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1

Aviation Clinical Psychology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper proposes that the Navy develop an Aviation Clinical Psychology (ACP) program that would complement the Flight Surgeon Program by providing mental health services tailored to the aviation community. Using a community psychology model, it is argue...

J. B. Parker

1987-01-01

2

Clinical Psychology for Cardiac Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a From its very beginning, modern scientific psychology has dealt with issues regarding mind-body, health-disease relationships;\\u000a in particular, clinical psychology, in its various applications, has tried to provide a structure to psychological concepts\\u000a tied to organic disease. Clinical psychology is described as the “area of psychology whose objectives are the explanation,\\u000a understanding, interpretation and reorganization of dysfunctional or pathological mental processes,

E. Molinari; L. Bellardita; A. Compare

3

Doctoral training programs in clinical psychology and in counseling psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

On recommendation of the Committee on Evaluation, the Education and Training Board with the concurrence of the Board of Directors of the American Psychological Association has approved the doctoral training programs in clinical psychology and in counseling psychology\\

1958-01-01

4

Reestablishing Clinical Psychology's Subjective Core  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comments on the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. The Task Force is to be commended for their report valuing evidence from "clinical expertise" on a par with "research data" (p. 272) in guiding psychological practices. The current author…

Hunsberger, Peter Hume

2007-01-01

5

The future of clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews the present status of clinical psychology. An analysis is presented of the reasons for the failure of clinical psychologists to provide strong supporting evidence for the utility of their diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, for the declining interest in diagnostic testing, and for the proliferation of new methods of intervention. A new conception of clinical practice, research, and graduate training

Julian B. Rotter

1973-01-01

6

Clinical psychology in Army hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recently established program of clinical psychological service in all general hospitals and in the major station hospitals is analyzed under the following headings: scope of the program, qualifications of clinical psychologists, administration of the hospital program, and training of professional personnel.

M. A. Seidenfeld

1944-01-01

7

Clinical Psychology and Evolutionary Psychology: Toward a Dialogue  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of evolutionary psychology as a theoretical framework for the study of human behavior has been spectacular. However, evolutionary psychology has been largely ignored by clinical psychology. This article is an attempt to encourage greater dialogue between the two. First, some of the major principles of evolutionary psychology are outlined, followed by consideration of some of the criticisms that

Richard J. Siegert; Tony Ward

2002-01-01

8

Clinical Psychology in Medical Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Greenfield's excellent appraisal (Amer. Psychologist, 1960, 15, 624-625) of the role of clinical psychology in medical education deserves commendation. Despite its brevity, it offers a great deal. In fact, it reads so well and makes such good sense, I was hopeful, as I neared the end, that Greenfield might have an answer to the question he raises implicitly: \\

Milton J. Horowitz

1961-01-01

9

The relationship of clinical psychology and psychiatry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The opinion is expressed that clinical psychology is essential to the best practice of psychiatry. Clinical psychology stems from a background of testing, investigation and experimental approach, while psychiatry originates from a background of humanics, public service, interpersonal relationships with suffering people and an almost entirely clinical approach. Details in the relationship between psychiatry and clinical psychology in four areas

William C. Menninger

1950-01-01

10

An asocial psychology and a misdirected clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses psychology's emphasis on the individual organism, an emphasis that ill prepared psychology in the post-World War II period for the public arena. One of the consequences for clinical psychology was that it became embroiled in the traditions of American medicine. The adverse effects of this are explored and discussed. (10 ref)

Seymour B. Sarason

1981-01-01

11

Clinical psychology and evolutionary psychology: Toward a dialogue  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of evolutionary psychology as a theoretical framework for the study of human behavior has been spectacular. However, evolutionary psychology has been largely ignored by clinical psychology. This article is an attempt to encourage greater dialogue between the two. First, some of the major principles of evolutionary psychol- ogy are outlined, followed by consideration of some of the criticisms

Richard J. Siegert; Tony Ward

2002-01-01

12

Oscillation and progress in clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In her address as the retiring President of the Western Psychological Association, the speaker gives a brief overview of some of the chief characteristics of clinical psychology today. These are related to historical developments in this field, and how this development has been affected by other disciplines. Strengths and weaknesses of present day trends and practices in clinical psychology are

Maud A. Merrill

1951-01-01

13

Research Mentoring and Women in Clinical Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main question explored in this study is whether a woman's choice to do research during her career as a clinical psychologist is associated with having had a research mentor. A sample of 616 women, all members of the American Psychological Association holding a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, completed a survey about their experience with a…

Dohm, Faith-Anne; Cummings, Wendy

2002-01-01

14

A brief history of clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of clinical psychology from just prior to the turn of the century to date is reviewed. Included are the topics: the psychometric tradition; the dynamic tradition; the psychologist in the clinic, the child guidance center, the mental hospital, and the home for mentally defective; psychology as a profession. These topics are organized under the headings of the 1920's

Robert I. Watson

1953-01-01

15

Research Mentoring and Women in Clinical Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The main question explored in this study is whether a woman's choice to do research during her career as a clinical psychologist is associated with having had a research mentor. A sample of 616 women, all members of the American Psychological Association holding a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, completed a survey about their experience with a…

Dohm, Faith-Anne; Cummings, Wendy

2002-01-01

16

Clinical psychology in medical settings: Psychology's role in health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of clinical psychologists working in medical settings has grown along with the range of services provided by psychologists to patients with a multitude of medical problems across the lifespan. Medical care cost savings brought about by these psychological interventions is highlighted along with issues of public policy and specialization of training. The opportunity for ongoing development of clinical

Ronald H. Rozensky

1994-01-01

17

The uncertain future of clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines the forces operating to inhibit the growth of clinical psychology, including the location of clinical training in the graduate school, the incompatibilities between a science and a profession, and the inappropriateness of the psychiatric setting and medical model. Consideration of the cost of viable alternatives includes 4 possible courses: (a) perpetuation of the Boulder model, (b) development of separate

George W. Albee

1970-01-01

18

Role of Clinical Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Clinical neuropsychology is developing into a professional specialty with training and credentialing criteria. This has implications for the roles clinical psychologists. It may no longer be responsible or ethical for the general clinical psychologist to ...

L. I. Cripe

1983-01-01

19

Evolution of Clinical Military Psychology Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethical quandaries for military psychologists are a challenge. Effective military mental health providers must have a thorough understanding of their ethics code, pertinent military instructions, military law, and the mental health laws of the countries in which they practice. This article traces the evolution of clinical military psychology ethics from World War II to present day and serves to introduce

Carrie H. Kennedy; Bret A. Moore

2007-01-01

20

A Selective Bibliography of Handbooks in Clinical Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The explosive growth of clinical psychology literature has made it difficult for anyone to get a comprehensive overview of the field. Clinical psychology handbooks help alleviate this problem by providing a thorough survey of the discipline. Despite their utility for both students and librarians, no literature reviews of handbooks in clinical psychology currently exist. The present study seeks to fill

Brian Quinn

1993-01-01

21

MAKING THE HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY CLINICALLY AND PHILOSOPHICALLY RELEVANT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses ways to make the history of psychology course relevant for a clinical psychology doctoral program within a multidenominational Protestant theological seminary. She uses a personalist orientation to emphasize the need to integrate psychology, philosophy, and theology. She differentiates among the intrapersonal, interpersonal, impersonal, and transpersonal dimensions of experience. She illustrates the rich multidisciplinary historical roots of contemporary

Hendrika Vande Kemp

2002-01-01

22

Integrative data analysis in clinical psychology research.  

PubMed

Integrative data analysis (IDA), a novel framework for conducting the simultaneous analysis of raw data pooled from multiple studies, offers many advantages including economy (i.e., reuse of extant data), power (i.e., large combined sample sizes), the potential to address new questions not answerable by a single contributing study (e.g., combining longitudinal studies to cover a broader swath of the lifespan), and the opportunity to build a more cumulative science (i.e., examining the similarity of effects across studies and potential reasons for dissimilarities). There are also methodological challenges associated with IDA, including the need to account for sampling heterogeneity across studies, to develop commensurate measures across studies, and to account for multiple sources of study differences as they impact hypothesis testing. In this review, we outline potential solutions to these challenges and describe future avenues for developing IDA as a framework for studies in clinical psychology. PMID:23394226

Hussong, Andrea M; Curran, Patrick J; Bauer, Daniel J

2013-02-01

23

Psychological testing in military clinical psychology: I. Intelligence testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychological testing in World War II has not been as novel and spectacular as in World War I. In the recent war the contributions have been in the direction of adaptation and development rather than invention. One of the greatest contributions has been the development of abbreviated test techniques. The success along this line challenges the established practice of constructing

W. A. Hunt; I. Stevenson

1946-01-01

24

Clinical Psychology Graduate Students’ Opinions about Prescriptive Authority: A Discussion of Medical Versus Psychological Training Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined current clinical psychology doctoral students’ interest in gaining prescriptive authority and opinions about potential training options. Three hundred and sixty-three students completed an exploratory survey via electronic mail distributed by the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology (CUDCP) listserv. Our results suggest that the majority of these students are at least somewhat interested in gaining prescriptive

Louisa D. Grandin; Michelle A. Blackmore

2006-01-01

25

AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course Held in Fort Gordon, Georgia on 13-17 February 1989.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains the proceedings of the 1989 AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course. Contents: Army Clinical Psychology into the 1990s; The Administratively Separate Psychology Service: Current Status and Update; Administratively Separate Psychology S...

A. D. MAngelsdorff

1990-01-01

26

[Comments on a concept of clinical child psychology].  

PubMed

Arguments in favor of establishing clinical child psychology as an independent subject are first discussed, and then the discipline itself is defined as a comparatively autonomous domain of psychology. Using three examples (research on reading and spelling weaknesses, the development of the memory and social interaction in ecological fields) it is shown that clinical child psychology can and must develop also through the utilization of fundamental research. The examples are closely related to aspects of the "Defective child" research project. PMID:122503

Schmidt, H D

1979-01-01

27

Clinical and Counseling Psychology Doctoral Trainees: How Students Perceive Internships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined applicants' perceptions of internship site types by specialty affiliation (clinical and counseling psychology). Multidimensional scaling analyses suggest that clinical psychology students focus their attention on internship site prestige, future job opportunities, opportunities for research, degree of client psychopathology and physical illness, and their overall comfort in working with the client population associated with the site type. Counseling

Victoria A. Shivy; Suzanne E. Mazzeo; Terri N. Sullivan

2007-01-01

28

Bridging Scientist and Practitioner Perspectives in Clinical Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literature suggests that a complex and often hostile relationship exists between the science and practice of clinical psychology. Contributors to this conflict of viewpoints are reconsidered within the proposition that there are different roads to discovery and that there may be good reasons to keep the science and practice of clinical psychology somewhat separate. Results of a national survey of

Larry E. Beutler; Rebecca E. Williams; Phylis J. Wakefield; Stephanie R. Entwistle

1995-01-01

29

Revisioning Clinical Psychology: Integrating Cultural Psychology into Clinical Research and Practice with Portuguese Immigrants  

PubMed Central

This article outlines a model for conducting psychotherapy with people of diverse cultural backgrounds. The theoretical foundation for the model is based on clinical and cultural psychology. Cultural psychology integrates psychology and anthropology in order to provide a complex understanding of both culture and the individual within his or her cultural context. The model proposed in this article is also based on our clinical experience and mixed-method research with the Portuguese community. The model demonstrates its value with ethnic minority clients by situating the clients within the context of their multi-layered social reality. The individual, familial, socio-cultural, and religio-moral domains are explored in two research projects, revealing the interrelation of these levels/contexts. The article is structured according to these domains. Study 1 is a quantitative study that validates the Agonias Questionnaire in Ontario. The results of this study are used to illustrate the individual domain of our proposed model. Study 2 is an ethnography conducted in the Azorean Islands, and the results of this study are integrated to illustrate the other three levels of the model, namely family, socio-cultural, and the religio-moral levels.

James, Susan; Harris, Sara; Foster, Gary; Clarke, Juanne; Gadermann, Anne; Morrison, Marie; Bezanson, Birdie Jane

2013-01-01

30

Compulsory Schooling, Child Study, Clinical Psychology, and Special Education: Origins of School Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The historical development of school psychology is discussed in the context of circumstances and individuals significant to its origins. The contributions of Witmer’s clinical psychology and Hall’s child study demonstrate how early forms of school psychology evolved from their conceptualizations. Even though the specialty did not achieve a stable national identity until the second half of the 20th century, the

Thomas K. Fagan

1992-01-01

31

Clinical Psychology Program Improvement on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study was conducted in the context of previous research on the validity, correlates, and stability over time of clinical psychology program graduate scores on the national licensing exam, the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). The purpose of the present study was to determine the characteristics of programs…

Templer, Donald I.; Tyler, Lori; Nelson, Adam A.; Winstanley, Scott; Chicota, Cammy

2004-01-01

32

Training in clinical child psychology: doing it right.  

PubMed

Discusses (a) what roles the specialty of clinical child psychology fulfills and how societal and professional changes have enhanced the need for the specialty, (b) how the field defines itself, (c) how models of training are conceptualized for the specialty, and (d) how some training programs implement specialty training with broad, interdisciplinary components. Clinical child psychology is a professional field of research and practice that, when adequate training is provided, properly deserves a places as a specialty. The dangers of overspecialization and narrowness are more likely present in traditional clinical (adult) psychology than in clinical child psychology, especially when the clinical child training is done in a broadly comprehensive and integrated manner. PMID:10587898

Roberts, M C; Sobel, A B

1999-12-01

33

The Use of Randomized Clinical Trials in Rehabilitation Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This article provides rehabilitation psychology researchers and clinicians with a tutorial approach to randomized clinical trials (RCTs), their basic assumptions and requirements, and a discussion of their potential applications and limitations to their use in rehabilitation and, more specifically, in rehabilitation psychology. Research Method\\/Design: The authors begin by reviewing a brief history and development of RCTs, definitions and considerations

Denise Tate; Claire Kalpakjian; Cianni Kwon

2008-01-01

34

Clinical health psychology: A specialty for the 21st century  

Microsoft Academic Search

To meet its potential in the 21st century, clinical health psychology must develop an accumulated body of knowledge relevant to practice, disseminate this knowledge, use this knowledge in practice and policy, and provide appropriate education and training for future psychologists. In this Division of Health Psychology Presidential Address, the author articulates issues in each of these areas, highlighting changes in

Cynthia D. Belar

1997-01-01

35

Measurement of Depression: Clinical, Biological, Psychological, and Psychosocial Perspectives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The papers from the conference on Measurement of Depression, held at Queens Hospital Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii in March 1984 are presented. Clinical, biological, psychological and psychosocial aspects of the problem are covered.

R. M. A. Hirschfeld A. J. Marsella M. M. Katz

1984-01-01

36

Stress Management Training in Health Psychology Practice: Critical Clinical Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress management training interventions have become one of the most popular treatment programs in health psychology practice. Although numerous clinical approaches are available, limited attention is given to the matching of intervention with the clinical needs of individuals. As a result, stress management programs are more frequently marketed in clinical and community settings as palliative techniques without sufficient exploration of

J. Bruce Hillenberg; Thomas M. DiLorenzo

1987-01-01

37

Animal clinical psychology: A modest proposal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes initial experiences in the development of a field of applied animal psychology dealing with the behavioral problems of pet animals. A team approach is suggested where (a) the pet's problem is analyzed; (b) a remedial training program based on classical and operant conditioning is used; (c) the owner is instructed in the implementation of the program; and (d) a

David S. Tuber; David Hothersall; Victoria L. Voith

1974-01-01

38

Developmental theory and the practice of clinical child psychology.  

PubMed

Examined developmental theory and its relevance for the practice of clinical child psychology. Following a brief review of basic principles of developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology, implications of a developmental perspective are explored for the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of childhood disorders. Although it is obvious that many developmental issues confront the clinical child psychologist and that we have learned much about translating developmental theory into clinical practice, we conclude we have a long way to go before we can assert that a true developmental-clinical child interface has been realized. PMID:10587895

Ollendick, T H; Vasey, M W

1999-12-01

39

PSYCHOLOGY IN COMMUNITY SETTINGS--CLINICAL, EDUCATIONAL, VOCATIONAL, SOCIAL ASPECTS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

IN THIS DESCRIPTION OF THE PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL CLINIC IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AT YALE UNIVERSITY, THE CLINIC'S HISTORICAL AND PROFESSIONAL ORIGINS ARE REVIEWED, AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE SCHOOLS THAT IT SERVES DISCUSSED. SPECIFIC TOPICS CONSIDERED ARE (1) THE APPROACH TO THE SCHOOLS, (2) TEACHING IS A LONELY PROFESSION, (3) HELPING TO…

SARASON, SEYMOUR B.; AND OTHERS

40

On the manpower problem and graduate training in clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses the problems of manpower shortage and the nature of clinical graduate education and proposes strategies for dealing with them. It is suggested that there be (1) movement away from the scientist-professional or V. C. Raimy's Boulder model still often considered the most appropriate for clinical psychology to more emphasis on a professional psychologist model, and (2) development of specialist-oriented

Paul D. Knott

1969-01-01

41

Clinical Psychology in General Hospital Settings: Issues in Interprofessional Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

We suggest that the involvement of clinical psychologists in health care teams may not necessarily improve health care. The position of clinical psychology with regard to medical theory and practice is examined. Then issues arising from multidisciplinary teamwork, with particular emphasis on consultation–liaison work, are discussed. We conclude that professional power structures in hospital settings have a profound influence on

Tracey Miller; Leslie Swartz

1990-01-01

42

Student Perspectives on Clinical and Counseling Psychology Practica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical practica are essential to the training and socialization of future clinical and counseling psychologists. When training expectations are not met, however, students may not be candid about these gaps, instead opting to grin and bear it. A sample of 321 doctoral psychology students responded to a survey that qualitatively and quantitatively assessed their expectations and actual training experiences at

Steven M. Gross

2005-01-01

43

Predictors of Psychological Help Seeking in Clinical and Counseling Psychology Graduate Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychologists are often called upon to provide supervision, mentorship, and training to graduate student therapists-in-training. In these roles, psychologists may influence whether graduate students enter personal therapy during their training. This study investigated variables (including perceived faculty attitudes about students in personal therapy) that predict psychotherapy help seeking in clinical and counseling psychology graduate students (N = 262). The findings

Ronda L. Dearing; James E. Maddux; June Price Tangney

2005-01-01

44

Current Status and Future Prospects of Clinical Psycholog  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The escalating costs of health care and other recent trends have made health care decisions of great societal import, with decision-making responsibility often being transferred from practitioners to health economists, health plans, and insurers. Health care decision making increasingly is guided by evidence that a treatment is efficacious, effective–disseminable, cost-effective, and scientifically plausible. Under these conditions of heightened cost concerns and institutional–economic decision making, psychologists are losing the opportunity to play a leadership role in mental and behavioral health care: Other types of practitioners are providing an increasing proportion of delivered treatment, and the use of psychiatric medication has increased dramatically relative to the provision of psychological interventions. Research has shown that numerous psychological interventions are efficacious, effective, and cost-effective. However, these interventions are used infrequently with patients who would benefit from them, in part because clinical psychologists have not made a convincing case for the use of these interventions (e.g., by supplying the data that decision makers need to support implementation of such interventions) and because clinical psychologists do not themselves use these interventions even when given the opportunity to do so. Clinical psychologists’ failure to achieve a more significant impact on clinical and public health may be traced to their deep ambivalence about the role of science and their lack of adequate science training, which leads them to value personal clinical experience over research evidence, use assessment practices that have dubious psychometric support, and not use the interventions for which there is the strongest evidence of efficacy. Clinical psychology resembles medicine at a point in its history when practitioners were operating in a largely prescientific manner. Prior to the scientific reform of medicine in the early 1900s, physicians typically shared the attitudes of many of today’s clinical psychologists, such as valuing personal experience over scientific research. Medicine was reformed, in large part, by a principled effort by the American Medical Association to increase the science base of medical school education. Substantial evidence shows that many clinical psychology doctoral training programs, especially PsyD and for-profit programs, do not uphold high standards for graduate admission, have high student–faculty ratios, deemphasize science in their training, and produce students who fail to apply or generate scientific knowledge. A promising strategy for improving the quality and clinical and public health impact of clinical psychology is through a new accreditation system that demands highquality science training as a central feature of doctoral training in clinical psychology. Just as strengthening training standards in medicine markedly enhanced the quality of health care, improved training standards in clinical psychology will enhance health and mental health care. Such a system will (a) allow the public and employers to identify scientifically trained psychologists; (b) stigmatize ascientific training programs and practitioners; (c) produce aspirational effects, thereby enhancing training quality generally; and (d) help accredited programs improve their training in the application and generation of science. These effects should enhance the generation, application, and dissemination of experimentally supported interventions, thereby improving clinical and public health. Experimentally based treatments not only are highly effective but also are cost-effective relative to other interventions; therefore, they could help control spiraling health care costs. The new Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) is intended to accredit clinical psychology training programs that offer highquality science-centered education and training, producing graduates who are successful in generating and applying scientific knowledge

Baker, Timothy B.; McFall, Richard M.; Shoham, Varda

2010-01-01

45

AFFECTIVE FACTORS FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the affective factors from the point of view of clinical psychology. Our scheme of personality description places sense feelings and instinct feelings at the first level of complexity. An attempt should be made, in regard to sense feelings, to show what the person does because his feeling of pleasure or displeasure is unusually strong in connection with

Edward M. Westburgh

1936-01-01

46

Delivery of psychological therapies: clinical governance implications for trusts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the clinical governance issues involved in the provision of psychological therapies within a context of massive demand and expansion underpinned by recent policy developments at the Department of Health. Raises awareness of the potential risks to Trusts involved in inadequate governance of therapy provision. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The

Robina Barry

2006-01-01

47

Ethical Issues in Mentoring Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethical issues abound in any relationship that is defined by differences between the parties in rank, status, and power. Such is the case in the relationship between a doctoral student in clinical psychology and his or her mentor. In this article, we examine several potential areas of ethical concern within the mentor-student relationship. We…

Rosenberg, Anna; Heimberg, Richard G.

2009-01-01

48

Graduate Training in Clinical Psychology and the Study of Suicide  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed the current level of training in the study of suicide in member departments (N = 115) of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology Programs. Of the 80% (92) of the departments that responded, only 35% offered any formal training in the study of suicide. If training occurred, it was usually offered as part of another course.

Bruce Bongar; Mort Harmatz

1989-01-01

49

Professional and ethical challenges of forensic clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the ethical and professional challenges encountered by two experienced forensic clinical psychologists in the course of their daily work. Five examples are chosen from a typical working week which illustrate and explain a particular professional dilemma and the forensic or organisational context The paper concludes that professional guidance from the British and Australian Psychological Societies and the

Kevin Howells

1996-01-01

50

Collective memory: A perspective from (experimental) clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the concept of collective memory from an experimental clinical psychology perspective. Exploration of the term collective reveals a broad distinction between literatures that view collective memories as a property of groups (collectivistic memory) and those that regard these memories as a property of individuals who are, to a greater or lesser extent, an integral part of their

Ineke Wessel; Michelle L. Moulds

2008-01-01

51

Tobacco Training in Clinical Psychology Graduate Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The leading cause of preventable death for persons with mental health illnesses, as well as those who live in poverty, is cigarette smoking. These marginalized groups are some of the key groups that clinical psychologists are trained to work with to improve the quality of their lives. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent of tobacco

JoAnn Kleinfelder; James H. Price; Joseph A. Dake; Timothy R. Jordan; Joy A. Price

2012-01-01

52

Mindfulness: A Dialogue between Buddhism and Clinical Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness as a clinical intervention is quickly growing. Much of our current understanding\\u000a and application of mindfulness within clinical psychology has arisen from dialogue with Buddhist traditions, with the notable\\u000a exception of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. We wrote this article with two purposes: (1) to provide a concise review of\\u000a mindfulness within the Buddhist traditions

Chris Kang; Koa Whittingham

2010-01-01

53

Clinical Child Psychology: A Practice Specialty Serving Children, Adolescents, and Their Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical child psychology is a growing and vibrant field of practice and research within professional psychology. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the recent series of articles on specialties in Professional Psychology Research and Practice and delineate the development, design, and purpose of clinical child psychology. The article describes the current trends in the specialty and the

Yo Jackson; Fred L. Alberts; Michael C. Roberts

2010-01-01

54

Psychological aspects of prostate cancer: a clinical review.  

PubMed

Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men. It is fraught with both physical and psychological symptomatology. Depression, anxiety, stress, fatigue, pain and psychosocial factors all affect the patient with prostate cancer. Impotence, erectile dysfunction, sexual issues and incontinence in these patients complicate matters further. Anxiety may exist both before testing and while awaiting test results. Confusion over choosing from various interventions often adds to anxiety and depression in these patients. Various demographic factors and the developmental stage of the couple affect these psychological symptoms. The caregiver may undergo significant psychological turmoil while caring for a patient diagnosed with prostate cancer, which is addressed. The role of nurses in the management of prostate cancer is discussed. The present review looks at psychological issues in patients with prostate cancer from a clinical perspective, with the aim of highlighting these issues for the clinical urologist dealing with these patients. It also explores the consultation-liaison relationship between psychiatrists, psychologists and urologists as a team for the multimodal management of prostate cancer. PMID:22212706

De Sousa, A; Sonavane, S; Mehta, J

2012-01-03

55

Tobacco Cessation Training in Clinical Psychology and Clinical Social Work Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the tobacco and smoking cessation training and curriculum in graduate clinical psychology and graduate clinical social work programs. The current status of the clinical graduate programs' tobacco education curricula was evaluated by using the Transtheoretical Model's Stages of Change. Perceived barriers to…

Kleinfelder, JoAnn

2009-01-01

56

The Clinical Skills Inventory: Competence-Based Assessment of Clinical Psychology Student Skill Acquisition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Clinical Skills Inventory (CSI), an instrument designed to evaluate clinical skills acquired by students over the course of training in a doctoral clinical psychology program, is described. Uses of the CSI are: (1) an advising tool by faculty and students to determine individualized learning objectives and to plan training activities and (2)…

Giannetti, Ronald A.; Radecki-Bush, Catherine; Hansen, Nancy D.; Bush, Joseph, P.

57

Psychological, Behavioral, and Immune Changes After a Psychological Intervention: A Clinical Trial  

PubMed Central

Purpose This randomized clinical trial tests the hypothesis that a psychological intervention can reduce emotional distress, improve health behaviors and dose-intensity, and enhance immune responses. Patients and Methods We studied 227 women who were surgically treated for regional breast cancer. Before adjuvant therapy, women completed interviews and questionnaires assessing emotional distress, social adjustment, and health behaviors. A 60-mL blood sample was drawn for immune assays. Patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention group or assessment only group. The intervention was conducted in small patient groups, with one session per week for 4 months. The sessions included strategies to reduce stress, improve mood, alter health behaviors, and maintain adherence to cancer treatment and care. Reassessment occurred after completion of the intervention. Results As predicted, patients receiving the intervention showed significant lowering of anxiety, improvements in perceived social support, improved dietary habits, and reduction in smoking (all P < .05). Analyses of adjuvant chemotherapy dose-intensity revealed significantly more variability (ie, more dispersion in the dose-intensity values) for the assessment arm (P < .05). Immune responses for the intervention patients paralleled their psychological and behavioral improvements. T-cell proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A remained stable or increased for the Intervention patients, whereas both responses declined for Assessment patients; this effect was replicated across three concentrations for each assay (all P < .01). Conclusion These data show a convergence of significant psychological, health behavior, and biologic effects after a psychological intervention for cancer patients.

Andersen, Barbara L.; Farrar, William B.; Golden-Kreutz, Deanna M.; Glaser, Ronald; Emery, Charles F.; Crespin, Timothy R.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Carson, William E.

2007-01-01

58

Pediatric neurology and clinical child psychology: The development of a specialized training practicum  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the implementation and development of a collaborative effort between a clinical psychology training program and a pediatric neurology clinic within a medical school to provide multidisciplinary services to children and families experiencing neurological and psychological problems. The article provides a description of the neurologist's views concerning the advantages of psychological consultation in a neurology clinic, as well

James E. Maddux; Richard J. Katnik; Elizabeth A. Sledden; Roger L. Greene

1983-01-01

59

Development of Clinical Psychology and Mental Health Resources in Vietnam  

PubMed Central

In this paper, we discuss development of the Vietnam National University graduate Clinical Psychology Program, which has the goal of training both Vietnamese researchers who will develop and evaluate culturally appropriate mental health treatments, as well as Vietnamese clinicians who will implement and help disseminate these evidence-based treatments. We first review the background situation in Vietnam regarding mental health, and its infrastructure and training needs, and discuss the process through which the decision was made to develop a graduate program in clinical psychology as the best approach to address these needs. We then review the development process for the program and its current status, and our focus on the schools as a site for service provision and mental health task shifting. Finally, we outline future goals and plans for the program, and discuss the various challenges that the program has faced and our attempts to resolve them.

Dang, Hoang-Minh; Ngo, Victoria; Pollack, Amie; Sang, David; Lam, Trung T.; Nguyen, My Loc Thi; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Tran, Nam; Tran, Cong; Do, Khanh N.

2011-01-01

60

APA-approved doctoral programs in clinical and in counseling psychology: 1965  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the recommendation of the Committee on Evaluation, the Education and Training Board has recommended, and the Board of Directors of the American Psychological Association has approved the doctoral programs in clinical psychology and in counseling psychology that are conducted by the institutions listed below. In the institutions listed, the approved programs are directed by the department of psychology unless

Sherman Ross

1965-01-01

61

Does theory have value in clinical child psychology?  

PubMed

Examines the value and importance of theory in child psychology, particularly with respect to clinical practice. Although it is readily apparent that theory is not an essential element of treatment, the role of theory is to provide a coherent framework for clinical intervention. Theory provides a foundation for understanding the presenting pathology, the factors that affect it, the patient's and therapist's roles within the context of treatment, and the specific intervention strategies to be utilized. Therapeutic commonalities are considered as they may affect treatment outcome, but they are not viewed as the essential factors in efficacy. The value and meaning of eclecticism are also discussed. PMID:10587906

Orvaschel, H

1999-12-01

62

Clinical Psychology Training in Sleep and Sleep Disorders  

PubMed Central

There is growing evidence to suggest that clinical psychologists would benefit from more training in sleep and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances are commonly comorbid with mental health disorders and this relationship is often bidirectional. In addition, psychologists have become integral members of multidisciplinary sleep medicine teams and there are not enough qualified psychologists to meet the clinical demand. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current education on sleep and sleep disorders provided to clinical psychology predoctoral students and interns. Directors of graduate programs and internships (N = 212) completed a brief online survey on sleep education in their program. Only 6% of programs offers formal didactic courses in sleep, with 31% of programs offering training in the treatment of sleep disorders. There are few programs with sleep faculty (16%), and most reported that their institutions were ineffective in providing sleep education. Thirty-nine percent of training directors reported they would implement a standard curriculum on sleep, if available. The findings from this study suggest that more opportunities are needed for trainees in clinical psychology to gain didactic and clinical experience with sleep and sleep disorders.

Meltzer, Lisa J.; Phillips, Cindy; Mindell, Jodi A.

2009-01-01

63

Relations between Prestige Rankings of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs and Scores on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed the relationship between "U.S. News and World Report" 2008 rankings of clinical psychology doctoral programs and scores earned by graduates on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). For the top 25 programs, relationship between ranking and EPPP scores was not significant, r[subscript s] = -0.28. EPPP scores…

Townsend, James M.; Ryan, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

64

Mentor Relationships in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Training: Results of a National Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a contemporary picture of mentor relationships in clinical psychology, focusing on 787 survey respondents who were U.S. members or associates of the American Psychological Association and graduated with a PhD or PsyD in clinical psychology in 1994, 1995, or 1996. Presents the results and discusses implications for graduate education. (CMK)

Clark, Richard A.; Harden, Sherry L.; Johnson, W. Brad

2000-01-01

65

Accuracy of Psychology Interns’ Clinical Predictions of Re-Incarceration of Delinquents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study involved the assessment of three psychology interns’ ability to predict re-incarceration based on the use of clinical judgement. Three psychology interns in an APA-accredited internship were given training on how to use clinical judgement in predicting future incarceration on the part of youth incarcerated in a juvenile correctional facility. After this training, the psychology interns were asked to

Michael P. Hagan; Tyffani M. Monford Dent; Jeff Coady; Shannon Stewart

2006-01-01

66

AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course Held at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, 24 - 28 May 1993.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Proceedings of the 1993 AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course conducted in Bethesda, Maryland. Presentations examined changes in AMEDD Clinical Psychology, neuropsychology, National Health Reform, forensic psychology, and organizational changes.

A. D. Mangelsdorff G. Southwell K. Stephens

1994-01-01

67

AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course, 10 -15 May 1992, Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Augusta, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The following topics were included in the clinical psychology short course of 1992: 'Medical Service Corps Update', 'Coordinated Care Issues', 'Stress Inoculation Training', 'Psychological interventions to mediate the impact of war stress on casualty oper...

