Glasser, Ev; Lindsay, Patrice

    2015-08-01

    The 2015 update of the Canadian?Stroke?Best?Practice?Recommendations?Hyperacute Stroke Care guideline highlights key elements involved in the initial assessment, stabilization, and treatment of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA), ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and acute venous sinus thrombosis. The most notable change in this 5th edition is the addition of new recommendations for the use of endovascular therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke and proximal intracranial arterial occlusion. This includes an overview of the infrastructure and resources required for stroke centers that will provide endovascular therapy as well as regional structures needed to ensure that all patients with acute ischemic stroke that are eligible for endovascular therapy will be able to access this newly approved therapy; recommendations for hyperacute brain and enhanced vascular imaging using computed tomography angiography and computed tomography perfusion; patient selection criteria based on the five trials of endovascular therapy published in early 2015, and performance metric targets for important time-points involved in endovascular therapy, including computed tomography-to-groin puncture and computed tomography-to-reperfusion times. Other updates in this guideline include recommendations for improved time efficiencies for all aspects of hyperacute stroke care with a movement toward a new median target door-to-needle time of 30?min, with the 90th percentile being 60?min. A stronger emphasis is placed on increasing public awareness of stroke with the recent launch of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada FAST signs of stroke campaign; reinforcing the public need to seek immediate medical attention by calling 911; further engagement of paramedics in the prehospital phase with prehospital notification to the receiving emergency department, as well as the stroke team, including neuroradiology; updates to the triage and same-day assessment of patients with transient ischemic attack; updates to blood pressure recommendations for the hyperacute phase of care for ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The goal of these recommendations and supporting materials is to improve efficiencies and minimize the absolute time lapse between stroke symptom onset and reperfusion therapy, which in turn leads to better outcomes and potentially shorter recovery times. PMID:26148019

  9. The use of cough cardiopulmonary resuscitation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Schultz, D D; Olivas, G S

    1986-05-01

    In summary, the cough CPR technique uses physiologic principles similar to those that maintain circulation during chest compression with a number of significant advantages over the latter. At the onset of lethal arrhythmias such as asystole, profound bradycardia, VT, and VF, coughing may assist in maintaining consciousness and an optimum systolic blood pressure. It may also generate the mechanism required to convert the arrhythmia. The simplicity and effectiveness of this technique warrants its consideration for greater clinical use by hospital staff in all monitored settings. It has been noted, however, that clinical research is indicated to more closely examine the proposed cause and effect relationship between cough and arrhythmia conversion and to compare the clinical efficacy between the cough CPR technique and chest blow or other clinical practice measures. PMID:3516934

  10. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Astrid P; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne H

    2014-06-01

    Concern about obesity has prompted numerous public health campaigns that urge people to be more physically active. The campaigns often include normative statements and attempt to impose restrictions on individuals' lives without considering the complexities of daily life. We suggest that broadening the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for public health initiatives and future efforts should incorporate this aspect. PMID:25110789

  11. [Clinical recommendations for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients with invasive breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Tomek, Rudolf; Oreskovi?, Lidija Beketi?; Vrdoljak, Eduard; Soldi?, Zeljko; Podolski, Paula; Plestina, Stjepko; Gugi?, Damir; Vojnovi?, Zeljko; Mise, Branka Petric; Tomi?, Snjezana; Fajdi?, Josip; Vrdoljak, Danko Velimir; Drinkovi?, Ivan; Brkljaci?, Boris; Musta?, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Preventive measures, early diagnosis and development of all treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormonal and targeted biologic therapy) led to improvement in survival and quality of life of the patient. In order to standardize and optimize the approach, following good clinical practice standards, we bring consensus guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of breast cancer patients as a result of consensus of a multidisciplinary team of experts for breast cancer. PMID:22519245

  12. The practice of clinical handover: a respite perspective.

    PubMed

    Croos, Solomon

    This article aims to reflect on handovers that take place in respite settings-a healthcare setting with little mention in the literature. The author presents a reflective account of the practice of handover in one respite unit in south-east England. As these are the author's own observations and experience, no reflective model has been used as a guide. The article also reports on the findings of a small web-based survey conducted by Facebook and email contacts that aimed to understand the attitudes of health professionals, mainly from the respite-care setting, towards the practice of clinical handover. The findings showed that handover is an important part of safer care practice and is highly valued by the respondents as being a planning and organising mechanism for better management of shifts. This paper concludes by raising awareness of the lack of information available about the practice of clinical handover in respite settings. It also suggests the need for an in-depth study on handover practice in respite care. PMID:25072335

  13. Farmer's Incentives for Adoption of Recommended Farm Practices in Wheat Crop in Aligarh Intensive Agricultural District, India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidyarthy, Gopal Saran

    This study was undertaken to identify farmer incentives that led them to adopt wheat crop practices in Aligarh Intensive Agricultural District Program: the association between the farmer's characteristics and adoption groups; the incentives that lead the farmers to adopt recommended wheat crop practices; relationship between identified incentives…

  14. Larynx preservation clinical trial design: summary of key recommendations of a consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Ang, K Kian

    2010-01-01

    An international consensus panel was convened to develop guidelines for the conduct of phase III clinical trials of larynx preservation in patients with locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. According to their recommendations, future trial populations should include patients with T2 or T3 laryngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma not considered for partial laryngectomy and should exclude those with laryngeal dysfunction or aged >70 years. Baseline and post-treatment functional assessments should include speech and swallowing evaluations. Furthermore, voice should be routinely assessed with a simple, validated instrument. Regarding endpoints, the primary endpoint should capture survival and function. As a result, the panel created a new endpoint of laryngoesophageal dysfunction (LED)-free survival, which includes the events of death, local relapse, total or partial laryngectomy, tracheotomy at ?2 years, or feeding tube at ?2 years. Recommended secondary endpoints are freedom from LED, overall survival, progression-free survival, locoregional control, time to tracheotomy, time to laryngectomy, time to discontinuation of feeding tube, and quality of life/patient-reported outcomes. Future exploratory correlative biomarker studies should include epidermal growth factor receptor, excision repair cross-complementation group 1 gene, E-cadherin and ?-catenin, epiregulin and amphiregulin, and TP53 mutation. Revised trial designs in several key areas are needed to advance the study of larynx preservation. With consistent methodologies, clinical trials can more effectively evaluate and quantify the therapeutic benefit of novel treatment options for patients with locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. PMID:21036886

  15. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn. PMID:8576492

  16. The ethics of the placebo in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, P; Heresco-Levy, U; Nitzan, U

    2004-01-01

    While discussions of the ethics of the placebo have usually dealt with their use in a research context, the authors address here the question of the placebo in clinical practice. It is argued, firstly, that the placebo can be an effective treatment. Secondly, it is demonstrated that its use does not always entail deception. Finally guidelines are presented according to which the placebo may be used for clinical purposes. It is suggested that in select cases, use of the placebo may even be morally imperative. The argument is illustrated by three case vignettes. PMID:15574442

  17. [Definition of sarcopenia and diagnostic evaluation in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Trombetti, A

    2015-03-18

    Aging is associated with progressive increase in body fat and a corresponding decline in lean muscle mass. When the decrease in muscle mass reaches a critical threshold, this may affect muscle strength and consequently limit the ability to cope with the activities of daily living, reducing the independence of elders. It is widely accepted to define sarcopenia as the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age. It is more difficult to establish cut-off points which are clinically relevant. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the definitions of sarcopenia and the assessment tools that can be used in clinical practice. PMID:25962226

  18. A review of clinical practice guidelines for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ball, David; Silvestri, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are important evidence-based resources to guide complex clinical decision making. However, it is challenging for health professionals to keep abreast available guidelines and to know how and where to access relevant guidelines. This review examines currently available guidelines for lung cancer published in the English language. Important key features are listed for each identified guideline. The methodology, approaches to dissemination and implementation, and associated resources are summarised. General challenges in the area of guideline development are highlighted. The potential to collaborate more widely across lung cancer guideline developers by sharing literature searches and assessments is discussed. PMID:24163752

  19. Towards Meaningful Medication-Related Clinical Decision Support: Recommendations for an Initial Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Phansalkar, S.; Wright, A.; Kuperman, G.J.; Vaida, A.J.; Bobb, A.M.; Jenders, R.A.; Payne, T.H.; Halamka, J.; Bloomrosen, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Clinical decision support (CDS) can improve safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care, especially when implemented in computerized provider order entry (CPOE) applications. Medication-related decision support logic forms a large component of the CDS logic in any CPOE system. However, organizations wishing to implement CDS must either purchase the computable clinical content or develop it themselves. Content provided by vendors does not always meet local expectations. Most organizations lack the resources to customize the clinical content and the expertise to implement it effectively. In this paper, we describe the recommendations of a national expert panel on two basic medication-related CDS areas, specifically, drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking and duplicate therapy checking. The goals of this study were to define a starter set of medication-related alerts that healthcare organizations can implement in their clinical information systems. We also draw on the experiences of diverse institutions to highlight the realities of implementing medication decision support. These findings represent the experiences of institutions with a long history in the domain of medication decision support, and the hope is that this guidance may improve the feasibility and efficiency CDS adoption across healthcare settings. PMID:23616860

  20. Consensus Recommendations for Current Treatments and Accelerating Clinical Trials for Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Evans, D. Gareth; Adler, John; Brackmann, Derald; Chen, Ruihong; Ferner, Rosalie E.; Hanemann, C. Oliver; Harris, Gordon; Huson, Susan M.; Jacob, Abraham; Kalamarides, Michel; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Korf, Bruce R.; Mautner, Victor-Felix; McClatchey, Andrea I.; Miao, Harry; Plotkin, Scott R.; Slattery, William; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Welling, D. Bradley; Wen, Patrick Y.; Widemann, Brigitte; Hunter-Schaedle, Kim; Giovannini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a tumor suppressor syndrome characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) which often result in deafness despite aggressive management. Meningiomas, ependymomas and other cranial nerve and peripheral schwannomas are also commonly found in NF2 and collectively lead to major neurologic morbidity and mortality. Traditionally, the overall survival rate in patients with NF2 is estimated to be 38% at 20 years from diagnosis. Hence, there is a desperate need for new, effective therapies. Recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of NF2 related tumors has aided in the identification of potential therapeutic targets and emerging clinical therapies. In June 2010, representatives of the international NF2 research and clinical community convened under the leadership of Drs. D. Gareth Evans (University of Manchester) and Marco Giovannini (House Research Institute) to review the state of NF2 treatment and clinical trials. This manuscript summarizes the expert opinions about current treatments for NF2 associated tumors and recommendations for advancing therapies emerging from that meeting. The development of effective therapies for NF2 associated tumors has the potential for significant clinical advancement not only for patients with NF2 but for thousands of neuro-oncology patients afflicted with these tumors. PMID:22140088

  1. Overrating or Dismissing the Value of Evidence-Based Practice: Consequences for Clinical Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis H. Zayas; Brett Drake; Melissa Jonson-Reid

    Current implementation of the evidence based practice (EBP) model in social work has focused on empirical evidence from efficacy\\u000a studies, with far less attention to practitioner judgment and client values. Among many clinical social workers the opposite\\u000a is often true: clinical judgment supersedes the use of scientifically tested techniques. Clinicians may reject EBP as coming\\u000a out of narrowly focused, possibly

  2. Recommendations for standardized pathological characterization of residual disease for neoadjuvant clinical trials of breast cancer by the BIG-NABCG collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, V; Provenzano, E; Symmans, W F; Boughey, J C; Coles, C; Curigliano, G; Dixon, J M; Esserman, L J; Fastner, G; Kuehn, T; Peintinger, F; von Minckwitz, G; White, J; Yang, W; Badve, S; Denkert, C; MacGrogan, G; Penault-Llorca, F; Viale, G; Cameron, D

    2015-07-01

    Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST) provides the unique opportunity to assess response to treatment after months rather than years of follow-up. However, significant variability exists in methods of pathologic assessment of response to NAST, and thus its interpretation for subsequent clinical decisions. Our international multidisciplinary working group was convened by the Breast International Group-North American Breast Cancer Group (BIG-NABCG) collaboration and tasked to recommend practical methods for standardized evaluation of the post-NAST surgical breast cancer specimen for clinical trials that promote accurate and reliable designation of pathologic complete response (pCR) and meaningful characterization of residual disease. Recommendations include multidisciplinary communication; clinical marking of the tumor site (clips); and radiologic, photographic, or pictorial imaging of the sliced specimen, to map the tissue sections and reconcile macroscopic and microscopic findings. The information required to define pCR (ypT0/is ypN0 or ypT0 yp N0), residual ypT and ypN stage using the current AJCC/UICC system, and the Residual Cancer Burden system were recommended for quantification of residual disease in clinical trials. PMID:26019189

  3. A simple instrument for assessing stress in clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Sonino, N.; Fava, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    Methods to assess the role of stress factors in patients with medical conditions are often rather complex, require specific training, and are difficult to use in clinical practice. We attempted to develop a short index tailored to a busy clinical setting, which would be easy to use while providing adequate individual information. This index (Psychosocial Index) was largely derived from well-established instruments, such as Kellner's Screening List for Psychosocial Problems. In addition, on the basis of the patient's self-report of items, the clinician is asked to rate four dimensions of the patient's life: stress, wellbeing, psychological distress, and illness behaviour. The questionnaires of 34 female patients with functional medical disorders were first rated by an internist and afterwards, blindly, by a psychiatrist. Agreement between the two raters was excellent, as measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient. It is hoped that this Psychosocial Index may provide a new tool for psychosomatic research and practice. PMID:9799912

  4. Practical Application of ISO 9000 and EC Good Clinical Practice in Validating Clinical Data Management Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fergus Sweeney

    1993-01-01

    The development of customized application programs by the end users of data management systems requires special consideration when computer validation is being discussed. These customized programs are produced to capture, tabulate, and analyze data within the context of a specific clinical trial. They may be numerous and in a busy department may be produced on a frequent basis. This paper

  5. Diagnostic value of faecal calprotectin in paediatric gastroenterology clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Berni Canani; L. Rapacciuolo; M. T. Romano; L. Tanturri de Horatio; G. Terrin; F. Manguso; P. Cirillo; F. Paparo; R. Troncone

    2004-01-01

    Background. Faecal calprotectin (FC) is a new marker of intestinal inflammation. Data on FC in paediatric gastroenterology clinical practice are still scarce.Aims. To assess FC values in different paediatric gastrointestinal diseases comparing them with those obtained in healthy children.Patients. Two hundred and eighty-one children (age range 13–216 months) consecutively referred for gastrointestinal symptoms. Seventy-six healthy controls (age range 13–209 months).

  6. Audit of the role of oesophageal manometry in clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P W Johnston; B T Johnston; B J Collins; J S Collins; A H Love

    1993-01-01

    This oesophageal laboratory serves a population of 1.5 million. The study aimed to review referral patterns and assess the cost effectiveness of oesophageal manometry in clinical practice. All 276 consecutive manometry studies performed between 1988 and 1991 were reviewed. Reasons for referral in the 268 first referrals were: dysphagia 50.4%, non-cardiac chest pain 23.1%, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease 14.2%, connective tissue

  7. Research staff training in a multisite randomized clinical trial: Methods and recommendations from the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2014-01-01

    Background Descriptions of and recommendations for meeting the challenges of training research staff for multisite studies are limited despite the recognized importance of training on trial outcomes. The STRIDE (STimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that was conducted at nine addiction treatment programs across the United States within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) and evaluated the addition of exercise to addiction treatment as usual (TAU), compared to health education added to TAU, for individuals with stimulant abuse or dependence. Research staff administered a variety of measures that required a range of interviewing, technical, and clinical skills. Purpose In order to address the absence of information on how research staff are trained for multisite clinical studies, the current manuscript describes the conceptual process of training and certifying research assistants for STRIDE. Methods Training was conducted using a three-stage process to allow staff sufficient time for distributive learning, practice, and calibration leading up to implementation of this complex study. Results Training was successfully implemented with staff across nine sites. Staff demonstrated evidence of study and procedural knowledge via quizzes and skill demonstration on six measures requiring certification. Overall, while the majority of staff had little to no experience in the six measures, all research assistants demonstrated ability to correctly and reliably administer the measures throughout the study. Conclusions Practical recommendations are provided for training research staff and are particularly applicable to the challenges encountered with large, multisite trials. PMID:25379036

  8. Biosimilars in oncology: from development to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rak Tkaczuk, Katherine H; Jacobs, Ira Allen

    2014-04-01

    Biologics play an integral role in the treatment of cancer not only for their therapeutic effects and ability to improve outcomes, but also as supportive care agents. Biologics are more complex to manufacture and take longer to bring to market. Because biologics are considerably more costly than small-molecule drugs, their use has placed an increasing economic demand on healthcare systems worldwide. Biosimilars are designed to be highly similar to existing branded biologics, but because biologics cannot be exactly copied, biosimilars should not be referred to as generic, exact versions of the innovator biologic. Biosimilars have the potential to increase access and provide lower cost options for cancer care as patent protection for some of the most widely used biologics begins to expire. Regulatory requirements for biosimilars are evolving, as are global harmonization and/or standardization strategies that can facilitate their robust clinical development. This review highlights critical factors involved with the integration of biosimilars into oncology treatment paradigms and practices. Clinicians will likely seek out practice guidelines and position statements from established scientific societies to help evaluate key information regarding biosimilars, such as efficacy, safety, comparability, and interchangeability with the reference biologic. Automatic substitution, nomenclature, extrapolation of clinical data from one indication to another, as well as parameters for ongoing pharmacovigilance are evolving considerations. Education of physicians and other healthcare providers, payers, and patients about biosimilars may facilitate informed decision making, promote acceptance of biosimilars into clinical practice, increase accessibility, and expedite associated health and economic benefits. PMID:24767633

  9. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  10. Diagnostic evaluation and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: A clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjay; Helmersen, Doug; Provencher, Steeve; Hirani, Naushad; Rubens, Fraser D; De Perrot, Marc; Blostein, Mark; Boutet, Kim; Chandy, George; Dennie, Carole; Granton, John; Hernandez, Paul; Hirsch, Andrew M; Laframboise, Karen; Levy, Robert D; Lien, Dale; Martel, Simon; Shoemaker, Gerard; Swiston, John; Weinkauf, Justin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pulmonary embolism is a common condition. Some patients subsequently develop chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Many care gaps exist in the diagnosis and management of CTEPH patients including lack of awareness, incomplete diagnostic assessment, and inconsistent use of surgical and medical therapies. METHODS A representative interdisciplinary panel of medical experts undertook a formal clinical practice guideline development process. A total of 20 key clinical issues were defined according to the patient population, intervention, comparator, outcome (PICO) approach. The panel performed an evidence-based, systematic, literature review, assessed and graded the relevant evidence, and made 26 recommendations. RESULTS Asymptomatic patients postpulmonary embolism should not be screened for CTEPH. In patients with pulmonary hypertension, the possibility of CTEPH should be routinely evaluated with initial ventilation/ perfusion lung scanning, not computed tomography angiography. Pulmonary endarterectomy surgery is the treatment of choice in patients with surgically accessible CTEPH, and may also be effective in CTEPH patients with disease in more ‘distal’ pulmonary arteries. The anatomical extent of CTEPH for surgical pulmonary endarterectomy is best assessed by contrast pulmonary angiography, although positive computed tomography angiography may be acceptable. Novel medications indicated for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension may be effective for selected CTEPH patients. CONCLUSIONS The present guideline requires formal dissemination to relevant target user groups, the development of tools for implementation into routine clinical practice and formal evaluation of the impact of the guideline on the quality of care of CTEPH patients. Moreover, the guideline will be updated periodically to reflect new evidence or clinical approaches. PMID:21165353

  11. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician’s understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc phosphate, Zinc polycarboxylate, Zinc oxide-eugenol, Glass-ionomer, Resin modified GIC, Compomers and Resin cement. The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion that provides a clinical perspective of luting cements currently available to help the general practitioner make smarter and appropriate choices. How to cite the article: Lad PP, Kamath M, Tarale K, Kusugal PB. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):116-20. PMID:24653615

  12. [The usefulness of platelet function evaluation in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Elalamy, Ismail; Gkalea, Vasiliki; Gerotziafas, Grigorios; Ketatni, Hela; Hatmi, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis. Functional testing of platelet response has been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances of light transmission aggregometry and development of more useful devices have demonstrated the clinical utility to enlarge platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of residual platelet response seems, with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events. Still a debate, it represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and the basic scientist. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia diagnosis is also difficult and a functional assay is now available for an easier and rapid method to rule out such a life-threatening situation. This review article will describe the available methods of measuring platelet response and will discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice. PMID:24235328

  13. IT Governance Practices in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: Recommendations from an Empirical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Zmud, Robert W.; Price, R. Leon

    Much has been learned through IT governance research about the nature of IT-related decisions, the location of decision rights for these decisions, and governance mechanisms applied to facilitate associated decision processes in large organisations. Our knowledge about IT governance structures in small and medium-sized enterprises (SME), on the other hand, is quite limited. Adopting a qualitative and inductive approach, this study examines the nature and influence of IT governance in SMEs through interviews with executives from three SMEs. Our results demonstrate that IT decision authority was centralized in all three SMEs but that senior management involvement in governance procedures and communication practices about governance policies were observed to explain differences in these organisations’ IT use. We propose recommendations based on the findings of this study.

  14. Recommended practices for spline usage in CAD/CAM systems: CADCAM-007

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, S.K.

    1984-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assigned Lead Lab responsibility for integrating CAD/CAM activities throughout the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) and automating exchange of product definition. Transfer of splines between CAD/CAM systems presents a special problem due to the use of different spline interpolation schemes in these systems. Automated exchange via IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification, ANSI Y14.26M-1981) shows promise but does not yet provide a usable data path for NWC spline needs. Data exchange today is primarily via hard copy drawings with manual data reentry and spline recomputation. In this environment, spline problems can be minimized by following the recommended practices set forth in this report.

  15. Percutaneous coronary intervention in the UK: recommendations for good practice 2015

    PubMed Central

    Banning, Adrian P; Baumbach, Andreas; Blackman, Dan; Curzen, Nick; Devadathan, Sen; Fraser, Douglas; Ludman, Peter; Norell, Micheal; Muir, Dougie; Nolan, James; Redwood, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 35?years, there has been dramatic progress in the technology and applicability of percutaneous techniques to treat obstructive coronary heart disease. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has a considerable evidence base and it is firmly established as the most common procedure used in the invasive treatment of patients with coronary heart disease in the UK. This set of guidelines aims to address specifically issues relating to PCI and not the growing subspecialty of structural heart disease intervention. It is not intended to provide a review of the entire evidence base for coronary intervention. The evidence base relating to PCI is extensively reviewed in international guidelines and the British Cardiovascular Intervention society endorses these guidelines and their updates. The guidelines presented here focus on issues pertinent to practice within the UK and set out a recommended template to ensure optimal delivery of patient care. PMID:26041756

  16. Guidelines International Network: toward international standards for clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Forland, Frode; Macbeth, Fergus; Ollenschläger, Günter; Phillips, Sue; van der Wees, Philip

    2012-04-01

    Guideline development processes vary substantially, and many guidelines do not meet basic quality criteria. Standards for guideline development can help organizations ensure that recommendations are evidence-based and can help users identify high-quality guidelines. Such organizations as the U.S. Institute of Medicine and the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence have developed recommendations to define trustworthy guidelines within their locales. Many groups charged with guideline development find the lengthy list of standards developed by such organizations to be aspirational but infeasible to follow in entirety. Founded in 2002, the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) is a network of guideline developers that includes 93 organizations and 89 individual members representing 46 countries. The G-I-N board of trustees recognized the importance of guideline development processes that are both rigorous and feasible even for modestly funded groups to implement and initiated an effort toward consensus about minimum standards for high-quality guidelines. In contrast to other existing standards for guideline development at national or local levels, the key components proposed by G-I-N will represent the consensus of an international, multidisciplinary group of active guideline developers. This article presents G-I-N's proposed set of key components for guideline development. These key components address panel composition, decision-making process, conflicts of interest, guideline objective, development methods, evidence review, basis of recommendations, ratings of evidence and recommendations, guideline review, updating processes, and funding. It is hoped that this article promotes discussion and eventual agreement on a set of international standards for guideline development. PMID:22473437

  17. Hypertextual navigation operationalizing generic clinical practice guidelines for patient-specific therapeutic decisions.

