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Sample records for clinical radiobiological experience

  1. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durantel, Florent; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine; Chevalier, François; Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas; Testard, Isabelle; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  2. Hypofractionation in prostate cancer: radiobiological basis and clinical appliance.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I; Detti, B; Bonomo, P; Greto, D; Paiar, F; Simontacchi, G; Meattini, I; Scoccianti, S; Masoni, T; Ciabatti, C; Turkaj, A; Serni, S; Minervini, A; Gacci, M; Carini, M; Livi, L

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76-80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α / β . Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  3. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    PubMed Central

    Mangoni, M.; Desideri, I.; Detti, B.; Bonomo, P.; Greto, D.; Paiar, F.; Simontacchi, G.; Meattini, I.; Scoccianti, S.; Masoni, T.; Ciabatti, C.; Turkaj, A.; Serni, S.; Minervini, A.; Gacci, M.; Carini, M.; Livi, L.

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α/β. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  4. In vitro irradiation system for radiobiological experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cell cultures provide important information on basic tumor biology and radiobiology, they are not representative of the complexity of three-dimensional (3-D) solid tumors. In particular, new models reproducing clinical conditions as closely as possible are needed for radiobiological studies to provide information that can be translated from bench to bedside. Methods We developed a novel system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of 3-D tumor spheroids, the in vitro model considered as a bridge between the complex architectural organization of in vivo tumors and the very simple one of in vitro monolayer cell cultures. The system exploits the same equipment as that used for patient treatments, without the need for dedicated and highly expensive instruments. To mimic the passage of radiation beams through human tissues before they reach the target tumor mass, 96-multiwell plates containing the multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are inserted into a custom-built phantom made of plexiglass, the material most similar to water, the main component of human tissue. Results The system was used to irradiate CAEP- and A549-derived MCTS, pre-treated or not with 20 μM cisplatin, with a dose of 20 Gy delivered in one session. We also tested the same treatment schemes on monolayer CAEP and A549 cells. Our preliminary results indicated a significant increment in radiotoxicity 20 days after the end of irradiation in the CAEP spheroids pre-treated with cisplatin compared to those treated with cisplatin or irradiation alone. Conversely, the effect of the radio- chemotherapy combination in A549-derived MCTS was similar to that induced by cisplatin or irradiation alone. Finally, the 20 Gy dose did not affect cell survival in monolayer CAEP and A549 cells, whereas cisplatin or cisplatin plus radiation caused 100% cell death, regardless of the type of cell line used. Conclusions We set up a system for the irradiation

  5. In vitro irradiation station for broad beam radiobiological experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wéra, A.-C.; Riquier, H.; Heuskin, A.-C.; Michiels, C.; Lucas, S.

    2011-12-01

    The study of the interaction of charged particles with living matter is of prime importance to the fields of radiotherapy, radioprotection and space radiobiology. Particle accelerators and their associated equipment are proven to be helpful tools in performing basic science in all these fields. Indeed, they can accelerate virtually any ions to a given energy and flux and let them interact with living matter either in vivo or in vitro. In this context, the University of Namur has developed a broad beam in vitro irradiation station for use in radiobiological experiments. Cells are handled in GLP conditions and can be irradiated at various fluxes with ions ranging from hydrogen to carbon. The station is mounted on a 2 MV tandem accelerator, and the energy range can be set up in the linear energy transfer (LET) ranges that are useful for radiobiological experiments. This paper describes the current status of the hardware that has been developed, and presents results related to its performance in term of dose-rate, energy range and beam uniformity for protons, alpha particles and carbon ions. The results of clonogenic assays of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells irradiated with protons and alpha particles are also presented and compared with literature.

  6. Studies in the radiobiology of osteoradionecrosis and their clinical significance

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, R.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1987-10-01

    The radiobiology of osteoradionecrosis is a complex of cellular death and cellular functional impairments from radiation energy transfers. Four studies of irradiated patients and a data base from 536 patients with osteoradionecrosis revealed separate pathophysiologic conditions for osteoradionecrosis induced by early trauma, osteoradionecrosis induced by late trauma, and spontaneous osteoradionecrosis. A large body of data suggested useful clinical guidelines for the management of irradiated patients. The guidelines, in part, include a recommendation for deferring radiation treatment for 21 days after tissue wounding, if possible; a relative contraindication to wounding tissue during a radiation course; a recommendation for the use of hyperbaric oxygen before wounding; and a strong recommendation to provide comprehensive dental care to the irradiated patient.

  7. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  8. Physical conditions for conducting radiobiological experiments in beams of accelerated particles with high linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, Y. I.; Marennyy, A. M.; Popov, V. I.; Aykhorn, K.; Ertsgreber, G.

    1974-01-01

    The design and construction of an accelerator to conduct radiobiological experiments is reported that uses aluminum filters to control the accelerated ion beam while preserving its stability, and a vacuum chamber to conduct the ion beam with the help of a collector through a lavsan exit port to the target. Depth distribution of the absorbed dose from a monodirectional ion beam is practically completely represented by the change in the energy spectrum of the biological object.

  9. [Radiobiological characteristics of chilled seedlings as an object for inflight experiments].

    PubMed

    Shaĭdorov, Iu I; Miller, A T; Fischere, G A

    1975-01-01

    It is recommended to use for experimentation cooled plant seedlings in the stage of delayed growth. Cooled seedlings have a high sensitivity to the environmental effects and can be used in long-term (up to 1-2 months) experiments. The influence of suboptimal temperatures on the radiosensitivity of seedlings, the development of radiation injury and maintenance of the radiobiological effect is described. PMID:1214486

  10. Preliminary analysis of a radiobiological experiment for LifeSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Hardy, Alva C.; Atwell, William; Schimmerling, Walter

    1991-01-01

    With the possibility of performing radiation life science experiments on a dedicated satellite (LifeSat) in space, a combined effort in radiation physics and radiation dosimetry, in addition to radiation biology, is clearly required to ensure that meaningful biological experiments can be performed. To better understand the relationship of these disciplines, some possible LifeSat missions are examined. As a trial biological system, tumorigenesis is considered in the Harderian gland of mice, a system of sufficient radiosensitivity for which relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is well defined by laboratory experiments.

  11. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Anikeeva, I D; Akatov YuA; Vaulina, E N; Kostina, L N; Marenny, A M; Portman, A I; Rusin, S V; Benton, E V

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors. PMID:11537516

  12. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Anikeeva, I. D.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied. The seeds were located inside the satellite in an open space, protected with aluminum foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminum foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival rate and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can thus be regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  13. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikeeva, I. D.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A. M.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  14. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen

    2003-10-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher Tpot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer: agr = 0.3 Gy-1, agr/bgr = 10 Gy and sub

  15. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  16. Studies of SSNTDs made from LR-115 in view of their applicability in radiobiological experiments with alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörschel, B.; Hermsdorf, D.; Pieck, S.; Starke, S.; Thiele, H.; Weickert, F.

    2003-06-01

    Radiobiological studies on cell monolayers irradiated by charged particles need to determine the number and position of particle traversals. Solid state nuclear track detectors used as basic substrate for the cell layers are in principle suitable for this purpose. The detector foils must be as thin as possible but still guaranteeing mechanical stability. Two types of LR-115, red coloured and colourless, were tested in the present work. The studies aimed at optimisation of the etching conditions and determination of the registration efficiency for alpha particles in a wide range of energies and angles of incidence. Specific requirements have to be fulfilled for application of the detector foils under the environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments. Most important are biocompatibility between detector and cells and registration properties insensible against special treatments, as UV sterilisation and cell plating prior to irradiation as well as cell incubation after the irradiation. The experimental studies performed with alpha particles showed that environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments do not change the registration properties of LR-115 detectors significantly.

  17. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörtel, H.; Georgi, J.; Eyrich, W.; Fritsch, M.; Distel, L.

    2002-08-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  18. The new hybrid thermal neutron facility at TAPIRO reactor for BNCT radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Esposito, J; Rosi, G; Agosteo, S

    2007-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, devoted to carry out both dosimetric and radiobiological studies on boron carriers, which are being developed in the framework of INFN BNCT project, has been installed at the ENEA Casaccia TAPIRO research fast reactor. The thermal column, based on an original, hybrid, neutron spectrum shifter configuration, has been recently become operative. In spite of its low power (5 kW), the new facility is able to provide a high thermal neutron flux level, uniformly distributed inside the irradiation cavity, with a quite low gamma background. The main features and preliminary benchmark measurements of the Beam-shaping assembly are here presented and discussed. PMID:17504745

  19. Determination of radiobiological parameters for the safe clinical application of BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Hopewell, J.W.; Morris, G.M.; Coderre, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the present report the effects of BNCT irradiation on the skin and spinal cord of Fischer 344 rats, for known concentrations of {sup 10}B in the blood and these normal tissues, are compared with the effects of the neutron beam alone or photon irradiation. The biological effectiveness of irradiation in the presence of the capture agents BSH and BPA have been compared. Irradiations were carried out using the thermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Therapy experiments were also carried out as part of this study, using the rat 9L-gliosarcoma cell line, in order to establish the potential therapeutic advantage that might be achieved using the above capture agents. This cell line grows as a solid tumor in vivo as well as in vitro. The implications of these findings, with respect to the clinical use of the Petten HBII based epithermal neutron beam, will be discussed.

  20. Future treatment directions for HPV-associated head and neck cancer based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Loredana G

    2016-07-01

    A relatively new entity of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma located in the oropharynx and associated to the human papillomavirus (HPV) is on the rise. This cancer represents a distinct entity from the non-HPV tumours, holds different biological characteristics and responds differently to treatment. An outcome analysis of locoregionally-advanced oropharyngeal versus non-oropharyngeal cancers treated with chemo-radiotherapy revealed a statistically significant improvement for oropharyngeal cancers, which are thought to be due to their HPV-association. Consequently, more attention is paid to HPV-related head and neck cancers, given that HPV status serves as prognostic marker in oropharyngeal cancer patients. Yet, HPV positivity is a simplistic approach for risk stratification, thus more robust biomarkers are needed to fulfil this task. Despite differences in clinical response, HPV-related oral cancers undergo similar therapy to their non-HPV counterparts. This review discusses future treatment directions for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence. PMID:27221393

  1. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Thrapsanioti, Zoi; Karanasiou, Irene; Platoni, Kalliopi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.; Matsopoulos, George; Dilvoi, Maria; Patatoukas, George; Chaldeopoulos, Demetrios; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model) and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and D50 (P < 0.001) and V60 (P = 0.001) dosimetric parameters, calculated for α/β = 10 Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and V≥60 dosimetric parameter, calculated for both α/β = 2.3 Gy (P < 0.001) and α/β = 10 Gy (P < 0.001). The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions. PMID:24348743

  2. Enhanced radiobiological effects at the distal end of a clinical proton beam: in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Matsuura, Taeko; Wada, Mami; Egashira, Yusuke; Nishio, Teiji; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    In the clinic, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 1.1 has usually been used in relation to the whole depth of the spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) of proton beams. The aim of this study was to confirm the actual biological effect in the SOBP at the very distal end of clinical proton beams using an in vitro cell system. A human salivary gland tumor cell line, HSG, was irradiated with clinical proton beams (accelerated by 190 MeV/u) and examined at different depths in the distal part and the center of the SOBP. Surviving fractions were analyzed with the colony formation assay. Cell survival curves and the survival parameters were obtained by fitting with the linear–quadratic (LQ) model. The RBE at each depth of the proton SOBP compared with that for X-rays was calculated by the biological equivalent dose, and the biological dose distribution was calculated from the RBE and the absorbed dose at each position. Although the physical dose distribution was flat in the SOBP, the RBE values calculated by the equivalent dose were significantly higher (up to 1.56 times) at the distal end than at the center of the SOBP. Additionally, the range of the isoeffective dose was extended beyond the range of the SOBP (up to 4.1 mm). From a clinical point of view, this may cause unexpected side effects to normal tissues at the distal position of the beam. It is important that the beam design and treatment planning take into consideration the biological dose distribution. PMID:24824674

  3. Radiobiological results from the Bacillus subtilis Biostack experiments within the Apollo and the ASTP space flights.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Bucker, H; Hildebrand, D; Horneck, G; Holtz, G; Reitz, G; Schafer, M; Toth, B

    1978-01-01

    In order to check the results of earlier Biostack experiments, new experimental techniques were developed for the Biostack III experiment in the Apollo-Soyuz test project (ASTP). These techniques resulted in an increased accuracy of localization down to 0.2 micrometers for the determination of the impact parameter, accompanied by an increase in the sample size available for biological investigation. In addition, colony forming ability, metabolic mutations, and mutations affecting UV- and x-ray sensitivity were rendered observable by these methods. The biological and physical results obtained so far from the evaluation of the Bacillus subtilis experiment within Biostack III confirm and extend the findings of the previous Biostack experiments. They also add to the questions about the mechanisms of action of the radiation field under investigation, since the observed effects cannot be interpreted in terms of standard concepts. PMID:11965659

  4. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H; Wouters, B; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  5. Non-extensive radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-14

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  6. Non-extensive radiobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-01

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  7. The radiobiology of hypofractionation.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Alan E

    2015-05-01

    If the α/β ratio is high (e.g. 10 Gy) for tumour clonogen killing, but low (e.g. 3 Gy) for late normal tissue complications, then delivering external beam radiotherapy in a large number (20-30) of small (≈2 Gy) dose fractions should yield the highest 'therapeutic ratio'; this is demonstrated via the linear-quadratic model of cell killing. However, this 'conventional wisdom' is increasingly being challenged, partly by the success of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) extreme hypofractionation regimens of three to five large fractions for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and partly by indications that for certain tumours (prostate, breast) the α/β ratio may be of the same order or even lower than that characterising late complications. It is shown how highly conformal dose delivery combined with quasi-parallel normal tissue behaviour (n close to 1) enables 'safe' hypofractionation; this can be predicted by the (α/β)eff concept for normal tissues. Recent analyses of the clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer radiotherapy covering 'conventional' hyper- to extreme hypofractionation (stereotactic ablative radiotherapy) regimens are consistent with linear-quadratic radiobiology, even at the largest fraction sizes, despite there being theoretical reasons to expect 'LQ violation' above a certain dose. Impairment of re-oxygenation between fractions and the very high (α/β) for hypoxic cells can complicate the picture regarding the analysis of clinical outcomes; it has also been suggested that vascular damage may play a role for very large dose fractions. Finally, the link between high values of (α/β)eff and normal-tissue sparing for quasi-parallel normal tissues, thereby favouring hypofractionation, may be particularly important for proton therapy, but more generally, improved conformality, achieved by whatever technique, can be translated into individualisation of both prescription dose and fraction

  8. Introduction to Radiobiology of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Lozza, Catherine; Deshayes, Emmanuel; Boudousq, Vincent; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRTs) are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors, which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure, and low absorbed dose rate) differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure, and high absorbed dose rate), and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose–effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related) and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related) of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main challenges of

  9. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: From genetics to biology to radiobiology to oncoimmunology and all the way back to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Emmanouil; O'Neill, Eric; Gordon-Weeks, Alex; Mukherjee, Somnath; McKenna, W Gillies; Muschel, Ruth J

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Despite improvements in the clinical management, the prognosis of PDAC remains dismal. In the present comprehensive review, we will examine the knowledge of PDAC genetics and the new insights into human genome sequencing and clonal evolution. Additionally, the biology and the role of the stroma in tumour progression and response to treatment will be presented. Furthermore, we will describe the evidence on tumour chemoresistance and radioresistance and will provide an overview on the recent advances in PDAC metabolism and circulating tumour cells. Next, we will explore the characteristics and merits of the different mouse models of PDAC. The inflammatory milieu and the immunosuppressive microenvironment mediate tumour initiation and treatment failure. Hence, we will also review the inflammatory and immune escaping mechanisms and the new immunotherapies tested in PDAC. A better understanding of the different mechanisms of tumour formation and progression will help us to identify the best targets for testing in future clinical studies of PDAC. PMID:25489989

  10. Comparison of cytogenetic effects in bone marrow of mice after the flight on the biosatellite "BION-M1" and the ground-based radiobiological experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhkina, Olga; Vorozhtsova, Svetlana; Ivanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    During space flight, the astronauts are exposed to radiation exposure at low doses with low dose rates, so one of the actual areas of Radiobiology is research of action of ionizing radiation in low and ultra-low doses. Violation of the chromosome apparatus of living biosystems, ranging from viruses and bacteria to humans, is the most reliable evidence of exposure to ionizing radiation. In this regard, the study of cytogenetic damage in the cells of humans and animals is central to space radiobiology (Fedorenko B.S., 2006). In experiment "BION - M1" by anaphase method was determined level of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of tibia of mice. Flight duration biosatellite "BION - M1" (Sychev V.N. et al., 2014) was 30 days in Earth orbit. Euthanasia of experimental animals was carried out after 12 hours from the moment of landing satellite by method of cervical dislocation. The level of chromosomal aberrations in vivarium-housed control mice was 1,75 ± 0,6% and 1,8 ± 0,45%, while the mitotic index 1,46 ± 0,09% and 1,53 ± 0,05%. The content of animals in the experiment with onboard equipment led to some increase in aberrant mitosis (2,3 ± 0,4%) and reduction of the mitotic index (1,37 ± 0,02%). In the flight experiment "BION-M1" was a statistically significant increase in level of chromosome aberrations (29,7 ± 4,18%) and a decrease in the mitotic index (0,74 ± 0,07%). According to VA Shurshakova (2014), the radiation dose to mice ranged from 32 to 72 mGy and relate to a range of small doses (ICRP, 2012). In this connection we conducted a series of experiments in the ground conditions, the aim of which was the study of earliest effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in mice irradiated with low doses of γ-irradiation of 10 to 200 mGy in the first 24 hours after exposure, i.e. within the first post-radiation exposure cell cycle. Studies were carried out on adult female mice outbred ICR (CD-1) - SPF category at the age of 4-4.5 months with an average

  11. Joint bone radiobiology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Bone Radiobiology Workshop was held on July 12--13, 1991 in Toronto, Canada. This document contains the papers presented at the meeting. The five sections were: Dose-effects, Endogenous Cofactors, Tumorigenesis, New Methods and Medical Implications. The papers covered risk assessment, tissue distribution of radionuclides, lifetime studies, biological half-lifes, the influence of age at time of exposure, tumor induction by different radionuclides, microscopic localization of radionuclides, and nuclear medicine issues including tissue distribution in the skeleton and bone marrow transplantation. (MHB)

  12. CRC handbook of radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, K.N.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents Development of Radiobiology. A Review. Basic Cell Biology. Physics of Radiation Biology. Cellular Radiation Damage. Modifications of Cellular Radiation Damage. Repair of Radiation Damage. Molecular Radiation Biology. Radiation Syndromes and their Modifications. Radiation Damage of Skin and Mucous Membrane. Radiation Damage of Nervous Tissue. Radiation Damage of Reproductive Organs. Radiation Damage of Other Organ Systems. Radiation Immunology. Background, Medical and Commercial Sources. Radiation Injuries to Human Fetuses. Radiation-Induced Genetic Damage. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Tissue Culture Model. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Animal Model. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Human Model. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Secondary Neoplasms. After Therapy of Tumors. Other Late Effects: Aging, Cataract, Aplastic Anemia. Maximum Permissible Dose (MPD). Radiation Response of Human Tumor. Radioisotopes in Biology and Medicine.

  13. Monte Carlo role in radiobiological modelling of radiotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Radiobiological models are essential components of modern radiotherapy. They are increasingly applied to optimize and evaluate the quality of different treatment planning modalities. They are frequently used in designing new radiotherapy clinical trials by estimating the expected therapeutic ratio of new protocols. In radiobiology, the therapeutic ratio is estimated from the expected gain in tumour control probability (TCP) to the risk of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). However, estimates of TCP/NTCP are currently based on the deterministic and simplistic linear-quadratic formalism with limited prediction power when applied prospectively. Given the complex and stochastic nature of the physical, chemical and biological interactions associated with spatial and temporal radiation induced effects in living tissues, it is conjectured that methods based on Monte Carlo (MC) analysis may provide better estimates of TCP/NTCP for radiotherapy treatment planning and trial design. Indeed, over the past few decades, methods based on MC have demonstrated superior performance for accurate simulation of radiation transport, tumour growth and particle track structures; however, successful application of modelling radiobiological response and outcomes in radiotherapy is still hampered with several challenges. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the main techniques used in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy, with focus on the MC role as a promising computational vehicle. We highlight the current challenges, issues and future potentials of the MC approach towards a comprehensive systems-based framework in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy.

  14. Radiobiological evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments of patients with head and neck cancer: A dual-institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, G.; Pyakuryal, A. P.; Pandit, S.; Vincent, J.; Lee, C.; Mavroidis, P.; Papanikolaou, N.; Kudrimoti, M.; Sio, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, evaluation of clinical efficacy of treatment planning stems from the radiation oncologist's experience in accurately targeting tumors, while keeping minimal toxicity to various organs at risk (OAR) involved. A more objective, quantitative method may be raised by using radiobiological models. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potential correlation of OAR-related toxicities to its radiobiologically estimated parameters in simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans of patients with head and neck tumors at two institutions. Lyman model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) models were used in the Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) analysis. In this study, 33 patients with oropharyngeal primaries in the head and neck region were used to establish the correlation between NTCP values of (a) bilateral parotids with clinically observed rates of xerostomia, (b) esophagus with dysphagia, and (c) larynx with dysphagia. The results of the study indicated a strong correlation between the severity of xerostomia and dysphagia with Lyman NTCP of bilateral parotids and esophagus, respectively, but not with the larynx. In patients without complications, NTCP values of these organs were negligible. Using appropriate radiobiological models, the presence of a moderate to strong correlation between the severities of complications with NTCP of selected OARs suggested that the clinical outcome could be estimated prior to treatment. PMID:26500403

  15. Radiobiology of pions at LAMPF.

    PubMed

    Raju, M R; Tokita, N

    1982-12-01

    Recent radiobiology data for pion beams used in therapy are presented. The biological systems used were cultured cells suspended in gelatin and intestinal crypt assay. The importance of fast neutrons from pion stars in large treatment volumes is discussed. The data for compensating the depth dose distribution to produce uniform cell killing across the peak region are presented. The changes in biological effectiveness with peak width for pion beams (unlike heavy ions) are small because of fast neutron contribution from pion stars. The need for innovative radiobiology programs to guide high-LET radiotherapy is discussed. PMID:7161165

  16. Radiobiological research at JINR's accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The half-a-century development of radiobiological studies at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is reviewed on a stage-by-stage basis. With the use of the institute's accelerators, some key aspects of radiation biology have been settled, including the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of various types of ionizing radiation with different physical characteristics; radiation-induced mutagenesis mechanisms, and the formation and repair of genetic structure damage. Practical space radiobiology problems that can be solved using high-energy charged particles are discussed.

  17. The Importance of Dosimetry Standardization in Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Marc; DeWerd, Larry; Deye, James; Lindsay, Patricia; Murphy, Mark K; Mitch, Michael; Macchiarini, Francesca; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Stone, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose is central to much of radiobiological research. Precision and accuracy of dose measurements and reporting of the measurement details should be sufficient to allow the work to be interpreted and repeated and to allow valid comparisons to be made, both in the same laboratory and by other laboratories. Despite this, a careful reading of published manuscripts suggests that measurement and reporting of radiation dosimetry and setup for radiobiology research is frequently inadequate, thus undermining the reliability and reproducibility of the findings. To address these problems and propose a course of action, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) brought together representatives of the radiobiology and radiation physics communities in a workshop in September, 2011. The workshop participants arrived at a number of specific recommendations as enumerated in this paper and they expressed the desirability of creating dosimetry standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cell culture and for small and large animal experiments. It was also felt that these SOPs would be most useful if they are made widely available through mechanism(s) such as the web, where they can provide guidance to both radiobiologists and radiation physicists, be cited in publications, and be updated as the field and needs evolve. Other broad areas covered were the need for continuing education through tutorials at national conferences, and for journals to establish standards for reporting dosimetry. This workshop did not address issues of dosimetry for studies involving radiation focused at the sub-cellular level, internally-administered radionuclides, biodosimetry based on biological markers of radiation exposure, or dose reconstruction for epidemiological studies. PMID:26401441

  18. Designing a Curriculum for Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, John E.; Erb, Dorothy J.; Randles, Halle Schoener; Fults, Nanette; Webb, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative effort among five teacher preparation programs to create a conceptual tool designed to put clinical experiences at the center of our programs. The authors refer to the resulting product as a clinical curriculum. The clinical curriculum describes a developmental sequence of clinical…

  19. Radiobiological influence of megavoltage electron pulses of ultra-high pulse dose rate on normal tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Karsch, Leonhard; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Oppelt, Melanie; Pawelke, Jörg; Richter, Christian; Schürer, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Regarding the long-term goal to develop and establish laser-based particle accelerators for a future radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, the radiobiological consequences of the characteristic short intense particle pulses with ultra-high peak dose rate, but low repetition rate of laser-driven beams have to be investigated. This work presents in vitro experiments performed at the radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance). This accelerator delivered 20-MeV electron pulses with ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10(10) Gy/min either at the low pulse frequency analogue to previous cell experiments with laser-driven electrons or at high frequency for minimizing the prolonged dose delivery and to perform comparison irradiation with a quasi-continuous electron beam analogue to a clinically used linear accelerator. The influence of the different electron beam pulse structures on the radiobiological response of the normal tissue cell line 184A1 and two primary fibroblasts was investigated regarding clonogenic survival and the number of DNA double-strand breaks that remain 24 h after irradiation. Thereby, no considerable differences in radiation response were revealed both for biological endpoints and for all probed cell cultures. These results provide evidence that the radiobiological effectiveness of the pulsed electron beams is not affected by the ultra-high pulse dose rates alone. PMID:27193178

  20. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Parajon, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Abad, E.

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 106 protons/cm2 s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  1. Dosimetry and radiobiological studies of automated alpha-particle irradiator.

    PubMed

    M V, Jyothish Babu; Shinde, Sanjay G; S, Sunil Kumar; Ali, Manjoor; Vasumathy, R; Kumar, Amit; Kolekar, R; Kumar, Manish; Nema, P; Bhagwat, P V; Pandey, Badri N

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effect of alpha radiation on biological systems is an important component of radiation risk assessment and associated health consequences. However, due to the short path length of alpha radiation in the atmosphere, in vitro radiobiological experiments cannot be performed with accuracy in terms of dose and specified exposure time. The present paper describes the design and dosimetry of an automated alpha-particle irradiator named 'BARC BioAlpha', which is suitable for in vitro radiobiological studies. Compared to alpha irradiators developed in other laboratories, BARC BioAlpha has integrated computer-controlled movement of the alpha-particle source, collimator, and electronic shutter. The diaphragm blades of the electronic shutter can control the area (diameter) of irradiation without any additional shielding, which is suitable for radiobiological bystander studies. To avoid irradiation with incorrect parameters, a software interlock is provided to prevent shutter opening, unless the user-specified speed of the source and collimator are achieved. The dosimetry of the alpha irradiator using CR-39 and silicon surface barrier detectors showed that ~4 MeV energy of the alpha particle reached the cells on the irradiation dish. The alpha irradiation was also demonstrated by the evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks in human cells. In conclusion, 'BARC BioAlpha' provides a user-friendly alpha irradiation system for radiobiological experiments with a novel automation mechanism for better accuracy of dose and exposure time. PMID:24266413

  2. Vardenafil: update on clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Pryor, J

    2002-02-01

    Vardenafil, a potent and selective phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, has entered phase 3 clinical trials. Pharmacodynamic studies showed that the maximum plasma concentration after oral administration of 20-40 mg of vardenafil occurred in 0.7-0.9 h, the half-life was 4-5 h, and negligible amounts remained in the circulation after 24 h. The efficacy of vardenafil compared with placebo was shown in RigiScan studies, a phase 2 study involving 601 men with mild-to-severe erectile dysfunction for at least 6 months, and a phase 3 study involving 452 diabetic men. Adverse effects were not severe and tended to decrease with time. PMID:11850738

  3. Clinical experience with CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Judd E.; Garry, John L.; Wilson, Lynn A.; Johnson, C. Daniel

    2000-04-01

    Since the introduction of Computed Tomographic Colonography (CTC) in 1995, many advances in computer equipment and software have become available. Despite these advances, the promise of colon cancer prevention has not been realized. A colorectal screening tool that performs at a high level, is acceptable to patients, and can be performed safely and at low cost holds promise of saving lives in the future. Our institution has performed over two hundred seventy five clinical CTC examinations. These scans, which each entail a supine and a prone acquisition, only differ from our research protocol in the necessity of an expeditious interpretation. Patients arrive for their CTC examination early in the morning following a period of fasting and bowel preparation. If a CTC examination has a positive finding, the patient is scheduled for colonoscopic polypectomy that same morning. To facilitate this, the patients are required to continue fasting until the CTC examination has been interpreted. It is therefore necessary to process the CTC examination very quickly to minimize patient discomfort. A positive CTC result occurred in fifteen percent of examinations. Among these positive results, the specificity has been in excess of ninety five percent. Additionally, life threatening extra-colonic lesions were discovered in two percent of the screened population.

  4. New clinical experience with tramadol.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A

    1994-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of tramadol has been recently reassessed as part of a new clinical development programme to support an application for registration in the USA. This article reviews the results of single dose and short term studies of oral tramadol 50, 75, 100 and 150 mg in various acute pain conditions. In a double-blind single dose study conducted in 161 patients with severe pain following caesarean section, tramadol 75 and 150 mg and the combination of paracetamol 650 mg with dextropropoxyphene napsylate 100 mg were shown to be effective and statistically superior to placebo. The results from this and 17 other similar studies in patients with pain after surgery (n = 1594) or dental extraction (n = 1859) including other comparators were included in a pooled analysis. Tramadol 100 mg was the optimal single dose for acute pain and tramadol 50 mg showed similar analgesic efficacy to codeine 60 mg. Multiple dose short term studies (n = 520) with tramadol 50, 75 and 100 mg demonstrated a statistically significant and dose-dependent reduction in the consumption of either ibuprofen or morphine as escape medication. New pharmacokinetic data show that steady-state plasma tramadol concentrations reached after oral administration of 50 mg doses every 6 hours are similar to those obtained after administration of a 100 mg single oral dose (250 micrograms/L). This rationale is supported by the results of long term studies in which the average daily dose of tramadol was approximately 250 mg. PMID:7517826

  5. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice. PMID:1188620

  6. Radiobiology of tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Dörr, W

    2015-06-01

    Tissue effects of radiation exposure are observed in virtually all normal tissues, with interactions when several organs are involved. Early reactions occur in turnover tissues, where proliferative impairment results in hypoplasia; late reactions, based on combined parenchymal, vascular, and connective tissue changes, result in loss of function within the exposed volume; consequential late effects develop through interactions between early and late effects in the same organ; and very late effects are dominated by vascular sequelae. Invariably, involvement of the immune system is observed. Importantly, latent times of late effects are inversely dependent on the biologically equieffective dose. Each tissue component and--importantly--each individual symptom/endpoint displays a specific dose-effect relationship. Equieffective doses are modulated by exposure conditions: in particular, dose-rate reduction--down to chronic levels--and dose fractionation impact on late responding tissues, while overall exposure time predominantly affects early (and consequential late) reactions. Consequences of partial organ exposure are related to tissue architecture. In 'tubular' organs (gastrointestinal tract, but also vasculature), punctual exposure affects function in downstream compartments. In 'parallel' organs, such as liver or lungs, only exposure of a significant (organ-dependent) fraction of the total volume results in clinical consequences. Forthcoming studies must address biomarkers of the individual risk for tissue reactions, and strategies to prevent/mitigate tissue effects after exposure. PMID:25816259

  7. Fundamental space radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle

  8. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  9. Canadian experience with structured clinical examinations.

    PubMed Central

    Grand'Maison, P; Lescop, J; Brailovsky, C A

    1993-01-01

    The use of structured clinical examinations to improve the evaluation of medical students and graduates has become significantly more common in the past 25 years. Many Canadian medical educators have contributed to the development of this technique. The Canadian experience is reviewed from the introduction of simulated-standardized patients and objective-structured clinical examinations to more recent developments and the use of such examinations for licensure and certification. PMID:8477384

  10. PACS clinical experience at Georgetown University.

    PubMed

    Horii, S C; Mun, S K; Levine, B; Lo, B; Garra, B S; Zeman, R K; Freedman, M; Leftridge, C; Schellinger, D; Keyes, J

    1991-01-01

    Georgetown University Hospital has been operating an image management and communications system (IMACS or PACS) for three-and-a-half years. This work was initially funded under the Army Medical Research and Development Command Digital Imaging Network Systems (DINS) project. The system was taken from a research system supporting only radiology tasks to one extended to clinical use, and has been used in clinical work for two-and-a-half years. This paper will summarize our PACS clinical experience and will describe the operational features implemented and those still necessary. PMID:1913567

  11. Early experiences of accredited clinical informatics fellowships.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, Christopher A; Pageler, Natalie M; Palma, Jonathan P; Finnell, John T; Levy, Bruce P; Yackel, Thomas R; Mohan, Vishnu; Hersh, William R

    2016-07-01

    Since the launch of the clinical informatics subspecialty for physicians in 2013, over 1100 physicians have used the practice and education pathways to become board-certified in clinical informatics. Starting in 2018, only physicians who have completed a 2-year clinical informatics fellowship program accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education will be eligible to take the board exam. The purpose of this viewpoint piece is to describe the collective experience of the first four programs accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education and to share lessons learned in developing new fellowship programs in this novel medical subspecialty. PMID:27206458

  12. Toolkit for determination of dose-response relations, validation of radiobiological parameters and treatment plan optimization based on radiobiological measures.

    PubMed

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Tzikas, Athanasios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Lind, Bengt K

    2010-10-01

    Accurately determined dose-response relations of the different tumors and normal tissues should be estimated and used in the clinic. The aim of this study is to demonstrate developed tools that are necessary for determining the dose-response parameters of tumors and normal tissues, for clinically verifying already published parameter sets using local patient materials and for making use of all this information in the optimization and comparison of different treatment plans and radiation techniques. One of the software modules (the Parameter Determination Module) is designed to determine the dose-response parameters of tumors and normal tissues. This is accomplished by performing a maximum likelihood fitting to calculate the best estimates and confidence intervals of the parameters used by different radiobiological models. Another module of this software (the Parameter Validation Module) concerns the validation and compatibility of external or reported dose-response parameters describing tumor control and normal tissue complications. This is accomplished by associating the expected response rates, which are calculated using different models and published parameter sets, with the clinical follow-up records of the local patient population. Finally, the last module of the software (the Radiobiological Plan Evaluation Module) is used for estimating and optimizing the effectiveness a treatment plan in terms of complication-free tumor control, P(+). The use of the Parameter Determination Module is demonstrated by deriving the dose-response relation of proximal esophagus from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. The application of the Parameter Validation Module is illustrated by verifying the clinical compatibility of those dose-response parameters with the examined treatment methodologies. The Radiobiological Plan Evaluation Module is demonstrated by evaluating and optimizing the effectiveness of head and neck cancer treatment plans. The results of the radiobiological

  13. Radioembolization of Hepatic Lesions from a Radiobiology and Dosimetric Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cremonesi, Marta; Chiesa, Carlo; Strigari, Lidia; Ferrari, Mahila; Botta, Francesca; Guerriero, Francesco; De Cicco, Concetta; Bonomo, Guido; Orsi, Franco; Bodei, Lisa; Di Dia, Amalia; Grana, Chiara Maria; Orecchia, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Radioembolization (RE) of liver cancer with 90Y-microspheres has been applied in the last two decades with notable responses and acceptable toxicity. Two types of microspheres are available, glass and resin, the main difference being the activity/sphere. Generally, administered activities are established by empirical methods and differ for the two types. Treatment planning based on dosimetry is a prerogative of few centers, but has notably gained interest, with evidence of predictive power of dosimetry on toxicity, lesion response, and overall survival (OS). Radiobiological correlations between absorbed doses and toxicity to organs at risk, and tumor response, have been obtained in many clinical studies. Dosimetry methods have evolved from the macroscopic approach at the organ level to voxel analysis, providing absorbed dose spatial distributions and dose–volume histograms (DVH). The well-known effects of the external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), such as the volume effect, underlying disease influence, cumulative damage in parallel organs, and different tolerability of re-treatment, have been observed also in RE, identifying in EBRT a foremost reference to compare with. The radiobiological models – normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability – and/or the style (DVH concepts) used in EBRT are introduced in RE. Moreover, attention has been paid to the intrinsic different activity distribution of resin and glass spheres at the microscopic scale, with dosimetric and radiobiological consequences. Dedicated studies and mathematical models have developed this issue and explain some clinical evidences, e.g., the shift of dose to higher toxicity thresholds using glass as compared to resin spheres. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the literature incident to dosimetry and radiobiological issues in RE, with the aim to summarize the results and to identify the most useful methods and information that should accompany future studies

  14. First time rounding experiences for nonclinicians: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Laura R; Nowacki, Amy S; Stoller, James K

    2015-01-01

    Clinical rounds serve several key objectives in academic medical centers: providing a forum for patient communication, clinical decision making, and teaching. Nonclinical colleagues ordinarily do not have the opportunity to round, and the idea of implementing a rounding program that includes nonclinical colleagues has received little attention to date. Reasoning that a rounding program with nonclinicians could enhance (1) understanding of the organization's clinical mission, (2) appreciation of caregivers' roles, and (3) engagement, the authors created such a program. From 2010 to 2013, 51 nonclinicians within the Cleveland Clinic Education Institute participated; 14 submitted written reflections, and 27 responded to a survey about their experience. Overall, 12 themes emerged that suggest an enhanced familiarity with the institution and increased engagement and alignment with its mission. Notably, the results align with a long-standing focus on organizational engagement and an observed increase in mean engagement scores since the program was implemented. PMID:24519444

  15. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  16. Nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Shali, Mahboubeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing holistic nursing care when there is a shortage of personnel and equipment exposes nurses to stress and a higher risk of occupational burnout. Humour can promote nurses’ health and influence nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings and factors affecting it. Methods: This qualitative study investigated nurses’ experiences of humour. Five hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences provided the setting for this study. The participants comprised of 17 nurses with master’s and Baccalaureate degrees (BSN) in nursing. These nurses worked at educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and had minimum work experience of 12 months in various clinical wards. Nurses from all wards were invited to participate in this study. The data were collected through semi structure interviews using guides comprising probing questions. Telephonic interviews were used to further supplement the data. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Results: The data were classified into five themes including the dynamics of humour, condition enforcement, Risk making probability, Instrumental use and Change: opportunities and threats. Conclusion: Understanding nurses’ perceptions and experiences of humour helps identify its contributing factors and provides valuable guidelines for enhancing nurses and patients’ mental, emotional and physical health. Spreading a culture of humour through teaching methods can improve workplace cheerfulness and highlights the importance of humour in patient care in nurses and nursing students. PMID:26034735

  17. Nursing students' perceptions of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Windsor, A

    1987-04-01

    Senior nursing students were interviewed in this study to better understand the clinical learning experience from the students' point of view. Results of the study revealed that the nursing students were indeed learning in their clinical experience. The major categories of learning were classified as nursing skills, time management, and professional socialization. The quality of learning was reportedly affected by the quality of the student's preparation, characteristics of the instructor, and the variety of clinical opportunities to which students were exposed. The data also reflected a pattern of student development which was separated into three stages. The first stage was permeated with anxiety and obsession with the rules of task performance. The second stage was a difficult transition period where students struggled with identifying the roles of nurses. During the final stage, the students become more comfortable with performing nursing tasks and become interested in expanding their role and becoming more independent. As the students strived for independence, they identified more closely with staff nurses and withdrew from instructors. PMID:3035128

  18. Radiobiological considerations in magna-field irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    Radiobiological considerations are described for total body irradiation (TBI) as given to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Although much progress has been made in the use of BMT for refractory leukemias, many patients still die from interstitial pneumonia and relapse. Fractionated TBI has been introduced in order to improve leukemic cell kill, while increasing the degree of normal tissue tolerance. Traditionally, bone marrow stem cells, leukemic cells and immunocytes have been considered as having a limited ability to repair radiation damage while cells of lung tissue and intestinal epithelial cells have a greater capacity. During fractionated radiation therapy or continuous low-dose rate exposure, repair of sublethal damage between fractions allows greater recovery in the cells of lung tissue to those in the bone marrow. Clinically, the potential benefit of six fractions over one fraction or low dose-rate TBI has yet to be proved, although there is suggestive evidence for a reduced incidence of interstitial pneumonitis. However, other extraneous factors such as doses to the lung, differences in conditioning regimens, effect of increased delay in BMT for patients receiving fractionated TBI, and the unmeasurable differences between institutions make definite conclusions impossible. Despite this, a consensus for dose fractionation has developed and most centers are moving away from the use of large single dose TBI.

  19. Preliminary clinical experience in cardiology with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Marelli, C

    2000-08-17

    Sonazoid (formerly NC100100) is a new ultrasound contrast agent for intravenous injection developed by Nycomed-Amersham. It consists of perfluorocarbon microbubbles that are stabilized with a surfactant and are within a well-defined size range (median diameter approximately 3 microm). Due to the low diffusibility and blood solubility of the gas, the controlled size distribution of the microbubbles, and the flexibility of the shell, Sonazoid is a free-flowing tracer capable of crossing the pulmonary capillary bed after peripheral intravenous injection. It is stable enough for the duration of the ultrasound examination and provides echo enhancement useful for clinical requirements. The preliminary clinical experience in cardiology indications, including its use in reducing the frequency of inadequate echocardiographic studies in patients with suboptimal echocardiograms, and its use as a myocardial perfusion agent in the setting of acute myocardial ischemia is briefly discussed. PMID:10997345

  20. [Clinical-parasitological experiences in Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Schubert, S

    1991-02-01

    Clinical-parasitological experiences collected 1989 in Cameroon during a 6-weeks lasting medical work are reported. Malaria tropica is by far the greatest problem due to the impossibility of an effective epidemiologic control, further to rising drug resistances. Beside malaria there are plenty of other parasitoses, but they are more restricted to lower social groups and to certain geographic regions--to the extreme Northern part of Cameroon in particular. Furthermore the actual situation depends also from epidemiologic control programmes. So the trypanosomiasis seems to be under epidemiologic control, the onchocerciasis in opposite to it has been increased again due to the absence of an effective control programme at present. PMID:2039090

  1. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  2. Relevance of radiobiological concepts in radionuclide therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chandan; Shetake, Neena; Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Samuel, Grace; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Purpose Radionuclide therapy (RNT) is a rapidly growing area of clinical nuclear medicine, wherein radionuclides are employed to deliver cytotoxic dose of radiation to the diseased cells/tissues. During RNT, radionuclides are either directly administered or delivered through biomolecules targeting the diseased site. RNT has been clinically used for diverse range of diseases including cancer, which is the focus of the review. Conclusions The major emphasis in RNT has so far been given towards developing peptides/antibodies and other molecules to conjugate a variety of therapeutic radioisotopes for improved targeting/delivery of radiation dose to the tumor cells. Despite that, many of the RNT approaches have not achieved their desired therapeutic success probably due to poor knowledge about complex and dynamic (i) fate of radiolabeled molecules; (ii) radiation dose delivered; (iii) cellular heterogeneity in tumor mass; and (iv) cellular radiobiological response. Based on understanding gathered during recent years, it may be stated that besides the absorbed dose, the net radiobiological response of tumor/normal cells also determines the clinical response of radiotherapeutic modalities including RNT. The radiosensitivity of tumor/normal cells is governed by radiobiological phenomenon such as radiation-induced bystander effect, genomic instability, adaptive response and low dose hyper-radiosensitivity. These concepts have been well investigated in the context of external beam radiotherapy, but their clinical implications during RNT have received meagre attention. In this direction, a few studies performed using in vitro and in vivo models envisage the possibilities of exploiting the radiobiological knowledge for improved therapeutic outcome of RNT. Abbreviations ALL Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia AML Acute Myeloid Leukaemia CEA Carcinoembryonic Antigen CD Cluster of Differentiation CLL Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia CNS Central Nervous System CPP Cell Penetrating Peptide, DC

  3. A Curriculum Model for an Integrated Senior Year Clinical Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wukasch, Ruth N.; Blue, Carolyn L.; Overbay, Jane

    2000-01-01

    A flexible clinical experience for nursing seniors integrates pediatrics, public health, and nursing leadership. Experiences in hospital units, schools, nurse-directed clinics, and home visits expose students to a wide range of settings and issues. (SK)

  4. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia; Lopez, Jesus

    2012-10-23

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  5. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yañez, Elvia; López, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerología de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  6. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, J. C.; Smith, S. K.; Watson, C. R.

    1991-12-01

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives.

  7. Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, Trela

    2006-01-01

    Being a member of the Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) Staff is a great experience. I joined the FMC staff 2 years ago when I became part of the Kelsey-Seybold team. The FMC staff consists of Flight Surgeons, Family Clinic Physician, Nursing staff, Wellness Coordinator and Support staff. We serve as the Primary Care Physicians for the astronauts and their families and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. We have approximately 800 patients in the FMC. As the Family Clinic Physician, I care for the astronaut spouses and children and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. Since we have a small patient population, we have the opportunity to spend increased personal time with our patients, which I enjoy. We have a pretty healthy patient population, who are very interested in their overall health and preventive care. In preparation for a shuttle launch, our nursing staff assists the flight surgeons with the astronaut physical exams, which occur 10 days prior to launch and again 3 days after their return. We also provide Primary Contact physicals for the families and guests, who will be in close contact with shuttle crew members. During these physicals, we provide education, emphasizing the importance of preventing the spread of communicable diseases to shuttle crew members. Being a part of the Space Medicine Program is an honor. To know that you contribute in some way to our nation s Space Program is very special. (This article was prepared by Dr. Trela Landry, M.D. for inclusion in a Kelsey-Seybold newsletter on 25 OCT 2006.)