D. Mangelsdorff

1993-01-01

68

Clinical psychology in general practice: a controlled trial evaluation  

PubMed Central

A controlled trial study is described in which 50 consecutive potential referrals for psychological treatment from one general practice were randomly allocated either to behavioural treatment or no-treatment conditions. Treatment-group patients received treatment from a clinical psychologist working within the practice; the control-group patients continued to be managed by their general practitioner. The patients' use of NHS resources was assessed during the treatment period (or its equivalent for the control group) and at a follow-up comparison point, when the patients' subjective ratings of their progress were also obtained. Between referral and the end of treatment the treated group received significantly less psychotropic medication than the control group. This difference was not, however, maintained at the longer-term follow-up. No differences in general practice consultation rates, in the subjective ratings of psychological distress, in control orientation or life satisfaction were found between the two groups, but the level of patient satisfaction was high. Implications for the design of future studies and for psychological health care delivery systems are discussed.

Earll, Louise; Kincey, John

1982-01-01

69

Compulsory Schooling, Child Study, Clinical Psychology, and Special Education: Origins of School Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the history of school psychology, emphasizing the work of L. Witmer (1897, 1907, 1910, 1922) and G. S. Hall (1911, 1923). Providing psychological services in the schools is among the earliest instances of applied psychology. School psychology was one of many child-saving services originating from 1890 to 1920. (SLD)

Fagan, Thomas K.

1992-01-01

70

Comparison of recent graduates of clinical versus counseling psychology programs.  

PubMed

Recent graduates from clinical (N = 65) and counseling (N = 64) psychology programs were surveyed to assess similarities and differences of aspects of their programs and job-related activity. Results revealed only minor differences. Counseling psychologists were more likely to provide group therapy, career counseling and assessment, public lectures and workshops, to have more knowledge of the Strong Interest Inventory, to be more likely to work in university counseling centers, and to endorse humanistic theoretical orientations. Clinical psychologists were more likely to work in medical school settings, to ascribe human behavior to internal states rather than to social causes, and to have greater knowledge of the Rorschach. However, the similarities between the two specialities relative to work setting, theoretical orientation, service, research, and teaching activities, far outweighed these minor differences. Implications of these findings are placed in the context of previous research that has suggested the possible merger of the two specialities. PMID:9018858

Brems, C; Johnson, M E

1997-01-01

71

Behavioral and Psychological Assessment of Child Sexual Abuse in Clinical Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper discusses the behavioral and psychological assessment of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) in clinical practice. Following a brief introduction regarding definition and etiology of CSA and discussion on issues of behavioral/psychological consequences of CSA, the paper reviews the various approaches towards behavioral/psychological assessment in…

Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy

2006-01-01

72

A Survey of Clinical Psychology Training in Canadian Federal Corrections: Implications for Psychologist Recruitment and Retention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although survey results seem to indicate an abundant interest among Canadian psychology graduate students in pursuing training in criminal justice psychology, the recruitment and retention of psychologists in the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) has been of some concern. The present study is a 2008 survey of sites within CSC that provide opportunities for clinical psychology training with offender clientele.

Mark E. Olver; Denise L. Preston; Joseph A. Camilleri; Leslie Helmus; Andrew Starzomski

2011-01-01

73

Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Compliance and Clinical Significance in the "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: In 2005, the "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology" ("JCCP") became the first American Psychological Association (APA) journal to require statistical measures of clinical significance, plus effect sizes (ESs) and associated confidence intervals (CIs), for primary outcomes (La Greca, 2005). As this represents the single largest…

Odgaard, Eric C.; Fowler, Robert L.

2010-01-01

74

Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Compliance and Clinical Significance in the "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: In 2005, the "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology" ("JCCP") became the first American Psychological Association (APA) journal to require statistical measures of clinical significance, plus effect sizes (ESs) and associated confidence intervals (CIs), for primary outcomes (La Greca, 2005). As this represents the single largest…

Odgaard, Eric C.; Fowler, Robert L.

2010-01-01

75

Psychological Applications in Clinical Sports Medicine: Current Status and Future Directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the role of psychologists in clinical sports medicine. Following an overview of the specialty's professionals, settings, and modalities, opportunities for psychological intervention in the prevention and rehabilitation of sport injuries are examined. The current status of psychology in clinical sports medicine is discussed and recommendations for the future are provided. It is concluded that although the involvement

Britton W. Brewer

1998-01-01

76

Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

2009-01-01

77

Toward Improved Statistical Reporting in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Philip Kendall's (1997) editorial encouraged authors in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) to report effect sizes and clinical significance. The present authors assessed the influence of that editorial--and other American Psychological Association initiatives to improve statistical practices--by examining 239 JCCP articles…

Fidler, Fiona; Cumming, Geoff; Thomason, Neil; Pannuzzo, Dominique; Smith, Julian; Fyffe, Penny; Edmonds, Holly; Harrington, Claire; Schmitt, Rachel

2005-01-01

78

Training in Empirically Validated Treatments: What Are Clinical Psychology Students Learning?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Directors of clinical training (83%) and directors of internships with American Psychological Association approval (55%) responded to a survey concerning empirically validated psychological treatments in which their students received training. Most programs provided supervised clinical experience in a number of these treatments. However, over 20% of doctoral training programs failed to provide minimal coverage of empirically validated treatments in didactic

Paul Crits-Christoph; Ellen Frank; Dianne L. Chambless; Cindy Brody; Jordan F. Karp

1995-01-01

79

Toward Improved Statistical Reporting in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Philip Kendall's (1997) editorial encouraged authors in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) to report effect sizes and clinical significance. The present authors assessed the influence of that editorial—and other American Psychological Association initiatives to improve statistical practices—by examining 239 JCCP articles published from 1993 to 2001. For analysis of variance, reporting of means and standardized effect sizes

Fiona Fidler; Geoff Cumming; Neil Thomason; Dominique Pannuzzo; Julian Smith; Penny Fyffe; Holly Edmonds; Claire Harrington; Rachel Schmitt

2005-01-01

80

Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

2009-01-01

81

Toward Improved Statistical Reporting in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Philip Kendall's (1997) editorial encouraged authors in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) to report effect sizes and clinical significance. The present authors assessed the influence of that editorial--and other American Psychological Association initiatives to improve statistical practices--by examining 239 JCCP articles…

Fidler, Fiona; Cumming, Geoff; Thomason, Neil; Pannuzzo, Dominique; Smith, Julian; Fyffe, Penny; Edmonds, Holly; Harrington, Claire; Schmitt, Rachel

2005-01-01

82

Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical Psychology. 1992/1993 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide is designed to help the prospective clinical psychology graduate student go through the application and selection process necessary for acceptance. Chapter 1 describes the two predominant training models in clinical psychology and alternatives to the discipline itself. Chapter 2 covers the essential preparation needed to enter graduate…

Sayette, Michael A.; And Others

83

Evaluation of the Colorado Clinical Psychology/Expanded Mental Health Benefits Experiment. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Colorado Clinical Psychology/Expanded Mental Health Benefits Experiment tested two alterations in the Medicare Program: (1) decreasing the copayment rate for outpatient mental health services from 50% to 20%, and (2) recognizing clinical psychologists...

N. McCall T. Rice B. Steinhardt

1981-01-01

84

Evaluation of the Colorado Clinical Psychology/Expanded Mental Health Benefits Experiment. Volume II: Process Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Colorado Clinical Psychology/Expanded Mental Health Benefits Experiment tested two alterations in the Medicare Program: (1) decreasing the copayment rate for outpatient mental health services from 50% to 20%, and (2) recognizing clinical psychologists...

N. McCall T. Rice M. Swenson

1981-01-01

85

The prediction of success in the VA training program in clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research program at the U. of Michigan has studied applicants and trainees of nearly forty departments of psychology. Objective, projective, subjective, clinical and quantitative data are utilized. From 1946-1948 about three fourths of the trainees in the V.A. clinical psychology program were studied. Tentative findings include: (1) comparison of clinical and non-clinical students; (2) inter-institutional differences; (3) correlations between

E. Lowell Kelly; Donald W. Fiske

1950-01-01

86

Behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology: introduction to the special issue.  

PubMed

This issue represents the 4th Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology special issue on behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology over the past 4 decades. Recent developments in health care policy, as well as in the maturation of the science, make a special issue in this area particularly timely. This collection includes state of the clinical science reviews, reports of clinical trials, and articles addressing theory and methods in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. A multilevel, ecological perspective that considers multiple levels of influences (e.g., cultural influences on behavior-health linkages, individual differences) is salient throughout many of the articles. Our hope is that this sampling of this broad field, and coverage of some key issues and areas, will play a role in stimulating the next 10 years of research, practice, and policy implementation in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. PMID:23544681

Christensen, Alan J; Nezu, Arthur M

2013-04-01

87

Diversity Training in Canadian Predoctoral Clinical Psychology Internships: A Survey of Directors of Internship Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of diversity training in Canadian Clinical Psychology predoctoral internships was conducted to examine how this complex issue is approached in internship training and also, as a follow-up to a previous survey of doctoral program directors completed by Hertzsprung and Dobson (2000). The training directors of internships listed in the Canadian Council of Professional Psychology Programs were asked to

Brian L. Brooks; Alisa R. Mintz; Keith S. Dobson

2004-01-01

88

Reading in Graduate School: A Survey of Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

To what extent do graduate students in clinical psychology complete assigned readings? A total of 744 graduate students in American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs completed an online survey regarding reading in graduate school (67% response rate, of those viewing the survey). The reported amount of assigned reading varied widely, with an average of 330 pages per week. Compliance ratings suggested

Mark R. McMinn; Anna Tabor; Bobby L. Trihub; Laura Taylor; Amy W. Dominguez

2009-01-01

89

APA Approved Doctoral Programs in Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychology: 1972  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Committee on Accreditation has approved the doctoral training programs in clinical, counseling, and school psychology that are conducted by the institutions listed in this article. In the institutions listed, the approved programs are directed by the department of psychology unless otherwise indicated. Programs that have not requested evaluation and programs that have been evaluated but not approved are not

1972-01-01

90

Early Recollections of Individuals Preparing for Careers in Clinical Psychology, Dentistry, and Law.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compared early recollections of students (N=90) preparing for careers in clinical psychology, dentistry, and law for differences significant to vocational choice and life-style. Results showed that recollections of psychology students showed significantly more negative affect, threatening situations, and less reference to other groups of people.…

Hafner, James L.; Fakouri, M. Ebrahim

1984-01-01

91

Early Recollections of Individuals Preparing for Careers in Clinical Psychology, Dentistry, and Law.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared early recollections of students (N=90) preparing for careers in clinical psychology, dentistry, and law for differences significant to vocational choice and life-style. Results showed that recollections of psychology students showed significantly more negative affect, threatening situations, and less reference to other groups of people.…

Hafner, James L.; Fakouri, M. Ebrahim

1984-01-01

92

Adolescents and the Media: Medical and Psychological Impact. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 33.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Aimed at primary care physicians and nurses, educators, and parents, this book reviews media effects on adolescent behavior and psychology. The book notes that television is a powerful medium to which adolescents are uniquely susceptible and how studies have shown television's ability to shape social attitudes. Theories of how television affects…

Strasburger, Victor C.

93

Service and training in a clinical psychology unit in a Veterans Administration neuropsychiatric hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two things are described in this report (1) the postgraduate training in the practicum of clinical psychology, and (2) the unit's organization which allows a two-fold function: (a) a training agency and (b) a service agency. The unit itself is comprised of 17 trainees and one supervising staff clinical psychologist. The duties of the unit include (1) clinical interviewing, (2)

L. A. Pennington; Oreon K. Timm

1949-01-01

94

Role Conflict in Forensic Clinical Psychology: Reply to Arcaya  

Microsoft Academic Search

I agree with Arcaya that there is potential for serious role conflict in conducting forensic evaluations, but I disagree with how this problem is characterized and explained. Arcaya's contentions are reformulated as research hypotheses that can be empirically tested. The American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists are relevant and are cited in support of several proposals for safeguarding defendant

Dewey G. Cornell

1987-01-01

95

Children and Disasters. Issues in Clinical Child Psychology Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Few images are as compelling as a child who has become the victim of a manmade or natural disaster. This book is designed to draw together data, theory, and observation that address children's psychological response to disaster. Characterized by its diversity in scope, nature, and quality, some of the material comes in the form of observations…

Saylor, Conway F., Ed.

96

Scientific Communication in Clinical Psychology: Examining Patterns of Citations and References.  

PubMed

Previous studies of scientific communication used citation mapping, establishing psychology as a 'hub science' from which many other fields draw information. Within psychology, the clinical and counselling discipline is a major 'knowledge broker'. This study analyzed scientific communication among three major subdisciplines of clinical psychology-the cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic and humanistic schools of thought-by examining patterns of references within and citations to 305 target articles published in leading journals of these subdisciplines. The results suggest that clinical researchers of each theoretical orientation engage in more insular scientific communication than an integrationist would find desirable and that cognitive-behavioural articles are more closely connected to mainstream psychology and related fields. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEY PRACTITIONERS MESSAGE: Eclectic practitioners draw on several different theoretical orientations to inform their practice; as such, they should be interested in understanding the patterns of scientific communication within and across theoretical orientations. Practitioners work in a variety of different mental health settings, with a variety of other professionals in psychology-related fields, and should be interested in how much influence their particular theoretical orientation has on the work of colleagues. Many practitioners rely on new, evidence-based research to inform their work. The results of this study provide these individuals with an objective measure of the influence of empirical work in different areas of clinical psychology. PMID:22941805

Kiselica, Andrew M; Ruscio, John

2012-09-01

97

Characteristics of American Psychological Association Division 40 (clinical neuropsychology) Fellows.  

PubMed

Fellow status is an honor bestowed on American Psychological Association (APA) members who have made unusual and outstanding contributions to the field of psychology that have had a national impact. Thus far no studies have examined the characteristics of the individuals who have received this honor. This study examined publicly available data for 157 Division 40 Fellows. Fellows comprise 3.7% of the 4273 members of the division compared to 5.7% of the entire APA membership. Fellows are predominantly male (73%). All but two fellows had earned a Ph.D. with the average time since granting of the doctoral degree of 17.1?±?6 years (median=16 years) with a range of 7-40 years post-degree. Slightly over half of the fellows hold board certification (53%) in the American Board of Professional Psychology. The largest group of fellows reports their primary employment currently as a university-affiliated medical setting (48%). These data serve to characterize current Division 40 Fellows for the field of neuropsychology and may provide useful information to assist prospective fellow applicants. PMID:22150469

Johnson-Greene, Doug; Collins, K C

2011-12-08

98

Positive Clinical Psychology: a new vision and strategy for integrated research and practice.  

PubMed

This review argues for the development of a Positive Clinical Psychology, which has an integrated and equally weighted focus on both positive and negative functioning in all areas of research and practice. Positive characteristics (such as gratitude, flexibility, and positive emotions) can uniquely predict disorder beyond the predictive power of the presence of negative characteristics, and buffer the impact of negative life events, potentially preventing the development of disorder. Increased study of these characteristics can rapidly expand the knowledge base of clinical psychology and utilize the promising new interventions to treat disorder through promoting the positive. Further, positive and negative characteristics cannot logically be studied or changed in isolation as (a) they interact to predict clinical outcomes, (b) characteristics are neither "positive" or "negative", with outcomes depending on specific situation and concomitant goals and motivations, and (c) positive and negative well-being often exist on the same continuum. Responding to criticisms of the Positive Psychology movement, we do not suggest the study of positive functioning as a separate field of clinical psychology, but rather that clinical psychology itself changes to become a more integrative discipline. An agenda for research and practice is proposed including reconceptualizing well-being, forming stronger collaborations with allied disciplines, rigorously evaluating the new positive interventions, and considering a role for clinical psychologists in promoting well-being as well as treating distress. PMID:20655136

Wood, Alex M; Tarrier, Nicholas

2010-06-17

99

Apartheid and post-apartheid intern clinical psychology training in South Africa.  

PubMed

An analysis of race and sex of clinical psychology interns was undertaken at a major training hospital complex during the Apartheid and Post-apartheid periods. 7 of 87 (8.1%) interns trained in the apartheid period were Black African. Significantly more Black Africans and women were trained during the Post-apartheid period. The results were discussed within the context of South Africa's social and political transition, as well as international trends relating to sex and professional psychology. PMID:20099528

Pillay, Anthony L

2009-12-01

100

Control theory: A useful conceptual framework for personality–social, clinical, and health psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contends that control theory provides a model of self-regulation that is useful in the analysis of human behavior. As an illustration of the breadth of its applicability, the basic construct of control theory––the discrepancy-reducing feedback loop––is presented, and certain implications for theory in 3 areas of human psychology are discussed. In personality-social, clinical, and health psychology, the construct proves to

Charles S. Carver; Michael F. Scheier

1982-01-01

101

It's time to Rework the Blueprints: Building a Science for Clinical Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aims in this article are to connect the conceptual structure of clinical psychological science to what the author believes to be the omnipresent principles of evolution, use the evolutionary model to create a deductively derived clinical theory and taxonomy, link the theory and taxonomy to comprehensive and integrated approaches to…

Millon, Theodore

2003-01-01

102

Psychological evaluation of clinical disturbance in children at risk for psychopathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluated children of 1 schizophrenic or 1 manic-depressive parent for clinical disturbance in the St. Louis risk research project between 1967 and 1971. The investigation employed a psychological battery using the WISC or WAIS, figure drawings, the TAT, the Rorschach, and the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Form Sequence, plus blind clinical disturbance ratings from the test batteries. Tests were administered individually to

Julien Worland; Harriet Lander; Victor Hesselbrock

1979-01-01

103

Methods for overcoming methodological problems in the measurement of client satisfaction in a clinical psychology practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study surveyed client satisfaction with an outpatient service in clinical psychology at a university-based clinic in New Zealand. In an effort to collect honest opinions rather than “grateful testimonials” from clients, special consideration was given to the methodology used. In the absence of guidelines on how to analyze client satisfaction data, a variety of techniques was developed. These methods

Susan J. Watson; Janet M. Leathern

1996-01-01

104

A role for clinical psychology in health care and policy concerning the physical environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some persons adversely react to specific environments, while others are impervious or actually thrive. Medical attention often overlooks such sensitivities to the physical environment. Such sensitivities, including phobias and seasonal affectivity, fall within clinical psychology's purview. A theoretical\\/clinical approach called the Synchronous Systems Model, which defines and uses individual differences in people and in settings, could serve medical health care

1995-01-01

105

Prevalence of psychological distress among patients at a physical therapy clinic specializing in sports medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the frequency with which patients at an orthopedic physical therapy clinic specializing in sports medicine experience clinically meaningful psychological distress, 200 consecutive patients were administered a standardized measure of psychopathology. Patients varied in terms of diagnosis, stage of rehabilitation, and level of athletic involvement. The physical therapist and athletic trainer responsible for the rehabilitation of a patient rated

Britton W. Brewer; Albert J. Petitpas; Judy L. Van Raalte; Joseph H. Sklar; Terry D. Ditmar

1995-01-01

106

A psychogeriatric assessment program. III. Clinical and experimental psychologic aspects.  

PubMed

Variables stemming from standard psychologic tests, psychophysiologic tests, and operant conditioning procedures were employed in assessing the status of 80 psychogeriatric patients with either organic brain syndromes or functional psychoses. Differences were observed in the responses between the two groups. In general, the performance of the patients with organic brain syndromes was more deviant than that of the patients with functional psychoses, and the performance of the hospitalized geriatric patients (regardless of diagnosis) was worse than that of the normal control groups. PMID:1244384

Klingner, A; Kachanoff, R; Dastoor, D P; Worenklein, A; Charlton, S; Gutbrodt, E; Müller, H F

1976-01-01

107

The clinical differential approach of Sante De Sanctis in Italian "scientific" psychology.  

PubMed

Sante De Sanctis, a psychiatrist and psychologist, is one of the most representative figures of Italian "scientific" psychology. He is considered one of the founders of the discipline as well as one of its main protagonists in the years between the two World Wars. Both with his extensive scientific productions (which include more than three hundred works) and with his uninterrupted institutional activity, he has left his significant mark on the history of Italian psychology. He was the first professor of Experimental Psychology and was internationally known: some of his works have been published in French, Swiss, American, German, Scandinavian, and English journals, and some of his volumes have been translated into English and German. Together with the other psychologists of the second generation (Binet, Külpe, Münsterberg, Stern, Claparède, Ebbinghaus), he was the Italian psychologist who decided to enrich the classical paradigm of Wundt's physiological psychology, by developing during the twentieth century the program of methodological and epistemological enlargement of the discipline. In his fundamental treatise Psicologia Sperimentale, written in 1929-30, a clear modern conception of psychology emerged: it jointly included both the generalist aspect (with some studies on psychophysical proportionality, thought mimicry, dreams, attention, emotions, etc.) and the applicative one, which included psychopathology, labor psychology, educational psychology, and criminal psychology, all seen in a general experimental framework. The present paper aims precisely to highlight the originality of De Sanctis' experimentalism that applied the differential clinical approach to the discipline of psychology, causing it for the first time in Italy to be seen in a unitary way as both general and applied psychology. PMID:19569448

Lombardo, Giovanni Pietro; Cicciola, Elisabetta

2006-01-01

108

Assessment of positive functioning in clinical psychology: theoretical and practical issues.  

PubMed

Positive psychology has led to an increasing emphasis on the promotion of positive functioning in clinical psychology research and practice, raising issues of how to assess the positive in clinical setting. Three key considerations are presented. First, existing clinical measures may already be assessing positive functioning, if positive and negative functioning exist on a single continuum (such as on bipolar dimensions from happiness to depression, and from anxiety to relaxation). Second, specific measures of positive functioning (e.g., eudemonic well-being) could be used in conjunction with existing clinical scales. Third, completely different measures would be needed depending on whether well-being is defined as emotional or medical functioning, or as humanistically orientated growth (e.g., authenticity). It is important that clinical psychologists introduce positive functioning into their research and practice in order to widen their armoury of therapeutic interventions, but in doing so researchers and practitioners need also to be aware that they are shifting the agenda of clinical psychology. As such, progress in clinical psychology moving toward the adoption of positive functioning requires reflection on epistemological foundations. PMID:20137841

Joseph, Stephen; Wood, Alex

2010-01-18

109

Closing the gaps: developmental psychopathology as a training model for clinical child psychology.  

PubMed

Espouses developmental psychopathology as a framework for training our future leaders due to its emphasis on an ecological, transactional lifespan perspective, as well as interdisciplinary bridging and policy focus. This perspective, used as a framework for questioning and thinking about the complex interplay of psychological and social phenomena, provides a method for closing the gaps in training future psychologists as it allows for the development of niche expertise under an umbrella of the broader, ecological perspective. In an increasingly complex world of shrinking mental health dollars and growing severity of mental health problems for families and youth, clinical psychologists are needed more than ever to solve social problems. The current training paradigms in clinical child psychology programs need redirection and clarification for future psychologists to contribute meaningfully to science, practice, and policy. This article provides background in the history and influence of the developmental psychopathology perspective, as well as future implications for doctoral training programs in clinical psychology. PMID:10587896

van Eys, P P; Dodge, K A

1999-12-01

110

Psychological Aspects of Paediatric Burns (A Clinical Review)  

PubMed Central

Summary Burn injuries in childhood can be traumatic with lasting effects until adulthood. This article reviews the various psychological issues one confronts when treating paediatric patients with burn injuries. A wide range of factors influence recovery and rehabilitation from paediatric burns. The role of family members, family dynamics, parental reactions, parental psychiatric illness, and pre-morbid psychiatric illness in the child are important factors. The entire family and the burned child have to show good coping skills if recovery from paediatric burn injuries is to be possible. It is very important that paediatric burn units realize the need for a child psychiatrist and psychotherapist in their rehabilitation team. Good psychotherapy along with burns-related treatment will go a long way to enhance the quality of life of these patients.

De Sousa, A.

2010-01-01

111

Psychological type and explanatory style of nursing students and clinical faculty.  

PubMed

Health care providers' collaboration and effective teamwork are essential to patient safety and quality care. Part of an ongoing project, this study focused on nursing faculty-student communication characteristics, specifically examining psychological type (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and explanatory style (Attributional Style Questionnaire) of participating first-year baccalaureate nursing students (n = 286) and clinical nursing faculty (n = 59) from both 2-year and 4-year nursing programs. Modal student psychological type was ESFJ, and modal faculty psychological type was ISTJ. The two groups demonstrated significant differences in information processing styles and in making decisions and judgments. Students demonstrated slightly more optimistic outlooks than did faculty. Psychological type and level of optimism did not appear to correlate. Data from this study provide an initial framework on which to base research to examine quality of teamwork among health care providers and, consequently, the quality of patient care. PMID:19441635

Allchin, Lynn; Dzurec, Laura Cox; Engler, Arthur J

2009-04-01

112

The Korsakoff Syndrome: Clinical Aspects, Psychology and Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The Korsakoff syndrome is a preventable memory disorder that usually emerges (although not always) in the aftermath of an episode of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The present paper reviews the clinical and scientific literature on this disorder. Methods: A systematic review of the clinical and scientific literature on Wernicke's encephalopathy and the alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome. Results: The Korsakoff syndrome is most

Michael D. Kopelman; D. Thomson; Irene Guerrini; E. Jane Marshall

2009-01-01

113

Supervision of clinical psychology trainees in a neuropsychiatric hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 4 year training program for clinical psychologists, as it operates in a VA hospital, is set forth. Objectives of the program, and responsibilities of trainees, are discussed; supervisory and training practices are described.

A. L. Carp

1951-01-01

114

Positive Clinical Psychology: A new vision and strategy for integrated research and practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review argues for the development of a Positive Clinical Psychology, which has an integrated and equally weighted focus on both positive and negative functioning in all areas of research and practice. Positive characteristics (such as gratitude, flexibility, and positive emotions) can uniquely predict disorder beyond the predictive power of the presence of negative characteristics, and buffer the impact of

Alex M. Wood; Nicholas Tarrier

2010-01-01

115

Clinical and psychological aspects of restless legs syndrome in uremic patients on hemodialysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The pathogenesis of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to determine relationships of the presence of RLS in uremic patients regularly undergoing hemodialysis (HD) with demographic, clinical, and psychological factors. Methods: In 490 uremic patients on HD therapy in Japan, RLS was diagnosed based on diagnostic criteria established by the International Restless

Jiro Takaki; Tadahiro Nishi; Masaomi Nangaku; Hiromi Shimoyama; Toshio Inada; Norimasa Matsuyama; Hiroaki Kumano; Tomifusa Kuboki

2003-01-01

116

Cross-Gender Mentorship in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs: An Exploratory Survey Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mentorship experiences of recent clinical psychology doctorates reporting a primary mentor in graduate school were assessed by means of a survey. Among 518 responding psychologists, male graduates were significantly more likely to have a same-gender mentor, and female graduates were more likely to report receiving support from mentors of both…

Harden, Sherry L.; Clark, Richard A.; Johnson, W. Brad; Larson, Joshua

2009-01-01

117

Survey Response Rates and Survey Administration in Counseling and Clinical Psychology: A Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports results of a meta-analysis of survey response rates in published research in counseling and clinical psychology over a 20-year span and describes reported survey administration procedures in those fields. Results of 308 survey administrations showed a weighted average response rate of 49.6%. Among possible moderators, response…

Van Horn, Pamela S.; Green, Kathy E.; Martinussen, Monica

2009-01-01

118

Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 2006/2007 Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Now in its 2006-2007 edition, this perennial bestseller is the resource students count on for the most current information on applying to doctoral programs in clinical or counseling psychology. The Insider's Guide presents up-to-date facts on 300 accredited programs in the United States and Canada. Each program's profile includes admissions…

Mayne, Tracy J.; Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.

2006-01-01

119

The Failure of Clinical Psychology Graduate Students to Apply Understood Ethical Principles  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a survey of 170 graduate students from 25 American Psychological Association- (APA-) approved clinical training programs, we asked them to state what they should do in a hypothetical situation in which a peer\\/friend is violating the Ethical Principles (APA, 1977, 1981) and then what they would do. Approximately half of these students would do less than they believe they

John L. Bernard; Carmen S. Jara

1986-01-01

120

The concept of alternative strategies and its relevance to psychiatry and clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intent of this article is to introduce the evolutionary concept of alternative strategies into the fields of psychiatry and clinical psychology. In behavioral ecology, the term alternative strategies refers to the presence of two or more discrete behavioral variants among adults of one sex and one population when those variants serve the same functional end. Often discrete behavioral variants

Alfonso Troisi

2005-01-01

121

Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 2006/2007 Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Now in its 2006-2007 edition, this perennial bestseller is the resource students count on for the most current information on applying to doctoral programs in clinical or counseling psychology. The Insider's Guide presents up-to-date facts on 300 accredited programs in the United States and Canada. Each program's profile includes admissions…

Mayne, Tracy J.; Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.

2006-01-01

122

Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 2004/2005 Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Now in its 2004/2005 edition, this perennial bestseller is the resource students count on for the most current information on applying to doctoral programs in clinical or counseling psychology. The Insider's Guide presents up-to-date facts on nearly 300 accredited programs in the United States and Canada. Each program's profile includes…

Sayette, Michael A.; Mayne, Tracy J.; Norcross, John C.

2004-01-01

123

The Surgeon as a Hand Patient: The Clinical and Psychological Impact of Hand and Wrist Fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

To gain insight into the management of patients with hand and wrist injuries, a series of clinical and psychological analyses was performed on 9 surgeons, each of whom underwent operative fixation of a hand or wrist fracture. The results of these analyses suggest that the functional outcome after hand surgery was affected by the surgeons' personality, motivation, and ability to

Kingsley R. Chin; Jess H. Lonner; Beryl S. Jupiter; Jesse B. Jupiter

1999-01-01

124

Symptoms of fatigue in chronic heart failure patients: Clinical and psychological predictors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the role of clinical and psychological characteristics as predictors of fatigue in CHF. Background: Little is known about predictors of fatigue in CHF. Next to heart failure characteristics, depressive symptoms and type-D personality may explain individual differences in fatigue. Methods: At baseline, 136 CHF outpatients (age ? 80 years) completed a questionnaire to assess depressive symptoms, type-D

Otto R. F. Smith; Helen J. Michielsen; Aline J. Pelle; Angelique A. Schiffer; Jobst B. Winter; Johan Denollet

2007-01-01

125

Attitudes Toward the Teaching of Chronic Pain Management in Doctoral Clinical Psychology Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A questionnaire was sent to 114 graduate schools with doctoral programs in clinical psychology to gain some measure of the perceived need and importance of pain as an area of training for psychologists and to assess current educational efforts in this area. Of the 59 programs responding to the questionnaire, 13 offered a course in pain management and 46 did

Ozzie Siegel; Seymour L. Roistacher

1988-01-01

126

The use of therapist self-disclosure: Clinical psychology trainees' experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study examined clinical psychology trainees' experiences of using, or not using, therapist self-disclosure and their experience of training and supervision on this issue. Fourteen trainees were interviewed and their accounts analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, yielding nine themes organized into two domains. The first domain (“the decision in the moment”) concerned participants' struggle with decision making about disclosure;

Samantha Bottrill; Nancy Pistrang; Chris Barker; Michael Worrell

2010-01-01

127

Hispanic Masculinity: Myth or Psychological Schema Meriting Clinical Consideration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the significant upsurge in research on White males of European origin that documents a relationship between the construct of male gender identity (i.e., machismo) and physical and mental health, there is a clinical need to study and understand this construct and its relationship to health across diverse racial\\/ethnic groups, including, but not limited to, Hispanics. To help develop such

J. Manuel Casas; Burl R. Wagenheim; Robert Banchero; Juan Mendoza-Romero

1994-01-01

128

Influence of Psychological and Clinical Factors on Postoperative Pain and Narcotic Consumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demographic, psychological and clinical factors influencing postoperative pain and narcotic analgesic requirements in 162 patients undergoing elective operations under general anesthesia were studied. Eysencks Personality Questionnaire, Foulds Hostility Questionnaire, Zung’s Anxiety-Depression (self-rating) Scales and the 43 Item Life Events Inventory by Holmes and Rahe were used. Clinical correlates such as surgical department, outcome of the operation, patient’s knowledge of the

Argyro Voulgari; Lefteris Lykouras; Metaxia Papanikolaou; Anastasia Tzonou; Aekaterini Danou-Roussaki; George Christodoulou

1991-01-01

129

Responses by graduates to memory of their internship in clinical psychology.  

PubMed

This study is a two-part investigation of clinical psychology internship training at the William S. Hall Psychiatric Institute. The first part surveyed 25 intern graduates to identify the relationship between experiences as an intern and current professional activities. Results are related to findings from other research in training clinical psychologists. The second part pertains to suggestions of intern graduates for specific additions and revisions of intership training at the Institute. PMID:600647

Stout, A L; Holmes, G R; Rothstein, W

1977-12-01

130

Evaluation of the Colorado Clinical Psychology/Expanded Mental Health Benefits Experiment. Volume I: Description of the Experiment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Colorado Clinical Psychology/Expanded Mental Health Benefits Experiment tested two alterations in the Medicare Program: (1) decreasing the copayment rate for outpatient mental health services from 50% to 20%, and (2) recognizing clinical psychologists...

N. McCall

1981-01-01

131

Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.  

PubMed Central

Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members.

Comings, D E; Comings, B G

1985-01-01

132

Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.  

PubMed

Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members. PMID:3859204

Comings, D E; Comings, B G

1985-05-01

133

Importance of developmental theory and investigation to research in clinical child psychology.  

PubMed

Focuses on the developmental periods of infancy, childhood, and adolescence to offer illustrations of the advantages of using developmental theory and research to establish targets for research on intervention, assessment and treatment planning, and evaluation of effective strategies for prevention of childhood and later adult disorders. The importance for training clinical graduate students in developmental approaches to research is stressed, and hopes for a future of mutual contributions of developmental and clinical psychology are expressed in light of the fact that, after a troubled history of isolation from one another and even active denigration of one another's goals and methods, developmental and clinical psychology are exhibiting joint recognition of the advantages of collaborative research. PMID:10587894

Peterson, L; Tremblay, G

1999-12-01

134

Correlates of intimate partner psychological aggression perpetration in a clinical sample of alcoholic men.  