    PubMed Central

    Bouaud, J.; Séroussi, B.; Antoine, E. C.; Gozy, M.; Khayat, D.; Boisvieux, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of implemented clinical practice guidelines, there is still little evidence of physicians compliance to formal standards. The ONCODOC project proposes a framework for elaborating generic decision support guidelines in a document-based paradigm with a knowledge-based approach. It has been first applied to assist clinicians in the treatment of breast cancer patients. Therapeutic expertise has been encoded as a decision tree. The decision process is driven by the clinician who interactively browses a hypertext version of the decision tree. During the navigation, he incrementally assigns values to decision parameters on the basis of his free interpretation of his patient's condition and thus builds a clinical context leading to patient-specific therapeutic recommendations. These guidelines are distributed on a hospital intranet and are evaluated at the point of care in an oncology department. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9929267

  18. Embedding the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in clinical practice: an audit review

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Claudia; Sorinmade, Oluwatoyin

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method An audit cycle assessed compliance of healthcare professionals within Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust with the statutory requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in patient care. Each stage involved a retrospective review of relevant patient electronic records. The additional purpose of the audit was to make recommendations to improve compliance with the requirement of the Act by healthcare professionals and improve patient understanding of its provisions. Results The audit cycle demonstrated some improvement in clinical practice as well as the need for further efforts at raising the understanding and compliance of clinicians and the public with provisions of the Act. Clinical Implications Healthcare professionals need further understanding of the provisions of the Act and their responsibilities. There is also the need to enhance public awareness to provisions of the Act in relation to their decision-making autonomy. Stakeholders need to put strategies in place for these to be achieved. PMID:25505630

  19. A survey of clinical practices and readiness to adopt evidence-based practices: Dissemination research in an addiction treatment system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark P. McGovern; Thomas S. Fox; Haiyi Xie; Robert E. Drake

    2004-01-01

    Addiction research is challenged to disseminate evidence-based practices into routine clinical settings. The successful adoption of innovation must consider issues of fit, such as the characteristics, readiness, and attitudes of clinicians in the community. We constructed a survey to assess clinical practices and readiness to adopt certain evidence-based practices in addiction treatment programs. The instrument was administered to directors (n

  20. Management of septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a review of current practices and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Edwin R; Makhni, Eric C; Mehran, Nima; Schulz, Brian M

    2013-11-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a rare and potentially devastating complication that often leads to articular destruction and adverse clinical outcomes. Because of its rare occurrence, best practices for diagnosis and management have yet to be established. However, graft retention and favorable outcomes are possible with early diagnosis, surgical intervention, and appropriate antibiotic management. Clinicians must be familiar with the diagnostic criteria and management options for septic arthritis. Most patients require multiple procedures to effectively eradicate infection. When the original reconstructed graft cannot be salvaged, a staged anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction revision is required. PMID:24187034

  1. [Functional neuroimaging in the diagnosis of patients with Parkinsonism: Update and recommendations for clinical use].

    PubMed

    Arbizu, J; Luquin, M R; Abella, J; de la Fuente-Fernández, R; Fernandez-Torrón, R; García-Solís, D; Garrastachu, P; Jiménez-Hoyuela, J M; Llaneza, M; Lomeña, F; Lorenzo-Bosquet, C; Martí, M J; Martinez-Castrillo, J C; Mir, P; Mitjavila, M; Ruiz-Martínez, J; Vela, L

    2014-01-01

    Functional Neuroimaging has been traditionally used in research for patients with different Parkinsonian syndromes. However, the emergence of commercial radiotracers together with the availability of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and, more recently, positron emission tomography (PET) have made them available for clinical practice. Particularly, the development of clinical evidence achieved by functional neuroimaging techniques over the past two decades have motivated a progressive inclusion of several biomarkers in the clinical diagnostic criteria for neurodegenerative diseases that occur with Parkinsonism. However, the wide range of radiotracers designed to assess the involvement of different pathways in the neurodegenerative process underlying Parkinsonian syndromes (dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway integrity, basal ganglia and cortical neuronal activity, myocardial sympathetic innervation), and the different neuroimaging techniques currently available (scintigraphy, SPECT and PET), have generated some controversy concerning the best neuroimaging test that should be indicated for the differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. In this article, a panel of nuclear medicine and neurology experts has evaluated the functional neuroimaging techniques emphazising practical considerations related to the diagnosis of patients with uncertain origin parkinsonism and the assessment Parkinson's disease progression. PMID:24731551

  2. Determination of Vancomycin Pharmacokinetics in Neonates To Develop Practical Initial Dosing Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Julianne; Iaboni, Dolores C.; Walker, Scott E.; Elligsen, Marion; Dunn, Michael S.; Allen, Vanessa G.; Simor, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Variability in neonatal vancomycin pharmacokinetics and the lack of consensus for optimal trough concentrations in neonatal intensive care units pose challenges to dosing vancomycin in neonates. Our objective was to determine vancomycin pharmacokinetics in neonates and evaluate dosing regimens to identify whether practical initial recommendations that targeted trough concentrations most commonly used in neonatal intensive care units could be determined. Fifty neonates who received vancomycin with at least one set of steady-state levels were evaluated retrospectively. Mean pharmacokinetic values were determined using first-order pharmacokinetic equations, and Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate initial dosing recommendations for target trough concentrations of 15 to 20 mg/liter, 5 to 20 mg/liter, and ?20 mg/liter. Monte Carlo simulation revealed that dosing by mg/kg of body weight was optimal where intermittent dosing of 9 to 12 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) every 8 h (q8h) had the highest probability of attaining a target trough concentration of 15 to 20 mg/liter. However, continuous infusion with a loading dose of 10 mg/kg followed by 25 to 30 mg/kg per day infused over 24 h had the best overall probability of target attainment. Initial intermittent dosing of 9 to 15 mg/kg i.v. q12h was optimal for target trough concentrations of 5 to 20 mg/liter and ?20 mg/liter. In conclusion, we determined that the practical initial vancomycin dose of 10 mg/kg vancomycin i.v. q12h was optimal for vancomycin trough concentrations of either 5 to 20 mg/liter or ?20 mg/liter and that the same initial dose q8h was optimal for target trough concentrations of 15 to 20 mg/liter. However, due to large interpatient vancomycin pharmacokinetic variability in neonates, monitoring of serum concentrations is recommended when trough concentrations between 15 and 20 mg/liter or 5 and 20 mg/liter are desired. PMID:24614381

  3. Clinical Practice of Steroid Avoidance in Pediatric Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nehus, E; Liu, C; Hooper, D K; Macaluso, M; Kim, M-O

    2015-08-01

    Steroid-avoidance protocols have recently gained popularity in pediatric kidney transplantation. We investigated the clinical practice of steroid avoidance among 9494 kidney transplant recipients at 124 transplant centers between 2000 and 2012 in the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network database. The practice of steroid avoidance increased during the study period and demonstrated significant variability among transplant centers. From 2008 to 2012, 39% of transplant centers used steroid avoidance in <10% of all discharged transplant recipients. Twenty-one percent of transplant centers practiced steroid avoidance in 10-40% of transplant recipients, and 40% of transplant centers used steroid avoidance in >40% of discharged patients. Children receiving steroid avoidance more frequently received induction with lymphocyte-depleting agents. Repeat kidney transplants were the least likely to receive steroid avoidance. Children who received a deceased donor kidney, underwent pretransplant dialysis, were highly sensitized, or had glomerular kidney disease or delayed graft function were also less likely to receive steroid avoidance. The variation in practice between centers remained highly significant (p?practice of steroid avoidance among transplant centers remain unexplained and may reflect uncertainty about the safety and efficacy of steroid-avoidance protocols. PMID:25908489

  4. Improving access to clinical practice guidelines with an interactive graphical interface using an iconic language

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines are useful for physicians, and guidelines are available on the Internet from various websites such as Vidal Recos. However, these guidelines are long and difficult to read, especially during consultation. Similar difficulties have been encountered with drug summaries of product characteristics. In a previous work, we have proposed an iconic language (called VCM, for Visualization of Concepts in Medicine) for representing patient conditions, treatments and laboratory tests, and we have used these icons to design a user interface that graphically indexes summaries of product characteristics. In the current study, our objective was to design and evaluate an iconic user interface for the consultation of clinical practice guidelines by physicians. Methods Focus groups of physicians were set up to identify the difficulties encountered when reading guidelines. Icons were integrated into Vidal Recos, taking human factors into account. The resulting interface includes a graphical summary and an iconic indexation of the guideline. The new interface was evaluated. We compared the response times and the number of errors recorded when physicians answered questions about two clinical scenarios using the interactive iconic interface or a textual interface. Users’ perceived usability was evaluated with the System Usability Scale. Results The main difficulties encountered by physicians when reading guidelines were obtaining an overview and finding recommendations for patients corresponding to “particular cases”. We designed a graphical interface for guideline consultation, using icons to identify particular cases and providing a graphical summary of the icons organized by anatomy and etiology. The evaluation showed that physicians gave clinical responses more rapidly with the iconic interface than the textual interface (25.2 seconds versus 45.6, p < 0.05). The physicians appreciated the new interface, and the System Usability Scale score value was 75 (between good and excellent). Conclusion An interactive iconic interface can provide physicians with an overview of clinical practice guidelines, and can decrease the time required to access the content of such guidelines. PMID:25158762

  5. Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePLUS

    Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians The full report is titled “Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice ...

  6. The implication of transcultural psychiatry for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moldavsky, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    This article deals with the main concepts of Transcultural Psychiatry and their applications to everyday psychiatric practice. Transcultural psychiatry has undergone a conceptual reformulation in the last two decades. Having started with a comparative approach, which focused on the diverse manifestations of mental disorders among different societies, it broadened its scope, aiming at present to incorporate social and cultural aspects of illness into the clinical framework. Therefore, transcultural psychiatry now focuses more on what is called the illness experience than on the disease process, the latter understood as illness as it is viewed by health practitioners. Western medicine, of which psychiatry is a part, is grounded in positivist epistemological principles that stress the biological processes of disease. The intention of the paper is to develop an interest in alternative but also complementary ways of thinking. Modern transcultural psychiatry interprets some epidemiological and clinical aspects of major mental disorders (such as schizophrenia and depression) in a different light. However, it also distances itself from the absolute relativism of antipsychiatry, centering on clinical facts and helping clinicians in their primary task of alleviating suffering. An important contribution in addressing this task is the formulation of a cultural axis within the DSM model of multiaxial evaluation. A clinical vignette of a cultural formulation applied to a clinical discussion of a case is described. PMID:12817669

  7. [Eslicarbazepine acetate in clinical practice. Efficacy and safety results].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Castro, Pedro J; Payán-Ortiz, Manuel; Cimadevilla, José M; Quiroga-Subirana, Pablo; Fernández-Pérez, Javier

    2013-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) licensed in Spain in February 2011 as an adjunctive therapy in adults with partial seizures with or without secondary generalization. Clinical trials with ESL have demonstrated acceptable efficacy and safety. AIM. To evaluate the results of ESL in our epilepsy unit during its first year of clinical experience with this AED. PATIENTS AND METHODS. We included all patients who started treatment with ESL at our epilepsy unit from March 2011 to May 2012. We collected the following variables: gender, aetiology of epilepsy, epileptogenic area, reason for switch to ESL, clinical response after initiation of ESL, adverse effects of ESL, refractoriness criteria and treatment discontinuation. A bivariate factor-to-factor correlation study was carried out to establish associations between the independent variables and the clinical response. RESULTS. We recruited 105 patients (51.4% male). 20,7% of patients remained seizure-free and 58.4% showed > 50% improvement after introduction of ESL. At 6 months, 18.1% had experienced some type of side effect, with cognitive disorders being the most common, and 11.5% had discontinued treatment. Combination with lacosamide proved to be significantly less effective in the control of seizures. Combination of ESL with the rest of sodium channel inhibitors was similar in efficacy to others combinations. CONCLUSIONS. ESL is a well-tolerated and effective AED when is used as adjunctive treatment with most of other AED in clinical practice. PMID:23483464

  8. Practical considerations for conducting dental clinical trials in primary care.

    PubMed

    Martin-Kerry, J M; Lamont, T J; Keightley, A; Calache, H; Martin, R; Floate, R; Princi, K; de Silva, A M

    2015-06-12

    There is increasing importance placed on conducting clinical trials in dentistry to provide a robust evidence base for the treatment provided, and models of care delivered. However, providing the evidence upon which to base such decisions is not straightforward, as the conduct of these trials is complex. Currently, only limited information is available about the strategies to deliver successful clinical trials in primary care settings, and even less available on dental clinical trials. Considerable knowledge and experience is lost once a trial is completed as details about effective management of a trial are generally not reported or disseminated to trial managers and researchers. This leads to loss of vital knowledge that could assist with the effective delivery of new trials. The aim of this study is to examine the conduct and delivery of five dental clinical trials across both Australia and the UK and identify the various factors that impacted upon their implementation. Findings suggest that early stakeholder engagement, and well-designed and managed trials, lead to improved outcomes for researchers, clinic staff and patients, and increases the potential for future dissemination and translation of information into practice. PMID:26068158

  9. Incorporation of expert variability into breast cancer treatment recommendation in designing clinical protocol guided fuzzy rule system models.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ying; John, Robert I; Ellis, Ian O

    2012-06-01

    It has been often demonstrated that clinicians exhibit both inter-expert and intra-expert variability when making difficult decisions. In contrast, the vast majority of computerized models that aim to provide automated support for such decisions do not explicitly recognize or replicate this variability. Furthermore, the perfect consistency of computerized models is often presented as a de facto benefit. In this paper, we describe a novel approach to incorporate variability within a fuzzy inference system using non-stationary fuzzy sets in order to replicate human variability. We apply our approach to a decision problem concerning the recommendation of post-operative breast cancer treatment; specifically, whether or not to administer chemotherapy based on assessment of five clinical variables: NPI (the Nottingham Prognostic Index), estrogen receptor status, vascular invasion, age and lymph node status. In doing so, we explore whether such explicit modeling of variability provides any performance advantage over a more conventional fuzzy approach, when tested on a set of 1310 unselected cases collected over a fourteen year period at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, UK. The experimental results show that the standard fuzzy inference system (that does not model variability) achieves overall agreement to clinical practice around 84.6% (95% CI: 84.1-84.9%), while the non-stationary fuzzy model can significantly increase performance to around 88.1% (95% CI: 88.0-88.2%), p<0.001. We conclude that non-stationary fuzzy models provide a valuable new approach that may be applied to clinical decision support systems in any application domain. PMID:22265814

  10. Clinical usage recommendations and analytic performance goals for total and free triiodothyronine measurements.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G

    1996-01-01

    The major clinical role for total triiodothyronine (TT3) and (or) free T3 (FT3) is the assessment of hyperthyroidism in patients with suppressed sensitive thyrotropin (sTSH) concentrations. The assays are particularly important in hyperthyroid patients with normal free thyroxine (FT4) concentrations to assess potential T3 thyrotoxicosis. Other specialized uses for T3 and FT3 measurements are monitoring thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the evaluation of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis, and predicting outcome of antithyroid drug therapy in patients with Graves hyperthyroidism. The roles of these tests in assessing heart function in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, evaluation of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, and monitoring of patients on anticonvulsant therapy are not well defined. These assays are not recommended for diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Analytic recommendations include CV < 5.2% for T3 and < 3.8% for FT3; < 0.2% cross-reactivity with L-T4; and < 1.0% cross-reactivity with D-T4, D-T3, and reverse T3. PMID:8565219

  11. ILAE official report: a practical clinical definition of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Acevedo, Carlos; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Bogacz, Alicia; Cross, J Helen; Elger, Christian E; Engel, Jerome; Forsgren, Lars; French, Jacqueline A; Glynn, Mike; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Lee, B I; Mathern, Gary W; Moshé, Solomon L; Perucca, Emilio; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Tomson, Torbjörn; Watanabe, Masako; Wiebe, Samuel

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy was defined conceptually in 2005 as a disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. This definition is usually practically applied as having two unprovoked seizures >24 h apart. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) accepted recommendations of a task force altering the practical definition for special circumstances that do not meet the two unprovoked seizures criteria. The task force proposed that epilepsy be considered to be a disease of the brain defined by any of the following conditions: (1) At least two unprovoked (or reflex) seizures occurring >24 h apart; (2) one unprovoked (or reflex) seizure and a probability of further seizures similar to the general recurrence risk (at least 60%) after two unprovoked seizures, occurring over the next 10 years; (3) diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome. Epilepsy is considered to be resolved for individuals who either had an age-dependent epilepsy syndrome but are now past the applicable age or who have remained seizure-free for the last 10 years and off antiseizure medicines for at least the last 5 years. "Resolved" is not necessarily identical to the conventional view of "remission or "cure." Different practical definitions may be formed and used for various specific purposes. This revised definition of epilepsy brings the term in concordance with common use. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. PMID:24730690

  12. Changing clinical practice: management of paediatric community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Elemraid, Mohamed A; Rushton, Stephen P; Thomas, Matthew F; Spencer, David A; Eastham, Katherine M; Gennery, Andrew R; Clark, Julia E

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and aim To compare clinical features and management of paediatric community-acquired pneumonia (PCAP) following the publication of UK pneumonia guidelines in 2002 with data from a similar survey at the same hospitals in 2001–2002 (pre-guidelines). Methods A prospective survey of 11 hospitals in Northern England was undertaken during 2008–2009. Clinical and laboratory data were recorded on children aged ?16 years who presented with clinical and radiological features of pneumonia. Results 542 children were included. There was a reduction in all investigations performed (P?recommendations. Improvements in antibiotic use are possible and have implications for future antimicrobial stewardship programmes. Further work using cost-effectiveness analysis may also demonstrate a financial benefit to health services from adoption of guidelines. PMID:24118607

  13. Barrett’s Esophagus and Cancer Risk: How Research Advances Can Impact Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Alzoubaidi, Durayd; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), whose incidence has increased sharply in the last 4 decades. The annual conversion rate of BE to cancer is significant, but small. The identification of patients at a higher risk of cancer therefore poses a clinical conundrum. Currently, endoscopic surveillance is recommended in BE patients, with the aim of diagnosing either dysplasia or cancer at early stages, both of which are curable with minimally invasive endoscopic techniques. There is a large variation in clinical practice for endoscopic surveillance, and dysplasia as a marker of increased risk is affected by sampling error and high interobserver variability. Screening programs have not yet been formally accepted, mainly due to the economic burden that would be generated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Screening programs have not yet been formally accepted, mainly due to the economic burden that would be generated by widespread indication to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In fact, it is currently difficult to formulate an accurate algorithm to confidently target the population at risk, based on the known clinical risk factors for BE and EAC. This review will focus on the clinical and molecular factors that are involved in the development of BE and its conversion to cancer and on how increased knowledge in these areas can improve the clinical management of the disease. PMID:25071900

  14. Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to, or better than the published evidence. REPORTED BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS The expected benefits from the recommendations include more rapid recovery from pain, impairment and disability (improved pain and ROM). The GDC identified evidence-based pain benefits from 10 unimodal treatments and more than 7 multimodal treatments. There were no pain benefits from magnets in necklaces, education or relaxation alone, occipital release alone, or head retraction-extension exercise combinations alone. The specificity of the studied treatments meant few studies could be generalized to more than a minority of patients. Adverse events were not addressed in most studies, but where they were, there were none or they were minor. The theoretic harm of vertebral artery dissection (VAD) was not reported, but an analysis suggested that 1 VAD may occur subsequent to 1 million cervical manipulations. Costs were not analyzed in this guideline, but it is the understanding of the GDC that recommendations limiting ineffective care and promoting a more rapid return of patients to full functional capacity will reduce patient costs, as well as increase patient safety and satisfaction. For simplicity, this version of the guideline includes primarily data synthesized across studies (evidence syntheses), whereas the technical and the interactive versions of this guideline (http://ccachiro.org/cpg) also include relevant data from individual studies (evidence extractions). RECOMMENDATIONS The GDC developed treatment, risk-management and research recommendations using the available evidence. Treatment recommendations addressing 13 treatment modalities revolved around a decision algorithm comprising diagnosis (or assessment leading to diagnosis), treatment and reassessment. Several specific variations of modalities of treatment were not recommended. For adverse events not associated with a treatment modality, but that occur in the clinical setting, there was evidence to recommend reconsideration of treatment options or referral to the appropriate health services. For adverse eve

  15. [Diagnostic strategy for a solitary thyroid nodule. Example of development of recommendations for a practice guideline].

    PubMed

    Mornex, R; Pazard, L; Massol, J

    1997-01-01

    The solitary thyroid nodule is frequently observed and many strategies are proposed for the diagnosis of the etiology and for the choice of treatment. Despite many discussions no clear consensus has been so far reached. The french groups concerned by this problem set up a Clinical Practice Guide line with the methodological help of Agence Nationale pour le Développement de l'Evaluation Médicale. Based upon the critical review of the literature a consensus was obtained concerning the natural history of the nodules and the diagnosis value of the complementary explorations. The clinical approach alone completed by a TSH determination gives the therapeutical choice in about 30% of the patient without any other explorations. In the remaining cases 3 methods (isotope scan, echography, cytopuncture) can be used alone or in a combined sequence. So far no strategy can be privilegiated. It is necessary to set up a systematic comparison between the possible strategies and this will be made by the french thyroid specialists after this first step of delimitation of a clinical practise guide line. PMID:9162507

  16. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung Hwa; Kim, Sung Tae; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Suh, Sang-il

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An intracranial aneurysm, with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is a relevant health problem. The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a critical concern for individual health; even an unruptured intracranial aneurysm is an anxious condition for the individual. The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the management of intracranial aneurysms, with or without rupture. Materials and Methods We performed an extensive literature search, using Medline. We met in person to discuss recommendations. This document is reviewed by the Task Force Team of the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology (KSIN). Results We divided the current guideline for ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RIAs) and unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). The guideline for RIAs focuses on diagnosis and treatment. And the guideline for UIAs focuses on the definition of a high-risk patient, screening, principle for treatment and selection of treatment method. Conclusion This guideline provides practical, evidence-based advice for the management of patients with an intracranial aneurysm, with or without rupture. PMID:25426300

  17. Best Practices in Clinical Supervision: another step in delineating effective supervision practice.

    PubMed

    Borders, L Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Across the helping professions, we have arrived at a point where it is possible to create statements of best practices in supervision that are based on available empirical research; credentialing, ethical, and legal guidelines; and consensus opinion. Best practices are different from, but certainly complementary to, statements of supervision competencies. In this paper, I highlight the differences between competencies and best practices, and then describe the development and content of one comprehensive statement, the Best Practices in Clinical Supervision created for the field of counseling and counselor education. I then illustrate the applicability of the Best Practices across disciplines and countries through a comparison and contrast with several other existing documents. I conclude with a brief look at the development of supervisor expertise, which requires not only declarative knowledge (competencies) and procedural knowledge (statements of best practices), but also reflective knowledge. The latter is composed of insights built over years of supervision education, experience, and self-reflection regarding necessary adaptions and improvisations that inform an individualized approach to supervision practice. PMID:25122982

  18. [Delirium in the clinical practice of a therapist].