  8. Application of SSNTDs in radiobiological investigations aboard recoverable satellites.

    PubMed

    Huang, R Q; Gu, R Q; Li, Q

    1997-01-01

    In recent years some Biostack experiments including a wide spectrum of biological objects have been devoted to study of the radiobiological effects on dry seeds aboard recoverable satellites. Some impressive phenomena have been observed. Clearly, the large amount of energy deposited by the highly ionizing heavy nuclei of cosmic rays is the principal reason for the induced aberrations of the chromosomes of wheat root tip cells. A methodical description of the experimental arrangement and procedure of handling and evaluation of given. The preliminary physical and biological results from the experimental "wheat seeds" are presented. PMID:11541794

  9. Transhiatal Esophagectomy: Clinical Experience and Refinements

    PubMed Central

    Orringer, Mark B.; Marshall, Becky; Iannettoni, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To review the authors’ clinical experience with transhiatal esophagectomy (THE) and the refinements in this procedure that have evolved. Background Increased use of THE during the past two decades has generated controversy about the merits and safety of this approach compared with transthoracic esophageal resection. The authors’ large THE experience provides a valuable basis for benchmarking data regarding the procedure. Methods The results of THE were analyzed retrospectively using the authors’ prospectively established esophageal resection database and follow-up information on these patients. Results From 1976 to 1998, THE was performed in 1085 patients, 26% with benign disease and 74% with cancer. The procedure was possible in 98.6% of cases. Stomach was the esophageal substitute in 96%. The hospital mortality rate was 4%. Blood loss averaged 689 cc. Major complications were anastomotic leak (13%), atelectasis/pneumonia (2%), intrathoracic hemorrhage, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, chylothorax, and tracheal laceration (<1% each). Actuarial survival of patients with carcinoma equaled or exceeded that reported after transthoracic esophagectomy. Late functional results were good or excellent in 70%. With preoperative pulmonary and physical conditioning, a side-to-side stapled cervical esophagogastric anastomosis (<3% incidence of leak), and postoperative epidural anesthesia, the need for an intensive care unit stay has been eliminated and the length of stay reduced to 7 days. Conclusion THE is possible in most patients requiring esophageal resection and can be performed with greater safety and fewer complications than the traditional transthoracic approaches. PMID:10493486

  10. Nurses' experiences of clinical commissioning group boards.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; O'Driscoll, Mike; Savage, Jan; Lee, Gay; Dixon, Roz

    2016-06-15

    Aim To explore the experience of governing body nurses appointed to clinical commissioning group (CCG) boards; how they perform their responsibilities; and their perceived effectiveness in ensuring safe, patient-centred care and the factors that influence their effectiveness. Method This was a small pilot study using a mixed methods approach. There were four phases of the study: literature review, qualitative data collection (interviews), quantitative data collection (survey), and final data analysis. Findings In the early stages of the formation of CCGs, few governing body nurses had relevant experience to meet the needs of a strategic role, and many of these nurses had no proper job description, too little time to carry out their responsibilities, little management support, and unequal access to training, development, formal support or supervision compared to GP colleagues. Two working patterns or models of work of governing body nurses emerged: the full-time integrated executive statutory role and the part-time non-executive statutory role. Quality and quality assurance were the most frequently cited roles or responsibilities of governing body nurses in CCGs, and their highest priority was to improve the population's health. Conclusion The role of governing body nurse has emerged at a time of organisational change, and following extensive criticism of nursing and nurses in the media. Nurses' roles and experiences are affected by these contextual events and by the emerging structures and diversity of CCGs. Further research is required into the leadership role of governing body nurses, succession planning, and the effectiveness of their relationships with other senior nurses. PMID:27305258

  11. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. ); Prather, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  12. [Aerospace radiobiology: 35 years (1960-1995)].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Davydov, B I

    1996-01-01

    The paper gives a brief history of the birth and development of aerospace radiobiology at the Institute of Aviation and Space Medicine. It covers from the first radiobiological investigations in space to the insurance of radiation safety for helicopter air crews who took part in cleaning-up operations of consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The workers of the Radiobiological Laboratory have performed some research theoretical and practical tasks in the interests of aviation and space, civil and military medicine: the impact of gravitation and radiation on genetic structures has been studied, a radiation safety system for vehicles of different use has been developed, new principles in the standardization of EMF for radiofrequency and microwave bands have been proposed, the new radioprotective agent indralin (B, B-190) has been discovered, which is accepted for supply and used in rotary wing aircraft pilots during liquidation works at the Chernobyl atomic power station. New experimental data on the combined effects of radiation and non-radiation flight factors have been obtained. Basically new data on the mechanism of action of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the brain have been also gained, a system for assessing the health and rehabilitation of pilots that cleaned-up the Chernobyl accident has been developed. Professor Pavel Petrovich Saksonov, RF Honoured Scientist, has the honour to create a school of aerospace radiobiology. PMID:8963185

  13. Guidelines to Clinical Experiences in Teacher Education. Position Paper 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Teacher Educators, Reston, VA.

    This document, a collection of guidelines for clinical experience in teacher education, is divided into eight sections with two appendixes. These sections are as follows: Frame of Reference; Aims of Clinical Experiences, which stresses that the experiences should be complementary to the humanistic, behavioral, and pedagogical studies for becoming…

  14. Minimally invasive thymectomy: the Mayo Clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Phillip G.; Roden, Anja C.; Corl, Frank M.; Allen, Mark S.; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Nichols, Francis C.; Shen, K. Robert; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of minimally invasive thymectomy (MIT) is increasing and may have significant benefit to patients in terms of morbidity and post-operative recovery. Our aim was to review the Mayo Clinic experience of MIT. Methods We reviewed data from all MIT cases collected in a prospectively maintained database from January 1995 to February 2015. Data were collected regarding patient demographics, perioperative management and patient outcomes. Results A total of 510 thymectomies were performed in 20 years. Fifty-six patients underwent MIT (45 video-assisted thoracoscopy, 11 robotic-assisted). The median age was 55 years (range, 23-87 years) with male to female ratio of 25:31. Thymoma was the main pathologic diagnosis in 27/56 patients (48%), with 11/27 (41%) associated with myasthenia gravis (MG), and 16/27 (59%) non-MG. Other pathologies included 1/56 (2%) of each teratoma, lymphoma, lymphangioma, carcinoma and thymolipoma. There were 3/56 (5%) atrophic glands, 4/56 (7%) cysts, 6/56 (11%) benign glands and 11/56 (20%) hyperplastic. Mean blood loss (mL) and operative time (min) were significantly lower in the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) group compared to robotic (65±41 vs. 160±205 mL, P=0.04 and 102±39 vs. 178±53 min, P=0.001, respectively). There was no 30-day mortality. Post-operative morbidity occurred in 7/45 (16%) VATS patients (phrenic nerve palsy 7%, pericarditis 4%, atrial fibrillation 2%, pleural effusion 2%) and 1/11 (9%) robotic (urinary retention requiring self-catheterization). Reoperation was required in 1/3 of VATS patients with phrenic nerve palsy. There was no significant difference in length of hospital stay [VATS 1.5 days (range, 1-4 days) and robotic 2 days (range, 1-5 days) VATS; P=0.05]. Mean follow-up was 18.4 months (range, 1-50.4 months) with no tumor recurrences. Conclusions MIT can be performed with low morbidity and mortality. VATS is associated with reduced blood loss, operative times and earlier hospital

  15. Workshop on Radiobiological Effectiveness of Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, G. E.; Thomas, R. G.; Thiessen, J. W.

    1985-09-01

    The radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons has become the subject of some heated discussions in both scientific and radiation-protection oriented communities. This has become especially so since the realization that neutron exposures of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima were considerably lower than previously assumed, thus devaluating the importance of what we thought was a solid human data base. At the same time, more recent data from radiobiological research appeared to indicate that, at least for some biological endpoints, the RBE of neutrons at low doses and low dose rates was increased dramatically compared to the RBE at higher dose and dose rates. As a consequence, the protection of health against neutrons became a subject of some urgency. The objective of this workshop was to evaluate the existing data base in order to determine the need for additional research in this field.

  16. Workshop on radiobiological effectiveness of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, G.E.; Thomas, R.G.; Thiessen, J.W.

    1985-09-01

    The radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons has become the subject of some heated discussions in both scientific and radiation-protection oriented communities. This has become especially so since the realization that neutron exposures of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima were considerably lower than previously assumed, thus ''devaluating'' the importance of what we thought was a solid human data base. At the same time, more recent data from radiobiological research appeared to indicate that, at least for some biological endpoints, the RBE of neutrons at low doses and low dose rates was increased dramatically compared to the RBE at higher dose and dose rates. As a consequence, the protection of health against neutrons became a subject of some urgency. The objective of this workshop was to evaluate the existing data base in order to determine the need for additional research in this field. 22 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. The Importance of Early Experiences: Clinical, Research, and Policy Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The degree to which early adverse experiences exert long term effects on development and how much early adversity may be overcome through subsequent experiences are important mental health questions. The clinical, research and policy perspectives on these questions lead to different answers. From a clinical perspective, change is always possible,…

  18. Clinical profile and practice experience of almotriptan.

    PubMed

    Gendolla, A

    2004-01-01

    Patients expect their acute migraine treatment to have a rapid onset of action, achieve complete pain relief that is sustained for 24 h, and to have a good tolerability profile. Almotriptan has a favourable pharmacokinetic profile that translates clinically to a rapid onset of action and consistent absorption regardless of age, sex, food intake and status of the acute migraine attack. In addition, almotriptan is not associated with any clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. Pain-free status at 2 h postdose is achieved by approximately 39% of patients receiving almotriptan in clinical trials. Recurrence of headaches within 24 h is low with almotriptan (<22%). Almotriptan has a sustained pain-free rate of 25-27%, which in a meta-analysis of triptans was superior to sumatriptan 100 mg. Almotriptan therapy is associated with a low incidence of adverse events, including those affecting the central nervous system and chest. PMID:15595990

  19. The Instructional Technology Clinical Experience: Expectations and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cennamo, Katherine S.; Holmes, Glen

    This paper provides an overview of the IT (Instructional Technology) Clinical graduate course at Virginia Tech and compares the perceived reality of the Clinical experience, in terms of benefits and concerns, with students' initial expectations. The paper begins with a discussion of the IT Clinical plan, the sociology of the learning environment…

  20. Collaborative Clinical Practice: An Alternate Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Amy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education in the 21st century is encountering increased scrutiny, added pressure, and escalating external regulations but does not have practical and immediate solutions for improving programs. While reforms in teacher education call for additional and improved clinical practice for candidates, through strengthened partnerships with local…

  1. A Simulated Interprofessional Rounding Experience in a Clinical Assessment Course

    PubMed Central

    Shrader, Sarah; McRae, Lacy; King, William M.; Kern, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement a simulated interprofessional rounding experience using human patient simulators as a required activity for third-year pharmacy students in a clinical assessment course. Design Interprofessional student teams consisting of pharmacy, medical, and physician assistant students participated in a simulated interprofessional rounding experience in which they provided comprehensive medical care for a simulated patient in an inpatient setting. Assessment Students completed a survey instrument to assess interprofessional attitudes and satisfaction before and after participation in the simulated interprofessional rounding experience. Overall student attitudes regarding interprofessional teamwork and communication significantly improved; student satisfaction with the experience was high and students’ self-perceived clinical confidence improved after participation. The mean team clinical performance scores were 65% and 75% for each simulated interprofessional rounding experience. Conclusion Incorporating a simulated interprofessional rounding experience into a required clinical assessment course improved student attitudes regarding interprofessional teamwork and was associated with high student satisfaction. PMID:21769137

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells: from experiment to clinic

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is currently much interest in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their ability to differentiate into other cell types, and to partake in the anatomy and physiology of remote organs. It is now clear these cells may be purified from several organs in the body besides bone marrow. MSCs take part in wound healing by contributing to myofibroblast and possibly fibroblast populations, and may be involved in epithelial tissue regeneration in certain organs, although this remains more controversial. In this review, we examine the ability of MSCs to modulate liver, kidney, heart and intestinal repair, and we update their opposing qualities of being less immunogenic and therefore tolerated in a transplant situation, yet being able to contribute to xenograft models of human tumour formation in other contexts. However, such observations have not been replicated in the clinic. Recent studies showing the clinical safety of MSC in several pathologies are discussed. The possible opposing powers of MSC need careful understanding and control if their clinical potential is to be realised with long-term safety for patients. PMID:21902837

  3. Introductory Laboratory Exercises in Radiobiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, J. R. Parry; Servant, D. M.

    1970-01-01

    Describes experiments suitable for introducing use of radioisotopes in biology. Includes demonstrations of tracing food chains, uptake of ions by plants, concentration of elements by insects, tracing photosynthetic reactions, activation analysis of copper, and somatic and genetic effects. Uses autoradiographic and counting techniques. (AL)

  4. Assessing the shift of radiobiological metrics in lung radiotherapy plans using 2D gamma index

    PubMed Central

    Balosso, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this work is to investigate the 2D gamma (γ) maps to illustrate the change of radiobiological outcomes for lung radiotherapy plans and evaluate the correlation between tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) with γ passing rates (γ-rates). Methods Nine patients with lung cancer were used. The doses were calculated using Modified Batho method integrated with pencil beam convolution (MB-PBC) and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) using the same beam arrangements and prescription dose. The TCP and NTCP were estimated, respectively, using equivalent uniform dose (EUD) model and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. The correlation between ΔTCP or ΔNTCP with γ-rates, from 2%/2 and 3%/3 mm, were tested to explore the best correlation predicting the relevant γ criteria using Spearman’s rank test (ρ). Wilcoxon paired test was used to calculate P value. Results TCP value was significantly lower in the recalculated AAA plans as compared to MB plans. However, AAA predicted more NTCP on lung pneumonitis according to the LKB model and using relevant radiobiological parameters (n, m and TD50) for MB-PBC and AAA, with P=0.03. The data showed a weak correlation between radiobiological metrics with γ-rates or γ-mean, ρ<0.3. Conclusions AAA and MB yield different TCP values as well as NTCP for lung pneumonitis based on the LKB model parameters. Therefore, 2D γ-maps, generated with 2%/2 or 3%/3 mm, could illustrate visual information about the radiobiological changes. The information is useful to evaluate the clinical outcome of a radiotherapy treatment and to approve the treatment plan of the patient if the dose constraints are respected. On the other hand, the γ-maps tool can be used as quality assurance (QA) process to check the predicted TCP and NTCP from radiobiological models. PMID:27413708

  5. Clinical nurse specialist regulation: the Maryland experience.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care will continue to be a driver in the evolution of today's health care environment. Ensuring effective, cost-conscious, quality care is the core of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice. The CNS practice varies by state, depending on each state's Nurse Practice Act. Some states have separate scopes of practice for CNSs, including prescriptive authority, whereas some states do not recognize CNS practice as different from the practice of the registered nurse. The journey to state recognition and title protection for the CNS role in the state of Maryland is described. PMID:25594481

  6. Standards and Methodologies for Characterizing Radiobiological Impact of High-Z Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Subiel, Anna; Ashmore, Reece; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Research on the application of high-Z nanoparticles (NPs) in cancer treatment and diagnosis has recently been the subject of growing interest, with much promise being shown with regards to a potential transition into clinical practice. In spite of numerous publications related to the development and application of nanoparticles for use with ionizing radiation, the literature is lacking coherent and systematic experimental approaches to fully evaluate the radiobiological effectiveness of NPs, validate mechanistic models and allow direct comparison of the studies undertaken by various research groups. The lack of standards and established methodology is commonly recognised as a major obstacle for the transition of innovative research ideas into clinical practice. This review provides a comprehensive overview of radiobiological techniques and quantification methods used in in vitro studies on high-Z nanoparticles and aims to provide recommendations for future standardization for NP-mediated radiation research. PMID:27446499

  7. Ankylosing Spondylitis: A rheumatology clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Tasnim; Erum, Uzma; Jabeen, Rukhshanda; Khowaja, Danish

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency, demographics, laboratory and radiological features in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients with a diagnosis of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), based on Modified New York criteria. The study was conducted at the Rheumatology Clinic of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), from February 2004 to February 2014. Detailed history, examination and laboratory investigations were recorded in a pre-designed structured proforma. The frequency, demographic characteristics, extra-articular features and associated co-morbidities were studied. Results: A total of 603 patients were registered in our Rheumatology Clinic during this period, with a definitive diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatological disorders. Out of these, Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) was diagnosed in 32 (5.3%) patients. 24 were male and 8 patients were female. The commonest affected age group was between 21-40 years. Majority of the patients belonged to Pathan ethnicity. Conclusion: The demographic features of AS are same as reported in earlier studies from other parts of the world. The predominance of AS in specific ethnic groups is a fact that needs to be studied. Larger studies are required for clarifying the triggers of this disease. It often leads to severe disability, hence an early diagnosis and prompt treatment is required for better disease control and quality of life. PMID:27182241

  8. Clinical experience with recently approved antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Paterson, David L

    2006-10-01

    The advent of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in the 1990s and the threat posed by vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus led to the development of several new antimicrobial agents active against these pathogens. Quinupristin/dalfopristin was the first such drug to be commercially available but adverse effects have meant that the drug is now rarely used. Linezolid, the first antimicrobial of the oxazolidinone class, has met with more widespread use and has both an intravenous and an oral formulation. Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antimicrobial that is rapidly bactericidal against S. aureus. It is effective in the therapy of S. aureus bloodstream infections but is inactivated by pulmonary surfactant, making it of no use in the therapy of pneumonia. Tigecycline, by contrast, is bacteriostatic against most pathogens but has a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and has enhanced penetration into many tissues. Other new antibiotics (dalbavancin, telavancin, ceftobiprole and doripenem) are currently under clinical development and hold promise for widespread clinical use in the next decade. PMID:16904377

  9. Paranasal sinus mucoceles: our clinical experiments

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete; Sari, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Keskin, I Gurkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We present the clinical and radiological features, treatment protocols, and medium-long-term results of our patients following surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele, along with a review of the relevant literature. Materials and methods: A total of 18 patients (11 women and 7 men) who underwent surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele at Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, between 2006 and 2013 were examined retrospectively. The mean patient age was 41 (range 4-73). Demographic and radiological features, symptoms, treatment protocols, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Results: The most frequently affected sinus was the maxillary sinus (n=9, 50%) followed by the frontal sinus (n=6, 33%) and sphenoidal sinus (n=3, 16%). The main symptom was headache. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele was applied in all 18 patients, while frontal sinus exploration with the osteoplastic flap procedure was performed in one patient and the Caldwell-Luc operation was performed in another patient. The Caldwell-Luc procedure was subsequently required in one patient (6%) and endoscopic revision surgery was required in another patient (6%). Conclusion: Sinus mucocele that enlarges, eroding the surrounding bone tissue, and induces various clinical symptoms due to the impression of the expansile mass, is treated surgically, and must be planned carefully to prevent serious complications. PMID:26770462

  10. Neural stimulation: clinical and laboratory experiences.

    PubMed

    Pudenz, R H

    1993-03-01

    This is a report of some of the experiences of the author and his associates with electrical stimulation of the animal and human nervous systems. It was presented as a personal history rather than a review of recent investigations and publications concerned with safe and effective stimulation of neural tissue with the ultimate goals of developing neural prostheses. Much of the information presented herein has been published. PMID:8456389

  11. [Euthanasia--experiences from Norwegian pain clinics].

    PubMed

    Meidell, N K; Naess, A C

    1998-10-10

    This survey focuses on the subject of euthanasia. A questionnaire was sent to 90 doctors working in pain clinics in Norwegian hospitals. 60 doctors (67%) returned the questionnaire. Only 18 doctors (30%) had ever received a request for euthanasia. The patients who requested euthanasia suffered from refractory pain, depression, fear of pain and fear of becoming helpless. 67% of the doctors were satisfied with the present Norwegian law, while 13% favoured a liberalization of the law. Only 5% were willing to comply with the patient's request for euthanasia under today's law. One third of the doctors would leave the decision to an officially appointed "board" if euthanasia were to become legalized. A majority wanted a doctor to commit the actual procedure, but there were also suggestions that a lawyer or other lay person should carry out the act of euthanasia. Our conclusion is that the closer the patient-doctor relationship is, the more opposed the doctor is to euthanasia. PMID:9816949

  12. Clinical experience with Angiojet: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, A M; Xhepa, G; Piffaretti, G; Bacuzzi, A; Tozzi, M; Carbone, M; Barile, A; Squillaci, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Carrafiello, G

    2015-12-01

    The development of various sophisticated mechanical thrombectomy devices and the amassed experience of physicians in minimal invasive therapy produced a paradigm shift in vascular access management toward percutaneous declotting procedures, using pharmaceutical thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, balloon thrombectomy, and a combination of the above techniques. In this setting, in the last years, AngioJet™ (Possis, Minneapolis, MN, USA) rheolytic thrombectomy (RT) showed an increasing use in emergency and election patients. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in different fields of applications. PMID:26498886

  13. Operation and Maintenance of the National Radiobiology Archives

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Anthony C. James; Stacey L. McCord

    2012-03-07

    The National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) are an archival program, started in 1989, to collect, organize and maintain data, laboratory notebooks, and animal tissue specimens from government (Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies) sponsored radiobiology life-span animal studies. These unique records, histopathology slides and paraffin embedded tissue blocks are maintained in a central facility and are available for further research study. The materials include electronic and paper records for each of more than 6,000 life-span-observations on dogs as well as details of major studies involving nearly 30,000 mice. Although these studies were performed over many years and at different laboratories with differing data management systems, the NRA has translated them into a standardized set of relational database tables. These can be distributed to interested individuals on written request. Specific Aims are: (1) To Maintain the Archive of Written Records from the Animal Experiments - The USTUR continued to maintain the NRA archives which consist of approximately 175 storage boxes containing laboratory notebooks, animal exposure records, animal pathologic records, and radiographs. These were stored in a 6,000 square foot leased facility in Richland, WA. Additionally, through a collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Low Dose Program, many of these records were scanned into digital files. These totaled 34 GB of data, which are saved in 2,407 separate PDF files that are organized by box number and animal identification number. (2) To Maintain the Archive of Animal Tissues at Washington State University - The USTUR continued to house the NRA dog tissue collection in the leased facility. The NRA tissue collection consisted of pathology slides and tissue blocks. Approximately 25% of the laboratory facility was dedicated to the storage of the NRA materials. (3) To Organize the Datasets of These Animals in the Context of Other Datasets so That

  14. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Hutt, Julie A.; Padilla, Mabel T.; Gott, Katherine M.

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  15. THREE YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Todo, Satoru; Tzakis, Andreas; Reyes, Jorge; Nour, Bakr; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Fung, John J.; Demetris, Anthony; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND After the successful evolution of hepatic transplantation during the last decade, small bowel and multivisceral transplantation remains the sole elusive achievement for the next era of transplant surgeons. Until recently, and for the last thirty years, the results of the sporadic attempts of intestinal transplantation worldwide were discouraging because of unsatisfactory graft and patient survival. The experimental and clinical demonstration of the superior therapeutic efficacy of FK 506, a new immunosuppressive drug, ushered in the current era of small bowel and multivisceral transplantation with initial promising results. STUDY DESIGN Forty-three consecutive patients with short bowel syndrome, intestinal insufficiency, or malignant tumors with or without associated liver disease, were given intestinal (n=15), hepatic and intestinal (n=21), or multivisceral allografts that contained four or more organs (n=7). Treatment was with FK 506 based immunosuppression. The ascending and right transverse colon were included with the small intestine in 13 of the 43 grafts, almost evenly distributed between the three groups. RESULTS After six to 39 months, 30 of the 43 patients are alive, 29 bearing grafts. The most rapid convalescence and resumption of diet, as well as the highest three month patient survival (100 percent) and graft survival (88 percent) were with the isolated intestinal procedure. However, this advantage was slowly eroded during the first two postoperative years, in part because the isolated intestine was more prone to rejection. By the end of this time, the best survival rate (86 percent) was with the multivisceral procedure. With all three operations, most of the patients were able to resume diet and discontinue parenteral alimentation, and in the best instances, the quality of life approached normal. However, the surveillance and intensity of care required for these patients for the first year, and in most instances thereafter, was very high

  16. Team Preceptorship Model: A Solution for Students' Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cooper Brathwaite, Angela; Lemonde, Manon

    2011-01-01

    There is a shortage of registered nurses in developed countries, and this shortage is due to the aging nursing workforce, demand for healthcare services, and shortage of nursing professors to teach students. In order to increase the number of clinical placements for nursing students, the authors developed and implemented a collaborative preceptorship model between a Canadian University and Public Health Department to facilitate the clinical experiences of Bachelor of Science of Nursing (BScN) students. This paper describes the Team Preceptorship Model which guided the clinical experience of nine students and 14 preceptors. It also highlights the model's evaluation, strengths, and limitations. PMID:21994893

  17. O. R. Clinical Experience: Catalyst For Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Mary Gill

    1976-01-01

    Active participation in a 12-hour operating room experience seemed to provide one group of medical-surgical nursing students with a broad range of clinical nursing experiences leading to rapid, integrated learning of knowledge and skills and increased self-confidence. (Author)

  18. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Thomas G.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Arteta, Manuel; Ramirez, Ixsy A.; Mullan, Patricia B.; Owens, Sonal T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. Methods First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Results Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Conclusions Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics. PMID:26547081

  19. Clinical Needs Finding: Developing the Virtual Experience, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vaishali; Thompson, Megan; Altman, Stuart M; Taylor, Peter; Summers, Alexander; Goodwin, Kelsey; Louie, Angelique Y

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative program at the University of California, Davis for students to engage in clinical needs finding. Using a team-based approach, students participated in clinical rotations to observe firsthand the needs of clinicians at the university affiliated medical center. The teams were asked to develop documentary-style videos to capture key experiences that would allow future viewers to use the videos as “virtual” clinical rotations. This was conceived as a strategy to allow students in prohibitively large classes, or students in programs at institutions without associated medical or veterinary school programs, to experience clinical rotations and perform needs assessments. The students' perspectives on the experience as well as instructor analysis of best practices for this type of activity are presented and discussed. We found that the internship experience was valuable to the students participating, by not only introducing the practice of needs finding but for increasing the students' confidence in the practice of engineering design and their ability to work independently. The videos produced were of such high quality that instructors from other institutions have requested copies for instructional use. Virtual clinical rotations through video experiences may provide a reasonable substitute for students who do not have the ability to participate in rotations in person. PMID:23483373

  20. The potential of californium-252 in radiotherapy. Preclinical measurements in physics and radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J; Rossi, H

    1975-10-01

    Californium-252 is a man-made radionuclide (half-life 2-65 years) which emits a mixture of neutrons and gamma rays. It is used in radiotherapy as an alternative to radium and extends the potential benefits of neutrons to interstitial and intracavitary applications. Gamma rays account for a variable proportion of the dose (30 to 50 per cent), depending on the source filtration and the distance from the source. Dosimetry is complicated by this mixture of neutrons and gamma rays. However, measurements with paired ion-chambers, together with Monte-Carlo calculations, have produced dosimetric data that are adequate for clinical use. Many determinations of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) have been reported. At the low dose-rates characteristic of interstitial implants, the OER is about 1-5. This is essentially the figure for fast neutrons alone, since at very low dose-rates the contribution of the gamma rays to the biological effect is negligible. As the dose increases, there is a corresponding rise in the OER because the gamma ray contribution can no longer be ignored. The OER is likely to be about 1-8 if 252Cf is used in intracavity treatments and 2-0 if used in "acute" exposures in devices such as the Cathetron. The relative biological effectivenesss (RBE) varies with dose-rate, and with the biological system used to measure it. Radiobiological experiments indicate that 6,000 rads of radium gamma rays in seven days is equivalent to 890 rads of 252Cf neutrons delivered in approximately the same overall time. This figure was suggested some years ago as an interim guide-line until sufficient clinical experience is accumulated. PMID:811295

  1. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  2. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  3. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting. PMID:27209870

  4. Bystander effects and their implications for clinical radiation therapy: Insights from multiscale in silico experiments.

    PubMed

    Powathil, Gibin G; Munro, Alastair J; Chaplain, Mark A J; Swat, Maciej

    2016-07-21

    Radiotherapy is a commonly used treatment for cancer and is usually given in varying doses. At low radiation doses relatively few cells die as a direct response to radiation but secondary radiation effects, such as DNA mutation or bystander phenomena, may affect many cells. Consequently it is at low radiation levels where an understanding of bystander effects is essential in designing novel therapies with superior clinical outcomes. In this paper, we use a hybrid multiscale mathematical model to study the direct effects of radiation as well as radiation-induced bystander effects on both tumour cells and normal cells. We show that bystander responses play a major role in mediating radiation damage to cells at low-doses of radiotherapy, doing more damage than that due to direct radiation. The survival curves derived from our computational simulations showed an area of hyper-radiosensitivity at low-doses that are not obtained using a traditional radiobiological model. PMID:27084360

  5. Dental Students' Clinical Expectations and Experiences Treating Persons with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Perusini, Darsi J; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Sigal, Michael J; Dempster, Laura J

    2016-03-01

    Persons with disabilities (PWDs) have a disproportionate level of dental disease relative to the general population. Access to care is a cause along with dentists' willingness to treat PWDs. The aim of this study was to investigate the expectations and experiences of dental students in providing treatment to these patients in a hospital-based dental clinic for PWDs. Senior dental students at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto (n=92) were surveyed prior to (Phase I) and at the end of (Phase II) mandatory clinical rotations at the Mount Sinai Hospital's Dentistry Clinic for Persons with Special Needs. Response rates were 88% for Phase I and 58% for Phase II. Before the rotations, 70% of the respondents reported little or no experience with PWDs, and 46% said they did not feel comfortable providing basic dental treatment to PWDs. However, in Phase II, significantly more students reported being comfortable than in Phase I (p=0.001). Overall, the majority of respondents (Phase I 95%; Phase II 98%) indicated they would at least attempt to provide basic dental care to PWDs after graduation. The majority also identified the opportunity to provide care and interact with PWDs as the most enjoyable aspect of their experience at the clinic. They reported that the experience helped reduce their concerns about treating PWDs including being more realistic about the time required and ideal quality of the treatment they could provide. These results suggest that their experience in the clinic significantly increased students' comfort in treating PWDs. The respondents expressed a willingness to treat PWDs once graduated and generally identified their experience as being more positive than their expectations. PMID:26933105

  6. The Student Trainer Clinical Experience at Lock Haven State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, David

    An integral part of the clinical experience for athletic trainers at Lock Haven State College (Pennsylvania) is training in first aid and learning to evaluate not only sport-related injuries but all injuries. Thorough knowledge is expected of athletic trainers in the areas of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, first aid, and treatment of…

  7. [Cryodevitalization of the mandible. The initial clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Eckelt, U; Lerch, H; Franke, W G

    1990-01-01

    There is given a report about first clinical experiences in the partial cryodevitalization of the mandible. 3 tumor-bearing patients were treated. The resection of the mandible was not necessary. The process of revitalisation was observed by bone scanning. PMID:2150462

  8. Time Keeps on Ticking: The Experience of Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    The reactions by Ridley and Shaw-Ridley (EJ832451) and Lichtenberg (EJ832452) to the authors' meta-analysis on the effects of experience on judgment accuracy add positively to what is hoped will become an ever more focused discourse on this most basic question: How can mental health clinical decision making be improved? In this rejoinder, the…

  9. A solo hospital librarian's experience in clinical informatics.

    PubMed

    Miles, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    This column reviews some of a solo librarian's experiences that led to involvement with the hospital Clinical Informatics Team. This included work on the electronic health record (EHR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system, development of order sets, and participation in the Physician Technology Committee. PMID:25927515

  10. Teachers' Clinical Experiences and Attitudes toward Technology Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paganelli, Andrea Lynch

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multisite case study is to examine participants' attitudes toward technology, types of technology available for participant use, and the extent to which technology is used by preservice and mentor teachers during clinical experiences. Research supports the benefit of improved attitudes toward technology integration…

  11. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    PubMed

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other. PMID:25991150

  12. Challenging clinical learning environments: experiences of undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Linda; McDonald, Jane; Gillespie, Mary; Brown, Helen; Miles, Lynn

    2014-03-01

    Clinical learning is an essential component of becoming a nurse. However at times, students report experiencing challenging clinical learning environments (CCLE), raising questions regarding the nature of a challenging clinical learning environment, its impact on students' learning and how students might respond within a CCLE. Using an Interpretive Descriptive study design, researchers held focus groups with 54 students from two Canadian sites, who self-identified as having experienced a CCLE. Students defined a CCLE as affected by relationships in the clinical area and by the context of their learning experiences. CCLE decreased students' learning opportunities and impacted on them as persons. As students determined which relationships were challenging, they tapped other resources and they used strategies to rebuilt, reframe, redirect and/or retreat relative to the specific challenge. Relationships also acted as buffers to unsupportive practice cultures. Implications for practice and research are addressed. PMID:24063792

  13. Fostering new relational experience: clinical process in couple psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical goals for couple psychotherapy is to foster a new relational experience in the session where the couple feels safe enough to reveal more vulnerable emotions and to explore their defensive withdrawal, aggressive attacking, or blaming. The lived intimate experience in the session offers the couple an opportunity to gain integrative insight into their feelings, expectations, and behaviors that ultimately hinder intimacy. The clinical processes that are necessary include empathizing with the couple and facilitating safety within the session, looking for opportunities to explore emotions, ruptures, and unconscious motivations that maintain distance in the relationship, and creating a new relational experience in the session that has the potential to engender integrative insight. These clinical processes will be presented with empirical support. Experts from a session will be used to highlight how these processes influence the couple and promote increased intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24059733

  14. Student nurses experience of learning in the clinical environment.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Tsangari, Haritini; Saarikoski, Mikko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2010-05-01

    The clinical learning environment is a complex social entity that influences student learning outcomes in the clinical setting. Exploration of this environment gives insight into the educational functioning of the clinical areas and allows nurse teachers to enhance students' opportunities for learning. Since Cyprus is undergoing major reforms in nursing education, building on the experience and knowledge gained, this study aims to explore the present clinical situation and how this would impact on nursing education moves to the university. As nursing education would take on a different approach, it is assumed the learning approach would also be different, and so utilization of the clinical environment would also be improved. Six hundred and forty five students participated in the study. Data were collected by means of the clinical learning environment and supervision instrument. A statistically significant correlation was found between the sub-dimensions "premises of nursing care" and "premises of learning" indicating that students are relating learning environment with the quality of nursing care and patient relationships. The ward atmosphere and the leadership style of the manager were rated as less important factors for learning. The majority of students experienced a group supervision model, but the more satisfied students were those with a "personal mentor" that was considered as the most successful mentor relationship. The findings suggest more thorough examination and understanding of the characteristics of the clinical environment that are conductive to learning. PMID:19700368

  15. Rubrics for clinical evaluation: objectifying the subjective experience.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Julie J; Stacy, Annette S

    2009-03-01

    Rubrics have historically been used in secondary and higher education to evaluate specific assignments or tasks. There is little mention of rubrics in the nursing literature, particularly in the area of clinical evaluation. A strong case can be made for expanding the traditional use of a rubric to include its validity with clinical evaluation. Clinical evaluation remains a challenge, even for seasoned faculty. Faculty and students often interpret clinical course objectives differently. Coupled with this concern is the subjectivity of the evaluation. The use of "novice" clinical faculty, who inevitably struggle with discerning and justifying anything but stellar student performance, further compounds these issues. Rubrics also facilitate the grading experience for faculty and students. Faculty often find themselves making repetitive written comments to students. These comments can be incorporated into the rubric, thus shortening grading time while increasing the quality and quantity of instructor feedback. When clarified in a rubric, course objectives become "real". Student benefits include increased critical thinking and a more realistic approach to self-evaluation. Clinical rubrics can be developed from existing course objectives. Though perhaps tedious in initial development, both faculty and student satisfaction with the clinical evaluation process can be enhanced with the use of rubrics. PMID:19083270

  16. Hot particle dosimetry and radiobiology--past and present.

    PubMed

    Charles, M W; Harrison, J D

    2007-09-01

    Small high-activity radioactive particles of nominal diameter ranging from approximately 1 mm down to several microm have been a radiological concern over the last 30 years in and around European and American nuclear reactor facilities. These particles have often been referred to as 'hot particles'. The 'hot particle problem' came into prominent concern in the late 1960s. The potential carcinogenic effects in lungs as the result of irradiation by discrete small particles containing alpha-emitting radionuclides, particularly (239)Pu, were claimed by some to be several orders of magnitude greater than those produced by uniform irradiation to the same mean dose. The phrase 'hot particle problem' was subsequently used to refer to the difficulty of predicting health effects for all microscopic radioactive sources. The difficulty arose because of the paucity of comparative human, animal or cell studies using radioactive particles, and the lack of validated measurement or calculational techniques for dose estimation for non-uniform exposures. Experience was largely restricted to uniform, large-area/volume exposures. The concern regarding cancer induction was extended to deterministic effects when the ICRP in 1977 failed to give adequate dose limits for dealing with 'hot particle' exposures of the skin. Since 1980, considerable efforts have been made to clarify and solve the dosimetric and radiobiological issues related to the health effects of 'hot particle' exposures. The general recommendations of the ICRP in 1991 used the latest radiobiological data to provide skin dose limits which are applicable to 'hot particle' exposures. More recently the NCRP has extended considerations to other organs. This progress is reviewed and applied to the specific case of the recent evaluation of potential health effects of Dounreay fuel fragments commissioned by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). Analyses of possible doses and risks in this case indicate that the

  17. Three-Dimensional Radiobiologic Dosimetry: Application of Radiobiologic Modeling to Patient-Specific 3-Dimensional Imaging–Based Internal Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Andrew R.; Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F.; He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George

    2010-01-01

    Phantom-based and patient-specific imaging-based dosimetry methodologies have traditionally yielded mean organ-absorbed doses or spatial dose distributions over tumors and normal organs. In this work, radiobiologic modeling is introduced to convert the spatial distribution of absorbed dose into biologically effective dose and equivalent uniform dose parameters. The methodology is illustrated using data from a thyroid cancer patient treated with radioiodine. Methods Three registered SPECT/CT scans were used to generate 3-dimensional images of radionuclide kinetics (clearance rate) and cumulated activity. The cumulated activity image and corresponding CT scan were provided as input into an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo calculation: The cumulated activity image was used to define the distribution of decays, and an attenuation image derived from CT was used to define the corresponding spatial tissue density and composition distribution. The rate images were used to convert the spatial absorbed dose distribution to a biologically effective dose distribution, which was then used to estimate a single equivalent uniform dose for segmented volumes of interest. Equivalent uniform dose was also calculated from the absorbed dose distribution directly. Results We validate the method using simple models; compare the dose-volume histogram with a previously analyzed clinical case; and give the mean absorbed dose, mean biologically effective dose, and equivalent uniform dose for an illustrative case of a pediatric thyroid cancer patient with diffuse lung metastases. The mean absorbed dose, mean biologically effective dose, and equivalent uniform dose for the tumor were 57.7, 58.5, and 25.0 Gy, respectively. Corresponding values for normal lung tissue were 9.5, 9.8, and 8.3 Gy, respectively. Conclusion The analysis demonstrates the impact of radiobiologic modeling on response prediction. The 57% reduction in the equivalent dose value for the tumor reflects a high level of dose

  18. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsässer, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  19. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsaesser, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-15

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  20. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  1. Nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical education models.

    PubMed

    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Hellström-Hyson, Eva; Persson, Elisabeth; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2014-08-01

    Preceptors play an important role in the process of developing students' knowledge and skills. There is an ongoing search for the best learning and teaching models in clinical education. Little is known about preceptors' perspectives on different models. The aim of the study was to describe nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical models of clinical education: peer learning and traditional supervision. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Eighteen preceptors from surgical and medical departments at two hospitals were interviewed, ten representing peer learning (student work in pairs) and eight traditional supervision (one student follows a nurse during a shift). The findings showed that preceptors using peer learning created room for students to assume responsibility for their own learning, challenged students' knowledge by refraining from stepping in and encouraged critical thinking. Using traditional supervision, the preceptors' individual ambitions influenced the preceptorship and their own knowledge was empathized as being important to impart. They demonstrated, observed and gradually relinquished responsibility to the students. The choice of clinical education model is important. Peer learning seemed to create learning environments that integrate clinical and academic skills. Investigation of pedagogical models in clinical education should be of major concern to managers and preceptors. PMID:24512652

  2. The interprofessional clinical experience: interprofessional education in the nursing home.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Kendra D; Ford, Channing R; Sawyer, Patricia; Foley, Kathleen T; Harada, Caroline N; Brown, Cynthia J; Ritchie, Christine S

    2015-03-01

    The interprofessional clinical experience (ICE) was designed to introduce trainees to the roles of different healthcare professionals, provide an opportunity to participate in an interprofessional team, and familiarize trainees with caring for older adults in the nursing home setting. Healthcare trainees from seven professions (dentistry, medicine, nursing, nutrition, occupational therapy, optometry and social work) participated in ICE. This program consisted of individual patient interviews followed by a team meeting to develop a comprehensive care plan. To evaluate the impact of ICE on attitudinal change, the UCLA Geriatric Attitudes Scale and a post-experience assessment were used. The post-experience assessment evaluated the trainees' perception of potential team members' roles and attitudes about interprofessional team care of the older adult. Attitudes toward interprofessional teamwork and the older adult were generally positive. ICE is a novel program that allows trainees across healthcare professions to experience interprofessional teamwork in the nursing home setting. PMID:25140581

  3. Biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Highlights of my biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology is presented. Early adventures involved developing state-vector models'' for specific harmful effects (cell killing, life shortening) of exposure to radiation. More recent adventures led to developing hazard-function models'' for predicting biological effects (e.g., cell killing, mutations, tumor induction) of combined exposure to different toxicants. Hazard-function models were also developed for predicting harm to man from exposure to large radiation doses. Major conclusions derived from the modeling adventures are as follows: (1) synergistic effects of different genotoxic agents should not occur at low doses; (2) for exposure of the lung or bone marrow to large doses of photon radiation, low rates of exposure should be better tolerated than high rates; and (3) for some types of radiation (e.g., alpha particles and fission neutrons), moderate doses delivered at a low rate may be more harmful than the same dose given at a high rate. 53 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Understanding Clinical Expertise: Nurse Education, Experience, and the Hospital Context

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Lake, Eileen T.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nursing expertise is central to quality patient care. Research on factors that contribute to expertise has focused largely on individual nurse characteristics to the exclusion of contextual factors. To address this, we examined effects of hospital contextual factors and individual nurse education and experience on clinical nursing expertise in a cross-sectional analysis of data from 8,611 registered nurses. In a generalized ordered logistic regression analysis, the composition of the hospital staff, particularly the proportion of nurses with at least a bachelor of science in nursing degree, was associated with significantly greater odds of a nurse reporting a more advanced expertise level. Our findings suggest that, controlling for individual characteristics, the hospital context significantly influences clinical nursing expertise. PMID:20645420

  5. The tumor radiobiology of SRS and SBRT: are more than the 5 Rs involved?

    PubMed

    Brown, J Martin; Carlson, David J; Brenner, David J

    2014-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), are rapidly becoming accepted practice for the radiation therapy of certain tumors. Typically, SRS and SBRT involve the delivery of 1 or a few large-dose fractions of 8 to 30 Gy per fraction: a major paradigm shift from radiation therapy practice over the past 90 years, when, with relatively large amounts of normal tissues receiving high doses, the goal was to maximize tumor response for an acceptable level of normal tissue injury. The development of SRS and SBRT have come about because of technologic advances in image guidance and treatment delivery techniques that enable the delivery of large doses to tumors with reduced margins and high gradients outside the target, thereby minimizing doses to surrounding normal tissues. Because the results obtained with SRS and SBRT have been impressive, they have raised the question whether classic radiobiological modeling, and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, are appropriate for large doses per fraction. In addition to objections to the LQ model, the possibility of additional biological effects resulting from endothelial cell damage, enhanced tumor immunity, or both have been raised to account for the success of SRS and SBRT. In this review, we conclude that the available preclinical and clinical data do not support a need to change the LQ model or to invoke phenomena over and above the classic 5 Rs of radiobiology and radiation therapy, with the likely exception that for some tumors high doses of irradiation may produce enhanced antitumor immunity. Thus, we suggest that for most tumors, the standard radiobiology concepts of the 5 Rs are sufficient to explain the clinical data, and the excellent results obtained from clinical studies are the result of the much larger biologically effective doses that are delivered with SRS and SBRT. PMID:24411596

  6. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  7. The Tumor Radiobiology of SRS and SBRT: Are More Than the 5 Rs Involved?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Carlson, David J.; Brenner, David J.

    2014-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), are rapidly becoming accepted practice for the radiation therapy of certain tumors. Typically, SRS and SBRT involve the delivery of 1 or a few large-dose fractions of 8 to 30 Gy per fraction: a major paradigm shift from radiation therapy practice over the past 90 years, when, with relatively large amounts of normal tissues receiving high doses, the goal was to maximize tumor response for an acceptable level of normal tissue injury. The development of SRS and SBRT have come about because of technologic advances in image guidance and treatment delivery techniques that enable the delivery of large doses to tumors with reduced margins and high gradients outside the target, thereby minimizing doses to surrounding normal tissues. Because the results obtained with SRS and SBRT have been impressive, they have raised the question whether classic radiobiological modeling, and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, are appropriate for large doses per fraction. In addition to objections to the LQ model, the possibility of additional biological effects resulting from endothelial cell damage, enhanced tumor immunity, or both have been raised to account for the success of SRS and SBRT. In this review, we conclude that the available preclinical and clinical data do not support a need to change the LQ model or to invoke phenomena over and above the classic 5 Rs of radiobiology and radiation therapy, with the likely exception that for some tumors high doses of irradiation may produce enhanced antitumor immunity. Thus, we suggest that for most tumors, the standard radiobiology concepts of the 5 Rs are sufficient to explain the clinical data, and the excellent results obtained from clinical studies are the result of the much larger biologically effective doses that are delivered with SRS and SBRT.