PubMed

This study longitudinally examined correlates of intimate partner psychological aggression in a sample of 178 men seeking treatment for alcoholism and their partners, building on a previous investigation examining correlates of intimate partner physical aggression (Taft et al., 2010). The men were largely Caucasian; average age was 41.0 years. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires that assessed distal and proximal predictors of psychological aggression perpetration. Distal factors, assessed at baseline, included initial alcohol problem severity, beliefs about alcohol, and antisocial personality characteristics. Proximal factors, assessed at baseline and at follow-ups 6 and 12 months later, included alcohol and drug use, relationship adjustment, and anger. Psychological aggression was assessed at all three time points. Findings showed that both groups of variables were associated with psychological aggression perpetration. Beliefs that drinking causes relationship problems and variables related to alcohol consumption exhibited the strongest associations with psychological aggression. The findings are consistent with theoretical models that emphasize both distal and proximal effects of drinking on intimate partner aggression. Implications for clinical interventions and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:22409160

Kachadourian, Lorig K; Taft, Casey T; O'Farrell, Timothy J; Doron-Lamarca, Susan; Murphy, Christopher M

2012-03-12

135

Correlates of Intimate Partner Psychological Aggression Perpetration in a Clinical Sample of Alcoholic Men  

PubMed Central

This study longitudinally examined correlates of intimate partner psychological aggression in a sample of 178 men seeking treatment for alcoholism and their partners, building on a previous investigation examining correlates of intimate partner physical aggression (Taft et al., 2010). The men were largely Caucasian; average age was 41.0 years. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires that assessed distal and proximal predictors of psychological aggression perpetration. Distal factors, assessed at baseline, included initial alcohol problem severity, beliefs about alcohol, and antisocial personality characteristics. Proximal factors, assessed at baseline and at follow-ups 6 and 12 months later, included alcohol and drug use, relationship adjustment, and anger. Psychological aggression was assessed at all three time points. Findings showed that both groups of variables were associated with psychological aggression perpetration. Beliefs that drinking causes relationship problems and variables related to alcohol consumption exhibited the strongest associations with psychological aggression. The findings are consistent with theoretical models that emphasize both distal and proximal effects of drinking on intimate partner aggression. Implications for clinical interventions and directions for future research are discussed.

Kachadourian, Lorig K.; Taft, Casey T.; O'Farrell, Timothy J.; Doron-LaMarca, Susan; Murphy, Christopher M.

2012-01-01

136

AMEDD Forensic Psychology Short Course: Microcomputer Use in Support of Clinical Psychology in Peace and War Time Environments Held in San Antonio, Texas on 4-8 November 1985.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains the proceedings of the 1985 AMEDD Forensic Psychology Short Course which focused on microcomputer use in support of clinical psychology in peace and wartime environments. Contents: Legal issues in computerized testing, Landmarks in co...

A. D. Mangelsdorff

1986-01-01

137

Reallocation of GS9 clinical psychology positions in the Veterans Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

After an appeal by individuals concerned, the Board of the A.P.A. appointed a committee to ascertain facts in regard to the reallocation of sixteen clinical psychology positions in the V.A. in New York and Brooklyn to GS-11 and GS-12 grades. A statement of the committee is given. The committee concluded that the original decision of the Board of Directors, i.e.––to

1950-01-01

138

Building a Bridge Between the School of Occupational Therapy and School of Professional Psychology Clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the supervision of Sean Roush, OTD, OTR\\/L, Assistant Professor at Pacific University (PU), two Master of Occupational Therapy students (MOTs) laid the foundation for a linked program between Pacific University’s School of Occupational Therapy and Professional Psychology Clinic (SPPC). The SPPC is staffed by professional and student Psy.D.s and provides mental health services to the community. Throughout the process,

Ingrid Borland; Ariel Schiller

2012-01-01

139

Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology: An Ethical Framework for Graduate Education, Clinical Training, and Maintaining Professional Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based practice is often acknowledged as the future state of psychology, yet those graduate students who will soon be applying such practices tend to hold several misconceptions about the major components within this framework. This review highlights implications for graduate education, clinical training, and professional competence in light of the movement toward evidence-based practice in psychology. These implications are discussed

Joseph M. Babione

2010-01-01

140

Narcissism at the crossroads: Phenotypic description of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social\\/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review documents two themes of emphasis found in phenotypic descriptions of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social\\/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis. Clinical theories of narcissism spanning 35 years consistently describe variations in the expression of pathological narcissism that emphasize either grandiosity or vulnerable affects and self-states. Recent research in social\\/personality psychology examining the structure of narcissistic personality traits consistently finds

Nicole M. Cain; Aaron L. Pincus; Emily B. Ansell

2008-01-01

141

Integrating research into clinical internship training bridging the science/practice gap in pediatric psychology.  

PubMed

Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a "capstone experience"; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the "business of science." Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists. PMID:22286345

McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Spirito, Anthony

2012-01-28

142

The end of clinical psychology as we know it? A response to Snyder and Elliott's four level matrix model.  

PubMed

C.R. Snyder and T.R. Elliott's proposed model (this issue, pp. 1033-1054) represents a good effort toward reexamining the premises of clinical psychology education. However, there are several concepts left underdeveloped and inadequately defined. Furthermore, their ideas for improving clinical training seem largely divorced from the model proposed. Before making propositions toward a "new clinical psychology," clarification of the constructs and model is needed to understand how it can better educate and prepare future clinical psychologists for the demands of tomorrow's marketplaces. PMID:15965943

Desrochers, Stephan; Halpern, Diane F; Tan, Sherylle J; Riggio, Heidi R

2005-09-01

143

[Clinical and experimental-psychological data of post-schizophrenic depression VG].  

PubMed

Since depressive symptoms (SDS) are prevalent under-recognized and clinically important problems in patients with schizophrenia, the pattern of symptoms and associated features of depressive symptoms, as well, as inclusion of psychopathology and neurodynemic variations in personality structure of patients with chronic schizophrenia deserve more investigation. The aim of the research was to identify clinical and experimental-psychological features of post-schizophrenic depression. The longitudinal study has been designed to investigate patients with paranoid schizophrenia. As a result of the careful clinical and psychological analyses due to psychopathology we defined four types of depression. From which two types of depression--agitated and asthenic prevailed in active phase of schizophrenia and remained two hypochondriac and apathyc mainly occurred during stabilization. This finding would have prognostic value. The authors examined personality changes leaded by cognitive symptoms and specified psychopathological and neurodynamical input in alteration of personality structure with word association experiment by A.D. Zurabashvili. As the semantics of trigger words became more complex the qualitative impairment deepened. Lower pathological associations have overcome scanty logical thinking and fluctuation of latency time since thought blocking became prominent. SSRI (Fevarin, Rexetin) appeared especially effective in treatment of certain type of post-schizophrenic depression. PMID:17984557

Kenchadze, V G; Chkoniia, E D

2007-09-01

144

The Influence of Clinical Variables on the Psychological Adaptation of Adolescents after Solid Organ Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the influence of clinical and socio-demographic variables on the psychological adaptation of transplanted\\u000a adolescents. Twenty-six transplanted adolescents and 25 healthy adolescents, aged 13–17, and their parents participated in\\u000a the study. The following domains were measured: social competence, emotional\\/behavioral problems, self-concept, self-esteem\\u000a and subjective well-being. The findings revealed that transplanted boys presented significantly less social competence (U = 26,000, p U = 25,000,

Elisa Kern de Castro; Bernardo Moreno Jiménez

2008-01-01

145

Nicotine dependence and psychological distress: outcomes and clinical implications in smoking cessation  

PubMed Central

Nicotine dependence is characteristically a chronic and relapsing disease. Although 75%–85% of smokers would like to quit, and one-third make at least three serious lifetime attempts, less than 50% of smokers succeed in stopping before the age of 60. Relevant and complex factors contributing to sustained cigarette consumption, and strongly implicated in the clinical management of smokers, are the level of nicotine dependence and psychological distress. In this review of the literature, these two factors will be examined in detail to show how they may affect smoking cessation outcome and to encourage clinicians to assess patients so they can offer tailored support in quitting smoking.

Cosci, Fiammetta; Pistelli, Francesco; Lazzarini, Nicola; Carrozzi, Laura

2011-01-01

146

Yet another look at clinical and statistical prediction: Or, is clinical psychology worthwhile?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews 5 types of severe limitations in most studies of clinical and statistical prediction, including the systematic overlooking of studies that favor the clinician. On critical examination, studies cited by P. E. Meehl (see 39:4) and J. Sawyer (see 40:11) prove irrelevant to most of the 6 issues cited as reasons for their importance. Clinical judgment plays a variable role

Robert R. Holt

1970-01-01

147

[The pendulum, the gap, and the clinic. Leendert Bouman (1869-1936) and the 'psychological turn' in Dutch psychiatry].  

PubMed

In recent historical literature, the Dutch psychiatrist Leendert Bouman (1869-1936) is named 'the godfather of psychological psychiatry'. He is regarded as one of the exponents of a shift or 'pendulum' movement from a biological-materialistic to a psychological, phenomenological orientation in the Dutch psychiatry of the Interbellum. As a professor of the orthodox calvinist Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam, he explicitly opposed a 'soul-less', biological-reductionist psychiatry. In addition, he played an important part in the introduction and spread of new'psychological' theories and especially Karl Jaspers' phenomenology in The Netherlands. It is one-sided and misleading, however, to refer to Bouman as a 'psychological' psychiatrist. Most of his scientific work was of a neurological and biological nature. He did not see biological (or nomothetic) and psychological (or idiographic) approaches as mutually exclusive, but as necessarily complementary. In this he followed Jaspers' distinction between and complementary use of the causal connections of psychic life (explanatory psychology) and meaningful psychic connections (psychology of meaning). Boumans pluralist orientation was rooted in his fundamentally clinical attitude toward psychiatry. In his view, a psychiatrist was in the first place a clinician. In the clinic, he stressed, a psychiatrist has to view and examine each individual patient in his bio-psycho-social totality. The case of Bouman illustrates that the history of psychiatry is by far richer and more complicated than is suggested by the standard account of that history being characterized by a pendulum movement and a one-dimensional struggle between 'somatic' and 'psychological' schools. It also suggests that the interaction between theory and clinical practice should be emphasized as an important dynamic factor in the history of psychiatry--next to or even above the dichotomy between 'biology' and 'psychology'. PMID:22586810

Bolt, Timo

2010-01-01

148

Psychological Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Does the appearance of pruritus always necessitate psychological treatment? The answer to this question remains subordinate\\u000a to the dermatologist’s clinical examination, including the psychological component (cf. Part II, Subchapter 4, Psychological\\u000a Approach). The dermatologist’s entire observational and clinical sense is mobilized. ‘What is the patient telling me about\\u000a his pruritus?’ ‘Is he psychically and physically overwhelmed by the itching?’ ‘Did

Sabine Dutray; Laurent Misery

149

Clinical, psychological and environmental predictors of prospective suicide events in patients with Bipolar Disorder.  

PubMed

Patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) have high rates of suicide compared to the general population. The present study investigates the predictive power of baseline clinical, psychological and environmental characteristics as risk factors of prospective suicide events (attempts and completions). Data was collected from the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study. 3083 bipolar patients were included in this report, among these 140 (4.6%) had a suicide event (8 died by suicide and 132 attempted suicide). Evaluation and assessment forms were used to collect clinical, psychological and socio-demographic information. Chi-square and independent t-tests were used to evaluate baseline characteristics. Potential prospective predictors were selected on the basis of prior literature and using a screening analysis of all risk factors that were associated with a history of suicide attempt at baseline and were tested using a Cox regression analysis. The strongest predictor of a suicide event was a history of suicide attempt (hazard ratio = 2.60, p-value < 0.001) in line with prior literature. Additional predictors were: younger age, a high total score on the personality disorder questionnaire and a high percentage of days spent depressed in the year prior to study entry. In conclusion, the present findings may help clinicians to identify patients at high risk for suicidal behavior upon presentation for treatment. PMID:24018102

Antypa, Niki; Antonioli, Marco; Serretti, Alessandro

2013-08-23

150

A Hospital Medical Staff Psychology Department: The Interface of Medical Education, Postdoctoral Psychology Training, Clinical Practice, and Medical Staff Membership  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the organization and development of the free-standing medical staff department of psychology at Hurley Medical Center (HMC) in Flint, Michigan. Housed in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Michigan State University College of Human Medicine (MSU\\/CHM), the department is unique in its independence and parity within the organized medical staff. The description herein follows the 10 organizational variables

Michael E. Lechner; Kirk J. Stucky

2000-01-01

151

Predoctoral training in clinical hypnosis: A national survey of availabil ity and educator attitudes in schools of medicine, dentistry, and graduate clinical psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postcard questionnaires on the subject of training in clinical hypnosis were mailed to all doctoral training programs and internship centers in clinical psychology, dental schools, and medical schools which were fully approved by their respective accrediting associations. Considerable interest in hypnotic procedures at both predoctoral and postdoctoral levels was shown by all groups. Availability of training in hypnosis and favorable

Marvin J. Parrish

1975-01-01

152

The psychological profile of parents who volunteer their children for clinical research: a controlled study.  

PubMed Central

Three standard psychometric tests were administered to parents who volunteered their children for a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial of a new asthma drug and to a control group of parents whose children were eligible for the trial but had declined the invitation. The trial took place at a children's hospital in Australia. The subjects comprised 68 parents who had volunteered their children and 42 who had not, a participation rate of 94 per cent and 70 per cent, respectively. The responses of these parents to the Gordon Survey of Interpersonal Values Questionnaire, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and the Cattell Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire were analysed by computer. There was a marked difference between the psychological profiles of the two groups of parents. Volunteering parents put more value on benevolence while non-volunteering parents were more concerned with power and prestige. The self-esteem of volunteering parents was much lower than that of non-volunteering parents. Finally, volunteering parents were more introverted, exhibited greater anxiety and low supergo, while non-volunteering parents appeared to have greater social confidence and emotional stability. Since an individual's values, self-esteem and personality may be important antecedents of behaviour, these findings suggest that parents who volunteer their children for clinical research are not only socially disadvantaged and emotionally vulnerable, but may also be psychologically predisposed to volunteering. Furthermore, these findings provide evidence for the existence of a psychosocial 'filter' effect of the informed consent procedure, which may be discouraging the better educated, more privileged and psychologically resilient members of society from participation as research subjects.

Harth, S C; Johnstone, R R; Thong, Y H

1992-01-01

153

Health care psychology and graduate education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contends that health care (HC) psychology should be more strongly emphasized in graduate clinical psychology training programs so that clinical psychologists can better meet demands for services that come from society, the HC field, clinical psychology itself, practicing clinical psychologists, and clinical psychology graduate students. The relationship of clinical psychology to HC psychology and the efficacy of training in HC

Bernard Sladen

1979-01-01

154

"Against all hushing up and stamping down": the Medico-Psychological Clinic of London and the novelist May Sinclair.  

PubMed

May Sinclair (1863-1946) was one of the first modern novelists to appropriate psychoanalytic theories in her works. She was an early reader of the new psychoanalytic techniques but, rather than embracing its theories wholeheartedly and unquestioningly, she synthesized those that appealed to her own psychology of womanhood. Moreover, Sinclair's position was a unique one. As well as a highly acclaimed novelist with a respected public voice, she was closely associated with the setting up of one of the first psychotherapeutic centres in Britain, the Medico-Psychological Clinic of London. In this paper, I argue that the eclectic psychoanalytic situations in which Sinclair places her literary heroines mirror the eclectic and potentially feminist endeavours of the medico-Psychological Clinic. I draw upon archival material, hitherto unexamined by literary critics and medical historians, to reflect upon the turbulent lifespan of the Clinic and the attempts to curtail its controversial practices. PMID:21850804

Martindale, Philippa

2004-01-01

155

The clinical psychology of Lightner Witmer: a case study of institutional innovation and intellectual change.  

PubMed

The name Lightner Witmer is rarely invoked in the historian's litany of psychological saints. Neither a grand systematizer nor an ardent experimentalist, the "world's first clinical psychologist" is even dismissed by contemporary clinicians because of his purported failure to achieve for psychologists professional hegemony over the "problem child." Yet disciplinary ventures which in Joseph Ben-David's phrase fail to "take off" represent extremely illuminating indicators of a discipline's shifting ideas, roles, and aspirations. Explicitly urging that historians pay more attention to subgroups of larger disciplines, this paper constitutes an attempt to assess the impact of changing social roles upon psychologists' intellectual stances through an examination of Witmer's novel activities at the University of Pennsylvania. PMID:400626

O'Donnell, J M

1979-01-01

156

Critical Thinking about Adverse Drug Effects: Lessons from the Psychology of Risk and Medical Decision-Making for Clinical Psychopharmacology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systematic biases in decision-making have been well characterized in medical and nonmedical fields but mostly ignored in clinical psychopharmacology. The purpose of this paper is to sensitize clinicians who prescribe psychiatric drugs to the issues of the psychology of risk, especially as they pertain to the risk of side effects. Specifically, the present analysis focuses on heuristic organization and framing

Andrew A. Nierenberg; Jordan W. Smoller; Polina Eidelman; Yelena P. Wu; Claire A. Tilley

2008-01-01

157

Predictors of treatment utilisation at cognitive remediation groups for schizophrenia: The roles of neuropsychological, psychological and clinical variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study highlights the importance of carefully assessing neuropsychological functioning at the outset of cognitive remediation (CR) treatment. The effects of neuropsychological, psychological, and clinical variables on treatment utilisation (TU) in CR groups for individuals with schizophrenia were examined. Data included neuropsychological and psychosocial assessments conducted with 39 adult clients enrolled in CR as part of their ongoing outpatient

Amanda L. Gooding; Alice Saperstein; Monica Rivera Mindt; Alice Medalia

2012-01-01

158

Now or Later?: An Empirical Investigation of When and Why Students Apply to Clinical Psychology PhD Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study used a national sample of PhD students in clinical psychology (N = 1,034) to explore when students decided to pursue their graduate degree, reasons for their decisions, and associated satisfaction. Results indicated that immediately after completing their undergraduate degree, 57% of current graduate students reported postponing…

Zimak, Eric H.; Edwards, Katie M.; Johnson, Shannon M.; Suhr, Julie

2011-01-01

159

Intervento psicologico e scompenso cardiaco: dalla teoria alla pratica clinica Heart failure and psychological intervention: from theory to clinical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heart feilure and psychological intervention: from theory to clinical practice. G.L. Balestroni. The management of chronic heart failure patients is complicated by the presence of multiple comorbid conditions, polypharmacy, psychosocial concerns and difficulties with adherence to complex medication, dietary regimen, smoking cessation and correct physical activity. Taken together, these factors contribute to the persistently high hospitalization and mortality rates as

G. L. Balestroni

160

Prostate cancer patients' support and psychological care needs: Survey from a non-surgical oncology clinic.  

PubMed

While there are numerous uncertainties surrounding prostate cancer's detection and treatment, more research focusing on the psychological needs of prostate patients is required. This study investigated the support and psychological care needs of men with prostate cancer. Patients were approached during urological oncology clinics and asked to complete the: Support Care Needs Survey (SCNS), Support Care Preferences Questionnaire, EORTC QLQ-C30 (Version 3) Measure plus Prostate Module, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Of the 249 patients meeting study entry criteria, there was an 89% response rate resulting in a cohort of 210 patients. The data showed that significant unmet need exists across a number of domains in the areas of psychological and health system/information. The more commonly reported needs were 'fears about cancer spreading (44%),' 'concerns about the worries of those close to you (43%),' and 'changes in sexual feelings (41%).' Half of all patients reported some need in the domain of sexuality, especially men younger than 65 years. Needs were being well met in the domain of patient care and support. A significant number of patients reported having used or desiring support services, such as information about their illness, brochures about services and benefits for patients with cancer (55%), a series of talks by staff members about aspects of prostate cancer (44%), and one-on-one counselling (48%). Quality of life (QoL) was most negatively impacted in those who: were < or =65 years old, had been diagnosed within one year, or had metastatic disease. Men < or =65 had decreased social functioning, greater pain, increased sleep disturbance, and were more likely to be uncomfortable about being sexually intimate. Patients recently diagnosed had increased fatigue, more frequent urination, greater disturbance of sleep, and were more likely to have hot flushes. Those with advanced disease scored lower on 12 out of 15 QoL categories. PSA level had no effect on QoL or anxiety/depression scores. Men with advanced disease had greater levels of depression and those < or =65 years old were more likely to be anxious. Although most men with prostate cancer seem to function quite well, a substantial minority report areas of unmet need that may be targets for improving care. PMID:14681951

Lintz, Kathleen; Moynihan, Clare; Steginga, Suzanne; Norman, Andy; Eeles, Ros; Huddart, Robert; Dearnaley, David; Watson, Maggie

2003-12-01

161

NeuroVR: an open source virtual reality platform for clinical psychology and behavioral neurosciences.  

PubMed

In the past decade, the use of virtual reality for clinical and research applications has become more widespread. However, the diffusion of this approach is still limited by three main issues: poor usability, lack of technical expertise among clinical professionals, and high costs. To address these challenges, we introduce NeuroVR (http://www.neurovr.org--http://www.neurotiv.org), a cost-free virtual reality platform based on open-source software, that allows non-expert users to adapt the content of a pre-designed virtual environment to meet the specific needs of the clinical or experimental setting. Using the NeuroVR Editor, the user can choose the appropriate psychological stimuli/stressors from a database of objects (both 2D and 3D) and videos, and easily place them into the virtual environment. The edited scene can then be visualized in the NeuroVR Player using either immersive or non-immersive displays. Currently, the NeuroVR library includes different virtual scenes (apartment, office, square, supermarket, park, classroom, etc.), covering two of the most studied clinical applications of VR: specific phobias and eating disorders. The NeuroVR Editor is based on Blender (http://www.blender.org), the open source, cross-platform suite of tools for 3D creation, and is available as a completely free resource. An interesting feature of the NeuroVR Editor is the possibility to add new objects to the database. This feature allows the therapist to enhance the patient's feeling of familiarity and intimacy with the virtual scene, i.e., by using photos or movies of objects/people that are part of the patient's daily life, thereby improving the efficacy of the exposure. The NeuroVR platform runs on standard personal computers with Microsoft Windows; the only requirement for the hardware is related to the graphics card, which must support OpenGL. PMID:17377310

Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea; Villani, Daniela; Preziosa, Alessandra; Morganti, Francesca; Corsi, Riccardo; Faletti, Gianluca; Vezzadini, Luca

2007-01-01

162

Reproductive options for prospective parents in families with Huntington's disease: clinical, psychological and ethical reflections.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative late onset disorder. This review of reproductive options aims to increase reproductive confidence and to prevent suffering in relation to family planning around HD and possibly other late onset neurodegenerative disorders. METHODS Selected relevant literature and own views and experiences as clinical geneticists, psychologists and ethicists have been used. RESULTS Possible options, with emphasis on prenatal diagnosis (PD) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the transmission of HD to the next generation, are described and discussed. They are formally presented in a decision tree, taking into account the presence or absence of a fully penetrant allele (FPA), a reduced penetrant allele (RPA) or an intermediate allele (IA). A table compares invasive and non-invasive PD and PGD. From a psychological perspective, the complex process of counselling and decision-making regarding reproductive options is discussed. Special attention is paid to the decision to avoid the transmission of the mutation and to the confrontation and coping of a mutation-free child growing up with a parent developing disease symptoms. From an ethical point of view, reflections on both PD and PGD are brought forward taking into account the difference between FPA, RPA and IA, direct testing or exclusion testing and taking into account the welfare of the child in the context of medically assisted reproduction. CONCLUSION Recommendations and suggestions for good clinical practice in the reproductive care for HD families are formulated. PMID:23377865

de Die-Smulders, C E M; de Wert, G M W R; Liebaers, I; Tibben, A; Evers-Kiebooms, G

2013-02-01

163

Enriching Our Views on Clinical Ethics: Results of a Qualitative Study of the Moral Psychology of Healthcare Ethics Committee Members  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contribution of healthcare ethics committee (HEC) members to HECs is fundamental. However, little is known about how HEC\\u000a members view clinical ethics. We report results from a qualitative study of the moral psychology of HEC members. We found\\u000a that contrary to the existing Kohlberg-based studies, HEC members hold a pragmatic non-expert view of clinical ethics based\\u000a mainly on respect

Eric Racine

2008-01-01

164

The cognitive attentional syndrome: Examining relations with mood and anxiety symptoms and distinctiveness from psychological inflexibility in a clinical sample.  

PubMed

Wells's (2009) metacognitive theory suggests that inflexible and recurrent styles of thinking in response to negative thoughts, feelings, and beliefs underlie mood and anxiety symptoms. Wells termed such styles of thinking as the cognitive attentional syndrome (CAS). Using a clinical sample (N=132) of patients with either a primary mood or anxiety disorder, we examined relations between the CAS and mood (depression) and anxiety (generalized anxiety, social anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and panic) symptoms. We also examined the distinctiveness of the CAS from the related construct of psychological inflexibility. The CAS shared significant positive associations with all of the assessed symptoms, but appeared particularly relevant to depression and generalized anxiety symptoms. Despite having a strong significant positive correlation with psychological inflexibility, the CAS tended to share unique relations with symptoms after controlling for psychological inflexibility. These results broadly support the purported transdiagnostic importance of Wells's theory and indicate that intervention strategies targeting the CAS might be useful in treating certain disorders. PMID:23790980

Fergus, Thomas A; Valentiner, David P; McGrath, Patrick B; Gier-Lonsway, Stephanie; Jencius, Simon

2013-06-18

165

Controversy clarified: an updated review of clinical psychology and tele-health.  

PubMed

One of the most controversial topics in the field of clinical psychology, online tele-health, or the integration of computers and the internet with therapeutic techniques, remains at the forefront of many debates. Despite potential interest, there are numerous factors that a psychologist must consider before integrating an online tele-health intervention into their own practice. This article outlines literature pertinent to the debate. The article begins with a brief history of the use of non-face-to-face interventions as well as the earliest recorded use of "tele-health" before discussing the modern benefits and risks associated with usage. Considerations for the psychologist as well as the client are detailed; incorporating ethical implications. The authors conclude that the utilization of tele-health interventions is an exponentially expanding field that should continue to be explored. Despite many well-conceived studies, a psychologist should educate themselves in all aspects of the new modes of intervention (e.g., ethical, legal, evidence-based treatments) before attempting to implement them into everyday practice. The article ends with a discussion on the acceptance among psychologists, as well as the outlook for the future. PMID:21963670

Perle, Jonathan G; Langsam, Leah C; Nierenberg, Barry

2011-08-31

166

The practice and problems of clinical psychology in a state psychiatric hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper emphasizes that psychology can make significant contributions to state mental hospitals. Psychologists should be encouraged to work in these institutions as fruitful fields for service and research. A greater interest on the part of the profession in the problems of psychology in state hospitals will yield a social return in the advancement of the treatment, research, and training

Jules D. Holzberg

1952-01-01

167

Drug side effect extraction from clinical narratives of psychiatry and psychology patients  

PubMed Central

Objective To extract physician-asserted drug side effects from electronic medical record clinical narratives. Materials and methods Pattern matching rules were manually developed through examining keywords and expression patterns of side effects to discover an individual side effect and causative drug relationship. A combination of machine learning (C4.5) using side effect keyword features and pattern matching rules was used to extract sentences that contain side effect and causative drug pairs, enabling the system to discover most side effect occurrences. Our system was implemented as a module within the clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System. Results The system was tested in the domain of psychiatry and psychology. The rule-based system extracting side effects and causative drugs produced an F score of 0.80 (0.55 excluding allergy section). The hybrid system identifying side effect sentences had an F score of 0.75 (0.56 excluding allergy section) but covered more side effect and causative drug pairs than individual side effect extraction. Discussion The rule-based system was able to identify most side effects expressed by clear indication words. More sophisticated semantic processing is required to handle complex side effect descriptions in the narrative. We demonstrated that our system can be trained to identify sentences with complex side effect descriptions that can be submitted to a human expert for further abstraction. Conclusion Our system was able to extract most physician-asserted drug side effects. It can be used in either an automated mode for side effect extraction or semi-automated mode to identify side effect sentences that can significantly simplify abstraction by a human expert.

Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Chute, Christopher G; Savova, Guergana K

2011-01-01

168

Knowledge of family history as a clinically useful index of psychological well-being and prognosis: A brief report.  

PubMed

Based on an instance of "clinical lore" we assess the efficacy of children's and adolescents' knowledge of family history as an index of psychological well-being and potential for positive change in clinical and educational settings. We report that knowledge of family history is significantly correlated with internal locus of control, higher self-esteem, better family functioning, greater family cohesiveness, lower levels of anxiety, and lower incidence of behavior problems. We suggest that through the use of a brief measure of family knowledge, practicing clinicians can rapidly generate a data-based correlate of children's well-being and likelihood of overcoming psychological and educational challenges. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122420

Duke, Marshall P; Lazarus, Amber; Fivush, Robyn

2008-06-01

169

Forensic Psychology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Introduction to forensic psychology; Psychological structure of the administration of justice; The methods of forensic psychology; Psychological fundamentals of preliminary investigation; Psychological fundamentals of court proceedings; Psycholo...

A. V. Dulov

1976-01-01

170

Into the Lion’s Den: Incorporating Personality and Evolutionary Psychology toExpand Clinical Behavior Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT This paper incorporates aspects of the personality and evolutionary psychology,literatures into a behavior,analytic framework,to expand,clinical behavior analysis. We argue,that personality can be understood ,in reference ,to contingencies, of reinforcement ,that are differentially potentiated across individuals by the joint influences of phylogenetic and ontogenetic variables. Moreover, we propose that the behavioral effects of phylogenetic variables, which have been relatively neglected

Jennifer A. h Arrington; Brandi C. Fink; Michael J. Dougher

2001-01-01

171

Psychological and social aspects of infertility in men: an overview of the evidence and implications for psychologically informed clinical care and future research.  

PubMed

Research concerning the psychosocial aspects of infertility and infertility treatment focuses more often on women than men. The aim of this review was to synthesize the English-language evidence related to the psychological and social aspects of infertility in men and discuss the implications of these reports for clinical care and future research. A structured search identified 73 studies that reported data concerning the desire for fatherhood and the psychological and social aspects of diagnosis, assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and unsuccessful treatment among men with fertility difficulties. The studies are diverse in conceptualisation, design, setting and data collection, but the findings were reasonably consistent. These studies indicated that fertile and infertile childless men of reproductive age have desires to experience parenthood that are similar to those of their female counterparts; in addition, diagnosis and initiation of treatment are associated with elevated infertility-specific anxiety, and unsuccessful treatment can lead to a state of lasting sadness. However, rates of clinically significant mental health problems among this patient population are no higher than in the general population. Infertile men who are socially isolated, have an avoidant coping style and appraise stressful events as overwhelming, are more vulnerable to severe anxiety than men without these characteristics. Men prefer oral to written treatment information and prefer to receive emotional support from infertility clinicians rather than from mental health professionals, self-help support groups or friends. Nevertheless, structured, facilitated psycho-educational groups that are didactic but permit informal sharing of experiences might be beneficial. There are gaps in knowledge about factors governing seeking, persisting with and deciding to cease treatment; experiences of invasive procedures; parenting after assisted conception; adoption and infertility-related grief and shame among men. Few resource-constrained countries have any data concerning male experiences of infertility. PMID:22179515

Fisher, Jane R W; Hammarberg, Karin

2011-12-19

172

Incorporating a developmental perspective in doctoral training: survey of clinical child psychology training programs and introduction to the special section.  

PubMed

Examined the degree to which clinical child programs incorporate and integrate developmental theory into their training, and introduced the contributions of 6 leaders in the field to this special section. Fifty-one clinical child doctoral programs responded to the survey. Results indicate that 3 types of training programs are operating: (a) child emphasis (n = 7), which do not have a formal clinical child training program but do have a faculty member who has child research interests; (b) clinical child (n = 37), which have a group of faculty members with specific child research and clinical interests and a formalized program of study; and (c) developmental-clinical programs (n = 7), which are similar to clinical child programs but require a substantive amount of developmental psychology course work and endorse a developmental psychopathology perspective. Findings reveal that clinical child programs have become increasingly differentiated and specialized over the past 20 years, but, with the exception of developmental-clinical programs, most programs are still neglecting to incorporate developmental theory into training. This issue, as well as concerns about the future direction of clinical child doctoral training is addressed in this special section on the Importance of Incorporating Developmental Theory Into Clinical Child Training. PMID:10587892

Zeman, J; Nangle, D W; Sim, L

1999-12-01

173

Roy Schafer's contributions to psychological testing: from clinical sensibility to the analytic attitude.  