    PubMed

    Kutlubaev, M A; Akhmadeeva, L R

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a neuropsychiatric condition that may complicate any visceral disease. Its rate is especially high among patients with inflammatory diseases or metabolic disturbances and in the elderly. Brain injury concurrent with an abnormal stress response underlies the development of delirium. The clinical picture of delirium is characterized by clouding of consciousness accompanied by global cognitive and behavioral changes. According to the nature of changes in motor behavior, delirium is divided into hyperactive, hypoactive, and mixed subtypes. Special scales, such as Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU), are used to identify delirium. Management of delirium includes specific therapy for the underlying disease and adequate care. Low-dose neuroleptics, haloperidol in particular, are recommended to correct behavioral changes. PMID:24779076

  19. Clinical Expert Panel on Monitoring Potential Lung Toxicity of Inhaled Oligonucleotides: Consensus Points and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Eric W.; Boushey, Homer A.; Garn, Holger; Green, Francis H.; Hodges, Michael; Martin, Richard J.; Murdoch, Robert D.; Renz, Harald; Shrewsbury, Stephen B.; Seguin, Rosanne; Johnson, Graham; Parry, Joel D.; Tepper, Jeff; Renzi, Paolo; Cavagnaro, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotides (ONs) are an emerging class of drugs being developed for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases including the treatment of respiratory diseases by the inhalation route. As a class, their toxicity on human lungs has not been fully characterized, and predictive toxicity biomarkers have not been identified. To that end, identification of sensitive methods and biomarkers that can detect toxicity in humans before any long term and/or irreversible side effects occur would be helpful. In light of the public's greater interests, the Inhalation Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG) held expert panel discussions focusing on the potential toxicity of inhaled ONs and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of different monitoring techniques for use during the clinical evaluation of inhaled ON candidates. This white paper summarizes the key discussions and captures the panelists' perspectives and recommendations which, we propose, could be used as a framework to guide both industry and regulatory scientists in future clinical research to characterize and monitor the short and long term lung response to inhaled ONs. PMID:22809313

  20. Recommendations for blood pressure measuring devices for office/clinic use in low resource settings.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Mendis, Shanthi; Abegunde, Dele; Asmar, Ronald; Mieke, Stephan; Murray, Alan; Shengelia, Bakuti; Steenvoorden, Gijs; Van Montfrans, Gert; O'Brien, Eoin

    2005-02-01

    This paper, which summarizes the conclusions of a WHO Expert meeting, is aimed at proposing indications to develop technical specifications for an accurate and affordable blood pressure measuring device for office/clinic use in low resource settings. Blood pressure measuring devices to be used in low resource settings should be accurate, affordable, and easily available worldwide. Given the serious inherent inaccuracy of the auscultatory technique, validated and affordable electronic devices, that have the option to select manual readings, seem to be a suitable solution for low resource settings. The agreement on the technical specifications for automated blood pressure measuring devices for office/clinic use in low resource settings included the following features: high accuracy, adoption of electronic transducers and solar batteries for power supply, standard rates of cuff inflation and deflation, adequate cuff size, digital display powered by solar batteries, facilities for adequate calibration, environmental requirements, no need of memory function, resistance to shock and temperature changes, and low cost. Availability of a device with these features should be accompanied by adequate training of health care personnel, who should guarantee implementation of the procedures recommended in recent European and American Guidelines for accurate blood pressure measurement. PMID:15687867

  1. Exploring nurses' perceptions of collecting and using HOBIC measures to guide clinical practice and improve care.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Wilson, Gail; Ferris, Ella; Cardiff, Brenda; Ng, San; Lanceta, Mary; White, Peggy; Pringle, Dorothy

    2012-03-01

    Ontario's Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC) is designed to help organizations and nurses plan and evaluate care by comparing patient outcomes with historical data on similar cases. Yet, fewer than 15% of patients in a 2010 study were found to have complete admission and discharge data sets. This low utilization rate of HOBIC measures prompted the current qualitative study, in which nurses from three clinical settings in an academic teaching hospital were interviewed to gain their perceptions related to collecting and using HOBIC measures in practice. The objective was to identify factors that promote or impede the collection and use of HOBIC data in clinical practice to improve patient care and outcomes. Analysis of interview results produced four key themes related to (a) use of HOBIC measures to inform patient care, (b) collecting and documenting HOBIC measures, (c) HOBIC as an afterthought and "black hole" and (d) impediments to assessing and documenting HOBIC measures because of language barriers, patients' cognitive status and lack of time. Recommendations to improve uptake include developing, implementing and evaluating a communication and learning plan that promotes HOBIC's values and benefits, and determining how managers and administrators perceive utilization of HOBIC at the clinical unit and organizational levels. PMID:22469758

  2. The Saudi clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis of the first deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Al-Hameed, Fahad; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M; Shamy, Abdulrahman; Qadi, Abdulelah; Bakhsh, Ebtisam; Aboelnazar, Essam; Abdelaal, Mohamad; Al Khuwaitir, Tarig; Al-Moamary, Mohamed S; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S; Brozek, Jan; Schünemann, Holger; Mustafa, Reem; Falavigna, Maicon

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) may be challenging due to the inaccuracy of clinical assessment and diversity of diagnostic tests. On one hand, missed diagnosis may result in life-threatening conditions. On the other hand, unnecessary treatment may lead to serious complications. As a result of an initiative of the Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), an expert panel led by the Saudi Association for Venous Thrombo-Embolism (SAVTE; a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society) with the methodological support of the McMaster University Working Group, produced this clinical practice guideline to assist healthcare providers in evidence-based clinical decision-making for the diagnosis of a suspected first DVT of the lower extremity. Twenty-four questions were identified and corresponding recommendations were made following the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. These recommendations included assessing the clinical probability of DVT using Wells criteria before requesting any test and undergoing a sequential diagnostic evaluation, mainly using highly sensitive D-dimer by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compression ultrasound. Although venography is the reference standard test for the diagnosis of DVT, its use was not recommended. PMID:25593601

  3. Clinical ethics and values: how do norms evolve from practice?

    PubMed

    Spranzi, Marta

    2013-02-01

    Bioethics laws in France have just undergone a revision process. The bioethics debate is often cast in terms of ethical principles and norms resisting emerging social and technological practices. This leads to the expression of confrontational attitudes based on widely differing interpretations of the same principles and values, and ultimately results in a deadlock. In this paper I would like to argue that focusing on values, as opposed to norms and principles, provides an interesting perspective on the evolution of norms. As Joseph Raz has convincingly argued, "life-building" values and practices are closely intertwined. Precisely because values have a more indeterminate meaning than norms, they can be cited as reasons for action by concerned stakeholders, and thus can help us understand how controversial practices, e.g. surrogate motherhood, can be justified. Finally, norms evolve when the interpretations of the relevant values shift and cause a change in the presumptions implicit in the norms. Thus, norms are not a prerequisite of the ethical solution of practical dilemmas, but rather the outcome of the decision-making process itself. Struggling to reach the right decision in controversial clinical ethics situations indirectly causes social and moral values to change and principles to be understood differently. PMID:22477038

  4. A Person-Centered Approach to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kathleen M.; Cloninger, C. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Effective clinical practice depends on tools that facilitate nonstigmatizing personality assessment, rapid development of a therapeutic alliance, and the guided development of self-awareness so that people learn how to live well. As an expert in psychological medicine, the psychiatrist is uniquely qualified to develop a holistic treatment approach addressing the needs of the person's body, thoughts, and psyche for the promotion of health and well-being. Personality assessment can be integrated into psychiatric practice in a way that is practical and that has many benefits for the psychiatrist and his or her patients. Personal reflection on one's temperament and character profile promotes understanding without judging or blaming. The dialogue between psychiatrist and patient about personality promotes the rapid development of a therapeutic alliance based on mutual respect, positive regard, and shared goals. The expertise and empathy of the psychiatrist in knowing more about the person's strengths and vulnerabilities beyond even the person's own awareness builds respect, trust, and hope. In this way, the assessment of personality promotes recovery of well-being and reduces disease and stigma. Likewise, the psychiatrist is more effective and satisfied with practice, standing ready with expertise, patience, and compassion to assist patients to work and develop at their own chosen pace.

  5. Translating guidelines into practice: a systematic review of theoretic concepts, practical experience and research evidence in the adoption of clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Davis, D A; Taylor-Vaisey, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend effective strategies for implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). DATA SOURCES: The Research and Development Resource Base in Continuing Medical Education, maintained by the University of Toronto, was searched, as was MEDLINE from January 1990 to June 1996, inclusive, with the use of the MeSH heading "practice guidelines" and relevant text words. STUDY SELECTION: Studies of CPG implementation strategies and reviews of such studies were selected. Randomized controlled trials and trials that objectively measured physicians' performance or health care outcomes were emphasized. DATA EXTRACTION: Articles were reviewed to determine the effect of various factors on the adoption of guidelines. DATA SYNTHESIS: The articles showed that CPG dissemination or implementation processes have mixed results. Variables that affect the adoption of guidelines include qualities of the guidelines, characteristics of the health care professional, characteristics of the practice setting, incentives, regulation and patient factors. Specific strategies fell into 2 categories: primary strategies involving mailing or publication of the actual guidelines and secondary interventional strategies to reinforce the guidelines. The interventions were shown to be weak (didactic, traditional continuing medical education and mailings), moderately effective (audit and feedback, especially concurrent, targeted to specific providers and delivered by peers or opinion leaders) and relatively strong (reminder systems, academic detailing and multiple interventions). CONCLUSIONS: The evidence shows serious deficiencies in the adoption of CPGs in practice. Future implementation strategies must overcome this failure through an understanding of the forces and variables influencing practice and through the use of methods that are practice- and community-based rather than didactic. PMID:9275952

  6. Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Sacks, Frank; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence, e-mail discussion, conference calls, and one in-person meeting. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: The Task Force recommends that the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia be based on fasting levels, that mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of 150–999 mg/dl) be diagnosed to aid in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, and that severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of > 1000 mg/dl) be considered a risk for pancreatitis. The Task Force also recommends that patients with hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for secondary causes of hyperlipidemia and that subjects with primary hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for family history of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. The Task Force recommends that the treatment goal in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia be a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in agreement with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel guidelines. The initial treatment should be lifestyle therapy; a combination of diet modification and drug therapy may also be considered. In patients with severe or very severe hypertriglyceridemia, a fibrate should be used as a first-line agent. PMID:22962670

  7. The International Conference on Harmonization Good Clinical Practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Dixon, J R

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Guideline are to protect the rights of human subjects participating in clinical trials and to ensure the scientific validity and credibility of the data collected in human clinical studies. The guiding principle in the guideline is that the rights, safety, and well-being of the trial subject are the most important considerations and should prevail over the interests of science and society. The guideline will have an important and beneficial impact on the clinical trials conducted in the three participating regions (the United States, Europe, and Japan) as well as many other regions throughout the world. In the years to come, it should fulfill its intended purpose of providing for a more economical use of human, animal, and material resources and the elimination of unnecessary delays in the global development and availability of new medicines, and at the same time maintaining safeguards on quality, safety, and efficacy and regulatory obligations to protect public health. PMID:10386329

  8. Pain management knowledge, attitudes and clinical practice: The impact of nurses' characteristics and education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen B. Clarke; Brian French; Mary Liz Bilodeau; Virginia C. Capasso; Annabel Edwards; Joanne Empoliti

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the knowattitudes, and clinical practice of registered nurses (N = 120) regarding paint management Data were collected from nine varied clinical units in a large, univasity-effiliaated teaching hospital to an urban area of the Northeast. Demogrohic information was also collected to explore the relationship between nurses' characteristics, including previous pain education, clinical experience, area of clinical practice,

  9. [Acceptance or rejection of clinical standardization?: Chilean doctors discuss clinical practice guidelines and benefit packages].

    PubMed

    Lemp, Sebastián; Calvo, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the degree to which Chilean doctors accept the standardization of clinical health care associated with the 2005 Health Reform AUGE-GES (from the Spanish Acceso Universal con Garantías Explícitas - Garantías Explícitas en Salud). Using 18 semi-structured interviews, four hypotheses were explored in relation to the level of acceptance of standardization and its variation according to years of clinical experience, the type of instrument (clinical practice guidelines or benefit packages), and the specialty (medical or surgical). Rather than a generalized rejection of the standardization of clinical procedures, the results suggest important differences within the discourse of the doctors. The level of acceptance depends both on years of clinical experience and the type of instrument evaluated. We discuss the implications of these results for the design and implementation of successful health reforms, incorporating the rationale of the medical profession and its emphasis on individual discretion, variability of treatment decisions, and the ability to adjust to the particular circumstances of the practice. PMID:23995496

  10. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    PubMed Central

    Mutters, Nico T.; Hägele, Ulrike; Hagenfeld, Daniel; Hellwig, Elmar; Frank, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice. Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP) in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well. Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100%) wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6%) gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%). Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100%) protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05). In addition, most of female dentists (62.9%) and dental assistants (80.7%) wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with infection control procedures. PMID:25285262

  11. The role of the clinical nurse specialist/neonatal nurse practitioner in a breastfeeding clinic: a model of advanced practice.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, S A; Green, P E; Scott, P A; MacDonell, J W

    2000-03-01

    A commitment to quality health care requires the development of innovative models of care. An example of such a model is the Clinical Nurse Specialist/Neonatal Nurse Practitioner in the role as consultant to Lactation Consultants in a large breastfeeding clinic. The role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist/Neonatal Nurse Practitioner in this ambulatory setting encompasses all the dimensions of the advanced practice model including research, leadership, education, and clinical practice. The evolution of this model of care is described. A conceptual framework of this advanced practice model is presented, supported by examples of the role in the clinic. PMID:11188448

  12. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H.; Richman, Joshua S.; Qvist, Vibeke; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Foy, Patrick J.; Gordan, Valeria V.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from “The Dental PBRN” (DPBRN) completed a detailed questionnaire about how they diagnose and treat dental caries. Next, they received a customized report that compared their answers to answers from all other practitioner-investigators. Then, 126 attended DPBRN's first network-wide meeting of practitioner-investigators from all five of its regions. Certain questions were repeated and new ones were asked about intention to change how they diagnose or treat dental caries. Less than one-third of practitioner-investigators intended to change how they diagnose or treat caries as a result of receiving the customized report. However, as a result of the meeting, the majority of these same practitioner-investigators stated an intention to change toward a more-conservative, less surgically-invasive, approach. These findings are consistent with the notion that the highly-interactive meeting with fellow practitioner-investigators may be an effective means to translate scientific findings into clinical practice. Practitioner-investigators are open to changing how they treat patients as a result of engaging fellow practitioner-investigators in the scientific process. PMID:21062721

  13. [Representations of clinical practice guidelines by general practitioners].

    PubMed

    Laure, P; Trépos, J Y

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the representations of general practitioners in regards to clinical practice guidelines. Two general practitioners samples have been studied according to two analytical methods: the method of scenarios, sent by e-mail to doctors belonging to a network, and a round table gathering volunteers having answered the scenario and drawn lots. 279 answers were received from 252 men and 27 women (response rate of 80%); eleven doctors (4 women) participated in the round table. Results analysis shows that the credibility of the scenario is judged as very good. Only 39% of the referees estimated that practice guidelines are little useful. The ideal type of answers was established. Five themes appeared from the debate, the main two being the elaboration of the guidelines and the measured opposition between medicine applied to individuals and epidemiology. The majority of the physicians considered clinical guidelines as a trump card, at the same moment as a tool and as an instigation, but found them difficult to hold and asked for their improvement. PMID:17294760

  14. An evidence-based approach to airway management: is there a role for clinical practice guidelines?

    PubMed

    Crosby, E T

    2011-12-01

    Complications arising out of airway management represent an important cause of anaesthesia-associated morbidity and mortality. Anaesthetic practice itself can lead to preventable harm, a particular example being persistent attempts at direct laryngoscopy, that results in delay in employing alternative strategies (or devices) when intubation is difficult. When patients are injured, expert review is called upon and often concludes that airway management provided by the anaesthetists was substandard. Many training programmes do not offer their trainees structured or organised teaching in airway management and many trainees probably enter practice with limited skills to deal with difficult airways. The literature on the management of the difficult airway in anaesthesia practice (especially as it relates to new technology and salvage strategies) is expanding rapidly. New technologies and practised response algorithms may be helpful in the management of the difficult airway, reducing the potential for adverse patient outcomes. Specialist societies and national interest groups can play an important role by critically reviewing and then applying the evidence base to generate clinical practice guidelines. The recommendations contained in such guidelines should be based on the most current evidence and they should be reviewed regularly for their content and continued relevance. PMID:22074085

  15. Canadian Thoracic Society: Presenting a new process for clinical practice guideline production

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Bhattacharyya, Onil K; Brouwers, Melissa C; Estey, Elizabeth A; Harrison, Margaret B; Hernandez, Paul; Palda, Valerie A; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    A key mandate of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is to promote evidence-based respiratory care through clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). To improve the quality and validity of the production, dissemination and implementation of its CPGs, the CTS has revised its guideline process and has created the Canadian Respiratory Guidelines Committee to oversee this process. The present document outlines the basic methodological tools and principles of the new CTS guideline production process. Important features include standard methods for choosing and formulating optimal questions and for finding, appraising, and summarizing the evidence; use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system for rating the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations; use of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation instrument for quality control during and after guideline development and for appraisal of other guidelines; use of the ADAPTE process for adaptation of existing guidelines to the local context; and use of the GuideLine Implementability Appraisal tool to augment implementability of guidelines. The CTS has also committed to develop guidelines in new areas, an annual guideline review cycle, and a new formal process for dissemination and implementation. Ultimately, it is anticipated that these changes will have a significant impact on the quality of care and clinical outcomes of individuals suffering from respiratory diseases across Canada. PMID:20011719

  16. American Geriatrics Society abstracted clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The abstracted set of recommendations presented here provides essential guidance both on the prevention of postoperative delirium in older patients at risk of delirium and on the treatment of older surgical patients with delirium, and is based on the 2014 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Guideline. The full version of the guideline, American Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults is available at the website of the AGS. The overall aims of the study were twofold: first, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the prevention of postoperative delirium in older adults; and second, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the treatment of postoperative delirium in older adults. Prevention recommendations focused on primary prevention (i.e., preventing delirium before it occurs) in patients who are at risk for postoperative delirium (e.g., those identified as moderate-to-high risk based on previous risk stratification models such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management. Clinical Guideline 103; London (UK): 2010 July 29). For management of delirium, the goals of this guideline are to decrease delirium severity and duration, ensure patient safety and improve outcomes. PMID:25495432

  17. Application of The APA Practice Guidelines on Suicide to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Douglas G; Brewer, Margaret L

    2006-06-01

    This article presents charts from The American Psychiatric Association Practice Guideline for the Assessment and Treatment of Patients with Suicidal Behaviors, part of the Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders Compendium, and a summary of the assessment information in a format that can be used in routine clinical practice. Four steps in the assessment process are presented: the use of a thorough psychiatric examination to obtain information about the patient's current presentation, history, diagnosis, and to recognize suicide risk factors therein; the necessity of asking very specific questions about suicidal ideation, intent, plans, and attempts; the process of making an estimation of the patient's level of suicide risk is explained; and the use of modifiable risk and protective factors as the basis for treatment planning is demonstrated. Case reports are used to clarify use of each step in this process. PMID:16816784

  18. Update on Best Practice Recommendations for Anesthetic Perioperative Care and Pain Management in Weight Loss Surgery, 2004–2007

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roman Schumann; Stephanie B. Jones; Bronwyn Cooper; Scott D. Kelley; Mark Vanden Bosch; Vilma E. Ortiz; Kathleen A. Connor; Michael D. Kaufman; Alan M. Harvey; Daniel B. Carr

    2009-01-01

    To reevaluate and update evidence-based best practice recommendations published in 2004 for anesthetic perioperative care and pain management in weight loss surgery (WLS), we performed a systematic search of English-language literature on anesthetic perioperative care and pain management in WLS published between April 2004 and May 2007 in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library. We identified relevant abstracts by using key

  19. Does practicing hatha yoga satisfy recommendations for intensity of physical activity which improves and maintains health and cardiovascular fitness?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marshall Hagins; Wendy Moore; Andrew Rundle

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the metabolic and heart rate responses to a typical hatha yoga session. The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether a typical yoga practice using various postures meets the current recommendations for levels of physical activity required to improve and maintain health and cardiovascular fitness; 2) to determine the reliability of metabolic costs

  20. The Use of Recommended Transition Education Practices and Perceptions of Administrative Support: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Karen Sopina

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized a mixed-methods approach to explore the relationship between the implementation of recommended transition education practices and perceptions of administrative support of transition education. Utilizing a web-based survey, I surveyed 120 secondary educators across Oklahoma to determine the extent to which they reported the use…

  1. Technology transfer through a network of standard methods and recommended practices - The case of petrochemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.; Karvounis, Sotirios

    2012-12-01

    Technology transfer may take place in parallel with cooperative action between companies participating in the same organizational scheme or using one another as subcontractor (outsourcing). In this case, cooperation should be realized by means of Standard Methods and Recommended Practices (SRPs) to achieve (i) quality of intermediate/final products according to specifications and (ii) industrial process control as required to guarantee such quality with minimum deviation (corresponding to maximum reliability) from preset mean values of representative quality parameters. This work deals with the design of the network of SRPs needed in each case for successful cooperation, implying also the corresponding technology transfer, effectuated through a methodological framework developed in the form of an algorithmic procedure with 20 activity stages and 8 decision nodes. The functionality of this methodology is proved by presenting the path leading from (and relating) a standard test method for toluene, as petrochemical feedstock in the toluene diisocyanate production, to the (6 generations distance upstream) performance evaluation of industrial process control systems (ie., from ASTM D5606 to BS EN 61003-1:2004 in the SRPs network).