  8. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources. PMID:25585469

  9. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them. PMID:17950499

  10. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  11. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  12. Clinical experience with adolescent diabetes in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Akanji, A. O.

    1996-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus presenting in adolescents age 10 to 20 years accounts for less than 5% of all diabetes in tropical African countries. Consequently, inadequate attention is paid to the medical and psychosocial problems attendant on adolescent diabetes in those countries. This article highlights our clinical experience in the management of 30 adolescent diabetic subjects who presented consecutively in the diabetic clinic of a major Nigerian teaching hospital. In these patients, adolescent diabetes appeared heterogeneous, comprising classical insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in approximately 80%; the remaining fraction (20%) was contributed variably by malnutrition-related diabetes (MRDM) and an "atypical" form of IDDM. The most common medical complications were recurrent hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, and infections. About 80% of the patients were poor, and up to two thirds had to withdraw from school or trade because of recurrent illness. One third of the girls had a history of unwanted pregnancies. Almost all (93%) had a history of general rebelliousness and clinic truancy. Therefore, the high prevalence of acute metabolic decompensation may be related to the increased frequency of psychosocial problems, especially poverty, in these patients. It is suggested that agencies in tropical Africa increase welfare facilities for adolescent chronic disease, and also establish and encourage clinics dedicated to adolescent diabetes care. PMID:8776066

  13. Developing a leadership pipeline: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Hess, Caryl A; Barss, Christina; Stoller, James K

    2014-11-01

    The complexity of health care requires excellent leadership to address the challenges of access, quality, and cost of care. Because competencies to lead differ from clinical or research skills, there is a compelling need to develop leaders and create a talent pipeline, perhaps especially in physician-led organizations like Cleveland Clinic. In this context, we previously reported on a cohort-based physician leadership development course called Leading in Health Care and, in the current report, detail an expanded health care leadership development programme called the Cleveland Clinic Academy (CCA). CCA consists of a broad suite of offerings, including cohort-based learning and 'a la carte' half- or full-day courses addressing specific competencies to manage and to lead. Academy attendance is optional and is available to all physicians, nurses, and administrators with the requisite experience. Course selection is guided by competency matrices which map leadership competencies to specific courses. As of December 2012, a total of 285 course sessions have been offered to 6,050 attendees with uniformly high ratings of course quality and impact. During the past 10 years, Cleveland Clinic's leadership and management curriculum has successfully created a pipeline of health care leaders to fill executive positions, search committees, board openings, and various other organizational leadership positions. Health care leadership can be taught and learned. PMID:25082312

  14. Clinical experience with adolescent diabetes in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Akanji, A O

    1996-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus presenting in adolescents age 10 to 20 years accounts for less than 5% of all diabetes in tropical African countries. Consequently, inadequate attention is paid to the medical and psychosocial problems attendant on adolescent diabetes in those countries. This article highlights our clinical experience in the management of 30 adolescent diabetic subjects who presented consecutively in the diabetic clinic of a major Nigerian teaching hospital. In these patients, adolescent diabetes appeared heterogeneous, comprising classical insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in approximately 80%; the remaining fraction (20%) was contributed variably by malnutrition-related diabetes (MRDM) and an "atypical" form of IDDM. The most common medical complications were recurrent hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, and infections. About 80% of the patients were poor, and up to two thirds had to withdraw from school or trade because of recurrent illness. One third of the girls had a history of unwanted pregnancies. Almost all (93%) had a history of general rebelliousness and clinic truancy. Therefore, the high prevalence of acute metabolic decompensation may be related to the increased frequency of psychosocial problems, especially poverty, in these patients. It is suggested that agencies in tropical Africa increase welfare facilities for adolescent chronic disease, and also establish and encourage clinics dedicated to adolescent diabetes care. PMID:8776066

  15. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  16. [Radiobiological aspects of diagnostic X-ray use in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Hoogeveen, R C; van den Aardweg, G J M J

    2015-05-01

    Soon after the discovery of X-rays, it became clear that their use can cause detrimental effects. The field of radiobiology deals with these detrimental effects. In this article, the theoretical concepts of radiobiology relevant to diagnostic X-ray use are presented. The effects of radiation on living tissues, the relationship between dose and effect, and a translation of these effects into the dental application are discussed. X-rays cannot be considered to be harmless even when used at the relatively low doses as in dentistry. If applied with justification and optimization, the risk to the patient will, however, be small. PMID:26210221

  17. Experience of isolated sleep paralysis in clinical practice in Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Ohaeri, J. U.

    1992-01-01

    The supernatural fears associated with the experience of isolated sleep paralysis in the culture of developing countries is sometimes associated with the evolution of somatic symptoms of psychological origin in patients predisposed to neurotic illness. Patients rarely spontaneously volunteer these fears and doctors pay them scant attention. Illustrative case histories that demonstrate the dynamics of the clinical presentation, as well as the treatment approach, are highlighted. It is hoped that doctors in general medical practice and in psychological medicine in developing countries where belief in supernatural causation of illness is rife will consider these factors in order to provide more effective treatment. PMID:1608064

  18. Experience of isolated sleep paralysis in clinical practice in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ohaeri, J U

    1992-06-01

    The supernatural fears associated with the experience of isolated sleep paralysis in the culture of developing countries is sometimes associated with the evolution of somatic symptoms of psychological origin in patients predisposed to neurotic illness. Patients rarely spontaneously volunteer these fears and doctors pay them scant attention. Illustrative case histories that demonstrate the dynamics of the clinical presentation, as well as the treatment approach, are highlighted. It is hoped that doctors in general medical practice and in psychological medicine in developing countries where belief in supernatural causation of illness is rife will consider these factors in order to provide more effective treatment. PMID:1608064

  19. [MODIFICATION OF THE PROTON BEAM PHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS BY ELEMENTS OF SPACECRAFT RADIATION PROTECTION].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Molokanov, A G; Shurshakov, V A; Bulynina, T M; Liakhova, K N; Severiukhin, Yu S; Abrosimova, A N; Ushakov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was performed with outbred ICR (CD-1). female mice (SPF). The animals were irradiated by 171 MeV protons at a dose of 20 cGy. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a "protective blind", and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Physical obstacles on the path of 171 MeV protons increase their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, two types of obstacles together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. Rationalization of physical methods of spacecrew protection should be based as on knowledge in physical dosimetry (ionizing chambers, thermoluminescent, track detectors etc.), so the radiobiological criteria established in experiments with animals. PMID:26738306

  20. A Guide to Professional Excellence in Clinical Experiences in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brooks, Ed.; And Others

    This booklet of guidelines for the total program of direct and simulated experiences in teacher education has six major sections: 1) Aims of Clinical Experiences; 2) Guidelines to Excellence with Focusing Questions--40 questions on 12 different aspects of the clinical experience programs; 3) Clinical Experiences: Descriptions and…

  1. Clinical trial participants’ experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. Setting The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. Participants The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. Outcomes We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Results Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Conclusions Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in ‘missing’ or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an

  2. Fingolimod Real World Experience: Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Fingolimod is a multiple sclerosis treatment licensed in Europe since 2011. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in three large phase III trials, used in the regulatory submissions throughout the world. As usual, in these trials the inclusion and exclusion criteria were designed to obtain a homogeneous population, with interchangeable characteristics in the different treatment arms. Although this is the best strategy to achieve a robust answer to the investigation question, it does not guaranty the treatment efficacy in the clinical practice, since in the real world there are concomitant treatments, comorbidities, adherence, and persistence challenges. But, to make informed treatment decision for a real life patient, we need to have evidence of the treatment efficacy, what has been called treatment effectiveness. This work aims to review fingolimod effectiveness, using, as source of information, abstracts, posters, and manuscripts. This unorthodox strategy was developed because more than half of the published experience with fingolimod is still on abstracts and posters. Only a small part of the studies reviewed are already published in peer reviewed journals. Fingolimod seems to be, at least, as effective and safe as it was on clinical trials, and with its long-term experience no new safety signals were observed. PMID:26693475

  3. Mutuality: clinical and metapsychological potentials of a failed experiment.

    PubMed

    Castillo Mendoza, Carlos Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis are often dismissed, without acknowledging the results obtained from them and his own cautionary remarks about their limits. Though ultimately failed, Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis were a source of clinical and metapsychological knowledge, despite the fact that he was unable to elaborate them in his lifetime. In this paper I connect mutuality to the development of the psyche, especially to the constitutive core of the intrapsychic. To understand the latter, it is necessary to take into account, among others, issues such as the common attribute, the mutual flux between the unconsciouses, the dialogue of unconsciouses, the maternal profundity, the primal relationship with the mother, and, above all, the primal unity between mother and child, which are fundamental for the emergence and development of the primary psychic forces. Incidences of rupture, distortion of the core of mutuality in the psychic life, its loss and disadjustment, by means of external traumatizing forces, and some clinical implications are described. PMID:22398886

  4. Clinical experience with flupirtine in the U.S.

    PubMed

    McMahon, F G; Arndt, W F; Newton, J J; Montgomery, P A; Perhach, J L

    1987-01-01

    Flupirtine, a chemically unique, orally effective, non-narcotic, centrally acting analgesic was evaluated for efficacy and safety in five parallel, double-blind randomized clinical trials which included both placebo and active control comparisons. Flupirtine was given in oral doses of 100 to 300 mg, with a maximum daily dose of 600 mg to patients with pain resulting from episiotomy, surgical or dental procedures. Patients rated pain intensity, pain relief and adverse experiences at regular intervals up to 6 hours following medication. Assessments of efficacy included measures of the sum of pain intensity differences (SPID), total pain relief (TOPAR) and peak analgesia (PPID). More than 1300 patients have been evaluated at 26 study sites in the United States. More than 170 of them received flupirtine 100 mg, 250 received 200 mg and 50 received 300 mg. An additional 415 patients received positive control medications (paracetamol 650 mg, codeine 60 mg, pentazocine 50 mg or oxycodone 10 mg plus paracetamol 650 mg). All doses of flupirtine produced analgesia after a single dose. Pharmacokinetic evaluations have shown linear kinetics for flupirtine and a 100 mg t.i.d. dosage schedule produces average steady-state blood levels equivalent to the peak response for a single 200 mg dose. Adverse experiences occurring in flupirtine clinical studies have been minimal in incidence, nature and degree, with drowsiness being the most frequently reported reaction (approximately 10%). PMID:3328854

  5. Trichomycosis (Trichobacteriosis): Clinical and Microbiological Experience with 56 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Váquez-González, Denisse; Fierro, Leonel; Araiza, Javier; Ponce, Rosa María

    2013-01-01

    Background: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic bacterial infection of the axillary hairs caused by Corynebacterium sp. Objective: to bring a series of cases of trichomycosis, its clinical and microbiological experience. Materials and Methods: This report consists in a linear and observational retrospective study of 15 years of cases of trichomycosis confirmed clinically and microbiologically. Results: Fifty six confirmed cases of trichomycosis were included in this report. The majority were men 53/56 (94.6%), mean age was 32.5 years. The most commonly affected area was the axilla (92%), trichomycosis flava was the principal variant 55/56 (98.2%) and signs and symptoms associated were hyperhidrosis (87.5%), hairs’ texture change (57.1%) and odor (35.7%). Bacterial concretions were observed in all cases, and the predominant causative agent in 89.3% of all cases was Corynebacterium sp. Thirty patients were included in therapeutic portion of the study, and 28 (93.3%) of them experienced a clinical and microbiological cure. Conclusion: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic, superficial infection, which primarily affects axillary hairs. PMID:23960390

  6. A computational tool for patient specific dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of selective internal radiation therapy with (90)Y microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kalantzis, Georgios; Leventouri, Theodora; Apte, Aditiya; Shang, Charles

    2015-11-01

    In recent years we have witnessed tremendous progress in selective internal radiation therapy. In clinical practice, quite often, radionuclide therapy is planned using simple models based on standard activity values or activity administered per unit body weight or surface area in spite of the admission that radiation-dose methods provide more accurate dosimetric results. To address that issue, the authors developed a Matlab-based computational software, named Patient Specific Yttrium-90 Dosimetry Toolkit (PSYDT). PSYDT was designed for patient specific voxel-based dosimetric calculations and radiobiological modeling of selective internal radiation therapy with (90)Y microspheres. The developed toolkit is composed of three dimensional dose calculations for both bremsstrahlung and beta emissions. Subsequently, radiobiological modeling is performed on a per-voxel basis and cumulative dose volume histograms (DVHs) are generated. In this report we describe the functionality and visualization features of PSYDT. PMID:26296058

  7. Early experience with tedizolid: clinical efficacy, pharmacodynamics, and resistance.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Jeffrey M; Marx, Kayleigh; Martin, Craig A

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among gram-positive organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) continues to limit therapeutic options. The oxazolidinones are a synthetic class of agents now commonly relied on for the treatment of serious MRSA and VRE infections. With increasing utilization of linezolid, resistant pathogens have once again begun to emerge. Tedizolid, a next-generation oxazolidinone, possesses a spectrum of activity including MRSA and VRE, with significantly enhanced potency also against linezolid-resistant strains. Preclinical and early clinical studies have reported positive results, demonstrating a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in combination with key potential safety advantages. In two phase III clinical trials, tedizolid was found noninferior to linezolid in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. Investigations for treatment of ventilator-acquired and health care-associated pneumonia are currently underway. Tedizolid has been subjected to pharmacodynamics studies throughout its development that have highlighted properties unique to this agent. Considerable accumulations in epithelial lining fluid and antimicrobial activity greatly augmented by the presence of granulocytes suggest that slow but bactericidal activity may be possible in some clinical scenarios. Structural distinctions between tedizolid and linezolid suggest that tedizolid has decreased vulnerability to oxazolidinone resistance mechanisms. Tedizolid minimum inhibitory concentrations are essentially unchanged in organisms possessing the chloramphenicol-florfenicol resistance gene, a horizontally transferable linezolid resistance mechanism. Although the clinical experience with tedizolid remains limited, early data suggest a potential role in the treatment of serious infections due to multidrug-resistant gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25266820

  8. Managing medical images and clinical information: InCor's experience.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Sergio S; Rebelo, Marina S; Moreno, Ramon A; Santos, Marcelo; Bertozzo, Nivaldo; Motta, Gustavo H M B; Pires, Fabio A; Gutierrez, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Patients usually get medical assistance in several clinics and hospitals during their lifetime, archiving vital information in a dispersed way. Clearly, a proper patient care should take into account that information in order to check for incompatibilities, avoid unnecessary exams, and get relevant clinical history. The Heart Institute (InCor) of São Paulo, Brazil, has been committed to the goal of integrating all exams and clinical information within the institution and other hospitals. Since InCor is one of the six institutes of the University of São Paulo Medical School and each institute has its own information system, exchanging information among the institutes is also a very important aspect that has been considered. In the last few years, a system for transmission, archiving, retrieval, processing, and visualization of medical images integrated with a hospital information system has been successfully created and constitutes the InCor's electronic patient record (EPR). This work describes the experience in the effort to develop a functional and comprehensive EPR, which includes laboratory exams, images (static, dynamic, and three dimensional), clinical reports, documents, and even real-time vital signals. A security policy based on a contextual role-based access control model was implemented to regulate user's access to EPR. Currently, more than 10 TB of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images have been stored using the proposed architecture and the EPR stores daily more than 11 GB of integrated data. The proposed storage subsystem allows 6 months of visibility for rapid retrieval and more than two years for automatic retrieval using a jukebox. This paper addresses also a prototype for the integration of distributed and heterogeneous EPR. PMID:17249400

  9. Almotriptan: a review of 10 years' clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio; Vila, Carlos; McGown, Caroline C

    2010-10-01

    Almotriptan, a serotonin 5-HT 1B/1D agonist, was developed for the acute treatment of migraine with or without aura and has been available for 10 years. This article evaluates the wealth of experience that has been obtained with almotriptan, including large randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and post-marketing studies that more closely reflect everyday clinical practice. Initial RCTs required patients to take almotriptan when migraine pain was of moderate or severe intensity, and found that 12.5 mg provided optimal outcomes for both pain relief and tolerability. Almotriptan effectively improved 2-h pain-relief, reduced migraine-associated symptoms and demonstrated low recurrence rates. These findings were also shown in patient subgroups, such as adolescents and menstrual migraineurs. A secondary finding in these trials was that patients who took almotriptan early, when the pain was still mild, achieved better outcomes. This prompted the initiation of studies designed to assess the effect of almotriptan in early intervention. Open-label trials reported improvements in pain-free end points (2 h, 24 h), and subsequent RCTs confirmed these findings. Pharmacovigilance data from more than 100 million tablets dispensed worldwide have confirmed that almotriptan is associated with a low occurrence of adverse effects, which, in clinical trials, has been shown to be similar to that observed with placebo. The clinical evidence obtained and comparisons made over a decade of use have demonstrated that almotriptan is one of the more effective and fast-acting triptans available, with a placebo-like tolerability profile. This suggests that almotriptan is an excellent choice for patients requiring specific acute migraine treatment. PMID:20945537

  10. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary

  11. Questioning Skills Demonstrated by Approved Clinical Instructors During Clinical Field Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Mary G

    2008-01-01

    Context: The current trend in athletic training clinical education places greater emphasis on the quality of interactions occurring between Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) and athletic training students (ATSs). Among other attributes, the ability of ACIs to facilitate and direct quality clinical learning experiences may be influenced by the skill with which the ACI is able to use selected teaching strategies. Objective: To gain insight into ACIs' use of questioning as a specific teaching strategy during the clinical education experiences of undergraduate ATSs. Design: Qualitative case study design involving initial and stimulated-recall interviews, prolonged field observations, and audio recording of ACI-ATS interactions. Setting: The primary athletic training facility at one athletic training education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: The 8 ACI participants included 3 full-time athletic training education program faculty members and 5 graduate-level assistants. The 24 ATS participants included 1 senior, 17 juniors, and 6 sophomores. Data Collection and Analysis: Transcribed data collected from 8 initial interviews, 23 field observations, 23 audio-recorded ACI-ATS interactions and 54 stimulated-recall interviews were analyzed through microscopic, open, and axial coding, as well as coding for process. The cognition level of questions posed by ACIs was analyzed according to Sellappah and colleagues' Question Classification Framework. Results: The ACI participants posed 712 questions during the 23 observation periods. Of the total questions, 70.37% were classified as low-level cognitive questions and 17.00% as high-level cognitive questions. The remaining 12.64% were classified as other. Conclusions: Although all ACIs used questioning during clinical instruction, 2 distinct questioning patterns were identified: strategic questioning and nonstrategic questioning. The way ACIs

  12. Tritium radiobiology research in the US DOE program

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The history of the original US Atomic Energy Commission, its replacement, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the present Department of Energy's interest and sponsorship of tritium radiobiology is reviewed beginning in 1971 and continuing through 1986. In particular, the four remaining US Department of Energy, Division of Health and Environmental Research programs are described in some detail.

  13. Research in radiobiology. Annual report, Internal Irradiation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Buster, D.S.

    1985-12-31

    The annual progress report for the Radiobiology Division of the University of Utah College of Medicine is presented. Summaries of twenty-four projects concerning the metabolism, dosimetry and toxicity of a variety of actinide elements in beagles or rats are given. Individual papers within this report have been separately indexed and abstracted for the data base.

  14. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  15. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  16. The Meta-Analysis of Clinical Judgment Project: Effects of Experience on Judgment Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.; Anderson, Linda A.; Cook, Robert S.; Nichols, Cassandra N.; Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Walker, Blain S.; Cohen, Genna R.; Rush, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and educational experience is one of the most commonly studied variables in clinical judgment research. Contrary to clinicians' perceptions, clinical judgment researchers have generally concluded that accuracy does not improve with increased education, training, or clinical experience. In this meta-analysis, the authors synthesized…

  17. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students. PMID:19631065

  18. A new research program for ground-based space radiobiology in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has been long acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures NASA started several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton NY Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan The European Space Agency ESA has recently established an ambitious exploration program AURORA and within this program it has been decided to start a space radiation research program Europe has a wide tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk To support research in this field in Europe ESA issued in 2005 a call for tender for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation IBER This study will prepare future ESA supported-activities in space radiation research by selecting the best European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics and a detailed proposal

  19. Preparatory study of a ground-based space radiobiology program in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has long been acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures, NASA initiated several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program, which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently established an ambitious exploration program (AURORA), and within this program it has been decided to include a space radiation research program. Europe has a long tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators, generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy. This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk. To support research in this field in Europe, ESA issued a call for tender in 2005 for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation (IBER). This study will provide guidance on future ESA-supported activities in space radiation research by identifying the most appropriate European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation, and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities. The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics, and a detailed proposal for experimental campaigns for the following 5 10 years.

  20. Clinical experience with a recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Andre, F E

    1988-09-01

    The clinical testing of EngerixR-B, the hepatitis B vaccine produced by SmithKline Biologicals using recombinant DNA technology, started in February 1984. Since extensive pre-clinical laboratory work had established that the polypeptide (HBsAg) expressed in genetically engineered yeast cells was after purification--physically, chemically and antigenically similar to the viral surface antigen particles found in the blood of chronic carriers, the aims of the clinical trials were to compare the safety, reactogenicity, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast-derived (YDV) and plasma-derived (PDV) vaccines. By September 1987, 89 studies had been initiated involving a total of 10,545 subjects aged from birth to 82 years. This extensive experience has established that the risk of hypersensitivity to yeast-derived contaminants is negligible since no hypersensitivity reaction has been observed in any vaccinee, the incidence and severity of local reactions have not increased after repeated inoculations and no anti-yeast antibodies were produced by vaccination. Reactogenicity has been comparable to that of PDV's consisting essentially of transient mild irritation at the site of injection presumably caused by the aluminium hydroxide used as adjuvant. The anti-HBs responses to YDV and PDV's were quantitatively (seroconversion rates, peak antibody levels and persistence) as well as qualitatively (epitope specificity and affinity) similar. The expected protective effect of the immune response to the vaccine was confirmed in a challenge study in chimpanzees and in vaccinated human populations (male homosexuals, institutionalized mentally retarded patients, neonates of carrier women) with historically a high infection rate. PMID:2464196

  1. Clinical experience of spontaneous pneumomediastinum: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Hyun Woo; Moon, Youngkyu; Kim, Young Du; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Jae Kil

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a benign disease with a variety degree of severity but definite treatment modality is not clearly identified with its rarity. The purpose of this study was to review our experience and discuss the management of SPM according to the severity of disease. Methods From March 1996 to December 2012, total 64 patients were enrolled and classified as mild, moderate and severe groups and subsequent clinical courses were analyzed retrospectively. Results Fifty-one were males and 13 were females (M:F =3.9:1) with a mean age of 18 years old (range: 10-30 years old). Thirty-six patients were in mild, 22 in moderate and 6 in severe group. Chief complaints were chest pain (50 cases; 78.1%), neck pain (35 cases; 54.7%), dyspnea (18 cases; 28.1%), odynophagia (9 cases; 14.1%) and precipitating factors were coughing in 12 cases, feeding problems in 9 cases, and vomiting in 7 cases; however, 34 patients (53.1%) had no precipitating signs. All patients received oxygen therapy (100%), prophylactic antibiotics in 57 patients (89.1%), and pain medications in 47 patients (73.4%). The mean hospital stay was 4.6 days (range: 1-10 days). There was an increased linear trend according to time to visit (P=0.023) but clinical course demonstrated no significant trend between groups. Conclusions These data demonstrated that there was no difference in symptom, clinical course and SPM was adequately treated with conservative management regardless of the degree of severity of SPM. PMID:26623105

  2. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80 mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. PMID:26643920

  3. One Thousand Patients With Primary Myelofibrosis: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Lasho, Terra L.; Jimma, Thitina; Finke, Christy M.; Gangat, Naseema; Vaidya, Rakhee; Begna, Kebede H.; Al-Kali, Aref; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Hanson, Curtis A.; Pardanani, Animesh

    2012-01-01

    Objective To share our decades of experience with primary myelofibrosis and underscore the importance of outcomes research studies in designing clinical trials and interpreting their results. Patients and Methods One thousand consecutive patients with primary myelofibrosis seen at Mayo Clinic between November 4, 1977, and September 1, 2011, were considered. The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), dynamic IPSS (DIPSS), and DIPSS-plus were applied for risk stratification. Separate analyses were included for patients seen at time of referral (N=1000), at initial diagnosis (N=340), and within or after 1 year of diagnosis (N=660). Results To date, 592 deaths and 68 leukemic transformations have been documented. Parameters at initial diagnosis vs time of referral included median age (66 vs 65 years), male sex (61% vs 62%), red cell transfusion need (24% vs 38%), hemoglobin level less than 10 g/dL (38% vs 54%), platelet count less than 100 × 109/L (18% vs 26%), leukocyte count more than 25 × 109/L (13% vs 16%), marked splenomegaly (21% vs 31%), constitutional symptoms (29% vs 34%), and abnormal karyotype (31% vs 41%). Mutational frequencies were 61% for JAK2V617F, 8% for MPLW515, and 4% for IDH1/2. DIPSS-plus risk distributions at time of referral were 10% low, 15% intermediate-1, 37% intermediate-2, and 37% high. The corresponding median survivals were 17.5, 7.8, 3.6, and 1.8 years vs 20.0, 14.3, 5.3, and 1.7 years for patients younger than 60 years of age. Compared with both DIPSS and IPSS, DIPSS-plus showed better discrimination among risk groups. Five-year leukemic transformation rates were 6% and 21% in low- and high-risk patients, respectively. Conclusion The current document should serve as a valuable resource for patients and physicians and provides context for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:22212965

  4. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members’ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

  5. Clinical experience of medical students at university sains malaysia.

    PubMed

    Quah, B S; Malik, A S; Simpson, H

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteritis, coma, and snake bite. Less than 33% had witnessed acute psychosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, acute hepatic failure, status epilepticus, near drowning, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute haemolysis or child abuse.Acute surgical/obstetrics cases, seen by >90% students, included fracture of long bones, head injury, acute abdominal pain, malpresentation and foetal distress. Less than 33% had observed epistaxis, sudden loss of vision, peritonitis or burns. Among operations only herniorrhaphy, Caesarian section, internal fixation of fracture and cataract extraction were seen by >80% students. The main deficits in clinical procedures are in rectal and vaginal examinations, urine collection and microscopic examinations. The performance of individual students, assessed by a scoring system, showed 15 students had unacceptably low scores (<149/230, 50%), 37 had good scores (>181.4/230, 70%) and 5 had superior scores (197.6/230, 80%). PMID:22844212

  6. Development of a novel experimental model to investigate radiobiological implications of respiratory motion in advanced radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Aidan J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; Prise, Kevin M.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.

    2012-11-01

    Respiratory motion introduces complex spatio-temporal variations in the dosimetry of radiotherapy. There is a paucity of literature investigating the radiobiological consequences of intrafraction motion and concerns regarding the impact of movement when applied to cancer cell lines in vitro exist. We have addressed this by developing a novel model which accurately replicates respiratory motion under experimental conditions to allow clinically relevant irradiation of cell lines. A bespoke phantom and motor driven moving platform was adapted to accommodate flasks containing medium and cells in order to replicate respiratory motion using varying frequencies and amplitude settings. To study this effect on cell survival in vitro, dose response curves were determined for human lung cancer cell lines H1299 and H460 exposed to a uniform 6 MV radiation field under moving or stationary conditions. Cell survival curves showed no significant difference between irradiation at different dose points for these cell lines in the presence or absence of motion. These data indicate that motion of unshielded cells in vitro does not affect cell survival in the presence of uniform irradiation. This model provides a novel research platform to investigate the radiobiological consequences of respiratory motion in radiotherapy.

  7. How Clinical Instructors Can Enhance the Learning Experience of Physical Therapy Students in an Introductory Clinical Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Beverley; Wessel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is little understanding of how physical therapy students are influenced by clinical instructors (CIs) particularly at the outset of their clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical therapy students' perceptions of their learning experiences during an introductory clinical placement. Methods: Subjects were…

  8. Sequencing of Simulation and Clinic Experiences in an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, Emily; DeSevo Bellottie, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine how the intrasemester sequencing of a simulation component, delivered during an ambulatory care introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE), affects student performance on a series of 3 assessments delivered during the second professional (P2) year. Design. At the Jefferson College of Pharmacy (JCP), P2 student pharmacists were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of simulation activities, followed by 6 weeks on site at an ambulatory care clinic or vice versa during either the fall or spring semesters. At the end of each semester, these students completed 3 skills-based assessments: answering a series of drug information (DI) questions; conducting medication adherence counseling; and conducting a medication history. The 2 groups’ raw scores on assessment rubrics were compared. Assessment. During academic years 2011-2012 and 2012-2013, 180 P2 student pharmacists participated in the required ambulatory care IPPE. Ninety experienced simulation first, while the other 90 experienced the clinic first. Students assessed over a 2-year time span performed similarly on each of 3 skills-based assessments, regardless of how simulation experiences were sequenced within the IPPE. Conclusion. The lack of significant difference in student performance suggests that schools of pharmacy may have flexibility with regard to how they choose to incorporate simulation into clinical ambulatory care IPPEs. PMID:26688585

  9. Centralization of a regional clinical microbiology service: The Calgary experience

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre L; Hall, Paula

    1999-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratory services in Alberta have been dramatically restructured over the past five years. In 1994, Alberta Health embarked on an aggressive laboratory restructuring that cut back approximately 30% of the overall monies previously paid to the laboratory service sector in Calgary. A unique service delivery model consolidated all institutional and community-based diagnostic testing in a company called Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) in late 1996. CLS was formed by a public/private partnership between the Calgary Regional Health Care Authority (CRHA) and MDS-Kasper Laboratories. By virtue of its customer service base and scope of testing, CLS provides comprehensive regional laboratory services to the entire populace. Regional microbiology services within CLS have been successfully consolidated over the past three years into a centralized high volume laboratory (HVL). Because the HVL is not located in a hospital, rapid response laboratories (RRLs) are operated at each acute care site. Although the initial principle behind the proposed test menus for the RRLs was that only procedures requiring a clinical turnaround time of more than 2 h stay on-site, many other principles had to be used to develop and implement an efficient and clinically relevant RRL model for microbiology. From these guiding principles, a detailed assessment of the needs of each institution and extensive networking with user groups, the functions of the microbiology RRLs were established and a detailed implementation plan drawn up. The experience at CLS with regards to restructuring a regional microbiology service is described herein. A post-hoc analysis provides the pros and cons of directing and operating a regionalized microbiology service. PMID:22346397

  10. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  11. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega Studies: A Case Study at Argonne National Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1992 more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the life span and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology mega studies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals, and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research. PMID:22004930

  12. Students' experiences of learning manual clinical skills through simulation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Eva; Silén, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Håkan

    2013-03-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and thoughts about their learning through simulation skills training. The study was designed for an educational setting at a clinical skills centre. Ten third-year undergraduate nursing students performed urethral catheterisation, using the virtual reality simulator UrecathVision™, which has haptic properties. The students practised in pairs. Each session was videotaped and the video was used to stimulate recall in subsequent interviews. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis from interviews resulted in three themes: what the students learn, how the students learn, and the simulator's contribution to the students' learning. Students learned manual skills, how to perform the procedure, and professional behaviour. They learned by preparing, watching, practising and reflecting. The simulator contributed by providing opportunities for students to prepare for the skills training, to see anatomical structures, to feel resistance, and to become aware of their own performance ability. The findings show that the students related the task to previous experiences, used sensory information, tested themselves and practised techniques in a hands-on fashion, and reflected in and on action. The simulator was seen as a facilitator to learning the manual skills. The study design, with students working in pairs combined with video recording, was found to enhance opportunities for reflection. PMID:22395307

  13. Assessment of radiobiological metrics applied to patient-specific QA process of VMAT prostate treatments.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Gutiérrez, Francisco; Pérez-Vara, Consuelo; Clavo-Herranz, María H; López-Carrizosa, Concepción; Pérez-Regadera, José; Ibáñez-Villoslada, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    VMAT is a powerful technique to deliver hypofractionated prostate treatments. The lack of correlations between usual 2D pretreatment QA results and the clini-cal impact of possible mistakes has allowed the development of 3D verification systems. Dose determination on patient anatomy has provided clinical predictive capability to patient-specific QA process. Dose-volume metrics, as evaluation crite-ria, should be replaced or complemented by radiobiological indices. These metrics can be incorporated into individualized QA extracting the information for response parameters (gEUD, TCP, NTCP) from DVHs. The aim of this study is to assess the role of two 3D verification systems dealing with radiobiological metrics applied to a prostate VMAT QA program. Radiobiological calculations were performed for AAPM TG-166 test cases. Maximum differences were 9.3% for gEUD, -1.3% for TCP, and 5.3% for NTCP calculations. Gamma tests and DVH-based comparisons were carried out for both systems in order to assess their performance in 3D dose determination for prostate treatments (high-, intermediate-, and low-risk, as well as prostate bed patients). Mean gamma passing rates for all structures were bet-ter than 92.0% and 99.1% for both 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria. Maximum discrepancies were (2.4% ± 0.8%) and (6.2% ± 1.3%) for targets and normal tis-sues, respectively. Values for gEUD, TCP, and NTCP were extracted from TPS and compared to the results obtained with the two systems. Three models were used for TCP calculations (Poisson, sigmoidal, and Niemierko) and two models for NTCP determinations (LKB and Niemierko). The maximum mean difference for gEUD calculations was (4.7% ± 1.3%); for TCP, the maximum discrepancy was (-2.4% ± 1.1%); and NTCP comparisons led to a maximum deviation of (1.5% ± 0.5%). The potential usefulness of biological metrics in patient-specific QA has been explored. Both systems have been successfully assessed as potential tools for evaluating the clinical

  14. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chávez, E.; Reyes-Frías, M. L.; Rodríguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vázquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  15. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  16. Fournier's Gangrene: A Summary of 10 Years of Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Oguz, Abdullah; Gümüş, Metehan; Turkoglu, Ahmet; Bozdağ, Zübeyir; Ülger, Burak Veli; Agaçayak, Elif; Böyük, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to present our clinical experience with FG treatment. Fournier's gangrene (FG) is a rare but serious disease characterized by progressive necrosis in the genitourinary and perineal region. The retrospective study included 43 patients. Patients were divided into 2 groups as survivors and nonsurvivors. Included in the analysis were data pertaining to demographics, predisposing factors, comorbidities, results of bacteriologic analyses, number of debridements, duration of treatment, FG Severity Index (FGSI) score, fecal diversion methods (trephine ostomy or Flexi-Seal Fecal Management System-FMS), and dressing methods (wet or negative aspiration system). In the nonsurvivor group, urea, WBC, and age were significantly higher, whereas albumin, hematocrit, platelet count, and length of hospital stay (LOHS) were significantly lower compared to the survivor group. Mean FGSI was lower in survivors in comparison with nonsurvivors (5.00 ± 1.86 and 10.00 ± 1.27, respectively; P < 0.001). We conclude that FGSI is an important predictor in the prognosis of FG. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) should be performed in compliant patients in order to enhance patient comfort by reducing pain and the number of dressings. Fecal diversion should be performed as needed, preferably by using FMS. The trephine ostomy should be the method of choice in cases where an ostomy is necessary. PMID:25859652

  17. Normothermic donor heart perfusion: current clinical experience and the future.

    PubMed

    Messer, Simon; Ardehali, Abbas; Tsui, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Following the first successful heart transplant in 1967, more than 100,000 heart transplants have been carried out worldwide. These procedures have mostly relied on cold ischaemic preservation of the donor heart because this simple technique is inexpensive and relatively reliable. However, the well-known limitations of cold ischaemic preservation imposes significant logistical challenges to heart transplantation which put a ceiling on the immediate success on this life-saving therapy, and limits the number of donor hearts that can be safely transplanted annually. Although the theoretical advantages of normothermic donor heart perfusion have been recognised for over a century, the technology to transport donor hearts in this state has only been developed within the last decade. The Organ Care System (OCS) which is designed and manufactured by TransMedics Inc. is currently the only commercially available device with this capability. This article reviews the history of normothermic heart perfusion and the clinical experience with the TransMedics OCS to date. We have also attempted to speculate on the future possibilities of this innovative and exciting technology. PMID:24853906

  18. Dosimetry for radiobiological studies of the human hematopoietic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, W. L.; Stokes, T. R.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    A system for estimating individual bone marrow doses in therapeutic radiation exposures of leukemia patients was studied. These measurements are used to make dose response correlations and to study the effect of dose protraction on peripheral blood cell levels. Three irradiators designed to produce a uniform field of high energy gamma radiation for total body exposures of large animals and man are also used for radiobiological studies.

  19. Radiobiological risk and single event effects during manned space flights.

    PubMed

    Bourrieau, J; Calvet, M C

    1995-01-01

    Radiation hazard during previous manned space flights was not a critical problem as seen from monitoring on board MIR and the SHUTTLE. Future Martian and Lunar missions as well as flights on inclined or high altitude orbits around the Earth can be exposed to a large radiobiological risk and critical reliability losses can be expected, due to Single Event Effects on VLSI devices. The main characteristics of these hazards and some counter-measures to be provided for are given. PMID:11540985

  20. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Durante, M

    2014-03-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  1. (Radio)Biological Optimization of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nahum, Alan E.; Uzan, Julien

    2012-01-01

    “Biological optimization” (BIOP) means planning treatments using (radio)biological criteria and models, that is, tumour control probability and normal-tissue complication probability. Four different levels of BIOP are identified: Level I is “isotoxic” individualization of prescription dose Dpresc at fixed fraction number. Dpresc is varied to keep the NTCP of the organ at risk constant. Significant improvements in local control are expected for non-small-cell lung tumours. Level II involves the determination of an individualized isotoxic combination of Dpresc and fractionation scheme. This approach is appropriate for “parallel” OARs (lung, parotids). Examples are given using our BioSuite software. Hypofractionated SABR for early-stage NSCLC is effectively Level-II BIOP. Level-III BIOP uses radiobiological functions as part of the inverse planning of IMRT, for example, maximizing TCP whilst not exceeding a given NTCP. This results in non-uniform target doses. The NTCP model parameters (reflecting tissue “architecture”) drive the optimizer to emphasize different regions of the DVH, for example, penalising high doses for quasi-serial OARs such as rectum. Level-IV BIOP adds functional imaging information, for example, hypoxia or clonogen location, to Level III; examples are given of our prostate “dose painting” protocol, BioProp. The limitations of and uncertainties inherent in the radiobiological models are emphasized. PMID:23251227

  2. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  3. Quantitative modeling of chronic myeloid leukemia: insights from radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Hlatky, Lynn; Landaw, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell population dynamics are being developed to improve CML understanding and treatment. We review such models in light of relevant findings from radiobiology, emphasizing 3 points. First, the CML models almost all assert that the latency time, from CML initiation to diagnosis, is at most ∼ 10 years. Meanwhile, current radiobiologic estimates, based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data, indicate a substantially higher maximum, suggesting longer-term relapses and extra resistance mutations. Second, different CML models assume different numbers, between 400 and 106, of normal HSCs. Radiobiologic estimates favor values > 106 for the number of normal cells (often assumed to be the HSCs) that are at risk for a CML-initiating BCR-ABL translocation. Moreover, there is some evidence for an HSC dead-band hypothesis, consistent with HSC numbers being very different across different healthy adults. Third, radiobiologists have found that sporadic (background, age-driven) chromosome translocation incidence increases with age during adulthood. BCR-ABL translocation incidence increasing with age would provide a hitherto underanalyzed contribution to observed background adult-onset CML incidence acceleration with age, and would cast some doubt on stage-number inferences from multistage carcinogenesis models in general. PMID:22353999

  4. Quantitative modeling of chronic myeloid leukemia: insights from radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Hlatky, Lynn; Landaw, Julian; Sachs, Rainer K

    2012-05-10

    Mathematical models of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell population dynamics are being developed to improve CML understanding and treatment. We review such models in light of relevant findings from radiobiology, emphasizing 3 points. First, the CML models almost all assert that the latency time, from CML initiation to diagnosis, is at most ∼10 years. Meanwhile, current radiobiologic estimates, based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data, indicate a substantially higher maximum, suggesting longer-term relapses and extra resistance mutations. Second, different CML models assume different numbers, between 400 and 10(6), of normal HSCs. Radiobiologic estimates favor values>10(6) for the number of normal cells (often assumed to be the HSCs) that are at risk for a CML-initiating BCR-ABL translocation. Moreover, there is some evidence for an HSC dead-band hypothesis, consistent with HSC numbers being very different across different healthy adults. Third, radiobiologists have found that sporadic (background, age-driven) chromosome translocation incidence increases with age during adulthood. BCR-ABL translocation incidence increasing with age would provide a hitherto underanalyzed contribution to observed background adult-onset CML incidence acceleration with age, and would cast some doubt on stage-number inferences from multistage carcinogenesis models in general. PMID:22353999

  5. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  6. Treatment plan comparison between helical tomotherapy and MLC-based IMRT using radiobiological measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Costa Ferreira, Brigida; Shi, Chengyu; Lind, Bengt K.; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2007-07-01

    The rapid implementation of advanced treatment planning and delivery technologies for radiation therapy has brought new challenges in evaluating the most effective treatment modality. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and helical tomotherapy (HT) are becoming popular modes of treatment delivery and their application and effectiveness continues to be investigated. Presently, there are several treatment planning systems (TPS) that can generate and optimize IMRT plans based on user-defined objective functions for the internal target volume (ITV) and organs at risk (OAR). However, the radiobiological parameters of the different tumours and normal tissues are typically not taken into account during dose prescription and optimization of a treatment plan or during plan evaluation. The suitability of a treatment plan is typically decided based on dosimetric criteria such as dose-volume histograms (DVH), maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviation of the dose distribution. For a more comprehensive treatment plan evaluation, the biologically effective uniform dose ({\\bar{\\bar{D}}}) is applied together with the complication-free tumour control probability (P+). Its utilization is demonstrated using three clinical cases that were planned with two different forms of IMRT. In this study, three different cancer types at different anatomical sites were investigated: head and neck, lung and prostate cancers. For each cancer type, a linac MLC-based step-and-shoot IMRT plan and a HT plan were developed. The MLC-based IMRT treatment plans were developed on the Philips treatment-planning platform, using the Pinnacle 7.6 software release. For the tomotherapy HiArt plans, the dedicated tomotherapy treatment planning station was used, running version 2.1.2. By using {\\bar{\\bar{D}}} as the common prescription point of the treatment plans and plotting the tissue response probabilities versus {\\bar{\\bar{D}}} for a range of prescription doses

  7. Clinical Experience With A Portable 3-D Reconstruction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holshouser, Barbara A.; Christiansen, Edwin L.; Thompson, Joseph R.; Reynolds, R. Anthony; Goldwasser, Samuel M.

    1988-06-01

    Clinical experience with a computer program for reconstructing and visualizing three-dimensional (3-D) structures is reported. Applications to the study of soft-tissue and skeletal structures, such as the temporomandibular joint and craniofacial anatomy, using computed tomography (CT) data are described. Several features specific to the computer algorithm are demonstrated and evaluated. These include: (1) manipulation of density windows to selectively visualize bone or soft tissue structures; (2) the efficacy of gradient shading algorithms in revealing fine surface detail; and (3) the rapid generation of cut-away views revealing details of internal structures. Also demonstrated is the importance of high resolution data as input to the 3-D program. The implementation of the program (VoxelView-32) described here, is on a MASSCOMP computer running UNIX. Data were collected with General Electric or Siemens CT scanners and transferred to the MASSCOMP for off-line 3-D recon-struction, via magnetic tape or Ethernet. An interactive graphics facility on the MASSCOMP allows viewing of 2-D slices, subregioning, and selection of lower and upper density thresholds for segmentation. The software then enters a pre-processing phase during which a volume representation of the segmented object (soft tissue or bone) is automatically created. This is followed by a rendering phase during which multiple views of the segmented object are automatically generated. The pre-processing phase typically takes 4 to 8 minutes (although very large datasets may require as much as 30 minutes) and the rendering phase typically takes 1 to 2 minutes for each 3-D view. Volume representation and rendering techniques are used at all stages of the processing, and gradient shading is used for enhanced surface detail.

  8. Initial clinical experience using a novel laparoscopy assistant.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Raineesh; Martínez, Arturo Minor; Lorias Espinoza, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    This article presents the first clinical and experimental experiences of the PMASS (Postural Mechatronic Assistance Solo Surgery) from a prospective study carried on on thirteen laparoscopic procedures. Also, their advantages and disadvantages are identified. The PMASS is a system with three articulations; two articulations are passive and one is active; this handles the optic in real time, reducing the latency time by spatial relocation. The surgeons assisted themselves visually in 13 surgical procedures, having direct and intuitive control in real time of the laparoscopic vision field using the PMASS. The surgical and delay time was documented for each surgery. The surgical procedures were: Laparoscopic appendicectomy, ovarian cystectomy and laparoscopic sterilization. In all procedures, surgeons were able to auto-navigate in real time and there was no visual tremor while using the system. The global average times taken to perform the self-assisted surgery with the PMASS for the laparoscopic appendicectomies were 45 ± 4.5 minutes, ovarian cystectomies 49 ± 3.5 minutes and for the laparoscopic sterilization 22 ± 2 minutes. The approximate set-up time of PMASS was one minute, and removal almost a minute (the time required by the surgeon to remove the harness after completing the surgery). The laparoscope itself disengages from the PMASS in a couple of seconds approximately. There were no transoperative or postoperative complications during the procedures. Thirteen laparoscopic procedures were performed, the design of the mechatronic assistance allowed the surgeon to self-assist visually in real time and in an autonomous way in the solo-surgery mode, without compromising the surgical performance and the morbidity. Additionally, the latency times are also reduced by space relocation and coupling of the telescope. PMID:21105849

  9. Chasing Ghosts in Space Radiobiology Research: The Lost Focus on Non-Targeted Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Saganti, Premkumar; Cacao, Eliedonna

    2016-07-01

    The doses and dose-rates of astronaut exposures to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are accurately known, and lead to particle hits per cell nucleus from high charge and energy (HZE) particles of much less than one hit per cell per week. A large number of experiments have shown that additivity of biological effects is a valid assumption for space radiation exposures, while experiments at higher doses and dose-rates than occur in space continue to be a focus of the majority of space radiobiology research. Furthermore HZE particle exposures with mono-energetic particles manifest themselves as a mixed-radiation field due to the contributions of delta-rays and the random impact parameter of a particles track core to DNA and non-DNA targets in cells and tissues. The mixed-field manifestation of mono-energetic HZE particle exposures is well known from theoretical studies of microdosimetry and track structure. Additional mixed-field effects occur for single species experiments due to nuclear fragmentation in particle accelerator beam-lines and biological samples along with energy straggling. In contrast to these well known aspects of space radiobiology there are many open questions on the contribution of non-targeted effects to low dose and dose-rate exposures. Non-targeted effects (NTEs) include bystander effects and genomic instability, and have been shown to be the most important outstanding question for reducing uncertainties in space radiation cancer risk assessment. The dose-rate and radiation quality dependence of NTE's has not been established, while there is an over-arching need to develop 21st century experimental models of human cancer risk. We review possible mechanisms of NTE's and how new experiments to address these issues could be designed.