PubMed

The author reviews Schafer's contributions to psychological testing, emphasizing his development of the test battery, his significant contributions to psychoanalytically oriented Rorschach interpretation, and his understanding of the complex interpersonal dynamics involved in psychological test interpretation. The author also discusses his use of Schafer's writing in his own teaching and academic work, noting that Schafer's contributions have not only provided innovative methods for examining test data, but have also promoted a respectful, humanistic, and individualized approach to the patient in testing and treatment. The author asserts that Schafer's later seminal contributions to psychoanalysis had their origins in his early career as a psychologist applying psychoanalytic ideas to testing. PMID:23457096

Fritsch, Richard C

2013-01-01

174

Posttraumatic growth in clinical psychology — A critical review and introduction of a two component model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Positive psychological or personal changes in the aftermath of trauma, defined as the result of the struggle with highly stressful events, have recently elicited heightened attention by trauma researchers. This article aims at summarizing the most important theoretical models and conceptualizations of posttraumatic growth (PTG) and addresses the issue of the adaptive significance of this phenomenon. It further renders a

Tanja Zoellner; Andreas Maercker

2006-01-01

175

Self-Assessment in Clinical Health Psychology: A Model for Ethical Expansion of Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Society expects autonomous professions to ensure the competency of its practitioners, and professions should facilitate the continuing education and training of its members. Given the shift from psychology as a mental health profession to that of a health profession, the authors propose a self-assessment model for the individual practitioner to gauge his or her readiness to provide professional services in

Cynthia D. Belar; Robert A. Brown; Lee E. Hersch; Lynne M. Hornyak; Ronald H. Rozensky; Edward P. Sheridan; Ronald T. Brown; Geoffrey W. Reed

2001-01-01

176

The Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents, Psychological Symptoms, and Clinical Status in Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) are three scales for assessing the relative strength of three aspects of personal resiliency as a profile in children and adolescents. This article presents preliminary evidence to support the use of the RSCA in preventive screening. First, this article examines associations between the RSCA Global scale and index scores and psychological symptoms

Sandra Prince-Embury

2008-01-01

177

Comparing Psychological Type and Explanatory Between Nursing Students and Clinical Faculty: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negotiation of complex collaboration and effective teamwork among health care providers is essential to patient safety and to quality of care. This study examined characteristics of nursing students and faculty influencing communication between them. Psychological type (Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI) (Myers, McCaulley, Quenk, & Hammer, 1998) and explanatory style (Attributional Style Questionnaire) (ASQ) (Peterson et al., 1982) were compared for

Lynn Allchin; Arthur J. Engler; Laura Cox Dzurec

2006-01-01

178

Health Psychology Specialty Practice Opportunities in a Rural Community Hospital: Practicing Local Clinical Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is currently considerable interest in opportunities for collaboration between psychologists and primary care providers, particularly in rural settings. This article is an attempt to expand this discussion by focusing on opportunities for more specialized health psychology practices within tertiary care settings. Two examples are provided of collaborative projects recently implemented in a rural community hospital in southern New Hampshire—1

Brian L. Lewis

2001-01-01

179

[Psychological resistances of women to the principal female methods of contraception. Clinical classification].  

PubMed

According to the literature and to the experience of the authors gathered at the family department at the Louvain Faculty of Medicine, these psychological resistances may schematically be classified as follows: normative and socio-cultural resistances; medical resistances (wish of pregnancy, personality traits, narcissm, sexual and technical resistances); psychopathological resistances (unspecific neurotic behavior, phobias, hypochondriasis, obsessive-compulsive neurosis, character neurosis); secondary resistances. PMID:1232762

Wauty-Dancot, M C; Rucquoy, G

1975-01-01

180

Psychology and the War: Notes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Provides information on programs and activities relevant to psychology and World War II. The Advisory Board on Clinical Psychology announces the creation of a clinical psychology program in the hospitals of the Army. The Office of War Information has instituted monthly newsletters in a number of fields such as psychology, physics, and medicine through their Overseas Branch. These newsletters are

Harold Schlosberg

1944-01-01

181

Clinical, physiologic, and psychologic comparison of treatment by cromolyn or theophylline in childhood asthma.  

PubMed

Treatment of chronic perennial childhood asthma with cromolyn sodium (CS) or long-acting theophylline (LAT) was compared in 13 children by a double-blind, cross-over trial in which each drug was administered for 4 wk. LAT was administered twice daily in individual doses to elicit adequate blood levels (mean 14.0 +/- 1.6 SEM, micrograms per milliliters). Powdered CS was administered by inhalation in a dose of 20 mg four times daily. The patients were followed by means of a daily symptom and drug consumption diary and twice daily peak flow measurements. A series of psychologic studies were performed in the third week of each month. Exercise and histamine bronchial provocation tests were performed at the end of each month. There were no significant differences between the month in which CS was taken and the month in which LAT was taken in terms of diary scores, peak flow rates, additional drug consumption, or in bronchial reactivity to exercise or histamine at the end of each month. The results of psychologic tests reflecting visual-spatial planning were significantly better for the four children receiving CS with lower IQ scores (87 to 105) but not for the nine children with higher IQ scores (111 to 134). The possibility that the psychologic performance of children with lower intelligence may be adversely affected by theophylline requires further evaluation. PMID:3924984

Springer, C; Goldenberg, B; Ben Dov, I; Godfrey, S

1985-07-01

182

Identification of clinically significant psychological distress and psychiatric morbidity by examining quality of life in subjects with occupational asthma  

PubMed Central

Background The Juniper Asthma Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ(S)) is a questionnaire that allows measurement of disease specific quality of life. We wanted to examine correlations between the (AQLQ(S)) general and different subscale scores and both psychiatric morbidity and levels of psychological distress in individuals with occupational asthma (OA) and to determine if results in the emotional function subscale allow identification of individuals with clinically significant psychological distress or current psychiatric disorders. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of individuals with OA who were assessed during a re-evaluation for permanent disability, after they were no longer exposed to the sensitizing agent. Patients underwent a general sociodemographic and medical history evaluation, a brief psychiatric interview (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders, PRIME-MD) and completed a battery of questionnaires including the AQLQ(S), the St-Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the Psychiatric Symptom Index (PSI). Results There was good internal consistency (Cronbach alpha = 0.936 for the AQLQ(S) total score) and construct validity for the AQLQ(S) (Spearman rho = -0.693 for the SGRQ symptom score and rho = -0.650 for the asthma severity score). There were medium to large correlations between the total score of the AQLQ(S) and the SGRQ symptom score (r = -.693), and PSI total (r = -.619) and subscale scores (including depression, r = -.419; anxiety, r = -.664; anger, r = -.367; cognitive disturbances, r = -.419). A cut-off of 5.1 on the AQLQ(S) emotional function subscale (where 0 = high impairment and 7 = no impairment) had the best discriminative value to distinguish individuals with or without clinically significant psychiatric distress according to the PSI, and a cut-off of 4.7 best distinguished individuals with or without a current psychiatric disorder according to the PRIME-MD. Conclusions Impaired quality of life is associated with psychological distress and psychiatric disorders in individuals with OA. Findings suggest that the AQLQ(S) questionnaire may be used to identify patients with potentially clinically significant levels of psychological distress.

2011-01-01

183

Screening for psychological distress in patients with lung cancer: results of a clinical audit evaluating the use of the patient Distress Thermometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Patients with lung cancer frequently suffer psychological distress and guidelines in the United Kingdom recommend screening\\u000a of all cancer patients for this problem. The audit investigated use of the Distress Thermometer in terms of staff adherence\\u000a to locally developed guidelines, patient willingness to use the tool, its impact on referral rates to clinical psychology\\u000a services and concordance between the tool

Johanna Lynch; Frances Goodhart; Yolande Saunders; Stephen J. O’Connor

2010-01-01

184

The use of functional neuroimaging to evaluate psychological and other non-pharmacological treatments for clinical pain.  

PubMed

A large number of studies have provided evidence for the efficacy of psychological and other non-pharmacological interventions in the treatment of chronic pain. While these methods are increasingly used to treat pain, remarkably few studies focused on the exploration of their neural correlates. The aim of this article was to review the findings from neuroimaging studies that evaluated the neural response to distraction-based techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), clinical hypnosis, mental imagery, physical therapy/exercise, biofeedback, and mirror therapy. To date, the results from studies that used neuroimaging to evaluate these methods have not been conclusive and the experimental methods have been suboptimal for assessing clinical pain. Still, several different psychological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities were associated with increased pain-related activations of executive cognitive brain regions, such as the ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. There was also evidence for decreased pain-related activations in afferent pain regions and limbic structures. If future studies will address the technical and methodological challenges of today's experiments, neuroimaging might have the potential of segregating the neural mechanisms of different treatment interventions and elucidate predictive and mediating factors for successful treatment outcomes. Evaluations of treatment-related brain changes (functional and structural) might also allow for sub-grouping of patients and help to develop individualized treatments. PMID:22445888

Jensen, Karin B; Berna, Chantal; Loggia, Marco L; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R; Gollub, Randy L

2012-03-14

185

Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program Admissions: Differential Values as a Function of Program Characteristics and the Implications of the Mentor-Model Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aims of this research were to 1) examine the qualities for which applicants are selected for entrance into clinical psychology Ph.D. programs, and 2) investigate the prevalence and impact of the mentor-model approach to admissions on multiple domains of programs and the field at large. Fifty Directors of Clinical Training (DCTs) provided data…

Metzger, Jesse A.

2010-01-01

186

Nonlinear Dynamics in Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a survey of the applications of nonlinear dynamical systems theory to substantive problems encountered in the full scope of psychological science. Applications are organized into three topical areas - cognitive science, social and organizational psychology, and personality and clinical psychology. Both theoretical and empirical studies are considered with an emphasis on works that capture the broadest scope

STEPHEN J. GUASTELLO

2000-01-01

187

Medical Psychology in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical psychology in Australia is heavily influenced by British and American thought. The dominant model for clinical training and practice is the scientist–practitioner model, yet a gulf exists between academic and practice settings. Membership of the professional society requires 6 years of university study in psychology. However, registration requires only 4 years training in psychology. Medical psychologists provide a broad

John Hambridge; Amanda Baker

2001-01-01

188

Empirically supported psychological therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces the special section of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology on empirically supported psychological therapies. After a discussion of the rationale for the selection of the specific terms in the label, several justifications are considered for conducting and learning from empirical evaluations of psychological therapies. Finally, the process that guided the special section is described.

Philip C. Kendall

1998-01-01

189

Does psychological status influence clinical outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic gastroenterological diseases: An observational cohort prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background Whether there is a temporal relationship between psychological problems and clinical outcomes in patients with diseases of the digestive tract has not been widely researched. Thus, our aims were 1) To observe and compare prospectively clinical outcomes in relation to psychological co-morbidity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic hepatitis C (HCV) and, 2) To test the hypothesis that patients with psychological co-morbidities are less likely to have a satisfactory response to standard treatment at 12 months. Methods Overall, 139 patients were enrolled in this observational cohort prospective study. Over the ensuing year, physical and psychological measures were made at baseline and after 12 months (HADS, SCL90, SF-12 and disease activity measures). A logistic regression was conducted to observe any relationship between baseline characteristics and patients' clinical outcomes after 12 months. Results Overall, there was no relationship between psychological status and quality of life at baseline and relapse at 12 months (p > 0.05). However, patients with inactive disease at baseline were at lower risk of relapse after 12 months (OR = 0.046, CI: 0.012–0.178). No significant relationship was found between psychological problems such as depression/anxiety and a total number of relapses in the IBD group. However, interestingly, patients with an active disease at baseline tended to have a greater number of relapses (OR = 3.07, CI: 1.650–5.738) and CD participants were found at lower risk of relapse than UC participants (OR = 0.382, CI: 0.198–0.736). Conclusion In contrast to previous investigations, this study suggests that there is no temporal relationship between psychological problems at baseline and clinical outcomes over time. Longer and larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this result.

Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A; Turnbull, Deborah A; Moulding, Nicole T; Wilson, Ian G; Holtmann, Gerald J; Andrews, Jane M

2008-01-01

190

Clinical status in adolescents: is its impact on oral health-related quality of life influenced by psychological characteristics?  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine, using structural equation modelling, the relationships among clinical characteristics (such as caries experience and malocclusion), oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), and psychological characteristics (mental health, self-esteem, somatisation, and social perception of body image) in adolescents in New Zealand. Adolescents were examined for malocclusion using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) and for dental caries. Among the 353 (58.8%) 12- and 13-yr-old adolescents who took part in this cross-sectional study, the overall mean ± SD decayed, missing, or filled surfaces (DMFS) value was 1.6 ± 3.0, with slightly more than 50% of being caries-free; the mean ± SD DAI was 31.5 ± 7.6, with one-quarter of subjects having a 'handicapping' malocclusion. The structural equation modelling analysis showed that the structural model was a good fit to the data. As hypothesized, the DAI score significantly predicted OHRQoL. There was no direct relationship between caries experience (DMFS) and OHRQoL, but there was an indirect effect of DMFS on OHRQoL mediated through psychological characteristics. The amount of OHRQoL variance accounted for in the model was substantial, at 62%. It appears that investigating OHRQoL in adolescents is not straightforward; while malocclusion directly affects OHRQoL, the influence of dental caries experience is less direct. PMID:23659241

Foster Page, Lyndie A; Thomson, W Murray; Ukra, Ali; Baker, Sarah R

2013-03-28

191

The STarT Back Screening Tool and Individual Psychological Measures: Evaluation of Prognostic Capabilities for Low Back Pain Clinical Outcomes in Outpatient Physical Therapy Settings  

PubMed Central

Background Psychologically informed practice emphasizes routine identification of modifiable psychological risk factors being highlighted. Objective The purpose of this study was to test the predictive validity of the STarT Back Screening Tool (SBT) in comparison with single-construct psychological measures for 6-month clinical outcomes. Design This was an observational, prospective cohort study. Methods Patients (n=146) receiving physical therapy for low back pain were administered the SBT and a battery of psychological measures (Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire physical activity scale and work scale [FABQ-PA and FABQ-W, respectively], Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], 11-item version of the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia [TSK-11], and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9]) at initial evaluation and 4 weeks later. Treatment was at the physical therapist's discretion. Clinical outcomes consisted of pain intensity and self-reported disability. Prediction of 6-month clinical outcomes was assessed for intake SBT and psychological measure scores using multiple regression models while controlling for other prognostic variables. In addition, the predictive capabilities of intake to 4-week changes in SBT and psychological measure scores for 6-month clinical outcomes were assessed. Results Intake pain intensity scores (?=.39 to .45) and disability scores (?=.47 to .60) were the strongest predictors in all final regression models, explaining 22% and 24% and 43% and 48% of the variance for the respective clinical outcome at 6 months. Neither SBT nor psychological measure scores improved prediction of 6-month pain intensity. The SBT overall scores (?=.22) and SBT psychosocial scores (?=.25) added to the prediction of disability at 6 months. Four-week changes in TSK-11 scores (?=?.18) were predictive of pain intensity at 6 months. Four-week changes in FABQ-PA scores (?=?.21), TSK-11 scores (?=?.20) and SBT overall scores (?=?.18) were predictive of disability at 6 months. Limitations Physical therapy treatment was not standardized or accounted for in the analysis. Conclusions Prediction of clinical outcomes by psychology-based measures was dependent upon the clinical outcome domain of interest. Similar to studies from the primary care setting, initial screening with the SBT provided additional prognostic information for 6-month disability and changes in SBT overall scores may provide important clinical decision-making information for treatment monitoring.

Bishop, Mark D.; Fritz, Julie M.; Robinson, Michael E.; Asal, Nabih R.; Nisenzon, Anne N.

2013-01-01

192

The psychological goods on clinical social work: a content analysis of the clinical social work and social justice literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this content analysis was to evaluate the extant literature on clinical social work and social justice. In July 2009, an online search of the university databases EBSCO Host (1988–2009) was conducted to identify articles on clinical social work and social justice. Thirty-six peer reviewed journal articles were identified and extracted. The majority were non-empirical articles (75%) published

Tina Maschi; Judy Baer; Sandra G. Turner

2011-01-01

193

Pediatric Psychology: Child Psychological Health in the Next Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

The future of pediatric psychology is reviewed and placed in brief historical context in relation to children's psychological health care. Contemporary trends affecting the delivery of psychological services, research, and clinical training are highlighted, with suggestions for future development. Pediatric psychology is a child-based, developmentally-focused multidisciplinary practice directed toward psychosocial and neuropsychological issues of health and illness in children and

Dennis C. Harper

1997-01-01

194

Interprofessional clinical education for occupational therapy and psychology students: a social skills training program for children with autism spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

An interprofessional clinical learning experience was developed for pre-licensure occupational therapy (OT) and psychology graduate students. Students worked in interprofessional teams to plan and implement a social skills training program for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The objectives were to provide a hands-on, student-led clinical experience; facilitate interprofessional collaborative learning through leadership partnerships and teach children with ASD to engage in appropriate social skill behaviors. Concurrently, faculty performed qualitative research to explore how the students worked together to provide intervention to the children. Data were collected via interview, direct observation of student planning sessions and student interprofessional interactions, and collection of posts from an online social network site used for session planning. There were six student participants and two faculty participants. Four themes emerged: learning who I am as a professional, learning to appreciate our professional differences, learning to communicate with each other and figuring it out, for the benefit of the kids. This interprofessional clinical learning experience and research helps ensure that students are adequately prepared to represent their profession as part of a diverse interprofessional health care team. PMID:22233368

Howell, Dana M; Wittman, Peggy; Bundy, Myra Beth

2012-01-01

195

The Sport–Clinical Intake Protocol: A Comprehensive Interviewing Instrument for Applied Sport Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sport–Clinical Intake Protocol (SCIP) was developed to provide clinical professionals with extensive information about the athletic client’s life within and outside of sport. The SCIP is divided into 7 sections that represent important areas of an athlete’s life that the professional must assess: (a) the presenting problem, (b) life and athletic history, (c) social support, (d) health status, (e)

Jim Taylor; Barry A. Schneider

1992-01-01

196

[Malnutrition in the elderly: clinical features, psychological and social determinants. Preliminary results].  

PubMed

In industrialized Countries malnutrition is a very frequent condition in frail groups of the population, people with low income and elderly subjects above all if institutionalized. The aim of the study is to: analyse the prevalence of malnutrition in a sample of elderly people located in different geographical areas in Italy; identify the psychological, social, economic, environmental, cultural and demographic determinants of malnutrition. The prevalence of malnutrition (estimated through the MNA) is high in both sexes (28% of F and 21.9% of M. Age, institutionalisation, health status, autonomy status, cognitive status and education level are some of the factors that correlate with the presence of malnutrition. Loneliness and poverty seem to have a negative impact on nutritional status but further data are needed to confirm this hypothesis. The data collected confirm the need to activate services dedicated to assess the nutritional status of elderly people, to implement campaigns in particular on food education for the elderly population, to set tools and guide lines for caregivers. PMID:21770232

Morrone, A; Donini, L M; Scardella, P; Piombo, L; Pinto, A; Giusti, A M; Neri, B; Hagedorn, T; Proietti, A R; Cataldi, S; Cucinotta, D; Di Bella, G; Barbagallo, M; Cannella, C

197

Psychological aspects of childhood obesity: a controlled study in a clinical and nonclinical sample.  

PubMed

Explored the relationship between obesity and psychosocial adjustment in a combined clinical and nonclinical sample of 139 obese children and 150 non-obese children (ages from 9 to 12 years and matched for age, socioeconomic status, and gender) who filled out the Perceived Competence Scale for Children; their parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. All obese children, independent of their help-seeking status, reported more negative physical self-perceptions than their nonobese peers and they scored lower on general self-worth. According to their parents, the obese children of the clinical sample appeared to have more behavior problems. Findings suggest that psychopathology depends on a clinical obese status, and they provide evidence for a psychosocial at-risk profile for a subgroup of obese children. PMID:9019048

Braet, C; Mervielde, I; Vandereycken, W

1997-02-01

198

Attachment style and its relationship to working alliance in the supervision of British clinical psychology trainees.  

PubMed

Although the supervisory relationship is thought to be critical in training clinical psychologists, little is known about factors affecting the supervisory alliance. We conducted an Internet survey of British clinical doctoral trainees (N = 259) in which participants rated their supervisory working alliance, parental style during childhood, pathological adult attachment behaviours and attachment style for themselves and their supervisors. Trainees' ratings of the working alliance were associated with perceptions of supervisors' attachment style, but not with perceptions of trainees' own attachment styles. Path analysis supported a causal chain linking parental indifference, compulsive self-reliance, insecure supervisor attachment style and lower ratings of the working alliance. Our results broadly replicate data from a US sample and suggest that attachment theory is helpful in understanding clinical supervisory processes. PMID:20645272

Dickson, Joanne M; Moberly, Nicholas J; Marshall, Yehuda; Reilly, James

2010-07-19

199

Some Nuances in Intersubjective Attachment Systems: Discussion of Shelley Doctors' Article, “Notes on Incorporating Attachment Theory and Research Into Self Psychological and Intersubjective Clinical Work”  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article I discuss Doctors's (2006) inclusive model presented in her paper, “Notes on Incorporating Attachment Theory and Research Into Self Psychological\\/Intersubjective Clinical Work.” I distinguish between linear stabilities of patterning emphasized by many attachment researchers and nonlinear properties of dyadic systems emphasized by relational and intersubjective systems, self–psychologists, and infant researchers, noting that Doctors brings both sensibilities into

Judith Pickles

2008-01-01

200

Determinantes psicológicos, clínicos y sociales del diagnóstico temprano del cáncer de mama en Bogotá, Colombia Psychological, Social, and Clinical Determinants of Breast Cancer Early Detection in Bogotá, Colombia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Various determinants of breast cancer early detection have been described (psychological, socio-demographic, clinical, health systems). Early detection of breast cancer is crucial to improve survival rates and quality of life. This paper analyzes determinants of breast cancer early detection in women form Bogota, Colombia. Methodology: A case-control study matched by socio economical strata was conducted. 102 women were included.

2007-01-01

201

General Exposure to Aging in Clinical and Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1992 an APA inter-divisional task force identified three levels of competency for professional practice with older adults: Exposure, Experience, and Expertise. It was recommended that all generalist programs provide their students with at least the first level of competency. However, most enter the field with little-to-no academic or clinical

Olthoff, Jacqueline K.

2010-01-01

202

Adoption in Clinical Psychology: A Review of the Absence, Ramifications, and Recommendations for Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practicing clinical psychologists reported that 5 to 10% of their patients are adoption triad members (Sass & Henderson, 1999) and yet recent studies concluded that the majority of psychologists are not being taught about adoption-related issues in their preservice raining (Post, 1999; Sass & Henderson, 1999). This article discusses the need for training on adoption in the context of the

Diana E. Post

2000-01-01

203

Factor-Analytic Methods of Scale Development in Personality and Clinical Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many clinical and social psychologists need to develop scales to carry out their research. Without adequate training in psychometric methods, they can easily run into difficulty. This article is designed to address some of the more common pitfalls in homogeneous scale construction. Empirical scale development by the criterion-group method is not considered. Suggestions are offered about item writing, answer scale

Andrew L. Comrey

1988-01-01

204

Toward a social psychology of diagnosis: Similarity, attraction, and clinical evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applied A. Byrne's (1971) similarity–attraction model in 2 studies of diagnostic bias. 56 clinicians and 56 undergraduates evaluated a client similar or dissimilar to themselves in political radicalism after hearing a taped interview with the client. Results for clinicians indicated no similarity–clinical judgment effect, but more radical Ss rated the client as having better therapy potential. Further, the more radical

Donald B. Mazer

1979-01-01

205

Interpersonal awareness in children: toward an integration of developmental and clinical child psychology.  

PubMed

This paper postulates a five-stage developmental sequence of awareness of interpersonal issues such as trust in friendship and loyalty in peer group relations. Results of research comparing the impersonal and interpersonal awareness of children with poor peer relations is presented in an attempt to clarify the function of social cognition in clinical contexts. PMID:855881

Selman, R L; Jaquette, D; Lavin, D R

1977-04-01

206

Handbook of Cross-Cultural and Multicultural Personality Assessment. Personality and Clinical Psychology Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This collection of papers includes: (1) "An Assessment-Intervention Model for Research and Practice with Multicultural Populations" (Richard H. Dana); (2) "An Africentric Perspective for Clinical Research and Practice" (Edward F. Morris); (3) "Myths about the Null Hypothesis and the Path to Reform" (Robert G. Malgady); (4) "A Construct-Based…

Dana, Richard H., Ed.

207

Clinical, Psychological and Personality Features Related to Age of Onset of Anorexia Nervosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: To investigate the relationship between age of onset and clinical and personality features of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Sampling andMethod: We assessed 250 outpatients with AN with the Temperament and Character Inventory, the Eating Disorder Inventory 2, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Body Shape Questionnaire. The patients were subdivided into 3 groups: early (n = 73), intermediate

G. Abbate-Daga; A. Pierò; R. Rigardetto; M. Gandione; C. Gramaglia; S. Fassino

2007-01-01

208

Predictive Validity of the Graduate Record Examination in a Clinical Psychology Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) has been plagued by the problem of restricted ranges resulting from the failure of low scorers to gain admission to graduate programs. This difficulty did not obtain with the present sample of 105 clinical students, which included a number of minority students admitted without consideration for their GRE scores. Two criterion variables

Stephen J. Dollinger

1989-01-01

209

Predictors of treatment utilisation at cognitive remediation groups for schizophrenia: the roles of neuropsychological, psychological and clinical variables.  

PubMed

The present study highlights the importance of carefully assessing neuropsychological functioning at the outset of cognitive remediation (CR) treatment. The effects of neuropsychological, psychological, and clinical variables on treatment utilisation (TU) in CR groups for individuals with schizophrenia were examined. Data included neuropsychological and psychosocial assessments conducted with 39 adult clients enrolled in CR as part of their ongoing outpatient therapy. TU was calculated using the percentage of sessions attended over a three-month period. Better global neuropsychological functioning (r = .46, p = .007), attention/working memory (r = .39, p = .03), and processing speed (r = .44, p = .01) were each associated with greater TU. Trend-level associations with TU were observed with executive functioning (r = .33, p = .06) and verbal learning (r = .23; p = .07). Higher rates of self-reported cognitive complaints were associated with lower TU (r = -.45, p = .01). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that both objective and subjective indicators of neuropsychological functioning independently contributed to the prediction of TU. This information can serve to help providers develop empirically informed strategies to support their clients' CR treatment utilisation. The implications from these findings can be used as a way to provide ongoing guidance for service provision and can aid in improving CR treatment utilisation, and thus treatment effectiveness, in clinical settings. PMID:22390152

Gooding, Amanda L; Saperstein, Alice; Rivera Mindt, Monica; Medalia, Alice

2012-03-05

210

A tale of two RCTs: Using Randomized Controlled Trials to benchmark Routine Clinical (psychological) Treatments for chronic pain.  

PubMed

This article reports the development of natural history and active treatment benchmarks for psychological treatments of chronic pain. The benchmarks were derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reported in a published meta-analysis. In two preliminary studies we surveyed small samples of active clinicians working in UK pain management programs. Study 1 assessed the fit between routine clinical treatment and the selected RCTs. In study 2 Delphi methodology was used to determine a set of outcome domains to be used in the development of benchmarks. In study 3 we extracted data from a set of RCTs where both pre- and post-treatment data were reported. Measures were allocated to 1 of 5 outcome domains (cognitive coping and appraisal, pain experience, pain behavior, emotional functioning, and physical functioning). Pre-treatment to post-treatment effect sizes (Cohen's d) were computed and, where necessary, aggregated within trial so that each trial contributed a single estimate to outcome domain. Effect size (ES) benchmarks were computed for all trials and those trials with an explicit cognitive behavior therapy protocol. In no case did the ES estimates for the untreated control deviate from 0. The average ES across outcome domains for the treatment arms was approximately 0.35. These benchmarks may be used to assess the effectiveness of routine clinical treatments for chronic pain. The application of these data and the limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:23806654

Fenton, Grania; Morley, Stephen

2013-06-24

211

Toward a Positive Military Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the role of positive psychology–based research and application in advancing the science and practice of military psychology. The role of positive psychology in military training, clinical application, and enhancing the welfare and well-being of military spouses and children is reviewed. Early research suggests that positive psychology–derived constructs may offer substantial advances across the spectrum of military psychology.

Michael D. Matthews

2008-01-01

212

[Psychological evaluation of patients by state-trait anxiety inventory in pain clinic].  

PubMed

In 84 outpatients who visited our pain clinic, we evaluated their anxiety before the first examination, using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. State anxiety scores were high in all the patients regardless of their underlying disease. Trait anxiety scores in patients with chronic pain such as postherpetic neuralgia or cervic-shoulder-hand syndrome were higher than in patients with facial nerve palsy, sudden hearing loss or herpetic pain. This study indicates that psychosomatic management is mandatory for patients with chronic pain. PMID:7815700

Fukuda, H; Kasuda, H; Nakaigawa, Y; Nemoto, K; Shimizu, R

1994-10-01

213

Applying psychological theories to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of placing preventive fissure sealants  

PubMed Central

Background Psychological models are used to understand and predict behaviour in a wide range of settings, but have not been consistently applied to health professional behaviours, and the contribution of differing theories is not clear. This study explored the usefulness of a range of models to predict an evidence-based behaviour -- the placing of fissure sealants. Methods Measures were collected by postal questionnaire from a random sample of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Scotland. Outcomes were behavioural simulation (scenario decision-making), and behavioural intention. Predictor variables were from the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Common Sense Self-regulation Model (CS-SRM), Operant Learning Theory (OLT), Implementation Intention (II), Stage Model, and knowledge (a non-theoretical construct). Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the predictive value of each theoretical model individually. Significant constructs from all theories were then entered into a 'cross theory' stepwise regression analysis to investigate their combined predictive value Results Behavioural simulation - theory level variance explained was: TPB 31%; SCT 29%; II 7%; OLT 30%. Neither CS-SRM nor stage explained significant variance. In the cross theory analysis, habit (OLT), timeline acute (CS-SRM), and outcome expectancy (SCT) entered the equation, together explaining 38% of the variance. Behavioural intention - theory level variance explained was: TPB 30%; SCT 24%; OLT 58%, CS-SRM 27%. GDPs in the action stage had significantly higher intention to place fissure sealants. In the cross theory analysis, habit (OLT) and attitude (TPB) entered the equation, together explaining 68% of the variance in intention. Summary The study provides evidence that psychological models can be useful in understanding and predicting clinical behaviour. Taking a theory-based approach enables the creation of a replicable methodology for identifying factors that may predict clinical behaviour and so provide possible targets for knowledge translation interventions. Results suggest that more evidence-based behaviour may be achieved by influencing beliefs about the positive outcomes of placing fissure sealants and building a habit of placing them as part of patient management. However a number of conceptual and methodological challenges remain.

2010-01-01

214

Science and pseudoscience in the development of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing: implications for clinical psychology.  

PubMed

The enormous popularity recently achieved by Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) as a treatment for anxiety disorders appears to have greatly outstripped the evidence for its efficacy from controlled research studies. The disparity raises disturbing questions concerning EMDR's aggressive commercial promotion and its rapid acceptance among practitioners. In this article, we: (1) summarize the evidence concerning EMDR's efficacy; (2) describe the dissemination and promotion of EMDR; (3) delineate the features of pseudoscience and explicate their relevance to EMDR; (4) describe the pseudoscientific marketing practices used to promote EMDR; (5) analyze factors contributing to the acceptance of EMDR by professional psychologists; and (6) discuss practical considerations for professional psychologists regarding the adoption of EMDR into professional practice. We argue that EMDR provides an excellent vehicle for illustrating the differences between scientific and pseudoscientific therapeutic techniques. Such distinctions are of critical importance for clinical psychologists who intend to base their practice on the best available research. PMID:11098395

Herbert, J D; Lilienfeld, S O; Lohr, J M; Montgomery, R W; O'Donohue, W T; Rosen, G M; Tolin, D F

2000-11-01

215

A case study of amnion rupture sequence with acalvaria, blindness, and clefting: clinical and psychological profiles.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to report the case of a 10-year-old girl born with anophthalmia, bilateral oblique facial clefts, and missing scalp and bones over the temporal and parietal areas of the cranial vault bilaterally. Early amnion rupture seems to be the most probable cause of this rare combination of anomalies. Because no similar case has been reported in the literature so far, we describe here the clinical and psychosocial history of this unusual patient, who has been able to live the intellectually and socially normal life of a blind child in spite of the major craniofacial deformities. The already completed and possible future therapeutic strategies are discussed. PMID:15167227

Hukki, Jyri; Balan, Polina; Ceponiene, Rita; Kantola-Sorsa, Elina; Saarinen, Pia; Wikstrom, Heidi

2004-03-01

216

Applying psychological theories to evidence-based clinical practice: Identifying factors predictive of managing upper respiratory tract infections without antibiotics  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Psychological models can be used to understand and predict behaviour in a wide range of settings. However, they have not been consistently applied to health professional behaviours, and the contribution of differing theories is not clear. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of a range of psychological theories to predict health professional behaviour relating to

Martin P Eccles; Jeremy M Grimshaw; Marie Johnston; Nick Steen; Nigel B Pitts; Ruth Thomas; Elizabeth Glidewell; Graeme Maclennan; Debbie Bonetti; Anne Walker

2007-01-01

217

Sport psychology: psychologic issues and applications.  