  2. Framework of policy recommendations for implementation of evidence-based practice: a systematic scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Guyatt, Gordon H; Vermeulen, Hester

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Evidence-based practice (EBP) may help improve healthcare quality. However, not all healthcare professionals and managers use EBP in their daily practice. We systematically reviewed the literature to summarise self-reported appreciation of EBP and organisational infrastructure solutions proposed to promote EBP. Design Systematic review. Two investigators independently performed the systematic reviewing process. Information sources MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched for publications between 2000 and 2011. Eligibility criteria for included studies Reviews and surveys of EBP attitude, knowledge, awareness, skills, barriers and facilitators among managers, doctors and nurses in clinical settings. Results We found 31 surveys of fairly good quality. General attitude towards EBP was welcoming. Respondents perceived several barriers, but also many facilitators for EBP implementation. Solutions were proposed at various organisational levels, including (inter)national associations and hospital management promoting EBP, pregraduate and postgraduate education, as well as individual support by EBP mentors on the wards to move EBP from the classroom to the bedside. Conclusions More than 20?years after its introduction, the EBP paradigm has been embraced by healthcare professionals as an important means to improve quality of patient care, but its implementation is still deficient. Policy exerted at microlevel , middlelevel and macrolevel, and supported by professional, educational and managerial role models, may further facilitate EBP. PMID:23355664

  3. Impact of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Test on Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Peabody, John W.; Strand, Vibeke; Shimkhada, Riti; Lee, Rachel; Chernoff, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Variability exists in the assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients that may affect quality of care. Objectives To measure the impact on quality of care of a Multi-Biomarker Disease Activity (MBDA) test that quantitatively assesses RA disease activity. Methods Board-certified rheumatologists without prior experience with the MBDA test (N?=?81) were randomized into an intervention or control group as part of a longitudinal randomized-control study. All physicians were asked to care for three simulated RA patients, using Clinical Performance and Value (CPV™) vignettes, in a before and after design. CPV™ vignettes have been validated to assess the quality of clinical practice and identify variation in care. The vignettes covered all domains of a regular patient visit; scores were determined as a percentage of explicit predefined criteria completed. Three vignettes, representing typical RA cases, were administered each round. In the first round, no physician received information about the MBDA test. In the second round, only physicians in the intervention group were given educational materials about the test and hypothetical test results for each of the simulated patients. The outcome measures were the overall quality of care, disease assessment and treatment. Results The overall quality scores in the intervention group improved by 3 percent (p?=?0.02) post-intervention compared with baseline, versus no change in the control group. The greatest benefit in the intervention group was to the quality of disease activity assessment and treatment decisions, which improved by 12 percent (p<0.01) compared with no significant change in the control group. The intervention was associated with more appropriate use of biologic and/or combination DMARDs in the co-morbidity case type (p<0.01). Conclusions Based on these results, use of the MBDA test improved the assessment and treatment decisions for simulated cases of RA and may prove useful for rheumatologists in clinical practice. PMID:23667587

  4. Proposed Recommendations for Myocardial Revascularisation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael

    2015-07-01

    This discussion paper presents proposed recommendations for myocardial revascularisation in the Australasian clinical setting based on underlying evidence-based principles and an understanding of local factors which may limit the provision of ideal practice. Recommendations are proposed for myocardial revascularisation in common clinical scenarios and also for special categories, such as patients with diabetes, chronic renal impairment, advanced age, chronic total occlusions and Indigenous patients. PMID:26050954

  5. Incorporating new materials and techniques into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pitts, N B; Drummond, J; Guggenberger, R; Ferrillo, P; Johnston, S

    2013-11-01

    This article outlines the subjects presented and discussed at the December 2012 IADR Dental Materials Innovation Workshop held at King's College London. Incorporating new materials and techniques into clinical practice was considered from 4 perspectives: (1) Accelerating the "research to regulatory approval" process was presented with current developments in the United States, with the National Institutes of Health/Food and Drug Administration process as a working example; (2) intellectual property and regulatory requirements were discussed across the well-established US and EU frameworks, as well as the more recently developed procedures across Brazil, Russia, India, and China; (3) the challenges and opportunities of incorporating innovations into dental education were considered with reference to the future needs of both students and faculty; and (4) the key but difficult and unpredictable step of translating such innovations into routine dental practice was then explored. Constructive and far-ranging discussion among the broadly based Workshop participants (from dental research, education, practice, and industry, as well as environmental organizations and the World Health Organization) mapped out key issues for the future. The focus was on facilitating the more timely adoption of improvements in both materials and techniques to improve patient health and health systems, while minimizing environmental impact. PMID:24129815

  6. [Clinical drug trials. Regulation, coordination and significance of "Good Clinical Practice"].

    PubMed

    Hvidberg, E F

    1994-02-01

    All major drug agencies in the world have now implemented, or have at least shown interest in, Good Clinical Practice (GCP) standards as an important part of their regulation of clinical trials. This is increasingly considered as a logical part of drug regulation in general, because the data produced in trials will later be evaluated by the government agencies, and the quality of trials and data must therefore be assured. Another significant effect of GCP will be caused by the ties between ethics, public health and scientific standard referred to in many of the requirements. This means that GCP may eventually have an impact on the entire clinical research programme, including nonregulatory projects (possibly the majority), because the same standard must apply throughout. Harmonisation is well under way internationally for both GCP and clinical trial regulation. This should also extend to the handling of scientific misconduct, the influence of GCP on health economics and the establishment of ethics committee systems. International data bases may obviously be required. Finally, the ultimate goal, the benefit for patients and society, must not be obscured by the mechanics of improving clinical trials and the harmonisation of regulations, and the investigator should maintain a key position in clinical drug development under the new regulatory conditions. PMID:8016980

  7. Evaluation of a new clinical support model in radiotherapy practice.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Joanne; Hodgson, Denyse

    2009-01-01

    The role of the Professional Development Facilitator (PDF) in radiotherapy was introduced by Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK in January 2002, in response to a number of changes in radiotherapy education (Duxbury, A., Eddy, D., Doughty, J., 2004. Modernisation of the clinical support model for radiotherapy education and training: 1. Synergy, July 2004, P4-8). The differing models of clinical education support that exist in healthcare informed the development of this 'hybrid' model in radiotherapy. Three years from its inception a project to evaluate the role was undertaken with the focus being a comparison of this new role with the traditional model of Link Tutor support from a number of perspectives. This paper discusses a number of models of clinical support in healthcare training that have lead to the development of the PDF and provides an overview of the two roles in radiotherapy. In this evaluative project lecturers provided their perspective on these roles through the completion of an open-ended questionnaire. The results demonstrated that although there were many similarities in the two roles the main distinction was the scope of their practice. This study did not seek to provide evidence of whether one model of support is more effective than the other however the findings will inform a detailed research project that seeks to address that question. PMID:18602866

  8. Multidisciplinary Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cannita, Katia; Giordano, Aldo Victor; Manetta, Rosa; Vicentini, Roberto; Carducci, Sergio; Saltarelli, Patrizia; Iapadre, Nerio; Coletti, Gino; Ficorella, Corrado; Ricevuto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients require different treatment strategies according to disease extension, liver function, and patient's fitness. We evaluated HCC multidisciplinary management in clinical practice. Methods. Consecutive patients were followed and treated with tailored medical, locoregional, and surgical treatments, according to disease stage and patient's fitness (age, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS)). Activity, efficacy, and safety were evaluated. Results. Thirty-eight patients were evaluated: median age, 74; elderly 92%; CIRS secondary 28 (74%); Child-Pugh A 20 (53%), B 11 (29%); and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) 0 2 (5%), A 9 (24%), B 10 (26%), C 13 (34%), and D 4 (11%). Overall survival (OS) was 30 months. At 9 months median follow-up, among 25 unresectable HCC, OS was 10 months; BCLC B–D unfit for sorafenib showed OS 3 months. Ten patients (40%) received sorafenib: Child-Pugh A 5 (50%) and B 5 (50%) and disease control rate 89%, progression-free survival 7 months, and OS 9 months. G3-4 toxicities: anorexia, hypertransaminaemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and hypercreatininemia. Limiting toxicity syndromes were 40%, all multiple sites. Conclusion. HCC patients require multidisciplinary clinical management to properly select tailored treatments according to disease stage, fitness, and liver function. Patients suitable for sorafenib should be carefully selected, monitored for individual safety, and prevalently characterized by limiting toxicity syndromes multiple sites. PMID:24900987

  9. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunoglobulin in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R S; Borte, M

    2014-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy has been the mainstay of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) treatment for more than 30 years and has substantially changed the lives of patients. This review focuses on aspects of Ig use in clinical practice in addition to discussing prioritizing future Ig use. Despite Ig therapy, PID patients continue to be predisposed to recurrent, subclinical respiratory tract infections, which may lead to chronic lung disease. Research has shown that one of the underlying reasons for this deterioration in lung function is the differential distribution and concentration of Ig isotypes in the airway lumen. Further to this, the relationship between Ig dose and infection outcome is explored, expanding on end-of-cycle loss of efficacy (wear-off) particularly with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), how this can confound the determination of optimal IgG dose and how our aim of treatment should be to improve clinical outcome. This review goes on to discuss the safety of Ig replacement therapy, which is generally well tolerated by most patients, compares the rates of systemic adverse reactions between IVIg and SCIg and highlights the advantages of SCIg administration in this respect, including the use of pre-infused subcutaneous recombinant human hyaluronidase to aid subcutaneous infusion volumes. The growing demand for Ig replacement therapy is challenging physicians; here we show the development of prioritization algorithms to assist in identifying those who will benefit most from this clinically valuable therapy. PMID:25546766

  10. Withdrawal symptoms and rebound syndromes associated with switching and discontinuing atypical antipsychotics: theoretical background and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cerovecki, Anja; Musil, Richard; Klimke, Ansgar; Seemüller, Florian; Haen, Ekkehard; Schennach, Rebecca; Kühn, Kai-Uwe; Volz, Hans-Peter; Riedel, Michael

    2013-07-01

    With the widespread use of atypical or second-generation antipsychotics, switching treatment has become current practice and more complicated, as the pharmacological profiles of these agents differ substantially despite their similarity in being 'atypical'. All share the ability to block dopamine D? receptors, and most of them also block serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Apart from these common features, some atypical antipsychotics are also able to block or stimulate other dopamine or serotonin receptors, as well as histaminergic, muscarinergic or adrenergic receptors. As a result of the varying receptor affinities, in switching or discontinuing compounds several possible pitfalls have to be considered, including the occurrence of withdrawal and rebound syndromes. This article reviews the pharmacological background of functional blockade or stimulation of receptors of interest in regard to atypical antipsychotics and the implicated potential withdrawal and rebound phenomena. A MEDLINE search was carried out to identify information on withdrawal or rebound syndromes occurring after discontinuation of atypical antipsychotics. Using the resulting literature, we first discuss the theoretical background to the functional consequences of atypical antipsychotic-induced blockade or stimulation of neurotransmitter receptors and, secondly, we highlight the clinical consequences of this. We then review the available clinical literature on switching between atypical antipsychotics, with respect to the occurrence of withdrawal or rebound symptoms. Finally, we offer practical recommendations based on the reviewed findings. The systematic evaluation of withdrawal or rebound phenomena using randomized controlled trials is still understudied. Knowledge of pharmacological receptor-binding profiles may help clinicians in choosing adequate switching or discontinuation strategies for each agent. Results from large switching trials indicate that switching atypical antipsychotics can be performed in a safe manner. Treatment-emergent adverse events during or after switching are not always considered to be, at least in part, associated with the pre-switch antipsychotic. Further studies are needed to substantiate the evidence gained so far on different switching strategies. The use of concomitant medication, e.g., benzodiazepines or anticholinergic drugs, may help to minimize symptoms arising from the discontinuation or switching of antipsychotic treatment. PMID:23821039

  11. Review of VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline on management of acute stress and interventions to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Nash, William P; Watson, Patricia J

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the recommendations of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)/Department of Defense (DOD) VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Post-Traumatic Stress that pertain to acute stress and the prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder, including screening and early interventions for acute stress states in various settings. Recommended interventions during the first 4 days after a potentially traumatic event include attending to safety and basic needs and providing access to physical, emotional, and social resources. Psychological first aid is recommended for management of acute stress, while psychological debriefing is discouraged. Further medical and psychiatric assessment and provision of brief, trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy are warranted if clinically significant distress or functional impairment persists or worsens after 2 days or if the criteria for a diagnosis of acute stress disorder are met. Follow-up monitoring and rescreening are endorsed for at least 6 months for everyone who experiences significant acute posttraumatic stress. Four interventions that illustrate early intervention principles contained in the VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline are described. PMID:23015576

  12. Health Promotion Board–Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Falls Prevention among Older Adults Living in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Shyamala, Thilagaratnam; Wong, Sweet Fun; Andiappan, Akila; Eong, Kah Guan Au; Bakshi, Anu Birla; Boey, Debbie; Chong, Tsung Wei; Eng, Hui Ping; Ismail, Noor Hafizah; Lau, Tang Ching; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lim, Hsin Wei Wendy; Seong, Lydia; Wong, Wei Chin; Yap, Kai Zhen; Yudah, Sri

    2015-01-01

    The Health Promotion Board (HPB) has developed the Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) on Falls Prevention among Older Adults Living in the Community to provide health professionals in Singapore with recommendations for evidence-based assessments and interventions for falls prevention. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary of the key recommendations from the HPB-MOH CPG on Falls Prevention among Older Adults Living in the Community for the information of SMJ readers. The chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Health Promotion Board website: http://www.hpb.gov. sg/cpg-falls-prevention. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:26034320

  13. Whole exome sequencing of suspected mitochondrial patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Koolen, David A; Smeitink, Jan A; van den Heuvel, Lambert; Rodenburg, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are characterized by a broad clinical spectrum. Identical clinical signs and symptoms can be caused by mutations in different mitochondrial or nuclear genes. Vice versa, the same mutation can lead to different phenotypes. Genetic syndromes and neuromuscular disorders mimicking mitochondrial disorders further complicate the diagnostic process. Whole exome sequencing (WES) is the state of the art next generation sequencing technique to identify genetic defects in mitochondrial disorders. Until recently it has mainly been used as a research tool. In this study, the use of WES in routine diagnostics is described. The WES data of 109 patients, referred under the suspicion of a mitochondrial disorder, were examined in two steps. First, the data were filtered using a virtual gene panel of genes known to be associated with mitochondrial disease. If negative, the entire exome was examined. A molecular diagnosis was achieved in 39 % of the heterogeneous cohort, and in 57 % of the subgroup of 42 patients with the highest suspicion for a mitochondrial disease. In addition to mutations in genes known to be associated with mitochondrial disorders (e.g. TUFM, MTFMT, FBXL4), in the subgroup of patients with the lowest suspicion for a mitochondrial disorder we found mutations in several genes associated with neuromuscular disorders (e.g. SEPN1, ACTA1) and genetic syndrome (e.g. SETBP1, ARID1B). Our results show that WES technology has been successfully implemented as a state-of-the-art, molecular diagnostic test for mitochondrial disorders as well as for the mimicking disorders in daily clinical practice. It also illustrates that clinical and biochemical phenotyping is essential for successful application of WES to diagnose individual patients. PMID:25735936

  14. GUIDELINES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ADMISSION TO ENGLISH SUBJECT-MATTER EDUCATION PROGRAM, ADMISSION TO CLINICAL PRACTICE AND COMPLETION OF PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Rusu, Adrian

    , and one Shakespeare course. It is further recommended that all English candidates take an adolescent literature course.. For enrollment in Clinical Practice: 1. English GPA* of 3.15 or above 2. Grade of C- and no Incompletes 4. Achieve minimum English GPA* (3.15) with no grade lower than C- in English courses 5. Earn

  15. Probiotic products in Canada with clinical evidence: What can gastroenterologists recommend?

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Gregor; Anukam, Kingsley; Koyama, Tara

    2008-01-01

    Probiotics, defined as ‘live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host’, are finally becoming an option for gastroenterologists in Canada, after being available for many years in Japan, Europe and the United States of America. Unfortunately, Health Canada and the US Food and Drug Administration have not controlled the use of the term ‘probiotic’ or put into place United Nations and World Health Organization guidelines. The net result is that a host of products called ‘probiotics’ are available but are not truly probiotic. The aim of the present review was to discuss the rationale for probiotics in gastroenterology, and specifically examine which products are options for physicians in Canada, and which ones patients might be using. It is hoped that by clarifying what probiotics are, and the strengths and limitations of their use, specialists will be better placed to make recommendations on the role of these products in patient care. In due course, more clinically documented probiotics will emerge, some with therapeutic effects based on a better understanding of disease processes. PMID:18299736

  16. Robot-mediated upper limb physiotherapy: review and recommendations for future clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Péter, Orsolya; Fazekas, Gábor; Zsiga, Katalin; Dénes, Zoltán

    2011-09-01

    Robot-mediated physiotherapy provides a new possibility for improving the outcome of rehabilitation of patients who are recovering from stroke. This study is a review of robot-supported upper limb physiotherapy focusing on the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, OVID, and EBSCO for clinical trials with robots providing shoulder, elbow, or wrist therapy. Results concerning motor control, spasticity, functional outcome, and the main features of the studies were evaluated. A total of 178 papers were found. On the basis of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 30 studies remained for evaluation. In these trials, a total of 493 patients received robot-aided therapy. The Fugl-Meyer assessment was the most commonly used motor scale, and in 24 of 27 trials, motor function improved significantly. The application of the Modified Ashworth Scale showed that spasticity decreased significantly in nine of 21 trials. Functional scales were only examined in one-third of the studies with significant changes being found in half of them. The intensity and duration of the interventions as well as the elapsed time poststroke were varied. There are several scales, which were used in only a few trials. Unifying the methodology in robotic trials is desirable. Clarification of the acute/subacute/chronic categories, standardizing the application of certain scales for outcome measure in each trial, use of functional scales, and a clearer description of the interventions are recommended. PMID:21543990

  17. The assessment of antiangiogenic and antivascular therapies in early-stage clinical trials using magnetic resonance imaging: issues and recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M O Leach; K M Brindle; J L Evelhoch; J R Griffiths; M R Horsman; A Jackson; G C Jayson; I R Judson; M V Knopp; R J Maxwell; D McIntyre; A R Padhani; P Price; R Rathbone; G J Rustin; P S Tofts; G M Tozer; W Vennart; J C Waterton; S R Williams; P Workman; MO Leach

    2005-01-01

    Vascular and angiogenic processes provide an important target for novel cancer therapeutics. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is being used increasingly to noninvasively monitor the action of these therapeutics in early-stage clinical trials. This publication reports the outcome of a workshop that considered the methodology and design of magnetic resonance studies, recommending how this new tool might best be used.

  18. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This document provides healthcare practitioners with information regarding the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to enable them to better meet the needs of this patient population. These guidelines describe controversies in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and include recommendations that take into account changes in the bacteriologic landscape. Recent guidelines in ABRS have been released by American and European groups as recently as 2007, but these are either limited in their coverage of the subject of CRS, do not follow an evidence-based strategy, or omit relevant stakeholders in guidelines development, and do not address the particulars of the Canadian healthcare environment. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of CRS, along with the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies, have improved outcomes for patients with CRS. CRS now affects large numbers of patients globally and primary care practitioners are confronted by this disease on a daily basis. Although initially considered a chronic bacterial infection, CRS is now recognized as having multiple distinct components (eg, infection, inflammation), which have led to changes in therapeutic approaches (eg, increased use of corticosteroids). The role of bacteria in the persistence of chronic infections, and the roles of surgical and medical management are evolving. Although evidence is limited, guidance for managing patients with CRS would help practitioners less experienced in this area offer rational care. It is no longer reasonable to manage CRS as a prolonged version of ARS, but rather, specific therapeutic strategies adapted to pathogenesis must be developed and diffused. Guidelines must take into account all available evidence and incorporate these in an unbiased fashion into management recommendations based on the quality of evidence, therapeutic benefit, and risks incurred. This document is focused on readability rather than completeness, yet covers relevant information, offers summaries of areas where considerable evidence exists, and provides recommendations with an assessment of strength of the evidence base and degree of endorsement by the multidisciplinary expert group preparing the document. These guidelines have been copublished in both Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology and the Journal of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. PMID:21310056

  19. Vaccination of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: report from the international consensus conference on clinical practice in chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Hilgendorf, Inken; Freund, Mathias; Jilg, Wolfgang; Einsele, Hermann; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Greinix, Hildegard; Halter, Jörg; Lawitschka, Anita; Wolff, Daniel; Meisel, Roland

    2011-04-01

    Patients lose protective immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Therefore, revaccination of HSCT recipients represents an important strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality associated with these infections. Since there is little consensus on vaccine recommendations and practices for allogeneic HSCT recipients with active chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) the German-Austrian-Swiss-Consensus Conference on Clinical Practice in Chronic GVHD developed an immunization schedule with the aim to provide optimal patient care. The proposed vaccine recommendations include immunization against Haemophilus influenzae type b, pertussis, pneumococci, meningococci, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis A and B, measles, mumps and rubella, influenza, poliomyelitis, varicella-zoster virus, human papilloma virus, and tick-borne encephalitis with a particular focus on vaccination of patients with active chronic GVHD. PMID:21345379

  20. IOM and DHHS Meeting on Making Clinical Practice Guidelines Appropriate for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Richard A.; Boyd, Cynthia; Tinetti, Mary E.; Von Kohorn, Isabelle; Parekh, Anand K.; McGinnis, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing prevalence of Americans with multiple (2 or more) chronic conditions raises concerns about the appropriateness and applicability of clinical practice guidelines for patient management. Most guidelines clinicians currently rely on have been designed with a single chronic condition in mind, and many such guidelines are inattentive to issues related to comorbidities. PURPOSE In response to the need for guideline developers to address comorbidities in guidelines, the Department of Health and Human Services convened a meeting in May 2012 in partnership with the Institute of Medicine to identify principles and action options. RESULTS Eleven principles to improve guidelines’ attentiveness to the population with multiple chronic conditions were identified during the meeting. They are grouped into 3 interrelated categories: (1) principles intended to improve the stakeholder technical process for developing guidelines; (2) principles intended to strengthen content of guidelines in terms of multiple chronic conditions; and (3) principles intended to increase focus on patient-centered care. CONCLUSION This meeting built upon previously recommended actions by identifying additional principles and options for government, guideline developers, and others to use in strengthening the applicability of clinical practice guidelines to the growing population of people with multiple chronic conditions. The suggested principles are helping professional societies to improve guidelines’ attentiveness to persons with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:24821897

  1. Variations in evidence-based clinical practices in nine United States Veterans Administration opioid agonist therapy clinics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark L Willenbring; Hildi J Hagedorn; Andrea C Postier; Marie Kenny

    2004-01-01

    Background: Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) for opioid dependence has a strong evidence base, but clinical practice often does not conform to evidence-based practices. The goal of the OpiATE Initiative is to improve patient outcomes by implementing four evidence-based practices in United States Veterans Administration OAT clinics: (1) long-term maintenance orientation, (2) adequate dosing, (3) adequate counseling, and (4) use of

  2. Focus on clinical practice: improving the quality of care.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2012-01-01

    In this diverse issue, we have a report on the high cost of diabetes quality improvement programs. Two studies using health information technology, including one that embedded a questionnaire and tool for bipolar disorder into an electronic health record to improve diagnosis, and another that collected information about anxiety and depression for adolescents with a personal digital assistant. Other articles considered sources of disparities in screening for colorectal cancer in rural Georgia, and the characteristics of sepsis in HIV patients. Clinicians will likely find interesting how patients interpret and report provider reactions to interpersonal violence situations. We also have a review of the symptoms patients report in a community practice sample; breast cancer survivors' perspectives on acupuncture for treating hot flashes; clinical reviews about Alzheimer disease and prasugrel; and several interesting brief case reports. PMID:22570385

  3. A framework to aid adoption of automated rehabilitation devices into clinical practice: synthesising and Interpreting Language for Clinical Kinematics (SILCK).

    PubMed

    Cozens, J A; Jackson, T; Henderson, K; Brough, S; Bhakta, B; Makower, S G; van Wijck, F; Smith, C

    2013-06-01

    The Synthesising and Interpreting Language for Clinical Kinematics (SILCK) is an informatic framework for developing software to control automated rehabilitation devices. It aids adoption of devices into rehabilitation practice, by bridging the gap between clinical practice and internal device operation. SILCK defines data entities and processes for capturing clinical observations of patients and their rehabilitation goals in formats which can be used to direct the tailoring of device parameters to the individual patient's needs. PMID:24187222

  4. Practices and recommendations in infant feeding and HIV prevention: the child's perspective.

    PubMed

    Torres, Victorio; Bedell, Richard Albert; Wachira, Mary Njoki; Dalmau, David

    2014-01-01

    Although the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4), reducing under-five mortality by two-thirds by the year 2015, depends on optimizing breast-feeding practices in resource-limited settings, there are some conditions in which breast-feeding is impossible, contraindicated, or not recommended. The overall impact of involuntary nonbreast-feeding on the attainment of MDG 4 has not been documented. In industrialized and many middle-income countries replacement feeding is affordable, feasible, acceptable, sustainable, and safe and complete avoidance of breast-feeding is the norm to prevent postnatal transmission of HIV. The situation is very different in many low-income countries affected by the HIV epidemic where infants are exposed to HIV and antiretroviral (ARV) mediation through breast milk for long periods with risk of acquiring HIV infection, development of multidrug resistant HIV and short and long term toxicity associated to ARV medications. Despite the obvious needs, there is no specific research on how to make replacement feeding safer for infants with no access to breast-feeding and for whom replacement feeding is justified. Orphans, abandoned and infants of severely ill mothers unable to breast-feed, won't benefit from the research done on making breast-feeding safer for HIV exposed infants. A child rights perspective illuminates societal obligations to provide replacement feeding with infant formula milk to such infants, and to support research to make it safer at the same time that breast-feeding is promoted and protected for the general population. PMID:24735258

  5. Two cases of verified clinical failures using internationally recommended first-line cefixime for gonorrhoea treatment, Norway, 2010.