  10. A detailed radiobiological and dosimetric analysis of biochemical outcomes in a case-control study of permanent prostate brachytherapy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Stewart, Renee R.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2009-03-15

    the harmonic mean and expressions of the generalized EUD. In this case-control study of prostate brachytherapy biochemical failures and nonfailures, there were no radiobiological parameters derived from detailed DVH-based analysis that predicted for biochemical control. This may indicate that in our approach, implant dosimetry is at or near the limits of clinically effective dose escalation.

  11. Femtosecond laser eye surgery: the first clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Kurtz, Ron M.; Horvath, Christopher; Suarez, Carlos G.; Nordan, Lee; Slade, Steven

    2002-04-01

    A brief review of commercial applications of femtosecond lasers in a clinical setting with emphasis on applications to corneal surgery is presented. The first clinical results of 208 procedures conducted from June to November 2000 is reported. The results show that femtosecond lasers may be safely used as keratome for use in LASIK procedures.

  12. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  13. Table Clinics: A Valuable Learning Experience for Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Jimmie H.

    Table clinics, or short oral presentations on techniques related to some phase of research, diagnosis, or treatment, can be used to enrich allied health education. To present a table clinic, students must choose a topic which lends itself to a 5- to 7-minute presentation and which imparts knowledge that participants can take back to their…

  14. SU-E-T-399: Determination of the Radiobiological Parameters That Describe the Dose-Response Relations of Xerostomia and Disgeusia From Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mavroidis, P; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Peixoto Xavier, C; Costa Ferreira, B; Khouri, L; Carmo Lopes, M do

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters that describe the doseresponse relations of xerostomia and disgeusia from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. To identify the organs that are best correlated with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodnessof- fit by comparing the model predictions against the actual clinical results. Methods: In this study, 349 head and neck cancer patients were included. For each patient the dose volume histograms (DVH) of parotids (separate and combined), mandible, submandibular glands (separate and combined) and salivary glands were calculated. The follow-up of those patients was recorded at different times after the completion of the treatment (7 weeks, 3, 7, 12, 18 and 24 months). Acute and late xerostomia and acute disgeusia were the clinical endpoints examined. A maximum likelihood fitting was performed to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the relative seriality model. The statistical methods of the error distribution, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the Pearson's test and the Akaike's information criterion were utilized to assess the goodness-of-fit and the agreement between the pattern of the radiobiological predictions with that of the clinical records. Results: The estimated values of the radiobiological parameters of salivary glands are D50 = 25.2 Gy, γ = 0.52, s = 0.001. The statistical analysis confirmed the clinical validity of those parameters (area under the ROC curve = 0.65 and AIC = 38.3). Conclusion: The analysis proved that the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material can be reproduced by the relative seriality model and the estimated radiobiological parameters. Salivary glands were found to have strong volume dependence (low relative seriality). Diminishing the biologically effective uniform dose to salivary glands below 30 Gy may significantly reduce the risk of complications to the patients irradiated for prostate cancer.

  15. Radiobiologic Modeling of Cytoprotection Effects in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. . E-mail: gplatan@med.uth.gr; Dale, Roger G.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for mathematical modeling of the normal tissue-sparing effects of cytoprotective agents used in conjunction with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The linear quadratic model was modified to include a 'cytoprotection factor,' in two alternative ways. The published results on the incidence of treatment-related oral mucositis in patients treated for head-and-neck carcinoma using radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy were assessed against the model to determine the likely values of the cytoprotection factor required to confer a reasonable degree of cytoprotection. Results: In both of the model alternatives considered, a cytoprotection factor value of {<=}0.85 was required for a clinically detectable degree of cytoprotection to be realized. A cytoprotection factor value of 0.85 would mean that the radiation sensitivity coefficients would be effectively reduced by 15% on account of the action of the cytoprotector. Conclusion: The incorporation of a cytoprotection factor into an existing linear quadratic method would allow a quantitative assessment of cytoprotection and could be useful in the design of future clinical studies.

  16. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Valluru, Keerthi S; Wilson, Katheryne E; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-08-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429141

  17. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic: The Keele experience.

    PubMed

    Katali, Hamza Mahamadu; Parry-Smith, William Rhys; Eliot, Rees L; O'Mahony, Fidelma

    2016-01-01

    Much discussion in the literature centres on how best to teach medical students the intricacies of gynaecological assessment and the subsequent formulation of a management plan. At Keele University skills are initially developed in a simulated setting and then transferred to the workplace where students continue to develop their skills. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic has been developed and comprises of 2-3 students and a tutor. All 38 students rotating through the department between January and June 2013 were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire to evaluate this clinic and 36 (95%) of them responded. Respondents felt significantly more comfortable taking a gynaecology history, ensuring privacy during examination and formulating a management plan post-clinic (all p < 0.001), with female students feeling significantly more comfortable than their male counterparts (p = 0.04). The use of this clinic shows great promise to help students learn an unfamiliar and challenging skill. PMID:26492580

  18. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  19. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Marshall, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represent a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space.

  20. Time resolving detector systems for radiobiological investigations of effects of single heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.U. ||

    1993-12-31

    The combination of the properties of Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) as image sensor and as detector for energetic charged particles makes them unique for time resolved radiation experiments in which single particles are to be correlated either to their radiation effects in individual objects, or to their sources or origins respectively. The experimental set up for the calibration of a frame transfer CCD type VALVO NXA 1011 with heavy ions from accelerators is described. For low energetic heavy ions, the single particle effects observed in the pixels of the sensor show a fairly linear response with the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) of the particle. As an example for the application of these detector systems in radiobiology, radiation effects of single ionizing particles in the meristem of moving biological objects have been investigated.

  1. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  2. Preclinical and clinical experience with a viscoelastic total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Ross, Raymond S.; Jollenbeck, Boris A.; Zimmers, Kari B.; Defibaugh, Neal D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe the mechanical durability and the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR). The human intervertebral disc is a complex, viscoelastic structure, permitting and constraining motion in 3 axes, thus providing stability. The ideal disc replacement should be viscoelastic and deformable in all directions, and it should restore disc height and angle. Methods Mechanical testing was conducted to validate the durability of the VTDR, and a clinical study was conducted to evaluate safety and performance. Fifty patients with single-level, symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease at L4-5 or L5-S1 were enrolled in a clinical trial at 3 European sites. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically for 2 years by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), a visual analog scale (VAS), and independent radiographic analyses. Results The VTDR showed a fatigue life in excess of 50 million cycles (50-year equivalent) and a physiologically appropriate level of stiffness, motion, geometry, and viscoelasticity. We enrolled 28 men and 22 women in the clinical study, with a mean age of 40 years. Independent quantitative radiographic assessment indicated that the VTDR restored and maintained disc height and lordosis while providing physiologic motion. Mean ODI scores decreased from 48% preoperatively to 23% at 2 years’ follow-up. Mean VAS low-back pain scores decreased from 7.1 cm to 2.9 cm. Median scores indicated that half of the patient population had ODI scores below 10% and VAS low-back pain scores below 0.95 cm at 2 years. Conclusions The VTDR has excellent durability and performs clinically and radiographically as intended for the treatment of symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease. Clinical Relevance The VTDR is intended to restore healthy anatomic properties and stability characteristics to the spinal segment. This study is the first to evaluate a VTDR in a 50-patient

  3. Radiobiological speculations on therapeutic total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Unexpected total body irradiation (TBI) of human beings, involved in nuclear warfare or in accidents in nuclear reactors can be lethal. In the 1950s, bone marrow transplantation was discovered as a potentially life saving procedure after TBI in the dose range of 5.0 to 12.0 Gy. Since that time, deliberate or therapeutic TBI has been used to condition patients with a lethal bone marrow disorder for bone marrow replacement. The therapeutic ratio of TBI followed by bone marrow transplantation is small. Many potentially lethal complications can occur, such as acute TBI side effects, late TBI side effects or immunological complications of bone marrow transplantation such as graft versus host disease or graft rejection. The benefits of TBI and bone marrow transplantation are that they offer a chance for cure of previously lethal bone marrow disorders. The optimal parameters for TBI remain to be defined. The review discusses the current clinical and experimental animal data, as they relate to the future definition of less toxic TBI procedures with a better therapeutic ratio. Different TBI procedures are required for patients with malignant vs. non-malignant disorders or for patients with histoincompatible vs. histocompatible bone marrow donors.77 references.

  4. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences with novel somatostatin ligands: advantages, disadvantages and new prospects.

    PubMed

    Hofland, L J; van der Hoek, J; Feelders, R; van der Lely, A J; de Herder, W; Lamberts, S W J

    2005-01-01

    Since the cloning and characterization of the five human somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes, our understanding of the expression and functional role of the five SSTR subtypes in human (neuro-)endocrine tumors has increased significantly. The majority of human (neuro-)endocrine tumors express multiple SSTR. GH-secreting pituitary adenomas preferentially express SSTR2 and SSTR5, prolactinomas SSTR1 and SSTR5, and corticotroph adenomas express SSTR2 (low number) and predominantly SSTR5s. In addition, gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors frequently express multiple SSTR as well, with SSTR2 being expressed at the highest level. Treatment with the current generation of octapeptide somatostatin-analogs, e.g. octreotide and lanreotide, normalizes circulating GH- and IGF-I levels in approximately 60-70% of acromegalic patients, thereby remaining about one-third of patients uncontrolled. In patients with GEP neuroendocrine tumors, both somatostatin-analogs effectively suppress the production of bioactive peptides and hormones by the tumor cells, resulting in an important improvement of the related clinical symptomatology. However, a considerable proportion of patients experience an escape from treatment within months to several years. Altogether, the current generation of somatostatin analogs are effective medical tools in the treatment of acromegalic patients and of patients with neuroendocrine GEP tumors, but there is certainly a need for novel somatostatin analogs. In recent years, a significant number of novel somatostatin-ligands has been developed. These ligands include SSTR selective-, bi-specific, universal, as well as chimeric dopamine (DA)-somatostatin ligands. In vitro studies using human pituitary adenoma cells demonstrate a more profound inhibition of GH, PRL and ACTH secretion by somatostatin-analogs targeting both SSTR2s and SSTR5s, compared with SSTR2-preferential somatostatin-analogs. This likely reflects the SSTR subtype expression pattern

  5. How to Conduct Clinical Qualitative Research on the Patient's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    From a perspective of patient-centered healthcare, exploring patients' (a) preconceptions, (b) treatment experiences, (c) quality of life, (d) satisfaction, (e) illness understandings, and (f) design are all critical components in improving primary health care and research. Utilizing qualitative approaches to discover patients' experiences can…

  6. Evaluating Perceptions of Culminating Clinical Education Experiences of Senior Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Patricia A.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The perceptions of athletic training students (ATSs) regarding their clinical education experiences are not fully understood. It is important to investigate ATS perceptions of clinical education to allow athletic training educators to provide educational experiences that will maximize learning. Objective: To determine what ATSs value…

  7. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  8. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been…

  9. Clinical interdisciplinary health team care: an educational experiment.

    PubMed

    Mazur, H; Beeston, J J; Yerxa, E J

    1979-09-01

    With increasing concern for teamwork in clinical practice in health care settings, the need to identify the concepts, methods, and learning processes for improving interdisciplinary team skills is apparent. This paper describes patient-centered, clinical-research-demonstration programs for teams of students, preceptors, and faculty members from six disciplines who provided patient care in a long-term rehabilitation setting. The teams were involved in the theory and practice of team-building, including weekly sessions on leadership styles, communication, group decision-making, and team effectiveness assessment. Objective and subjective measurements were administered throughout the program. The results indicate that task-oriented patient care favors the learning of team skills, especially when all levels of administration support and participate in the processes. Question are raised concerning the effect of clinical teams on the quality of patient care, their cost-effectiveness, and the low priority given to teaching interdisciplinary team skills in professional education. PMID:158089

  10. Clinical Experience of the Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyung Min; Lee, Seok Jong; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Cho, Byung Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is characterized by three clinical features, namely cutaneous capillary malformations, venous malformations, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy of the extremities. The varied manifestations are attributed to the unpredictable clinical nature and prognosis of the syndrome. To elucidate the clinical characteristics of this disease, we reviewed a relatively large number of KTS patients who presented to our vascular anomalies center. Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 19 patients who were diagnosed with KTS and treated in our vascular anomalies clinic between 2003 and 2014, and examined their demographic characteristics, their clinical features, and the treatments administered. Results The sex distribution was balanced, with 9 (47%) males and 10 (53%) females. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years (range, 7 months-9 years). Most of the patients received conservative treatments such as medication or physiotherapy. Compression therapies such as wearing of elastic garments/bandages were also administered, and surgical interventions were considered only when the patients became excessively symptomatic. Other treatments included laser therapy and sclerotherapy, and all the treatments were adjusted according to each case, tailored to the conditions of the individual patients. Conclusions KTS is an extremely rare, multifactorial disorder that induces widely varied symptoms. Because of this unique feature, plastic surgeons, when not careful, tend to attach a one-sided importance to typical symptoms such as limb hypertrophy or capillary malformation and thus overlook other symptoms and clinical features. KTS can be suspected in all infants who show capillary malformations or limb hypertrophy and require a multi-disciplinary approach for comprehensive management. PMID:26430625

  11. Our Experience in a Psychodermatology Liaison Clinic at Manipal, India

    PubMed Central

    Shenoi, Shrutakirthi D; Prabhu, Smitha; Nirmal, B; Petrolwala, Shailee

    2013-01-01

    Psychodermatology is an emerging specialty in dermatology which deals with the interactions between mind and skin. Psychocutaneous diseases can be either primary psychiatric or primary cutaneous, with various degrees of associations between psyche and skin. Unless the dermatologist cultivates a special interest in this field, many an invisible mental disorder may be missed leading to sub optimal treatment of the visible skin condition. Though Dermatology Psychiatry liaison clinics are common in Europe and other western countries, it is just an emerging concept in India. Here we describe the working pattern of psychodermatology liaison clinic established in Manipal in August 2010 and describe briefly the type of cases attended to. PMID:23372214

  12. Necrotizing Craniocervical Soft Tissue Infections: Clinical Experience and Personal Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Riccardo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Dallan, Iacopo

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing cervical soft tissue infections (NCSTIs) are devastating uncommon clinical entities that are often life threatening. We report two patients suffering from NCSTI and treated at our institution. Diagnosis of NCSTI has been confirmed histologically and surgically. Both patients were managed with very aggressive treatment (medical and surgical) and survived with minimal morbidity. Early diagnosis and aggressive, multimodality treatment can reduce mortality and morbidity rates. Thoracic and mediastinal involvement requires appropriate management. A strong clinical suspicion remains one of the most important aspects of the management of such shattering conditions. PMID:23304596

  13. Clinical experience with recombinant molecules for allergy vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Oliver; Niederberger, Verena; Horak, Friedrich; Fiebig, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Numerous allergens have been cloned and produced by the use of recombinant DNA technology. In several cases recombinant variants with reduced IgE-reactivity have also been developed as candidates for allergen specific immunotherapy. Only very few of these proteins have as yet been tested in the clinic, and the major focus has been on birch and grass pollen, two of the most common causes of IgE-mediated allergic disease. This article serves to justify the rational for using recombinant products and reviews the progress that has been made to date with their clinical assessment. PMID:21562972

  14. Differences in Clinical Experiences of ADN and BSN Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oermann, Marilyn H.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 211 associate degree (AD) and 204 baccalaureate nursing students, AD students reported significantly higher stress in clinical practice. Stress for both groups increased as they progressed. Instructors were the predominant source of stress. Students had the most difficulty coping with the demands of patient care and the clinical…

  15. Managing University Clinical Partnership: Learning from International Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Stephen; Smith, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Dialogue between the leaders of academic clinical organisations in different countries has revealed that the core elements of the partnership between universities and health care systems are remarkably consistent across national boundaries. There is now an impetus to move beyond analysis of common challenges and towards strategies for success that…

  16. The Clinical/Practicum Experience in Professional Preparation: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Edwin George; Walker, Keith; Wimmer, Randy

    2008-01-01

    The authors synthesize preliminary findings from an interdisciplinary study of the practicum/clinical phase of undergraduate pre-service education in the professions. Early data analysis identified similarities and differences across disciplines in terms of: (a) the terminology describing each practicum program, (b) the programs' key…

  17. Improving biological relevancy of transcriptional biomarkers experiments by applying the MIQE guidelines to pre-clinical and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dooms, M; Chango, A; Barbour, E; Pouillart, P; Abdel Nour, A M

    2013-01-01

    The "Minimum Information for the Publication of qPCR Experiments" (MIQE [3]) guidelines are very much targeted at basic research experiments and have to our knowledge not been applied to qPCR assays carried out in the context of clinical trials. This report details the use of the MIQE qPCR app for iPhone (App Store, Apple) to assess the MIQE compliance of one clinical and five pre-clinical trials. This resulted in the need to include 14 modifications that make the guidelines more relevant for the assessment of this special type of application. We also discuss the need for flexibility, since while some parameters increase experimental quality, they also require more reagents and more time, which is not always feasible in a clinical setting. PMID:22910527

  18. Professor Hassan K. Awwad; The Father of Radiation Oncology and Radiobiology in Egypt and the Arab World, His Good Deeds Last Forever and Inspire us for the Future.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S; El-Badawi, Samy A; Abd Elbaky, Hoda

    2007-03-01

    Our most respected professor Hassan K. Awwad passed away on January 5th, 2007, at the age of 81. He was considered as the father of radiotherapy in Egypt. He was always named "The Professor", as he was the founder of the radiotherapy departments at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University&Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University. He also shared in developing NEMROCK (Kasr El Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine), the place where he graduated and worked during his early years of experience. He, together with professor Reda Hamza, dean of NCI, Cairo at that time, had initiated 7 oncology centers all over Egypt, from Aswan in the South to Dammietta and Damanhour in the North. These 7 centers were developed by the Ministry of Health. Prof. Awwad and Prof. Hamza were responsible for facility providing and plans. They chose all the necessary equipment, tools and personnel. These centers were in action since 1988 and are currently taking care of the oncology patients in a wide area of the country. Prof. Awwad graduated from the Faculty of medicine, Cairo University, in 1949. He had his Medical Doctorate (MD) in Radiotherapy from Alexandria University in 1956. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) awarded him fellowships in France (Institute Gustave Rossy) to gain experience in brachytherapy in 1956 and 1971, England 1956, 1959. Another fellowship was awarded to Prof Awwad in Harvard University (Peter Bent Brigham Hospital) in radiobiology and radiotherapy during the years 1964-1965. He personally and with other members of the National Cancer Institute gave much of their efforts and time to teach, train and guide young radiotherapists, biologists, physicists and radiation therapists through direct on-hand teaching and training as well as holding training courses for radiation oncologists, physicists and technologists. He insisted to ensure its regularity 4 times yearly. These courses trained a lot of personnel from all over Egypt, Sudan

  19. Clinical and experimental experiences of graft-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lane, Emma L

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials evaluating transplantation of fetal tissue for the treatment of Parkinson's disease identified the unexpected side effect of abnormal movements in the 'off'l-DOPA state. Termed graft-induced dyskinesia (GID), various hypotheses have been put forward as to their cause but unfortunately the significant differences in clinical trial protocols and lack of a truly representative animal model has hindered the search for a conclusive basis for their appearance. Likely causative factors have been identified through careful examination of patient data and the use of amphetamine-induced dyskinesia in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease. New trials being planned in Europe hope to avoid GID, whilst maximizing on the functional benefit that can be afforded by this treatment approach but questions still remain as to the underlying mechanism. PMID:21907087

  20. Rapid extraction of DNA from archival clinical specimens: our experiences.

    PubMed

    Poljak, M; Seme, K; Gale, N

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of DNA extracted from archival clinical specimens using polymerase chain reaction represents the basis of a variety of research and diagnostic protocols in medicine. However, the selection of optimal DNA extraction method is critical if such an analysis is to be successful. Recently, we have evaluated a number of rapid DNA extraction protocols in order to find the most suitable method for routine processing of the most common archival materials in pathological and cytological laboratories: paraffin-embedded tissues and Papanicolaou- or Giemsa-stained smears. Our results demonstrate that rapid DNA extraction methods have comparable DNA extraction efficiencies with standard DNA isolation protocols on archival clinical specimens with the exception of Giemsa-stained smears. PMID:10653137

  1. Laboratory and clinical experience with neodymium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1991, we have undertaken extensive laboratory and clinical studies of the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser for surgical treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Side-firing optical fibers which emit a divergent, relatively low energy density Nd:YAG laser beam produce coagulation necrosis of obstructing periurethral prostate tissue, followed by gradual dissolution and slough in the urinary stream. Laser-tissue interactions and Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for prostatectomy have been studied in canine and human prostate model systems, enhancing clinical application. Ongoing studies examine comparative Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for various beam configurations produced by available side-firing optical fibers and continue to refine operative technique. We have documented clinical outcomes of Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy in 230 consecutive patients treated with the UrolaseTM side-firing optical fiber. Nd:YAG laser coagulation the prostate produces a remarkably low acute morbidity profile, with no significant bleeding or fluid absorption. No postoperative incontinence has been produced. Serial assessments of voiding outcomes over more than 3 years of followup show objective and symptomatic improvement following Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy which is comparable to older but more morbid electrosurgical approaches. Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy is a safe, efficacious, durable and cost-effective treatment for BPH.

  2. Cell irradiation setup and dosimetry for radiobiological studies at ELBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Beyreuther, E.; Lessmann, E.; Wagner, W.; Pawelke, J.

    2009-07-01

    The radiation source ELBE delivers different types of secondary radiation, which is used for cell irradiation studies in radiobiological research. Thereby an important issue is the determination of the biological effectiveness of photon radiation as a function of photon energy by using low-energetic, monochromatic channeling radiation (10-100 keV) and high-energetic bremsstrahlung (up to 40 MV). Radiobiological studies at the research facility ELBE demand special technical and dosimetric prerequisites. Therefore, a cell irradiation system (CIS) has been designed, constructed and installed at the beam line. The CIS allows automatic irradiation of a larger cell sample number and the compensation of spatial inhomogeneity of the dose distribution within the beam spot. The recently introduced GafChromic ® EBT radiochromic film model has been used to verify the cell irradiation dose deposition achieving a dose uncertainty of <5%. Both, the installed cell irradiation system and the developed dosimetric procedure based on the use of the EBT film have been experimentally tested at ELBE. The biological effectiveness of 34 MV bremsstrahlung with respect to 200 kV X-rays from a conventional X-ray tube has been determined. An RBE value of 0.75 has been measured in good agreement with literature.

  3. Influence of oxygen on the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    The simulation of the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism may be very helpful in studying the radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation when the water radical clusters formed by the densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particle may form DSBs damaging DNA molecules in living cells. It is possible to study not only the efficiency of individual radicals but also the influence of other species or radiomodifiers (mainly oxygen) being present in water medium during irradiation. The mathematical model based on Continuous Petri nets (proposed by us recently) will be described. It makes it possible to analyze two main processes running at the same time: chemical radical reactions and the diffusion of radical clusters formed during energy transfer. One may study the time change of radical concentrations due to the chemical reactions running during diffusion process. Some orientation results concerning the efficiency of individual radicals in DSB formation (in the case of Co60 radiation) will be presented; the influence of oxygen present in water medium during irradiation will be shown, too.

  4. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    SciTech Connect

    Komisopoulos, Georgios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  5. Suicide Loss Survivors' Experiences with Therapy: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Rebecca; Cerel, Julie; McGann, Vanessa; Maple, Myfanwy

    2016-07-01

    Over two-thirds of suicide loss survivors, those who have lost a loved one to suicide, seek individual therapy following their loss. However, nothing is known about what survivors find helpful about therapy or how therapy impacts their grief. An online survey was conducted June 2012-March 2013 with a convenience sample of 197 survivors primarily from the USA and Australia to develop a better understanding of treatment seeking loss survivors and their experiences in therapy. Questions explored the experience of the suicide death, the therapy received after the loss, and insights about improving therapy for loss survivors. Participants were generally positive about their therapy experiences. However, respondents endorsed symptoms of PTSD, though many did not report a formal diagnosis from a provider, suggesting a discrepancy that could lead to inadequate treatment of symptoms. The findings provide an understanding of treatment seeking loss survivors, along with implications for therapists treating this population. PMID:27074845

  6. Medical students' emotional development in early clinical experience: a model.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

    2014-08-01

    Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes, students wrote daily about their most impressive experiences, explicitly reporting what they felt, thought, and did. In a subsequent interview, they discussed those experiences in greater detail. Following a grounded theory approach, we conducted a constant comparative analysis, collecting and then interpreting data, and allowing the interpretation to inform subsequent data collection. Impressive experiences set up tensions, which gave rise to strong emotions. We identified four 'axes' along which tensions were experienced: 'idealism versus reality', 'critical distance versus adaptation', 'involvement versus detachment' and 'feeling versus displaying'. We found many factors, which influenced how respondents relieved those tensions. Their personal attributes and social relationships both inside and outside the medical community were important ones. Respondents' positions along the different dimensions, as determined by the balance between attributes and tensions, shaped their learning outcomes. Medical students' emotional development occurs through active participation in medical practice and having impressive experiences within relationships with patients and others on wards. Tensions along four dimensions give rise to strong emotions. Gaining insight into the many conditions that influence students' learning about emotions might support educators and supervisors in fostering medical students' emotional and professional development. PMID:23949724

  7. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  8. Co-Learning: Maximizing Learning in Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merk, Hillary; Waggoner, Jacqueline; Carroll, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and teacher educators have given increased attention to co-teaching during the student teaching experience. Co-teaching facilitates an apprenticeship arrangement that encourages modeling of classroom practice for the candidate and a chance to implement directly what is being learned by the apprentice. The co-teaching model can be…

  9. Clinical experience with generic levetiracetam in people with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chaluvadi, Siresha; Chiang, Sharon; Tran, Larry; Goldsmith, Corey E.; Friedman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose To describe the clinical outcomes of a compulsory switch from branded to generic levetiracetam (LEV) among people with epilepsy (PWE) in an outpatient setting. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of 760 unduplicated consecutive adult patients attending a tertiary care epilepsy clinic at Ben Taub General Hospital. On November 1, 2008 hospital policy required all patients receiving branded LEV to be automatically switched to generic LEV. We calculated the proportion of patients switching back to branded LEV and reasons for the switch back. Key Findings Of the 260 patients (34%) being prescribed LEV (generic and brand name) during the study period, 105 (42.9%) were switched back to brand name LEV by their treating physicians. Reasons for switch back included increase in seizure frequency (19.6% vs. 1.6%; p < 0.0001) and adverse effects (AEs) (3.3%). AEs included headache, fatigue, and aggression. Patient age was associated with switchback when controlling for gender, epilepsy classification, and treatment characteristics [relative risk (RR) 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.09–2.84; p < 0.05)]. An increase in seizure frequency subsequent to generic substitution was associated with polytherapy compared to monotherapy (3.225; 1.512–6.880; p < 0.05). Significance A significant proportion of patients in our cohort on generic LEV required switch back to the branded drug. Careful monitoring is imperative because a compulsory switch from branded to generic LEV may lead to poor clinical outcomes, with risk of AEs and increased seizure frequency. PMID:21426334

  10. Use of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory to Conduct Charged Particle Radiobiology Studies Relevant to Ion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Held, Kathryn D; Blakely, Eleanor A; Story, Michael D; Lowenstein, Derek I

    2016-06-01

    Although clinical studies with carbon ions have been conducted successfully in Japan and Europe, the limited radiobiological information about charged particles that are heavier than protons remains a significant impediment to exploiting the full potential of particle therapy. There is growing interest in the U.S. to build a cancer treatment facility that utilizes charged particles heavier than protons. Therefore, it is essential that additional radiobiological knowledge be obtained using state-of-the-art technologies and biological models and end points relevant to clinical outcome. Currently, most such ion radiotherapy-related research is being conducted outside the U.S. This article addresses the substantial contributions to that research that are possible at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is the only facility in the U.S. at this time where heavy-ion radiobiology research with the ion species and energies of interest for therapy can be done. Here, we briefly discuss the relevant facilities at NSRL and how selected charged particle biology research gaps could be addressed using those facilities. PMID:27195609

  11. The osmotic tissue expander: a three-year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Obdeijn, Miryam C; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Werker, Paul M N

    2009-09-01

    Closure of defects after trauma or excision of neoplasms is a basic skill in plastic surgery. Local, regional and distant flaps lead to additional scars. Skin recruitment by serial excision or skin expansion is a less damaging option for defects that must be closed. Advantages of tissue expansion include good colour and texture match. Disadvantages are the need for a second operation, use of an implant with the attendant risk of infection, time needed for inflation of the device, repeat visits to the clinic, and punctures to inflate the expander. To overcome the last disadvantage, an osmotic expander was developed in Germany in 1999 by OSMED GmbH (Ilmenau). PMID:18755643

  12. Application sorption: experience in clinical use and prospects of development.

    PubMed

    Eretskaya, E V; Sakhno, L A; Nikolaev, V G

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of experimental - clinical results obtained during the last decade in the field of application of adsorptive carbon dressings in wound and burn therapy is given. Possible mechanisms of the therapeutic effect of this material are discussed, the feasibility of their application during different phases of wound process and burn disease treatment is demonstrated. The local absorption may be independent efficient method of treatment in the case of surface burns and wound with a small area of injury and provide a pronounced detoxifying effect in the case of suppurative-septic complication of a mechanical trauma and burns. PMID:1751664

  13. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: clinical experience with 124 patients.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Martinez-Guerra, G; Altamirano-Alvarez, E; Martinez-Avalos, A; Cardenas-Cardoz, R; Ayon-Cardenas, A; Ruiz-Maldonado, R; Lopez-Corella, E

    1988-08-01

    We cared for 124 pediatric patients with a histologic diagnosis of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (histiocytosis X) over a period of 14 years. Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings were analyzed. The most frequent manifestations were bone lesions, lymph node involvement, and skin infiltration. Liver disease was noted in 50% of patients and lung disease in 23%; hematologic changes were also frequent. Dysfunction and involvement of these three organ systems, plus age of onset, distinguished the group of patients with the highest mortality. All patients with generalized disease or organ dysfunction were treated with systemic chemotherapy. The actuarial survival curve at 10 years was 63%. PMID:3264610

  14. Experience of a Clinic for Afghan Refugees in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Walter A.

    1988-01-01

    Since the Soviets invaded Afghanistan in 1979, 3.5 to 4 million refugees have moved into Pakistan and Iran. Even before the war, the health status of the Afghans was extremely poor and the medical personnel limited. Various international efforts are attempting to cope with the health care needs of the refugees. Economic, language, and cultural problems hamper the projects. One clinic found the most common problems were of the gastrointestinal tract, then the respiratory tract, with a problem ranking similar to that of pre-war Afghanistan. Many of the health problems are linked to deficiencies in sanitation and nutrition. PMID:3247740

  15. Respiratory infections: clinical experiences with the new quinolones.

    PubMed

    Davies, B I; Maesen, F P

    1987-12-11

    Nearly 300 patients, admitted to hospital with acute purulent exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, have been treated with various newer quinolones: 26 patients received enoxacin, 50 pefloxacin, 80 ciprofloxacin and 143 ofloxacin. Dosages varied from 400 mg once daily to 1000 mg twice daily. orally for five to 10 days. Patients were evaluated bacteriologically and clinically before, during and after treatment. Nearly all infections associated with Haemophilus influenzae and/or Branhamella catarrhalis were successfully eradicated. Some Streptococcus pneumoniae infections relapsed, some could not be eradicated, and a number of patients developed new infections with these organisms. Approximately half of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections were eradicated. Nearly all patients received concomitant theophylline but this only caused serious problems in those given 600 mg doses of enoxacin twice daily. Five patients given ciprofloxacin had to discontinue because of unwanted effects (mostly hallucinations), one patient given pefloxacin had gastric pain and two patients given ofloxacin developed a skin rash. Apart from the theophylline interaction, the unwanted effects did not appear to be dose-related. The best overall clinical results were noted after 800 mg doses of ofloxacin once daily for seven days. PMID:3438151

  16. Clinical experiences in fungal keratitis caused by Acremonium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Jae; Cho, Yong-Wun; Seo, Seong-Wook; Kim, Sun-Joo; Yoo, Ji-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the predisposing risk factors, clinical presentation, management, and therapeutic outcomes of fungal keratitis caused by Acremonium. Methods This is a retrospective study of cases with Acremonium fungal keratitis that presented to our tertiary referral center between January 2006 and August 2012. Patient demographic and clinical details were determined and reported. Results Five cases of fungal keratitis from Acremonium species were identified in five patients (three males, two females). The mean age of the patients was of 73.4±5.46 years, with a mean follow-up time of 124±72 days. All patients had a history of corneal trauma with vegetable matter. Four cases were unresponsive to initial treatment (0.2% fluconazole, 0.15% amphotericin B) and required topical 5% natamycin, and, in two out of five cases, topical 1% voriconazole. Conclusion The most common risk factors for Acremonium fungal keratitis was ocular trauma. When a corneal lesion is found to be unresponsive to the initial treatment, we should consider adding or substituting topical natamycin or voriconazole for treatment. PMID:24492439

  17. Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation: preliminary clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, E.S.; Ward, R.E.; Stadalnik, R.C.; Vera, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA) is a new liver imaging agent that binds to hepatic-binding protein, a hepatocyte-specific membrane receptor. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of Tc-NGA imaging in clinical liver transplantation. A total of 25 studies were performed in nine patients. Imaging studies performed in the early posttransplant period in patients with good hepatic allograft function revealed diffuse patchiness in tracer distribution, a manifestation of preservation damage. Left lobar infarction was demonstrated within a few hours of ischemic injury. Right posterior segmental infarction was seen in another patient. Comparison of kinetic, clinical, and biochemical data revealed good correlation between hepatic allograft function and Tc-NGA kinetics. Major kinetic alterations were noted during periods of preservation injury, hepatic infarction, and acute rejection. These studies indicate: (1) major alterations in Tc-NGA kinetics occur during preservation injury, hepatic infarction, and acute rejection, and (2) Tc-NGA kinetic data appear to provide an accurate reflection of hepatic allograft function. Tc-NGA imaging has the advantages of being noninvasive and of utilizing standard nuclear medicine instrumentation, including portable imaging devices. In conclusion, Tc-NGA imaging provides a promising noninvasive approach for evaluation of liver function in patients undergoing hepatic transplantation.

  18. [First clinical experiences with ceramic ball attachments for overdentures].

    PubMed

    Büttel, Adrian E; Schmidli, Fredy; Marinello, Carlo P; Lüthy, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective clinical study on 40 patients with similar clinical conditions (edentulous jaw with 2 interforaminal implants) commercially available ceramic ball attachments (ruby) were compared to commercial titanium ball attachments. The primary aim of the study was to measure the wear of the ball attachments after being 1 year in function. However, in the course of the study already after 7 to 12 months multiple failures with ceramic ball attachments occurred. Twelve (28%) of 43 ceramic ball attachments had to be replaced, mostly because of fractures (8) of the ceramic ball. It seems that ceramic ball attachments of the investigated design are not able to withstand normal intraoral stresses. The short-term susceptibility to fractures didn't allow to examine the ceramic-inherent features such as compressive strength and wear resistance. Furthermore, a secure connection between a titan base and a ceramic ball seems to be challenging. Based on these results, in implant-retained removable prosthesis the use of metal-based retainers is still recommended, although during maintenance a higher wear has to be expected. This wear can be compensated by either activating or changing the matrix or the patrix. PMID:18293602

  19. Clinical experience of PDT in Brazil: a 300 patient overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Cristina; Ferreira, Juliana; Marcassa, Luis G.; Cestari Filho, Guilherme A.; Souza, Cacilda S.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2005-04-01

    Clinical application of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) in Brazil is a result of a pioneering work in a collaborative program involving the Physics Institute and the Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo and the Amaral Carvalho Cancer Hospital in the city of Jau, Sao Paulo. This work began in 1997 with the first patient treated in 1999. Up to the end of 2003 this program has treated over 300 patients and the ones with correct follow up had their lesions included in this report. The majority of the lesions were of non-melanoma skin cancer located on the head and neck region, but the group has also treated Esophagus, Bladder, Gynecological, chest wall recurrence of breast cancer, among others. The results have shown to be compatible with internationally reported data, and we have modified some application procedures towards to a better benefit for the patient and an optimization of the results. We present the overall results observed after 5 year of experimental clinical treatment.

  20. Gay men's experiences of surrogacy clinics in India.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Damien W; Due, Clemence; Power, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    While growing numbers of Australian gay men are entering into 'offshore' surrogacy arrangements in order to become parents, little empirical research has been conducted with this population. This article reports on a qualitative analysis of interviews with 12 gay men who had entered into surrogacy arrangements in India. The findings outline both positive and negative experiences in terms of support pre-conception, during the birth and post-birth. Changes to legislation in India mean that gay men can no longer access surrogacy services there, but it is important to understand the experiences of men who had previously accessed those services. The article concludes by highlighting aspects of the data that demonstrate the particular experiences of gay men who undertake offshore surrogacy arrangements, especially with regard to their need for support and involvement in all aspects of the process. A more thoroughly developed network of care may help to facilitate such support and this may further increase the positive outcomes reported by gay men who form families through surrogacy arrangements. PMID:25351689

  1. Translating comparative effectiveness research into clinical practice: the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Walley, Tom

    2012-01-22

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is not new but its potential to improve the effectiveness of healthcare has not yet been exploited in the US. Other countries such as the UK have more experience of this. Key points of the UK experience are summarized here and some possible pointers for the US are drawn. These include the following: how to go beyond the evidence and apply judgements to make recommendations with authority and in a timely manner; how to implement these recommendations; how to identify suitable topics; and how to be open and transparently fair to all stakeholders. The quality of the science of CER is key but this needs developing, and not just in biomedical or statistical terms but also in how to understand public expectations, and how to implement its recommendations. A key issue is the role of health economics, which seems to have been marginalized by the CER legislation, but perhaps this is more apparent than real. Clearly this is a matter for much further debate. It is hard to see how CER can deliver its potential without active consideration of both benefits and costs. Although other countries have more experience of this than does the US, the context for such work is always very specific and the US will have to find its own way, while trying to avoid some of the errors made elsewhere. PMID:22268389

  2. [Clinical experiences of RUAN's needling method for insomnia].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling-Zhen; Ruan, Bu-Qing

    2013-07-01

    The theoretical basis and needling techniques of RUAN's needling method in treatment of insomnia are introduced in this paper. Ruan's needling method follows the theory of traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture, stresses the theory of taking brain as the marrow sea in treatment of insomnia acupuncture. The characteristics of his needling method are that emphasis on acupoints, including positioning accuracy and proper compatibility; think highly of needling method that combines with perpendicular needling, oblique needling, parallel needling, deep needling and shallow needling; emphasis on manipulation and identify qi under the needle to decide reinforcing or reducing method by arrival of qi, excess or deficiency. And the clinical observation of RUAN' s needling method on 30 cases of insomnia is attached. PMID:24032204

  3. [Experience in thyroglossal duct pathology: clinical case series].

    PubMed

    Cieri, Patricio; Udaquiola, Julia E; Calello, Santiago E; Libero, Daniel H

    2016-10-01

    The thyroglossal duct cyst pathology represents the second cause of bening cervical anomalies in childhood. Diagnosis is mainly clinical. Sistrunk (1920) proposed a surgical technique that is still considered the gold standard for definitive treatment of this condition. A retrospective study was made including patients who underwent surgery for thyroglossal duct cyst pathology in our department between June 2008 and August 2015. In this period, we performed 54 procedures in 45 patients (39 primary cases). Median age was 4.7 years; 14/39 patients (31.1%) had pre-operative infection. All patients were studied with neck ultrasound. A Sistrunk's procedure was performed in all cases. The global recurrence rate was 17.8% (8/45). PMID:27606652

  4. Selecting clinical diagnoses: logical strategies informed by experience.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Donald Edward; Campos, Daniel G

    2016-08-01

    This article describes reasoning strategies used by clinicians in different diagnostic circumstances and how these modes of inquiry may allow further insight into the evaluation and treatment of patients. Specifically, it aims to make explicit the implicit logical considerations that guide a variety of strategies in the diagnostic process, as exemplified in specific clinical cases. It focuses, in particular, in strategies that clinicians use to move from a large set of possible diagnoses initially suggested by abductive inferences - the process of hypothesis generation that creates a diagnostic space - to a narrower set or even to a single 'best' diagnosis, where the criteria to determine what is 'best' may differ according to different strategies. Experienced clinicians should have a diversified kit of strategies - for example, Bayesian probability or inference to a lovely explanation - to select from among previously generated hypotheses, rather than rely on any one approach every time. PMID:26201314

  5. Clinical experience with aurora kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Boss, David S; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2009-08-01

    The aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members, designated auroras A, B, and C. Auroras A and B are essential components of the mitotic pathway, ensuring proper chromosome assembly, formation of the mitotic spindle, and cytokinesis. The role of aurora C is less clear. Overexpression of aurora A and B has been observed in several tumor types, and has been linked with a poor prognosis of cancer patients. Several small molecules targeting aurora kinases A and B or both have been evaluated preclinically and in early phase I trials. In this review we aim to summarize the most recent advances in the development of aurora kinase inhibitors, with a focus on the clinical data. PMID:19684075

  6. An R package for simulation experiments evaluating clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Day, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an open-source application for evaluating competing clinical trial (CT) designs using simulations. The S4 system of classes and methods is utilized. Using object-oriented programming provides extensibility through careful, clear interface specification; using R, an open-source widely-used statistical language, makes the application extendible by the people who design CTs: biostatisticians. Four key classes define the specifications of the population models, CT designs, outcome models and evaluation criteria. Five key methods define the interfaces for generating patient baseline characteristics, stopping rule, assigning treatment, generating patient outcomes and calculating the criteria. Documentation of their connections with the user input screens, with the central simulation loop, and with each other faciliates the extensibility. New subclasses and instances of existing classes meeting these interfaces can integrate immediately into the application. To illustrate the application, we evaluate the effect of patient pharmacokinetic heterogeneity on the performance of a common Phase I "3+3" design. PMID:21347151

  7. [Subantral augmentation with porous titanium in experiment and clinic].