PubMed

This article has briefly highlighted the area of sport psychology as it relates to performance psychology skills (mental training), including a historical overview and current topics overview. The use of mental training skills may be of interest to the practicing physical medicine and rehabilitation professional in the treatment of his or her patients. It is important that the physical medicine professional recognize what sport or performance psychology represents within the paradigm of psychologic interventions. Referring to an individual based on his or her training (licensed psychologist versus mental training consultant) is essential for the appropriate management of psychologic issues related to performance. The issues related to the psychologic rehabilitation of the injured athlete are of importance to the medical staff; the overview of affective responses can assist in understanding the normal and adaptive responses of the injured athlete. Finally, a brief description of a psychologist's role within a sports medicine and rehabilitation practice is presented. The psychologic issues that are present in the world of sport and elite performance are numerous, and not all are mentioned in this article. Issues of eating disorders, substance abuse, and psychologic health with athletes should be further explored within the physical medicine and rehabilitation discipline as well as in the sports medicine discipline. The ever-evolving psychologic dynamics of individuals involved in sport and elite performance are intriguing and unique. A specialized knowledge base, training, and experience in providing psychologic services are required to treat this unique population. Counseling and clinical issues of the athlete and elite performer require further attention in the realm of psychologic interventions, including further exploration of the efficacy of interventions for performance enhancement. The field of applied sport psychology may offer the physical medicine professional a unique perspective into the care of patients who are athletes and elite performers. PMID:16952750

Carr, Christopher M

2006-08-01

218

Senior house officers' work related stressors, psychological distress, and confidence in performing clinical tasks in accident and emergency: a questionnaire study.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between accident and emergency senior house officers' psychological distress and confidence in performing clinical tasks and to describe work related stressors. DESIGN: Questionnaire survey with data collected at four points during senior house officers' six month attachment to accident and emergency departments. SUBJECTS: 171 newly appointed accident and emergency senior house officers from 27 hospitals in the South Thames region. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Psychological distress measured with a 25 item questionnaire; confidence in performing a range of 35 clinical and practical activities (visual analogue scales); reported consultation stress factors, other work related stressors, and personal stressors. RESULTS: Overall confidence scores in carrying out a range of clinical and practical activities increased significantly between the end of the first and the end of the fourth month (Z = -6.05, P < 0.001). Senior house officers with higher psychological distress scores at the end of their first and fourth month had significantly lower confidence scores (Z = -3.20, P < 0.001; Z = -1.90, P < 0.05). Senior house officers with lower increases in confidence between the first and fourth month had significantly higher distress than those with greater increases (Z = -2.62, P < 0.001). Factors identified as causing stress during consultations included difficulties with communication, certain clinical presentations, and department organisational factors (particularly the intensity of workload). CONCLUSIONS: Psychological distress is linked to confidence in senior house officers. This supports the need to monitor and build confidence in senior house officers and to address work related stressors. Additional communication skills training needs to be considered.

Williams, S.; Dale, J.; Glucksman, E.; Wellesley, A.

1997-01-01

219

The Representation of Applied Psychology Areas in Introductory Psychology Textbooks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many psychology majors indicate helping others as a reason for majoring in psychology, yet many enter positions not closely related to the field. This discrepancy may be due to a lack of student knowledge of the applied areas of psychology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the coverage of clinical, counseling,…

Haselhuhn, Charlotte W.; Clopton, Kerri L.

2008-01-01

220

Psychological Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses three articles of Mr. McDougall, on the subject of psychological method. The articles accomplish their purpose, if by method we mean (with Mr. McDougall) not so much ways and means of going to work in psychology, but the method of conceiving the scope of psychology and of psychological processes. By their contention that there can be \\

W. Caldwell

1899-01-01

221

Assessing Student Interest and Familiarity with Professional Psychology Specialty Areas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined undergraduate psychology students' (N = 83) self-reported interest in and familiarity with five specialty areas in professional psychology: counseling psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, forensic psychology, and criminal profiling. Results suggest that although students are quite interested in careers…

Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Wiggins, Tina L.; Ryan, Joseph J.

2006-01-01

222

Assessing Student Interest and Familiarity with Professional Psychology Specialty Areas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study examined undergraduate psychology students' (N = 83) self-reported interest in and familiarity with five specialty areas in professional psychology: counseling psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, forensic psychology, and criminal profiling. Results suggest that although students are quite interested in careers…

Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Wiggins, Tina L.; Ryan, Joseph J.

2006-01-01

223

The clinical obesity maintenance model: an integration of psychological constructs including mood, emotional regulation, disordered overeating, habitual cluster behaviours, health literacy and cognitive function.  

PubMed

Psychological distress and deficits in executive functioning are likely to be important barriers to effective weight loss maintenance. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, in the light of recent evidence in the fields of neuropsychology and obesity, particularly on the deficits in the executive function in overweight and obese individuals, a conceptual and theoretical framework of obesity maintenance is introduced by way of a clinical obesity maintenance model (COMM). It is argued that psychological variables, that of habitual cluster Behaviors, emotional dysregulation, mood, and health literacy, interact with executive functioning and impact on the overeating/binge eating behaviors of obese individuals. Second, cognizant of this model, it is argued that the focus of obesity management should be extended to include a broader range of maintaining mechanisms, including but not limited to cognitive deficits. Finally, a discussion on potential future directions in research and practice using the COMM is provided. PMID:23710346

Raman, Jayanthi; Smith, Evelyn; Hay, Phillipa

2013-02-14

224

Developmental Course of Deprivation-Specific Psychological Patterns: Early Manifestations, Persistence to Age 15, and Clinical Features  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In chapter IV, the authors focused on their findings on the developmental course of deprivation-specific psychological patterns (DSPs). The authors rediscussed the syndrome concept in the light of two main considerations. First, the findings indicated substantial overlap among the four postulated DSPs at 15 years including CI and I/O before…

Kreppner, Jana; Kumsta, Robert; Rutter, Michael; Beckett, Celia; Castle, Jennifer; Stevens, Suzanne; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.

2010-01-01

225

Positive Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

Peterson, Christopher

2009-01-01

226

Positive Psychology \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Positive psychology is the study of human strength, resilience, and optimal human functioning. The goal of positive psychology is to make people happier by understanding and building positive emotion, gratification and meaning. The constructs of happiness, hope, optimism, well-being, resilience and flow are examined in how they relate to positive psychology. The \\

Andrew W Fleming

2006-01-01

227

Forensic Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citation: Brigham, J., & Grisso, T. (2003). Forensic Psychology. In D.K. Friedheim & I.B. Weiner (eds.), Comprehensive handbook of psychology. Vol. 1: The history of psychology, (pp. 391-411). New York: John Wiley and Sons. ISBN 0471383201, 9780471383208.\\u000aLimited preview available via Google Books.

John C. Brigham; Thomas Grisso

2003-01-01

228

Children's perceptions of psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveyed various aspects of 1,314 5th–22th grade children's perceptions concerning what psychologists do and their attraction to the field of psychology. It was found that children strongly conceive of psychology as a therapeutic enterprise, with a minority of Ss citing the research roles of the psychologist. A factor analysis of attraction ratings also revealed this clinical emphasis. Grade trends were

Stephen J. Dollinger; Mark H. Thelen

1978-01-01

229

Medical psychology: Psychology's neglected child  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explores the field of medicine as an area for psychological inquiry. Evidence for the growth of medical psychology is presented, though relatively few psychologists are engaged in its pursuit. Medical topics of interest to psychologists are discussed, and the importance of more rigorous research methodologies being used in this area is stressed. It is suggested that psychology and medicine need

Michael J. Asken

1975-01-01

230

Características da população infantil atendida em triagem no período de 2000 a 2002 numa clínica-escola Characteristics of children seen at a University Psychology clinic from 2000 to 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the Psychology Applied Center experience from Faculdade de Psicologia da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia. It has aimed to identify, from 2000 to 2002 clinical infant data, children's epidemiological and clinical characteristics, considering reception process. Important aspects from the 139 cases had been analyzed in terms of incidence (percentages) and revised trough case supervision sessions. These analysis have

Sandra Augusta de MELO; Cristine Castro; Silva PERFEITO

231

20 CFR 416.1016 - Medical or psychological consultants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...psychologist at the independent practice level of psychology by the State in which he or she practices...2)(i) Possesses a doctorate degree in psychology from a program in clinical psychology of an educational institution...

2009-04-01

232

20 CFR 416.1016 - Medical or psychological consultants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...psychologist at the independent practice level of psychology by the State in which he or she practices...2)(i) Possesses a doctorate degree in psychology from a program in clinical psychology of an educational institution...

2010-04-01

233

20 CFR 404.1616 - Medical or psychological consultants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...psychologist at the independent practice level of psychology by the State in which he or she practices...2)(i) Possesses a doctorate degree in psychology from a program in clinical psychology of an educational institution...

2009-04-01

234

20 CFR 404.1616 - Medical or psychological consultants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...psychologist at the independent practice level of psychology by the State in which he or she practices...2)(i) Possesses a doctorate degree in psychology from a program in clinical psychology of an educational institution...

2010-04-01

235

Study protocol: a dissemination trial of computerized psychological treatment for depression and alcohol/other drug use comorbidity in an Australian clinical service  

PubMed Central

Background The rise of the internet and related technologies has significant implications for the treatment of complex health problems, including the combination of depression and alcohol/other drug (AOD) misuse. To date, no research exists to test the real world uptake of internet and computer-delivered treatment programs in clinical practice. This study is important, as it is the first to examine the adoption of the SHADE treatment program, a DVD-based psychological treatment for depression and AOD use comorbidity, by clinicians working in a publicly-funded AOD clinical service. The study protocol that follows describes the methodology of this dissemination trial. Methods/design 19 clinicians within an AOD service on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia, will be recruited to the trial. Consenting clinicians will participate in a baseline focus group discussion designed to explore their experiences and perceived barriers to adopting innovation in their clinical practice. Computer comfort and openness to innovation will also be assessed. Throughout the trial, current, new and wait-list clients will be referred to the research program via the clinical service, which will involve clients completing a baseline and 15-week follow-up clinical assessment with independent research assistants, comprising a range of mental health and AOD measures. Clinicians will also complete session checklists following each clinical session with a client, outlining the extent to which the SHADE computer program was used. Therapeutic alliance will be measured at intake and discharge from both the clinician and client perspectives. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the factors associated with the adoption of an innovative, computer-delivered evidence-based treatment program, SHADE, by clinicians working in an AOD service. The results will contribute to the development of a model of dissemination of SHADE, which could be applied to a range of technological innovations. Clinical trials registry Australian Clinical Trial Registration Number: ACTRN12611000382976.

2012-01-01

236

Empowerment in Mainstream Psychology: Legitimacy, Obstacles, and Possibilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hitherto, the concept of empowerment has been largely denied a place of prominence in both mainstream academic and applied psychology. It is argued that if this concept is to expand beyond the field of community psychology into more traditional areas of psychology, such as social, personality, clinical and school psychology, its moral and psychological foundations should be more clearly articulated.

ISAAC PRILLELTENSKY

1994-01-01

237

Psychological Interventions in Dermatology  

PubMed Central

The objective of this paper is to introduce and emphasize the importance of psychological interventions for those with dermatological conditions. In keeping with the current literature, the author envisages a two-tier approach in the provision of such psychological interventions. Firstly, most patients with dermatology conditions may not require psychological change. Instead, they could be approached with effective doctor–patient communication skills, within a context of empathy and positive regard. At the second tier, however, based on the clinical interview, some patients may require varying degrees of psychological change in order to better manage their illness. In such a context, a dermatologist with training in psychotherapy would be required. In the absence of such a person, the patient may be referred to a psychologist or another mental health professional trained in psychotherapy.

de Zoysa, Piyanjali

2013-01-01

238

[Political psychology].  

PubMed

In Hungary one can mostly find references to the psychological processes of politics in the writings of publicists, public opinion pollsters, philosophers, social psychologists, and political analysts. It would be still important if not only legal scientists focusing on political institutions or sociologist-politologists concentrating on social structures could analyse the psychological aspects of political processes; but one could also do so through the application of the methods of political psychology. The authors review the history of political psychology, its position vis-à-vis other fields of science and the essential interfaces through which this field of science, which is still to be discovered in Hungary, connects to other social sciences. As far as its methodology comprising psycho-biographical analyses, questionnaire-based queries, cognitive mapping of interviews and statements are concerned, it is identical with the psychiatric tools of medical sciences. In the next part of this paper, the focus is shifted to the essence and contents of political psychology. Group dynamics properties, voters' attitudes, leaders' personalities and the behavioural patterns demonstrated by them in different political situations, authoritativeness, games, and charisma are all essential components of political psychology, which mostly analyses psychological-psychiatric processes and also involves medical sciences by relying on cognitive and behavioural sciences. This paper describes political psychology, which is basically part of social sciences, still, being an interdisciplinary science, has several ties to medical sciences through psychological and psychiatric aspects. PMID:23587541

Resch, Mária; Bella, Tamás

2013-04-21

239

Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology  

PubMed Central

Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism.

Staats, Arthur W.

1994-01-01

240

Comparative psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comments on Notes on the Psychic Development of the Young White Rat, by Willard S. Small (American Journal of Psychology, Vol. XI., No. I, Oct., 1899. Pp. 80-100; ; An Experimental Study of the Mental Processes of the Rat, by Willard S. Small (American Journal of Psychology, Vol. XI., No. 2, Jan., 1900. Pp. 133-165; ; Notes on the Individual

Edward Thorndike

1900-01-01

241

Psychological Profiling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article concerns itself with the four factors in preparing psychological profiles of perpetrators of crimes. The author provides a brief background of psychological profiling and its application to biographical studies and law enforcement. The author's perspective is that of a psychoanalytical orientation. He emphasizes the need to integrate neurological understanding when preparing the profile of a suspect.

Ronald N. Turco

1990-01-01

242

Applying psychological theories to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of lumbar spine x-ray for low back pain in UK primary care practice  

PubMed Central

Background Psychological models predict behaviour in a wide range of settings. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of a range of psychological models to predict the health professional behaviour 'referral for lumbar spine x-ray in patients presenting with low back pain' by UK primary care physicians. Methods Psychological measures were collected by postal questionnaire survey from a random sample of primary care physicians in Scotland and north England. The outcome measures were clinical behaviour (referral rates for lumbar spine x-rays), behavioural simulation (lumbar spine x-ray referral decisions based upon scenarios), and behavioural intention (general intention to refer for lumbar spine x-rays in patients with low back pain). Explanatory variables were the constructs within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Common Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM), Operant Learning Theory (OLT), Implementation Intention (II), Weinstein's Stage Model termed the Precaution Adoption Process (PAP), and knowledge. For each of the outcome measures, a generalised linear model was used to examine the predictive value of each theory individually. Linear regression was used for the intention and simulation outcomes, and negative binomial regression was used for the behaviour outcome. Following this 'theory level' analysis, a 'cross-theoretical construct' analysis was conducted to investigate the combined predictive value of all individual constructs across theories. Results Constructs from TPB, SCT, CS-SRM, and OLT predicted behaviour; however, the theoretical models did not fit the data well. When predicting behavioural simulation, the proportion of variance explained by individual theories was TPB 11.6%, SCT 12.1%, OLT 8.1%, and II 1.5% of the variance, and in the cross-theory analysis constructs from TPB, CS-SRM and II explained 16.5% of the variance in simulated behaviours. When predicting intention, the proportion of variance explained by individual theories was TPB 25.0%, SCT 21.5%, CS-SRM 11.3%, OLT 26.3%, PAP 2.6%, and knowledge 2.3%, and in the cross-theory analysis constructs from TPB, SCT, CS-SRM, and OLT explained 33.5% variance in intention. Together these results suggest that physicians' beliefs about consequences and beliefs about capabilities are likely determinants of lumbar spine x-ray referrals. Conclusions The study provides evidence that taking a theory-based approach enables the creation of a replicable methodology for identifying factors that predict clinical behaviour. However, a number of conceptual and methodological challenges remain.

2011-01-01

243

HOSPITAL PSYCHOLOGY IN CANADA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Canadian hospital psychology is examined in terms of the existing organizational models, professional practices, academic activities, and professional orientations of hospital psychologists. The survey reveals that psychologists are active clinically and academically in Canadian hospitals in a wide variety of health care areas in addition to traditional mental health areas. In the majority of hospitals, psychologists are organized in independent

JOHN L. ARNETT; ROBERT M. MARTIN; DAVID L. STREINER; JOHN T. GOODMAN

1987-01-01

244

Pre-hospital discharge testing of defibrillator without anesthesia: effects on psychological symptoms during clinical follow-up.  

PubMed

Objective After the implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), patients often fear therapeutic shock. The extent to which the experience of pre-hospital discharge (PHD) testing without anesthesia after ICD implantation, under observation by a physician, affects shock-related anxiety symptoms on follow-up has not been investigated as yet. Methods In a prospective, randomized controlled trial, 44 patients with a primary prevention indication for an ICD were randomly assigned to experience PHD testing without anesthesia (n = 23) or with anesthesia (n = 21). Patients were longitudinally evaluated before (T1), shortly after (T2), and 3 months after (T3) PHD testing. During the respective PHD testings, the course of patients' serum cortisol release was measured. Results During PHD testing, patients without anesthesia showed a significantly higher serum cortisol release than patients with anesthesia (F(4,152) = 22.227, p < .001). Patients who experienced PHD testing without anesthesia felt significantly safer with the ICD (U = 165.000, p = .040), would significantly more often recommend other patients to undergo PHD testing without anesthesia (?(2) = 12.013, p = .002), and showed significantly lower levels of general shock-related anxiety shortly afterward (F(1,42) = 6.327, p = .02) and 3 months after PHD testing (F(1,41) = 8.603, p = .005). Conclusions The implementation of PHD testing without anesthesia is associated with lower anxiety concerning therapeutic shock. Patients should be advised about the effects of PHD testing without anesthesia on their psychological well-being in the long run. PMID:23975945

Petrowski, Katja; Wintermann, Gloria-Beatrice; Petzold, Christian; Strasser, Ruth H; Guenther, Michael

2013-08-24

245

Virtual Reality as Assessment Tool in Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual environments (VEs), offering a new human-computer interaction paradigm, have attracted much attention in clinical psychology, especially in the treatment of phobias. However, a possible new application of VR in psychology is as assessment tool: VEs can be considered as an highly sophisticated form of adaptive testing. This chapter describes the context of current psychological assessment and underlines possible advantages

Giuseppe Riva

1998-01-01

246

Personal construct psychology and personal selling performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proposes an alternative approach to understanding personal selling performance based on personal construct psychology, a cognitively based personality paradigm, originally formulated in clinical psychology by George Kelly. Explains how personal construct psychology theory (PCT), which reflects a constructivist epistemology, provides a conceptual framework for understanding and predicting sales performance. Demonstrates how PCT can be integrated with existing theoretical models of

Richard E. Plank; Joel N. Greene

1996-01-01

247

Test Review: Bracken, B. A., & Keith, L. K. (2004). "Clinical Assessment of Behavior." Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Clinical Assessment of Behavior (CAB) is designed to assess both adaptive and problematic behaviors of children and adolescents from age 2 to 18 years. It can be individually or group administered, measures behaviors in different contexts, and includes both parent and teacher forms. The test was developed to be consistent with current…

Beran, Tanya N.

2006-01-01

248

Substance misuse in depression and bipolar disorder: a review of psychological interventions and considerations for clinical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has documented high levels of co-morbidity between mental illness and substance misuse. This essay explores clinical practice issues relating to ‘dual diagnosis’ substance misuse in bipolar disorder and depression. Such misuse is common in this population, and presents a number of challenges to clinicians. Those with substance misuse have more severe symptoms and an increased risk of relapse. Assessment

Thomas H. Richardson

2012-01-01

249

Test Reviews: Bracken, B. A., & Howell, K. (2004). "Clinical Assessment of Depression." Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the authors review the Clinical Assessment of Depression (CAD), a 50-item self-report measure of depressive symptoms designed for children, adolescents, adults, and elderly adults from 8 to 79 years of age. Purporting to be sensitive to depressive symptomatology across the lifespan, the test items were written to reflect the…

Aghakhani, Anoosha; Chan, Eric K.

2007-01-01

250

Sport Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sport psychology is defined in terms of human behavior in athletic situations. The psychosocial cross-cultural setting provides a model for studying trait and state psychosocial attributes and suggests issues and concerns for further study. (JMF)

Krotee, March L.

1980-01-01

251

Amateur Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comments on a recent article in The Reporter (Feb. 16, 1962), where Marya Mannes, a staff writer of this publication, praises Joyce Brothers for her ability to answer complex psychological problems in simple language \\

W. G. Eliasberg

1962-01-01

252

[Psychological harassment].  

PubMed

Two types of harassment are distinguished: sexual and psychological. In the private sector, according to French labour laws and the penal code, psychological harassment is actionable. It is up to the employer to prove the absence of harassment. The sanctions incurred can be up to 5 years imprisonment and a 150,000 euro fine and various measures of compensation for damages can be envisaged. PMID:23672157

Puech, Paloma; Pitcho, Benjamin

2013-04-01

253

A Conceptual and Empirical Review of the Meaning, Measurement, Development, and Teaching of Intervention Competence in Clinical Psychology  

PubMed Central

Through the course of this paper we discuss several fundamental issues related to the intervention competence of psychologists. Following definitional clarification and proposals for more strictly distinguishing competence from adherence, we interpret Dreyfus and Dreyfus’s (1986) five stage theory of competence development (from novice to expert) within a strictly clinical framework. Existing methods of competence assessment are then evaluated, and we argue for the use of new and multiple assessment modalities. Next, we utilize the previous sections as a foundation to propose methods for training and evaluating competent psychologists. Lastly, we discuss several potential impediments to large scale competence assessment and education, such as the heterogeneity of therapeutic orientations and what could be termed a lack of transparency in clinical training.

Barber, Jacques P.

2009-01-01

254

A Second Life for eHealth: Prospects for the Use of 3-D Virtual Worlds in Clinical Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present paper is to describe the role played by three-dimensional (3-D) virtual worlds in eHealth applications, addressing some potential advantages and issues related to the use of this emerging medium in clinical practice. Due to the enormous diffusion of the World Wide Web (WWW), telepsychology, and telehealth in general, have become accepted and validated methods for

Alessandra Gorini; Andrea Gaggioli; Cinzia Vigna; Giuseppe Riva

2008-01-01

255

A Second Life for eHealth: Prospects for the Use of 3-D Virtual Worlds in Clinical Psychology  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present paper is to describe the role played by three-dimensional (3-D) virtual worlds in eHealth applications, addressing some potential advantages and issues related to the use of this emerging medium in clinical practice. Due to the enormous diffusion of the World Wide Web (WWW), telepsychology, and telehealth in general, have become accepted and validated methods for the treatment of many different health care concerns. The introduction of the Web 2.0 has facilitated the development of new forms of collaborative interaction between multiple users based on 3-D virtual worlds. This paper describes the development and implementation of a form of tailored immersive e-therapy called p-health whose key factor is interreality, that is, the creation of a hybrid augmented experience merging physical and virtual worlds. We suggest that compared with conventional telehealth applications such as emails, chat, and videoconferences, the interaction between real and 3-D virtual worlds may convey greater feelings of presence, facilitate the clinical communication process, positively influence group processes and cohesiveness in group-based therapies, and foster higher levels of interpersonal trust between therapists and patients. However, challenges related to the potentially addictive nature of such virtual worlds and questions related to privacy and personal safety will also be discussed.

Gaggioli, Andrea; Vigna, Cinzia; Riva, Giuseppe

2008-01-01

256

A Clinical-EEG Study of Sleepiness and Psychological Symptoms in Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy Patients Treated with Lacosamide  

PubMed Central

Our aim was to evaluate the EEG and clinical modifications induced by the new antiepileptic drug lacosamide (LCM) in patients with epilepsy. We evaluated 10 patients affected by focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy in which LCM (mean 250?mg/day) was added to the preexisting antiepileptic therapy, which was left unmodified. Morning waking EEG recording was performed before (t0) and at 6 months (t1) after starting LCM. At t0 and t1, patients were also administered questionnaires evaluating mood, anxiety, sleep, sleepiness, and fatigue (Beck Depression Inventory; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Y1 and Y2; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; Epworth Sleepiness Scale; Fatigue Severity Scale). We performed a quantitative analysis of EEG interictal abnormalities and background EEG power spectrum analysis. LCM as an add-on did not significantly affect anxiety, depression, sleepiness, sleep quality, and fatigue scales. Similarly, adding LCM to preexisting therapy did not modify significantly patient EEGs in terms of absolute power, relative power, mean frequency, and interictal abnormalities occurrence. In conclusion, in this small cohort of patients, we confirmed that LCM as an add-on does not affect subjective parameters which play a role, among others, in therapy tolerability, and our clinical impression was further supported by evaluation of EEG spectral analysis.

Giorgi, Filippo S.; Pizzanelli, Chiara; Pelliccia, Veronica; Di Coscio, Elisa; Maestri, Michelangelo; Iacopini, Elena; Iudice, Alfonso; Bonanni, Enrica

2013-01-01

257

Psychological maltreatment.  

PubMed

Psychological or emotional maltreatment of children may be the most challenging and prevalent form of child abuse and neglect. Caregiver behaviors include acts of omission (ignoring need for social interactions) or commission (spurning, terrorizing); may be verbal or nonverbal, active or passive, and with or without intent to harm; and negatively affect the child's cognitive, social, emotional, and/or physical development. Psychological maltreatment has been linked with disorders of attachment, developmental and educational problems, socialization problems, disruptive behavior, and later psychopathology. Although no evidence-based interventions that can prevent psychological maltreatment have been identified to date, it is possible that interventions shown to be effective in reducing overall types of child maltreatment, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, may have a role to play. Furthermore, prevention before occurrence will require both the use of universal interventions aimed at promoting the type of parenting that is now recognized to be necessary for optimal child development, alongside the use of targeted interventions directed at improving parental sensitivity to a child's cues during infancy and later parent-child interactions. Intervention should, first and foremost, focus on a thorough assessment and ensuring the child's safety. Potentially effective treatments include cognitive behavioral parenting programs and other psychotherapeutic interventions. The high prevalence of psychological abuse in advanced Western societies, along with the serious consequences, point to the importance of effective management. Pediatricians should be alert to the occurrence of psychological maltreatment and identify ways to support families who have risk indicators for, or evidence of, this problem. PMID:22848125

Hibbard, Roberta; Barlow, Jane; Macmillan, Harriet

2012-07-30

258

Can the Theory of Planned Behavior Help Explain Men's Psychological Help-Seeking? Evidence for a Mediation Effect and Clinical Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior findings show that men as a group seek psychological help at relatively low rates. The current study sought to provide preliminary evidence that Ajzen's (1991) Theory of Planned Behavior can integrate prior research findings and help explain men's psychological help-seeking by testing a mediation model among a young adult sample. Structural equation modeling was utilized to investigate the impact

Joshua P. Smith; Giao Q. Tran; Rachel D. Thompson

2008-01-01

259

Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of School Psychology: Findings and Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the fund and source of knowledge that undergraduate students possess about school psychology. Results indicated that although undergraduate students rated their perceived knowledge of school psychology significantly higher than clinical psychology, the mean ratings for both disciplines were low. Both psychology and education majors…

Gilman, Rich; Handwerk, Michael L.

2001-01-01

260

The Competency Movement Within Psychology: An Historical Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors provide a recitation of events in recent years that document an increased focus on competency-based models of education, training, and assessment in professional psychology, particularly clinical, counseling, and school psychology, based on the work of the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Task Force on Assessment of Competence in Professional Psychology. The article begins with the inclusion of competencies as

Nancy J. Rubin; Muriel Bebeau; Irene W. Leigh; James W. Lichtenberg; Paul D. Nelson; Sanford Portnoy; I. Leon Smith; Nadine J. Kaslow

2007-01-01

261

Counseling Psychology in Israel: Successful Accomplishments of a Nonexistent Specialty  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the status of counseling psychology in Israel in the context of its unique characteristics. Despite the respected status of psychology as a profession in Israel and its overall acceptance and involvement in numerous social issues, counseling psychology as a separate specialty is nonexistent, especially because of resistance to the clinical psychology specialty. In addition to general subjects

Azy Barak; G. Golan

2000-01-01

262

New Models of Care for Psychology in Canada's Health Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychological services in health care have expanded beyond traditional areas of mental health to the full spectrum of health disorders, as research has increasingly shown the importance of psychological processes in health outcomes. Behavioural and psychological factors can contribute to the onset, course, or severity of many chronic diseases, and psychology has much to offer with clinically and cost-effective interventions.

Lesley A. Graff; George Kaoukis; Norah Vincent; Andrea Piotrowski; Jason Ediger

2012-01-01

263

[Psychological debriefing].  

PubMed

Diagnostic criteria for stress reactions and adjustment disorders are summarized. Existing psychological treatments are outlined with a focus on evidence-based methods, and recommendations for treatment are described. The conclusion is that there is no evidence for the effect of psychological debriefing or other professional treatment in the immediate aftermath of traumatic events. On the other hand, cognitive behavioural therapy, EMDR and similar methods with focus on exposure can be recommended, both as a preventive strategy and for patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:19284905

Arendt, Mikkel; Rosenberg, Raben

2009-02-16

264

Family-based associations in measures of psychological distress and quality of life in a cardiac screening clinic for inheritable cardiac diseases: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Family-based cardiac screening programmes for persons at risk for genetic cardiac diseases are now recommended. However, the psychological wellbeing and health related quality of life (QoL) of such screened patients is poorly understood, especially in younger patients. We sought to examine wellbeing and QoL in a representative group of adults aged 16 and over in a dedicated family cardiac screening clinic. Methods Prospective survey of consecutive consenting patients attending a cardiac screening clinic, over a 12 month period. Data were collected using two health measurement tools: the Short Form 12 (version 2) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), along with baseline demographic and screening visit-related data. The HADS and SF-12v.2 outcomes were compared by age group. Associations with a higher HADS score were examined using logistic regression, with multi-level modelling used to account for the family-based structure of the data. Results There was a study response rate of 86.6%, with n=334 patients providing valid HADS data (valid response rate 79.5%), and data on n=316 retained for analysis. One-fifth of patients were aged under 25 (n=61). Younger patients were less likely than older to describe significant depression on their HADS scale (p<0.0001), although there were overall no difference between the prevalence of a significant HADS score between the younger and older age groups (18.0% vs 20.0%, p=0.73). Significant positive associates of a higher HADS score were having lower educational attainment, being single or separated, and being closely related to the family proband. Between-family variance in anxiety and depression scores was greater than within-family variance. Conclusions High levels of anxiety were seen amongst patients attending a family-based cardiac screening clinic.Younger patients also had high rates of clinically significant anxiety. Higher levels of anxiety and depression tends to run in families, and this has implications for family screening and intervention programmes.

2013-01-01

265

UCSD-SDSU JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE SEMINAR: ASSESSMENT ISSUES Psychology 842 Fall 1999 Tuesdays: 4:00 pm - 6:40 pm DOCTORAL TRAINING FACILITY. Conference Room A.(upstairs)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with (a) general issues of measurement in Behavioral Medicine\\/Health Psychology and (b) specific measures that are relevant to topic areas. Both theoretical and practical aspects of measurement are covered so students receive a balanced view of the strengths and weaknesses of measures that are discussed. In most classes several measures of

James F. Sallis

266

EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Studying human behavior in the light of evolutionary theory involves studying the comparative evolutionary history of behaviors (phylogeny), the psychological machinery that generates them (mechanisms), and the adaptive value of that machinery in past reproductive competition (natural selection). To show the value of a phylogenetic perspective, I consider the ethology of emotional expression and the cladistics of primate social

Doug Jones

1999-01-01

267

Psychology Today.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the design of the University of Texas Austin's Seay Psychology and Child Development & Family Relationships building. With modern technique and materials, the Seay building adds to the established architectural language of the campus, offering a richly tactile structure and adjoining outdoor space embracing the tenets of successful…

Anderssen, Arthur

2003-01-01

268

Psychological Trivia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses trivia related to the history of psychology (with many fun examples such as: What are the names of Pavlov's original dogs?) and the relationship of this game to students learning how to use library resources (in attempts to answer such trivia questions), as well as the relevance of such knowledge.

Robert S. Harper

1970-01-01

269

Adult Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

Bischof, Ledford J.

270

Black Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contents of the present volume, designed to bring together in a single place writings by the new black psychologists and other black social and behavioral scientists, are organized in seven parts, as follows: Part I, "Black Psychology: Perspectives," includes articles by Cedric Clark, Wade W. Nobles, Doris P. Mosby, Joseph White, and William…

Jones, Reginald L., Ed.

271

Future Issues in Pediatric Psychology: Delphic Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a Delphic poll procedure, we surveyed pediatric psychologists who were established in either clinical practice or empirical research in pediatric psychology. Three rounds of expert responses were logically combined in order to identify domains of importance to the future of pediatric psychology and to determine to what extent research and clinical aims concur. Overall, researchers and clinicians did not

Keri J. Brown; Michael C. Roberts

2000-01-01

272

Treating psychological and phsyical disorders with VR  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present some applications that therapists have used with patients. Treating psychological disorders is one aspect of a larger application area of VR that we refer to as clinical virtual reality-the direct use of VR as a tool in treating or assessing psychological and physical disorders. Examples of clinical applications that use VR include treatment of phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder

Larry F. Hodges; Page Anderson; Grigore C. Burdea; H. G. Hoffmann; Barbara O. Rothbaum

2001-01-01

273

Applying psychological theories to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of lumbar spine x-ray for low back pain in UK primary care practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Psychological models predict behaviour in a wide range of settings. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of\\u000a a range of psychological models to predict the health professional behaviour 'referral for lumbar spine x-ray in patients\\u000a presenting with low back pain' by UK primary care physicians.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Psychological measures were collected by postal questionnaire survey from a random

Jeremy M Grimshaw; Martin P Eccles; Nick Steen; Marie Johnston; Nigel B Pitts; Liz Glidewell; Graeme Maclennan; Ruth Thomas; Debbie Bonetti; Anne Walker

2011-01-01

274

Darwinian theory, functionalism, and the first American psychological revolution.  