    PubMed

    Unemo, M; Golparian, D; Syversen, G; Vestrheim, D F; Moi, H

    2010-11-25

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to most of the available therapeutic antimicrobials. The susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, the last remaining first-line treatment option, is decreasing globally. This report describes the first two cases outside Japan of verified gonorrhoea clinical failures using internationally recommended first-line cefixime treatment. Enhanced awareness and more frequent follow-up examination, test-of-cure and appropriate verification/falsification of presumed clinical treatment failures, involving several clinical and laboratory parameters should be strongly emphasised worldwide. PMID:21144442

  6. Vector-Borne Diseases - constant challenge for practicing veterinarians: recommendations from the CVBD World Forum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The human-animal bond has been a fundamental feature of mankind's history for millennia. The first, and strongest of these, man's relationship with the dog, is believed to pre-date even agriculture, going back as far as 30,000 years. It remains at least as powerful today. Fed by the changing nature of the interactions between people and their dogs worldwide and the increasing tendency towards close domesticity, the health of dogs has never played a more important role in family life. Thanks to developments in scientific understanding and diagnostic techniques, as well as changing priorities of pet owners, veterinarians are now able, and indeed expected, to play a fundamental role in the prevention and treatment of canine disease, including canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs). The CVBDs represent a varied and complex group of diseases, including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, leishmaniosis, rickettsiosis and thelaziosis, with new syndromes being uncovered every year. Many of these diseases can cause serious, even life-threatening clinical conditions in dogs, with a number having zoonotic potential, affecting the human population. Today, CVBDs pose a growing global threat as they continue their spread far from their traditional geographical and temporal restraints as a result of changes in both climatic conditions and pet dog travel patterns, exposing new populations to previously unknown infectious agents and posing unprecedented challenges to veterinarians. In response to this growing threat, the CVBD World Forum, a multidisciplinary group of experts in CVBDs from around the world which meets on an annual basis, gathered in Nice (France) in 2011 to share the latest research on CVBDs and discuss the best approaches to managing these diseases around the world. As a result of these discussions, we, the members of the CVBD Forum have developed the following recommendations to veterinarians for the management of CVBDs. PMID:22433172

  7. What Should We Mean by Empirical Validation in Hypnotherapy: Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Hypnosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Assen Alladin; Linda Sabatini; Jon K. Amundson

    2007-01-01

    This paper briefly surveys the trend of and controversy surrounding empirical validation in psychotherapy. Empirical validation of hypnotherapy has paralleled the practice of validation in psychotherapy and the professionalization of clinical psychology, in general. This evolution in determining what counts as evidence for bona fide clinical practice has gone from theory-driven clinical approaches in the 1960s and 1970s through critical

  8. Characterization of the Knowledge Contained in Diagnostic Problem Oriented Clinical Practice Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Peleg, Mor

    TM (NGC) - a public resource for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, initiated and maintained the knowledge contained in clinical practice guidelines refer to these data types, and to what extent evidence to explore whether evidence-based medicine (EBM) instruments for aiding clinical diagnosis utilize these data

  9. Psychologists' Clinical Practices in Assessing Dementia in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Ellen; Scior, Katrina

    2008-01-01

    There are now ample guidelines for the assessment and diagnosis of possible dementia in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) and Down syndrome. However, little is known about their implementation in clinical practice. This study set out to examine the clinical practice of one key professional group, namely clinical psychologists. A…

  10. Integrating Single-System Design Research into the Clinical Practice Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marlene G.

    2006-01-01

    Clinical practice and research are generally taught separately in Master of Social Work programs by faculty with distinct areas of expertise. This paper discusses the teaching of single-subject design research methodology by clinical faculty, in the clinical practice class. Examples from student papers demonstrate the effectiveness of integrating…

  11. Nutrition myths and healthy dietary advice in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Lenard I; Mazza, Mary Carol; Lucan, Sean C

    2015-05-01

    Healthy dietary intake is important for the maintenance of general health and wellness, the prevention of chronic illness, the optimization of life expectancy, and the clinical management of virtually all disease states. Dietary myths (i.e., concepts about nutrition that are poorly supported or contradicted by scientific evidence) may stand in the way of healthy dietary intake. Dietary myths exist about micronutrients, macronutrients, non-nutrients, and food energy. Representative myths of each type include that patients need to focus on consuming enough calcium to ensure bone health, dietary fat leads to obesity and is detrimental to vascular health, all fiber (whether naturally occurring or artificially added) is beneficial, and food calories translate to pounds of body weight through a linear relationship and simple arithmetic. A common theme for dietary myths is a reductionist view of diet that emphasizes selected food constituents as opposed to whole foods. Healthy dietary advice takes a more holistic view; consistent evidence supports recommendations to limit the consumption of ultraprocessed foods and to eat whole or minimally processed foods, generally in a form that is as close to what occurs in nature as possible. Family physicians can help dispel myths for patients and give sound nutritional advice by focusing on actual foods and broader dietary patterns. PMID:25955738

  12. Strategies for promoting physical activity in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sallis, Robert; Franklin, Barry; Joy, Liz; Ross, Robert; Sabgir, David; Stone, James

    2015-01-01

    The time has come for healthcare systems to take an active role in the promotion of physical activity (PA). The connection between PA and health has been clearly established and exercise should be viewed as a cost effective medication that is universally prescribed as a first line treatment for virtually every chronic disease. While there are potential risks associated with exercise, these can be minimized with a proper approach and are far outweighed by the benefits. Key to promoting PA in the clinical setting is the use of a PA Vital Sign in which every patient's exercise habits are assessed and recorded in their medical record. Those not meeting the recommended 150min per week of moderate intensity PA should be encouraged to increase their PA levels with a proper exercise prescription. We can improve compliance by assessing our patient's barriers to being more active and employing new and evolving technology like accelerometers and smart phones applications, along with various websites and programs that have proven efficacy. PMID:25459975

  13. Dexmedetomidine: an adjuvant making large inroads into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Sj; Kulshrestha, A

    2013-10-01

    The introduction of newer more selective ?(-2) adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine has made a revolution in the field of anesthesia owing to its varied application. The aim of the current review is to highlight the various clinical and pharmacological aspects of dexmedetomidine in daily routine practice of anesthesiology and intensive care besides its potential role in other clinical specialties. This review of dexmedetomidine was carried out after searching the medical literature in Pubmed, Science direct, Scopus, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles using keywords anesthesia, dexmedetomidine, neurosurgery, pediatric surgery, regional dexmedetomidine, anesthesia, regional, neurosurgery, and pediatric surgery. Dexmedetomidine has made its application from a novel sedating agent in the intensive care unit to its use as an adjuvant in various regional anesthetic techniques because of its "cooperative sedation" without any respiratory depression. It has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile suitable to be used in the perioperative period to reduce the requirements of opioids and anesthetic drugs. There are few side-effects of dexmedetomidine, which should always be kept in mind before choosing the patients for its use. The various side-effects associated with dexmedetomidine include, but are not limited to hypotension, bradycardia, worsening of heart block, dry mouth, and nausea. However, large scale randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish various effects of dexmedetomidine and to clearly define its safety profile. PMID:24379995

  14. Sitagliptin: Is It Effective in Routine Clinical Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Mohan Dallumal, Rita; Chua, Siew Siang; Wu, David Bin-Chia; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The present study was conducted to determine the glycaemic effects of sitagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods. Data was collected from patient medical records of a major teaching hospital in Malaysia, from 2009 to 2012. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values prior to and up to 12 months after the initiation of sitagliptin were analysed. The change in HbA1c values was accounted for based on a generalized linear model generated using the Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) method. Results and Discussion. Of the 457 patients, 53.6% were elderly and 81.4% were overweight. The mean HbA1c (standard deviation) before initiation of sitagliptin was 8.5 (1.4)%. This dropped to 7.7 (1.4)%, 3 to 6 months after initiation of sitagliptin, with a mean difference of 0.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7–1.0; P < 0.001). However, this value increased to 8.0 (1.7)% after 7 to 12 months on sitagliptin (P = 0.002) with a mean difference from baseline of 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4–0.7; P < 0.001). Conclusion. In routine clinical practice, sitagliptin produces a significant reduction in mean HbA1c (0.8%) within the first 6 months of use which corresponds to efficacy data obtained in controlled clinical trials. However, this reduction was lesser, 7 to 12 month later.

  15. Ethics committees and achievement of good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Glasa, J; Holomán, J; Klepanec, J; Soltés, L

    1996-01-01

    Local ethics committees (institutional review boards, or similar bodies) were established during the last decades at (bio)medical research institutions worldwide to serve as review bodies of the proposed research projects (inclusive protocols of clinical trials), and also to monitor if the ethical principles, including the requirements of good practice (clinical, laboratory, and scientific) are respected and fulfilled during the conduct of research projects. Existing pluralism of the philosophical background on which contemporary bioethics theories are developed is questioning seriously the ancient traditions of Hippocratic, non-utilitarian medical ethics, trying to promote more utilitarian and secular approaches. Individual physicians, or researchers, as well as the ethics committee itself, are faced today with complicated ethical dilemmas, that frequently have to be solved in the atmosphere of considerable social, collegiate, economical, and time pressures, and sometimes without helpful guidance of appropriate legislation. An interesting possibility of how to overcome some of the pitfalls of the ethics review process is to express a common ethical responsibility for the research project or trial protocol in a statement of most (or all) parties involved (such as the principal investigator, sponsor, ethics committee, the patient, "society'). Such an approach has proven helpful in enhancing concrete deliberations of ethics committees-established in Slovakia since 1991 according to the requirements of the national guidelines issued by the Slovak Ministry of Health. PMID:8953810

  16. [Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease: from research to clinical practice and ethics].

    PubMed

    Tarquini, Daniela; Pucci, Eugenio; Gasparini, Maddalena; Zullo, Silvia; Tiraboschi, Pietro; Bonito, Virginio; Defanti, Carlo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the so-called Dubois criteria introduced the use of biomarkers in research (in particular, brain amyloid positron emission tomography imaging and the cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau/fosfo-tau and beta-amyloid 1-42) for the early or preclinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Even so, we are looking at an increased use of these markers in clinical practice. In the 1960s, Alzheimer's disease was considered a rare form of presenile dementia, but gradually it has been recognized as the prevalent form of old-age dementia. As a consequence, what was once regarded as an inevitable outcome of old age is now recognized as a true disease. Several factors contributed to this paradigm shift, in particular a longer lifespan, new techniques of in vivo study of the central nervous system, and the pressure exerted by the pharmaceutical industry and patient groups. The current lack of disease-modifying therapies and the high incidence of mild cognitive impairment, which is a risk factor for dementia, raise a series of clinical ethical problems ranging from how diagnosis is communicated to how resources are used. This article offers a conceptual scheme through which these issues can be addressed. PMID:25072545

  17. Optical coherence tomography: clinical applications in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Wali, Upender K; Azeem, Sitara

    2013-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a success story of scientific and technological co-operation between a physicist and a clinician. The concept of cross-sectional imaging revolutionalized the applicability of OCT in the medical profession. OCT is a non-contact, topographic, biomicroscopic device that provides high resolution, cross-sectional digital images of live biological tissues in vivo and in real time. OCT is based on the property of tissues to reflect and backscatter light involving low-coherence interferometry. The spatial resolution of as little as 3 microns or even less has allowed us to study tissues almost at a cellular level. Overall, OCT is an invaluable adjunct in the diagnosis and follow up of many diseases of both anterior and posterior segments of the eye, primarily or secondary to systemic diseases. The digitalization and advanced software has made it possible to store and retrieve huge patient data for patient services, clinical applications and academic research. OCT has revolutionized the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, follow up and response to treatment in almost all fields of clinical practice involving primary ocular pathologies and secondary ocular manifestations in systemic diseases like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, vascular and neurological diseases, thus benefitting non-ophthalmologists as well. Systemically, OCT is proving to be a helpful tool in substantiating early diagnosis in diseases like multiple sclerosis and drug induced retinopathies by detecting early changes in morphology of the retinal nerve fiber layer. PMID:23599874

  18. Dexmedetomidine: An Adjuvant Making Large Inroads into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, SJ; Kulshrestha, A

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of newer more selective ??2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine has made a revolution in the field of anesthesia owing to its varied application. The aim of the current review is to highlight the various clinical and pharmacological aspects of dexmedetomidine in daily routine practice of anesthesiology and intensive care besides its potential role in other clinical specialties. This review of dexmedetomidine was carried out after searching the medical literature in Pubmed, Science direct, Scopus, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles using keywords anesthesia, dexmedetomidine, neurosurgery, pediatric surgery, regional dexmedetomidine, anesthesia, regional, neurosurgery, and pediatric surgery. Dexmedetomidine has made its application from a novel sedating agent in the intensive care unit to its use as an adjuvant in various regional anesthetic techniques because of its “cooperative sedation” without any respiratory depression. It has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile suitable to be used in the perioperative period to reduce the requirements of opioids and anesthetic drugs. There are few side-effects of dexmedetomidine, which should always be kept in mind before choosing the patients for its use. The various side-effects associated with dexmedetomidine include, but are not limited to hypotension, bradycardia, worsening of heart block, dry mouth, and nausea. However, large scale randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish various effects of dexmedetomidine and to clearly define its safety profile. PMID:24379995

  19. Implementation of Multi-parametric Prostate MRI in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kierans, Andrea S; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2015-08-01

    While initial implementations of prostate MRI suffered from suboptimal performance in tumor detection, technological advances over the past decade have allowed modern multi-parametric prostate MRI (mpMRI) to achieve high diagnostic accuracy for detection, localization, and staging and thereby impact patient management. A particular emerging application of mpMRI is in the pre-biopsy setting to allow for MRI-targeted biopsy, for instance, through real-time MRI/ultrasound fusion, which may help reduce the over-detection of low-risk disease and selectively detect clinically significant cancers, in comparison with use of standard systematic biopsy alone. mpMRI and MRI-targeted biopsy are spreading beyond the large academic centers to increasingly be adopted within small and community practices. Aims of this review article are to summarize the hardware and sequences used for performing mpMRI, explore patient specific technical considerations, delineate approaches for study interpretation and reporting [including the recent American College of Radiology Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2], and describe challenges and implications relating to the widespread clinical implementation of mpMRI. PMID:26077358

  20. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treatment strategies were rated on strength of evidence, and a clinical recommendation for each intervention was made, based on global impression of efficacy, effectiveness, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guidelines. Results These guidelines are presented in 10 sections, including an introduction, principles of diagnosis and management, six sections (Sections 3 through 8) on the specific anxiety-related disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder), and two additional sections on special populations (children/adolescents, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly) and clinical issues in patients with comorbid conditions. Conclusions Anxiety and related disorders are very common in clinical practice, and frequently comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions. Optimal management requires a good understanding of the efficacy and side effect profiles of pharmacological and psychological treatments. PMID:25081580

  1. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery applications in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross S; Sodergren, Mikael H; Clark, James; Teare, Julian; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2012-01-01

    To review natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) applications in clinical practice and assess the evidence base for each application as reported in the literature. An electronic literature search was performed. Inclusion criteria were publications relating to NOTES applications in humans. For each type of operation the highest level of evidence available for clinical NOTES publications was evaluated. Morbidity and short-term operative outcomes were compared with gold standard published evidence where available. Finally, registered trials recruiting patients for NOTES applications were identified. Human NOTES publications with the highest level of evidence in each application are identified. There were no RCTs in the literature to date. The strongest evidence came in the form of large, multi-centre trials with 300-500 patients. The results are encouraging, comparable with gold standard techniques on morbidity and mortality. While short-term operative outcomes were also similar when compared to the gold standard techniques, other than improved cosmesis little else can definitely be concluded as a clear benefit of a NOTES procedure. The most common procedures are cholecystectomy, appendicectomy and peritoneoscopy mainly performed via transvaginal access. It is evident that morbidity appears to be higher when the transgastric route is used. The safety profile of hybrid NOTES transvaginal procedures is beginning to be confirmed as is evident from the large number of procedures presented in this review. A number of authors have presented work on pure NOTES procedures but the results are inconsistent and thus the vast majority of NOTES procedures worldwide are performed in a hybrid fashion with a variable amount of laparoscopy. This review of the clinical applications of NOTES summarises the growing evidence behind this surgical discipline and highlights NOTES procedures with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:22442743

  2. The ESPEN clinical practice Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: present status and perspectives for future research.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, Federico; Forbes, Alastair

    2009-08-01

    The ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition (PN) reflect current scientific knowledge in the field of clinical nutrition in adults. They summarize the indications for PN and its anticipated outcomes in respect of the underlying disease, nutritional status and quality of life. They are companion documents to the ESPEN Guidelines on Enteral Nutrition and follow the same general format. They address the influence of the underlying disease on the patient's nutritional status, and that of malnutrition on the outcome of the disease. Contraindications to and complications of PN are considered, together with comparative analyses of the roles of the parenteral and enteral routes in different illness states. The quality and strength of the supporting literature has been graded according to the criteria of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Hence, meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials (level of evidence Ia) or at least one randomised clinical trial (level of evidence Ib) translate to a Grade A recommendation. Levels of evidence IIa, IIb and III are attributed respectively to: at least one well-designed controlled trial without randomisation; at least one other type of well-designed, quasi-experimental study; or well-designed non-experimental descriptive studies such as comparative studies, correlation studies, case-control studies; each of these sustains a Grade B recommendation. Grade C recommendations reflect expert opinion and/or the clinical experience of respected authorities (level of evidence IV). Each of the 11 sets of PN Guidelines was devised by an international working group, the total faculty comprising no fewer than 87 experts from 16 European/Mediterranean countries, each group's contributions being co-ordinated by a designated chairman. Once each guideline had been approved by all the members of the relevant working group, this version was reviewed by at least two independent external reviewers (one selected from ESPEN's Education and Clinical Practice Committee, and at least one from outside the ESPEN committee structure). Following this review each guideline was hosted in draft form on the public pages of the ESPEN website for at least one month to permit the receipt of comments or suggestions from any interested party. At this point the Guidelines were reviewed and revised again by the original working group chairman and submitted to the Clinical Nutrition editorial process. At least 3 further reviewers were selected by the Journal's editorial office for each guideline, in line with the normal selection process. Final revisions were performed by the Chairmen of the working groups, and by ourselves as commissioning editors of the whole project. More than 300 evidence-based recommendations are now presented. Fewer than one sixth of the recommendations are Grade A, and disappointingly, but unsurprisingly, more than 50% are Grade C. The need for more and better controlled trials in the field remains apparent. PMID:19523723

  3. Breast ultrasound tomography: bridging the gap to clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Schmidt, Steven; Janer, Roman; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Goll, Jeffrey; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Greenway, William

    2012-03-01

    Conventional sonography, which performs well in dense breast tissue and is comfortable and radiation-free, is not practical for screening because of its operator dependence and the time needed to scan the whole breast. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can significantly improve on these limitations, it is also not practical because it has long been prohibitively expensive for routine use. There is therefore a need for an alternative breast imaging method that obviates the constraints of these standard imaging modalities. The lack of such an alternative is a barrier to dramatically impacting mortality (about 45,000 women in the US per year) and morbidity from breast cancer because, currently, there is a trade-off between the cost effectiveness of mammography and sonography on the one hand and the imaging accuracy of MRI on the other. This paper presents a progress report on our long term goal to eliminate this trade-off and thereby improve breast cancer survival rates and decrease unnecessary biopsies through the introduction of safe, cost-effective, operatorindependent sonography that can rival MRI in accuracy. The objective of the study described in this paper was to design and build an improved ultrasound tomography (UST) scanner in support of our goals. To that end, we report on a design that builds on our current research prototype. The design of the new scanner is based on a comparison of the capabilities of our existing prototype and the performance needed for clinical efficacy. The performance gap was quantified by using clinical studies to establish the baseline performance of the research prototype, and using known MRI capabilities to establish the required performance. Simulation software was used to determine the basic operating characteristics of an improved scanner that would provide the necessary performance. Design elements focused on transducer geometry, which in turn drove the data acquisition system and the image reconstruction engine specifications. The feasibility of UST established by our earlier work and that of other groups, forms the rationale for developing a UST system that has the potential to become a practical, low-cost device for breast cancer screening and diagnosis.