    PubMed

    Sirak, S V; Shchetinin, E V; Sletov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the use of porous titanium for subantral augmentation. Experimental study was conducted on 12 yearling rams. Subantral augmentation using porous titanium was performed in 33 patients. In the control group consisting of 14 patients calcium phosphates and bone collagen based agents ("Bio-Оss" and "Collost") were used. In the main and control groups 46 and 32 implant were placed, respectively. Pilot histological and clinical studies proved that the granules of porous titanium are biocompatible with bone tissue, provide the optimal surface microrelief, thus creating good conditions for adhesion, expansion and migration of osteoforming cells, have negligible kinetics of resorption, are porous to ensure effective neovascularization of de novo formed bone tissue. Porous titanium is an effective alternative material for subantral bone augmentation for dental implantation and reconstructive operations on the maxillary sinus. PMID:26925568

  8. Clinical profile, etiology, and management of hydropneumothorax: An Indian experience

    PubMed Central

    Kasargod, Vasunethra; Awad, Nilkanth Tukaram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hydropneumothorax is an abnormal presence of air and fluid in the pleural space. Even though the knowledge of hydro-pneumothorax dates back to the days of ancient Greece, not many national or international literatures are documented. Aim: To study clinical presentation, etiological diagnosis, and management of the patients of hydropneumothorax. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted in a tertiary care hospital with diagnosis of hydropneumothorax between 2012 and 2014 were prospectively studied. Detailed history and clinical examination were recorded. Blood, pleural fluid, sputum investigations, and computed tomography (CT) thorax (if necessary) were done. Intercostal drainage (ICD) tube was inserted and patients were followed up till 3 months. Results: Fifty-seven patients were studied. Breathlessness, anorexia, weight loss, and cough were the most common symptoms. Tachypnea was present in 68.4% patients. Mean PaO2 was 71.7 mm of Hg (standard deviation ±12.4). Hypoxemia was present in 35 patients (61.4%). All patients had exudative effusion. Etiological diagnosis was possible in 35 patients by initial work-up and 22 required CT thorax for arriving at a diagnosis. Tuberculosis (TB) was etiology in 80.7% patients, acute bacterial infection in 14%, malignancy in 3.5%, and obstructive airway disease in 1.8%. All patients required ICD tube insertion. ICD was required for 24.8 days (±13.1). Conclusion: Most patients presented with symptoms and signs of cardiorespiratory distress along with cough, anorexia, and weight loss. Extensive pleural fluid analysis is essential in establishing etiological diagnosis. TB is the most common etiology. ICD for long duration with antimicrobial chemotherapy is the management. PMID:27185991

  9. The clinical presentation of celiac disease: experiences from northeastern iran.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Azita; Esmaielzadeh, Abbas; Aafzal Aghayee, Mehdi; Goshayeshi, Ladan; Ghaffarzadegan, Kamran

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to explore demographic characteristics and clinical presentations of celiac disease (CD) in Northeastern Iran. METHODS This was a cross-sectional retrospective study of 193 adults with CD who presented to Mashhad University Gastroenterology Clinic between 2008 and 2013. Patient data that included mode of presentation and the presence of any concomitant illnesses were collected. Intestinal biopsy and serum anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) were used for diagnosis. Mucosal lesions were classified according to modified Marsh classification. RESULTS Overall, 132 females and 61 males, with a mean age at diagnosis of 32.6 ± 13.2 years were included. The patient's chief complaints in order of decreasing frequency were dyspepsia (24.6%), diarrhea (20%), anemia (12.8%), and flatulence (7.2%). Bone disease was seen (osteopenia, osteoporosis) in 30% of patients. A positive family history of CD was found in 17.9% of cases. There were 64% who had serum anti-tTG >200 units/ml and 78% had a Marsh classification grade 3 on duodenal biopsy. The histology grade (Marsh) did not show any correlation with anti-tTG serum levels, age, body mass index (BMI) or hemoglobin levels. CONCLUSION In Northeastern Iran, CD was seen more commonly in females and with non-diarrheal presentations. Abdominal discomfort, anemia and bone disease were most common primary presentations in this area. Histology grade showed no significant correlation with level of anti-tTG, BMI or hemoglobin levels. We suggest screening for CD in unexplained abdominal discomfort, bone disease and anemia. PMID:24872868

  10. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  11. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  12. Effect of different cell cluster models on the radiobiological output for (211)At-radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Xu, Yuanying

    2011-02-01

    The cell cluster modeling is a widely used method to estimate the small-scale dosimetry and provides the implication for a clinic. This work evaluated the effect of different regular cluster models on the radiobiological outputs for (211)At-radioimmunotherapy. The cell activity threshold was estimated using a tumor control probability of 0.90. Basically, regular models show similar features with cluster configuration and cell dimension variation. However, their individual results such as the cumulated activity threshold per cell and the prescription dose per volume should not be substituted reciprocally. The tissue composed of smaller cells or midcell packing will need a little more high prescription dose per volume. The radiation sensitivity parameters in a linear-quadratic model are critical to decide the radiobiological response with dose. The cumulated cell activity threshold increases exponentially with α decreasing, and its influence on the big cell dimension is more than on the small one. The different subsources affect radioresistant organs or tissues more remarkably than radiosensitive ones, especially the cells with large cytoplasm. The heterogeneous activity of Gaussian distribution will decrease the therapeutical effectiveness for the nucleus source, but its influence on the cytoplasm and cell surface sources is a little uncertain, as their real mean value is always higher than its set mean value by assuming the cell activity uptakes from zero. Careful usage of underdose with heterogeneous activity distribution should be practiced in clinics. The deteriorated heterogeneous distribution will salvage the potential subversive and lead to the failure of tumor local control. Some cells with no or little activity that are located on the edge or vertex of cube or corner models will have the ability to survive, as there is a lack of a part of the cross-fire dose effect, and so more attention should be paid in selecting the dosage. Although this work focuses on

  13. Computerized documentation in middle ear surgery. Methods and clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Harris, S

    1981-01-01

    A computerized system for recording results of ear surgery is presented. Specially designed forms are filled in at the time of operation as well as 2 months, 6 months and annually for 1-5 years after operation. The data are processed in a Univac 1100-80 by specific programmes written in FORTRAN. A Follow-up programme gives up-to-date information on hearing and healing after different types of operations. An Annual Production Control programme gives more detailed information about various correlations, such as results in draining ears, frequency of residual cholesteatoma etc. Four years experience with the system and obtainable data is discussed. PMID:6274131

  14. Experience with the Implementation of Clinical Pharmacy Services and Processes in a University Hospital in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Somers, Annemie; Claus, Barbara; Vandewoude, Koen; Petrovic, Mirko

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes the experience with the development of clinical pharmacy services in the Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. Implementation of clinical pharmacy services in Belgian hospitals has not been evident because these activities were initially not structurally financed. The aim is to describe the strengths and weaknesses of the clinical pharmacy development process, and the milestones that enhanced the progress. Furthermore, the organisation of clinical pharmacy in the Ghent University Hospital is explained, including back- and front-office activities, seamless pharmaceutical care and medication safety improvement. Some working methods, procedures and tools are explained for different clinical pharmacy services. In particular, the clinical pharmacy projects for geriatric patients as well as the preparation of clinical pharmacy services for the accreditation process are explained. We also reflect on the organisation model and the future development of clinical pharmacy, taking into consideration facilitators and potential barriers. PMID:26922733

  15. Assessing Research Participants’ Perceptions of their Clinical Research Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Lee, Laura M.; Yessis, Jennifer; Coller, Barry S.; Henderson, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Participants’ perceptions of their research experiences provide valuable measures of ethical treatment, yet no validated instruments exist to measure these experiences. We conducted focus groups of research participants and professionals as the initial step in developing a validated instrument. Methods Research participants enrolled in twelve focus groups, consisting of: 1) individuals with disorders undergoing interventions or 2) in natural history studies; or 3) healthy volunteers. Research professionals participated in six separate groups of 1) IRB members, ethicists, Research Subject Advocates, 2) research nurses/coordinators, or 3) investigators. Focus groups used standard methodologies. Results 85 participants and 29 professionals enrolled at 8 academic centers. Altruism and personal relevance of the research were commonly identified motivators; financial compensation was less commonly mentioned. Participants were satisfied with informed consent processes but disappointed if not provided test results, or study outcomes. Positive relationships with research teams were valued highly. Research professionals were concerned about risks, undue influence, and informed consent. Conclusions Participants join studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. They value staff relationships, health gains, new knowledge, and compensation, and expect professionalism and good organization. Based on these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention and satisfaction. PMID:22212221

  16. Clinical spectrum and outcome of pulmonary nocardiosis: 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Akashdeep; Chhina, Deepinder; Soni, RK; Kakkar, Chandan; Sidhu, US

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary nocardiosis is a rare but a life-threatening infection caused by Nocardia spp. The diagnosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus higher mortality. Aim: In this study, we aim to evaluate the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis. Methods: A retrospective, 5-year (2009–2014) review of demographic profile, risk factors, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, treatment, and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Results: The median age of the study subjects was 54 years (range, 16–76) and majority of them (75%) were males. The risk factors for pulmonary nocardiosis identified in our study were long-term steroid use (55.6%), chronic lung disease (52.8%), diabetes (27.8%), and solid-organ transplantation (22.2%). All the patients were symptomatic, and the most common symptoms were cough (91.7%), fever (78%), and expectoration (72%). Almost two-third of the patients were initially misdiagnosed and the alternative diagnosis included pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 7), community-acquired pneumonia (n = 5), lung abscess (n = 4), invasive fungal infection (n = 3), lung cancer (n = 2), and Wegener's granulomatosis (n = 2). The most common radiographic features were consolidation (77.8%) and nodules (56%). The mortality rate for indoor patients was 33% despite treatment. Higher mortality rate was observed among those who had brain abscess (100.0%), HIV positivity (100%), need for mechanical ventilation (87.5%), solid-organ transplantation (50%), and elderly (age > 60 years) patients (43%). Conclusion: The diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus high mortality. A lower threshold for diagnosing pulmonary nocardiosis needs to be exercised, in chest symptomatic patients with underlying chronic lung diseases or systemic immunosuppression, for the early diagnosis

  17. EPID based in vivo dosimetry system: clinical experience and results.

    PubMed

    Celi, Sofia; Costa, Emilie; Wessels, Claas; Mazal, Alejandro; Fourquet, Alain; Francois, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mandatory in several countries, in vivo dosimetry has been recognized as one of the next milestones in radiation oncology. Our department has implemented clinically an EPID based in vivo dosimetry system, EPIgray, by DOSISOFT S.A., since 2006. An analysis of the measurements per linac and energy over a two-year period was performed, which included a more detailed examination per technique and treat-ment site over a six-month period. A comparison of the treatment planning system doses and the doses estimated by EPIgray shows a mean of the differences of 1.9% (± 5.2%) for the two-year period. The 3D conformal treatment plans had a mean dose difference of 2.0% (± 4.9%), while for intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy treatments the mean dose difference was -3.0 (± 5.3%) and -2.5 (± 5.2%), respectively. In addition, root cause analyses were conducted on the in vivo dosimetry measurements of two breast cancer treatment techniques, as well as prostate treatments with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. During the breast study, the dose differences of breast treatments in supine position were correlated to patient setup and EPID positioning errors. Based on these observations, an automatic image shift correc-tion algorithm is developed by DOSIsoft S.A. The prostate study revealed that beams and arcs with out-of-tolerance in vivo dosimetry results tend to have more complex modulation and a lower exposure of the points of interest. The statistical studies indicate that in vivo dosimetry with EPIgray has been successfully imple-mented for classical and complex techniques in clinical routine at our institution. The additional breast and prostate studies exhibit the prospects of EPIgray as an easy supplementary quality assurance tool. The validation, the automatization, and the reduction of false-positive results represent an important step toward adaptive radiotherapy with EPIgray. PMID:27167283

  18. Clinical experience in treatment of diffuse unilateral subretinal neuroretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Relhan, Nidhi; Pathengay, Avinash; Raval, Vishal; Nayak, Sameera; Choudhury, Himadri; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features, management, and outcomes of patients with diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN). Methods A noncomparative, consecutive analysis of case series from two tertiary care campuses of LV Prasad Eye Institute, India, between January 2011 and April 2014 was performed. Medical records of the patients presenting with DUSN (early or late stage) were reviewed. Results The current study included 13 patients. The majority (10/13, 76.92%) of the patients were aged 20 years or less. All patients had unilateral eye involvement. Visual acuity at presentation was 20/200 or worse in 9/13 (69.23%) patients. A delay in diagnosis occurred in 6/13 patients, and initial diagnosis in these patients included retinitis pigmentosa (4 patients) and posterior uveitis (2 patients). Clinical features included early presentation (prominent vitritis, localized retinitis, and vasculitis) in 7/13 (53.85%) patients and late presentation (attenuation of vessels, retinal pigment epithelium atrophic changes, and optic atrophy) in 6/13 (46.15%) patients. Worm could not be identified in any of the cases. All the patients received laser photocoagulation of retina and oral albendazole treatment for a period of 30 days. With treatment, visual acuity improved in seven patients (six early stage, one late stage) and remained unchanged in six patients. Mean follow-up period was 8.69 months (range, 1–21 months). The mean central foveal thickness in the affected eye, done by optical coherence tomography, during the late stage of the disease was 188.20±40 µm (range, 111–242 µm), which was significantly thinner than the fellow eye, 238.70±36.90 µm (range, 186–319 µm), P=0.008. Conclusion DUSN is a serious vision threatening disease, which may progress to profound vision loss in the later stage of the disease. Visualization of subretinal worm is usually not possible. Treatment with high-dose albendazole therapy and laser photocoagulation may alter the

  19. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... center. (3) A pancreas transplant center is not required to comply with the clinical experience... pancreas transplants performed at the center. (4) A center that is requesting initial Medicare approval...

  20. Initial Clinical Experience Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, David J.; Kessel, David O. Nicholson, Anthony A.; Patel, Jai V.; McPherson, Simon J.; Shaw, David R.

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a self-expanding nitinol wire mesh vascular embolization device derived from the Amplatz septal occluder. We assessed the results of vascular embolization obtained using the AVP. Methods. A retrospective review was carried out of 23 consecutive cases of vascular embolization using the AVP in a variety of different clinical settings. The AVP was chosen to have a diameter approximately 30-50% greater than the target vessel. The device was delivered via an appropriately sized guide catheter and was released when satisfactorily positioned. Additional embolic agents were used in some cases. Results. All target vessels were successfully occluded with no device malpositioning or malfunction. In 14 (61%) patients the AVP was the sole embolic material. In the remaining patients additional agents were used, particularly in preoperative embolization of highly vascular renal tumors. The AVP does not cause instantaneous thrombosis and in high-flow situations thrombosis typically takes up to 15 min. Conclusion. The AVP is a safe, effective embolization device that provides a useful adjunct to the therapeutic armamentarium. It is particularly suited to the treatment of short high-flow vessels where coil migration and catheter dislodgment might occur. In the majority of cases no additional embolic agents are necessary but it may take up to 15 min for complete thrombosis to occur.

  1. [Brain-Computer Interface: the First Clinical Experience in Russia].

    PubMed

    Mokienko, O A; Lyukmanov, R Kh; Chernikova, L A; Suponeva, N A; Piradov, M A; Frolov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is suggested to stimulate the same plastic mechanisms in the brain as a real movement. The brain-computer interface (BCI) controls motor imagery by converting EEG during this process into the commands for an external device. This article presents the results of two-stage study of the clinical use of non-invasive BCI in the rehabilitation of patients with severe hemiparesis caused by focal brain damage. It was found that the ability to control BCI did not depend on the duration of a disease, brain lesion localization and the degree of neurological deficit. The first step of the study involved 36 patients; it showed that the efficacy of rehabilitation was higher in the group with the use of BCI (the score on the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) improved from 1 [0; 2] to 5 [0; 16] points, p = 0.012; no significant improvement was observed in control group). The second step of the study involved 19 patients; the complex BCI-exoskeleton (i.e. with the kinesthetic feedback) was used for motor imagery trainings. The improvement of the motor function of hands was proved by ARAT (the score improved from 2 [0; 37] to 4 [1; 45:5] points, p = 0.005) and Fugl-Meyer scale (from 72 [63; 110 ] to 79 [68; 115] points, p = 0.005). PMID:27188145

  2. Clinical Experience with Insulin Glargine in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Emily; Dain, Marie-Paule; Rodionova, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) demonstrated the importance of optimal glycemic control achieved through intensive insulin therapy in reducing the microvascular complications associated with type 1 diabetes. However, the DCCT, which was conducted prior to the availability of insulin analogs, also reported a significant increase in severe hypoglycemia with intensive versus conventional therapy. Insulin analogs were developed to aid patients in achieving better diabetes control by providing insulins with optimized pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. Insulin glargine was the first long-acting insulin analog with a 24-h duration of action, offering once-daily injection, and has now been in clinical use for over 10 years. The authors performed a systematic search of EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science (Science Citation Index) to determine the efficacy of insulin glargine in type 1 diabetes in basal–bolus insulin regimens. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that glycemic control with insulin glargine is at least comparable to that with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin in adults and in children and adolescents, and with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults. However, these same trials show a significantly lower risk for hypoglycemia with insulin glargine compared with NPH insulin in adults. PMID:20969435

  3. [Cystinic nephrolythiasis: clinical experience and new diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gentili, Anna; Ria, Paolo; Lupo, Antonio; Fabris, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Cystinuria is an inherited autosomal recessive disease with a prevalence 1:7000 and typical age of onset in the second decade of life. This nephrolithiasis is not always well known and well studied and for this reason it is often underdiagnosed. Cystinuria is characterized by increased urinary excretion of cystine and dibasic amino acids (lysine, ornithine, arginine) caused by defective transport of these amino acids across the luminal membrane of proximal tubule and small intestine cells. Two mutated genes responsible of this tubular defect are SLC3A1 on chromosome 2 and SLC7A9 on chromosome 19. Clinical manifestations of cystinuria are essentially those related to stones formation and their movement across the urinary tract, like flank pain/abdomen pain and hematuria, as occurred in other nephrolithiasis types. Diagnosis is based on biochemical urine analysis, stone analysis and imaging. Genetic study of this disease may be a new and stimulating approach to better understand the defects and identify new therapeutic targets. A wider knowledge and a more detailed approach to cystinuria may help to ameliorate patients quality of life, to prevent recurrences and complications and to develop more specific and adequate treatments. PMID:27374390

  4. The universal serial bus endoscope: design and initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Zendejas, Gregorio; Dobke, Marek K; Guerrerosantos, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic forehead lift is a well-established procedure in aesthetic plastic surgery. Many agree that currently available video-endoscopic equipment is bulky, multipieced and sometimes cumbersome in the operating theater. A novel system, the Universal Serial Bus Endoscope (USBE) was designed to simplify and reduce the number of necessary equipment pieces in the endoscopic setup. The USBE is attached by a single cable to a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port of a laptop computer. A built-in miniaturized cold light source provides illumination. A built-in digital camera chip enables procedure recording. The real-time images and movies obtained with USBE are displayed on the computer's screen and recorded on the laptop's hard disk drive. In this study, 25 patients underwent endoscopic browlift using the USBE system to test its clinical usefulness, all with good results and without complications or need for revision. The USBE was found to be reliable and easier to use than current video-endoscope equipment. The operative time needed to complete the procedure by the authors was reduced approximately 50%. The design and main technical characteristics of the USBE are presented. PMID:15383889

  5. Role of Clinical Education Experiences on Athletic Training Students' Development of Professional Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Context: Limited evidence exists on the role clinical education can play in the development of athletic training student commitment for the profession. Objective: Investigating the role clinical education experiences play on the development of passion for athletic training. Design: Exploratory qualitative study. Setting: Athletic training…

  6. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  7. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed…

  8. Using Clinical Experience in Discussion within Problem-Based Learning Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Paul; Duplock, Amanda; Willis, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    A key principle in problem-based learning (PBL) is the student linking learning from different sources to enrich understanding. We have explored how medical students based in a clinical environment use clinical experience within PBL groups. We recorded the discussion of 12 third-year groups, which were meeting for the second time on a PBL case,…

  9. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  10. The Impact of Clinical Experiences from Athletic Training Student and Preceptor Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an integral part of athletic training programs. This is where students should develop their professional identities and become socialized into the profession. Understanding the student and preceptor perspectives of the impact that clinical experiences have on students can provide valuable insight into this aspect of…

  11. Experiences of Student Speech-Language Pathology Clinicians in the Initial Clinical Practicum: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Speech-language pathology literature is limited in describing the clinical practicum process from the student perspective. Much of the supervision literature in this field focuses on quantitative research and/or the point of view of the supervisor. Understanding the student experience serves to enhance the quality of clinical supervision. Of…

  12. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  13. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Clinical Experiences in Rural and Remote Areas: Recruitment Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, Jane; Taylor, Kerry

    2002-01-01

    Two urban Australian nursing students' stories of their experiences in clinical placements in rural and Aboriginal communities indicate their interest in and enthusiasm for returning to rural nursing after graduation. Unfortunately, many urban students are disadvantaged financially by the added expense of their rural clinical rotation. Assisting…

  14. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  15. Clinical Experience with Cone Beam CT Navigation for Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Van der Sterren, William; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical use and potential benefits of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) navigation to perform image guided percutaneous tumor ablations. Materials and Methods All ablations performed between February 2011 and February 2013 using CBCT navigation, were included. Sixteen patients underwent 20 ablations for 29 lesions. CBCT ablation planning capabilities include multimodality image fusion and tumor segmentation for visualization, depiction of the predicted ablation zones for intra-procedural planning and segmentation of the ablated area for immediate post-treatment verification. Number and purpose of CBCT were examined. The initial ablation plan defined as number of probes and duration of energy delivery was recorded for 20/29 lesions. Technical success and local recurrences were recorded. Primary and secondary effectiveness rates were calculated. Results Image fusion was utilized for 16 lesions and intra-procedural ultrasound for 4. Of the 20/29 lesions, where the ablation plans were recorded, there was no deviation from the plan in 14. In the remaining 6/20, iterative planning was needed for complete tumor coverage. An average of 8.7 ± 3.2 CBCT were performed per procedure, including 1.3 ± 0.5 for tumor segmentation and planning, 1.7 ± 0.7 for probe position confirmation, 3.9 ± 2 to ensure complete coverage. Mean follow-up was 18.6 ± 6.5 months. 28/29 ablations were technically successful (96.5%). Of ablations performed with curative intent, technical effectiveness at one-month was 25/26 (96.1%) and 22/26 (84.6%) at last follow-up. Local tumor progression was observed in 11.5% (3/26). Conclusion CBCT navigation may add information to assist and improve ablation guidance and monitoring. PMID:25645409

  16. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Single Brainstem Metastases: The Cleveland Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Chao, Samuel T.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the imaging and clinical outcomes of patients with single brainstem metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from patients with single brainstem metastases treated with SRS. Locoregional control and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Between 1997 and 2007, 43 patients with single brainstem metastases were treated with SRS. The median age at treatment was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance status was 80, and the median follow-up was 5.3 months. The median dose was 15 Gy (range, 9.6-24), and the median conformality and heterogeneity index was 1.7 and 1.9, respectively. The median survival was 5.8 months from the procedure date. Of the 33 patient with post-treatment imaging available, a complete radiographic response was achieved in 2 (4.7%), a partial response in 8 (18.6%), and stable disease in 23 (53.5%). The 1-year actuarial rate of local control, distant brain control, and overall survival was 85%, 38.3%, and 31.5%, respectively. Of the 43 patients, 8 (19%) died within 2 months of undergoing SRS, and 15 (36%) died within 3 months. On multivariate analysis, greater performance status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.95, p = .004), score index for radiosurgery (HR, 0.7; p = .004), graded prognostic assessment score (HR, 0.48; p = .003), and smaller tumor volume (HR, 1.23, p = .002) were associated with improved survival. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SRS is a safe and effective local therapy for patients with brainstem metastases.

  17. Clinical experiences with three different designs of ankle prostheses.

    PubMed

    Rippstein, Pascal F

    2002-12-01

    Until 1995, fusion was in our institution the only rational surgical option for a severe ankle arthrosis. Consistent reports about good mid- and long-term results with ankle replacement allowed us to change our minds. Ankle replacement became the gold standard and fusion was then almost totally banished. Because ankle arthrosis can be morphologically different from one patient to another, we soon believed that one single type of ankle prosthesis would not be the universal optimal solution for all patients. We therefore divided the ankle arthrosis into three groups. Each group shows the best solution from each of the ankle prostheses with which we had gained experience (Agility, STAR, and BP). The Agility prosthesis, which was indicated for ankles with extremely damaged geometry, did not restore sufficiently the ankle motion. Preoperatively stiff ankles remained stiff postoperatively. Additionally, significant residual pain was more likely to occur in those patients. These cases did not show significant advantages compared with ankle fusion, especially from a functional point of view. Fusion for these stiff ankles is therefore today our first treatment of choice. In our experience, the malleolar joints do not have to be replaced. Even a severe arthrosis at this level does not produce significant pain, provided that osteophytes have been removed and joint height has been restored by the implanted prosthesis. It is our strong belief that these malleolar joints are also less sensitive to pain, similar to the femoropatellar joint. For these reasons, a replacement of the malleolar joints and the resurfacing of the talar sides is not necessary. Leaving the talar sides untouched requires less bone resection and makes the implantation of the talar component easier. Although we obtained good results with the STAR prosthesis, we progressively abandoned it because of these reasons, and we preferred the BP prosthesis. The BP prosthesis works on the same biomechanic principle as

  18. A study of the use of past experiences in clinical decision making in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, J

    2001-10-01

    Making decisions to call emergency assistance to patients is an important dimension of nursing practice. Most usually these decision making situations are uncertain and it is expected nurses rely on past clinical experiences. This study, approved by the ethics committees of both a university and an area health service, aimed to describe nurses' reliance on past experiences and identify associated judgement strategies (heuristics). Thirty-two registered nurses with five or more years experience were interviewed. Main findings were: nurses did use their past experiences and these experiences were used in the form of the three "classic" heuristics, representativeness, availability and anchoring and adjustment. It can be concluded past experiences are intrinsic to decision making and this has implications for both the clinical components of nursing educational programs and staffing allocations made by administrators. Some nurses, however, did not include referral to past experiences in their decision-making accounts which may be a limitation of the study design. PMID:11524105

  19. Three years of clinical experiences on excimer laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viligiardi, Riccardo; Galiberti, Sandra; Pini, Roberto; Salimbeni, Renzo

    1992-03-01

    We report here the experience of our multidisciplinary group that has been working since 1986 on excimer laser angioplasty. After having selected the excimer laser between the available sources because of the negligible lesions left on the residual tissue, we had the purpose to develop a suitable laser and catheter system. Neglecting here all the preliminary studies, we outline only a typical phenomenon related to the energy delivery and useful for the comprehension of the recanalization process. The energy emitted by every single fiber determines, under a certain threshold, independent recanalized channels in the plaque with residual flaps. At a higher energy level the overposition of the lobes, due to the intrinsic divergence, up to the recanalization in a single large channel. In our opinion this condition is crucial in the design of the catheters to obtain an optical instead of a mechanical recanalization. The biological experimentation conducted during the preliminary tests on human hearts obtained from transplants or cadavers, convinced us that the correct goal to pursue was unique laser angioplasty without the need for further balloon dilation.

  20. Clinical review: The Israeli experience: conventional terrorism and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Aschkenasy-Steuer, Gabriella; Shamir, Micha; Rivkind, Avraham; Mosheiff, Rami; Shushan, Yigal; Rosenthal, Guy; Mintz, Yoav; Weissman, Charles; Sprung, Charles L; Weiss, Yoram G

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years there have been 93 multiple-casualty terrorist attacks in Israel, 33 of them in Jerusalem. The Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center is the only Level I trauma center in Jerusalem and has therefore gained important experience in caring for critically injured patients. To do so we have developed a highly flexible operational system for managing the general intensive care unit (GICU). The focus of this review will be on the organizational steps needed to provide operational flexibility, emphasizing the importance of forward deployment of intensive care unit personnel to the trauma bay and emergency room and the existence of a chain of command to limit chaos. A retrospective review of the hospital's response to multiple-casualty terror incidents occurring between 1 October 2000 and 1 September 2004 was performed. Information was assembled from the medical center's trauma registry and from GICU patient admission and discharge records. Patients are described with regard to the severity and type of injury. The organizational work within intensive care is described. Finally, specific issues related to the diagnosis and management of lung, brain, orthopedic and abdominal injuries, caused by bomb blast events associated with shrapnel, are described. This review emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in caring for these patients. PMID:16277738

  1. Radiobiological Optimization of Combination Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Applied to Myeloablative Treatment of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F; Wahl, Richard L; Frey, Eric C; Kasamon, Yvette; Song, Hong; Huang, Peng; Jones, Richard J; Sgouros, George

    2014-01-01

    Combination treatment is a hallmark of cancer therapy. Although the rationale for combination radiopharmaceutical therapy was described in the mid ‘90s, such treatment strategies have only been implemented clinically recently, and without a rigorous methodology for treatment optimization. Radiobiological and quantitative imaging-based dosimetry tools are now available that enable rational implementation of combined targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy. Optimal implementation should simultaneously account for radiobiological normal organ tolerance while optimizing the ratio of two different radiopharmaceuticals required to maximize tumor control. We have developed such a methodology and applied it to hypothetical myeloablative treatment of non-hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) patients using 131I-tositumomab and 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Methods The range of potential administered activities (AA) is limited by the normal organ maximum tolerated biologic effective doses (MTBEDs) arising from the combined radiopharmaceuticals. Dose limiting normal organs are expected to be the lungs for 131I-tositumomab and the liver for 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan in myeloablative NHL treatment regimens. By plotting the limiting normal organ constraints as a function of the AAs and calculating tumor biological effective dose (BED) along the normal organ MTBED limits, the optimal combination of activities is obtained. The model was tested using previously acquired patient normal organ and tumor kinetic data and MTBED values taken from the literature. Results The average AA values based solely on normal organ constraints was (19.0 ± 8.2) GBq with a range of 3.9 – 36.9 GBq for 131I-tositumomab, and (2.77 ± 1.64) GBq with a range of 0.42 – 7.54 GBq for 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Tumor BED optimization results were calculated and plotted as a function of AA for 5 different cases, established using patient normal organ kinetics for the two radiopharmaceuticals. Results included AA ranges

  2. The cardiac troponins: uses in routine clinical practice. Experiences from GUSTO and other clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, P

    1998-11-01

    Recent advances in pharmacological and mechanical approaches to acute coronary syndromes have led to rapid changes in the management of patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes. These changes have been mirrored by the appearance of newer highly specific biochemical markers of myocardial damage particularly the cardiac troponins. When new biochemical markers become available it is the responsibility of the clinical chemist to evaluate them critically in terms of sensitivity, specificity, efficiency and analyzer precision, in the rigid setting of quality control that laboratories practise, and to compare them with other markers. When the data are shown to Clinical Cardiologists with supporting statements such as 'useful management tool' and 'can be used for early diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction', a different set of questions may need to be answered. The 'So what?' response is most frequent and is the most important hurdle that these newer biochemical markers have to overcome to convince physicians to change their current practice. This presentation will review the results of studies that have examined the potential clinical usefulness of the cardiac troponins with respect to diagnosis and risk stratification of patients admitted with suspected acute coronary syndromes. Any troponin variable that survives the 'so what' question has one further major hurdle to overcome. This is the requirement to inform physicians what different therapeutic strategies they should follow if the variable is present. Available clinical trial evidence about differing management options for patients according to their troponin status will be reviewed and outline management algorithms will be presented. Many questions remain unanswered and these will be included at the time points where they may be relevant. PMID:9857942

  3. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AND IMPACT OF A COMMUNITY-LED VOLUNTEER ATMOSPHERIC HAZE CLINIC IN SINGAPORE.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Benson; Liew, Choon Fong; Oon, Hazel H

    2014-11-01

    The Pollutant Standards Index reached a life-threatening level of 401 in Singapore on 21 June 2013. Grassroot leaders in Ulu Pandan Constituency conducted the first community-led free atmospheric Haze Clinic from 25 June 2013 to 11 July 2013 to provide accessible medical assessment for affected community members. This provided insight into the common conditions afflicting that community during the haze period while allaying public anxiety. Seventy-two consultations were conducted over the 3 week period, of which 26 (36.1%) were haze related, 18 (25%) were possibly haze related and 28 (38.9%) were non-haze related. The majority of haze-related complaints were respiratory, eye and skin-related. During a haze crisis, such adhoc community-led clinics may help alleviate the surge in patients seen at emergency departments and public primary health clinics. Many of the patients seen were from low income families and a significant number (38.9%) sought help for non-haze related medical conditions. PMID:26466431

  4. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Gretchen M.; Edwards, Mary E.; Butson, Linda C.; Auten, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n=21), interviews (n=2), and an online survey (n=167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly effective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians’ perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics. PMID:26211792

  5. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Jennifer A; Kuntz, Gretchen M; Edwards, Mary E; Butson, Linda C; Auten, Beth

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n = 21), interviews (n = 2), and an online survey (n = 167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly affective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians' perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics. PMID:26211792

  6. A systematic review of evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Cathal; Lennox, Laura; Bell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness outcomes. Design Systematic review. Setting A wide range of settings within primary and secondary care including hospitals and primary care centres. Participants A wide range of demographic groups and age groups. Primary and secondary outcome measures A broad range of patient safety and clinical effectiveness outcomes including mortality, physical symptoms, length of stay and adherence to treatment. Results This study, summarising evidence from 55 studies, indicates consistent positive associations between patient experience, patient safety and clinical effectiveness for a wide range of disease areas, settings, outcome measures and study designs. It demonstrates positive associations between patient experience and self-rated and objectively measured health outcomes; adherence to recommended clinical practice and medication; preventive care (such as health-promoting behaviour, use of screening services and immunisation); and resource use (such as hospitalisation, length of stay and primary-care visits). There is some evidence of positive associations between patient experience and measures of the technical quality of care and adverse events. Overall, it was more common to find positive associations between patient experience and patient safety and clinical effectiveness than no associations. Conclusions The data presented display that patient experience is positively associated with clinical effectiveness and patient safety, and support the case for the inclusion of patient experience as one of the central pillars of quality in healthcare. It supports the argument that the three dimensions of quality should be looked at as a group and not in isolation. Clinicians should resist sidelining patient experience as too subjective or mood-oriented, divorced from the ‘real’ clinical work of measuring safety and effectiveness. PMID:23293244

  7. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  8. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  9. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  10. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  11. Using Case Study Analysis and Case Writing to Structure Clinical Experiences in a Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Deborah M.; Bodur, Yasar

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on the design and results of a two-semester study on the use of case study analysis and case writing in clinical experiences in an undergraduate teacher education program. Findings indicated that structured experiences with case studies and case writing increase preservice teachers' informed decision making on educational…

  12. Prehospital Emergency Nursing students' experiences of learning during prehospital clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kim; Fridlund, Bengt; Thorén, Ann-Britt

    2013-07-01

    Clinical placements play an important role in learning a new profession, but students report about poor placement experiences. Standards have been laid down for improvements within clinical training in Prehospital Emergency Nursing programmes in Sweden, but no studies have been carried out in this field in a Swedish context. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the experiences of Prehospital Emergency Nursing (PEN) students of their clinical placement and the effect on their learning process. Data were collected in 28 individual interviews and analyzed in accordance with Flanagan's Critical Incident Technique. Three main areas emerged: the professional clinical supervisor, the clinical placement setting and the learning strategy. All these areas played a significant role in the PEN students' learning progress and development into a new professional role. The choice of clinical supervisor (CS) and clinical placement is important if PEN students' learning is to be an effective and positive experience. The prehospital environment is unique and can have positive and negative effects on student learning depending on the support and structure given during their clinical placement. A learning strategy based on reflective dialogue, CS continuity and a learning structure based on the prehospital environment is presented. PMID:23140791

  13. Detailed characterization of the 1087 MeV/nucleon iron-56 beam used for radiobiology at the alternating gradient synchrotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.

    1998-01-01

    We report beam characterization and dosimetric measurements made using a 56Fe beam extracted from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a kinetic energy of 1087 MeV/nucleon. The measurements reveal that the depth-dose distribution of this beam differs significantly from that obtained with a 600 MeV/nucleon iron beam used in several earlier radiobiology experiments at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's BEVALAC. We present detailed measurements of beam parameters relevant for radiobiology, including track- and dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET), fragment composition and LET spectra measured behind sample holders used in irradiations of biological samples. We also report measurements of fluence behind three depths (1.94, 4.68 and 9.35 g cm(-2)) of polyethylene targets with the 1087 MeV/nucleon beam, and behind 1.94 g cm(-2) of polyethylene with a 610 MeV/nucleon beam delivered by the AGS. These results are compared to earlier measurements with the 600 MeV/nucleon beam at the BEVALAC.

  14. Stresses and threats reported by baccalaureate students in relation to an initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Pagana, K D

    1988-11-01

    Based upon the theory of cognitive appraisal of stress, an instrument was designed to describe the aspects of a clinical experience that were challenging or threatening. The qualitative data largely reflected the threatening, rather than the challenging, aspects of the experience. Thus, this research report provides a typological analysis of qualitative data describing the threatening nature of an initial medical-surgical experience for 262 baccalaureate students. Content analysis was used to determine the six predominant themes of threat which included personal inadequacy, fear of making errors, uncertainty, the clinical instructor, being scared or frightened, and fear of failure. The threats elaborated upon in this research should provide the instructor with some insight into understanding the stressors inherent in the clinical experience. The students' comments offer direction for nurse educators to pursue in facilitating therapeutic discussions with nursing students. PMID:2852715

  15. Left atrial appendage isolation using percutaneous (endocardial/epicardial) devices: Pre-clinical and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jorge; Natale, Andrea; Engstrom, Krysthel; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the elderly population and it is associated with a four-fold to five-fold increased risk of thromboembolic events. It was not until the mid-1950s that the left atrial appendage (LAA) was identified as the main location of thrombus formation, particularly in patients with non-valvular AF. In this review, we explain at some extent its embryology, anatomy and physiology, and as well as the clinical and pre-clinical trials published to date testing the safety and efficacy of most LAA closure devices. Among those devices, the most studied include the PLAATO system (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN), the Amplatzer cardiac plug (St Jude, Golden Valley, MN; St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN), the WATCHMAN device (Boston Scientific, Plymouth, MN; Atritech Inc., Plymouth, MN), and the LARIAT device (SentreHEART, Palo Alto, CA). Similarly, newer LAA closure devices currently under investigation such as the Transcatheter Patch (Custom Medical Devices, Athens, Greece), AEGIS, and the Coherex WaveCrest (Salt Lake City, UT) will also be discussed. Future perspectives and the need for well-designed prospective studies between devices and new oral anticoagulant drugs are also proposed. PMID:26141854

  16. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  17. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  18. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  19. TRIGA reactor facility at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute: a simplified technical description. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.L.; Elsasser, S.

    1986-05-01

    In support of its mission the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) operates a medium-sized research nuclear reactor. The reactor is used to generate radiations, primarily neutrons and gamma rays, which are used to conduct experimental biomedical research and to produce isotopes. The radiations are delivered to the experiments in one of two ways: a pulse operation delivers a very short burst of high power, or a steady-state operation delivers a longer, continuous low- to medium-power exposure. The reactor is also used to train military personnel in reactor operations. TRIGA is an acronym for Training, Research, and Isotope, General Atomics. Mark-F is the specific General Atomics Reactor model, distinguished by a pool, a movable core, exposure-room facilities, and the ability to pulse to momentary high powers. Reactor operations at AFRRI began is 1962. In 1965, a change was made from aluminum-clad to stainless steel-clad fuel elements. Currently more than 150 multiple exposure experiments are performed each year using the reactor.

  20. Use of Tablet Computers to Promote Physical Therapy Students' Engagement in Knowledge Translation During Clinical Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Kathryn; Barbosa, Sabrina; Jiang, Fei; Lee, Karin T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Physical therapists strive to integrate research into daily practice. The tablet computer is a potentially transformational tool for accessing information within the clinical practice environment. The purpose of this study was to measure and describe patterns of tablet computer use among physical therapy students during clinical rotation experiences. Methods: Doctor of physical therapy students (n = 13 users) tracked their use of tablet computers (iPad), loaded with commercially available apps, during 16 clinical experiences (6-16 weeks in duration). Results: The tablets were used on 70% of 691 clinic days, averaging 1.3 uses per day. Information seeking represented 48% of uses; 33% of those were foreground searches for research articles and syntheses and 66% were for background medical information. Other common uses included patient education (19%), medical record documentation (13%), and professional communication (9%). The most frequently used app was Safari, the preloaded web browser (representing 281 [36.5%] incidents of use). Users accessed 56 total apps to support clinical practice. Discussion and Conclusions: Physical therapy students successfully integrated use of a tablet computer into their clinical experiences including regular activities of information seeking. Our findings suggest that the tablet computer represents a potentially transformational tool for promoting knowledge translation in the clinical practice environment. Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A127). PMID:26945431

  1. An in vitro study of the radiobiological effects of flattening filter free radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. B.; Hyland, W. B.; Cole, A. J.; Butterworth, K. T.; McMahon, S. J.; Redmond, K. M.; Trainer, C.; Prise, K. M.; McGarry, C. K.; Hounsell, A. R.

    2013-03-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators allow for an increase in instantaneous dose-rate of the x-ray pulses by a factor of 2-6 over the conventional flattened output. As a result, radiobiological investigations are being carried out to determine the effect of these higher dose-rates on cell response. The studies reported thus far have presented conflicting results, highlighting the need for further investigation. To determine the radiobiological impact of the increased dose-rates from FFF exposures a Varian Truebeam medical linear accelerator was used to irradiate two human cancer cell lines in vitro, DU-145 prostate and H460 non-small cell lung, with both flattened and FFF 6 MV beams. The fluence profile of the FFF beam was modified using a custom-designed Nylon compensator to produce a similar dose profile to the flattened beam (6X) at the cell surface but at a higher instantaneous dose-rate. For both cell lines there appeared to be no significant change in cell survival. Curve fitting coefficients for DU145 cells irradiated with constant average dose-rates were 6X: α = 0.09 ± 0.03, β = 0.03 ± 0.01 and 6FFF: α = 0.14 ± 0.13, β = 0.03 ± 0.02 with a significance of p = 0.75. For H460 cells irradiated with the same instantaneous dose-rate but different average dose-rate the fit coefficients were 6FFF (low dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.11, 0.07 ± 0.02 and 6FFF (high dose-rate): α = 0.21 ± 0.16, 0.07 ± 0.03, with p = 0.79. The results indicate that collective damage behaviour does not occur at the instantaneous dose-rates investigated here and that the use of either modality should result in the same clinical outcome, however this will require further validation in vivo.

  2. Collimator design for spatially-fractionated proton beams for radiobiology research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsin; Meyer, Juergen; Sandison, George

    2016-07-21

    Preclinical and translational research is an imperative to improve the efficacy of proton radiotherapy. We present a feasible and practical method to produce spatially-modulated proton beams for cellular and small animal research for clinical and research facilities. The University of Washington (UW) 50.5 MeV proton research beamline hosting a brass collimation system was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. This collimator consisted of an array of 2 cm long slits to cover an area of 2  ×  2 cm(2). To evaluate the collimator design effects on dose rate, valley dose and the peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) the following parameters were varied; slit width (0.1-1.0 mm), peak center-to-center distance (1-3 mm), collimator thickness (1-7 cm) and collimator location along the beam axis. Several combinations of slit widths and 1 mm spacing achieved uniform dose at the Bragg peak while maintaining spatial modulation on the beam entrance. A more detailed analysis was carried out for the case of a slit width of 0.3 mm, peak center-to-center distance of 1 mm, a collimator thickness of 5 cm and with the collimator flush against the water phantom. The dose rate at 5 mm depth dropped relative to an open field by a factor of 12 and produced a PVDR of 10.1. Technical realization of proton mini-beams for radiobiology small animal research is demonstrated to be feasible. It is possible to obtain uniform dose at depth while maintaining reasonable modulation at shallower depths near the beam entrance. While collimator design is important the collimator location has a strong influence on the entrance region PVDRs and on dose rate. These findings are being used to manufacture a collimator for installation on the UW cyclotron proton beam nozzle. This collimator will enable comparative studies on the radiobiological efficacy of x-rays and proton beams. PMID:27362834

  3. Collimator design for spatially-fractionated proton beams for radiobiology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunsin; Meyer, Juergen; Sandison, George

    2016-07-01

    Preclinical and translational research is an imperative to improve the efficacy of proton radiotherapy. We present a feasible and practical method to produce spatially-modulated proton beams for cellular and small animal research for clinical and research facilities. The University of Washington (UW) 50.5 MeV proton research beamline hosting a brass collimation system was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. This collimator consisted of an array of 2 cm long slits to cover an area of 2  ×  2 cm2. To evaluate the collimator design effects on dose rate, valley dose and the peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) the following parameters were varied; slit width (0.1–1.0 mm), peak center-to-center distance (1–3 mm), collimator thickness (1–7 cm) and collimator location along the beam axis. Several combinations of slit widths and 1 mm spacing achieved uniform dose at the Bragg peak while maintaining spatial modulation on the beam entrance. A more detailed analysis was carried out for the case of a slit width of 0.3 mm, peak center-to-center distance of 1 mm, a collimator thickness of 5 cm and with the collimator flush against the water phantom. The dose rate at 5 mm depth dropped relative to an open field by a factor of 12 and produced a PVDR of 10.1. Technical realization of proton mini-beams for radiobiology small animal research is demonstrated to be feasible. It is possible to obtain uniform dose at depth while maintaining reasonable modulation at shallower depths near the beam entrance. While collimator design is important the collimator location has a strong influence on the entrance region PVDRs and on dose rate. These findings are being used to manufacture a collimator for installation on the UW cyclotron proton beam nozzle. This collimator will enable comparative studies on the radiobiological efficacy of x-rays and proton beams.

  4. Clinical needs finding: developing the virtual experience-a case study.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Vaishali; Thompson, Megan; Altman, Stuart M; Taylor, Peter; Summers, Alexander; Goodwin, Kelsey; Louie, Angelique Y

    2013-09-01

    We describe an innovative program at the University of California, Davis for students to engage in clinical needs finding. Using a team-based approach, students participated in clinical rotations to observe firsthand the needs of clinicians at the university affiliated medical center. The teams were asked to develop documentary-style videos to capture key experiences that would allow future viewers to use the videos as "virtual" clinical rotations. This was conceived as a strategy to allow students in prohibitively large classes, or students in programs at institutions without associated medical or veterinary school programs, to experience clinical rotations and perform needs assessments. The students' perspectives on the experience as well as instructor analysis of best practices for this type of activity are presented and discussed. We found that the internship experience was valuable to the students participating, by not only introducing the practice of needs finding but also increasing the students' confidence in the practice of engineering design and their ability to work independently. The videos produced were of such high quality that instructors from other institutions have requested copies for instructional use. Virtual clinical rotations through video experiences may provide a reasonable substitute for students who do not have the ability to participate in rotations in person. PMID:23483373

  5. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sook; Kim, Wonwoo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eunjin; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Lawrence Chinsoo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS. PMID:26756026

  6. Clinical Outcome and Safety of Multilevel Vertebroplasty: Clinical Experience and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mailli, Leto Filippiadis, Dimitrios K.; Brountzos, Elias N.; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kelekis, Alexios

    2013-02-15

    To compare safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) when treating up to three vertebrae or more than three vertebrae per session. We prospectively compared two groups of patients with symptomatic vertebral fractures who had no significant response to conservative therapy. Pathologic substrate included osteoporosis (n = 77), metastasis (n = 24), multiple myeloma (n = 13), hemangioma (n = 15), and lymphoma (n = 1). Group A patients (n = 94) underwent PVP of up to three treated vertebrae (n = 188). Group B patients (n = 36) underwent PVP with more than three treated vertebrae per session (n = 220). Decreased pain and improved mobility were recorded the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery per clinical evaluation and the use of numeric visual scales (NVS): the Greek Brief Pain Inventory, a linear analogue self-assessment questionnaire, and a World Health Organization questionnaire. Group A presented with a mean pain score of 7.9 {+-} 1.1 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.1 {+-} 1.6, 2.0 {+-} 1.5 and 2.0 {+-} 1.5 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Group B presented with a mean pain score of 8.1 {+-} 1.3 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.2 {+-} 1.3, 2.0 {+-} 1.5, and 2.1 {+-} 1.6 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Overall pain decrease and mobility improvement throughout the follow-up period presented no statistical significance neither between the two groups nor between different underlying aetiology. Reported cement leakages presented no statistical significance between the two groups (p = 0.365). PVP is an efficient and safe technique for symptomatic vertebral fractures independently of the vertebrae number treated per session.