PubMed

American functionalist psychology constituted an effort to model scientific psychology on the successes of English evolutionary theory. In part it was a response to the stagnation of Wundt's psychological research program, which had been grounded in German experimental physiology. In part it was an attempt to make psychology more appealing within the highly pragmatic American context and to facilitate the application of psychology to domains outside of the scientific laboratory. Applications of psychology that emerged from the functionalist ethos included child and developmental psychology, clinical psychology, psychological testing, and industrial/vocational psychology. Functionalism was also the ground within which behaviorism rooted and grew into the dominant form of psychology through the middle of the 20th century. PMID:19203139

Green, Christopher D

275

Psychology of religion: perspectives from cultural psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

After a brief introduction, this paper tries to establish what type of psychology the psychology of religion is. Having introduced cultural psychology in general, some theories applicable in research on religion are presented, and some examples of cultural psychological research of religious phenomena are discussed.

Jacob A. Belzen

2010-01-01

276

Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university…

Rapport, Zachary

2011-01-01

277

20 CFR 404.1616 - Medical or psychological consultants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...State in which he or she practices; and (2)(i) Possesses a doctorate degree in psychology from a program in clinical psychology of an educational institution accredited by an organization recognized by the Council on Post-Secondary...

2013-04-01

278

20 CFR 416.1016 - Medical or psychological consultants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...State in which he or she practices; and (2)(i) Possesses a doctorate degree in psychology from a program in clinical psychology of an educational institution accredited by an organization recognized by the Council on Post-Secondary...

2013-04-01

279

Proceedings of the Current Trends in Army Medical Department Psychology Held at San Antonio, Texas on 8-12 November 1976.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Proceedings document the 1976 symposium presentations. Presentations dealt with: community psychology, regional consultants, administration, educational psychology, clinical biofeedback, behavioral toxicology, clinical neuropsychological, child and fa...

A. D. Mangelsdorff E. R. Worthington

1976-01-01

280

Psychology brings justice: the science of forensic psychology.  

PubMed

In this paper the focus is on one aspect of forensic psychology: the development of psychological instruments, a social psychological model and assessment procedures for evaluating the credibility of witnesses and police detainees during interviewing. Clinically grounded case work and research has impacted on police interviewing and practice, the admissibility of expert psychological testimony and the outcome of cases of miscarriage of justice. After describing the research that laid the foundations for advancement of scientific knowledge in this area, a brief review is presented of 22 high-profile murder cases where convictions based on confession evidence have been quashed on appeal between 1989 and 2001, often primarily on the basis of psychological evidence. The review of the cases demonstrates that psychological research and expert testimony in cases of disputed confessions have had a profound influence on the practice and ruling of the Court of Appeal for England and Wales and the British House of Lords. The cases presented in this paper show that it is wrong to assume that only persons with learning disability or those who are mentally ill make unreliable or false confessions. Personality factors, such as suggestibility, compliance, high trait anxiety and antisocial personality traits, are often important in rendering a confession unreliable. Future research needs to focus more on the role of personality factors in rendering the evidence of witnesses and suspects potentially unreliable. PMID:14654868

Gudjonsson, Gisli H

2003-01-01

281

Psychological Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are very prevalent in the general population, only the minority with IBS who seek treatment tend to be somewhat psychologically distressed. Four different classes of psychological treatment (brief psychodynamic psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, multicomponent cognitive–behavioral treatment regimens, and cognitive therapy) have each been shown to be superior to symptom monitoring or routine clinical medical

Edward B. Blanchard; Howard S. Malamood

1996-01-01

282

Casebook for Providers of Psychological Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses three cases involving quality assurance problems in clinical, industrial/organizational, and school psychology. Gives a statement of problem, applicable American Psychological Association policies, an interpretation of policy and principles in light of major questions posed by each case, and educative ramifications. (CMG)|

Committee on Professional Standards

1984-01-01

283

The Future of Psychology in Family Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychology has been integral to the field of family medicine since its inception as a medical specialty in the 1960s. Psychologists and other behavioral scientists contribute to family medicine in teaching clinical skills, in defining research questions, in developing research methodology, and in creating integrated physical\\/mental health care delivery systems. Future developments in the field of psychology in family medicine

Edward J. Callahan

1997-01-01

284

The Future of Psychology in Pain Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain treatment facilities have proliferated in recent years and psychology has enjoyed considerable success in the clinical and research arenas of pain management. However, changes in the health care environment present significant challenges to the future of psychology in pain management. This article discusses concerns in three important areas of pain treatment that psychologists must address if they are to

Roger B. Fillingim

1997-01-01

285

[Foucault's relevance for psychology].  

PubMed

In this article, we will attempt to address one of the most outstanding and influential thinkers of the past century: Michel Foucault, Philosopher, Psychologist, and above all (university) Professor. Michel Foucault is certainly versatile: Historian (of madness, clinical practice, imprisonment and sexuality), Archaeologist (of knowledge), Analyst (of discourse and power relations), Psychologist (genealogy of subjectivity) and Philosopher (of power and the subject). With this article, we eventually expect to offer some clues to be able to use the work of Michel Foucault for the problematization of Psychology. PMID:19861110

Pastor, Juan

2009-11-01

286

Social Psychology (Program Description)  

NSF Publications Database

... and Cognitive Sciences Social Psychology Description The Social Psychology Program at NSF ... emotion, social comparison and social influence, and the psychophysiological and neurophysiological ...

287

Purposive or Mechanical Psychology?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distinction between purposive and mechanical psychology cuts across both introspective and behavioristic psychology. Although behaviorism is actually mechanistic, a teleological behaviorism is theoretically possible. \\

W. McDougall

1923-01-01

288

Sport Psychology: Psychologic Issues and Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field of sport and exercise psychology explores the relation between psychologic factors and optimal performance. Sport psychology is slowly becoming an integral aspect of the holistic care of sports medicine and phys- ical rehabilitation patients. The physician specialist should have some knowledge regarding the various facets of sport and performance psychol- ogy, because many of these skills are relevant

Christopher M. Carr

2006-01-01

289

Sport Psychology in the Profession of Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, sport psychology has been identified with physical education; however, recent developments in the field toward applied issues have substantially expanded psychologists' interests and opportunities. Unfortunately, little is known about professional psychologists' involvement in sport psychology practice, research, and training. Therefore, a national survey of 500 male and 500 female psychologists (American Psychological Association Division 12members) was conducted. Based on

Trent A. Petrie; Nancy S. Diehl

1995-01-01

290

Educational Psychology’s First Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

Educational psychology mediates between the disciplines of psychology and education. Scholars have seldom agreed on a single definition of the field but have incorporated knowledge from several areas. The discipline of educational psychology was fostered primarily in the United States by such eminent psychologists as William James, Edward L. Thorndike, and James McKeen Cattell. Over the past century, several philosophical

Herbert J. Walberg; Geneva D. Haertel

1992-01-01

291

RECONSIDERING HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY’S BORDERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

By accepting psychology’s borders of concern, some histories of psychology tend to mute significant interfaces between research and society. The alternative approach of critical theory provides histories more sensitive to these relations. Critical theory’s conceptual problems with regress of explanation and with determining adequate criteria for evaluating differing historical narratives are considered. By using this approach, the study of history

David L. Krantz

2001-01-01

292

The State of the Psychology Health Service Provider Workforce  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of…

Michalski, Daniel S.; Kohout, Jessica L.

2011-01-01

293

Psychology, the Stalwart Profession, Faces New Challenges and Opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychology emerged as a profession following World War II, seemingly out of nowhere and against all odds, through the sheer grit and determination of its early clinical psychology doctoral pioneers, who recognized the economic importance of licensure and third-party reimbursement. After 2 or 3 decades of prosperity in which psychology became the nation's preeminent psychotherapy profession, professional psychologists ignored warnings

Nicholas A. Cummings

2006-01-01

294

The Place and Promise of Theory in Rehabilitation Psychology Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Although rehabilitation psychology is more focused on empirical evidence and clinical application than theory development, the authors argue for the primacy of theory and explain why theories are needed in and useful for rehabilitation psychology. Impediments to theory development are discussed, including the difficulties of applying psychological theories in multidisciplinary enterprises and the difficulties in developing a theory-driven research

Dana S. Dunn; Timothy R. Elliott

2008-01-01

295

The challenge of recruiting control groups. An experiment of different recruitment models in the control group of a clinical psychological postal survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recruitment of a large and reliable control group is a challenge in psychological survey based research. The effect of recruitment\\u000a styles and age on response-rate, data quality, and individual differences were investigated in a control group for a postal\\u000a survey of elderly bereaved people. This study was a direct reaction to the first recruitment attempt that had a 10% response

Maja O’Connor

2011-01-01

296

Suffering in Psychology: The Demoralization of Psychotherapeutic Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faced with a chasm of seemingly geological proportions, scientists and practitioners in clinical psychology and psychotherapy must confront the concealed moral conflicts that permeate the field. Our clinical practices reflect and contribute to the search for the good life in contemporary society. The application of the Enlightenment's view of science and rationality to clinical psychology has led to a demoralization

Ronald B. Miller

2005-01-01

297

Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

Cheung, Fanny M.

2012-01-01

298

Psychological progress in 1908  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews the state of psychology in 1908: Describes the developments in animal psychology and the mnemic conception of evolution proposed by Darwin; conflicting views on consciousness, especially its physical conditions had been proposed, and the chemical nature of nervous impulses, mechanism of audition, and cerebral localization were studied; assessing the requirements of experimental psychology was emphasized; the psychology of temperature

Edward Franklin Buchner

1909-01-01

299

Psychology and Mathematics Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Analyzes the relationship between cognitive psychology as a broad theoretical framework, and the psychology of mathematics education. Argues that mathematics education should not simply borrow from cognitive psychology; rather, it should provide its own psychological research problems, adapted investigation strategies, and adequate original…

Fischbein, Efraim

1999-01-01

300

Introduction to Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for community students interested in learning about psychology as a field of study, this module offers group and individual activities to involve the beginning student in research, experimentation and discussion. Unit 1, "What Is Psychology?," includes the use of animals in psychology, ethics, the history of psychology, an overview of…

Edwards, Lesley

301

Introduction to Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Designed for community students interested in learning about psychology as a field of study, this module offers group and individual activities to involve the beginning student in research, experimentation and discussion. Unit 1, "What Is Psychology?," includes the use of animals in psychology, ethics, the history of psychology, an overview of…

Edwards, Lesley

302

Psychology and social practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this address to the American Psychological Association, the President examines the relation of psychology to social practice, focusing primarily on the relation of psychology to education. The main point is whether the standpoint of psychological science, as a study of mechanism, is indifferent and opposed to the demands of education with its free interplay of personalities in their vital

John Dewey

1900-01-01

303

Psychological Implications of Cystic Fibrosis  

PubMed Central

A psychological and psychiatric study of 11 children with cystic fibrosis revealed major psychological problems in all of them. Among the parents of the majority of these children, marked psychopathology and gross marital discord were noted. Popular literature concerning cystic fibrosis had a negative effect on the child's attitude toward the disease. Virtually all of these patients showed a preoccupation with death. In this study, the necessity of psychiatric consultation as an integral part of current intensive treatment programs in cystic fibrosis clinics was demonstrated.

Lawler, Robert H.; Nakielny, Wladyslaw; Wright, Nancy A.

1966-01-01

304

Predictors of Psychology Graduate Student Interest in the Field of Developmental Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined predictors of interest in the future provision of clinical services to people with developmental disabilities by Canadian graduate students in psychology. Utilizing a cross-sectional survey, 458 psychology students from clinical, clinical neuropsychology, and counseling psychology programs from across Canada provided information on their interest in working with the population, their formal training experiences within the university, and

Michelle A. Viecili; Jennifer A. MacMullin; Jonathan A. Weiss; Yona Lunsky

2010-01-01

305

Predictors of Psychology Graduate Student Interest in the Field of Developmental Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined predictors of interest in the future provision of clinical services to people with developmental disabilities by Canadian graduate students in psychology. Utilizing a cross-sectional survey, 458 psychology students from clinical, clinical neuropsychology, and counseling psychology programs from across Canada provided…

Viecili, Michelle A.; MacMullin, Jennifer A.; Weiss, Jonathan A.; Lunsky, Yona

2010-01-01

306

Psychology in the ICT Era: Electronic Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive science is the scientific domain which studies, analyses, simulates and infers for various aspects, functions and\\u000a procedures of human mentality such as, thinking, logic, language, knowledge, memory, learning, perception and the ability\\u000a to solve problems. E-psychology is in a close relation with the cognitive science domain, but expands beyond it, as e-psychology\\u000a is the efficient convergence of Psychology and

Athanasios Drigas; Leyteris Koukianakis; Yannis Papagerasimou

2008-01-01

307

Health services and health care economics: the health psychology marketplace.  

PubMed

In an effort toward cost containment, the health care system in the United States has undergone radical changes in the last decade. These changes have influenced the delivery of clinical health psychology services. This article reviews several economic and marketing factors salient to the clinical health psychology marketplace. For example, these economic changes have placed greater emphasis on the need for cost-effectiveness and accountability in the health psychology field. Implications for education and training, collaboration with other health care specialties, new practice initiatives, and public relations are reviewed. Future challenges and opportunities for clinical health psychology are discussed. PMID:15008657

Tovian, Steven M

2004-03-01

308

Student Psychological Distress: A psychometric study of 1750 Norwegian 1st?year undergraduate students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence which suggests that university and college students are more vulnerable to psychological distress than the general population has generated increasing public concern. This study presents psychometric data on Norwegian undergraduate students' psychological distress (N = 1750). Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12?item version of the General Health Questionnaire. Twenty?one percent of the students reported symptoms indicating clinically significant psychological

Per Nerdrum; Tone Rustøen; Michael H. Rønnestad

2006-01-01

309

LIFE BEGINS AT THIRTY: TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Possibilities for employment opportunities related to aging are reviewed for four areas of professional psychology: clinical and counseling psychology, education, human factors engineering and ecological psychology, and teaching and research. Some reasons for the slow development of opportunities for employment in the field of psychology of aging are identified and discussed.

James L. Fozard

1978-01-01

310

Educational facilities and financial assistance for graduate students in psychology: 1966-67  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is similar to previous ones on educational facilities and financial assistance for graduate students in psychology. Institutions with graduate programs in psychology are listed, with information supplied by the respective departments. There is no evaluation of these programs and no implication of approval of them by the American Psychological Association, except those doctoral programs in clinical psychology and

Sherman Ross; Jacqueline J. Harmon

1966-01-01

311

Valuing Psychological Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Psychological Operations - targeting not just the physical capabilities of an opponent but the psychological dimensions as well is a key military consideration. The direct and almost instantaneous communication available with today's technology provides a...

P. M. Kerchner R. F. Deckro J. M. Kloeber

1999-01-01

312

The Trait Psychology Controversy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Arguments associated with trait psychology are reviewed with an application in the field of sport psychology. The role of cognition and perception in sport and physical activities is also discussed. (CJ)

Morgan, William P.

1980-01-01

313

Psychology of Religion  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Psychology’s most explicitly direct involvement with religion has obviously been the sub-discipline Psychology of Religion.\\u000a While enjoying an early flourishing in North America and mainland Europe, this went into a serious decline during the 1920s\\u000a and by 1930 appeared to have run into the ground in anglophone Psychology, despite occasional fitful revivals for the rest\\u000a of the century. Although C.

Graham Richards

314

The Humanistic Psychology and Positive Psychology Connection: Implications for Psychotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the common ground between positive and humanistic psychology and responds to positive psychology’s challenges to humanistic psychology about research and a concern for social values. It begins with a brief review of the humanistic psychology movement and shows how its many developments in fact constitute a “positive psychology.” Next, the article moves into an exploration of the

Stella Resnick; Arthur Warmoth; Ilene A. Serlin

2001-01-01

315

Psychological training in medical school departments of pediatrics: A survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports results from a survey of 100 united states medical schools investigating the internship, practicum, or joint training facilities offered to psychology students by the pediatrics department. Responses were obtained from 34 physicians, 64 psychologists, a secretary, and a sociologist. It was found that psychologically relevant programs are of 4 basic types: (a) development, (b) clinical, (c) developmental clinical, and

Donald K. Routh

1970-01-01

316

Psychological adaptation to ICDs and the influence of anxiety sensitivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-nine patients scheduled for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation completed self-report psychological questionnaires prior to surgery and at 2, 4 and 6 months after surgery. The most common psychological problem identified was anxiety, with clinically significant cases based on the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) ranging between 26% and 34%. Clinically significant depression ranged between 8% and 20%. Anxiety

Jim Lemon; Sarah Edelman

2007-01-01

317

Using Positive Psychology with Special Mental Health Populations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In our clinical practice, we have attempted to use a positive psychology approach in working with people with schizophrenia and youths with behavioral disorders. We present three clinical applications that use a positive psychology approach with these populations: group treatment with persons with schizophrenia; individual cognitive stimulation…

Mohiuddin, Ahmed; Boisvert, Charles M.

2006-01-01

318

Surveying Psychology's Public Image  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychologists have been interested in their public image since the organization of the American Psychological Association nearly 100 years ago. Yet formal surveys of the public's opinions about and understanding of psychology are more recent, dating from the 1940s. This article reviews the published and unpublished surveys of psychology's public image to date and describes new data from a recent

Wendy Wood; Melinda Jones; Ludy T. Benjamin

1986-01-01

319

The Encyclopedia of Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews a major new subject encyclopedia, the Encyclopedia of Psychology, jointly published by the American Psychological Association and Oxford University Press. This comprehensive and scholarly reference tool encompasses the discipline's theory, research, practice, and history. All of the articles are signed and include bibliographies. The author describes important features of the set, including biographies, articles about psychology in

Barbara Wales

2002-01-01

320

Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of 2…

Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

2006-01-01

321

Psychology: Student Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book published in 1986 introduces students to psychology and its related subject areas. Students learn that psychology has matured through the centuries from its taboo beginnings in supernatural beliefs and magic to its current status as a scientific discipline. Sections of the book include: (1) "What is Psychology?"; (2) "Human…

Stark, Rebecca

322

Medical Psychology in Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes medical psychology in Russia. A particular emphasis is placed upon a historical description of the changes that have occurred since the 1930s when the scientific development of psychology was “interrupted” by the policies of Stalin's government. These changes have included the development of psychology faculties at St. Petersburg State University and Moscow State University in the 1960s

Tatiana N. Balachova; Sheldon Levy; Galina L. Isurina; Ludvig I. Wasserman

2001-01-01

323

Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of…

Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

2006-01-01

324

The Social Psychology of Compassion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article places social work clinicians’ compassion fatigue, burnout, and other negative consequences in a broader context\\u000a of positive social work. We argue for a paradigm shift towards identifying the factors that lead clinical social workers toward\\u000a human flourishing in their field. We introduce a model for creating “compassion satisfaction” or feelings of fulfillment with\\u000a clients, rooted in positive psychology

Melissa Radey; Charles R. Figley

2007-01-01

325

Mistreating Psychology in the Decades of the Brain  

PubMed Central

We systematically mistreat psychological phenomena, both logically and clinically. This article explores three contentions: that the dominant discourse in modern cognitive, affective, and clinical neuroscience assumes that we know how psychology/biology causation works when we do not; that there are serious intellectual, clinical, and policy costs to pretending we do know; and that crucial scientific and clinical progress will be stymied as long as we frame psychology, biology, and their relationship in currently dominant ways. The arguments are developed with emphasis on misguided attempts to localize psychological function via neuroimaging, misunderstandings about the role of genetics in psychopathology, and unfortunate constraints on health-care policy and clinical service delivery. A particular challenge, articulated but not resolved in this article, is determining what constitutes adequate explanation in the relationship between psychology and biology.

Miller, Gregory A.

2011-01-01

326

Psychological factors affecting a medical condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The criteria for scientific validation of the entities currently subsumed under the DSM-IV category of “Psychological Factors Affecting a Medical Condition” have never been clearly enumerated. Historically, its precursor category (“Psychophysiological Disorder”) was rarely used, and predicated upon clinical observation of personality styles among patients with specific physical illnesses, or clinical observations relating psychosocial events and symptom exacerbation. Because of

Mark W Ketterer; Gregory Mahr; A. David Goldberg

2000-01-01

327

The lack of representation of educational psychology and school psychology in introductory psychology textbooks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first goal of this study was to look at the representation of educational and school psychology in introductory psychology textbooks. Research into the representation of other sub?fields of psychology has been conducted but no research has looked specifically at educational or school psychology. The second goal was to compare the representation of educational and school psychology in introductory psychology

Jennifer L. Lucas; Melissa A. Blazek; Amber B. Raley; Christi Washington

2005-01-01

328

The Cost-Effective Delivery of Rehabilitation Psychology Services: The Responsible Utilization of Paraprofessionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new and rapidly changing health care environment necessitates innovation on the part of rehabilitation psychology to achieve cost-effectiveness. This innovation could take the form of rehabilitation psychologists' responsibly using bachelor's-level technicians, or paraprofessionals, in the delivery of clinical services. This article proposes a pyramid model of rehabilitation psychology service delivery using paraprofessionals and psychology trainees. Specific clinical activities appropriate

Daniel Holland

1998-01-01

329

A socio-psychological investigation into limitations and incentives concerning reporting a clinically suspect situation aimed at improving early detection of classical swine fever outbreaks.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to identify limitations and incentives in reporting clinically suspect situations, possibly caused by classical swine fever (CSF), to veterinary authorities with the ultimate aim to facilitate early detection of CSF outbreaks. Focus group sessions were held with policy makers from the veterinary authorities, and representatives of veterinary practitioners and pig farmer unions. Personal interviews with a small group of pig farmers and practitioners were held to check limitations raised and solutions proposed during the focus group sessions. An electronic questionnaire was mailed to pig farmers and practitioners to investigate perceptions and attitudes with respect to clinically suspect situations possibly caused by CSF. After triangulating the responses of veterinary authorities, veterinary practitioners and farmers, six themes emerged across all groups: (1) lack of knowledge on the early signs of CSF; (2) guilt, shame and prejudice; (3) negative opinion on control measures; (4) dissatisfaction with post-reporting procedures; (5) lack of trust in government bodies; (6) uncertainty and lack of transparency of reporting procedures. The following solutions to facilitate early detection of CSF were put forward: (a) development of a clinical decision-support system for vets and farmers, in order to get faster diagnosis and detection of CSF; (b) possibility to submit blood samples directly to the reference laboratory to exclude CSF in a clinical situation with non-specific clinical signs, without isolation of the farm and free of charge for the individual farmer; (c) decrease social and economic consequences of reporting CSF, for example by improving the public opinion on first reports; (d) better schooling of veterinary officers to deal with emotions and insecurity of farmers in the process after reporting; (e) better communication of rules and regulations, where to report, what will happen next; (f) up-to-date website with information and visual material of the clinical signs of CSF. PMID:19854004

Elbers, A R W; Gorgievski-Duijvesteijn, M J; van der Velden, P G; Loeffen, W L A; Zarafshani, K

2009-09-30

330

Mainstreaming culture in psychology.  

PubMed

Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, the author discusses the inadequacies of sole reliance on either the etic or the emic approach and points out the advantages of a combined emic-etic approach in bridging global and local human experiences in psychological science and practice. With the blurring of the boundaries between North American-European psychologies and psychology in the rest of the world, there is a need to mainstream culture in psychology's epistemological paradigm. Borrowing from the concept of gender mainstreaming that embraces both similarities and differences in promoting equal opportunities, the author discusses the parallel needs of acknowledging universals and specifics when mainstreaming culture in psychology. She calls for building a culturally informed universal knowledge base that should be incorporated in the psychology curriculum and textbooks. PMID:23163473

Cheung, Fanny M

2012-11-01

331

Cognitive Defusion versus Thought Distraction: A Clinical Rationale, Training, and Experiential Exercise in Altering Psychological Impacts of Negative Self-Referential Thoughts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using two modes of intervention delivery, the present study compared the effects of a cognitive defusion strategy with a thought distraction strategy on the emotional discomfort and believability of negative self-referential thoughts. One mode of intervention delivery consisted of a clinical rationale and training (i.e., Partial condition). The…

Masuda, Akihiko; Feinstein, Amanda B.; Wendell, Johanna W.; Sheehan, Shawn T.

2010-01-01

332

A Brief History of the Development of Abnormal Psychology, a Training Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The material is presented particularly for practitioners, but academicians should find the material of help and value, also, for introductory courses to study of clinical psychology, abnormal psychology, and psychopathology. Areas covered include the foll...

W. R. Phelps

1974-01-01

333

Enhancing placebo effects: insights from social psychology.  

PubMed

Placebo effects are widely recognized as having a potent impact upon treatment outcomes in both medical and psychological interventions, including hypnosis. In research utilizing randomized clinical trials, there is usually an effort to minimize or control placebo effects. However, in clinical practice there may be significant benefits in enhancing placebo effects. Prior research from the field of social psychology has identified three factors that may enhance placebo effects, namely: priming, client perceptions, and the theory of planned behavior. These factors are reviewed and illustrated via a case example. The consideration of social-psychological factors to enhance positive expectancies and beliefs has implications for clinical practice as well as future research into hypnotic interventions. PMID:23488251

Sliwinski, Jim; Elkins, Gary R

2013-01-01

334

Psychological treatments for pediatric headache.  

PubMed

Headache is the most common pain problem in children and adolescents and, in a considerable proportion, a source of suffering and disability. Medical intervention mainly relies on abortive pharmacological agents (analgesics and antimigraine drugs). Psychological therapies aim at the prevention of headache episodes and the modifications of cognitive-emotional and cognitive-behavioral processes influencing pain. Three main forms of therapy have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials and reviewed in meta-analyses: relaxation training, biofeedback and multimodal cognitive-behavioral therapy. So far there is only scarce evidence on hypnosis and acceptance and commitment therapy, although they seem to be promising. Evidence demonstrates that psychological therapies are efficacious, and that clinically relevant improvement is found in approximately 70% of the treated children at follow-up examination. Future research needs to focus on mechanisms of change, and to extend its view of effects induced by therapy beyond headache improvement to indicators of quality of life. PMID:21375445

Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

2011-03-01

335

Psychology in sports injury rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Using the case study of an 18-year-old track athlete with a chronic Achilles tendinopathy, this article identifies risk factors associated with training for major athletic events, such as the forthcoming Olympic Games, and presents evidence for adopting a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment and management of athletic injury, addressing the physical aspects of the injury, as well as the psychological needs of the athlete. The athlete's GP and practice nurse, as well as a podiatrist and sport psychologist, are all involved in providing an accurate clinical diagnosis, effective physical intervention, and psychological skills training to address emotional issues and encourage adherence to the rehabilitation programme. Nurses, in both secondary and primary care, can play a crucial role; in this case, the practice nurse recognised the adverse impact that the injury was having on the athlete's emotional wellbeing before making a referral to a trained sport psychologist. PMID:22585077

Concannon, Michael; Pringle, Bob

336

Positive Psychology: Considerations and Implications for Counseling Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Why has the specialty of counseling psychology been overlooked in the larger conversation about positive psychology? Is it reasonable that counseling psychology claims positive psychology as its own? What are some of the problems in defining "positive psychology," and how does the lack of consensus around operationalization thwart discourse on…

Mollen, Debra; Ethington, Lanaya L.; Ridley, Charles R.

2006-01-01

337

Money Doesn't Buy Happiness, but It Helps: Marital Satisfaction, Psychological Distress, and Demographic Differences Between Low and Middle-Income Clinic Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of 51 very low-income and 61 middle-income couples receiving services from a university-based community clinic offering a sliding fee scale were compared on a number of demographic variables. Group differences were significant with the exception of the number of children and wife's ethnicity. Middle-income couples were better educated, more likely to be full-time employed, less likely to be

John Dakin; Richard Wampler

2008-01-01

338

Evaluation of psychological treatment in primary care  

PubMed Central

As clinical psychology services to primary care have grown considerably in recent years, several papers have examined the impact of such services. Benefits to patients following contact with the psychologist have been described, but the few studies which have used control groups have -not shown long-lasting effects. However, assessing the global effects of psychological treatment creates several methodological problems, and many of the studies have serious shortcomings in their use of sampling procedures and dependent measures. Clear results are unlikely to emerge from such studies because psychological treatment is not a single entity but encompasses a number of interventions for different types of problem. A more differentiated approach to evaluation is needed to assess the effectiveness of psychological treatment services in primary care.

Trepka, Chris; Griffiths, Terry

1987-01-01

339

Psychology of Religion Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Designed and maintained by Professor Michael E. Nielsen of the Psychology Department at Georgia Southern University, this site offers numerous resources for people interested in psychological aspects of religious belief and behavior. The site is designed as an introduction to the psychology of religion, rather than a comprehensive treatment. Resources are grouped into three main categories: general resource pages, science and religion pages, and pages devoted to new religious movements. Contents include notable people in the psychology of religion; a bibliography; course syllabi; journal TOCs; essays on the field, on science and religion, and on several aspects of new religious movements; and related links.

Nielsen, Michael E.

1998-01-01

340

A brief screening tool for assessing psychological trauma in clinical practice: development and validation of the New York PTSD Risk Score?,??  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective was to develop a brief posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) screening instrument that is useful in clinical practice, similar to the Framingham Risk Score used in cardiovascular medicine. Methods We used data collected in New York City after the World Trade Center disaster (WTCD) and other trauma data to develop a new PTSD prediction tool — the New York PTSD Risk Score. We used diagnostic test methods to examine different clinical domains, including PTSD symptoms, trauma exposures, sleep disturbances, suicidal thoughts, depression symptoms, demographic factors and other measures to assess different PTSD prediction models. Results Using receiver operating curve (ROC) and bootstrap methods, five prediction domains, including core PTSD symptoms, sleep disturbance, access to care status, depression symptoms and trauma history, and five demographic variables, including gender, age, education, race and ethnicity, were identified. For the best prediction model, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.880 for the Primary Care PTSD Screen alone (specificity=82.2%, sensitivity=93.7%). Adding care status, sleep disturbance, depression and trauma exposure increased the AUC to 0.943 (specificity=85.7%, sensitivity=93.1%), a significant ROC improvement (P < .0001). Adding demographic variables increased the AUC to 0.945, which was not significant (P=.250). To externally validate these models, we applied the WTCD results to 705 pain patients treated at a multispecialty group practice and to 225 trauma patients treated at a Level I Trauma Center. These results validated those from the original WTCD development and validation samples. Conclusion The New York PTSD Risk Score is a multifactor prediction tool that includes the Primary Care PTSD Screen, depression symptoms, access to care, sleep disturbance, trauma history and demographic variables and appears to be effective in predicting PTSD among patients seen in healthcare settings. This prediction tool is simple to administer and appears to outperform other screening measures.

Boscarino, Joseph A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Hoffman, Stuart N.; Sartorius, Jennifer; Adams, Richard E.; Figley, Charles R.

2013-01-01

341

Health psychology in australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opportunities are expanding rapidly for health psychologists to work in Australia in a wider range of health-care settings, and on challenging aspects of community disease prevention and public health. Published material in psychological journals in Australia does not suggest that there is a trend towards more health psychology research being reported in this country; however, research reported at conferences, and

Brian Oldenburg; Neville Owen

1990-01-01

342

Techniques in Adlerian Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book is a collection of classic and recent papers (published between 1964 and 1994) reprinted from the "Journal of Juvenile Psychology""Individual Psychologist," and "Individual Psychology." Each of the five sections is introduced by the editor's comments. "General Techniques" contains the following articles: (1) "I-Thou Relationship Versus…

Carlson, Jon, Ed.; Slavik, Steven, Ed.

343

Teaching psychology to children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suggests that school psychologists and teachers ought to begin teaching school children about psychology, using as an example the author's experiences in teaching psychology to 4th, 5th, and 6th graders. The need for mental health education is also suggested.

Barbara E. Long

1968-01-01

344

Rehabilitation: Psychology's Greatest Opportunity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses how psychologists have established themselves as integral health care providers in rehabilitation. Discusses how psychologists and the psychological associations have failed to recognize the importance of public policy for the practice of psychology. Explores the role of Medicare, and the effects of the inclusion of psychologists in…

Frank, Robert G.; And Others

1990-01-01

345

Psychological Dynamics of Sport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides a comprehensive review of the branch of sport and exercise science that focuses on the psychological aspects of human behavior. Part I presents a general orientation to the field, including an introduction and description of sport psychology and a discussion of the history and current status of the field. Individual differences…

Gill, Diane L.

346

Teaching Anomalistic Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses need for anomalistic psychology courses (the occult, astrology, ESP, or those phenomena inexplicable in terms of orthodox science) in the college psychology curriculum. A study of an anomalistics course indicates that student belief in the paranormal was associated with greater learning which was then followed by significant reductions…

Jones, Warren; Zusne, Leonard

1981-01-01

347

Transpersonal Psychology in Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The introduction to this booklet states that transpersonal psychology focuses attention on the human capacity for self-transcendence as well as self-realization, and is concerned with the optimum development of consciousness. This booklet attempts to illustrate the value of this psychology in education, not as a complete substitute for traditional…

Roberts, Thomas Bradford; Clark, Frances Vaughan

348

Careers in Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is intended to help make secondary and college students aware of careers in psychology. Approximately one-half of the booklet contains sketches of 16 jobs in psychology emphasizing teaching, research, and public service. For each job sketch there is a general description of the types of work involved and the educational background…

Kasschau, Richard A.; Johnson, Margaret M.