  4. The attitude of Belgian social insurance physicians towards evidence-based practice and clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Heselmans, Annemie; Donceel, Peter; Aertgeerts, Bert; Van de Velde, Stijn; Ramaekers, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine has broadened its scope and is starting to reach insurance medicine. Although still in its initial stages, physicians in the area of insurance medicine should keep up-to-date with the evidence on various diseases in order to correctly assess disability and to give appropriate advice about health care reimbursement. In order to explore future opportunities of evidence-based medicine to improve daily insurance medicine, there is a need for qualitative studies to better understand insurance physicians' perceptions of EBM. The present study was designed to identify the attitude of insurance physicians towards evidence-based medicine and clinical practice guidelines, and to determine their ability to access, retrieve and appraise the health evidence and the barriers for applying evidence to practice. Methods A cross-sectional survey study was carried out among all Dutch-speaking insurance physicians employed at one of the six Belgian social insurance sickness funds and at the National Institute of Disability and Health care Insurance (n = 224). Chi-square tests were used to compare nominal and ordinal variables. Student's t-tests, ANOVA, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis were used to compare means of continuous variables for different groups. Results The response rate was 48.7%. The majority of respondents were positive towards evidence-based medicine and clinical practice guidelines. Their knowledge of EBM was rather poor. Perceived barriers for applying evidence to practice were mainly time and lack of EBM skills. Conclusion Although the majority of physicians were positive towards EBM and welcomed more guidelines, the use of evidence and clinical practice guidelines in insurance medicine is low at present. It is in the first place important to eradicate the perceived inertia which limits the use of EBM and to further investigate the EBM principles in the context of insurance medicine. Available high-quality evidence-based resources (at the moment mainly originating from other medical fields) need to be structured in a way that is useful for insurance physicians and global access to this information needs to be ensured. PMID:19740436

  5. Use of Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Median Sternal Incisions after Cardiothoracic Surgery: Clinical Evidence and Consensus Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M.; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors’ own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  6. Use of incisional negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery: clinical evidence and consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Pascal M; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors' own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  7. Clinical practice in secondary prophylaxis and management of febrile neutropenia in Poland: results of the febrile neutropenia awareness project

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska, Ewa; Filipczyk-Cisar?, Emilia; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof; Le?niewski-Kmak, Krzysztof; Litwiniuk, Maria M.; Wieruszewska-Kowalczyk, Karolina; Kosno-Kruszewska, El?bieta

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study This paper presents the second part of the GoPractice project involving oncologists from seven Polish provinces. The aim of this part of the project was to assess the knowledge of oncologists on indications for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secondary prophylaxis (SP) of febrile neutropenia (FN) and FN management based on current therapeutic guidelines (Polish Society of Clinical Oncology [PTOK] and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC]). Material and methods The project involved 169 oncologists from 7 regions working in large specialist oncological centers, university hospitals, regional and city hospitals, specialist outpatient clinics and oncological wards in small, local hospitals. The participants completed a questionnaire based on 7 prepared clinical cases of patients with different tumor types and patient characteristics, receiving chemotherapy (CT) with different levels of FN risk. Participants answered questions related to FN risk assessment and G-CSF use as secondary prophylaxis (SP) and for the management of FN. After completing the questionnaire, the participants proceeded to an educational module in which they were provided with an analysis of correct diagnostic and therapeutic procedures according to the PTOK and EORTC guidelines. Results and Conclusions Indications for G-CSF SP were generally well recognized: in nearly 90% of responses, oncologists assessed correctly indications/lack of indications for secondary prophylaxis, in accordance with guideline recommendations and Experts’ opinion. However, the use of daily G-CSFs was often recommended by the study participants for the management of FN. This clinical practice is contradictory to PTOK and EORTC recommendations and may unnecessarily increase treatment costs. Changing this clinical approach may be achieved through regular training to improve guideline adherence. PMID:25784842

  8. Couple/family therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: review to facilitate interpretation of VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Monson, Candice M; Macdonald, Alexandra; Brown-Bowers, Amy

    2012-01-01

    A well-documented association exists among Veterans' posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, family relationship problems, and mental health problems in partners and children of Veterans. This article reviews the recommendations regarding couple/family therapy offered in the newest version of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)/Department of Defense (DOD) VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Post-Traumatic Stress. We then provide a heuristic for clinicians, researchers, and policy makers to consider when incorporating couple/family interventions into Veterans' mental health services. The range of research that has been conducted on couple/family therapy for Veterans with PTSD is reviewed using this heuristic, and suggestions for clinical practice are offered. PMID:23015582

  9. An educational game for teaching clinical practice guidelines to Internal Medicine residents: development, feasibility and acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Slomka, Thomas; Alawneh, Alia; Vedavalli, Abhishek; Schünemann, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    Background Adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) remains suboptimal among internal medicine trainees. Educational games are of growing interest and have the potential to improve adherence to CPGs. The objectives of this study were to develop an educational game to teach CPGs in Internal Medicine residency programs and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. Methods We developed the Guide-O-Game© in the format of a TV game show with questions based on recommendations of CPGs. The development of the Guide-O-Game© consisted of the creation of a multimedia interactive tool, the development of recommendation-based questions, and the definition of the game's rules. We evaluated its feasibility through pilot testing and its acceptability through a qualitative process. Results The multimedia interactive tool uses a Macromedia Flash web application and consists of a manager interface and a user interface. The user interface allows the choice of two game styles. We created so far 16 sets of questions relating to 9 CPGs. The pilot testing proved that the game was feasible. The qualitative evaluation showed that residents considered the game to be acceptable. Conclusion We developed an educational game to teach CPGs to Internal Medicine residents that is both feasible and acceptable. Future work should evaluate its impact on educational outcomes. PMID:19017400

  10. Compliance of Middle School–Aged Babysitters in Central Pennsylvania With National Recommendations for Emergency Preparedness and Safety Practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole M. Hackman; Katie Cass; Robert P. Olympia

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the compliance of middle school–aged babysitters with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices. Patients and methods. A prospective, self-administered questionnaire-based study was conducted at 3 middle schools in central Pennsylvania. Results. A total of 1364 questionnaires were available for analysis. Responding babysitters (n = 890) reported previous training that included babysitter (21%), first aid (64%),

  11. Rigour of development does not AGREE with recommendations in practice guidelines on the use of ice for acute ankle sprains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Van de Velde; A Heselmans; P Donceel; P Vandekerckhove; D Ramaekers; B Aertgeerts

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveThis study evaluated whether the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) rigour of development score of practice guidelines on ice for acute ankle sprains is related to the convergence between recommendations.DesignThe authors systematically reviewed guidelines on ice for acute ankle sprains. Four appraisers independently used the AGREE instrument to evaluate the rigour of development of selected guidelines. For each

  12. On the justifiability of ACMG recommendations for reporting of incidental findings in clinical exome and genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    May, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines three possible justifications for original ACMG recommendations to return incidental findings from whole exome or genome sequencing independent of patient preferences. The first two potential justifications, based on a patient's authentic values, then on harms to others, are founding lacking as a basis of justification for these recommendations. The third, grounded in analogous professional practices, might serve as a potential justification if several controversies can be avoided. However, given the nature of these controversies and the need to instill public trust in this newly emerging science, the paper finds that updated ACMG recommendations that recognize opt-out rights on behalf of patients is the most prudent, and justifiable, approach. PMID:25846044

  13. Preschool English Language Learners with Disabilities: A Comparison of Recommended and Actual Language of Instruction Practices 

    E-print Network

    Cole, Corinna V.

    2010-07-14

    This study investigated, through survey methodology, the instructional practices of teachers of English Language Learners (ELLs) with disabilities in Preschool Programs for Children with Disabilities (PPCD). These practices were compared to best...

  14. Clinical outcomes of Single-Visit oral Prophylaxis: A practice-based randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Practice-based general dental practitioners routinely provide "scale and polish" or "oral prophylaxis" to patients attending their practices. Despite its routine provision, there is no evidence to support the clinical effectiveness of single-visit scale and polish, nor the frequency at which it should be provided. A recent systematic review recommended that future trials investigating scale and polish should involve dental practice patients. Methods A practice-based parallel randomised controlled trial with 24-month follow-up was conducted. Healthy adults (Basic Periodontal Examination [BPE] codes <3) were randomly assigned to 3 groups (6-month, 12-month, or 24-month interval between scale and polish). The primary outcome was gingival bleeding with the hypothesis that 6-monthly scale and polish would result in lower prevalence than 12-month or 24-month frequency. Follow-up measurements were recorded by examiners blinded to the allocation. 125, 122 and 122 participants were randomised to the 6-month, 12-month and 24-month groups respectively. Complete data set analyses were conducted for 307 participants: 107, 100, and 100 in the 6-month, 12-month and 24-month groups respectively. Chi-square test and ANOVA were used to compare treatment groups at follow-up. Logistic regression and ANCOVA were used to estimate the relationship between outcome and treatment group, adjusted for baseline values. Multiple imputation analyses were also carried out for participants with incomplete data sets. Results Prevalence of gingival bleeding at follow-up was 78.5% (6-month), 78% (12-month) and 82% (24-month) (p = 0.746). There were no statistically significant differences between groups with respect to follow-up prevalence of plaque and calculus. Statistically significant differences detected in the amount (millimetres) of calculus were too small to be clinically significant. Seventeen (4.6%) participants were withdrawn from the trial to receive additional treatment. Conclusions This trial could not identify any differences in outcomes for single-visit scale and polish provided at 6, 12 and 24 month frequencies for healthy patients (with no significant periodontal disease). However, this is the first trial of scale and polish which has been conducted in a general practice setting and the results are not conclusive. Larger trials with more comprehensive measurement and long-term follow up need to be undertaken to provide a firm evidence base for this intervention. This trial informs the design of future practice-based trials on this subject. PMID:22204658

  15. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in the kidney tumors: report from the International Society of Urologic Pathology consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Victor E; Argani, Pedram; Zhou, Ming; Delahunt, Brett

    2014-08-01

    Primary renal neoplasms comprise multiple distinct entities, some of which are well understood and others that are not. It is not uncommon for some of these entities to have overlapping morphologic features. Their clinical behavior is varied, ranging from highly malignant to benign, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma oftentimes enters into the differential diagnosis of tumors of unknown primary. In this age of personalized medicine, identifying biomarkers that can better predict clinical outcome and response to therapy is a pressing need. In 2013 the International Society of Urological Pathology held a meeting in which best practices recommendations on the use of immunohistochemical markers in urologic malignancies were discussed. In this review we make recommendations regarding immunohistochemical markers that are best suited to aid in establishing a diagnosis of renal primary, panels of antibodies that are most useful in classifying renal tumors, and the current status of prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Although no prognostic or predictive marker and set of markers have yet to be validated, ongoing research suggests that this fact is likely to change in the near future. PMID:25025368

  16. Use of 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: updated HPV vaccination recommendations of the advisory committee on immunization practices.

    PubMed

    Petrosky, Emiko; Bocchini, Joseph A; Hariri, Susan; Chesson, Harrell; Curtis, C Robinette; Saraiya, Mona; Unger, Elizabeth R; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-03-27

    During its February 2015 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (9vHPV) (Gardasil 9, Merck and Co., Inc.) as one of three HPV vaccines that can be used for routine vaccination. HPV vaccine is recommended for routine vaccination at age 11 or 12 years. ACIP also recommends vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years and males aged 13 through 21 years not vaccinated previously. Vaccination is also recommended through age 26 years for men who have sex with men and for immunocompromised persons (including those with HIV infection) if not vaccinated previously. 9vHPV is a noninfectious, virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine. Similar to quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV), 9vHPV contains HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 VLPs. In addition, 9vHPV contains HPV 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 VLPs. 9vHPV was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on December 10, 2014, for use in females aged 9 through 26 years and males aged 9 through 15 years. For these recommendations, ACIP reviewed additional data on 9vHPV in males aged 16 through 26 years. 9vHPV and 4vHPV are licensed for use in females and males. Bivalent HPV vaccine (2vHPV), which contains HPV 16, 18 VLPs, is licensed for use in females. This report summarizes evidence considered by ACIP in recommending 9vHPV as one of three HPV vaccines that can be used for vaccination and provides recommendations for vaccine use. PMID:25811679

  17. Clinical recommendations for postoperative care after heart transplantation in children: 21 years of a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Azeka, Estela; Jatene, Marcelo Biscegli; Tanaka, Ana Cristina; Galas, Filomena Regina; Hajjar, Ludhmilla Abrahao; Miura, Nana; Auler, Jose Otávio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Heart transplantation is an option for children with complex congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies. A patient's quality of life and long-term survival depend on successful management of the surgical complications and adverse side effects of immunosuppression. The purpose of this review was to summarize the practical management of postoperative care in this patient population and to make recommendations for the future. PMID:24860859

  18. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  19. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy. PMID:19917871

  20. Empirical recommendations for improving the stability of the dot-probe task in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Price, Rebecca B; Kuckertz, Jennie M; Siegle, Greg J; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Silk, Jennifer S; Ryan, Neal D; Dahl, Ronald E; Amir, Nader

    2015-06-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 27(2) of Psychological Assessment (see record 2015-09326-001). The hypothetical example provided when explaining the Winsorizing approach on the sixth page, first paragraph, is inaccurate because the interquartile range will always be equal to the 75th percentile value - the 25th percentile value. A corrected example is as follows: "For example, for a RT distribution with a 25th percentile value of 600 ms, a 75th percentile value of 800 ms, and an interquartile range of 200 ms, values >1100 would be rescaled to 1100 ms (the largest value in the distribution that is within the valid range) whereas values < 300 ms would be rescaled to 300 ms (the smallest value in the distribution that is within the valid range)."] The dot-probe task has been widely used in research to produce an index of biased attention based on reaction times (RTs). Despite its popularity, very few published studies have examined psychometric properties of the task, including test-retest reliability, and no previous study has examined reliability in clinically anxious samples or systematically explored the effects of task design and analysis decisions on reliability. In the current analysis, we used dot-probe data from 3 studies in which attention bias toward threat-related faces was assessed at multiple (?5) time-points. Two of the studies were similar (adults with social anxiety disorder, similar design features) whereas 1 was more disparate (pediatric healthy volunteers, distinct task design). We explored the effects of analysis choices (e.g., bias score formula, outlier handling method) on reliability and searched for convergent findings across the 3 studies. We found that, when concurrently considering the 3 studies, the most reliable RT index of bias used data from dot-bottom trials, comparing congruent to incongruent trials, with rescaled outliers, particularly after averaging across more than 1 assessment point. Although reliability of RT bias indices was moderate to low, within-session variability in bias (attention bias variability; ABV), a recently proposed RT index, was more reliable across sessions. Several eyetracking-based indices of attention bias (available in the pediatric healthy sample only) showed reliability that matched the optimal RT index (ABV). On the basis of these findings, we make specific recommendations to researchers using the dot-probe, particularly those wishing to investigate individual differences and/or single-patient applications. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25419646

  1. [The concept of equity when developing clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Acosta, Naydú; Pollard, Jennifer; Mosquera, Paola; Reveiz, Ludovic

    2011-04-01

    This systematic literature review sought to identify methodologies and technical strategies emphasising healthcare services and outcomes when incorporating the concept of equity into Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG). 940 references were identified, of which 20 fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected. While no reports were found describing or evaluating an explicit methodology for incorporating considerations of equity into CPG, some studies revealed related strategies or processes, summarised as follows: 1. Target population involvement during all phases of designing, implementing and evaluating CPG; 2. "Cultural capacity" seen as being necessary in CPGs' "cultural translation" for interventions to have less disparity regarding their application and results; 3. Considering psycho-social factors which could affect implementing CPG, and; 4. Considering system inequities so that any health intervention would also confront risks and obstacles to health care due to socioeconomic status. It was concluded that CPGs could be a potential route for promoting more equitable healthcare effects by standardising health interventions if, by incorporating some of the processes described above, they actively seek to avoid unjust differences in access to and/or the quality of the interventions that they prescribe. PMID:22030890

  2. Pseudohyponatremia: Does It Matter in Current Clinical Practice?

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Serum consists of water (93% of serum volume) and nonaqueous components, mainly lipids and proteins (7% of serum volume). Sodium is restricted to serum water. In states of hyperproteinemia or hyperlipidemia, there is an increased mass of the nonaqueous components of serum and a concomitant decrease in the proportion of serum composed of water. Thus, pseudohyponatremia results because the flame photometry method measures sodium concentration in whole plasma. A sodium-selective electrode gives the true, physiologically pertinent sodium concentration because it measures sodium activity in serum water. Whereas the serum sample is diluted in indirect potentiometry, the sample is not diluted in direct potentiometry. Because only direct reading gives an accurate concentration, we suspect that indirect potentiometry which many hospital laboratories are now using may mislead us to confusion in interpreting the serum sodium data. However, it seems that indirect potentiometry very rarely gives us discernibly low serum sodium levels in cases with hyperproteinemia and hyperlipidemia. As long as small margins of errors are kept in mind of clinicians when serum sodium is measured from the patients with hyperproteinemia or hyperlipidemia, the present methods for measuring sodium concentration in serum by indirect sodium-selective electrode potentiometry could be maintained in the clinical practice. PMID:24459491

  3. Clinical applications of laser therapy on the dental practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2004-09-01

    Dental practice consists of a series of laboring procedures which demands the use of several types of equipment and materials. Usually patient"s fears brings additional burden to the Dentists. The use of Lasers for treating and diagnosis in Dentistry is quite new comparing to other medical areas. Initially Laser technology was used as an alternative method for treating dental caries in order to substitute the use of the drill. Lately surgical Lasers have shown themselves very useful for treating several pathologies and began to be used as a powerful tool on the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial complex and later on, the era of the use of Laser therapy began. The advent of the diode Lasers made possible the introduction of small units at the dental office and Laser therapy was used to improve healing and later included also caries diagnosis. This paper discuss the use of Laser therapy on Restorative Dentistry, Periodondology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral implantology and other. Clinical and laboratorial experience has demonstrated that Laser therapy does improve the healing of both mineralized and soft tissues, reduces pain and inflammation, and also reduces both cost and length of the dental treatment.

  4. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunoglobulin in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R S; Borte, M

    2014-12-01

    Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins (IVIg and SCIg, respectively) are increasingly used in clinical practice, not only as replacement therapy but also for immunomodulation. Physicians have learned that primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients are susceptible to recurrent respiratory tract infections even when appropriately treated with immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy. Further investigation will establish whether a combined therapeutic approach including Ig dose optimization will prevent progressive lung disease in PID. The wear-off effects observed with IVIg can be minimized by adjusting the dosing regimen. It is also possible to avoid the cyclic wear-off following transition to SCIg administration. Consideration of benefit versus risk with Ig therapy includes evaluating the potential occurrence of thromboembolic and haemolytic events, which may be more frequent when Ig is administered in high doses and in the presence of pre-existing risk factors. The ability to select an administration method from IVIg, SCIg or hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIg infusions provides patient choice and alternatives if one or other administration route is not suitable for a patient. The evolution in indications, applications, and understanding of Ig therapy described here has reinforced the need for robust methods to prioritize Ig use. PMID:25546773

  5. The impact of television on children and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tonge, B J

    1990-12-01

    The impact of television on children and child development and on the practice of child psychiatry is reviewed. Evidence from research is that children learn from watching television and the programs they see can change their behaviour. Programs with violent and aggressive themes tend to make children more aggressive and disobedient. Cultural sex-role and social stereotypes depicted on the television can also influence children's perceptions of society. Programs specifically designed for different age groups of children which depict pro-social behaviour are likely to lead children to become more friendly, co-operative and self-controlled. The use of television in child psychiatric clinical work supervision and research, and its potential to reduce the psychological trauma experienced by children in the legal proceedings of child abuse cases is discussed. More research is needed to determine the content and intervening variables that effect the acquisition of both positive and negative behaviour from television and enhance its promotion of mental health. PMID:2073232

  6. Enteral nutrition and cardiovascular failure: from myths to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Berger, Mette M; Chiolero, René L

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular failure and low flow states may arise in very different conditions from both cardiac and noncardiac causes. Systemic hemodynamic failure inevitably alters splanchnic blood flow but in an unpredictable way. Prolonged low splanchnic blood flow causes intestinal ischemia, increased mucosal permeability, endotoxemia, and distant organ failure. Mortality associated with intestinal ischemia is high. Why would enteral nutrition (EN) be desirable in these complex patients when parenteral nutrition could easily cover energy and substrate requirements? Metabolic, immune, and practical reasons justify the use of EN. In addition, continuous enteral feeding minimizes systemic and myocardial oxygen consumption in patients with congestive heart failure. Further, early feeding in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients has been shown to reduce mortality, particularly in the sickest patients. In a series of cardiac surgery patients with compromised hemodynamics, absorption has been maintained, and 1000-1200 kcal/d could be delivered by enteral feeding. Therefore, early EN in stabilized patients should be attempted, and can be carried out safely under close clinical monitoring, looking for signs of incipient intestinal ischemia. Energy delivery and balance should be monitored, and combined feeding considered when enteral feeds cannot be advanced to target within 4-6 days. PMID:19892904

  7. Professionalism and clinical autonomy in the practice of medicine.

    PubMed

    Morreim, E Haavi

    2002-11-01

    Professionalism in medicine requires a reasonable measure of freedom for physicians to determine patients needs based on their own judgment. However, because virtually every medical decision is also a spending decision, third-party payers concerned about rising health care costs have introduced cost-containment tactics that significantly limit physicians accustomed autonomy. In response, groups of physicians have filed class-action lawsuits against managed care plans, alleging causes of action such as fraud, breach of contract, extortion, and violations of federal RICO (Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) law. Such litigation may have merits, but it also faces significant obstacles, in part because the contracts involved may not actually have promised the broad measure of clinical autonomy that the physicians allege was promised, then denied. As physicians seek to restore and retain their professional autonomy, it will be important for them to be increasingly proactive in structuring or modifying the contracts under whose terms they practice as some physicians have successfully done. PMID:12429955

  8. Why use automated office blood pressure measurements in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Agaliotis, Gerasimos D; Tsakanikas, Athanasios P; Mousoulis, George P

    2011-09-01

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement with the patient resting alone in a quiet examining room can eliminate the white-coat effect associated with conventional readings taken by manual sphygmomanometer. The key to reducing the white-coat response appears to be multiple blood pressure (BP) readings taken in a non-observer office setting, thus eliminating any interaction that could provoke an office-induced increase in BP. Furthermore, AOBP readings have shown a higher correlation with the mean awake ambulatory BP compared with BP readings recorded in routine clinical practice. Although there is a paucity of studies connecting AOBP with organ damage, AOBP values were recently found to be equally associated with left ventricular mass index as those of ambulatory BP. This concludes that in contrast to routine manual office BP, AOBP readings compare favourably with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in the appraisal of cardiac remodelling and, as such, could be complementary to ambulatory readings in a way similar to home BP measurements. PMID:21950780

  9. The EndoPredict Gene-Expression Assay in Clinical Practice - Performance and Impact on Clinical Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Berit Maria; Keil, Elke; Lehmann, Annika; Winzer, Klaus-Jürgen; Richter-Ehrenstein, Christiane; Prinzler, Judith; Bangemann, Nikola; Reles, Angela; Stadie, Sylvia; Schoenegg, Winfried; Eucker, Jan; Schmidt, Marcus; Lippek, Frank; Jöhrens, Korinna; Pahl, Stefan; Sinn, Bruno Valentin; Budczies, Jan; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The validated EndoPredict assay is a novel tool to predict the risk of metastases of patients with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy alone. It has been designed to integrate genomic and clinical information and includes clinico-pathological factors such as tumor size and nodal status. The test is feasible in a decentral setting in molecular pathology laboratories. In this project, we investigated the performance of this test in clinical practice, and performed a retrospective evaluation of its impact on treatment decisions in breast cancer. During one year, EndoPredict assays from 167 patients could be successfully performed. For retrospective evaluation of treatment decisions, a questionnaire was sent to the clinical partner. Regarding the molecular EP class, samples from 56 patients (33.5%) had a low-risk, whereas 111 patients (66.5%) showed a high-risk gene profile. After integration of the clinicopathological factors the combined clinical and molecular score (EPclin) resulted in a low-risk group of 77 patients (46.4%), while 89 (53.6%) had a high risk EPclin score. The EPclin-based estimated median 10-year-risk for metastases with endocrine therapy alone was 11% for the whole cohort. The median handling time averaged three days (range: 0 to 11 days), 59.3% of the tests could be performed in three or less than three days. Comparison of pre- and post-test therapy decisions showed a change of therapy in 37.7% of patients. 16 patients (12.3%) had a change to an additional chemotherapy while 25.4% of patients (n?=?33) changed to an endocrine therapy alone. In 73 patients (56.2%) no change of therapy resulted. In 6.1% of patients (n?=?8), the patients did not agree to the recommendation of the tumor board. Our results show that the EndoPredict assay could be routinely performed in decentral molecular pathology laboratories and the results markedly change treatment decisions. PMID:23826382

  10. The EndoPredict Gene-Expression Assay in Clinical Practice - Performance and Impact on Clinical Decisions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Berit Maria; Keil, Elke; Lehmann, Annika; Winzer, Klaus-Jürgen; Richter-Ehrenstein, Christiane; Prinzler, Judith; Bangemann, Nikola; Reles, Angela; Stadie, Sylvia; Schoenegg, Winfried; Eucker, Jan; Schmidt, Marcus; Lippek, Frank; Jöhrens, Korinna; Pahl, Stefan; Sinn, Bruno Valentin; Budczies, Jan; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The validated EndoPredict assay is a novel tool to predict the risk of metastases of patients with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy alone. It has been designed to integrate genomic and clinical information and includes clinico-pathological factors such as tumor size and nodal status. The test is feasible in a decentral setting in molecular pathology laboratories. In this project, we investigated the performance of this test in clinical practice, and performed a retrospective evaluation of its impact on treatment decisions in breast cancer. During one year, EndoPredict assays from 167 patients could be successfully performed. For retrospective evaluation of treatment decisions, a questionnaire was sent to the clinical partner. Regarding the molecular EP class, samples from 56 patients (33.5%) had a low-risk, whereas 111 patients (66.5%) showed a high-risk gene profile. After integration of the clinicopathological factors the combined clinical and molecular score (EPclin) resulted in a low-risk group of 77 patients (46.4%), while 89 (53.6%) had a high risk EPclin score. The EPclin-based estimated median 10-year-risk for metastases with endocrine therapy alone was 11% for the whole cohort. The median handling time averaged three days (range: 0 to 11 days), 59.3% of the tests could be performed in three or less than three days. Comparison of pre- and post-test therapy decisions showed a change of therapy in 37.7% of patients. 16 patients (12.3%) had a change to an additional chemotherapy while 25.4% of patients (n?=?33) changed to an endocrine therapy alone. In 73 patients (56.2%) no change of therapy resulted. In 6.1% of patients (n?=?8), the patients did not agree to the recommendation of the tumor board. Our results show that the EndoPredict assay could be routinely performed in decentral molecular pathology laboratories and the results markedly change treatment decisions. PMID:23826382

  11. Management of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Clinical Practice: Initiation, Maintenance, and Discontinuation of Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Pearse A.; Tufail, Adnan; Patel, Praveen J.