  7. An exploration of the clinical learning experience of nursing students in nine European countries.

    PubMed

    Warne, Tony; Johansson, Unn-Britt; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Tichelaar, Erna; Tomietto, Marco; Van den Bossche, Koen; Moreno, Maria Flores Vizcaya; Saarikoski, Mikko

    2010-11-01

    The overall aim of the study was to develop a composite and comparative view of what factors enhance the learning experiences of student nurses whilst they are in clinical practice. The study involved students undertaking general nurse training programmes in nine Western European countries. The study focused on: (1) student nurse experiences of clinical learning environments, (2) the supervision provided by qualified nurses in clinical placements, and (3) the level of interaction between student and nurse teachers. The study utilised a validated theoretical model: the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES+T) evaluation scale. The evaluation scale has a number of sub-dimensions: Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward; Supervisory Relationships; the Leadership Style of Ward Managers; Premises of Nursing; and the Role of the Nurse Teacher. Data (N=1903) was collected from Cyprus, Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Spain and Sweden using web-based questionnaire 2007-2008. The findings revealed that respondents were generally satisfied with their clinical placements. There was clear support for the mentorship approach; 57% of respondents had a successful mentorship experience although some 18% of respondents experienced unsuccessful supervision. The most satisfied students studied at a university college, and had at least a seven week clinical placement supported by individualised mentorship relationships. Learning to become a nurse is a multidimensional process that requires both significant time being spent working with patients and a supportive supervisory relationship. PMID:20409620

  8. The role of technological progress vs. accidental discoveries and clinical experience in the evolution of dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of dialysotherapy celebrated by nephrologists around the world in 2012 provided an opportunity for discussion on the role of clinical experience in relation to technological progress in the evolution of dialysis, especially of recently observed inadequate decrease in mortality/morbidity rates of patients on chronic dialysis. My report, based on almost 50 years of career in nephrology, refers the evolution of dialysis, from catharsis to modern dialysotherapy with special attention devoted to nowadays gravely underestimated role of clinical experience and personalized professional care for patients. PMID:24226207

  9. Clinical orthodontics in predoctoral education. Six years of experience at Indiana University.

    PubMed

    Hohlt, W F; Roberts, W E

    1997-01-01

    Since 1990, clinical achievement in orthodontics has been a graduation requirement at Indiana University. To be certified for graduation, all dental students must treat at least one limited orthodontic problem and observe the retention of at least one previously treated, limited orthodontics patient. Although clinical orthodontics for adults appears to be a very successful addition to the predoctoral curriculum, the specific accreditation requirements that mandated it have been rescinded. However, the positive response of the students, apparent acceptance by the orthodontic community, and the national acclaim afforded the program indicate that a hands-on clinical experience in orthodontics is a positive addition to the predoctoral curriculum. PMID:9517360

  10. Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a laser-plasma electron beam line for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, D.; Russo, G.; Casarino, C.; Gagliano, L.; Candiano, G. C.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Fulgentini, L.; Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Palla, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a Monte Carlo application, based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the characterization and optimization of electron beams for clinical applications produced by a laser-driven plasma source. The GEANT4 application is conceived so as to represent in the most general way the physical and geometrical features of a typical laser-driven accelerator. It is designed to provide standard dosimetric figures such as percentage dose depth curves, two-dimensional dose distributions and 3D dose profiles at different positions both inside and outside the interaction chamber. The application was validated by comparing its predictions to experimental measurements carried out on a real laser-driven accelerator. The work is aimed at optimizing the source, by using this novel application, for radiobiological studies and, in perspective, for medical applications.

  11. Amchitka Radiobiological Program progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, L.D.; Sibley, T.H.; Nakatani, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of the Amchitka Radiobiological Program for the period 1970-1979 was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from world-wide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear blasts on Amchitka Island. The objective is achieved, by the collection and radiological analyses of biological and environmental samples and by background radiation measurements. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground sites of the Amchitka nuclear detonations would be suspected if the contamination was significntly greater than would be expected from world fallout. An account of the program from July 1970 to December 1978 has been given in nine previous reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1979. The results of analyses of the samples collected in 1979 lead to the same conclusions as in previous years; i.e., there is no evidence that the radionuclide contamination at Amchitka Island is greater than would be expected from world fallout except for a slight contamination of the Long Shot Mud Pits with tritium.

  12. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Final report, July 1970-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, T.H.; Tornberg, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program, to collect biological and environmental samples for radiological analyses, began in 1970 and continued through 1979. The principal objective was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from worldwide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground test sites would be suspected if the amount of contamination was significantly greater than could be attributed to worldwide fallout or if an unexpected assemblage of radionuclides was detected. No radionuclides from the underground sites were detected, except for tritium from the Long Shot test (1965) which produced increased tritium concentrations in surface water and freshwater plants near the test site. This final report compiles all previous data into one report and considers the temporal trends in these data. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, /sup 40/K and /sup 7/Be, were the most abundantly occurring radionuclides in most samples; in lichen samples either /sup 137/Cs or /sup 144/Ce had the highest activity. All samples were below applicable Radiation Protection Guides and by 1979 most samples were near or below the statistical detection limits. Increased concentrations of short-lived fallout radionuclides following the Chinese atmospheric tests were found in freshwater and seawater samples and in most indicator organisms.

  13. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  14. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  15. [Radiobiological analysis of cancerogenic risk values in radioepidemiological investigations].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present article consisted in critical analysis of the epidemiological approach to radiocancerogenic risk estimation in region of low level radiation (LLR). The estimation is making by means of mathematician models that ignore a principal difference in biological action of LLR and high level radiation (HLR). The main formal characteristic of LLR action is the presence of a plateau in beginning of a dose-effect curve of radiogenic risk. It may be argued by the following positions: repeating the plateau-phenomenon on various radiobiological effects, in different tests and bioobjects, first; a paradoxical trend of reciprocal ERR/Sv increasing regarding dose decreasing in region of plateau, second, and third, the increasing of the curvature in dose-effect curve beginning. The presence of a plateau is associated with the presence of a real radiogenic risk threshold. Besides, the analysis of processes influencing significantly the dynamics of initial radiation injury of biologically important macromolecules showed the preference in region of LLR those, decreasing/eliminating genome damages. There is follows from mentioned above a necessity to evaluate radiogenic risks in LLR region separately from HLR region. PMID:18825986

  16. Differences in the internal structure of hallucinatory experiences between clinical and nonclinical populations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Yeni; Kim, Se Hyun; Hwang, Samuel; Kim, Jayoun; Chung, In-Won; Kim, Yong Sik; Jung, Hee-Yeon

    2015-03-30

    We investigated differential patterns of hallucinatory experiences between nonclinical and clinical samples. A total of 223 nonclinical individuals (108 females) and 111 subjects with schizophrenia (54 females) completed the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale-Revised (LSHS-R) and Perceptual Aberration Scale (PAS). The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) was used for the nonclinical group, and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) hallucination item was used for the clinical group. Cronbach's alpha values showed good internal consistency for the LSHS-R. In the two groups, significant associations were found between LSHS-R and PAS scores. Two factors were extracted through a principal component analysis (PCA) in the nonclinical group, and three factors were identified in the clinical group. The results of a hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) revealed that a perception-cognition dimension was clear cluster discriminating element for the nonclinical group, whereas alterations in perception-cognition dimension were characteristic in cluster structure of the clinical group. Our findings suggest that the nature of hallucinatory experiences may differ qualitatively between a nonclinical population and subjects with schizophrenia. Perceptual or cognitive aberrations may add a psychopathologic dimension to hallucinatory experiences. Exploring the internal structure of hallucinatory experiences may provide explanatory insight into these experiences in the general population. PMID:25619435

  17. Informed Practice: Students' Clinical Experiences in the Undergraduate Phase of an Accelerated Physician Assistant Program.

    PubMed

    Dereczyk, Amy; DeWitt, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study explored the clinical experiences of students in an accelerated physician assistant (PA) program. The participants were either certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or emergency medical technicians-basic (EMTs-B). The study was designed to elicit (1) how the participants perceived their older patients and (2) how the participants' experiences might affect their own future communications, bedside manner, and clinical preparedness as PAs. This study used a focus group to explore students' clinical experiences before the graduate phase of their accelerated PA program. Five female and 2 male PA students (N = 7) participated in the study. All participants were 23 years old and worked as either a CNA or an EMT-B. Results fell into 2 basic themes: informing practice and forming relationships. Regarding the first theme, participants felt that their experience as entry-level health care providers allowed them to improve their communication skills and bedside manner and to provide greater comfort to patients. Regarding the second theme, participants gained appreciation for older people and began to recognize the knowledge deficits and learning needs of their patients. The results suggested that a student's clinical experience as a CNA or an EMT-B before entering a PA program has a positive effect on the student's personal and professional development. The participants acquired greater appreciation and respect for older patients and members of the health care team. PMID:27123599

  18. The Safe use of Radioactive Isotopes in Teaching Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawcroft, D. M.; Stewart, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    This article briefly discusses some of the dangers involved in the use of radioisotopes and includes a comprehensive list of precautions and laboratory rules for use during radiobiology experiments. (Author)

  19. Women’s Management of Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis and Experiences of Clinical Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; McNair, Ruth; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Background Few data are available on how women manage recurring bacterial vaginosis (BV) and their experiences of the clinical care of this condition. This study aimed to explore women’s recurrent BV management approaches and clinical care experiences, with a view to informing and improving the clinical management of BV. Methods A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty-five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past 5 years took part in semi-structured interviews. Results The majority of women reported frustration and dissatisfaction with current treatment regimens and low levels of satisfaction with the clinical management of BV. Overall, women disliked taking antibiotics regularly, commonly experienced adverse side effects from treatment and felt frustrated at having symptoms recur quite quickly after treatment. Issues in clinical care included inconsistency in advice, misdiagnosis and inappropriate diagnostic approaches and insensitive or dismissive attitudes. Women were more inclined to report positive clinical experiences with sexual health physicians than primary care providers. Women’s frustrations led most to try their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications in an attempt to treat symptoms and prevent recurrences, including well-known risk practices such as douching. Conclusion In the face of considerable uncertainty about the cause of BV, high rates of recurrence, unacceptable treatment options and often insensitive and inconsistent clinical management, women are trying their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications to prevent recurrences, often with little effect. Clinical management of BV could be improved through the use of standardised diagnostic approaches, increased sensitivity and understanding of the impact of BV, and the provision of evidence based advice about known BV related risk factors. PMID:27010725

  20. Appraisals and Responses to Experimental Symptom Analogues in Clinical and Nonclinical Individuals With Psychotic Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Thomas A.; Gaynor, Keith J.; Hunter, Mike D.; Woodruff, Peter W. R.; Garety, Philippa A.; Peters, Emmanuelle R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive models of psychosis suggest that anomalous experiences alone do not always lead to clinical psychosis, with appraisals and responses to experiences being central to understanding the transition to “need for care”. Methods: The appraisals and response styles of Clinical (C; n = 28) and Nonclinical (NC; n = 34) individuals with psychotic experiences were compared following experimental analogues of thought interference (Cards Task) and auditory hallucinations (Virtual Acoustic Space Paradigm). Results: The groups were matched in terms of their psychotic experiences. As predicted, the C group scored higher than the NC group on maladaptive appraisals following both tasks, rated the experience as more personally significant, and was more likely to incorporate the experimental setup into their ongoing experiences. The C group also appraised the Cards Task as more salient, distressing, and threatening; this group scored higher on maladaptive—and lower on adaptive—response styles, than the NC group on both tasks. Conclusions: The findings are consistent with cognitive models of psychosis, with maladaptive appraisals and response styles characterizing the C group only. Clinical applications of both tasks are suggested to facilitate the identification and modification of maladaptive appraisals. PMID:23858493

  1. An investigation of nurse educator's perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Angela; Taylor, Cathy

    2008-11-01

    Educational policy (DOH, 1999. Making a difference: strengthening the nursing, midwifery and health visiting contribution to health and healthcare. Department of Health, London; UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, London; Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2006. Standards to support learning and assessment in practice. Nursing and Midwifery Council, London) and current nursing literature (Griscti, O., Jacono, B., Jacono, J., 2005. The nurse educator's clinical role. Journal of Advanced Nursing 50 (1), 84-92; Owen, S., Ferguson, K., Baguley, I., 2005. The clinical activity of mental health nurse lecturers. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 12, 310-316), place increasing emphasis on nurse educators undertaking clinical practice to facilitate their clinical confidence and competence. This study investigated nurse educators' perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A qualitative design and descriptive, exploratory approach were used. A purposive sample of 11 nurse educators in one nursing department, took part in two focus group interviews, one with 5 and the other with 6 respondents, to identify and discuss their perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A process of thematic content analysis revealed three broad themes relating to the meaning and importance of clinical practice, perceived benefits and barriers which are examined and discussed. The paper concludes that despite policy recommendations, barriers highlighted in this study such as insufficient time, heavy workload and a lack of valuing of the clinical role have been raised over the past few decades. The effect of undertaking clinical practice, particularly on the quality of teaching is argued to be valuable armoury in the battle to secure sufficient resources to support engagement in clinical practice. Financial and organisational commitment; valuing of clinical practice and research

  2. An Exploration of Dental Students' Assumptions About Community-Based Clinical Experiences.

    PubMed

    Major, Nicole; McQuistan, Michelle R

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain which assumptions dental students recalled feeling prior to beginning community-based clinical experiences and whether those assumptions were fulfilled or challenged. All fourth-year students at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics participate in community-based clinical experiences. At the completion of their rotations, they write a guided reflection paper detailing the assumptions they had prior to beginning their rotations and assessing the accuracy of their assumptions. For this qualitative descriptive study, the 218 papers from three classes (2011-13) were analyzed for common themes. The results showed that the students had a variety of assumptions about their rotations. They were apprehensive about working with challenging patients, performing procedures for which they had minimal experience, and working too slowly. In contrast, they looked forward to improving their clinical and patient management skills and knowledge. Other assumptions involved the site (e.g., the equipment/facility would be outdated; protocols/procedures would be similar to the dental school's). Upon reflection, students reported experiences that both fulfilled and challenged their assumptions. Some continued to feel apprehensive about treating certain patient populations, while others found it easier than anticipated. Students were able to treat multiple patients per day, which led to increased speed and patient management skills. However, some reported challenges with time management. Similarly, students were surprised to discover some clinics were new/updated although some had limited instruments and materials. Based on this study's findings about students' recalled assumptions and reflective experiences, educators should consider assessing and addressing their students' assumptions prior to beginning community-based dental education experiences. PMID:26933101

  3. Introductory and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences Within Campus-based Influenza Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric J.; Hagemann, Tracy M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To describe the development, implementation, and assessment of an introductory and an advanced pharmacy practice experience (IPPE and APPE) integrated within campus-based influenza clinics. Design. The influenza clinics were designed to incorporate the learning objectives for the IPPE and APPE, and included preparatory sessions, online learning, and direct patient interactions tailored to the appropriate education level of the learner. Assessment. The clinics provided influenza vaccinations to 2,292 and 2,877 individuals in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The clinics allowed for experiential education of 39 students earning a total of 467 IPPE and APPE hours in 2010 and 58 students earning a total of 656 IPPE and APPE hours in 2011. Third-year students were assessed before and after completing the IPPE, and improvement was seen in knowledge and self-ratings of perceptions and attitudes toward administering immunizations. Conclusions. Integrating pharmacy practice experiences within campus-based influenza clinics was an effective way to provide students with direct patient care experience and preventive health services knowledge. PMID:23610479

  4. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  5. Why Clinical Experience and Mentoring Are Replacing Student Teaching on the Best Campuses. A White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, James W.; Watson, Audra M.

    2014-01-01

    Woodrow Wilson Senior Fellow James W. Fraser and Audra Watson, the Foundation's Director of Mentoring and Induction Strategy, take a look at emerging trends in clinical preparation for new teachers. This new white paper is based on experience with the Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowships, and includes observations from some of the colleges and…

  6. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and…

  7. Using a Web-Based Database to Record and Monitor Athletic Training Students' Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kirk W.; Williams, Lisa; Janicki, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to introduce a documentation recording system employing the Microsoft Structured Query Language (MS-SQL) database used by the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) for recording and monitoring of athletic training student (ATS) clinical experiences and hours. Background: Monitoring ATSs clinical…

  8. Instant Experience in Clinical Trials: A Computer-Aided Simulation Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    Describes "Instant Experience," a simulation and game method in which students are given information about a promising new drug and asked to design a protocol for a clinical trial of the drug. Evaluation of a trial workshop showed positive response to the method. Educational goals to be achieved through its use are noted. (JT)

  9. Preservice Teachers' Reflection on Clinical Experiences: A Comparison of Blog and Final Paper Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Darci J.; Wondra, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the depth of reflection in the writing of preservice teachers who completed end-of-the-semester reflective papers or reflective blogs for undergraduate education courses associated with clinical experiences. Coders rated the depth of reflection as one of four categories: non-reflection, understanding, reflection, or critical…

  10. A Tool To Evaluate How to Learn from Experience in Clinical Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Louise; Villeneuve, Jean; Chevrier, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation tool for the process of learning from experience in a clinical practicum at baccalaureate nursing level was developed and validated. This reflective type of process evaluation helps students link theory to practice and think critically. (Contains 50 references.) (JOW)

  11. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... required data on all transplants (deceased and living donor) it has performed. Required data submissions... registration, transplant beneficiary registration and follow-up, and living donor registration and follow-up. (b) Standard: Clinical experience. To be considered for initial approval, an...

  12. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... required data on all transplants (deceased and living donor) it has performed. Required data submissions... registration, transplant beneficiary registration and follow-up, and living donor registration and follow-up. (b) Standard: Clinical experience. To be considered for initial approval, an...

  13. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  14. Evaluation of Nontraditional Age Learners' Experiences in Internet-Based Clinical Social Work Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanke, Jayme; Zeman, Laura Dreuth

    2015-01-01

    This study involves an evaluation of online learners' experiences with two Internet-based clinical social work courses. The evaluation sought to discover whether there were differences in learning between traditional (under 25 years old) and nontraditional age learners (25 years and over) who completed the asynchronous online course. The study…

  15. Clinical placements in Australian general practice: (Part 1) the experiences of pre-registration nursing students.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An international shift towards strengthening primary care services has stimulated the growth of nursing in general (family) practice. As learning in the clinical setting comprises a core component of pre-registration nursing education, it is logical that clinical placement opportunities would follow the workforce growth in this setting. Beyond simply offering placements in relevant clinical areas, it is vital to ensure high quality learning experiences that meet the educational needs of pre-registration nurses. Part 1 of a two part series reports on the qualitative study of a mixed methods project. Fifteen pre-registration nursing students participated in semi-structured interviews following a clinical placement in an Australian general practice. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and underwent a process of thematic analysis. Findings are presented in the following four themes; (1) Knowledge of the practice nurse role: I had very limited understanding, (2) Quality of the learning experience: It was a fantastic placement, (3) Support, belonging and mutual respect: I really felt part of the team, (4) Employment prospects: I would really, really love to go to a general practice but …… General practice placements exposed students to a diverse range of clinical skills which would equip them for future employment in primary care. Exposure to nursing in general practice also stimulated students to consider a future career in this clinical setting. PMID:25979152

  16. Nursing Students Achieving Community Health Competencies through Undergraduate Clinical Experiences: A Gap Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pijl-Zieber, Em M; Barton, Sylvia; Awosoga, Oluwagbohunmi A; Konkin, Jill

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, it is widely believed that nursing practice and health care will move from acute care into the community. At the same time, increasing numbers of nursing students are engaged in non-traditional clinical experiences for their community health rotation. These clinical experiences occur at agencies not organizationally affiliated with the health care system and typically do not employ registered nurses (RNs). What has yet to be established is the degree to which nursing students are actually being prepared for community health nursing roles through their community health clinical rotations. In this paper we report the findings of a mixed method study that explored the gap between desired and observed levels of competence in community health of senior nursing students and new graduates. The gap was quantified and then the nature of the gap further explored through focus groups. PMID:26461843

  17. High-fidelity simulation and the development of clinical judgment: students' experiences.

    PubMed

    Lasater, Kathie

    2007-06-01

    Nursing education programs across the country are making major capital investments in alternative learning strategies, such as human patient simulators; yet, little research exists to affirm this new innovation. At the same time, nursing programs must become even more effective in the development of students' clinical judgment to better prepare graduates to take on increasingly complex care management. This qualitative study examined the experiences of students in one nursing program's first term of using high-fidelity simulation as part of its regular curriculum. On the basis of these experiences, it seems that high-fidelity simulation has potential to support and affect the development of clinical judgment in nursing students and to serve as a value-added adjunct to their clinical practica. PMID:17580739

  18. [Personal experiences with induced abortions in private clinics in Northeast Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Paloma; McCallum, Cecilia; Menezes, Greice

    2016-01-01

    Based on a qualitative study conducted in 2012, the article analyzes middle-class individuals' experiences with induced abortions performed in private clinics. Thirty-four stories of induced abortions were narrated by 19 women and five men living in two state capitals in Northeast Brazil. Thematic analysis revealed differences in types of clinics and care provided by the physicians. The article shows that abortion in private clinics fails to guarantee safe or humane care. The narratives furnish descriptions of diverse situations and practices, ranging from flaws such as lack of information on medicines to others involving severe abuses like procedures performed without anesthesia. The article concludes that criminalization of abortion in Brazil allows clinics to operate with no state regulation; it does not prevent women from having abortions, but exposes them to total vulnerability and violation of human rights. PMID:26958817

  19. Radiobiologic Parameters and Local Effect Model Predictions for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Exposed to High Linear Energy Transfer Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beuve, Michael Alphonse, Gersende Ph.D.; Maalouf, Mira; Colliaux, Anthony M.S.; Battiston-Montagne, Priscilla; Jalade, Patrice; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Demeyer, Albert; Bajard, Marcel; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To establish the radiobiologic parameters of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) in response to ion irradiation with various linear energy transfer (LET) values and to evaluate the relevance of the local effect model (LEM) in HNSCC. Methods and Materials: Cell survival curves were established in radiosensitive SCC61 and radioresistant SQ20B cell lines irradiated with [33.6 and 184 keV/n] carbon, [302 keV/n] argon, and X-rays. The results of ion experiments were confronted to LEM predictions. Results: The relative biologic efficiency ranged from 1.5 to 4.2 for SCC61 and 2.1 to 2.8 for SQ20B cells. Fixing an arbitrary D{sub 0} parameter, which characterized survival to X-ray at high doses (>10 Gy), gave unsatisfying LEM predictions for both cell lines. For D{sub 0} = 10 Gy, the error on survival fraction at 2 Gy amounted to a factor of 10 for [184 keV/n] carbon in SCC61 cells. We showed that the slope (s{sub max}) of the survival curve at high doses was much more reliable than D{sub 0}. Fitting s{sub max} to 2.5 Gy{sup -1} gave better predictions for both cell lines. Nevertheless, LEM could not predict the responses to fast and slow ions with the same accuracy. Conclusions: The LEM could predict the main trends of these experimental data with correct orders of magnitude while s{sub max} was optimized. Thus the efficiency of carbon ions cannot be simply extracted from the clinical response of a patient to X-rays. LEM should help to optimize planning for hadrontherapy if a set of experimental data is available for high-LET radiations in various types of tumors.

  20. QIN. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Doot, Robert K.; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E.; Allberg, Keith C.; Linden, Hannah M.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging is a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  1. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    PubMed Central

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching. PMID:26109975

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters in Linear-Quadratic Radiobiologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Jack F.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiobiologic modeling is increasingly used to estimate the effects of altered treatment plans, especially for dose escalation. The present article shows how much the linear-quadratic (LQ) (calculated biologically equivalent dose [BED] varies when individual parameters of the LQ formula are varied by {+-}20% and by 1%. Methods: Equivalent total doses (EQD2 = normalized total doses (NTD) in 2-Gy fractions for tumor control, acute mucosal reactions, and late complications were calculated using the linear- quadratic formula with overall time: BED = nd (1 + d/ [{alpha}/{beta}]) - log{sub e}2 (T - Tk) / {alpha}Tp, where BED is BED = total dose x relative effectiveness (RE = nd (1 + d/ [{alpha}/{beta}]). Each of the five biologic parameters in turn was altered by {+-}10%, and the altered EQD2s tabulated; the difference was finally divided by 20. EQD2 or NTD is obtained by dividing BED by the RE for 2-Gy fractions, using the appropriate {alpha}/{beta} ratio. Results: Variations in tumor and acute mucosal EQD ranged from 0.1% to 0.45% per 1% change in each parameter for conventional schedules, the largest variation being caused by overall time. Variations in 'late' EQD were 0.4% to 0.6% per 1% change in the only biologic parameter, the {alpha}/{beta} ratio. For stereotactic body radiotherapy schedules, variations were larger, up to 0.6 to 0.9 for tumor and 1.6% to 1.9% for late, per 1% change in parameter. Conclusions: Robustness occurs similar to that of equivalent uniform dose (EUD), for the same reasons. Total dose, dose per fraction, and dose-rate cause their major effects, as well known.

  3. SU-E-T-385: 4D Radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Fourkal, E; Hossain, M; Veltchev, I; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Horwitz, E; Nahum, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The linear-quadratic model is the most prevalent model for planning dose fractionation in radiation therapy in the low dose per fraction regimens. However for high-dose fractions, used in SRS/SBRT/HDR treatments the LQ model does not yield accurate predictions, due to neglecting the reduction in the number of sublethal lesions as a result of their conversion to lethal lesions with subsequent irradiation. Proper accounting for this reduction in the number of sublethally damaged lesions leads to the dependence of the survival fraction on the temporal structure of the dose. The main objective of this work is to show that the functional dependence of the dose rate on time in each voxel is an important additional factor that can significantly influence the TCP. Methods: Two SBRT lung plans have been used to calculate the TCPs for the same patient. One plan is a 3D conformal plan and the other is an IMRT plan. Both plans are normalized so that 99.5% of PTV volume receives the same prescription dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The dose rate in each individual voxel is calculated as a function of treatment time and subsequently used in the calculation of TCP. Results: The calculated TCPs show that shorter delivery times lead to greater TCP, despite all delivery times being short compared to the repair half-time for sublethal lesions. Furthermore, calculated TCP(IMRT) =0.308 for the IMRT plan is smaller than TCP(3D) =0.425 for 3D conformal, even though it shows greater tumor hot spots and equal PTV coverage. The calculated TCPs are considerably lower compared to those based on the LQ model for which TCP=1 for both plans. Conclusion: The functional dependence of the voxel-by-voxel dose rate on time may be an important factor in predicting the treatment outcome and cannot be neglected in radiobiological modeling.

  4. Consequences of anorectal cancer atlas implementation in the cooperative group setting: Radiobiologic analysis of a prospective randomized in silico target delineation study

    PubMed Central

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Giantsoudis, Drosoula; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Duppen, Joop C.; Thomas, Charles R.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Kachnicc, Lisa A.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to ascertain the subsequent radiobiological impact of using a consensus guideline target volume delineation atlas. Materials and methods Using a representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed IMRT rectal cancer clinical trial, gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical/planning target volumes (CTV/PTV) were contoured by 13 physician observers (Phase 1). The observers were then randomly assigned to follow (atlas) or not-follow (control) a consensus guideline/atlas for anorectal cancers, and instructed to re-contour the same case (Phase 2). Results The atlas group was found to have increased tumor control probability (TCP) after the atlas intervention for both the CTV (p < 0.0001) and PTV1 (p = 0.0011) with decreasing normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for small intestine, while the control group did not. Additionally, the atlas group had reduced variance in TCP for all target volumes and reduced variance in NTCP for the bowel. In Phase 2, the atlas group had increased TCP relative to the control for CTV (p = 0.03). Conclusions Visual atlas and consensus treatment guidelines usage in the development of rectal cancer IMRT treatment plans reduced the inter-observer radiobiological variation, with clinically relevant TCP alteration for CTV and PTV volumes. PMID:24996454

  5. Belongingness: a montage of nursing students' stories of their clinical placement experiences.

    PubMed

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lathlean, Judith; McMillan, Margaret; Higgins, Isabel

    2007-04-01

    The psychological and social sciences literature is replete with assertions that human beings are fundamentally and pervasively motivated by the need to belong. This paper reports on some of the findings from the qualitative phase of a mixed-method, multi-site study that explored nursing students' experience of belongingness while on clinical placements. Students from Australia and the United Kingdom were interviewed to identify factors that impact upon and are consequences of belongingness. A montage of participants' stories is used to illustrate some of the key features of clinical workplaces that are conducive to the development of belongingness. Contextual factors and interpersonal dynamics were seen to have a significant bearing on students' experiences. Clinical leaders/managers who were welcoming, accepting and supportive, and nursing staff who were inclusive and encouraging, facilitated students' perception of being valued and respected as members of the nursing team. Additionally, the provision of consistent, quality mentorship was identified as important to students' feelings of connectedness and fit. The experience of belongingness, in turn, enhanced students' potential for learning and influenced their future career decisions. Alternatively, alienation resulted from unreceptive and unwelcoming clinical environments and from the dissonance created when students' personal and professional values did not articulate with those evident in practice environments. Consequently, distress, detachment and disengagement occurred and students' capacity and motivation for learning was negatively impacted. PMID:17563325

  6. A web application for recording and analyzing the clinical experiences of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Linda; Sedlmeyer, Robert; Carlson, Cathy; Modlin, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A primary focus in nursing education is to provide students with a diverse range of clinical experiences. Historically, the collection and assessment of data from students' clinical experiences have been paper-and-pencil tasks that are arduous for both students and nursing faculty. The volume of collected information also has made it difficult to produce ad hoc statistical reports without additional intensive manual labor. To facilitate recording and analysis of these data, the Nursing and Computer Science Departments at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne have collaborated to create a Web application: Essential Clinical Behaviors. The use of the Web-accessible database represents a major change in nursing education by alteration of format used by students to record their clinical experiences in nursing courses. The application was designed to enhance nursing students' learning and to assist faculty in making student assignments, evaluating student progress, and supporting curriculum decisions. This report discusses the rationale for the development of the Web application, a description of its data entry and reporting mechanisms, an overview of the system architecture, its use in the nursing curriculum, and planned enhancements. PMID:12869872

  7. Perceived Experience of Fatigue in Clinical and General Population: Descriptors and Associated Reactivities.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Márquez, Sandra; Senín-Calderón, Cristina; Rodríguez-Testal, Juan F; Carrasco, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is the analysis of different descriptors and reactions related to the experience of fatigue. Two groups were compared: a clinical sample (n = 92, 31 males, mean age = 38.87) and a non-clinical (n = 225, 135 males, mean age = 32.45) sample. The total sample was composed of 317 participants (52% males), ranging in age from 18 to 76 years. Findings show the experience of fatigue was mainly related to somatic terms (76% of the total sample). Specific results were found only for the clinical group: (a) significant relationships between fatigue and anxiety, χ2(1) = 34.71, p < .01; tension, χ2(1) = 16.80, p < .01; and sadness, χ2(1) = 24.59, p < .01; (b) higher intensity of fatigue (F = 84.15, p = .001), and predominance of the cognitive components of fatigue. Results showed that fatigue in subjects with a clinical disorder (versus those without) was associated both, to negative emotional states, and to a higher intensity of fatigue, especially in its cognitive elements. Important clinical implications for its assessment and intervention are discussed. PMID:26055395

  8. Neural and cognitive basis of spiritual experience: biopsychosocial and ethical implications for clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Giordano, James; Engebretson, Joan

    2006-05-01

    The role of patient spirituality and spiritual/liminal experience(s; SE) in the clinical setting has generated considerable equivocality within the medical community. Spiritual experience(s), characterized by circumstance, manifestation, and interpretation, reflect patients' explanatory models. We seek to demonstrate the importance of SE to clinical medicine by illustrating biological, cognitive, and psychosocial domains of effect. Specifically, we address where in the brain these events are processed and what types of neural events may be occurring. We posit that existing evidence suggests that SE can induce both intermediate level processing (ILP) to generate attentional awareness (ie, "consciousness of") effects and perhaps nonintermediate level processing to generate nonattentive, subliminal (ie, "state of") consciousness effects. Recognition of neural and cognitive mechanisms is important to clinicians' understanding of the biological basis of noetic, salutogenic, and putative physiologic effects. We posit that neurocognitive mechanisms, fortified by anthropologic and social contexts, led to the incorporation of SE-evoked behaviors into health-based ritual(s) and religious practice(s). Thus, these experiences not only exert biological effects but may provide important means for enhancing patients' locus of control. By recognizing these variables, we advocate clinicians to act within an ethical scope of practice as therapeutic and moral agents to afford patients resources to accommodate their specific desire(s) and/or need(s) for spiritual experiences, in acknowledgement of the underlying mechanisms and potential outcomes that may be health promotional. PMID:16781644

  9. Experimenting Clinical Pathways in General Practice: a Focus Group Investigation with Italian General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Lucia; Cattaneo, Cesarina; Peduzzi, Paolo; Lopiccoli, Silvia; Auxilia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB), Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs) care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs) held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results Four major themes emerged: i) clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii) they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii) nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv) the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment. Acknowledgments the Authors thank Dr. AP. Cantù and Dr D. Cereda who participated in the two focus groups as observers. PMID:25181354

  10. Systematic reviews of animal experiments demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive Scopus biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. In 20 reviews in which clinical utility was examined, the authors concluded that animal models were either significantly useful in contributing to the development of clinical interventions, or were substantially consistent with clinical outcomes, in only two cases, one of which was contentious. These included reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments--those involving the species considered most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes, such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments, which was evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which the majority of animal experiments were of good methodological quality. Whilst the effects of some of these problems might be minimised with concerted effort (given their widespread prevalence), the limitations resulting from interspecies differences are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Non-animal models are generally required to pass formal scientific validation prior to their regulatory acceptance. In contrast

  11. DoD's Medical Radiobiology Advisory Team: experts on the ground.

    PubMed

    VanHorne-Sealy, Jama; Livingston, Brian; Alleman, Lee

    2012-05-01

    The Medical Radiobiology Advisory Team (MRAT) is the operations arm of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), located at Naval Support Activity in Bethesda, MD. AFRRI is internationally recognized as expert in the biological effects of ionizing radiation research, training, and mitigation. During the U.S. Department of Defense's (DoD) response to the Fukushima Daiichi reactor incident, Operation Tomodachi, the MRAT provided guidance and advice to the U.S. Military leaders in Japan. This support helped ensure the safety of U.S. service members, family members, and civilians and supported the humanitarian relief in a coordinated effort with the Government of Japan (GOJ). PMID:22469928

  12. The first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma compared with topical hydroquinone: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Adalatkhah, Hassan; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of melasma is unsatisfactory most of the times. Hormonal role is shown to exist in pathogenesis of the melasma, and sex-hormone related drugs may have an effect on melasma. Aim To investigate efficacy of 1% flutamide cream versus 4% hydroquinone cream on melasma. Methods In a parallel randomized clinical trial, 74 women with melasma were allocated to receive a sunscreen along with 4% hydroquinone cream or 1% flutamide cream. Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI), mexameter melanin assay, and patient satisfaction were investigated. Results Mean age of the participants was 33.8 years. Mean length of time suffering from Melasma was 96.3 months. The subjects reported in average 1.1 hours per day of exposure to sunlight. Mean standardized total patient satisfaction score was 28.8 (standard deviation [SD] 17.2) in flutamide group patients versus 18 (SD 15.5) in control group (P<0.01). Regardless of treatment group, the skin darkness assessed upon MASI scales was reduced over the treatment course (P<0.001). Using mixed effects, longitudinal modeling showed better treatment efficacy based on MASI scale for flutamide group compared to the hydroquinone group (P<0.05). However, longitudinal analysis of mexameter scores did not reveal any significant difference in melanin measurements between flutamide and hydroquinone. Conclusion Topical flutamide appeared as effective as topical hydroquinone in treating melasma using mexameter assessment but with a better MASI improvement trend and higher patient satisfaction in flutamide treatment versus topical hydroquinone. As the present study is possibly the first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma, it would be quite unreasonable to recommend clinical use of it before future studies replicate the results on its efficacy and safety. PMID:26345129

  13. Peroral small-intestinal biopsy: experience with the hydraulic multiple biopsy instrument in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Experience of the peroral, hydraulic, multiple, small-bowel biopsy instrument is recorded and compared with reported experience of other peroral biopsy instruments. It is concluded that, in routine clinical practice, there is no particular danger associated with this instrument despite warnings to the contrary. Furthermore, biopsies are obtained at least as quickly as with other instruments and with great reliability. Since this instrument also enables multiple, precisely located biopsies to be taken from various levels of the small intestine, it could be considered the instrument of choice for peroral jejunal biopsy. PMID:1086269

  14. Clinical hypnosis with a Little League baseball population: performance enhancement and resolving traumatic experiences.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Adam

    2011-01-01

    A model for the use of clinical hypnosis with a Little League population was proposed and outlined with dual emphasis: performance enhancement and resolving traumatic experiences. The Performance Enhancement Training Model was developed to enhance performance with this non-patient population. It employed clinical hypnosis to bring to fruition recommendations made by coaches to enhance players' batting proficiency. The second emphasis of the proposed model focused on the resolution of involuntary maladaptive habits secondary to a traumatic experience that impede or compromise optimum performance. Included in this category were detrimental defensive habits "at the plate" after a beaming by a pitch and detrimental defensive habits "on the field" after being hit by a batted ball. PMID:21404954

  15. Clinical Experience in Late Antiquity: Alexander of Tralles and the Therapy of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouras-vallianatos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Alexander of Tralles, writing in the late sixth century, combined his wide-ranging practical knowledge with earlier medical theories. This article shows how clinical experience is used in Alexander’s works by concentrating on his therapeutic advice on epilepsy and, in particular, on pharmacology and the group of so-called natural remedies. I argue that clinical testing is used not only for the introduction of new medicines but also as an instrument for checking the therapeutic effect of popular healing practices. On another level, this article discusses Alexander’s role as the author of a medical compendium; it suggests that by marking the cases of clinical testing with a set of recurrent expressions, Alexander leads his audience to reflect on his medical authority and personal contribution. PMID:25045178

  16. Technical experiences of implementing a wireless tracking and facial biometric verification system for a clinical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent; Lee, Jasper; Documet, Jorge; Guo, Bing; King, Nelson; Huang, H. K.

    2006-03-01

    By implementing a tracking and verification system, clinical facilities can effectively monitor workflow and heighten information security in today's growing demand towards digital imaging informatics. This paper presents the technical design and implementation experiences encountered during the development of a Location Tracking and Verification System (LTVS) for a clinical environment. LTVS integrates facial biometrics with wireless tracking so that administrators can manage and monitor patient and staff through a web-based application. Implementation challenges fall into three main areas: 1) Development and Integration, 2) Calibration and Optimization of Wi-Fi Tracking System, and 3) Clinical Implementation. An initial prototype LTVS has been implemented within USC's Healthcare Consultation Center II Outpatient Facility, which currently has a fully digital imaging department environment with integrated HIS/RIS/PACS/VR (Voice Recognition).

  17. Animal experiments scrutinised: systematic reviews demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive "Scopus" biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. Of 20 reviews examining clinical utility, authors concluded that the animal models were substantially consistent with or useful in advancing clinical outcomes in only two cases, and the conclusion in one case was contentious. Included were reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments - the species most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of experimental outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which a majority of animal experiments were of good quality. While the latter problems might be minimised with concerted effort, given their widespread nature, the interspecies limitations are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Yet, unlike non-animal models, animal models are not normally subjected to formal scientific validation. Instead of simply assuming they are predictive of human outcomes, the consistent application of formal validation studies to all test models is clearly warranted, regardless of their

  18. The effect of alternative clinical teaching experience on preservice science teachers' self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klett, Mitchell Dean

    The purpose of this study was to compare different methods of alternative clinical experience; family science nights and Saturday science (authentic teaching) against micro-teaching (peer teaching) in terms of self-efficacy in science teaching and teaching self-efficacy. The independent variable, or cause, is teaching experiences (clinical vs. peer teaching); the dependent variable, or effect, is two levels of self-efficacy. This study was conducted at the University of Idaho's main campus in Moscow and extension campus in Coeur d'Alene. Four sections of science methods were exposed to the same science methods curriculum and will have opportunities to teach. However, each of the four sections were exposed to different levels or types of clinical experience. One section of preservice teachers worked with students in a Saturday science program. Another section worked with students during family science nights. The third worked with children at both the Saturday science program and family science nights. The last section did not have a clinical experience with children, instead they taught in their peer groups and acted as a control group. A pre-test was given at the beginning of the semester to measure their content knowledge, teaching self-efficacy and self-efficacy in science teaching. A post-test was given at the end of the semester to see if there was any change in self-efficacy or science teaching self-efficacy. Throughout the semester participants kept journals about their experiences and were interviewed after their alternative clinical teaching experiences. These responses were categorized into three groups; gains in efficacy, no change in efficacy, and drop in efficacy. There was a rise in teaching efficacy for all groups. The mean scores for personal teaching efficacy dropped for the Monday-Wednesday and Tuesday-Thursday group while the both Coeur D'Alene groups remained nearly unchanged. There was no significant change in the overall means for science

  19. Clinical evaluation of music perception, appraisal and experience in cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Ward. R.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Gfeller, Kate; Crosson, Jillian; Driscoll, Virginia D.; Won, Jong Ho; Anderson, Elizabeth S.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objectives were to evaluate the relationships among music perception, appraisal, and experience in cochlear implant users in multiple clinical settings and to examine the viability of two assessments designed for clinical use. Design Background questionnaires (IMBQ) were administered by audiologists in 14 clinics in the United States and Canada. The CAMP included tests of pitch-direction discrimination, and melody and timbre recognition. The IMBQ queried users on prior musical involvement, music listening habits pre and post implant, and music appraisals. Study sample One-hundred forty-five users of Advanced Bionics and Cochlear Ltd cochlear implants. Results Performance on pitch direction discrimination, melody recognition, and timbre recognition tests were consistent with previous studies with smaller cohorts, as well as with more extensive protocols conducted in other centers. Relationships between perceptual accuracy and music enjoyment were weak, suggesting that perception and appraisal are relatively independent for CI users. Conclusions Perceptual abilities as measured by the CAMP had little to no relationship with music appraisals and little relationship with musical experience. The CAMP and IMBQ are feasible for routine clinical use, providing results consistent with previous thorough laboratory-based investigations. PMID:25177899

  20. Voices from a minority: experiences of chinese male nursing students in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Z C Y; Lui, C W; Cheung, K L; Hung, K K; Yu, K H; Kei, S H

    2013-07-01

    In Hong Kong, males constituted only about 10.2% of the nursing workforce in 2010. The learning experiences of male nursing students in Hong Kong during their clinical practicum have rarely been explored. If these students cannot maintain their psychological well-being and psychological health in formal education and clinical placements, then their physical health will also suffer. This ethnographic qualitative study gave male nursing students in Hong Kong a chance to voice their experiences during their clinical practicum. Selected through snowball sampling, 18 male nursing students from a local university participated in individual face-to-face semistructured interviews. The data were processed with content analysis. The findings indicated that male students not only received more support and understanding from male rather than female members of staff but endured a certain amount of oppression while working in female wards. According to the students' comments on nursing culture, the work climate of male nursing students could be improved by reorganizing the clinical placements and providing extra support to male nursing students. PMID:23339129

  1. A novel platform to simplify human observer performance experiments in clinical reading environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J.; Zanca, F.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Human observer performance experiments (HOPE) are frequently carried out in controlled environments in order to maximize the influence of the performance parameter under study. As an example, the amount of ambient reading variables can be kept as low as possible during HOPE. This is contrasting with the dynamic nature of a clinical reading environment that may therefore be suboptimal for the majority of the experiments. The aim of current work was to extend our previously developed software platform Sara² to cope with the influences of the reading environment on HOPE experiments. Generic modules for ROC, LROC, FROC, MAFC and visual grading analysis/image quality criteria (VGA/IQC) experiments were developed for 2D and 3D input images. Additional modules were included in the platform for finding unexpected interruptions due to clinical emergencies by means of idle time and for mouse trajectory monitoring. Also a generic approach towards the inclusion of reading questionnaires and a RFID enabled secured login system was added. Next, we created a sensor network consisting of off-the-shelf components which continuously monitor ambient reading conditions like: temperature, ambient lighting, humidity, ambient noise levels and observer reading distance. These measured parameters can be synchronized with the reading findings. Finally we included a link to incorporate the use of specialized 3rd party PACS viewers in our software framework. Using the proposed software and hardware solution, we could simplify the setup and the performing of HOPE in clinical reading environments and we can now properly control our reading experiments.