349

Transpersonal Psychology in Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The introduction to this booklet states that transpersonal psychology focuses attention on the human capacity for self-transcendence as well as self-realization, and is concerned with the optimum development of consciousness. This booklet attempts to illustrate the value of this psychology in education, not as a complete substitute for…

Roberts, Thomas Bradford; Clark, Frances Vaughan

350

Teaching Psychology in Estonia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the experience of teaching psychology at Tartu University and Tallinn Pedagogical University in Estonia. Discusses the lessons learned by teaching in Estonia and applies those lessons to teaching psychology in the United States, focusing on the benefits teachers reap when they become more aware of themselves and their audiences. (CMK)|

White, Lawrence T.; Ransdell, Sarah

2000-01-01

351

Psychologic assessment in rheumatology.  

PubMed

In rheumatology practice and applied research, there are numerous psychologic issues that merit special attention, including depression, helplessness, self-efficacy, and coping. A wide variety of measures are available for addressing these issues. The tests themselves must meet the psychometric criteria of reliability and validity. Psychologic tests must be administered under standardized conditions. PMID:7631039

Parker, J C; Wright, G

1995-05-01

352

Genetics and Developmental Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

Plomin, Robert

2004-01-01

353

GENERAL HOSPITAL PSYCHOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The practice of psychology in general hospitals has evolved from a few isolated practitioners operating primarily within psychiatry to several thousand psychologists, organized administratively and providing a wide range of services to various hospital departments. This article reviews major developments in the practice of hospital psychology. Four current influences on hospital psychologists are particularly noted: the deinstitutionalization of chronic mental

ROBERT J. DUNN

1986-01-01

354

The Psychology of Memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter I will try to provide a brief overview of the concepts and techniques that are most widely used in the psychology of memory. Although it may not appear to be the case from sampling the literature, there is in fact a great deal of agreement as to what constitutes the psychology of memory, much of it developed

Alan D. Baddeley

1976-01-01

355

Psychology for All  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In "Psychology in its place" (2008) John Radford explores and attempts to initiate a debate on what is or should be the place and role of psychology in Higher Education, primarily as a main subject for a first degree. In this paper, the author raises the stakes, and argues that Higher Education should provide a certain form of practical…

Popovic, Nash

2008-01-01

356

Medical Psychology in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the state of medical psychology in Canada and explores some current controversies and challenges for the future of the field. The practice of psychology in Canadian medical settings is influenced by the country's universal healthcare system and by the need to provide adequate care to a diverse and widely dispersed population. Although Canada's licensing system does not

Alisha Ali

2001-01-01

357

Expanding community psychology's domain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Community psychology's twin goals of prevention and empowerment are ill-served when researchers and practitioners restrict their activities to traditional mental health settings. This paper echoes the call of the Swampscott conference for expanding community psychology's domain of inquiry and action. It reviews examples from the research literature of efforts at prevention and empowerment in five classes of behavior settings identified

Marybeth Shinn

1987-01-01

358

Affecting qualitative health psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ‘affective turn’ is a contemporary movement within the humanities, social science, and psychology to investigate affect, emotion, and feeling as hybrid phenomena jointly constituted from both biological and social influences. Health and illness are themselves jointly constituted in this way, and many of the topics, concerns, and methods of health psychology are strongly permeated by affective phenomena. Qualitative research

John Cromby

2011-01-01

359

The Virtues of Positive Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

How have spokespersons for the positive psychology movement presented the movement to the public and to the profession of psychology? Moreover, what are the consequences for psychology of that presentation? These questions inform my assessment of the \\

Barbara S. Held

2005-01-01

360

Gender differences in psychological impairment after a coronary incident  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this study was to determine in 231 coronary patients (109 men, 122 women) which variables of psychological impairment were most discriminating between the sexes at 5 weeks, 4 months, and 18 months after a coronary incident, and whether using absolute scores or clinical levels of psychological impairment might have an impact on the results. Hierarchical logistic regression

Veronika Brezinka; Stan Maes; Elise Dusseldorp

2001-01-01

361

[Is the concept of psychological dependence still valid today?].  

PubMed

Historically, psychological dependence to alcohol has been dissociated from physical dependence. Progress in neurosciences and genetics now question this dichotomy as complex neurobiological mechanisms and genetic factors seem to underlie craving, which is typically considered as the clinical manifestation of psychological dependence. PMID:23888575

Pinto, E

362

Research Productivity in Counseling Psychology: An Update. Conference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article is an update and review of institutional research productivity in counseling psychology. Institutional research productivity is assessed by totaling credits for articles published from 1993 to 2002 in the following journals: "Journal of Counseling Psychology," "The Counseling Psychologist," "Journal of Consulting and Clinical

Buboltz, Walter C., Jr.; Jenkins, Steve M.; Thomas, Adrian; Lindley, Lori D.; Schwartz, Jonathan P.; Loveland, James M.

2005-01-01

363

Applied Sport Psychology in Professional Sports: The Team Psychologist  

Microsoft Academic Search

Professional sports has become a significant worldwide business in which highly paid athletes are considered substantial assets to be carefully selected, developed, and protected. Psychologists have become increasingly involved with professional sport organizations, providing a wide range of psychological services, such as performance enhancement consultation, clinical or counseling interventions, and psychological testing. As increasing numbers of psychologists enter the sport

Frank L. Gardner

2001-01-01

364

Identifying Effective Psychological Treatments of Insomnia: A Meta-Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Clarified efficacy of psychological treatments for insomnia through a meta-analysis of 66 outcome studies representing 139 treatment groups. Psychological treatments produced considerable enhancement of both sleep patterns and the subjective experience of sleep. Participants who were clinically referred and who did not regularly use sedatives…

Murtagh, Douglas R. R.; Greenwood, Kenneth M.

1995-01-01

365

Disappearances, Silences, and Anxious Rhetoric: Gender in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viewed from a feminist perspective, the history of clinical psychology reveals a troubled—and troubling—relationship to women. Diagnoses and treatments have sometimes served to control and even victimize women. Over the past 25 years, feminist scholarship, activism, and practice have yielded impressive contributions to knowledge. Yet, these accomplishments go largely unnoticed in textbooks in abnormal psychology. Why the resistance? Looking beyond

Jeanne Marecek

1993-01-01

366

Competence Assessment Integrating Reflective Practice in a Professional Psychology Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Midwestern University Clinical Psychology Program--Glendale Campus (MWU) created a Comprehensive Assessment Method in Psychology (CAMP) comprised of 35 different "tasks" of authentic work products representing a variety of assessment techniques based on pedagogical theory. Each task assesses one or more components of one of the program's five…

Lewis, Deborah; Virden, Tom; Hutchings, Philinda Smith; Bhargava, Ruchi

2011-01-01

367

Community psychology in Hong Kong: Past, present, and future  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expansion of mental health services during the 1960s from a single remote mental hospital to centers and clinics in mainstream communities fostered the development of community psychology in Hong Kong. Few psychologists were initially involved in the local community mental health movement, but its momentum resulted in increasing numbers of practitioner psychologists working in community-based service settings. Community psychology

David J. Lam; David Y. F. Ho

1989-01-01

368

Social Justice: A Long-Term Challenge for Counseling Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Counseling psychology has a long history of interest and commitment to social justice and multicultural issues. This article discusses some of that history and, in addition, speaks to specifics of implementing a liberation psychology frame of reference into clinical practice along with the issues of implementation and challenges faced by those of…

Ivey, Allen E.; Collins, Noah M.

2003-01-01

369

Psychology Interns as Patient Suicide Survivors: Incidence, Impact, and Recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors investigated incidence, impact, and methods of coping with patient suicide during the training years of Psychology graduate students. All 54 interns in clinical psychology at the Boston VA in 1983–1988 were surveyed. 1 in 6 Ss had experienced a patient's suicide at some time during their training. The group who experienced a patient's suicide and a group who

Phillip M. Kleespies; Marcia R. Smith; Bonnie R. Becker

1990-01-01

370

Transforming Coverage of Primary Prevention in Abnormal Psychology Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that a comprehensive understanding of abnormal psychology requires coverage of recent advances in primary prevention. Describes a conceptual scheme and recommends resources and teaching methods for instructors. Asserts that clinical and community psychology are conceptually distinct but complementary fields. (CFR)

Dalton, James H.; And Others

1994-01-01

371

Avoidance of Counseling: Psychological Factors that Inhibit Seeking Help  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do counselors reach out to individuals who are reluctant to seek counseling services? To answer this question, the authors examined the research on the psychological help-seeking barriers from counseling, clinical and social psychology, as well as social work and psychiatry. Specific avoidance factors that have been identified in the mental…

Vogel, David L.; Wester, Stephen R.; Larson, Lisa M.

2007-01-01

372

Avian psychology and communication.  

PubMed Central

The evolution of animal communication is a complex issue and one that attracts much research and debate. 'Receiver psychology' has been highlighted as a potential selective force, and we review how avian psychological processes and biases can influence the evolution and design of signals as well as the progress that has been made in testing these ideas in behavioural studies. Interestingly, although birds are a focal group for experimental psychologists and behavioural ecologists alike, the integration of theoretical ideas from psychology into studies of communication has been relatively slow. However, recent operant experiments are starting to address how birds perceive and respond to complex natural signals in an attempt to answer evolutionary problems in communication. This review outlines how a psychological approach to understanding communication is useful, and we hope that it stimulates further research addressing the role of psychological mechanisms in signal evolution.

Rowe, Candy; Skelhorn, John

2004-01-01

373

Traumatic Stress, Disaster Psychology, and Graduate Education: Reflections on the Special Section and Recommendations for Professional Psychology Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

The articles appearing in this special section highlight disaster psychology as a typically neglected aspect of the clinical curriculum, the challenges of operationalizing efficacy measures for program evaluation, and the personal and professional impact of disaster exposure. The authors review literature suggesting the importance of training in disaster psychology. The authors also offer a framework for promoting competency among future

Barbara A. Yutrzenka; James A. Naifeh

2008-01-01

374

Psychological treatments for pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders.  

PubMed

Our objective was to systematically review and evaluate behavioral and psychological treatments applied to pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders. Electronic searches were conducted in bibliographic databases including PubMed, PsychInfo, and Medline. Psychological and behavioral interventions were classified into the following 5 primary treatment modalities: psychoeducation, behavior therapy/contingency management, relaxation-based therapies (including biofeedback and hypnotherapy), and cognitive-behavioral therapy (including cognitive-behavioral family therapy). There was a wide variation in the quality and quantity of studies within each treatment category. Effective interventions generally involved multiple therapeutic components and included elements of both individual and family treatment. Psychological interventions that combine psychoeducation, relaxation-based therapies, and cognitive-behavioral therapy appear superior to standard care (reassurance or dietary manipulation) in the elimination of pain and reduction in functional disability. Although many psychological treatments demonstrated evidence of positive effects, few well-designed randomized controlled trials of psychological treatments for functional gastrointestinal disorders exist. More work is needed to determine the most potent, essential elements of psychological treatments alone or in combination with standard medical intervention, and to establish their applicability with diverse populations. Clinical and research implications are discussed. PMID:19172118

Brent, Meredith; Lobato, Debra; LeLeiko, Neal

2009-01-01

375

Lonely hearts: Psychological perspectives on loneliness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Loneliness is a complex set of feelings encompassing reactions to the absence of intimate and social needs. Although transient for some individuals, loneliness can be a chronic state for others. We review the developmental, social, personality, clinical, and counseling psychology literatures on loneliness with an emphasis on recent empirical findings. Chronic feelings of loneliness appear to have roots in childhood

John M. Ernst; John T. Cacioppo

1999-01-01

376

Promoting Social Responsibility in Graduate Psychology Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the intentional implementation of a program designed to enhance attitudes of social responsibility in graduate students in clinical psychology. Key factors in developing social responsibility appear to be confrontation with injustice, modeling, and self-efficacy. Teaching goals and methods for facilitating these factors are…

Campbell, Clark D.

377

Psychological and Vocational Assessment of Native Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper introduces important issues in the psychological and vocational assessment of Native Americans in schools, mental health clinics, counseling centers, and rehabilitation programs. A primary concern is to conduct such assessment in a fair and unbiased manner. Various methods are used to gather information: interviewing the client, family…

Thomason, Timothy C.

378

Positive Psychology and Humanistic Psychology: A Reply to Seligman  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arguments in the current debate between “positive psychology” and humanistic psychology are reviewed with particular emphasis on Martin Seligman’s comment that humanistic psychologists do not represent “positive psychology” because they have generated no research tradition, are narcissistic, and are antiscientific. Each one of these claims is dispelled with specific references to the larger humanistic tradition in American psychology, which includes

Eugene Taylor

2001-01-01

379

Counseling psychology in behavioral medicine and health psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Counseling psychology can make a contribution to the newly emerging fields of health-related behavioral science, but the nature of that contribution will depend on counseling psychology's willingness to develop new perspectives and practices. The present authors compare 2 of these health orientations, behavioral medicine and health psychology, in an effort to establish counseling psychology's relationship with either of these approaches.

Judith A. Klippel; David M. DeJoy

1984-01-01

380

International School Psychology: Psychology's Worldwide Portal to Children and Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|International school psychology is discussed in reference to scholarly and professional development within psychology, the emergence of an international association of school psychology, its efforts to promote school psychology, prevailing characteristics of school psychologists, and additional efforts needed to further enhance its development.…

Oakland, Thomas D.

2003-01-01

381

University Psychology Students Having Had Psychology in High School  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does a high school course in psychology influence students to take further work in the subject? Is high school psychology of assistance to those who take psychology in a university? In an attempt to answer these questions, 13 university departments of psychology (Denver, Florida State, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Purdue, Southern California, Texas, Vermont) were

T. L. Engle

1958-01-01

382

Sports Psychology and Counseling Psychology: Players in the Same Ballpark?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reacts to four previous articles on counseling psychology and sport psychology. Voices concerns about coherence and boundaries of counseling psychology's scientific and practice bases, efficient use of training resources, how much can be accomplished within predoctoral curricula, and how to work in tandem with those in other psychological

Lent, Robert W.

1993-01-01

383

An introduction to spiritual psychology: overview of the literature, east and west.  

PubMed

This article outlines the philosophical background to spiritual psychology and selectively reviews Western and Eastern literature on the subject. The world views of theism, atheism, and agnosticism are defined and critiqued, and the boundaries of scientific knowledge discussed. The views of James, Jung, and Freud are reviewed, and the contributions of humanistic psychology noted. Contemporary spiritual psychology is then summarized with reference to recent literature on theistic psychotherapy, Buddhist psychology, mind-body medicine, and transpersonal psychology. Sri Aurobindo's work is introduced as a modern Asian perspective on theistic psychology, and his model of the relationship between the "soul" and the unconscious described. Finally, a brief clinical vignette is given. PMID:15204805

Miovic, Michael

384

The Integration of Psychology Into Primary Care: Personal Perspectives and Lessons Learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to discuss the integration of psychology into a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Primary Care clinic, as experienced by the authors. There has been an evolving need for psychology's presence in primary care, due in part to the increasing number of primary care patients who present with complex physical and psychological issues, as well as

Myra Q. Elder; Shelley A. Silvers

2009-01-01

385

Graduate Students’ Experiences, Interests, and Attitudes Toward Correctional\\/Forensic Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the availability of correctional and forensic psychology training as well as graduate students’ experiences and attitudes toward working with offender populations. Using survey data gathered from 175 graduate students representing 30 clinical and 29 counseling psychology programs, results indicate the availability of specialized training in correctional and\\/or forensic psychology for approximately one half of the participants. Furthermore,

Robert D. Morgan; Amanda M. Beer; Katherine L. Fitzgerald; Jon T. Mandracchia

2007-01-01

386

Development and Evaluation of the Balanced Index of Psychological Mindedness (BIPM)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Psychological mindedness (PM) refers to a person's interest and ability to be in touch with and reflect on his or her psychological states and processes. In this multipart study, the authors present the Balanced Index of Psychological Mindedness (BIPM). The psychometric properties and clinical relevance of this 14-item self-report scale were…

Nyklicek, Ivan; Denollet, Johan

2009-01-01

387

Changes in Research Productivity in Counseling Psychology: Revisiting Howard (1983) a Decade Later.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Assessed institutional research productivity in counseling psychology by totaling credits for articles published from 1983 through 1992 in "Journal of Counseling Psychology,""Counseling Psychologist,""Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology,""Journal of Vocational Behavior," and "Journal of Counseling and Development." Found that several…

Delgado, Edward A.; Howard, George S.

1994-01-01

388

Statistical Power of Psychological Research: What Have We Gained in 20 Years?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Calculated power for 6,155 statistical tests in 221 journal articles published in 1982 volumes of "Journal of Abnormal Psychology,""Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology," and "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology." Power to detect small, medium, and large effects was .17, .57, and .83, respectively. Concluded that power of…

Rossi, Joseph S.

1990-01-01

389

Distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology: Science and scientific thinking as safeguards against human error  

Microsoft Academic Search

Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist–practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for school psychologists. Specifically, we (a) outline basic principles of scientific thinking, (b) delineate widespread cognitive

Scott O. Lilienfeld; Rachel Ammirati; Michal David

390

The Practice of Forensic Psychology: A Look Toward the Future in Light of the Past  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a 1987 American Psychologist article, Tom Grisso summarized the state of forensic psychological assessment, noted its limitations and potential, and offered suggestions for researchers and practitioners interested in contributing to its future. Since that time, there have been many important developments in the field of forensic psychology, as well as in clinical psychology more generally, some of which were

Randy K. Otto; Kirk Heilbrun

2002-01-01

391

A psychological study of a schizophrenic: exemplification of a method  

Microsoft Academic Search

In diagnosing and treating neuropsychiatric casualties from the armed forces, patients were examined by a full clinical staff. The psychological battery included mental tests, Rorschach, association, aspiration level, thematic apperception under normal and \\

D. Shakow; E. H. Rodnick; T. Lebeaux

1945-01-01

392

Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer: Psychological and Social Impact  

MedlinePLUS

Breast cancer Basics In-Depth Multimedia Expert Answers Expert Blog Resources What's New Reprints A single copy of ... for personal, noncommercial use only. Genetic testing for breast cancer: Psychological and social impact By Mayo Clinic staff ...

393

Psychology of Terrorism.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In compiling this annotated bibliography on the psychology of terrorism, the author has defined terrorism as 'acts of violence intentionally perpetrated on civilian noncombatants with the goal of furthering some ideological, religious or political objecti...

R. Borum

2007-01-01

394

[Psychological consequences of obesity].  

PubMed

Overweight and obesity is associated with a broad variety of stigmatization and discrimination in every day live. Obese people have more difficulties in finding a job, have a lower income, and are less often seen in leadership positions. In society, responsibility for the weight situation in seen as lying by the individuals affected altogether, leading to chronic stress, problems with self esteem and perception of loss of control. As a consequence, there is an increased risk for developing serious psychological problems such as affective and anxiety disorders. As a reaction, coping strategies to deal with the psychological pressure such as dysfunctional eating behavior, binge eating and physical inactivity are used. Females, people belonging to another ethnic or social minority, adolescents and people with eating disorders are considered at increased risk of psychological distress. Psychological vulnerabilities and the consequences of stigmatization need to be considered. Moreover, perceived behavioral control and self esteem are key aspects of to be addressed on the treatment. PMID:23385186

Müller, Roland

2013-02-01

395

American Psychological Association  

MedlinePLUS

... Psychology Topics Addictions ADHD Anger Anxiety Bipolar Disorder Bullying Depression Eating Disorders Emotional Health Ethics Learning & Memory ... ADHD Aging Alzheimer's Anger Anxiety Autism Bipolar Disorder Bullying Children Death & Dying Depression Disability Eating Disorders Education ...

396

Criminal Psychological Profiling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Criminal psychological profiling is potentially one of the most innovative new techniques available to criminal investigators. However, profiling is viewed skeptically by many criminal justice practitioners and academicians, which has limited the use of t...

S. J. Moree

1993-01-01

397

Operational Psychology Perspective.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This slide presentation reviews the history of long duration spaceflight, and the changes in the International Space Station crew and the effect that this has had on the psychology of astronaut selection and training.

A. Holland

2009-01-01

398

Psychology and dentistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses contributions of psychology to dental education; a description of the functions of the department of behavioral science in one dental school is presented. A model for training more psychologists in this area is proposed. (19 ref)

Robert H. Sachs; Charles R. Eigenbrode; Donald C. Kruper

1979-01-01

399

What Is Forensic Psychology, Anyway?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of how “forensic psychology” is defined has taken on a new urgency in the context of an application to have forensic psychology designated a “specialty” by the American Psychological Association. To provide a historical perspective, I briefly review early attempts to apply psychological concepts to legal issues, beginning with the McNaughten trial in England in 1843. I then

John C. Brigham

1999-01-01

400

Giving Psychology Away Is Expensive  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents comments on "Does Psychology make a significant difference in our lives?" by P. Zimbardo. We deeply appreciate the documentation and inspiration provided by Zimbardo on how psychology is reaching out to the public by "giving psychology away" (p. 340). We totally agree that psychology has much, much more to offer that could be…

Gorsuch, Richard L.; Wallace, William L.

2005-01-01

401

Giving Psychology Away Is Expensive  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents comments on "Does Psychology make a significant difference in our lives?" by P. Zimbardo. We deeply appreciate the documentation and inspiration provided by Zimbardo on how psychology is reaching out to the public by "giving psychology away" (p. 340). We totally agree that psychology has much, much more to offer that could…

Gorsuch, Richard L.; Wallace, William L.

2005-01-01

402

Introduction to Psychology. Fourth Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Chapters in this textbook for college students in introductory psychology courses are: (1) What is Psychology?; (2) Scientific Methods in Psychology; (3) Biological Psychology; (4) Sensation and Perception; (5) Altered States; (6) Learning; (7) Memory; (8) Cognition and Language; (9) Intelligence and Its Measurement; (10) Development; (11)…

Kalat, James W.

403

Positive organizational psychology in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature relating to the positive aspects of organizational psychology research in sport. To this end, the narrative is divided into three main sections. The first section defines and delimits relevant concepts, including organizational psychology, positive psychology and positive organizing. The second section presents the background to positive organizational psychology in sport

Christopher Robert David Wagstaff; David Fletcher; Sheldon Hanton

2012-01-01

404

Positive organizational psychology in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature relating to the positive aspects of organizational psychology research in sport. To this end, the narrative is divided into three main sections. The first section defines and delimits relevant concepts, including organizational psychology, positive psychology and positive organizing. The second section presents the background to positive organizational psychology in sport

Christopher Robert David Wagstaff; David Fletcher; Sheldon Hanton

2011-01-01

405

Psychological study of whole families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of whole families is delineated as a field of psychological study. Relevance to psychology of personality and social psychology is shown. Emergence of the field is traced, and major current approaches are examined. A general conceptual framework, growing out of and integrating data from psychology and other behavioral sciences, is shown to be developing. Evidence suggests that a great

Gerald Handel

1965-01-01

406

The need for social psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sketches, the development of the field of social psychology from the coincidental work of Tarde (1890-1900). The aim is to make others aware of how social psychology grew in spite of a numbers of inhibitory influences. Foresees a return of focus from social to general psychology. Implications for theory of psychology and society are mentioned.

John Dewey

1917-01-01

407

Evolutionary Psychology and Feminism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a historical context of evolutionary psychology and feminism, and evaluates the contributions to this\\u000a special issue of Sex Roles within that context. We briefly outline the basic tenets of evolutionary psychology and articulate its meta-theory of the\\u000a origins of gender similarities and differences. The article then evaluates the specific contributions: Sexual Strategies Theory\\u000a and the desire for

David Michael Buss; David P. Schmitt

2011-01-01

408

Ecological psychology and social psychology: continuing discussion.  

PubMed

What form would an ideal merger of ecological and social psychology take? Is that ideal attainable? Many researchers and theorists are working to answer these questions. Charles (2009, 2011a) offered insights from E. B. Holt, one of James J. Gibson's mentors, who argued that minds-mental kinds, processes, states, etc.-are observable aspects of the environment. Phrasing that in Ecological terms, the minds of other organisms are specified in the structure of ambient energy extended over time and space; they are directly perceivable by a properly attuned organism. Ecological Psychology enhances Holt's story, by brining to the table a sophisticated theory of direct perception; Holt enhances the Ecological story by brining to the table a sophisticated theory about the nature of minds. The two combine to form the long-sought ideal merger. Thus, I claimed, Ecological Psychology will either rediscover its roots, or go through the trouble of re-creating them. This paper further develops those ideas, by presenting a simpler version of the argument, suggesting easy ways of dismissing that argument, and addressing the concerns expressed by Castro and Lafuente (2011). PMID:21809179

Charles, Eric P

2012-06-01

409

Self-Care Practices and Perceived Stress Levels Among Psychology Graduate Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that stress among psychology graduate students can negatively impact academic performance, clinical skills, and personal well-being. However, less is known about factors related to stress management among psychology graduate students. The current study examined self-care practices and perceived stress among psychology graduate students Four hundred eighty-eight psychology graduate students from across the United States completed an

Shannon B. Myers; Alison C. Sweeney; Victoria Popick; Kimberly Wesley; Amanda Bordfeld; Randy Fingerhut

2012-01-01

410

Psychological issues in IVF.  

PubMed

The role of psychological factors in IVF is complex. Psychological issues intertwine with physical ones, often with additive effects. The very diagnosis of infertility is likely to cause stress. In addition, the many investigations and procedures may have compounded distress. There are probably a small number of patients in whom psychological factors may induce infertility. But in the majority, psychological factors may exacerbate infertility and influence the patient's and partner's responses. Mental, sexual, marital and social adjustment may all be affected. The procedure of IVF is likely to have a further impact. A pilot study of couples entering an IVF programme revealed the women to be highly anxious and to conform strongly to feminine stereotypes. Many had received psychiatric help in the past. The idiopathic group appeared to cope less well with stress and had higher anxiety and neuroticism scores. Follow-up revealed that IVF had a profound impact on many of the women. Most had received no counselling in the interim. In those who completed questionnaires at follow-up, a differential effect was observed between the organic and idiopathic groups. State anxiety fell in the idiopathic group but so did marital adjustment. The clinician is advised to incorporate consideration of the psychological aspects of IVF into every aspect of the programme. The addition of a psycho-social team may assist the gynaecologist in this and help the couple to make an optimal adjustment. PMID:3833441

Dennerstein, L; Morse, C

1985-12-01

411

Psychological Research on Retirement.  

PubMed

Retirement as a research topic has become increasingly prominent in the psychology literature. This article provides a review of both theoretical development and empirical findings in this literature in the past two decades. We first discuss psychological conceptualizations of retirement and empirical operationalizations of retirement status. We then review three psychological models for understanding the retirement process and associated antecedents and outcomes, including the temporal process model of retirement, the multilevel model of retirement, and the resource-based dynamic model for retirement adjustment. We next survey the empirical findings regarding how various individual attributes, job and organizational factors, family factors, and socioeconomic context are related to the retirement process. We also discuss outcomes associated with retirement in terms of retirees' financial well-being, physical well-being, and psychological well-being. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Psychology Volume 65 is January 03, 2014. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates. PMID:23751036

Wang, Mo; Shi, Junqi

2013-06-01

412

Specialty guidelines for forensic psychology.  

PubMed

In the past 50 years forensic psychological practice has expanded dramatically. Because the practice of forensic psychology differs in important ways from more traditional practice areas (Monahan, 1980) the "Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists" were developed and published in 1991 (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists, 1991). These Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology were developed by the American Psychology-Law Society (Division 41 of the American Psychological Association [APA]) and the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. They were adopted by the APA Council of Representatives on August 3, 2011. PMID:23025747

2012-10-01

413

Psychological Factors in Asthma  

PubMed Central

Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma.

2008-01-01

414

Sociogenomic Personality Psychology  

PubMed Central

In this article, we address a number of issues surrounding biological models of personality traits. Most traditional and many contemporary biological models of personality traits assume that biological systems underlying personality traits are causal and immutable. In contrast, sociogenomic biology, which we introduce to readers in this article, directly contradicts the widely held assumption that something that is biological, heritable, or temperamental, is unchangeable. We provide examples of how seemingly unchanging biological systems, such as DNA, are both dependent on environments for elicitation and can be modified by environmental changes. Finally, we synthesize sociogenomic biology with personality psychology in a model of personality traits that integrates this more modern perspective on biology, physiology, and environment that we term sociogenomic personality psychology. We end the article with a discussion of the future directions of sociogenomic personality psychology.

Roberts, Brent W.; Jackson, Joshua J.

2009-01-01

415

Embodiment in social psychology.  

PubMed

Psychologists are increasingly interested in embodiment based on the assumption that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are grounded in bodily interaction with the environment. We examine how embodiment is used in social psychology, and we explore the ways in which embodied approaches enrich traditional theories. Although research in this area is burgeoning, much of it has been more descriptive than explanatory. We provide a critical discussion of the trajectory of embodiment research in social psychology. We contend that future researchers should engage in a phenomenon-based approach, highlight the theoretical boundary conditions and mediators involved, explore novel action-relevant outcome measures, and address the role of individual differences broadly defined. Such research will likely provide a more explanatory account of the role of embodiment in general terms as well as how it expands the knowledge base in social psychology. PMID:22777820

Meier, Brian P; Schnall, Simone; Schwarz, Norbert; Bargh, John A

2012-07-09

416

Teaching Psychology in the 1980s: A Content Analysis of Leading Introductory Psychology Textbooks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introductory psychology textbooks were analyzed to determine what percentage of space they devoted to the following content areas: experimental/learning, physiological/biological, developmental, social/personality, cognitive, clinical, educational, industrial/organizational, tests and measurements, and other. Results showed a clear preponderance…

Harari, Herbert; Jacobson, Adela

1984-01-01

417

"Giving Psychology Away". Some Experiences Teaching Undergraduates Practical Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A psychology course in which students are required to apply learned principles to their interpersonal experiences is the instructors answer to the need to make psychological principles and methods generally available for a wider impact on human existence. (JH)|

Grasha, Anthony F.

1974-01-01

418

The psychologic of forgiving.  

PubMed

Psychologic is an attempt to systematize the commonsense psychology embedded in ordinary language. In this system, the concepts of respect, anger, and guilt, are directly linked, since messages of disrespect, and only those, create anger in the receiver and guilt in the sender. This paper deals with the process of forgiving, whereby respect is reaffirmed and anger and guilt are alleviated. Forgiving depends on clarification of misunderstanding as well as on apology and atonement. The distinction between forgiving others and forgiving oneself is treated. It is concluded that what goes on inside persons and between persons has the same structure. PMID:2068550

Smedslund, J

1991-01-01

419

Introduction to Psychology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Psychology is a vast and complex area of inquiry, and students entering the field may be confounded by the number of subfields within the discipline. Professor Russell A. Dewey of Georgia Southern University has created this fine online introductory textbook that covers everything from states of consciousness to social psychology. The online text includes sixteen chapters, and each chapter contains a number of parts that break each topic into smaller subtopics. The text is well-written and it draws on a number of examples and well-known experiments that will keep readers engaged. The site is rounded out by the inclusion of Professor Dewey's contact information and links to additional resources.

Dewey, Russell A.

2007-09-03

420

Gender and Psychological Essentialism  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY When individuals reason in an essentialist way about social categories, they assume that group differences reflect inherently different natures (Gelman, 2003; Rothbart & Taylor, 1992). This paper describes the psychological and social implications of essentialist beliefs, and examines the extent to which children exhibit psychological essentialism when reasoning about gender. The authors discuss reasons young children as well as older children show essentialist reasoning in some contexts, but not in others. Finally, the authors suggest directions for future research, and discuss a primary challenge to many working in this field: reduction of rigid gender beliefs.

Heyman, Gail D.; Giles, Jessica W.

2010-01-01

421

Psychological essentialism in children.  

PubMed

Psychological essentialism is the idea that certain categories, such as "lion" or "female", have an underlying reality that cannot be observed directly. Where does this idea come from? This article reviews recent evidence suggesting that psychological essentialism is an early cognitive bias. Young children look beyond the obvious in many converging ways: when learning words, generalizing knowledge to new category members, reasoning about the insides of things, contemplating the role of nature versus nurture, and constructing causal explanations. These findings argue against the standard view of children as concrete thinkers, instead claiming that children have an early tendency to search for hidden, non-obvious features. PMID:15350241

Gelman, Susan A

2004-09-01

422

Psychologic assessment technology for geriatric practice.  

PubMed

Psychologic assessment is an integral aspect of the comprehensive functional assessment of geriatric patients. Medical areas in which psychologic testing and evaluation can be of significant service in the diagnosis and formulation of treatment plans include psychiatric and neurologic disturbances, psychosomatic disorders, circulatory diseases (especially hypertension), diabetes, chronic pain, sexual dysfunctions, and gastrointestinal problems. In the effort to gain an understanding of the total patient, it is important to clarify the effect of physical condition on a person's psychologic reactions as well as the impact of psychologic states on his/her biologic status. This orientation is particularly important in dealing with elderly patients because the interaction between the physical and the psychologic in this age group is exceedingly strong and significant. Despite the fact that research in the psychology of the aged is of long standing, the attention given by clinical psychologists to the provision of services to geriatric patients has been quite limited until recently. Many psychologic tests have been developed during the past 70 years, but relatively few of them have been standardized for use with the aged. Of late, however, this has been changing. Several tests have been adapted, and some new ones have been organized with the needs and characteristics of the aged in mind. Closer attention has been paid to psychometric principles in the development of the tests, leading to the organization of useful norms and the demonstration of proper levels of reliability and validity. Accordingly, the state of the art of psychologic assessment of the aged is currently rather limited, but the outlook for the near future appears encouraging. In evaluating the condition of a geriatric patient, the clinical psychologist normally generates data through observations, testing, and interviewing. The resulting report covers the following areas: 1) adaptation to the examination and behavioral characteristics during the procedure, 2) cognitive functioning, 3) visual motor coordination and perception of spatial relationships, and 4) personality characteristics and mental health status. Data for the first area are normally derived by the examiner from observations and subjective impressions of the patient's behavior. For each of the other areas the information is obtained through standardized tests. In this discussion, some of the principal assessments that are currently available are reviewed and evaluated for their usefulness with the aged. PMID:6361103

Granick, S

1983-12-01

423

A survey of psychological test use patterns among forensic psychologists.  