    2011-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible visual loss in elderly populations. In recent years, pharmacological inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), via intravitreal injection of ranibizumab (Lucentis) or bevacizumab (Avastin), has offered the first opportunity to improve visual outcomes in patients diagnosed with this disorder. In this paper, we provide recommendations on how bevacizumab and ranibizumab may be best applied in current clinical practice, with an emphasis on their underlying pharmacology and efficacy. In addition, we review current guidelines for the initiation, maintenance, and discontinuation of anti-VEGF therapies, as well as emerging treatment strategies and future directions in the field. PMID:22174995

  12. [Is MRI monitoring useful in clinical practice in patients with multiple sclerosis? No].

    PubMed

    Edan, G

    2013-11-01

    Is regular MRI monitoring useful in clinical practice in multiple sclerosis patients treated with disease modifying therapy (DMT) drugs? My answer is no. Tacking a DMT drug is not by itself a pertinent criterion for requiring a systematic MRI monitoring in MS patients. Five clinical criteria should be taken into consideration before prescribing regular MRI examinations. The clinical form of the disease: MRI monitoring in DMT treated patients, has been demonstrated as useful only in pure relapsing-remitting MS patients. Up to now, there is no convincing demonstration of therapeutic efficacy with any DMT drug, neither first-line nor second-line drugs in patients with primary or secondary progressive MS disease. The duration of the disease, epidemiological data leading to the concept of a two-stage disability progression in MS, emphasizes the importance of treating as early as possible RRMS patients in order to stop accumulation of new focal MRI CNS lesions. In this regard, an annual monitoring for the 5 first years of the disease looks reasonable in order to better personalize the treatment choice among the few approved DMT drugs. The duration of the treatment: a first MRI assessment at month 6 after initiating a new DMT drug is adequate in order to better distinguish responder versus no responder. The persistence of Gado+lesions at 6 months is a strong indication for considering alternative treatment. The disease activity: both criteria, clinical and MRI, are needed to recognized very active or aggressive relapsing MS patients, leading to decide a rapid use of second-line treatment therapy. The treatment choice: in JC positive MS patients treated with natalizumab, the risk of PML is as high as more than 1 % in those JC+MS patients that are treated continuously more than 24 months. A regular MRI monitoring (3 or 6months) is recommended in order to detect as early as possible MRI abnormalities suggesting PML. PMID:24125462

  13. Clinical problem solving based on the 1999 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, R D; Campbell, N R; Larochelle, P

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 Canadian Recommendations for the Management of Hypertension are notable for the trends that they represent with regard to the evolution of the management of hypertension. Diagnostically, the Recommendations endorse the greater use of non-office-based measures of blood pressure control and greater emphasis on the assessment of other atherosclerotic risk factors, both when considering prognosis in hypertension and in the choice of therapy. On the treatment side of the equation, lower targets for blood pressure control have been advocated in subgroups of hypertensive patients, particularly in those with diabetes and renal disease. In conjunction with the recently published recommendations on lifestyle management, there is a greater emphasis on lifestyle modification, both as initial and adjunctive therapy in hypertension. Implicit in the recommendations for therapy is the principle that for the vast majority of hypertensive patients treated pharmacologically, practitioners should not follow a stepped-care approach. Instead, therapy should be individualized, primarily based on consideration of concurrent diseases, both cardiovascular and noncardiovascular (Tables 1 and 2). Through the consensus process, there was a general appreciation of how far we have come in the development of evidence-based recommendations for hypertension management. However, there was also an increasing appreciation of how far we have to go in effectively translating these recommendations into better blood pressure control. PMID:10624418

  14. Dentist and practice characteristics associated with restorative treatment of enamel caries in permanent teeth: multiple-regression modeling of observational clinical data from The National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Jeffrey L; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Benjamin, Paul; Flink, Håkan; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Johnson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Current evidence in dentistry recommends non-surgical treatment to manage enamel caries lesions. However, surveyed practitioners report they would restore enamel lesions that are confined to the enamel. We used actual clinical data to evaluate patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with restoration of enamel caries, while accounting for other factors. Methods We combined data from a National Dental Practice-Based Research Network observational study of consecutive restorations placed in previously unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and practice/demographic data from 229 participating network dentists. Analysis of variance and logistic regression, using generalized estimating equations (GEE) and variable selection within blocks, were used to test the hypothesis that patient, dentist, and practice characteristics were associated with variations in enamel restorations of occlusal and proximal caries compared to dentin lesions, accounting for dentist and patient clustering. Results Network dentists from 5 regions placed 6,891 restorations involving occlusal and/or proximal caries lesions. Enamel restorations accounted for 16% of enrolled occlusal caries lesions and 6% of enrolled proximal caries lesions. Enamel occlusal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by patient age and race/ethnicity, dentist use of caries risk assessment, network region, and practice type. Enamel proximal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by dentist race/ethnicity, network region, and practice type. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Identifying patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with enamel caries restorations can guide strategies to improve provider adherence to evidence-based clinical recommendations. PMID:25000667

  15. Acceptance of biomarker-based tests for application in clinical practice: criteria and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, M

    2010-12-01

    The journey from the discovery of a biomarker to its implementation in clinical practice is long and complex. There are many obstacles along the way, including lack of consistent evidence, inadequate validation of the biomarker, inadequate evidence of clinical utility, operational barriers to clinical implementation, and inadequate evidence of operational effectiveness or impact in clinical care. Multipronged approaches, incorporating input from many disciplines working together, will be required to overcome the obstacles to the clinical implementation and to allow the progression of clinical practice from the current paradigm of a one-size-fits-all strategy to more personalized treatment pathways that are more predictable in terms of health gains. PMID:20981006

  16. Measuring treatment effects on dual-task performance: a framework for research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Prudence; Eskes, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of dual-task walking to everyday ambulation is widely acknowledged, and numerous studies have demonstrated that dual-task interference can significantly impact recovery of functional walking in people with neurological disorders. The magnitude and direction of dual-task interference is influenced by the interaction between the two tasks, including how individuals spontaneously prioritize their attention. Therefore, to accurately interpret and characterize dual-task interference and identify changes over time, it is imperative to evaluate single and dual-task performance in both tasks, as well as the tasks relative to each other. Yet, reciprocal dual-task effects (DTE) are frequently ignored. The purpose of this perspective paper is to present a framework for measuring treatment effects on dual-task interference, specifically taking into account the interactions between the two tasks and how this can provide information on whether overall dual-task capacity has improved or a different attentional strategy has been adopted. In discussing the clinical implications of using this framework, we provide specific examples of using this method and provide some explicit recommendations for research and clinical practice. PMID:25972801

  17. Clinical practice guidelines for patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    For many years, the understanding of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), which are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, has been very limited. However, it is now possible to provide a more precise definition through the use of pathology classification and molecular techniques. Coupled with the advancement of clinical practice, especially the development of targeted therapy, there is now a much better insight into its treatment. At present, organizations such as the National Comprehensive Cancer Network in the USA and the European Society for Medical Oncology in Europe have established a consensus and drawn up guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of GISTs. With experts coming from various districts in Taiwan and combining the most recent clinical data and experiences, the Taiwan Surgical Society of Gastroenterology drafted the first national GIST treatment guidelines after a consensus meeting in 2007. Following subsequent advances in GIST diagnosis and treatment, further revisions and modifications have been made to the original guidelines. We present here the updated consensus and recommendations of the Taiwan Surgical Society of Gastroenterology for the diagnosis and treatment of GIST. We hope these guidelines can help enhance the quality of diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with GIST in Taiwan. PMID:23153013

  18. Rorschach scores in applied clinical practice: a survey of perceived validity by experienced clinicians.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gregory J; Hsiao, Wei-Cheng; Viglione, Donald J; Mihura, Joni L; Abraham, Leah M

    2013-01-01

    We surveyed practicing clinicians who regularly used the Rorschach about the perceived clinical validity of specific Rorschach scores from many coding systems. The survey included quantitative feedback on the validity of specific variables as well as qualitative input in several areas, including the validity of specific variables, the potentially unique information that can be obtained from them, coding challenges associated with Comprehensive System (CS) codes, and recommendations for CS developments. Participants were recruited by applying a snowball sampling strategy. Based on responses from 246 experienced clinicians from 26 countries, composite judgments on rated variables were quite reliable (e.g., M ? = .95 across 88 CS variables), despite limited agreement among any 2 judges. The aggregated judgments clearly differentiated among scores that were considered more and less clinically valid and the overall results aligned with recently obtained meta-analytic conclusions from the traditional validity literature (Mihura, Meyer, Dumitrascu, & Bombel, 2012). The judges also provided guidance concerning revisions and enhancements that would facilitate Rorschach-based assessment in the future. We discuss the implication of the quantitative and qualitative findings and provide suggestions for future directions based on the results. PMID:23452352

  19. Recommendations for using smallpox vaccine in a pre-event vaccination program. Supplemental recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC).

    PubMed

    Wharton, Melinda; Strikas, Raymond A; Harpaz, Rafael; Rotz, Lisa D; Schwartz, Benjamin; Casey, Christine G; Pearson, Michele L; Anderson, Larry J

    2003-04-01

    This report supplements the 2001 statement by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) (CDC. Vaccinia [smallpox] vaccine: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP], 2001. MMWR 2001;50[No. RR-10]:1-25). This supplemental report provides recommendations for using smallpox vaccine in the pre-event vaccination program in the United States. To facilitate preparedness and response, smallpox vaccination is recommended for persons designated by public health authorities to conduct investigation and follow-up of initial smallpox cases that might necessitate direct patient contact. ACIP recommends that each state and territory establish and maintain > or = 1 smallpox response team. ACIP and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) recommend that each acute-care hospital identify health-care workers who can be vaccinated and trained to provide direct medical care for the first smallpox patients requiring hospital admission and to evaluate and manage patients who are suspected as having smallpox. When feasible, the first-stage vaccination program should include previously vaccinated health-care personnel to decrease the potential for adverse events. Additionally persons administering smallpox vaccine in this pre-event vaccination program should be vaccinated. Smallpox vaccine is administered by using the multiple-puncture technique with a bifurcated needle, packaged with the vaccine and diluent. According to the product labeling, 2-3 punctures are recommended for primary vaccination and 15 punctures for revaccination. A trace of blood should appear at the vaccination site after 15-20 seconds; if no trace of blood is visible, an additional 3 insertions should be made by using the same bifurcated needle without reinserting the needle into the vaccine vial. If no evidence of vaccine take is apparent after 7 days, the person can be vaccinated again. Optimal infection-control practices and appropriate site care should prevent transmission of vaccinia virus from vaccinated health-care workers to patients. Health-care personnel providing direct patient care should keep their vaccination sites covered with gauze in combination with a semipermeable membrane dressing to absorb exudates and to provide a barrier for containment of vaccinia virus to minimize the risk of transmission; the dressing should also be covered by a layer of clothing. Dressings used to cover the site should be changed frequently to prevent accumulation of exudates and consequent maceration. The most critical measure in preventing contact transmission is consistent hand hygiene. Hospitals should designate staff to assess dressings for all vaccinated health-care workers. When feasible, staff responsible for dressing changes for smallpox health-care teams should be vaccinated, all persons handling dressings should observe contact precautions. Administrative leave is not required routinely for newly vaccinated health-care personnel unless they are physically unable to work as a result of systemic signs and symptoms of illness; have extensive skin lesions that cannot be adequately covered or if they are unable to adhere to the recommended infection-control precautions. Persons outside the patient-care setting can keep their vaccination sites covered with a porous dressing hand hygiene remains key to preventing inadvertent inoculation. FDA has recommended that recipients of smallpox vaccine be deferred from donating blood for 21 days or until the scab has separated. Contacts of vaccinees, who have inadvertently contracted vaccinia, also should be deferred from donating blood for 14 days after complete resolution of their complication. In the pre-event vaccination program, smallpox vaccination is contraindicated for persons with a history or presence of eczema or atopic dermatitis; who have other acute, chronic, or exfoliative skin conditions; who have conditions associated with immunosuppression; are aged < 1 year; who have a serious allergy to any component of the vaccine; or who are pregnant

  20. Safety, efficacy and indications of prescription of maraviroc in clinical practice: Factors associated with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Llibre, Josep M; Rivero, Antonio; Rojas, Jhon F; Garcia Del Toro, Miguel; Herrero, Cristina; Arroyo, David; Pineda, Juan A; Pasquau, Juan; Masiá, Mar; Crespo, Manel; Blanco, José R; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    Maraviroc is approved for treatment-experienced HIV+ adults in twice-daily administration. Limited data are available on safety, efficacy and use in routine clinical practice, outside of restrictive clinical trials. This retrospective multicenter (27 centers) study included 667 subjects starting a regimen with maraviroc. The primary endpoint was plasma HIV-RNA <50copies/mL and CD4(+) cell count change at 48 and 96weeks (FDA snapshot analysis). 94.4% had CCR5 tropism (58.3% Trofile™, 29.2% population genotype, and 12% genotyping proviral DNA). Half of the subjects received the drug in scenarios or dosages outside the initial approval. Maraviroc was prescribed for salvage in 346 (51.9%) individuals, as a switch strategy due to toxicity in 135 (38.7%), for immune discordance in 75 (11.2%), and for simplification in 48 (7.2%). After salvage therapy, 223 (64.5%) subjects had HIV-RNA <50copies/mL at 48weeks, and 178 (51.4%) at 96weeks. Darunavir/r was included in 224 (64.7%) subjects and associated with higher rates of virological and immunologic efficacy (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis MSM (OR 2.25; 95%CI 1.29-3.94) and baseline HIV-RNA <100,000copies/mL (OR 1.96; 1.06-3.70) were associated with virological suppression. An increase in CD4(+) counts was seen at 48 and 96weeks in subjects with immune discordance (p<0.001). Maraviroc was used once-daily in 142 (21.3%) subjects overall, and 68 (57.4%) in switch/simplification. No new safety signals were identified. Besides in salvage regimens, maraviroc was frequently used in switch due to toxicity, simplification, and immune discordance. The efficacy in salvage in clinical practice was higher than in phase III clinical trials, likely due to availability of new active drugs in the regimen. These results increase our understanding of the efficacy, safety, and conditions of prescription of maraviroc beyond the initial registrational trials and the early manufacturer pharmacovigilance programs. PMID:25977241

  1. Teaching Reflective Practice in Practice Settings: Students' Perceptions of Their Clinical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trede, Franziska; Smith, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice

  2. Effect of a genomic classifier test on clinical practice decisions for patients with high-risk prostate cancer after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Badani, Ketan K; Thompson, Darby J; Brown, Gordon; Holmes, Daniel; Kella, Naveen; Albala, David; Singh, Amar; Buerki, Christine; Davicioni, Elai; Hornberger, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of a genomic classifier (GC) test for predicting metastasis risk after radical prostatectomy (RP) on urologists' decision-making about adjuvant treatment of patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Subjects and Methods Patient case history was extracted from the medical records of each of the 145 patients with pT3 disease or positive surgical margins (PSMs) after RP treated by six high-volume urologists, from five community practices. GC results were available for 122 (84%) of these patients. US board-certified urologists (n = 107) were invited to provide adjuvant treatment recommendations for 10 cases randomly drawn from the pool of patient case histories. For each case, the study participants were asked to make an adjuvant therapy recommendation without (clinical variables only) and with knowledge of the GC test results. Recommendations were made without knowledge of other participants' responses and the presentation of case histories was randomised to minimise recall bias. Results A total of 110 patient case histories were available for review by the study participants. The median patient age was 62 years, 71% of patients had pT3 disease and 63% had PSMs. The median (range) 5-year predicted probability of metastasis by the GC test for the cohort was 3.9 (1–33)% and the GC test classified 72% of patients as having low risk for metastasis. A total of 51 urologists consented to the study and provided 530 adjuvant treatment recommendations without, and 530 with knowledge of the GC test results. Study participants performed a mean of 130 RPs/year and 55% were from community-based practices. Without GC test result knowledge, observation was recommended for 57% (n = 303), adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) for 36% (n = 193) and other treatments for 7% (n = 34) of patients. Overall, 31% (95% CI: 27–35%) of treatment recommendations changed with knowledge of the GC test results. Of the ART recommendations without GC test result knowledge, 40% (n = 77) changed to observation (95% CI: 33–47%) with this knowledge. Of patients recommended for observation, 13% (n = 38 [95% CI: 9–17%]) were changed to ART with knowledge of the GC test result. Patients with low risk disease according to the GC test were recommended for observation 81% of the time (n = 276), while of those with high risk, 65% were recommended for treatment (n = 118; P < 0.001). Treatment intensity was strongly correlated with the GC-predicted probability of metastasis (P < 0.001) and the GC test was the dominant risk factor driving decisions in multivariable analysis (odds ratio 8.6, 95% CI: 5.3–14.3%; P < 0.001). Conclusions Knowledge of GC test results had a direct effect on treatment strategies after surgery. Recommendations for observation increased by 20% for patients assessed by the GC test to be at low risk of metastasis, whereas recommendations for treatment increased by 16% for patients at high risk of metastasis. These results suggest that the implementation of genomic testing in clinical practice may lead to significant changes in adjuvant therapy decision-making for high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:24784420

  3. Management of cryptorchidism: a survey of clinical practice in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An evidence-based Consensus on the treatment of undescended testis (UT) was recently published, recommending to perform orchidopexy between 6 and 12 months of age, or upon diagnosis and to avoid the use of hormones. In Italy, current practices on UT management are little known. Our aim was to describe the current management of UT in a cohort of Italian children in comparison with the Consensus guidelines. As management of retractile testis (RT) differs, RT cases were described separately. Methods Ours is a retrospective, multicenter descriptive study. An online questionnaire was filled in by 140 Italian Family Paediatricians (FP) from Associazione Culturale Pediatri (ACP), a national professional association of FP. The questionnaire requested information on all children with cryptorchidism born between 1/01/2004 and 1/01/2006. Data on 169 children were obtained. Analyses were descriptive. Results Overall 24% of children were diagnosed with RT, 76% with UT. Among the latter, cryptorchidism resolved spontaneously in 10% of cases at a mean age of 21.6 months. Overall 70% of UT cases underwent orchidopexy at a mean age of 22.8 months (SD 10.8, range 1.2-56.4), 13% of whom before 1 year. The intervention was performed by a paediatric surgeon in 90% of cases, with a success rate of 91%. Orchidopexy was the first line treatment in 82% of cases, while preceded by hormonal treatment in the remaining 18%. Hormonal treatment was used as first line therapy in 23% of UT cases with a reported success rate of 25%. Overall, 13 children did not undergo any intervention (mean age at last follow up 39.6 months). We analyzed the data from the 5 Italian Regions with the largest number of children enrolled and found a statistically significant regional difference in the use of hormonal therapy, and in the use of and age at orchidopexy. Conclusions Our study showed an important delay in orchidopexy. A quarter of children with cryptorchidism was treated with hormonal therapy. In line with the Consensus guidelines, surgery was carried out by a paediatric surgeon in the majority of cases, with a high success rate. PMID:22233418

  4. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Clinical

    E-print Network

    Weyde, Tillman

    setting) with evidence-based knowledge and practice of advanced level primary eye care. The programme evaluate research and the clinical evidence base. In addition, you will be able to conduct a piece (Clinical Optometry) is to provide optometrists working in specialist practice (in the hospital or community

  5. Evidence-Based Practices Addressed in Community-Based Children's Mental Health Clinical Supervision

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erin C. Accurso; Robin M. Taylor; Ann F. Garland

    2011-01-01

    Clinical supervision is the principal method of training for psychotherapeutic practice, however there is virtually no research on supervision practice in community settings. Of particular interest is the role supervision might play in facilitating implementation of evidence-based (EB) care in routine care settings. This study examines the format and functions of clinical supervision sessions in routine care, as well as

  6. How to integrate individual patient values and preferences in clinical practice guidelines? A research protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trudy van der Weijden; Antoine Boivin; Jako S Burgers; Haske van Veenendaal; Anne M Stiggelbout; Marjan Faber; Glyn Elwyn

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines are largely conceived as tools that will inform health professionals' decisions rather than foster patient involvement in decision making. The time now seems right to adapt clinical practice guidelines in such a way that both the professional's perspective as care provider and the patients' preferences and characteristics are being weighed equally in the decision-making process. We

  7. Translating Research into Practice: Trans Youth Recommendations for Improving School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sausa, Lydia A.

    2005-01-01

    Trans youth are considered one of the most marginalized and oppressed populations. Many experience transphobia and violence based on their gender identity and expression. This qualitative study describes the school experiences of 24 trans youth in Philadelphia and presents their recommendations for school administrators and educators. To…

  8. Recommended Policies and Practices for Advancing Indiana's System of Adult Education and Workforce Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    With generous support from the Lilly Endowment, the Indiana Chamber has contracted with National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) to provide a policy framework and specific recommendations for improving the system of adult education and workforce training in Indiana--building on the important initiatives that have already…

  9. Recommended practice for earthquake resistant design of high pressure gas pipelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Toki; Y. Fukumuri; M. Sako; T. Tsubakimoto

    1983-01-01

    This work contains greatly improved concepts with regard to the evaluation of earthquake motion and interaction (slippage) between ground and pipe. Among the recommendations and standards it offers, it stresses the need to take account of the seismic waves apparently propagating along the ground surface and the strain in ground with inclined base rock; to consider the nonlinearity of restoring

  10. Putting the concept of environmentally balanced fertilizer recommendations into practice on the farm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Steen

    1995-01-01

    The intermediate meeting of the Ministers North Sea Conference was held in Copenhagen during December 1993. The Declaration published as a result of that meeting places particular emphasis on the need to define the exact meaning of balanced fertilizer recommendations and the objective to implement these, preferably by the year 2000, but no later than the year 2002. The progress

  11. Evaluation in New Jersey Education: A Survey of Present Practices and Recommendations for Future Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkowski, Francis; And Others

    Current evaluation activities in the New Jersey school system are surveyed, and recommendations for future evaluation efforts are made. The current activities and future developments of school (or school district), statewide, and project (or program) evaluation are discussed individually. The following program objectives are suggested: to raise…

  12. Reporting Practices in Confirmatory Factor Analysis: An Overview and Some Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Dennis L.; Gillaspy, J. Arthur, Jr.; Purc-Stephenson, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Reporting practices in 194 confirmatory factor analysis studies (1,409 factor models) published in American Psychological Association journals from 1998 to 2006 were reviewed and compared with established reporting guidelines. Three research questions were addressed: (a) how do actual reporting practices compare with published guidelines? (b) how…

  13. DEC Recommended Practices in Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandall, Susan; McLean, Mary E.; Smith, Barbara J.

    This book is designed to provide guidance on effective practices that are related to better outcomes for young children with disabilities, their families, and the personnel who serve them. Practices were identified through focus groups of stakeholders: practitioners, personnel trainers, researchers, administrators, and family members. These…

  14. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice: Strategic and Pedagogical Recommendations for Schools of Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Matthew Owen; Allen-Meares, Paula; Ruffolo, Mary C.