  2. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doot, Robert K; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E; Allberg, Keith C; Linden, Hannah M; Mankoff, David A; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging are a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing the feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed, and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  3. Learning experience of Chinese nursing students in an online clinical English course: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anson C Y; Wong, Nick; Wong, Thomas K S

    2015-02-01

    The low English proficiency of Chinese nurse/nursing students affects their performance when they work in English-speaking countries. However, limited resources are available to help them improve their workplace English, i.e. English used in a clinical setting. To this end, it is essential to look for an appropriate and effective means to assist them in improving their clinical English. The objective of this study is to evaluate the learning experience of Chinese nursing students after they have completed an online clinical English course. Focus group interview was used to explore their learning experience. 100 students in nursing programs at Tung Wah College were recruited. The inclusion criteria were: (1) currently enrolled in a nursing program; and (2) having clinical experience. Eligible participants self-registered for the online English course, and were required to complete the course within 3 months. After that, semi-structured interviews were conducted on students whom completed the whole and less than half of the course. One of the researchers joined each of the interviews as a facilitator and an observer. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Finally, 7 themes emerged from the interviews: technical issues, adequacy of support, time requirement, motivation, clarity of course instruction, course design, and relevancy of the course. Participants had varied opinions on the 2 themes: motivation and relevancy of the course. Overall, results of this study suggest that the online English course helped students improve their English. Factors which support their learning are interactive course design, no time constraint, and relevancy to their work/study. Factors which detracted from their learning are poor accessibility, poor technical and learning support and no peer support throughout the course. PMID:25497137

  4. My personal experiences at the BEST Medical Center: A day in the clinic-the morning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic is a gastroenterologist who trained at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center, after having completed her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (recently renamed the Harvey Provider School). She accepted a faculty position at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center. Dr. Lystic shares her experiences on a typical morning in gastroenterology clinic. Although her clinic start date was delayed by 2 months after becoming sick following a mandatory flu shot and having to complete more than 70 hours of compliance training modules, she is now familiar with the BEST system. Clinic scheduling priorities include ensuring that the staff can eat lunch together and depart at 5:00 pm. It is a continual challenge to find time to complete the electronic medical record after BEST changed from the SIMPLE (Succinct Input Making Patients Lives Electronic) system to LEGEND (referred to as Lengthy and Excessively Graded Evaluation and Nomenclature for Diagnosis by her colleagues). To maintain clinic punctuality, a compliance spreadsheet is e-mailed monthly to the Wait Time Committee. Their most recent corrective action plan for tardy physicians included placing egg timers on the doors and having nurses interrupt visits that exceed the allotted time. Administrative decisions have resulted in downsizing personnel. Patients are required to schedule their own tests and procedures and follow-up appointments-causing low patient satisfaction scores; however, the money saved lead to a large year-end bonus for the vice president of BEST Efficiency, who holds "providers" accountable for the poor patient experience. Although Dr. Ida Lystic and the gastroenterology clinic at "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, the majority of the anecdotes are based on actual events. PMID:27265082

  5. Developing more positive attitudes towards mental health nursing in undergraduate students: part 2--The impact of theory and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Happell, B; Robins, A; Gough, K

    2008-09-01

    Previous research examining the impact of education on nursing students' attitudes towards mental health nursing as a career has highlighted clinical experience as the primary influencing factor and generally has not considered the impact of theory. The current study compared a cohort of second-year and a cohort of third-year nursing students from the same university. Second-year students had received more theory and clinical experience than their counterparts. Questionnaires were distributed to the total population of students before commencement of, and after completion of clinical placement. This paper examines students' perceived preparedness for and satisfaction with clinical experience, attitudes towards people with mental illness, and attitudes towards mental health nursing as a career option following the completion of differing amounts of theory and clinical experience. The results demonstrate some statistically significant differences with increased amounts of theory and clinical experience in the second-year cohort being positively influential. The findings suggest that an increased component of theoretical and clinical experience in psychiatric/mental health nursing is likely to produce more positive attitudes towards people with mental illness and psychiatric/mental health nursing. However, little difference in perceived preparedness for and satisfaction with clinical experience was noted between the two cohorts. PMID:18768004

  6. Radiobiologically guided optimisation of the prescription dose and fractionation scheme in radiotherapy using BioSuite

    PubMed Central

    Uzan, J; Nahum, A E

    2012-01-01

    Objective Radiobiological models provide a means of evaluating treatment plans. Keeping in mind their inherent limitations, they can also be used prospectively to design new treatment strategies which maximise therapeutic ratio. We propose here a new method to customise fractionation and prescription dose. Methods To illustrate our new approach, two non-small cell lung cancer treatment plans and one prostate plan from our archive are analysed using the in-house software tool BioSuite. BioSuite computes normal tissue complication probability and tumour control probability using various radiobiological models and can suggest radiobiologically optimal prescription doses and fractionation schemes with limited toxicity. Results Dose–response curves present varied aspects depending on the nature of each case. The optimisation process suggests doses and fractionation schemes differing from the original ones. Patterns of optimisation depend on the degree of conformality, the behaviour of the normal tissue (i.e. “serial” or “parallel”), the volume of the tumour and the parameters of clonogen proliferation. Conclusion Individualising the prescription dose and number of fractions with the help of BioSuite results in improved therapeutic ratios as evaluated by radiobiological models. PMID:22457318

  7. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  8. Fluctuations in energy loss and their implications for dosimetry and radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Steigerwalt, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Serious consideration of the physics of energy deposition indicates that a fundamental change in the interpretation of absorbed dose is required at least for considerations of effects in biological systems. In addition, theoretical approaches to radiobiology and microdosimetry seem to require statistical considerations incorporating frequency distributions of the magnitude of the event sizes within the volume of interest.

  9. Haemophilia in a real-world setting: the value of clinical experience in data collection.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Gerry; Iorio, Alfonso; Jokela, Vuokko; Juusola, Kristian; Lassila, Riitta

    2016-02-01

    At the 8th Annual Congress of the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) held in Helsinki, Finland, in February 2015, Pfizer sponsored a satellite symposium entitled: 'Haemophilia in a real-world setting: The value of clinical experience in data collection' Co-chaired by Riitta Lassila (Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland) and Gerry Dolan (Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK); the symposium provided an opportunity to explore the practical value of real-world data in informing clinical decision-making. Gerry Dolan provided an introduction to the symposium by describing what is meant by real-world data (RWD), stressing the role RWD can play in optimising patient outcomes in haemophilia and highlighting the responsibility of all stakeholders to collaborate in continuous data collection. Kristian Juusola (Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland) then provided personal experience as a haemophilia nurse around patient views on adherence to treatment regimes, and how collecting insights into real-world use of treatment can shape approaches to improving adherence. The importance of elucidating pharmacokinetic parameters in a real-world setting was then explored by Vuokko Jokela (Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland). Finally, Alfonso Iorio (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) highlighted the importance of quality data collection in translating clinical reality into scientific advances. PMID:26809546

  10. Effect of patient experience on the results of automated perimetry in clinically stable glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Werner, E B; Adelson, A; Krupin, T

    1988-06-01

    The first four automated visual field examinations of 20 patients with clinically stable chronic open-angle glaucoma who had previously undergone manual perimetry were studied for the presence of a learning effect on mean sensitivity, number of disturbed test locations, total loss, and short-term fluctuation. A learning effect, if present, would manifest itself as an improvement in the visual field as patients become more experienced with the test. There was no apparent effect of patient experience on the mean sensitivity, total loss, or the number of disturbed test locations. There was a significant (P less than 0.0001) decrease in short-term fluctuation as measured by the root mean square between the first and second visual field examinations. These results indicate that a learning effect did not play an important role in the clinical interpretation of automated perimetry in patients with glaucoma who have previous experience with manual perimetry. In most cases, it was not necessary to obtain more than one "baseline" examination unless a patient demonstrated unusually high short-term fluctuation or had visual field defects inconsistent with the rest of the clinical examination. PMID:3211477

  11. Preliminary experience with small animal SPECT imaging on clinical gamma cameras.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, P; Silva-Rodríguez, J; Herranz, M; Ruibal, A

    2014-01-01

    The traditional lack of techniques suitable for in vivo imaging has induced a great interest in molecular imaging for preclinical research. Nevertheless, its use spreads slowly due to the difficulties in justifying the high cost of the current dedicated preclinical scanners. An alternative for lowering the costs is to repurpose old clinical gamma cameras to be used for preclinical imaging. In this paper we assess the performance of a portable device, that is, working coupled to a single-head clinical gamma camera, and we present our preliminary experience in several small animal applications. Our findings, based on phantom experiments and animal studies, provided an image quality, in terms of contrast-noise trade-off, comparable to dedicated preclinical pinhole-based scanners. We feel that our portable device offers an opportunity for recycling the widespread availability of clinical gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments to be used in small animal SPECT imaging and we hope that it can contribute to spreading the use of preclinical imaging within institutions on tight budgets. PMID:24963478

  12. Does reflective web-based discussion strengthen nursing students' learning experiences during clinical training?

    PubMed

    Mettiäinen, Sari; Vähämaa, Kristiina

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this research was to study how a web-based discussion forum can be used as a supervision tool during nursing students' clinical training. The study emphasises peer support and its importance for the students. The empirical research was carried out at a Finnish university of applied sciences. 25 nursing students took part in web-based discussion during their eight-week clinical training period. All in all, 395 comments were submitted. The material was analysed by using categorisation and a thematic analysis process. Finally, the results were reported using a modified Salmon's (2002) 5-stage model of Teaching and Learning On-line and Mezirow's (1981) levels of reflection. The students motivated each other by sharing their feelings and experiences. They noticed the value of peer support and started to learn from each other as well. By reflecting on their experiences, the students progressed in their learning process and at the same time advanced their reflective thinking process. This combination of theoretical knowledge and practice, based on the students' needs and interests, could lead to a deeper understanding which could also result in better clinical skills. This method offers the lecturers the possibility to support and follow the professional growth process in a new evidence-based manner. PMID:23116619

  13. Clinical and Histopathological Diagnosis of Glomus Tumor: An Institutional Experience of 138 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mravic, Marco; LaChaud, Gregory; Nguyen, Alan; Scott, Michelle A.; Dry, Sarah M.; James, Aaron W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glomus tumors are relatively uncommon subcentimeteric benign perivascular neoplasms usually located on the fingers. With their blue-red color and common subungual location, they are commonly confused for vascular or melanocytic lesions. To date there is no comprehensive review of an institutional experience with glomus tumors. Methods A 14-year retrospective review of all cases within University of California, Los Angeles, with either a clinical or pathological diagnosis of glomus tumor was performed. Data obtained included demographic information, tumor description, pathological diagnoses, immunohistochemical studies, radiographic and treatment information, and clinical course. Rates of concordance between clinical and pathological diagnoses and an evaluation of overlap with other entities were assessed. Results Clinical diagnosis of glomus tumor showed concordance with a histopathological diagnosis (45.4% of cases). The most common alternate clinical diagnoses included lipoma, cyst, or angioma. A pathological diagnosis of glomus tumor was most common in the fourth to seventh decades of life. The most common presentation was a subcentimeter lesion on the digit. Deep-seated tumors had a strikingly increased risk for malignancy (33%). Radiological studies were not relied on frequently (18.2% of cases). Immunohistochemical analysis showed diffuse αSMA and MSA expression in nearly all cases (99% and 95%, respectively), with focal to diffuse CD34 immunostaining in 32% of cases. Discussion Our study illustrates trends in the clinical versus pathologic diagnoses of glomus tumor, common competing diagnoses, a difference in demographics than is commonly reported (older age groups most commonly affected), and important differences in the use adjunctive diagnostic tools including radiology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:25614464

  14. Human Brucellosis in Macedonia – 10 Years of Clinical Experience in Endemic Region

    PubMed Central

    Bosilkovski, Mile; Krteva, Ljiljana; Dimzova, Marija; Vidinic, Ivan; Sopova, Zaklina; Spasovska, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Aim To present our 10-year clinical experience with brucellosis patients at the University Clinic for Infectious Diseases and Febrile Conditions in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. Methods A total of 550 patients with brucellosis treated between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively assessed for their demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics and outcomes. Results Of the 550 patients, 395 (72%) were male. The median age was 34.5 years (range, 1-82). Direct contact with infected animals was recorded in 333 (61%) patients and positive family history in 310 (56%). The most frequently seen symptoms were arthralgia (438, 80%), fever (419, 76%), and sweating (394, 72%). The most common signs were fever and hepatomegaly, which were verified in 357 (65%) and 273 (50%) patients, respectively. Focal brucellosis was found in 362 patients (66%) and osteoarticular in 299 (54%). Therapeutic failures were registered in 37 (6.7%) patients. Of the 453 (82%) patients who completed a follow-up period of at least 6 months, relapses occurred in 60 (13%). Conclusion Due to non-specific clinical manifestation and laboratory parameters, brucellosis should be considered one of the differential diagnoses of any patient suffering from obscure involvement of various organs in a brucellosis-endemic region. High percentage of relapses and therapeutic failures in spite of the use of currently recommended therapeutic regimens indicates the seriousness of this zoonosis and the need to control it. PMID:20718086

  15. Does experience in general practice influence the clinical thinking of foundation trainees?

    PubMed

    Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha; Wilson, Sally; Odbert, Reg; Lyon-Maris, Johnny; Leach, Camilla

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to capture and identify changes in clinical thinking amongst foundation trainees after a four-month attachment in general practice, and to develop a means of analysing the data collected to inform understanding about how clinical thinking develops and changes for a trainee - the learner - in the context of clinical experience. We use the term 'clinical thinking' consistently throughout our paper to refer to the trainees' general thinking about a case, and do so in the same way as other academics. Through the innovative use of Mind Maps, we have sought to demonstrate whether there was a significant change in the themes and key features contained in maps drawn by foundation year 2 trainees before and after an attachment in general practice, and to locate the nature of the change if present. Being able to identify such change is potentially valuable as it can assist in revealing a trainee's learning needs and shape future learning. PMID:25693153

  16. The 10-year experience of an academically affiliated occupational and environmental medicine clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstock, L; Daniell, W; Barnhart, S; Stover, B; Castorina, J; Mason, S E; Heyer, N J; Hubbard, R; Kaufman, J D; Brodkin, C A

    1992-01-01

    Occupational and environmental diseases are underrecognized. Among the barriers to the successful diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these conditions are inadequate consultative and information resources. We describe the 10-year clinical and training experiences of an academically affiliated referral center that has as its primary goal the identification of work-related and other environmental diseases. The University of Washington Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program has evaluated 6,048 patients in its diagnostic and screening clinics. Among the 2,841 seen in the diagnostic clinics, 1,553 (55%) had a work-related condition. The most prevalent diagnoses included asbestos-related lung disease (n = 603), toxic encephalopathy (n = 160), asthma (n = 119), other specific respiratory conditions (n = 197), carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 86), and dermatitis (n = 82). The clinics serve as a training site for fellows in the specialty training program, primary care internal medicine residents, residents from other medical specialties, and students in industrial hygiene, toxicology, and occupational health nursing. The program serves two additional important functions: providing consultative services to community physicians and training specialists and other physicians in this underserved area of medicine. PMID:1462536

  17. Experience inheritance from famous specialists based on real-world clinical research paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanli; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Runshun; Liu, Baoyan; Zhou, Xuezhong; Zhou, Xiaji; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yufeng; Xue, Yanxing; Xu, Lili

    2014-09-01

    The current modes of experience inheritance from famous specialists in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) include master and disciple, literature review, clinical-epidemiology-based clinical research observation, and analysis and data mining via computer and database technologies. Each mode has its advantages and disadvantages. However, a scientific and instructive experience inheritance mode has not been developed. The advent of the big data era as well as the formation and practice accumulation of the TCM clinical research paradigm in the real world have provided new perspectives, techniques, and methods for inheriting experience from famous TCM specialists. Through continuous exploration and practice, the research group proposes the innovation research mode based on the real-world TCM clinical research paradigm, which involves the inheritance and innovation of the existing modes. This mode is formulated in line with its own development regularity of TCM and is expected to become the main mode of experience inheritance in the clinical field. PMID:25159993

  18. Effects of Anxiety on Novice Genetic Counseling Students' Experience of Supervised Clinical Rotations.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Ian M; McCarthy Veach, Pat; Grier, Janelle E; Meister, Derek J; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2016-08-01

    Supervised clinical experiences with patients comprise a critical component of genetic counseling student education. Previous research has found genetic counseling students tend to be more anxiety prone than the general population, and anxiety related to supervision has been found in genetic counseling and related fields. The present study investigated how anxiety affects the experience of supervision for genetic counseling students. Second year genetic counseling students were invited to participate through email invitations distributed via training directors of the 33 programs accredited at the time of the study by the American Board of Genetic Counseling. An initial online survey contained the trait scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory to estimate anxiety proneness in this population and an invitation to participate in a 45-minute semi-structured phone interview focusing on students' experiences of supervision during their clinical rotations. High and low trait anxiety groups were created using STAI scores, and the groups' interview responses were compared using consensual qualitative research methodology (CQR; Hill 2012). The high anxiety group was more likely to describe problematic supervisory relationships, appreciate the supervisor's ability to help them when they get stuck in sessions, and feel their anxiety had a negative effect on their performance in general and in supervision. Common themes included supervisors' balancing support and guidance, the importance of feedback, ego-centric responses, and supervisors as focal points. The results of the present study are largely consistent with current literature. Further research findings and research, practice, and training recommendations are provided. PMID:27098419

  19. Psychotic experiences as indicators of suicidal ideation in a non-clinical college sample.

    PubMed

    DeVylder, Jordan E; Thompson, Elizabeth; Reeves, Gloria; Schiffman, Jason

    2015-04-30

    Suicide is a leading cause of preventable death. Epidemiological studies have shown strong associations between sub-threshold psychotic experiences and risk for suicidal ideation and behavior. Screens designed to assess psychotic experiences may have clinical utility in improving suicide prevention efforts. In the current study, we hypothesized that the Prodromal Questionnaire-Brief (PQ-B) would reliably distinguish levels of suicidal ideation within a sample of college students (n=376). As predicted, PQ-B scores varied significantly across levels of suicidal ideation, both when treated as a raw count of sub-threshold psychotic experiences and when taking into account subjective distress associated with those symptoms. In addition, we explored the feasibility of developing a short screen based on the most discriminating items, finding that a six-item version of the PQ-B yielded higher accuracy for detecting elevated suicidal ideation over the full measure. The PQ-B has the potential for clinical utility in detecting groups that might be at increased risk for suicidal ideation. PMID:25746171

  20. Reflective Prompts to Guide Termination of the Psychiatric Clinical Student Nursing Experience.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-04-01

    The average length of stay on psychiatric inpatient units has decreased in the past 40 years from 24.9 to 7.2 days. Inpatient psychiatric nurses are challenged to meet the standards and scope of practice despite the changing circumstances of their work environment. The amount of time student nurses spend with a given patient has been affected by changes in acute psychiatric inpatient care and decreased length of stay; however, opportunities exist for effective termination of the nurse-client relationship. Facilitation of students' awareness and understanding of the dynamics inherent in the termination process is an important teaching task for psychiatric nursing clinical instructors. In the current article, a clinically focused learning activity using structured prompts to guide and promote psychiatric nursing students' experiences with the process of termination is described and teaching strategies are discussed. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(4), 38-43.]. PMID:27042927

  1. Clinical research for older adults in rural areas: the MINDED study experience.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Bertrand; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine; Demougeot, Laurent; Cluzan, Céline; Cesari, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing need to make clinical decisions based on valid and objective scientific evidence, the number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has increased over the last three decades. Nevertheless, evidence-based medicine has still limited applicability in older adults, because they are often excluded from clinical trials. Evidence-based medicine is even more challenging in rural areas, as its remote environment provides additional barriers. Nevertheless, given the high prevalence of older adults living in rural settings, research in this type of environment has become crucial. This can only be accomplished by considering the multiple additional challenges of these regions. In this paper, we examine potential environmental, procedural, and participants' barriers to the management of a RCT in a rural area. Possible solutions and suggestions are provided based on our experience-from the Multidomain Intervention to preveNt Disability in ElDers (MINDED) project. PMID:26891623

  2. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  3. Practical guide for implementing hybrid PET/MR clinical service: lessons learned from our experience.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nainesh; Friedman, Kent P; Shah, Shetal N; Chandarana, Hersh

    2015-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging, until recently, have been performed on separate PET and MR systems with varying temporal delay between the two acquisitions. The interpretation of these two separately acquired studies requires cognitive fusion by radiologists/nuclear medicine physicians or dedicated and challenging post-processing. Recent advances in hardware and software with introduction of hybrid PET/MR systems have made it possible to acquire the PET and MR images simultaneously or near simultaneously. This review article serves as a road-map for clinical implementation of hybrid PET/MR systems and briefly discusses hardware systems, the personnel needs, safety and quality issues, and reimbursement topics based on experience at NYU Langone Medical Center and Cleveland Clinic. PMID:25985966

  4. Practical guide for implementing hybrid PET/MR clinical service: lessons learned from our experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nainesh; Friedman, Kent P.; Shah, Shetal N.; Chandarana, Hersh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging, until recently, have been performed on separate PET and MR systems with varying temporal delay between the two acquisitions. The interpretation of these two separately acquired studies requires cognitive fusion by radiologists/nuclear medicine physicians or dedicated and challenging post-processing. Recent advances in hardware and software with introduction of hybrid PET/MR systems have made it possible to acquire the PET and MR images simultaneously or near simultaneously. This review article serves as a road-map for clinical implementation of hybrid PET/MR systems and briefly discusses hardware systems, the personnel needs, safety and quality issues, and reimbursement topics based on experience at NYU Langone Medical Center and Cleveland Clinic. PMID:25985966

  5. The Usefulness of Systematic Reviews of Animal Experiments for the Design of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rob B. M.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Avey, Marc T.; Stephens, Martin L.; Sena, Emily S.; Leenaars, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The question of how animal studies should be designed, conducted, and analyzed remains underexposed in societal debates on animal experimentation. This is not only a scientific but also a moral question. After all, if animal experiments are not appropriately designed, conducted, and analyzed, the results produced are unlikely to be reliable and the animals have in effect been wasted. In this article, we focus on one particular method to address this moral question, namely systematic reviews of previously performed animal experiments. We discuss how the design, conduct, and analysis of future (animal and human) experiments may be optimized through such systematic reviews. In particular, we illustrate how these reviews can help improve the methodological quality of animal experiments, make the choice of an animal model and the translation of animal data to the clinic more evidence-based, and implement the 3Rs. Moreover, we discuss which measures are being taken and which need to be taken in the future to ensure that systematic reviews will actually contribute to optimizing experimental design and thereby to meeting a necessary condition for making the use of animals in these experiments justified. PMID:25541545

  6. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C.; Pyakuryal, A; Narayanasamy, Ganesh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  7. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry of kidneys for treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Boubaker, Ariane; Buchegger, Franz; He Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) delivers high absorbed doses to kidneys and may lead to permanent nephropathy. Reliable dosimetry of kidneys is thus critical for safe and effective PRRT. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of planning PRRT based on 3D radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) in order to optimize both the amount of activity to administer and the fractionation scheme, while limiting the absorbed dose and the biological effective dose (BED) to the renal cortex. Methods: Planar and SPECT data were available for a patient examined with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide at 0.5 (planar only), 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection. Absorbed dose and BED distributions were calculated for common therapeutic radionuclides, i.e., {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, using the 3D-RD methodology. Dose-volume histograms were computed and mean absorbed doses to kidneys, renal cortices, and medullae were compared with results obtained using the MIRD schema (S-values) with the multiregion kidney dosimetry model. Two different treatment planning approaches based on (1) the fixed absorbed dose to the cortex and (2) the fixed BED to the cortex were then considered to optimize the activity to administer by varying the number of fractions. Results: Mean absorbed doses calculated with 3D-RD were in good agreement with those obtained with S-value-based SPECT dosimetry for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu. Nevertheless, for {sup 111}In, differences of 14% and 22% were found for the whole kidneys and the cortex, respectively. Moreover, the authors found that planar-based dosimetry systematically underestimates the absorbed dose in comparison with SPECT-based methods, up to 32%. Regarding the 3D-RD-based treatment planning using a fixed BED constraint to the renal cortex, the optimal number of fractions was found to be 3 or 4, depending on the radionuclide administered and the value of the fixed BED. Cumulative activities obtained using the proposed simulated

  8. Safety Overview of Postmarketing and Clinical Experience of Sodium Oxybate (Xyrem): Abuse, Misuse, Dependence, and Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. Grace; Swick, Todd J.; Carter, Lawrence P.; Thorpy, Michael J.; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study reviewed the cumulative postmarketing and clinical safety experience with sodium oxybate (Xyrem®), a treatment approved for cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy. Study objectives were to investigate the occurrence of abuse/misuse of sodium oxybate since first market introduction in 2002, classify cases using DSM-IV criteria for substance abuse and dependence, and describe specific characteristics of these cases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed postmarketing spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports from 15 countries for all cases containing reporting terminology related to abuse/misuse to determine its occurrence. All death cases independent of causality were reviewed to identify associated risk factors. Results: Approximately 26,000 patients worldwide received sodium oxybate from first market introduction in 2002 through March 2008. Of those 26,000 patients, 0.2% reported ≥ 1 of the events studied. These included 10 cases (0.039%) meeting DSM-IV abuse criteria, 4 cases (0.016%) meeting DSM-IV dependence criteria, 8 cases (0.031%, including 3 of the previous 4) with withdrawal symptoms reported after discontinuation of sodium oxybate, 2 confirmed cases (0.008%) of sodium oxybate–facilitated sexual assault, 8 cases (0.031%) of overdose with suicidal intent, 21 deaths (0.08%) in patients receiving sodium oxybate treatment with 1 death known to be related to sodium oxybate, and 3 cases (0.01%) of traffic accidents involving drivers taking sodium oxybate. During this period, approximately 600,000 bottles of sodium oxybate were distributed, and 5 incidents (0.0009%) of diversion were reported. Conclusion: Cumulative postmarketing and clinical experience indicates a very low risk of abuse/misuse of sodium oxybate. Citation: Wang YG; Swick TJ; Carter LP; Thorpy MJ; Benowitz NL. Safety overview of postmarketing and clinical experience of sodium oxybate (xyrem): abuse, misuse, dependence, and diversion. J Clin Sleep

  9. Drug administration in animal studies of cardiac arrest does not reflect human clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To date, there is no evidence showing a benefit from any advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) medication in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA), despite animal data to the contrary. One explanation may be a difference in the time to first drug administration. Our previous work has shown the mean time to first drug administration in clinical trials is 19.4 minutes. We hypothesized that the average time to drug administration in large animal experiments occurs earlier than in OOHCA clinical trials. Methods We conducted a literature review between 1990 and 2006 in MEDLINE using the following MeSH headings: swine, dogs, resuscitation, heart arrest, EMS, EMT, ambulance, ventricular fibrillation, drug therapy, epinephrine, vasopressin, amiodarone, lidocaine, magnesium, and sodium bicarbonate. We reviewed the abstracts of 331 studies and 197 full manuscripts. Exclusion criteria included: non-peer reviewed, all without primary animal data, and traumatic models. From these, we identified 119 papers that contained unique information on time to medication administration. The data are reported as mean, ranges, and 95% confidence intervals. Mean time to first drug administration in animal laboratory studies and clinical trials was compared with a t-test. Regression analysis was performed to determine if time to drug predicted ROSC. Results Mean time to first drug administration in 2378 animals was 9.5 minutes (range 3.0–28.0; 95% CI around mean 2.78, 16.22). This is less than the time reported in clinical trials (19.4 min, p<0.001). Time to drug predicted ROSC (Odds Ratio 0.844; 95% CI 0.738, 0.966). Conclusion Shorter drug delivery time in animal models of cardiac arrest may be one reason for the failure of animal studies to translate successfully into the clinical arena. PMID:17360097

  10. Evaluating Quality in Clinical Cancer Research: The M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James D.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Veazie, Mary L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Bruner, Janet M.; Chan, Ka Wah; Hittelman, Walter N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Karp, Daniel D.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lippman, Scott M.; Raad, Issam I.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Zwelling, Leonard A.; Markman, Maurie

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the unquestionable importance of clinically oriented research designed to test the safety and efficacy of new therapies in patients with malignant disease, there is limited information regarding strategies to evaluate the quality of such efforts at academic institutions. Methods To address this issue, a committee of senior faculty at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center established specific criteria by which investigators from all departments engaged in clinical research could be formally evaluated. Scoring criteria were established and revised based on the results of a pilot study. Beginning in January 2004, the committee evaluated all faculty involved in clinical research within 35 departments. Scores for individual faculty members were assigned on a scale of 1 (outstanding) to 5; a score of 3 was set as the standard for the institution. Each department also received a score. The results of the evaluation were shared with departmental chairs and the Chief Academic Officer. Results 392 faculty were evaluated. The median score was 3. Full professors more frequently received a score of 1, but all faculty ranks received scores of 4 and 5. As a group, tenure/tenure track faculty achieved superior scores compared to nontenure track faculty. Conclusions Based on our experience, we believe it is possible to conduct a rigorous consensus-based evaluation of the quality of clinical cancer research being conducted at an academic medical center. It is reasonable to suggest such evaluations can be used as a management tool and may lead to higher-quality clinical research. PMID:19571599

  11. Clinical Experience in Using the Water Jet in Burn Wound Debridement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.-Y.; Hwuang, J.-Y.; Chuang, S.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Water jets have been used in many areas of surgery. Recently a new surgical debridement device was launched onto the market - VersajetTM. VersajetTM is a unique hydrosurgical device that uses a precise jet of water to simultaneously hold, cut, and remove devitalized or necrotic tissue. This paper describes our experience with ten patients comparing Weck knives with the newly designed hydrosurgical device when debriding burn wounds. The patients' age ranged from 27 to 60 yr (average, 37.8 yr) and the burn wounds treated were between 3 and 7% total body surface area, involving the face, abdomen, and limbs. The hydrosurgical system is a very useful tool for irregular and complex burn wound debridement. This paper represents the first written clinical experience utilizing hydrosurgery in the burn wound management in an Eastern country. PMID:21991073

  12. The Subjective Experience of Youths at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Shelly; Birnbaum, Michael; Eilenberg, Mara; DeVylder, Jordan; Gill, Kelly; Schienle, Jessica; Azimov, Neyra; Lukens, Ellen P.; Davidson, Larry; Corcoran, Cheryl Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the experience of individuals across stages of schizophrenia is important for development of services to promote recovery. As yet, little is known about the experience of individuals who exhibit prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Audiotaped interviews were conducted with 27 participants at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (15 males; 12 females; mean age 21; ethnically diverse). Phenomenological qualitative research techniques of coding, consensus, and comparison were used. Results Emergent themes differed by gender. Themes for males were feeling abnormal or “broken”; focus on going “crazy”; fantasy and escapism; and alienation and despair, with a desire for relationships. Themes for females were psychotic illness in family members; personal trauma; struggle with intimate relationships; and career and personal development. Conclusions The finding of relative social engagement and future-orientation of females identified as at risk for psychosis is novel, and has implications for outreach and treatment. PMID:25179420

  13. Clinical case reviews in multiple sclerosis spasticity: experiences from around Europe.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jürgen; Amato, Maria P; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Lycke, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Spasticity is one of the main symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Epidemiological studies indicate that approximately two-thirds of MS patients experience spasticity and, in a relevant proportion of this group, spasticity is moderate to severe. Yet, spasticity remains largely undertreated. The most commonly used oral antispasticity agents (e.g., baclofen, tizanidine, gabapentin) generally do not reduce spasticity adequately at dosages that are well tolerated by patients. This review of MS spasticity cases from around Europe presents current knowledge of considerations for administration of a new agent (tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol-based nabiximols [Sativex®] oromucosal spray) for management of MS spasticity, with the aim of ensuring appropriate and optimal use for best outcomes. Assessment of the European clinical experience is intended to provide a better understanding of the prescribing regulations for MS spasticity treatments, facilitate identification of suitable candidate patients for Sativex and increase awareness of alternative management approaches for MS-related spasticity. PMID:24289846

  14. Participants’ Experiences of Being Debriefed to Placebo Allocation in a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Felicity L.; Jacobsen, Eric E.; Shaw, Jessica; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2013-01-01

    Participants in placebo-controlled clinical trials give informed consent to be randomized to verum or placebo. However, researchers rarely tell participants which treatment they actually received. We interviewed four participants in a trial of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome, before, during, and after they received a course of placebo treatments over six weeks. During the final interview, we informed participants that they had received a course of placebo treatments. We used an idiographic phenomenological approach based on the Sheffield School to describe each participant’s experiences of being blinded to and then debriefed to placebo allocation. Our participants’ experiences of blinding and debriefing were embodied, related to their goals in undertaking the study, and social (e.g., embedded in trusting and valued relationships with acupuncturists). We suggest ways in which debriefing to placebo allocation can be managed sensitively to facilitate positive outcomes for participants. PMID:22673094

  15. Beyond a diagnosis: The experience of depression among clinically-referred adolescents.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Nick; Parkinson, Sally; Holmes, Josh; Stapley, Emily; Eatough, Virginia; Target, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Policy-makers have identified an urgent need to improve our ability to detect and diagnose depression in adolescents. This study aims to explore the lived experience of depression in clinically referred adolescents. 77 adolescents, aged between 11 and 17 with moderate to severe depression, were interviewed as part of a randomised controlled trial, using the Expectations of Therapy Interview. Data were analysed qualitatively using framework analysis, with a focus on how the adolescents spoke about their depression. The study identified five themes: 1) Misery, despair and tears; 2) Anger and violence towards self and others; 3) A bleak view of everything; 4) Isolation and cutting off from the world; and 5) The impact on education. Researchers and policy-makers need to develop an understanding of depression grounded in the experiences of adolescents to improve detection and diagnosis of depression. PMID:26325067

  16. Estimation of a Self-Consistent Set of Radiobiological Parameters From Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A method to estimate intrinsic radiosensitivity (α), fractionation sensitivity (α/β), repopulation doubling time, number of clonogens, and kick-off time for accelerated repopulation of prostate cancer has been developed. Based on the generalized linear-quadratic model and without assuming the isoeffective hypothesis, the potential applications of the method were investigated using the clinical outcome of biochemical relapse-free survival recently reviewed in the literature. The strengths and limitations of the method, regarding the fitted parameters and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), are also discussed. Results: Our best estimate of α/β is 2.96 Gy (95% CI 2.41-3.53 Gy). The corresponding α value is 0.16 Gy{sup −1} (95% CI 0.14-0.18 Gy{sup −1}), which is compatible with a realistic number of clonogens: 6.5 × 10{sup 6} (95% CI 1.5 × 10{sup 6}-2.1 × 10{sup 7}). The estimated cell doubling time is 5.1 days (95% CI 4.2-7.2 days), very low if compared with that reported in the literature. This corresponds to the dose required to offset the repopulation occurring in 1 day of 0.52 Gy/d (95% CI 0.32-0.68 Gy/d). However, a long kick-off time of 31 days (95% CI 22-41 days) from the start of radiation therapy was found. Conclusion: The proposed analytic/graphic method has allowed the fitting of clinical data, providing a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer. With our analysis we confirm a low value for α/β with a correspondingly high value of intrinsic radiosensitivity, a realistic average number of clonogens, a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation, and a surprisingly fast repopulation that suggests the involvement of subpopulations of specifically tumorigenic stem cells during continuing radiation therapy.

  17. Patient perceptions of an art-making experience in an outpatient blood and marrow transplant clinic.

    PubMed

    Mische Lawson, L; Glennon, C; Amos, M; Newberry, T; Pearce, J; Salzman, S; Young, J

    2012-05-01

    This study explored blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) patients' perceptions of an art-making experience during BMT treatment. Participants including patients receiving BMT for a variety of cancers (10 men/10 women, aged 20-68) were offered a 1 hour tile-painting activity during treatment. Participants with cognitive impairment and respiratory precautions were excluded from the study. Researchers followed immune precaution protocols for the safety of participants. Data were collected through semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 20 participants to gather information about their perceptions of the art-making experience in a BMT clinic setting. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed. Researchers coded transcripts independently and discussed outcomes together to achieve agreement on themes. Twelve themes emerged from the data, with the three most prevalent themes being Occupying Time (20.5%), Creative Expression (13.5%), and Reactions to Tile Painting (13.5%). Other themes included Support (12.2%), Side Effects (7.3%), Other Activities Suggested by Patients (7%), BMT Treatment Process (6.2%), Shared Painting Experience (5.9%), Life Outlook (5.2%), BMT Life Changes (3.8%), Spirituality (3%) and Barriers (1.9%). Through analysis of these themes, researchers have identified this art-making experience as a diversional or meaningful way to spend time during treatment, a medium for creative expression, and a distraction from negative side effects of the BMT process. PMID:22150782

  18. Early practical experience and the social responsiveness of clinical education: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Sonia; Ypinazar, Valmae; Margolis, Stephen A; Scherpbier, Albert; Spencer, John; Dornan, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To find how early experience in clinical and community settings (“early experience”) affects medical education, and identify strengths and limitations of the available evidence. Design A systematic review rating, by consensus, the strength and importance of outcomes reported in the decade 1992-2001. Data sources Bibliographical databases and journals were searched for publications on the topic, reviewed under the auspices of the recently formed Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) collaboration. Selection of studies All empirical studies (verifiable, observational data) were included, whatever their design, method, or language of publication. Results Early experience was most commonly provided in community settings, aiming to recruit primary care practitioners for underserved populations. It increased the popularity of primary care residencies, albeit among self selected students. It fostered self awareness and empathic attitudes towards ill people, boosted students' confidence, motivated them, gave them satisfaction, and helped them develop a professional identity. By helping develop interpersonal skills, it made entering clerkships a less stressful experience. Early experience helped students learn about professional roles and responsibilities, healthcare systems, and health needs of a population. It made biomedical, behavioural, and social sciences more relevant and easier to learn. It motivated and rewarded teachers and patients and enriched curriculums. In some countries, junior students provided preventive health care directly to underserved populations. Conclusion Early experience helps medical students learn, helps them develop appropriate attitudes towards their studies and future practice, and orientates medical curriculums towards society's needs. Experimental evidence of its benefit is unlikely to be forthcoming and yet more medical schools are likely to provide it. Effort could usefully be concentrated on evaluating the methods and

  19. Experiences of using the Theoretical Domains Framework across diverse clinical environments: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Cameron J; Marshall, Andrea P; Chaves, Nadia J; Jankelowitz, Stacey K; Lin, Ivan B; Loy, Clement T; Rees, Gwyneth; Sakzewski, Leanne; Thomas, Susie; To, The-Phung; Wilkinson, Shelley A; Michie, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) is an integrative framework developed from a synthesis of psychological theories as a vehicle to help apply theoretical approaches to interventions aimed at behavior change. Purpose This study explores experiences of TDF use by professionals from multiple disciplines across diverse clinical settings. Methods Mixed methods were used to examine experiences, attitudes, and perspectives of health professionals in using the TDF in health care implementation projects. Individual interviews were conducted with ten health care professionals from six disciplines who used the TDF in implementation projects. Deductive content and thematic analysis were used. Results Three main themes and associated subthemes were identified including: 1) reasons for use of the TDF (increased confidence, broader perspective, and theoretical underpinnings); 2) challenges using the TDF (time and resources, operationalization of the TDF) and; 3) future use of the TDF. Conclusion The TDF provided a useful, flexible framework for a diverse group of health professionals working across different clinical settings for the assessment of barriers and targeting resources to influence behavior change for implementation projects. The development of practical tools and training or support is likely to aid the utility of TDF. PMID:25834455

  20. The disclosure of dyslexia in clinical practice: experiences of student nurses in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Morris, David K; Turnbull, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    Heightened awareness and increasingly sophisticated psychological tests have seen a dramatic rise in the numbers of people diagnosed with dyslexia. Accordingly, there is a reported increase in the numbers of students with dyslexia entering Higher Education (HE) in the United Kingdom (UK) [Singleton, C.H., Chair, 1999. Dyslexia in higher education: policy, provision and practice. Report of the national working party on dyslexia in higher education. University of Hull on behalf of the Higher Education Funding Councils of England and Scotland, Hull], [Higher Education Statistics Agency. HESA. Available from: (accessed 21.12.05)]. Studies researching the effects of dyslexia on the clinical practice of nurses are almost non-existent. This paper reports part of a UK study exploring the clinical experiences of student nurses with dyslexia. In depth interviewing of 18 adult branch student nurses revealed a range of difficulties encountered and a variety of coping mechanisms to manage these. Other than in exceptional circumstances there is no legal requirement to disclose a dyslexia diagnosis. The decision to conceal or disclose their dyslexia was particularly prominent and contentious for these participants. This related to the attitudes of co-workers, concerns for patient safety, expectations of support, confidentiality issues and potential discrimination. Dyslexia continues to attract an unwarranted stigma and can adversely affect the learning experience. The need for disability awareness training in the workplace and improved education/service partnerships to support these students is considered crucial. PMID:16624451

  1. Preliminary single center clinical experience of the use of a new implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J M; Roberts, P R; Allen, S; Kallok, M J

    1998-12-01

    We report a single center's preliminary clinical experience of the Sentinel (Angeion, Minneapolis, MN) implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), which employs novel technologies that offer the potential for significant reduction in ICD size. Thirty-three patients have received Sentinel ICDs with a mean follow-up of 450 (range 150-1023) days. Device shock therapy has been used to defibrillate/cardiovert 43 spontaneous episodes of malignant ventricular arrhythmia and 510 episodes of hemodynamically well tolerated ventricular arrhythmia have been pace-terminated (pace-termination failed in 6 episodes with subsequent delivery of appropriate shock therapy). There has been no arrhythmic death in this patient population. There have been 9 inappropriate shocks in 6 patients (in 2 patients for atrial fibrillation which had satisfied the algorithm detection criteria for high zone ventricular arrhythmia, in 3 for sinus tachycardia [rate greater than 180 beats per min] and in 1 due to device capacitor malfunction). Device replacement has been required for component malfunction in 3 patients. There have been no other major complications. Follow-up time to date is short and longterm device efficacy and performance remain unproven. However, our early clinical experience suggests that the innovations used to manufacture the Sentinel ICD have facilitated reduction in ICD size without compromising therapeutic efficacy. PMID:10027122

  2. Clinical Experiences of Korean Medicine Treatment against Urinary Bladder Cancer in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Taeyeol; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) is one of the most common cancers, with 1 out of every 26 men and 1 out of every 80 women worldwide developing the disease during their lifetime. Moreover, it is a disease that predominantly affects the elderly and is becoming a major health problem as the elderly population continues to rapidly increase. In spite of the rapid development of medical science, the 5-year survival rate has remained around 75% since the 1990s, and the FDA has approved no new drugs for UBC over the last 10 years. In addition, most patients experience frequent recurrence and poor quality of life after diagnosis. Therefore, in order to solve unmet needs by alternative methods, we present our clinical cases of UBC where we observed outstanding results including regression and recurrence prevention exclusively through Traditional Korean Medicine such as (1) herbal therapy, (2) acupuncture, (3) pharmacopuncture and needle-embedding therapy, (4) moxibustion, and (5) cupping therapy. From our experience, it appears that multimodal strategies for synergistic efficiency are more effective than single Korean Medicine treatment. We hope this will encourage investigation of the efficacy of Korean Medicine treatment in clinical trials for UBC patients. PMID:27190532

  3. Three clinical experiences with SNP array results consistent with parental incest: a narrative with lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Helm, Benjamin M; Langley, Katherine; Spangler, Brooke; Vergano, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays have the ability to reveal parental consanguinity which may or may not be known to healthcare providers. Consanguinity can have significant implications for the health of patients and for individual and family psychosocial well-being. These results often present ethical and legal dilemmas that can have important ramifications. Unexpected consanguinity can be confounding to healthcare professionals who may be unprepared to handle these results or to communicate them to families or other appropriate representatives. There are few published accounts of experiences with consanguinity and SNP arrays. In this paper we discuss three cases where molecular evidence of parental incest was identified by SNP microarray. We hope to further highlight consanguinity as a potential incidental finding, how the cases were handled by the clinical team, and what resources were found to be most helpful. This paper aims to contribute further to professional discourse on incidental findings with genomic technology and how they were addressed clinically. These experiences may provide some guidance on how others can prepare for these findings and help improve practice. As genetic and genomic testing is utilized more by non-genetics providers, we also hope to inform about the importance of engaging with geneticists and genetic counselors when addressing these findings. PMID:24222483

  4. Insights on GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) from the patient's perspective: GRACE participant survey.