PubMed

Clinical psychologists are frequently called on to testify in court regarding mental health issues in civil or criminal cases. One of the legal criteria by which admissibility of testimony is determined includes whether the testimony is based on methods that have gained "general acceptance" in their field. In this study, we sought to evaluate the psychological tests used in forensic assessments by members of the American Psychology-Law Society Division of the American Psychological Association, and by diplomates in the American Board of Forensic Psychology. We present test results from this survey, based on 152 respondents, for forensic evaluations conducted with adults using multiscale inventories, single-scale tests, unstructured personality tests, cognitive and/or intellectual tests, neuropsychological tests, risk assessment and psychopathy instruments, sex offender risk assessment instruments, competency or sanity-related instruments, and instruments used to evaluate malingering. In addition, we provide findings for psychological testing involving child-related forensic issues. PMID:16856789

Archer, Robert P; Buffington-Vollum, Jacqueline K; Stredny, Rebecca Vauter; Handel, Richard W

2006-08-01

424

Evidence-Based Psychological Treatments for Disruptive Behaviors in Individuals With Dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, the authors review the literature regarding evidence-based psychological treatments (EBTs) for behavioral disturbances in older adults with dementia, as proposed by the American Psychological Association's Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology. Fifty-seven randomized clinical trials were reviewed for inclusion on the basis of titles or abstract information. Forty-three were excluded either because

Rebecca G. Logsdon; Susan M. McCurry; Linda Teri

2007-01-01

425

Sport Psychology: An Emerging Domain in the Counseling Psychology Profession?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed counseling psychologists on their involvement in sport psychology research, training, and practice; their affiliation with sport psychology professional organizations; and their attitudes toward current professional sport psychology issues. Found that counseling psychologists were minimally involved, and had received little formal…

Petrie, Trent A.; And Others

1995-01-01

426

Coverage of Russian psychological contributions in American psychology textbooks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internationalizing psychology is an important component of current globalization trends. American textbooks on the history of psychology and introductory psychology were surveyed for the presence of historical and contemporary important Russian psychologists to assess the current status of Russian–American crossfertilization. Of a list of 97 important Russian psychologists, as determined by the editors of the Russian journal Methodology and History

Maria Aleksandrova-Howell; Charles I. Abramson; David Philip Arthur Craig

2012-01-01

427

Coverage of Russian psychological contributions in American psychology textbooks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internationalizing psychology is an important component of current globalization trends. American textbooks on the history of psychology and introductory psychology were surveyed for the presence of historical and contemporary important Russian psychologists to assess the current status of Russian–American crossfertilization. Of a list of 97 important Russian psychologists, as determined by the editors of the Russian journal Methodology and History

Maria Aleksandrova-Howell; Charles I. Abramson; David Philip Arthur Craig

2011-01-01

428

Psychological type and counselling psychology trainees’ choice of counselling orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clarifying the factors which influence choice of counselling orientation is important. This study investigated whether psychological type is associated with choice of orientation in counselling psychology trainees. Sets of questionnaires were sent to 210 counselling psychology trainees in four universities, which resulted in a sample of 84 participants. The measures were the Keirsey Temperament Sorter II and a short demographic

Evi Varlami; Rowan Bayne

2007-01-01

429

Towards an ICT-based psychology: E-psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive science is the scientific domain which studies, analyzes, simulates and infers for various aspects, functions and procedures of human mentality such as, thinking, logic, language, knowledge, memory, learning, perception and the ability to solve problems. E-psychology is in close relation with the cognitive science domain, but expands beyond it, as e-psychology is the efficient convergence of psychology and Information

Athanasios Drigas; Lefteris Koukianakis; Yannis Papagerasimou

2011-01-01

430

Experiences of Psychological and Physical Aggression in Adolescent Romantic Relationships: Links to Psychological Distress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This research examined links between adolescents' experiences of psychological and physical relationship aggression and their psychological distress. Experiences of psychological and physical aggression were expected to correlate positively with symptoms of psychological distress, but experiences of psychological aggression were…

Jouriles, Ernest N.; Garrido, Edward; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee

2009-01-01

431

Experiences of Psychological and Physical Aggression in Adolescent Romantic Relationships: Links to Psychological Distress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: This research examined links between adolescents' experiences of psychological and physical relationship aggression and their psychological distress. Experiences of psychological and physical aggression were expected to correlate positively with symptoms of psychological distress, but experiences of psychological aggression were…

Jouriles, Ernest N.; Garrido, Edward; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee

2009-01-01

432

The Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This column reviews the Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection, published by EBSCO. This database contains a large number of full text scholarly journal articles in psychology and the behavioral sciences.

John R. Clark

2002-01-01

433

Computer Simulations in Teaching Psychology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The use of computer simulations as teaching devices in two psychology courses (statistics and research design and physiological psychology) is discussed. In the statistics and design course the primary pupose of simulation activities was to provide a prob...

R. E. Snyder

1977-01-01

434

Advances in Adolescent Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Adolescence is a multiplicity of events, experiences, behavior, people, and cultural meanings. This book attempts to provide detailed and in-depth analysis of the central issues related to adolescent psychology, while taking this multiplicity into account. A comprehensive representation of the topic is provided through integration of historical,…

Violato, Claudio; Travis, Leroy

435

Self psychology: Today  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self psychology is maintaining continuity with Kohut's last work, How Does Analysis Cure? and his vision of human nature, as well as exploring a multiplicity of new directions. This paper discusses the expansion of Kohut's contributions in terms of the “figure?ground”; dimensions of transference: a selfobject dimension and representational configurations. On the basis of empirical studies of infancy, the paper

Frank M. Lachmann; Beatrice Beebe

1995-01-01

436

Basic readings in psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perhaps one of the best criteria of a book's present significance is whether or not it is deemed important enough to be chosen to appear on the reading lists for graduate students preparing for their doctoral examinations. With this criterion in mind, letters were sent to all American and Canadian psychology departments granting doctor's degrees in 1953-54 and again, five

Norman D. Sundberg

1960-01-01

437

New Journals of Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creativity, personality assessment and social attitudes are the three primary interests listed by Ronald Taft in the International Directory of Psychologists. He took his Ph.D. at the University of Berkeley, California, USA and is now at the University of Melbourne, Australia. He is also Consulting Editor of Australian Journal of Psychology. The International Platform asked him to review the new

Ronald Taft

1967-01-01

438

Evolutionary Social Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have argued that the evolutionary perspective to social psychology is not untestable, not reductionist, not a theory about rigid genetic determinism, not a justification for the status quo, and not incompatible with sociocultural or cognitive analyses. What it is, instead, is a set of ideas that have proved quite useful in generating novel hypotheses, and parsimoniously connecting findings from

Douglas Kenrick; Josh Ackerman; Susan Ledlow

439

Psychologic aspects in proctalgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: One of the main problems in coloproctology is chronic idiopathic anal pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychosomatic components of proctalgia to identify which, if any, component is associated with this pain and to what extent. METHODS: Twenty patients with proctalgia were observed (mean age, 46 years). Psychologic consultations were required by the surgeons, because

Caterina Renzi; Mario Pescatori

2000-01-01

440

Psychology. New York State.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a reference guide to the laws, rules, and regulations of the State Education Department that govern the profession of psychology in the state of New York. The requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a psychologist are also highlighted. General regulations for the licensed professions as well…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Cultural Education Center.

441

Psychological Treatments to Avoid  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Certain psychological treatments should be avoided, and a list of such treatments would provide valuable guidance for counselors, as well as potential clients. It is well established that some therapies are potentially dangerous, and some fringe therapies are highly unlikely to help clients beyond a placebo effect. This article provides an…

Thomason, Timothy C.

2010-01-01

442

A Psychology of Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|William James, the turn of the century psychologist, philospher, and educator, was avidly interested in the relationship between psychology and teaching. This paper considers operant conditioning, timing of reinforcers, and programmed instruction--touchstones of B.F. Skinner in the teaching/learning milieu. Of course, materials not just methods…

Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, B. C.

443

Psychological Tests in Advertising  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a recent study of advertising by means of the association test (J. of Experimental Psychol., 1923, ^W6,^n 357-365) Laird finds that there is a discrepancy between brand name recalled and brand used, or between association and use. On the basis on these findings he condemns the association test as worthless in studying the psychology of advertising. Professor Poffenberger points

A. T. Poffenberger

1924-01-01

444

Color and Psychological Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Color is a ubiquitous perceptual experience, yet little scientific information about the influence of color on affect, cognition, and behavior is available. Accordingly, we have developed a general model of color and psychological functioning, which we present in this article. We also describe a hypothesis derived from this model regarding the influence of red in achievement contexts. In addition, we

Andrew J. Elliot; Markus A. Maier

2007-01-01

445

Rediscovering Differential Psychology?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Comments on the original article, "Many forms of culture," by A. B. Cohen. Cohen offered an eye-opening review of how culture means much more than ethnicity within a nation or differences between nations. After developing a much-expanded definition of culture, he concluded, "I have lamented the fact that psychology has focused on some important…

Takooshian, Harold

2010-01-01

446

Advances in Adolescent Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adolescence is a multiplicity of events, experiences, behavior, people, and cultural meanings. This book attempts to provide detailed and in-depth analysis of the central issues related to adolescent psychology, while taking this multiplicity into account. A comprehensive representation of the topic is provided through integration of historical,…

Violato, Claudio; Travis, Leroy

447

What is abnormal psychology?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abnormal psychology is the scientific study of the mental pathology that underlies the symptomatology of psychiatric diseases. It is general when the symptoms studied are common to a number of diseases; and special, when the symptoms studied are idiopathic to particular diseases.

A. E. Davies

1931-01-01

448

Character and abnormal psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Character may be defined in terms of ethically effective organization of all the forces of an individual. Such a definition takes account of modern ethical conceptions and seems to express the fundamental interest of all students of abnormal psychology. It serves to distinguish character from other aspects of personality.

W. S. Taylor

1926-01-01

449

On psychological understanding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses the psychology of understanding delusions. Two types of delusions have been proposed: positive wish-fulfilling delusions of grandeur; and negative delusions of persecution and depreciation. The 2 kinds of understanding are: (1) retrospective understanding consisting in an essentially reductive method, and (2) prospective understanding consisting of a constructive method. Constructive understanding is explained as subjective, not scientific, and as decomposing

C. G. Jung

1915-01-01

450

Psychological aspects of pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manual therapy is based on a biomedical model of illness and places considerable reliance on the patient's report of pain. Reported pain intensity is assumed to bear a close relationship with underlying nociception but research has shown that the experience of pain is also influenced by a wide range of psychological factors. Firstly, response to pain provocation (whether palpation or

C. J. Main; P. J. Watson

1999-01-01

451

Giftedness and Psychological Type.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Comparison of the psychological types, as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), of 966 students at a public residential magnet high school for academically talented students with other gifted and traditional high school students found both magnet school students and gifted students showed a particular MBTI distribution. (DB)|

Hawkins, John

1998-01-01

452

Psychology: Teacher Supplement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This supplement provides teachers with tests, quizzes, answers to questions in the text, and general teaching information for using the student text, "Psychology," by Rebecca Stark. Quizzes included are on the topics of human development; the nervous system; the brain; cognitive development; sensation and perception; conditioning; learning;…

Stark, Rebecca

453

Psychological aspects of asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asthma can be affected by stress, anxiety, sadness, and suggestion, as well as by environmental irritants or allergens, exercise, and infection. It also is associated with an elevated prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Asthma and these psychological states and traits may mutually potentiate each other through direct psychophysiological mediation, nonadherence to medical regimen, exposure to asthma triggers, and inaccuracy

Paul Lehrer; Jonathan Feldman; Nicholas Giardino; Hye-Sue Song; Karen Schmaling

2002-01-01

454

Psychological Aspects of Asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asthma can be affected by stress, anxiety, sadness, and suggestion, as well as by environmental irritants or allergens, exercise, and infection. It also is associated with an elevated prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders. Asthma and these psychological states and traits may mutually potentiate each other through direct psychophysiological mediation, nonadherence to medical regimen, exposure to asthma triggers, and inaccuracy

Paul Lehrer; Jonathan Feldman; Nicholas Giardino; Hye-Sue Song; Karen Schmaling

2002-01-01

455

Psychology of Poverty  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is a critical review of researches in psychology of poverty in India. In spite of the fact that poverty remains to be the foremost problem of India, there seems to be a general negligence on the part of the Indian behavioral scientists in studying it with researcher’s rigour. Poverty in India is typically a unique Indian problem deeply

Moulik T K

456

APA Educational Psychology Handbook  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The "APA Educational Psychology Handbook" reflects the broad nature of the field today, with state-of-the-science reviews of the diverse critical theories driving research and practice; in-depth investigation of the range of individual differences and cultural/contextual factors that affect student achievement, motivation, and beliefs; and close…

Harris, Karen R., Ed.; Graham, Steve, Ed.; Urdan, Tim, Ed.

2011-01-01

457

Surrogacy: the psychological issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surrogate motherhood arrangements have increased in recent years and yet the practice remains controversial. The present paper evaluates the limited available research evidence. Issues discussed include: psychological stressors associated with surrogacy, attitudes towards the practice, motives of surrogate and commissioning couple and issues pertaining to their relationship, the question of the surrogate relinquishing the child to the commissioning couple and

R. J. Edelmann

2004-01-01

458

‘Hirsutism’: A Psychological Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hirsutism, i.e. ‘excess’ body hair in the ‘male’ distribution, is a medical term applied only to women. Although associated with social and psychological difficulties including anxiety, social avoidance and a confusion of gender identity and although it raises important gender issues, there has been little systematic study. No prior research has focussed on the relationship between women’s perceived degree of

Anna Keegan; Lih-Mei Liao; Mary Boyle

2003-01-01

459

A psychology without heredity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Starting from a behavioristic definition of psychology, Professor Kuo vigorously attacks the use of heredity as an explanatory conception. It is commonly assumed that instinctive behavior has a fixed and invariable neural pattern as its basis; but the facts are against this view, as they are also against the view of a variable synaptic resistance. Even if we knew something

Z. Y. Kuo

1924-01-01

460

Developments in Industrial Psychology in India.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper briefly describes the development of industrial psychology in India. It is divided into five parts: (1) Graduate training in psychology with special reference to industrial psychology; (2) Analysis of publications on psychology published in Indi...

H. C. Ganguli

1971-01-01

461

Psychology and Death: Meaningful Rediscovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The place of death in psychology is reviewed historically. Leading causes for its being slighted as an area of investigation during psychology’s early years are presented. Reasons for its rediscovery in the mid-1950s as a legitimate sector for scientific inquiry are then discussed, along with some vicissitudes encountered in carrying out research in the field. This is followed by a

Herman Feifel

1990-01-01

462

Positive Psychology at the Summit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychology has traditionally placed more emphasis on the negative than positive aspects of human behavior. The positive psychology movement, since its beginnings in 1999, has made major advances toward correcting this imbalance. Research inspired by the movement now spans an impressive range of topics, including many that are absolutely essential to a comprehensive psychological understanding of human nature. The present

Dean Keith Simonton; Roy F. Baumeister

2005-01-01

463

Positive psychological approaches to therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term positive psychology has become widely used in recent years to refer to the new movement among psychologists who have turned their attention to positive human functioning. In this article we will review what the emerging field of positive psychology tells us about therapeutic practice. The positive psychology movement has led to a questioning of the fundamental assumptions underlying

Stephen Joseph; P. Alex Linley

2005-01-01

464

Positive Psychology: The Emerging Paradigm.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses positive psychology, which focuses on health and well-being utilizing the elements of belief, hope, self-esteem, responsibility, elation, and wisdom as the basis of psychological theory and practice. Describes efforts to change the psychology field, including identifying promising young professionals, establishing monetary prizes, and…

Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly

2000-01-01

465

Educational Psychology: The distinctive contribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper, written in the twenty?first anniversary year of the journal Educational Psychology in Practice, attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in time and outlining some of the difficulties involved in

R. J. Cameron

2006-01-01

466

My marriage with music psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A childhood musical environment, supportive family, early experience of performance on piano and organ, interest in psychology in late teenage years, studies of psychology and musicology at Uppsala University, and fortuitous external academic encounters led the author to a lifelong relation with music psychology. During undergraduate studies he conducted research on rhythm with Ingmar Bengtsson, a professor of musicology. The

ALF GABRIELSSON

2009-01-01

467

Ethics, Psychology, and Public Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

An introduction to the Journal of Forensic Psychology's new section on “Ethics, Psychology, and Public Policy,” this essay outlines the contours that characterize the interrelationship between ethics, psychology, and public policy. Offering a broad and inclusive framework for understanding this interrelationship, it lays out and comments upon several spheres of analysis - the practical\\/professional, law, lawmaking, and public policy, justice

Christopher R. Williams

2009-01-01

468

Signature Strengths in Positive Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Positive psychology can be thought of as the scientific study of what is "right about people" as opposed to the traditional focus on the healing of psychological pain or trauma. The philosophical roots of positive psychology can be traced back to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, as well as Islamic and Athenian…

Molony, Terry; Henwood, Maureen

2010-01-01

469

The New Psychology of Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new psychology of men has emerged over the past 15 years within the larger fields of men's studies and gender studies. Informed by the academic breakthroughs of feminist scholarship, the new psychology of men examines masculinity not as a normative referent, but rather as a problematic construct. In so doing, it provides a framework for a psychological approach to

Ronald F. Levant

1996-01-01

470

Psychology's Role in Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This information packet contains eight two- to three-page publications from the American Psychological Association series "Psychological Services for the 21st Century, Psychology's Role in Health Care: Studying Human Behavior; Promoting Health; Saving Health Care Dollars; Providing Mental Health Services." The focus of the series is the connection…

American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

471

Evolutionary Psychology and Intelligence Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article seeks to unify two subfields of psychology that have hitherto stood separately: evolutionary psychology and intelligence research/differential psychology. I suggest that general intelligence may simultaneously be an evolved adaptation and an individual-difference variable. Tooby and Cosmides's (1990a) notion of random quantitative…

Kanazawa, Satoshi

2010-01-01

472

The vocabulary of educational psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vocabulary analyses of 8 educational psychology texts published since 1937 were made by looking up every word on odd pages of each book in Thorndike's word lists and keeping a frequency count of those not found in the first 10,000 words, and by checking difficult words with Warren's Dictionary of psychology to single out those of psychological nature. Frequency of

G. M. Blair

1941-01-01

473

Transpersonal: The New Educational Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article lists some of the major ideas and topics of interest in transpersonal psychology and illustrates them with examples of transpersonal education applied to schools. Transpersonal psychology includes psychological aspects of such things as new world views, altered states of consciousness, an impulse toward higher states, self-realization…

Roberts, Thomas Bradford

474

ON RELATIVISM IN CONSTRUCTIVIST PSYCHOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many scholars criticize constructivist approaches to psychology for culminating in a nihilistic relativism. This article reviews the problem of relativism within per- sonal construct psychology and social constructionism. It argues that labeling constructivist approaches to psychology as essentially relativist or nonrelativist simplifies the debate by assigning indisputable characteristics to a family of theories. Both relativ- ist and nonrelativist interpretations of

Jonathan D. Raskin

2001-01-01

475

Transpersonal: The New Educational Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article lists some of the major ideas and topics of interest in transpersonal psychology and illustrates them with examples of transpersonal education applied to schools. Transpersonal psychology includes psychological aspects of such things as new world views, altered states of consciousness, an impulse toward higher states,…

Roberts, Thomas Bradford

476

Teaching of psychology in Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychology programs were first recognized in Brazilian universities during the mid?20th century. Prior to that, psychology had been taught in conjunction with other programs such as medicine, law, and education. The growth of psychology programs has been rapid in the last 25 years. From the time the Brazilian government first established a 5?year degree program in 1962, the number of

Claudio S. Hutz; William Gomes; Sherri McCarthy

2006-01-01

477

Psychology and Phenomenology: A Clarification  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Controversies are rampant in contemporary psychology concerning the appropriate method for observing consciousness and the role inner experience should play in psychological theorizing. These conflicting orientations reflect, in part, methodological differences between natural science and human science interpretations of psychology. Humanistic…

Kendler, Howard H.

2005-01-01

478

Positive Psychology and Outdoor Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A relatively new movement in psychology, positive psychology, has many implications for the field of outdoor education. Positive psychology has the goal of fostering excellence through the understanding and enhancement of factors that lead to growth. It embraces the view that growth occurs when positive factors are present, as opposed to the…

Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

2005-01-01

479

A Positive Psychology That Matters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Major Contribution intended to situate positive psychology in counseling psychology's past and future and in the complex world we live and work in today. The four reactions (Frazier, Lee,& Steger; Gerstein; Linley; Mollen, Ethington,& Ridley) provide new insights into how counseling psychology has and will contribute to the study of human…

Lopez, Shane L.; Magyar-Moe, Jeana L.

2006-01-01

480

Reverse Psychologism, Cognition and Content  

Microsoft Academic Search

The confusion between cognitive states and the content of cognitive states that gives rise to psychologism also gives rise to reverse psychologism. Weak reverse psychologism says that we can study cognitive states by studying content – for instance, that we can study the mind by studying linguistics or logic. This attitude is endemic in cognitive science and linguistic theory. Strong

Terry Dartnall

2000-01-01

481

Signature Strengths in Positive Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Positive psychology can be thought of as the scientific study of what is "right about people" as opposed to the traditional focus on the healing of psychological pain or trauma. The philosophical roots of positive psychology can be traced back to Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, as well as Islamic and Athenian…

Molony, Terry; Henwood, Maureen

2010-01-01

482

Historical Perspectives on School Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph was created to stimulate more thorough study of the history of school psychology. In the first section, "Mapping the Territory for Historical Study of School Psychology," by Liam K. Grimley, some fundamental questions are raised about what should be studied in the history of school psychology, how that study might be approached, and…

Grimley, Liam K., Ed.

483

Mechanisms of Mindfulness: A Buddhist Psychological Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several models have explored the possible change mechanisms underlying mindfulness-based interventions from the perspectives\\u000a of multiple disciplines, including cognitive science, affective neuroscience, clinical psychiatry, and psychology. Together,\\u000a these models highlight the complexity of the change process underlying these interventions. However, no one model appears\\u000a to be sufficiently comprehensive in describing the mechanistic details of this change process. In an attempt

Andrea D. Grabovac; Mark A. Lau; Brandilyn R. Willett

2011-01-01

484

Hospital practice of psychology resurveyed: 1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considered from the perspective of licensed psychologists in fee-for-service (FFS) practice, the extent of medical staff membership and of clinical privileges is tabulated. The hospital practice of psychology, although still proportionally quite limited, is viewed in the context of interprofessional competition and current trend. Based on survey data from 10 states, it was found that one-fifth of FFS-licensed psychologists reported

Herbert Dörken; James T. Webb; Joan S. Zaro

1982-01-01

485

Psychodiagnostic Testing in Forensic Psychology: A Commentary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article comments on five articles in a series designed to provide some current guidelines concerning the forensic applicability of five widely used psychological tests: the Bender Gestalt Test (BGT), the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and the Rorschach Inkblot Method (RIM). The author's observations and recommendations make a valuable

Irving B. Weiner

2002-01-01

486

Psychological condition of patients complaining of halitosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the actual degree of malodor and the psychological condition of patients complaining of halitosis.Methods: The subjects consisted of 155 patients aged 46±17 years (mean±SD) who visited the Halitosis Clinic at Kyushu University Dental Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan. The Cornell Medical Index (CMI) Health Questionnaire was used to evaluate the

T Oho; Y Yoshida; Y Shimazaki; Y Yamashita; T Koga

2001-01-01

487

Standardizing the psychological autopsy: addressing the Daubert standard.  

PubMed

The psychological autopsy, as a research, clinical, and forensic tool, has gained widespread usage in suicidology over the last half century. In forensic settings, the lack of standardization and problems determining the procedure's validity and reliability pose significant issues for the procedure's admissibility under the Daubert standard of evidence. The Daubert standard requires that evidence must be founded on scientific knowledge and established five guidelines for judicial decisions regarding the admissibility of expert testimony. In this paper we examine expert opinion regarding the psychological autopsy and recommend a standardized protocol or template regarding areas and lines of inquiry for a psychological autopsy used in legal cases. PMID:17087630

Snider, Jenifer E; Hane, Steve; Berman, Alan L

2006-10-01

488

The impact of clinical conditions and social factors on the psychological distress of cancer patients: an explorative study at a consultation and liaison service in a rural general hospital  

PubMed Central

Background In recent decades, increasing attention has been paid to the subjective dimension of cancer, especially to psychosocial screening procedures, major psychiatric disorders but also psychological and psychosocial distress, and finally to met needs of oncologic patients. This study aims first to describe cancer patients in a rural hospital attended by a psycho-oncological consultation-liaison team, second to assess predictors for psychological distress in cancer patients, and finally to identify predictors for recommendation of further psychosocial support. Methods The sample (n = 290) comprises a full survey of patients at breast and bowel cancer services (n=209) and patients referred by other medical and surgical services because of psychosocial impairment (n = 81). All patients were assessed by means of the PO-Bado (Psycho-Oncological Basic Documentation) expert rating scale. Assessment of predictors for psychological distress was conducted by multivariate regression models and assessment for predictors for need for outpatient psychosocial support by a logistic regression analysis. All analyses were conducted using STATA 12. Results Most members of the assessed sample (average age 65, 82% women) were not severely impaired from a functional and psychological point of view. A total of 14% had received psychiatric treatment before. Mood swings, anxiety, grief, and fatigue were the most important distress symptoms. Selectively referred patients vs. full survey patients of cancer centres, as well as bowel vs. breast cancer patients show a higher level of psychological and physical distress. Fatigue, assessed metastases, and functional limitations were the best predictors for psychological burden. Referral mode, gender, age, family problems, fatigue, and previous psychiatric treatment were associated with further need of psychosocial support. Conclusions Psycho-oncological consultation and liaison services may offer support to patients in an early stage of cancer, especially in cancer centres. Because of selectively referred patients show a higher burden, the use of basic screening instruments could be meaningful. Fatigue, metastases status, and functional limitations may better predict psychological distress than pain, duration of illness, psychosocial conditions or previous psychiatric treatment. More attention has to be paid to outpatient follow-up with older cancer patients, those with family problems, and those suffering from significant fatigue.

2013-01-01

489

Adolescents' pain coping profiles: Expectations for treatment, functional outcomes and adherence to psychological treatment recommendations  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To explore how adolescents’ pain coping profiles relate to their expectations regarding psychological treatment recommendations, and to examine patients’ functioning and engagement in psychological treatment three months following a multidisciplinary pain clinic evaluation. METHODS: Adolescents and their parents completed measures of pain coping strategies, treatment expectations, pain ratings, somatic symptoms, school absences and functional disability. Parents also reported whether patients followed through with psychological treatment recommendations. RESULTS: Adaptive copers and their parents were more likely to expect psychological treatments to be helpful; however, at follow-up, there were no significant group differences in patients’ participation in psychological treatment. Patients in both groups experienced significantly lower levels of somatic symptoms and functional disability, and had fewer school absences from the initial evaluation to the follow-up. DISCUSSION: The results of the present study identify preliminary clinical implications for the way in which practitioners in multidisciplinary pain clinics present recommendations for psychological treatment to patients and their families.

Claar, Robyn Lewis; Simons, Laura E

2011-01-01

490

Psychiatric Symptomatology and Psychological Functioning in HIV-Infected Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines psychiatric and psychological functioning in HIV-infected mothers with young children. Reflecting the epidemiology of HIV disease in women, the majority were African American and Latina, socioeconomically disadvantaged single parents with histories of substance use. Women were recruited from primary care HIV clinics. They were administered a structured psychiatric interview (SCID-R-Nonpatient form), as well as a psychological

Claude Ann Mellins; Anke A. Ehrhardt; Wanda F. Grant

1997-01-01

491

The PostDoctoral Residency in School Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Professional psychology has been experiencing dramatic changes and challenges. Of note, many newly minted doctorates in clinical and counseling psychology are increasingly concerned about em-ployability. In fact, increasingly, the post-doctoral residency required for credentialling as a Licensed Psychologist can offer poor financial renum-eration. At the same time, the Certified School Psychologist is increasingly able to secure a satisfying position. However,

Tony D. Crespi; Barbara A. Fischetti

2001-01-01

492

Developmental psychology and early childhood education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Child psychology and early childhood education are closely related, but the relationship is very complex. This is due to the fact that ‘child psychology’ at the same time covers 1) researchers' scientific psychology, 2) writers' popular psychology, and 3) parents' and teachers' common sense psychology about child development. This article presents current trends in scientific child psychology and recent studies

Hans Vejleskov

1999-01-01

493

A comparison of psychological and pharmacological treatment in smoking cessation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A double-blind trial of a smoking-withdrawal chewing gum containing 2 mg nicotine was conducted with 100 consecutive patients in a smoking cessation clinic. All patients received the usual psychological treatment given at the clinic. In addition, the patients were randomly assigned to a nicotine gum (the experimental group) or a placebo chewing gum (control group). The abstinence rates for the

Karl-Olov Fagerström

1982-01-01

494

Referrals for anger and aggression in forensic psychology outpatient services  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate a clinical observation in referrals to a forensic clinical psychology outpatient service: that anger was related to obsessional-compulsive behaviours, possibly as a substitute means of controlling situations. A secondary hypothesis was that control of situations by obsessional-compulsive behaviours would result in greater levels of anxiety and depression, since this is not this

Mary McMurran; Vincent Egan; Cathryn Richardson; Shahla Ahmadi; Gillian Cooper

2000-01-01

495

Psychological and Social Predictors of Suicidal Ideation among Young Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although there is an enormous amount of literature demonstrating socio-psychological determinants of suicide and self-injurious behaviour among adults or clinical samples of children and adolescents, there is a scarcity of studies focussing on non-clinical adolescent samples. The current study examined associations between self-reported data on…

Kirkcaldy, Bruce D.; Eysenck, Michael W.; Siefen, Georg R.

2004-01-01

496

Youth Reactions to Participation in Psychological Assessment Procedures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates self-reported positive and negative reactions of youth to psychological assessment procedures. A community sample (COM) reported reactions to completing a self-report questionnaire of negative emotional states. A clinical sample (CL) reported reactions both to completion of the questionnaire and to a clinical intake.…

Saldana, Lisa; DuBois, David L.

2006-01-01

497

The Critical Role for Psychology in the Children's Mental Health System: Being a Catalyst to Implement and Build Better Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing demands for accountability, effectiveness, and use of research in the children's mental health system places psychology in a unique and important position. Psychology practitioners are highly trained in scientific and clinical methods and possess the skills needed to implement evidence-based practices in community organisations. Moreover, psychology's central role in the increasing demand to evaluate services can help to

FRED SCHMIDT

2012-01-01

498

School Psychology Resources Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With over 1,000 annotated links, this Website offers a valuable directory of online resources in the broad and burgeoning field of school psychology. Resources are divided into two broad categories: Specific Conditions, Disorders, and Disabilities, and Other Information. The first includes listings for such topics as Attention Deficit Disorders, Deafness, Eating Disorders, Learning Disabilities, Mental Retardation, Substance Abuse, and Tourette's Syndrome. The second catch-all category includes such topics as Adolescence, Assessment/Evaluation, ERIC Clearinghouses, Law and Education, Mental Health, Professional Organizations, and about a dozen others. The links are authoritative, and the Website is updated daily. A features section also includes an online bookstore, daily cartoon, and jobs information. The site is created and maintained by Sandra Steingart, who holds a doctorate in education and works in the Office of Psychological Services in the Baltimore County Public Schools.

499

Future directions in psychological assessment: combining evidence-based medicine innovations with psychology's historical strengths to enhance utility.  

PubMed

Assessment has been a historical strength of psychology, with sophisticated traditions of measurement, psychometrics, and theoretical underpinnings. However, training, reimbursement, and utilization of psychological assessment have been eroded in many settings. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) offers a different perspective on evaluation that complements traditional strengths of psychological assessment. EBM ties assessment directly to clinical decision making about the individual, uses simplified Bayesian methods explicitly to integrate assessment data, and solicits patient preferences as part of the decision-making process. Combining the EBM perspective with psychological assessment creates a hybrid approach that is more client centered, and it defines a set of applied research topics that are highly clinically relevant. This article offers a sequence of a dozen facets of the revised assessment process, along with examples of corollary research studies. An eclectic integration of EBM and evidence-based assessment generates a powerful hybrid that is likely to have broad applicability within clinical psychology and enhance the utility of psychological assessments. PMID:23153181

Youngstrom, Eric A

2012-11-15

500

Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica, to clinical psychology doctoral students within a large urban professional psychology program.

Richard A. Zweig; Lawrence Siegel; Kathy Byrne; Vicki Passman; Steven Hahn; Gail Kuslansky; Denise Fyffe; Douglas Stewart; Gregory Hinrichsen

2005-01-01