    2007-01-01

    Widespread adoption of pedagogical methods promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) could enhance the effectiveness of social work practice education. Schools of social work should ensure that faculty are trained in the methods of EBP; establish a committee responsible for tracking and implementing demonstrably effective instructional innovations…

  15. Clinical Experience in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Canadian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    The role of advanced practice (AP) nurses must be clearly articulated and defined and not overshadowed by medical functions. Consensus on their educational preparation and explication of the nature of expertise in advanced practice are needed if AP nurses are to realize the full scope of their practice. (Contains 35 references.) (SK)

  16. Surgeon-performed ultrasound: its use in clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, G S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To highlight areas where surgeon-performed ultrasound (US) is an effective diagnostic and therapeutic tool. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The success of US in trauma and technologic advances have enhanced the interest and ability of surgeons to perform their own US examinations. METHODS: General surgeons perform US examinations of the thyroid gland, breast, gastrointestinal tract, peritoneal cavity (laparoscopy), and vascular system. Essentials of these examinations are discussed and a plan for educating surgical residents in US is outlined. RESULTS: Focused assessment for the sonographic examination of the trauma patient, or FAST, is replacing central venous pressure measurements to detect hemopericardium and diagnostic peritoneal lavage to detect hemoperitoneum. Bedside US can be used to detect a pleural effusion so well in critically ill patients that lateral decubitus x-rays are rarely needed. US-directed biopsy of breast lesions is a common office procedure. Laparoscopic US allows tumor staging without formal celiotomy, and many hepatic and pancreatic surgical procedures include US as an adjunct. Endoscopic and endorectal US have added a new dimension to the assessment of many gastrointestinal lesions. Color flow duplex imaging and endoluminal US have significantly expanded the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of vascular imaging. The training program developed at Emory University and Grady Memorial Hospital is offered as a model for educating surgical residents in US techniques. CONCLUSIONS: US is a valuable addition to the general surgeon's diagnostic armamentarium and is rapidly becoming an integral part of the surgeon's clinical practice. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. Figure 14. Figure 15. Figure 16. PMID:9671062

  17. Evolving role of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Azzari, Chiara; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Schmitt, Heinz-Josef; Dagan, Ron

    2014-08-01

    Since the introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), PCVs with extended coverage have become available, and there is emerging global evidence that these vaccines, in particular PCV13, have further reduced rates of invasive pneumococcal disease compared with PCV7. The present article aims to address emerging topics related to PCV13 use in routine clinical practice; specifically: (1) the potential role of high-valent PCVs in reducing pneumococcal disease burden; (2) the impact of PCVs on nasopharyngeal carriage and how this may contribute to reductions in otitis media and pneumonia, as well as the prevalence of resistant pneumococcal strains; (3) new PCV13 indications and (4) importance of schedule adherence for PCV in the prevention of cases of vaccine serotype-specific invasive pneumococcal disease. The beneficial effects of PCVs in protecting individuals from a wide spectrum of pneumococcal diseases can be increased by improving the vaccine coverage and adhering to the recommended vaccination schedules. There is increasing evidence that PCV13 has reduced much of the post-PCV7 burden of pneumococcal diseases in the pediatric community, including reducing pneumococcal colonization and the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease and mucosal diseases. This has also led to a reduction in antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal diseases. The role of PCV13 in clinical practice is evolving, with PCV13 now available for children and adolescents between the ages of 6 weeks and 17 years, thus ensuring that children in all age groups can be protected against vaccine-serotype pneumococcal diseases. Continued surveillance is warranted to monitor the impact of PCV13 on disease burden. PMID:24618937

  18. The Clinical Placement Consortium: where education and practice meet.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Jan; Kline, Kay

    2005-01-01

    The process of planning the clinical rotations for nursing students can be challenging for both academia and the clinical service setting. This article will discuss a collaborative model that is used by one nursing community. Advantages and challenges will be presented from both views as well as lessons learned. The Clinical Placement Consortium (CPC) has served as a method to work toward a common goal of quality clinical experiences for all students. PMID:16331082

  19. Adverse event assessment, analysis, and reporting in recent published analgesic clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon M; Wang, Anthony T; Katz, Nathaniel P; McDermott, Michael P; Burke, Laurie B; Coplan, Paul; Gilron, Ian; Hertz, Sharon H; Lin, Allison H; Rappaport, Bob A; Rowbotham, Michael C; Sampaio, Cristina; Sweeney, Michael; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The development of valid and informative treatment risk-benefit profiles requires consistent and thorough information about adverse event (AE) assessment and participants' AEs during randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Despite a 2004 extension of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement recommending the specific AE information that investigators should report, there is little evidence that analgesic RCTs adequately adhere to these recommendations. This systematic review builds on prior recommendations by describing a comprehensive checklist for AE reporting developed to capture clinically important AE information. Using this checklist, we coded AE assessment methods and reporting in all 80 double-blind RCTs of noninvasive pharmacologic treatments published in the European Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and PAIN® from 2006 to 2011. Across all trials, reports of AEs were frequently incomplete, inconsistent across trials, and, in some cases, missing. For example, >40% of trials failed to report any information on serious adverse events. Trials of participants with acute or chronic pain conditions and industry-sponsored trials typically provided more and better-quality AE data than trials involving pain-free volunteers or trials that were not industry sponsored. The results of this review suggest that improved AE reporting is needed in analgesic RCTs. We developed an ACTTION (Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks) AE reporting checklist that is intended to assist investigators in thoroughly and consistently capturing and reporting these critically important data in publications. PMID:23602344

  20. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and…

  1. AI Planning Technology as a Component of Computerised Clinical Practice Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Winstanley, Graham

    , based on locally-agreed, evidence-based best practice. The ability to generate, cri- tique, and the need to continually update this knowledge to conform to the prin- ciple of evidence-based best practiceAI Planning Technology as a Component of Computerised Clinical Practice Guidelines Kirsty Bradbrook

  2. Neuroscience and the Feldenkrais Method: evidence in research and clinical practice

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    @ canterbury.ac.nz Some say evidence-based practice stifles the creative therapies and learning modalitiesNeuroscience and the Feldenkrais Method: evidence in research and clinical practice Associate. It draws on principles of exploratory practice rather than prescribed exercises and can work at different

  3. Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the KDIGO clinical practice guideline for CKD evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Ayub; Clase, Catherine M; Acott, Phil; Battistella, Marisa; Bello, Aminu; Feltmate, Patrick; Grill, Allan; Karsanji, Meena; Komenda, Paul; Madore, Francois; Manns, Braden J; Mahdavi, Sara; Mustafa, Reem A; Smyth, Andrew; Welcher, E Sohani

    2015-02-01

    We congratulate the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) work group on their comprehensive work in a broad subject area and agreed with many of the recommendations in their clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease. We concur with the KDIGO definitions and classification of kidney disease and welcome the addition of albuminuria categories at all levels of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the terminology of G categories rather than stages to describe level of GFR, the division of former stage 3 into new G categories 3a and 3b, and the addition of the underlying diagnosis. We agree with the use of the heat map to illustrate the relative contributions of low GFR and albuminuria to cardiovascular and renal risk, though we thought that the highest risk category was too broad, including as it does people at disparate levels of risk. We add an albuminuria category A4 for nephrotic-range proteinuria and D and T categories for patients on dialysis or with a functioning renal transplant. We recommend target blood pressure of 140/90mm Hg regardless of diabetes or proteinuria, and against the combination of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We recommend against routine protein restriction. We concur on individualization of hemoglobin A1c targets. We do not agree with routine restriction of sodium intake to <2g/d, instead suggesting reduction of sodium intake in those with high intake (>3.3g/d). We suggest screening for anemia only when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2). We recognize the absence of evidence on appropriate phosphate targets and methods of achieving them and do not agree with suggestions in this area. In drug dosing, we agree with the recommendation of using absolute clearance (ie, milliliters per minute), calculated from the patient's estimated GFR (which is normalized to 1.73m(2)) and the patient's actual anthropomorphic body surface area. We agree with referral to a nephrologist when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2) (and for many other scenarios), but suggest urine albumin-creatinine ratio > 60mg/mmol or proteinuria with protein excretion > 1g/d as the referral threshold for proteinuria. PMID:25511161

  4. Effectiveness of a clinical practice guideline implementation strategy for patients with anxiety disorders in primary care: cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anxiety is a common mental health problem seen in primary care. However, its management in clinical practice varies greatly. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have the potential to reduce variations and improve the care received by patients by promoting interventions of proven benefit. However, uptake and adherence to their recommendations can be low. Method/design This study involves a community based on cluster randomized trial in primary healthcare centres in the Madrid Region (Spain). The project aims to determine whether the use of implementation strategy (including training session, information, opinion leader, reminders, audit, and feed-back) of CPG for patients with anxiety disorders in primary care is more effective than usual diffusion. The number of patients required is 296 (148 in each arm), all older than 18 years and diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and panic attacks by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV). They are chosen by consecutive sampling. The main outcome variable is the change in two or more points into Goldberg anxiety scale at six and twelve months. Secondary outcome variables include quality of life (EuroQol 5D), and degree of compliance with the CPG recommendations on treatment, information, and referrals to mental health services. Main effectiveness will be analyzed by comparing the patients percentage improvement on the Goldberg scale between the intervention group and the control group. Logistic regression with random effects will be used to adjust for prognostic factors. Confounding factors or factors that might alter the effect recorded will be taken into account in this analysis. Discussion There is a need to identify effective implementation strategies for CPG for the management of anxiety disorders present in primary care. Ensuring the appropriate uptake of guideline recommendations can reduce clinical variation and improve the care patients receive. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN83365316 PMID:22132861

  5. Treatment of chronic hepatitis B in clinical practice with entecavir or tenofovir.

    PubMed

    Ridruejo, Ezequiel

    2014-06-21

    Results from phase III clinical trials clearly demonstrate the efficacy and safety of entecavir and tenofovir in the controlled environment of randomized clinical studies. There are several studies with both drugs performed in clinical practice (also called "real life studies"). Despite the pros and cons, studies performed in real life conditions represent everyday practice and add important information about long term treatment effectiveness and safety in this clinical setting. This review shows that patients treated with first line nucleos(t)ide analogs at referral centres, with good clinical follow-up and adherence to international guidelines, can achieve high treatment response rates with a very low rate of adverse events. PMID:24966587

  6. Reducing the risks of herbicide resistance: best management practices and recommendations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are the foundation of weed control in commercial crop production. However, herbicide-resistant weed populations are developing rapidly in response to selection pressure. Critical practices include reducing selection through diversification of weed control techniques, minimizing spread of ...

  7. Portal imaging practice patterns of children's oncology group institutions: Dosimetric assessment and recommendations for minimizing unnecessary exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Olch, Arthur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)]. E-mail: aolch@chla.usc.edu; Geurts, Mark [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Thomadsen, Bruce [Department of Medical Physics and Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Famiglietti, Robin [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine and analyze the dosimetric consequences of current portal imaging practices for pediatric patients, and make specific recommendations for reducing exposure from portal imaging procedures. Methods and Materials: A survey was sent to approximately 250 Children's Oncology Group (COG) member institutions asking a series of questions about their portal imaging practices. Three case studies are presented with dosimetric analysis to illustrate the magnitude of unintended dose received by nontarget tissues using the most common techniques from the survey. Results: The vast majority of centers use double-exposure portal image techniques with a variety of open field margins. Only 17% of portal images were obtained during treatment, and for other imaging methods, few centers subtract monitor units from the treatment delivery. The number of monitor units used was nearly the same regardless of imager type, including electronic portal imaging devices. Eighty-six percent imaged all fields the first week and 17% imaged all fields every week. An additional 1,112 cm{sup 3} of nontarget tissue received 1 Gy in one of the example cases. Eight new recommendations are made, which will lower nontarget radiation doses with minimal impact on treatment verification accuracy. Conclusion: Based on the survey, changes can be made in portal imaging practices that will lower nontarget doses. It is anticipated that treatment verification accuracy will be minimally affected. Specific recommendations made to decrease the imaging dose and help lower the rate of radiation-induced secondary cancers in children are proposed for inclusion in future COG protocols using radiation therapy.

  8. Practice recommendations cite use of disinfection caps, implementation strategies to reduce CLABSIs.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    The use of disinfection caps is one strategy highlighted in updated guidelines that focus on reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). The recommendations, which are sponsored by the Arlington, VA-based Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and other infection control organizations, focus not just on specific strategies, but also how to implement the strategies. Infection control advocates are hopeful that the dramatic gains made in reducing the incidence of CLABSls in ICUs can be extended to other units of the hospital setting including the ED. Disinfection caps are recommended under the"special approaches" section of the guidelines, which offers recommendations for locations or populations that have unacceptably high CLABSI rates. However, some hospitals are adopting the approach throughout their facilities with impressive results. Infection preventionists at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, IL report that disinfection caps helped them reduce CLABSls by 68% in one year, saving the organization more than $1 million. The approach replaces a scrub-the-hub approach that was used previously, but left room for error, according to administrators. Guideline authors gave disinfection caps a level 1 ranking, indicating that there is high-quality evidence to support their effectiveness. However, the authors stopped short of calling for their use on a routine basis PMID:25141498

  9. Recommendations for the management of irritable bowel syndrome in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, W G; Thompson, W G; Vanner, S J; Faloon, T R; Rosser, W W; Birtwhistle, R W; Morse, J L; Touzel, T A

    1999-01-01

    To help family physicians manage patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a consensus conference was convened in June 1997 at which 5 internationally recognized experts in IBS presented position papers on selected topics previously circulated to the conference participants. Five working groups comprising family physicians, gastroenterologists and allied health care professionals from across Canada were then charged with developing recommendations for the diagnosis, patient education, psychosocial management, dietary advice and pharmacotherapy, respectively. An evidence-based approach was used where possible; otherwise, recommendations were made by consensus. The participants concluded that family physicians can make a positive diagnosis of IBS using symptom criteria. The pathophysiology is poorly understood, but motility and sensory disturbances appear to play a role. Neither psychological nor specific dietary factors cause IBS, but both can trigger symptoms. Drug therapy is not recommended for the routine treatment of IBS, but short-term trials of drug therapy may be targeted to predominant symptoms in selected patients. A step-wise, patient-centred approach to management is outlined. PMID:10439825

  10. Practical recommendations for coaches and athletes: a meta-analysis of sodium bicarbonate use for athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Peart, Daniel J; Siegler, Jason C; Vince, Rebecca V

    2012-07-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is a buffering agent that is suggested to improve performance by promoting the efflux of hydrogen ions from working cells and tissues. Research surrounding its efficacy as an ergogenic aid is conflicting, making it difficult to draw conclusions as to its effectiveness for training and competition. This study performed a meta-analysis of relevant research articles to allow the development of concise practical recommendations for coaches and athletes. The overall effect size for the influence of NaHCO3 on performance was moderate, and was significantly lower for specifically trained as opposed to recreationally trained participants. PMID:22505127

  11. Pulmonary rehabilitation exercise prescription in chronic obstructive lung disease: US survey and review of guidelines and clinical practices.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Chris; Fullwood, M Dot; Rigler, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common, progressive disorder associated with disabling symptoms, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and substantial morbidity and mortality. Current national guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to improve dyspnea, functional capacity, and quality of life. Many PR exercise programs are based on guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine. Recommendations have also been published by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the American Thoracic Society. Translating exercise science into effective training and clinical care requires interpretation and the use of diverse national PR guidelines and recommendations. Pulmonary rehabilitation clinicians often vary in their education and background, with most nurses and respiratory care practitioners lacking formal training in exercise physiology. Patients often have comorbidities that may further complicate exercise provision and prescription. This article describes the results of an informal, nonscientific survey of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation members exploring current PR exercise prescription practices as a basis for discussion and reviews current national exercise recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Further, it describes areas of uncertainty regarding exercise prescription in PR and suggests strategies for providing effective exercise training, given the diversity of guidelines, clinician preparedness, and patient complexity. PMID:23846840

  12. The critical need for academic health centers to assess the training, support, and career development requirements of clinical research coordinators: recommendations from the Clinical and Translational Science Award Research Coordinator Taskforce.

    PubMed

    Speicher, Lisa A; Fromell, Gregg; Avery, Sue; Brassil, Donna; Carlson, Lori; Stevens, Erika; Toms, Michele

    2012-12-01

    Clinical Research Coordinators (CRCs) are a vital component of the clinical research enterprise providing a pivotal role in human subject protection through the numerous activities and responsibilities assigned to them. In 2006, the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Research resources (NCRR) implemented the Clinical and Translational Science Awards program (CTSA) to advance biomedical research. As a part of this endeavor, many workgroups were formed among the Consortium to support translational research. The Research Coordinator Taskforce was created as part of the Regulatory Knowledge group of the Clinical Research Innovation Key Function Committee, and focuses on enhancing CTSA capabilities to provide support and training for CRCs. In the spring of 2008, this taskforce conducted two surveys of the then 24 CTSA Consortium members to better understand the current expectations and responsibilities of research coordinators in addition to the mechanism for providing education, training, and support in order for CRCs to successfully meet the study responsibilities placed upon them. The results of these surveys are summarized in this article and provide context to the recommendations of the Research Coordinator Taskforce for institutional considerations, approaches, and best practices for providing education, training, and support the expanding role of CRCs in fulfilling their responsibilities delegated to them by investigators. PMID:23253669

  13. Supporting Student Nurses Learning in and through Clinical Practice: The Role of the Clinical Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Margaret; Roberts, Debbie

    2003-01-01

    A clinical guide is an experienced nurse who supports nursing students throughout the program, particularly in clinical placements. More than a mentor, a guide is fully involved in promoting deep learning in clinical settings. (SK)

  14. Adaptation of the application of good clinical practice depending on the features of specific research projects.

    PubMed

    Bertoye, Pierre-Henri; Courcier-Duplantier, Soizic; Best, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    The conduct of clinical trials falls within a strict regulatory framework. The objective of the round table was to develop reasonable recommendations for the implementation of GCP according to the type of research and taking in account the risks and challenges related to this research. Two types of risks have been identified: those related to the characteristics of the research and those related to the impact of the study results. The group designed an evaluation table of these risks. The round table focused its investigations on 3 main themes: monitoring, the investigational medicinal product and undesirable effects. Three methods of monitoring adaptation were analysed in terms of advantages and disadvantages: the gradual approach, the central monitoring, monitoring on the basis of sampling. Examination of the investigational medicinal product focused on the medicinal product circuit. The group recommends using the following 'basic' decision-making tree, which takes three elements into account: 1) is it an investigational medicinal product?, 2) do the trial objectives and design require packaging specific to the research?, 3) is the risk of use higher than that in standard practice? Finally, adaptation of the implementation of GCP in terms of pharmacovigilance appeared very limited and could possibly be considered for the medicinal product, the subject of the research, which already holds a marketing authorisation, and for which the safety profile is well known; in this case, only simplified collection of non-serious adverse events may be envisaged, which may be implemented by designing and using a standard collection listing. The adaptation of the implementation of GCP is possible. This firstly takes into account the characteristics of the research: which objectives/which risks/which challenges. The options in terms of adaptation must be pre-defined, documented and justified; if necessary, they will also be re-assessed in the course of analysis. PMID:17124945

  15. HIV Testing Practices by Clinical Service before and after Revised Testing Guidelines in a Swiss University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Katharine E. A.; Hugli, Olivier; Mamin, Rachel; Cellerai, Cristina; Martenet, Sebastien; Berney, Alexandre; Peters, Solange; Du Pasquier, Renaud A.; Bodenmann, Patrick; Cavassini, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine 1) HIV testing practices in a 1400-bed university hospital where local HIV prevalence is 0.4% and 2) the effect on testing practices of national HIV testing guidelines, revised in March 2010, recommending Physician-Initiated Counselling and Testing (PICT). Methods Using 2 hospital databases, we determined the number of HIV tests performed by selected clinical services, and the number of patients tested as a percentage of the number seen per service (‘testing rate’). To explore the effect of the revised national guidelines, we examined testing rates for two years pre- and two years post-PICT guideline publication. Results Combining the clinical services, 253,178 patients were seen and 9,183 tests were performed (of which 80 tested positive, 0.9%) in the four-year study period. The emergency department (ED) performed the second highest number of tests, but had the lowest testing rates (0.9–1.1%). Of inpatient services, neurology and psychiatry had higher testing rates than internal medicine (19.7% and 9.6% versus 8%, respectively). There was no significant increase in testing rates, either globally or in the majority of the clinical services examined, and no increase in new HIV diagnoses post-PICT recommendations. Conclusions Using a simple two-database tool, we observe no global improvement in HIV testing rates in our hospital following new national guidelines but do identify services where testing practices merit improvement. This study may show the limit of PICT strategies based on physician risk assessment, compared to the opt-out approach. PMID:22761757

  16. Erectile dysfunction in general medicine practice: prevalence and clinical correlates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KK Chew; CM Earle; BGA Stuckey; K Jamrozik; EJ Keogh

    2000-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common problem in general medical practice affecting especially the elderly and those with cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. A study was undertaken by questionnaire distributed to consecutive adult male attendees at 62 general medical practices. 1240 completed questionnaires were available for analysis. The mean age of participants was 56.4 y (range 18 – 91 y).

  17. Acute mastoiditis in southern Sweden: a study of occurrence and clinical course of acute mastoiditis before and after introduction of new treatment recommendations for AOM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karin Stenfeldt; Ann Hermansson

    2010-01-01

    Watchful waiting was recommended as an option for uncomplicated episodes of acute otitis media in Sweden in the year 2000.\\u000a Concern was raised that these recommendations would lead to a higher incidence of acute mastoiditis. The aim of this study\\u000a was to map the occurrence, treatment policy and the clinical course of mastoiditis before and after the new treatment recommendations

  18. Fear of AIDS: Its meaning and implications for clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel Knapp; Leon Vandecreek

    1989-01-01

    Clinical reports have appeared about patients who present for mental health treatment with the major symptom of fearing that they have AIDS. The clinical reports of patients who fear AIDS are similar to those made many years ago by patients who feared syphilis. As with the syphilophobia of years ago, the AIDS group represents a divergent set of patients. Some

  19. A Model for Ethical Practices in Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of clinical phonetics and linguistics as an area of scientific inquiry gives rise to the need for guidelines that define ethical and responsible conduct. The diverse membership of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association (ICPLA) and the readership of this journal are uniquely suited to consider ethical issues…

  20. Recommendation by a law body to ban infant male circumcision has serious worldwide implications for pediatric practice and human rights

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent attempts in the USA and Europe to ban the circumcision of male children have been unsuccessful. Of current concern is a report by the Tasmanian Law Reform Institute (TLRI) recommending that non-therapeutic circumcision be prohibited, with parents and doctors risking criminal sanctions except where the parents have strong religious and ethnic ties to circumcision. The acceptance of this recommendation would create a precedent for legislation elsewhere in the world, thereby posing a threat to pediatric practice, parental responsibilities and freedoms, and public health. Discussion The TLRI report ignores the scientific consensus within medical literature about circumcision. It contains legal and ethical arguments that are seriously flawed. Dispassionate ethical arguments and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child are consistent with parents being permitted to authorize circumcision for their male child. Uncritical acceptance of the TLRI report’s recommendations would strengthen and legitimize efforts to ban childhood male circumcision not just in Australia, but in other countries as well. The medical profession should be concerned about any attempt to criminalize a well-accepted and evidence-based medical procedure. The recommendations are illogical, pose potential dangers and seem unworkable in practice. There is no explanation of how the State could impose criminal charges against doctors and parents, nor of how such a punitive apparatus could be structured, nor how strength of ethnic or religious ties could be determined. The proposal could easily be used inappropriately, and discriminates against parents not tied to the religions specified. With time, religious exemptions could subsequently be overturned. The law, governments and the medical profession should reject the TLRI recommendations, especially since the recent affirmative infant male circumcision policy statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics attests to the significant individual and public health benefits and low risk of infant male circumcision. Summary Doctors should be allowed to perform medical procedures based on sound evidence of effectiveness and safety with guaranteed protection. Parents should be free to act in the best interests of the health of their infant son by having him circumcised should they choose. PMID:24010685