    PubMed

    Squires, Kathleen; Feinberg, Judith; Bridge, Dawn Averitt; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Seyedkazemi, Setareh; Dayaram, Yaswant K; Mrus, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The Gender, Race And Clinical Experience (GRACE) study was conducted between October 2006 and December 2008 to evaluate sex- and race-based differences in outcomes after treatment with a darunavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral regimen. Between June 2010 and June 2011, former participants of the GRACE trial at participating sites were asked to complete a 40-item questionnaire as part of the GRACE Participant Survey study, with a primary objective of assessing patients' characteristics, experiences, and opinions about participation in GRACE. Of 243 potential survey respondents, 151 (62%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of the overall GRACE population and were predominantly female (64%); fewer were black, and more reported recreational drug use compared with nonrespondents (55% vs. 62% and 17% vs. 10%, respectively). Access to treatment (41%) and too many blood draws (26%) were reported as the best and worst part of GRACE, respectively. Support from study site staff was reported as the most important factor in completing the study (47%). Factors associated with nonadherence, study discontinuation, and poor virologic response in univariate analyses were being the primary caregiver for children, unemployment, and transportation difficulties, respectively. Patients with these characteristics may be at risk of poor study outcomes and may benefit from additional adherence and retention strategies in future studies and routine clinical care. PMID:23701200

  5. Running a postmortem service--a business case and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marta C; Whitby, Elspeth; Fink, Michelle A; Collett, Jacquelene M; Offiah, Amaka C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the postmortem examination is to offer answers to explain the cause and manner of death. In the case of perinatal, infant and paediatric postmortem examinations, the goal is to identify unsuspected associated features, to describe pathogenic mechanisms and new conditions, and to evaluate the clinical management and diagnosis. Additionally, the postmortem examination is useful to counsel families regarding the probability of recurrence in future pregnancies and to inform family planning. Worldwide the rate of paediatric autopsy examinations has significantly declined during the last few decades. Religious objections to postmortem dissection and organ retention scandals in the United Kingdom provided some of the impetus for a search for non-invasive alternatives to the traditional autopsy; however, until recently, imaging studies remained an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, the traditional autopsy. In 2012, Sheffield Children's Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust set up the service provision of minimally invasive fetal, perinatal and neonatal autopsy, while a postmortem imaging service has been running in Melbourne, Australia, since 2008. Here we summarise the essentials of a business case and practical British and Australian experiences in terms of the pathological and radiologic aspects of setting up a minimally invasive clinical service in the United Kingdom and of developing a clinical postmortem imaging service as a complementary tool to the traditional autopsy in Australia. PMID:25828353

  6. Who benefits most from THC:CBD spray? Learning from clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) represent a diverse and heterogeneous population varying in terms of disease type, its severity and variable progression/time-course, and with regard to the wide range of presenting symptoms. Consequently, detailed experience with individual patients is important to provide examples of therapy to specific patient types. In this article, real-life data from clinical practice showing specific aspects relating to use of 9-delta-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol (THC:CBD) oromucosal spray (Sativex®) in patients with moderate to severe spasticity resistant to usual therapy will be presented. Three common clinical scenarios will be considered: MS patients with resistance to usual spasticity therapies; patients with impairment in MS spasticity symptoms; MS patients with relevant impairment in quality of life/activities of daily living (QoL/ADL). These case reports highlight the diverse nature of the MS spasticity population and they show the possible usefulness of THC:CBD oromucosal spray in individual patients with moderate to severe spasticity resistant to existing therapies, within the frame of use approved after large clinical trial results. Perhaps the most important finding is the possibility of obtaining relevant improvements in QoL/ADL in some patients with resistant MS spasticity, allowing them to engage back in physical and social activities. PMID:24457847

  7. Special operator level clinical ultrasound: an experience in application and training.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrew R; Vasios, William N; Hubler, David A; Benson, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, ultrasound has evolved from a radiology and subspecialist-centric instrument, to a common tool for bedside testing in a variety of specialties. The SOF community is now recognizing the relevancy of training medics to employ this technology for multiple clinical indications in the austere operating environment. In the Fall 2008 issue of Journal of Special Operations Medicine two of the authors described the concept of training SOF medics to employ portable ultrasound as a diagnostic aid. After over two years of concerted effort, the authors trained 29 out of 40 medics of a Special Forces battalion. Retrospective analysis of the quality assurance data for ultrasound studies conducted placed the 109 studies into six categories, allowing inference of trends in clinical indication for ultrasound exams as determined by the SOF medic-ultrasonographer. The resulting distribution suggests that indications for fractures and superficial applications are as prevalent as those for focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) and pneumothorax exams. This analysis focuses on Special Operator Level Clinical Ultrasound (SOLCUS), an ultrasound training curriculum specifically for SOF medics, and helps appropriately prioritize its objectives. Despite the success of this experience, there are several issues requiring resolution before being able to integrate ultrasound training and fielding into the SOF medical armamentarium. PMID:20936599

  8. Clinical analysis on anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis cases: Chinese experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Fan, Chunqiu; Wu, Jian; Ye, Jing; Zhan, Shuqin; Song, Haiqing; Liu, Aihua; Su, Yingying; Jia, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of autoimmune encephalitis which was just identified, the clinical manifestations of the anti-N methyl-D aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis are complex, diverse and in severe condition. The immunotherapy has shown good effect on the treatment but in generally, the diagnosis and treatment are still in the experience accumulation stage. More clinical research in different population is necessary, for example, in the Chinese population. This study was completed in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients who were diagnosed in Beijing Xuan Wu Hospital (China) during the time from 2011 to 2013. Total 33 patients were involved with the average age of 29.7 years old when the diseases were onset. With diverse clinical manifestations, most patients displayed positively by NMDAR antibody test and 63.6% of them were associated with elevated CSF-lgA. Patients also showed abnormal MRI and EEG. Only three patients had teratomas. With hormone therapy, gamma globulin treatment or plasma exchange, more than three quarters of patients fully recovered and the others had moderate symptoms. Based on our results, we suggest that NMDAR antibody test would be helpful to make a timely diagnosis and to administer immunotherapy. PMID:26770517

  9. Experimental and clinical employment of end-to-side coaptation: our experience.

    PubMed

    Tos, P; Geuna, S; Papalia, I; Conforti, L G; Artiaco, S; Battiston, B

    2011-01-01

    The last 15 years have seen a growing interest regarding a technique for nerve repair named end-to-side coaptation. Since 2000, we have carried out experimental studies on end-to-side nerve repair as well as employed this technique to a series of selected clinical cases. Here we report on the results of this experience.For experimental studies, we have used the model represented by median nerve repair by end-to-side coaptation either on the ulnar (agonistic) or the radial (antagonistic) nerve. For time course assessment of median nerve functional recovery we used the grasping test, a test which permits to assess voluntary control of muscle function. Repaired nerves were processed for resin embedding to allow nerve fibre stereology and electron microscopy. Results showed that, in either experimental group, end-to-side-repaired median nerves were repopulated by axons regenerating from ulnar and radial donor nerves, respectively. Moreover, contrary to previously published data, our results showed that voluntary motor control of the muscles innervated by the median nerve was progressively recovered also when the antagonistic radial nerve was the donor nerve.As regards our clinical experience, results were not so positive. We have treated by end-to-side coaptation patients with both sensory (n = 7, collateral digital nerves) and mixed (n = 8, plexus level) nerve lesions. Results were good, as in other series, in sensory nerves whilst they were very difficult to investigate in mixed nerves at the plexus level.Take together, these results suggest that clinical employment of end-to-side coaptation should still be considered at the moment as the ultima ratio in cases in which no other repair technique can be attempted. Yet, it is clear that more basic research is needed to explain the reasons for the different results between laboratory animal and humans and, especially, to find out how to ameliorate the outcome of end-to-side nerve repair by adequate treatment and

  10. Critical periods after stroke study: translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dromerick, Alexander W.; Edwardson, Matthew A.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Giannetti, Margot L.; Barth, Jessica; Brady, Kathaleen P.; Chan, Evan; Tan, Ming T.; Tamboli, Irfan; Chia, Ruth; Orquiza, Michael; Padilla, Robert M.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Mapstone, Mark E.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Federoff, Howard J.; Newport, Elissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seven hundred ninety-five thousand Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS) is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 h of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2–3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 1 year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial. PMID

  11. Patients' experiences of dental implant placement for treatment of partial edentulism in a student clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Seferli, Jotta; Michelin, Mattias; Klinge, Björn; Wettergren, Lena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' experiences of oral implant surgery when performed in a student clinic setting and the potential impact on patients'daily life. Patient selection was carried out during a round, to which undergraduate students in semester 9 and 10 could bring patients that they considered eligible for one or two implants. Partial edentulous patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria for implant installation at the student's clinic were consequently enrolled to implant surgery with either Astra Tech or 3i implants. The same surgeon accomplished all implant installations and the students were involved in the treatment, initially by assisting during the surgery and subsequently by performing the prosthetic restoration. After the surgery, a study-specific questionnaire was sent to patients for evaluation of discomfort, pain during the surgical procedure and postoperative symptoms. Thirty-six patients were included in the study, 30 patients answered the questionnaire (response rate 83%). When retrospectively assessed, more than half of the patients (60%) perceived discomfort in the course of the implant surgery and 29% reported pain during the surgical procedure. Impact on daily living and postoperative symptoms were rarely reported (most common were pain, swelling and difficulties with chewing) and had a short duration when they occurred. Based on the results of this study conducted at a student's clinic, the impact of implant surgery on daily living appears to be small. However, it is noteworthy that the perception of discomfort and pain during the surgical procedure was frequently reported. Continued research is recommended to expose the patient's experiences of implant surgery in an educational context as well as in general dental practice. PMID:25102718

  12. Evaluation of the medical diagnostic imaging support system based on 2 years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Smith, D V; Smith, S; Bender, G N; Carter, J R; Kim, Y; Cawthon, M A; Leckie, R G; Weiser, J C; Romlein, J; Goeringer, F

    1995-05-01

    The Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support (MDIS) system at Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) has been operational in a phased approach since March 1992. Since then, nearly all image acquisition has been digital with progressively increasing primary softcopy diagnosis used. More than 375,000 computed radiography (CR) images as well as other modality images have been archived. Considerable experience in installation and implementation phasing has been gained. The location and ergonomic aspects of equipment placement were refined with time. The original clinical scenario was insufficiently detailed and additions were made to facilitate smoother and more complete transition toward a filmless environment. The MDIS system effectiveness and performance have been good in terms of operational workload throughout, background operations, and reliability. The important areas regarding reliability are image acquisition, output, display, database operations, storage, and the local area network. Fail-safe strategies have been continually improved to maintain continuous clinical image availability during the times when the MDIS system or components malfunction. Many invaluable lessons have been learned for effective quality assurance in a hospital-wide picture archiving and communication system. These issues include training, operational quality control, practical aspects of CR image quality, and increased timeliness in the generation and distribution of radiographic reports. Clinical acceptability has been a continuous process as each phase has been implemented. Clinical physicians quickly used the workstations soon after the start of MDIS at MAMC. The major advantage for clinicians has been the amount of time saved when retrieving multimodality images for review. On the other hand, the radiologists have been slower in their acceptance of the workstation for routine use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7612705

  13. SU-E-T-344: Validation and Clinical Experience of Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo Algorithm (EMC)

    SciTech Connect

    Pokharel, S; Rana, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to validate Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo (Algorithm for routine clinical uses. Methods: The PTW inhomogeneity phantom (T40037) with different combination of heterogeneous slabs has been CT-scanned with Philips Brilliance 16 slice scanner. The phantom contains blocks of Rando Alderson materials mimicking lung, Polystyrene (Tissue), PTFE (Bone) and PMAA. The phantom has 30×30×2.5 cm base plate with 2cm recesses to insert inhomogeneity. The detector systems used in this study are diode, tlds and Gafchromic EBT2 films. The diode and tlds were included in CT scans. The CT sets are transferred to Eclipse treatment planning system. Several plans have been created with Eclipse Monte Carlo (EMC) algorithm 11.0.21. Measurements have been carried out in Varian TrueBeam machine for energy from 6–22mev. Results: The measured and calculated doses agreed very well for tissue like media. The agreement was reasonably okay for the presence of lung inhomogeneity. The point dose agreement was within 3.5% and Gamma passing rate at 3%/3mm was greater than 93% except for 6Mev(85%). The disagreement can reach as high as 10% in the presence of bone inhomogeneity. This is due to eclipse reporting dose to the medium as opposed to the dose to the water as in conventional calculation engines. Conclusion: Care must be taken when using Varian Eclipse EMC algorithm for dose calculation for routine clinical uses. The algorithm dose not report dose to water in which most of the clinical experiences are based on rather it just reports dose to medium directly. In the presence of inhomogeneity such as bone, the dose discrepancy can be as high as 10% or even more depending on the location of normalization point or volume. As Radiation oncology as an empirical science, care must be taken before using EMC reported monitor units for clinical uses.

  14. The importance of clinical experience for mental health nursing - part 2: relationships between undergraduate nursing students' attitudes, preparedness, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2008-10-01

    Clinical experience is consistently emphasized in research findings as the primary influence in encouraging more positive attitudes to mental health nursing. The available research, however, presents two major limitations. First, it does not measure the specific factors that might contribute to a positive clinical experience. Second, it does not consider the relationship between clinical experience and attitudes towards people experiencing a mental illness or towards mental health nursing. This is the second of a two-part paper presenting findings from a statewide survey of undergraduate nursing students in Victoria. A pre-/post-test design was used to measure the impact of clinical experience on the following subscales: (i) attitudes towards people experiencing a mental illness; (ii) attitudes toward mental health nursing; and (iii) preparedness for mental health practice. Subscale (iv) satisfaction with clinical experience was also measured in the post-test phase. The findings demonstrated an improvement on all three subscales in the post-test phase and a high level of satisfaction with clinical experience. Furthermore, a relationship between all four subscales was evident. PMID:18789043

  15. Nurse Practitioners' Knowledge, Experience, and Intention to Use Health Literacy Strategies in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cafiero, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Nurse practitioners' (NPs) knowledge, experience, and intention to use health literacy strategies in practice were investigated using the Theory of Planned Behavior as the theoretical framework. NPs who work in outpatient settings were recruited at a national NP conference. Participants were administered 3 self-report instruments: Health Literacy Knowledge and Experience Survey, Parts I and II; and the Health Literacy Strategies Behavioral Intention Questionnaire. Overall knowledge of health literacy and health literacy strategies was found to be low. Screening patients for low health literacy and evaluating patient education materials were found to be areas of knowledge deficit. Most NP participants used written patient education materials with alternate formats for patient education, such as audiotapes, videotapes, or computer software rarely used. Statistically significant differences were found in mean experience scores between NP level of educational preparation and NP practice settings. The intention to use health literacy strategies in practice was found to be strong. The findings of this investigation offer implications for enhancing NP curriculum and for continuing education opportunities. Increasing NPs' knowledge of health literacy and facilitating the use of health literacy strategies has the potential to change clinical practice and support improved patient outcomes. PMID:24093347

  16. Experiences of women with a diagnosis of breast cancer: a clinical pathway approach.

    PubMed

    Lindop, E; Cannon, S

    2001-06-01

    The study presented in this paper formed the first part of a large survey of breast cancer patients in one health authority in England, UK looking at individual needs expressed by women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The paper provides an account of the experiences of 12 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The women represent a wide age range and different stages of illness. The transcribed accounts of the women were analysed by means of Qualitative Solutions and Research, Non-Numerical Unstructured Data Indexing Searching and Theorising (QSR*NUDIST). The study examined the individual experiences of women with a diagnosis of breast cancer and its aftermath as they passed through different stages related to it. The women's experiences are presented within the conceptual framework of the clinical pathway and their accounts represent their journey along the pathway. Various significant points in this journey are portrayed representing the women's reactions to diagnosis, treatment, femininity and body image, support, family and friends, information and after care. PMID:12849036

  17. Clinical Audits in a Postgraduate General Practice Training Program: An Evaluation of 8 Years' Experience

    PubMed Central

    Al-Baho, Abeer; Serour, Maleka; Al-Weqayyn, Adnan; AlHilali, Mohammed; Sadek, Ali A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical audit can be of valuable assistance to any program which aims to improve the quality of health care and its delivery. Yet without a coherent strategy aimed at evaluating audits' effectiveness, valuable opportunities will be overlooked. Clinical audit projects are required as a part of the formative assessment of trainees in the Family Medicine Residency Program (FMRP) in Kuwait. This study was undertaken to draw a picture of trainees' understanding of the audit project with attention to the knowledge of audit theory and its educational significance and scrutinize the difficulties confronted during the experience. Methodology/Principal Findings The materials included the records of 133 audits carried out by trainees and 165 post course questionnaires carried out between 2004 and 2011. They were reviewed and analyzed. The majority of audit projects were performed on diabetic (44.4%) and hypertensive (38.3%) care. Regarding audits done on diabetic care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (8.6%), microalbuminuria (19.3%), hemoglobin A1c (15.5%), retinopathy (10.3%), dyslipidemia (15.8%), peripheral neuropathy (8.8%), and other problems (21.7%). As for audits concerning hypertensive care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (38.0%), obesity (26.0%), dyslipidemia (12.0%), microalbuminuria (10.0%) and other problems (14.0%). More than half the participants (68.48%) who attended the audit course stated that they ‘definitely agreed’ about understanding the meaning of clinical audit. Most of them (75.8%) ‘definitely agreed’ about realizing the importance of clinical audit in improving patients' care. About half (49.7%) of them ‘agreed’ that they can distinguish between ‘criteria’ and ‘standards’. Conclusion The eight years of experience were beneficial. Trainees showed a good understanding of the idea behind auditing the services

  18. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on shield design for a 60-day lunar mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Schimmerling, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray exposure are analyzed to determine their effect on engineering designs for a first lunar outpost - a 60-day mission. Quantitative estimates of shield mass requirements as a function of a radiobiological uncertainty factor are given for a simplified vehicle structure. The additional shield mass required for compensation is calculated as a function of the uncertainty in galactic cosmic ray exposure, and this mass is found to be as large as a factor of 3 for a lunar transfer vehicle. The additional cost resulting from this mass is also calculated. These cost estimates are then used to exemplify the cost-effectiveness of research.

  19. Dissociative experiences in obsessive-compulsive disorder and trichotillomania: clinical and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Christine; Seedat, Soraya; Hemmings, Sian M J; Kinnear, Craig J; Corfield, Valerie A; Niehaus, Dana J H; Moolman-Smook, Johanna C; Stein, Dan J

    2004-01-01

    A link between dissociation proneness in adulthood and self-reports of childhood traumatic events (including familial loss in childhood, sexual/physical abuse and neglect) has been documented. Several studies have also provided evidence for an association between dissociative experiences and trauma in patients with various psychiatric disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality, dissociative identity and eating disorders. Based on the relative paucity of data on dissociation and trauma in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and trichotillomania (TTM), the primary objective of this study was to examine the relationship between trauma and dissociative experiences (DE) in these two diagnostic groups. Furthermore, the availability of clinical and genetic data on this sample allowed us to explore clinical and genetic factors relevant to this association. A total of 110 OCD and 32 TTM patients were compared with respect to the degree of dissociation (using the Dissociative Experiences Scale [DES]) and childhood trauma (using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire [CTQ]). Patients were classified on the DES as either "high" (mean DES score >/= 30) or "low" (mean DES score < 30) dissociators. Additional clinical and genetic factors were also explored with chi-square and t tests as appropriate. A total of 15.8% of OCD patients and 18.8% of TTM patients were high dissociators. OCD and TTM groups were comparable on DES and CTQ total scores, and in both OCD and TTM groups, significant positive correlations were found between mean DES scores and mean CTQ subscores of emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect. In the OCD group, high dissociators were significantly younger than low dissociators, and significantly more high dissociators than low dissociators reported a lifetime (current and past) history of tics (P <.001), Tourette's syndrome (P =.019), bulimia nervosa (P =.003), and borderline personality disorder (P =.027

  20. [From microdosimetry to nanodosimetry--the link between radiobiology and radiation physics].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuchuan; Li, Ping

    2014-06-01

    The link between micro- and macro-parameters for radiation interactions that take place in living biological systems is described in this paper. Meanwhile recent progress and development in microdosimetry and nanodosimetry are introduced, including the methods to measure and calculate these micro- or nano-parameters. The relationship between radiobiology and physical quantities in microdosimetry and nanodosimetry was presented. Both the current problems on their applications in radiation protection and radiotherapy and the future development direction are proposed. PMID:25219261

  1. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  2. An exploration of the experience of compassion fatigue in clinical oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Perry, Beth; Toffner, Greg; Merrick, Trish; Dalton, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Compassion fatigue (CF) is "debilitating weariness brought about by repetitive, empathic responses to the pain and suffering of others" (LaRowe, 2005, p. 21). The work performed by oncology nurses, and the experiences of the people they care for, place oncology nurses at high risk for CF (Pierce et al., 2007; Ferrell & Coyle, 2008). Thus oncology nurses were chosen as the study focus. This paper details a descriptive exploratory qualitative research study that investigated the experience of CF in Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs). A conceptual stress process model by Aneshensel, Pearlin, Mullan, Zarit, and Whitlatch (1995) that considers caregivers' stress in four domains provided the study framework (see Figure 1). Nineteen study participants were recruited through an advertisement in the Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal (CONJ). The advertisement directed potential participants to a university-based online website developed for this study. Participants completed a questionnaire and wrote a narrative describing an experience with CF and submitted these through the secure research website. Data were analyzed thematically. Five themes include: defining CF, causes of CF, factors that worsen CF, factors that lessen CF, and outcomes of CF. Participants had limited knowledge about CF, about lack of external support, and that insufficient time to provide high quality, care may precipitate CF. The gap between quality of care nurses wanted to provide and what they were able to do, compounded by coexisting physical and emotional stress, worsened CF. CF was lessened by colleague support, work-life balance, connecting with others, acknowledgement, and maturity and experience. Outcomes of CF included profound fatigue of mind and body, negative effects on personal relationships, and considering leaving the specialty. Recommendations that may enhance oncology nurse well-being are provided. PMID:21661623

  3. Crossing Over: The Lived Experiences of Clinical Laboratory Science Education Teachers as They Transition from Traditional to Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldkamp, Ruth B.

    2013-01-01

    A phenomenological study was undertaken to understand and describe the nature and meaning of the live experiences of faculty transition from traditional to teaching online clinical laboratory science courses. In order to gain insight into the lived experiences of faculty, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 faculty members. The task of the…

  4. Initial experience of MAGIC gels, their reproducibility and their practical application in the clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, A.; Lewis, D. G.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we report on our initial experience with MAGIC gels as a dosimetric tool. In particular, we address the issue of the reproducibility of the gel's response to radiation by measuring the spin-spin relaxation times of gels irradiated to known doses using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a conventional multi-echo CPMG pulse sequence. As a practical implementation of MAGIC gels into the clinic is required, the time to acquire images using MRI must be short. For this reason, the effect of the echo train length used in determining the spin-spin relaxation times was assessed as an initial investigation into whether alternative pulse sequences could be used to accurately measure the gels relaxation properties.

  5. [Indications for antireflux surgery: a clinical experience and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Braghetto, Italo; Korn, Owen; Valladares, Héctor; Silva, Johanna; Azabache, Verónica

    2010-05-01

    Antireflux laparoscopic surgery has excellent results in terms of improvement of symptoms, esophagitis, gastroesophageal sphincter competence and abnormal acid reflux. Indications for surgery are well established, however some of these are controversial. This is a review of the present indications for surgery in gastroesophageal reflux. The surgical indication should be the result of a complex clinical and laboratory work up. Patients with a clear cut surgical indication should be differentiated from those with doubtful indications, that require further analysis and those that are bad candidates for surgery. Young patients with macroscopic esophagitis, an incompetent sphincter, abnormal acid reflux test, that have a partial or negative response to treatment with proton pump inhibitors are those with the best surgical results. Bad candidates are patients with a psychiatric background, with atypical symptoms and those with a normal acid reflux test. In our experience with 935 patients, only 23% had a surgical indication. PMID:20668817

  6. [FlU Zhonghua's clinical experience of Fu's subcutaneous needling for cervical spondylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Minying; Zhang, Xiyu

    2015-08-01

    Professor FU Zhonghua's unique clinical experience of Fu's subcutaneous needling (FSN) for cervical spondylosis (CS) is discussed in this paper, which is analyzed from the aspects of recognition of CS pathogenesis, treatment mechanism of FSN, advantage indications of FSN for CS and examples of medical cases. Professor FU introduced the theory of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) into the field of the management of CS. The site of neck MTrP should be carefully examined, and FSN needles for single use are used to sweep the affected area or subcutaneous layer of adjacent upper limb. This method can rapidly improve ischemia and hypoxia state of the relevant muscles and prompt the self-recovery of neck muscles. During FSN treatment, reperfusion approach is recommended to adopt to improve the qi and blood circulation and recovery of neck function. PMID:26571902

  7. The relationship between super users' attitudes and employee experiences with clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R B; Wakefield, Douglas S; Ward, Marcia M; Brokel, Jane; Crandall, Donald

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the manner in which Super User attitudes toward clinical information systems (CIS) are associated with employee experiences with CIS implementation. Super Users (N = 82), selected by hospital administration to assist in implementation of the new CIS, completed a survey that assessed time spent in the Super User role as well as attitudes toward the role. These data were matched with hospital employee (N = 325) survey data about attitudes toward CIS and its impact on work processes. Time spent in the role of Super User was associated with employee attitudes; Super Users' perceptions about qualifications also predicted employee attitudes, particularly about care outcomes and perceptions about implementation of the CIS. The study suggests that as organizations encourage more time in the Super User role and develop more positive attitudes about this role, the possibility of positive employee attitudes toward CIS increases. PMID:19047764

  8. A qualitative study of patients' experiences of a nurse-led memory clinic.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Christine; Campbell, Briony; Bentley, Michael; Bucher, Hazel; Morrissey, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about patients' decision-making to attend a nurse-led memory clinic (NLMC) or of their experiences in the months following attendance. This paper reports qualitative follow-up data from 13 participants who attended a NLMC run by a Nurse Practitioner, and who were interviewed later in their own homes. Participants attended the NLMC seeking 'benchmarking' against the broader population or confirmation of diagnosis, with the Nurse Practitioner perceived as having more time to talk. Although we anticipated that participants would have changed some behaviours to incorporate 'brain health material', we found that the focus was on maintaining current capacity and lifestyle with most participants delaying planning and decisions about future lifestyle changes until 'necessary'. Understanding why people contact a NLMC and how their participation influences future planning can help us better target health care messages with the aim of improving health literacy. PMID:24381213

  9. Bridging Protocol for Surgical Patients: One Clinic's Experience Facilitating a Safe Anticoagulation Intervention.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Lorena; Grabowski, Dean; Siragusa, Lanette; Young, R Shawn

    2015-12-01

    Surgical candidates often present with complex medical histories that necessitate an individualized approach to care to minimize surgical and anesthetic risk. Patients on warfarin require exceptionally careful clinical assessment, consideration, and consistency to reduce the risk of perioperative thromboembolism and bleeding complications. In response to this need, Victoria General Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada developed a bridging protocol based on evidence-based guidelines and a checklist tool to incorporate and communicate the necessary tasks among the interprofessional team. The purpose of this initiative was to create a patient-focused process to assist those at risk for a thromboembolic event to navigate through a clear, consistent, and collaborative surgical experience whenever cessation and resumption of warfarin administration was required. PMID:26596383

  10. [Stabilizing the pelvic ring with the external fixator. Biomechanical studies and clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Egbers, H J; Draijer, F; Havemann, D; Zenker, W

    1992-11-01

    Experimental studies were performed on anatomic pelvis specimens. In different series of experiments the positioning of the screws and the assembly of the external fixator were changed. We tried fixing the external fixator to the screws at varying distances from the body surface. For stabilisation of the fractured pelvic girdle a self-constructed "bow fixator", fixed to supra-acetabular screws with proximal compression and distal traction showed the best results. Homogeneous distribution of the pressure could be achieved on the unstable dorsal pelvic ring structures. In clinical routine we used the triangular external fixator, which in the experimental situation yielded results close to those of the bow fixator. External fixation of the pelvic girdle has been performed 128 times since 1977, in January 1991 a prospective study was started. For Tile type B injuries the external fixator itself represents an effective, minimally invasive system, but type C fractures often require an additional internal fixation of the dorsal lesion. PMID:1475122

  11. Clinical experience with stem cells and other cell therapies in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota; Kassis, Ibrahim

    2013-01-15

    To overcome the limited capacity of the CNS for regeneration, the theoretical alternative would be to use stem cells for more effective management of chronic degenerative and inflammatory neurological conditions, and also of acute neuronal damage from injuries or cerebrovascular diseases. Although the adult brain contains small numbers of stem cells in restricted areas, this intrinsic stem cell repertoire is small and does not measurably contribute to functional recovery. Embryonic cells carrying pluripotent and self-renewal properties represent the stem cell prototype, but there are additional somatic stem cells that may be harvested and expanded from various tissues during adult life. Stem cell transplantation is based on the assumption that such cells may have the potential to regenerate or support the survival of the existing, partially damaged cells. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art and the clinical worldwide experience with the use of various types of stem cells in neurological diseases. PMID:23107343

  12. Clinical and human resource planning for the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals: the British Columbia experience.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, D; Fortin, P; Fox, J; Gundry, S; Oshry, J; Warren, E

    1997-01-01

    Riverview Hospital, B.C.'s only and Canada's largest remaining provincial psychiatric hospital began a formal planned "downsizing" process in 1992. This initiative was an important element in the Province's strategic plan to shift to a more community-focused mental health system and to bring tertiary psychiatric services "closer to home" by redeveloping Riverview Hospital on three sites. The paper summarizes the literature pertaining to the "downsizing" of psychiatric hospital services in relation both to clinical and human resource planning. It describes the mental health system in B.C. and the service system context in which this exercise is occurring. It is based on the first three years of experience in identifying the major challenges and the strategies developed to meet these challenges. It draws some conclusions about the effectiveness of these strategies and it speculates about the likely future challenges as the "downsizing" process continues. PMID:9021839

  13. Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience

    PubMed Central

    Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa; Brigham, Greg; Babcock, Dean; L.C.S.W.; Muir, Joan A.; Buchan, Betty J.; Horton, Terry

    2005-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opioid-dependent men and women were randomized to a thirteen-day buprenorphine-naloxone taper regimen for short-term opioid detoxification. The 234 buprenorphine-naloxone patients averaged 37 years old and used mostly intravenous heroin. Direct and rapid induction onto buprenorphine-naloxone was safe and well tolerated. Most patients (83%) received 8 mg buprenorphine-2 mg naloxone on the first day and 90% successfully completed induction and reached a target dose of 16mg buprenorphine-4 mg naloxone in three days. Medication compliance and treatment engagement was high. An average of 81% of available doses was ingested, and 68% of patients completed the detoxification. Most (80.3%) patients received some ancillary medications with an average of 2.3 withdrawal symptoms treated. The safety profile of buprenorphine-naloxone was excellent. Of eighteen serious adverse events reported, only one was possibly related to buprenorphine-naloxone. All providers successfully integrated buprenorphine-naloxone into their existing treatment milieus. Overall, data from the CTN field experience suggest that buprenorphine-naloxone is practical and safe for use in diverse community treatment settings, including those with minimal experience providing opioid-based pharmacotherapy and/or medical detoxification for opioid dependence. PMID:15204675

  14. Use of antidepressants in the treatment of depression in Asia: guidelines, clinical evidence, and experience revisited.

    PubMed

    Treuer, Tamás; Liu, Chia-Yih; Salazar, Gerardo; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Jia, Fujun; Habil, Hussain; Lee, Min-Soo; Lowry, Amanda; Dueñas, Héctor

    2013-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is prevalent worldwide, and only about half of those affected will experience no further episodes or symptoms. Additionally, depressive symptoms can be challenging to identify, with many patients going undiagnosed despite a wide variety of available treatment options. Antidepressants are the cornerstone of depression treatment; however, a large number of factors must be considered in selecting the treatment best suited to the individual. To help support physicians in this process, international and national treatment guidelines have been developed. This review evaluates the current use of antidepressant treatment for major depressive disorder in six Asian countries (China, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, and Thailand). No remarkable differences were noted between Asian and international treatment guidelines or among those from within Asia as these are adapted from western guidelines, although there were some local variations. Importantly, a shortage of evidence-based information at a country level is the primary problem in developing guidelines appropriate for Asia, so most of the guidelines are consensus opinions derived from western research data utilized in western guidelines. Treatment guidelines need to evolve from being consensus based to evidence based when evidence is available, taking into consideration cost/effectiveness or cost/benefit with an evidence-based approach that more accurately reflects clinical experience as well as the attributes of each antidepressant. In everyday practice, physicians must tailor their treatment to the patient's clinical needs while considering associated external factors; better tools are needed to help them reach the best possible prescribing decisions which are of maximum benefit to patients. PMID:23857712

  15. Exploring the cultural adaptability of doctoral entry-level physical therapist students during clinical education experiences.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Marjorie Johnson; Rathsack, Christi; Brannigan, Pauline; Sander, Antoinette P

    2008-01-01

    Cultural competence is an essential component of health care education. The aim of this study was to explore the development of cultural competence in 14 physical therapist students during their final, 23 weeks of clinical education (CE) experiences. A mixed methods design was used to quantitatively measure and qualitatively describe cultural adaptability as an indicator of cultural competence. Subjects completed the Cross-Cultural Adaptability Inventory (CCAI) at the end of their didactic curriculum and again at the end of their CE experiences. Constant comparative methods were used to analyze written narrative summaries of how students made meaning of their cultural encounters. The students exhibited statistically significant changes in the total CCAI score (paired t-test: p < 0.001), and three CCAI subscales: emotional resilience (paired t-test: p < 0.002), flexibility/openness (paired t-test: p < 0.003), and perceptual acuity (paired t-test: p < 0.001). There was not a statistically significant change in the fourth CCAI subscale, personal autonomy. Qualitatively, four themes emerged that described students' cultural encounters with patients, families, and co-workers: recognizing cultural descriptors; consideration of feelings, values, attitudes and beliefs; effective communication to breakdown barriers; and awareness of strategies for current and future cross-cultural practice. Clinical cultural encounters are important in the progression toward cultural competence in physical therapist students. Changes in attitude appear to be key in effective cultural encounters as students learn to communicate and connect with anyone perceived to be different from them. PMID:19753398

  16. Blood-Brain Barrier Experiments with Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Han, Hyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of study was to evaluate the feasibility of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images of the rat obtained using a 1.5T MR machine in several blood-brain barrier (BBB) experiments. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. MR images were obtained using a clinical 1.5T MR machine. A microcatheter was introduced via the femoral artery to the carotid artery. Normal saline (group 1, n = 4), clotted autologous blood (group 2, n = 4), triolein emulsion (group 3, n = 4), and oleic acid emulsion (group 4, n = 4) were infused into the carotid artery through a microcatheter. Conventional and diffusion-weighted images, the apparent coefficient map, perfusion-weighted images, and contrast-enhanced MR images were obtained. Brain tissue was obtained and triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining was performed in group 2. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran images and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) studies were performed in group 4. Results The MR images in group 1 were of good quality. The MR images in group 2 revealed typical findings of acute cerebral infarction. Perfusion defects were noted on the perfusion-weighted images. The MR images in group 3 showed vasogenic edema and contrast enhancement, representing vascular damage. The rats in group 4 had vasogenic edema on the MR images and leakage of dextran on the FITC-labeled dextran image, representing increased vascular permeability. The immune reaction was decreased on the EBA study. Conclusion Clinical 1.5T MR images using a rat depicted many informative results in the present study. These results can be used in further researches of the BBB using combined clinical MR machines and immunohistochemical examinations. PMID:20379473

  17. Clinical Experience with Daptomycin for the Treatment of Gram-positive Infections in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Dailiana, Zoe; Dmitriy, Nisichenko; Utili, Riccardo; Pathan, Rashidkhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This subgroup analysis of the European Cubicin Outcomes Registry Experience evaluated the safety and effectiveness of daptomycin in children and adolescent patients (<18 years). Methods: Clinical outcomes at the end of therapy were assessed as success (cured or improved), failure or nonevaluable. Safety was assessed for up to 30 days post treatment. Results: Eighty-one children and adolescent patients were included in this study. The most common primary infections were bacteremia (19.8%), complicated skin and soft-tissue infection (18.5%), osteomyelitis (13.6%), endocarditis (12.3%), foreign body/prosthetic infection (12.3%), uncomplicated skin and soft-tissue infection (9.9%) and other (13.6%). Daptomycin doses ranged from 4 to >10 mg/kg/day. Median duration of therapy was 12.5 (interquartile range, 7–25; mean, 16.7; standard deviation, 12.8) days. Staphylococcus aureus (46.7%) was the most commonly isolated pathogen (23.8% methicillin-resistant S. aureus). Forty-nine (60.5%) patients completed daptomycin therapy without further antibiotics, 27 (33.3%) switched to another antibiotic, 4 (4.9%) discontinued because of adverse events (AEs) and 1 (1.2%) discontinued because of other reason. Overall, 75 (92.6%; 95% confidence interval: 95.2–100.0%) patients achieved clinical success; 39 of 41 (95.1%) patients receiving daptomycin monotherapy and 36 of 40 (90.0%) patients receiving concomitant antibiotics. Six (7.4%) patients reported AEs, including 1 patient with increased blood creatine phosphokinase. Three (3.7%) patients had serious AEs; 1 (1.2%) had a serious AE possibly related to daptomycin. Conclusion: Daptomycin, alone or combined with other antibiotics and/or surgery, demonstrated high clinical success rates against a wide variety of infections and was well tolerated in children and adolescents. PMID:26849158

  18. Isavuconazole: Pharmacology, Pharmacodynamics, and Current Clinical Experience with a New Triazole Antifungal Agent.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Jeffrey M; Marx, Kayleigh R; Nishimoto, Andrew T; Rogers, P David

    2015-11-01

    Coinciding with the continually increasing population of immunocompromised patients worldwide, the incidence of invasive fungal infections has grown over the past 4 decades. Unfortunately, infections caused by both yeasts such as Candida and molds such as Aspergillus or Mucorales remain associated with unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. In addition, the available antifungals with proven efficacy in the treatment of these infections remain severely limited. Although previously available second-generation triazole antifungals have significantly expanded the spectrum of the triazole antifungal class, these agents are laden with shortcomings in their safety profiles as well as formulation and pharmacokinetic challenges. Isavuconazole, administered as the prodrug isavuconazonium, is the latest second-generation triazole antifungal to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. Approved for the treatment of both invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis, and currently under investigation for the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis, isavuconazole may have therapeutic advantages over its predecessors. With clinically relevant antifungal potency against a broad range of yeasts, dimorphic fungi, and molds, isavuconazole has a spectrum of activity reminiscent of the polyene amphotericin B. Moreover, clinical experience thus far has revealed isavuconazole to be associated with fewer toxicities than voriconazole, even when administered without therapeutic drug monitoring. These characteristics, in an agent available in both a highly bioavailable oral and a β-cyclodextrin-free intravenous formulation, will likely make isavuconazole a welcome addition to the triazole class of antifungals. PMID:26598096

  19. New Embolization Microcoil Consisting of Firm and Flexible Segments: Preliminary Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To describe the preliminary clinical experience with a new embolization microcoil. Methods. The microcoil was made of a platinum coil spring, and consisted of firm and flexible segments. The firm segment functioned as an anchor and the flexible segment was well compacted to occlude the arteries. No Dacron fiber was attached. Seventy-one new microcoils were placed via microcatheters in 28 visceral arteries of 17 patients. Two other types of microcoils with Dacron fibers were used together in 8 arteries. Results. Sixty-nine new microcoils were placed and compacted successfully. Two coils were misplaced; one was retrieved and the other was left in the migrated artery, which remained patent 5 months later. All 28 arteries were occluded, and the goals of intervention were achieved successfully in all 17 cases. Conclusion. The new microcoils anchored and compacted well in the arteries. The clinical feasibility of this coil design was confirmed. The additional use of other types of microcoils with Dacron fiber was necessary to obtain rapid occlusion in some cases.

  20. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon's examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner.

  1. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon’s examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner. PMID:25706821

  2. Developing clinical competency: Experiences and perceptions of Advanced Midwifery Practitioners in training.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Lynne; Beaton, Susan

    2015-07-01

    This paper will describe the experiences and perception of a cohort of trainee Advanced Midwifery Practitioners (AMP's) during their training on an MSc in Advanced Practice. The educational philosophy underpinning the master's programme is interprofessional learning linked closely to work based learning and assessment. The focus group explored how the AMP's were developing core competencies within four domains: The links between the university and clinical assessments were instrumental in developing both midwifery and specialised skills required for extending their scope of practice. The changing demographics of their client group facilitated the need to provide safe assessment and management of ladies with complex health and social needs in pregnancy and childbirth; provide specialised clinics and the development of a robust staff training and assessment process. The generic competencies they gained improved collaborative working with their medical colleagues, raising the trainees profile and acceptance of their extended role. In addition to this, development of specialised midwifery skills promoted a high degree of decision making responsibilities within midwifery to facilitate service development and promote evidence based care. PMID:25892367

  3. UTERINE ADENOMATA IN THE RABBIT : I. CLINICAL HISTORY, PATHOLOGY AND PRELIMINARY TRANSPLANTATION EXPERIMENTS.

    PubMed

    Greene, H S; Saxton, J A

    1938-04-30

    83 cases of an adenomatous tumor of the uterine mucosa have been observed in a colony of rabbits during the past 4 years The results of a clinical and pathological study of the tumor, together with a description of transplantation experiments are included in the present report. The clinical histories of tumor bearing animals are similar in all cases. Discovery of the tumor is preceded by a long period of reproductive disturbance, and its subsequent course is one of slow, continuous growth which has terminated in death with metastasis in all animals held under observation for longer than 1 year. Microscopically, the tumor shows an atypical alveolar structure, and its characteristics closely resemble those of an adenocarcinoma of the uterine fundus in women. Pathological changes similar to those observed in mice after treatment with estrogenic substances occur in the thyroid, suprarenal, pituitary and mammary glands. Intraocular transplantation of the tumor has been successful, and at the present time the growth has been carried through 6 generations by serial transfer. PMID:19870749

  4. Nursing students' experiences of ethical issues in clinical practice: A New Zealand study.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, J; Papps, E; Marshall, B

    2016-03-01

    Nursing students experience ethical problems in clinical practice in a different way from registered nurses. In order to develop ethical reasoning and competence in nursing students, nurse educators must recognise the unique issues students face. This research described the occurrence of ethical issues in clinical practice for 373 undergraduate nursing students who responded to a national questionnaire investigating the frequency of pre-determined ethical issues and the corresponding level of distress. Over two thirds of respondents experienced breaches of a patient's right to confidentiality, privacy, dignity or respect and 87% experienced unsafe working conditions. The most distressing issues were those that compromised patient safety, including unsafe healthcare practices, working conditions and suspected abuse or neglect. Themes that emerged from an open-ended question included lack of support and supervision, bullying and end of life issues. This research found the frequency at which ethical issues are experienced was highest in year three participants. However, the overall distress levels were lower for the majority of issues for those participants in the later part of their degree. Recommendations from this research include developing ethics education around the main concerns that students face in order to enhance students' understanding, resilience and ability to respond appropriately. PMID:27038081

  5. Clinical and Neuroradiological Spectrum of Metronidazole Induced Encephalopathy: Our Experience and the Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Ajay; Pandit, Alak; Das, Susanta Kumar; Joshi, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is an antimicrobial agent mainly used in the treatment of several protozoal and anaerobic infections, additionally, is often used in hepatic encephalopathy and Crohn disease. Apart from peripheral neuropathy, metronidazole can also cause symptoms of central nervous system dysfunction like ataxic gait, dysarthria, seizures, and encephalopathy which may result from both short term and chronic use of this drug and is collectively termed as “metronidazole induced encephalopathy”(MIE). Neuroimaging forms the backbone in clinching the diagnosis of this uncommon entity, especially in cases where there is high index of suspicion of intoxication. Although typical sites of involvement include cerebellum, brain stem and corpus callosum, however, lesions of other sites have also been reported. Once diagnosed, resolution of findings on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the Brain along with clinical improvement remains the mainstay of monitoring. Here we review the key clinical features and MRI findings of MIE as reported in medical literature. We also analyze implication of use of this drug in special situations like hepatic encephalopathy and brain abscess and discuss our experience regarding this entity. PMID:27504340

  6. Clinical experience of anidulafungin for the treatment of patients with documented candidemia.

    PubMed

    Falcone, M; Russo, A; De Rosa, F G; Pasero, D; Toma, L; Raponi, G; Ghezzi, M C; Venditti, M

    2010-12-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of invasive fungal infections in humans, producing infections that range from mucocutaneous disorders to invasive disease that can involve any organ. Here we present our clinical experience with anidulafungin for the treatment of documented nosocomial candidaemia. From february 2009 through January 2010 all patients with documented candidemia treated with anidulafungin in three medical centers in italy were reviewed. Demographics, clinical and microbiological data, and outcome were collected for each patient. Twenty-four patients were included in the study. most patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) or a port-a-cath (100%), had a history of recent surgery (87.5%), or were receiving total parenteral nutrition (79%), broad spectrum antibiotics (83%), steroids or chemotherapy (45.8%). C. albicans (54%) was the most commonly isolated pathogen. CVC was the source of candidemia in 79% of cases. Six patients (25%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock, and five patients had unfavorable outcomes, with an overall mortality rate of 20%. No patients experienced side effects related to anidulafungin therapy. Anidulafungin was effective in the treatment of patients with documented candidemia arising from different sites, and no significant side effects were observed. PMID:21303747

  7. Clinical experience with infliximab biosimilar Remsima (CT-P13) in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Jahnsen, Jørgen

    2016-05-01

    Many reference biological therapies have now reached or are near to patent expiry, and therefore a number of biosimilars have been or will be developed. The term biosimilar can be defined as a biotherapeutic product that is similar in efficacy, safety and quality to the licensed reference product. Biosimilars may lead to a reduced price and significant cost savings for the health community and hopefully more patients globally will have easier access to biological therapy when indicated. CT-P13, which is a TNF-alfa inhibitor, is the first monoclonal antibody biosimilar being used in clinical practice. The drug is approved for all indications as an innovator product although clinical efficacy has only been demonstrated in rheumatic diseases. Until now the number of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with CT-P13 is confined, but experience is continuously growing. Based on current data, CT-P13 seems to be efficacious and generally well tolerated in IBD especially in patients who are naïve to biological therapy. Knowledge with regard to interchangeability between CT-P13 and the originator infliximab is however, still rather sparse and more data are desired. Immunogenicity and long-term safety related to CT-P13 are other areas of great importance and good and reliable postmarketing pharmacovigilance is therefore required in the coming years. PMID:27134662

  8. Clinical and Neuroradiological Spectrum of Metronidazole Induced Encephalopathy: Our Experience and the Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ujjawal; Panwar, Ajay; Pandit, Alak; Das, Susanta Kumar; Joshi, Bhushan

    2016-06-01

    Metronidazole is an antimicrobial agent mainly used in the treatment of several protozoal and anaerobic infections, additionally, is often used in hepatic encephalopathy and Crohn disease. Apart from peripheral neuropathy, metronidazole can also cause symptoms of central nervous system dysfunction like ataxic gait, dysarthria, seizures, and encephalopathy which may result from both short term and chronic use of this drug and is collectively termed as "metronidazole induced encephalopathy"(MIE). Neuroimaging forms the backbone in clinching the diagnosis of this uncommon entity, especially in cases where there is high index of suspicion of intoxication. Although typical sites of involvement include cerebellum, brain stem and corpus callosum, however, lesions of other sites have also been reported. Once diagnosed, resolution of findings on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the Brain along with clinical improvement remains the mainstay of monitoring. Here we review the key clinical features and MRI findings of MIE as reported in medical literature. We also analyze implication of use of this drug in special situations like hepatic encephalopathy and brain abscess and discuss our experience regarding this entity. PMID:27504340

  9. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  10. FDDI information management system for centralizing interactive, computerized multimedia clinical experiences in pediatric rheumatology/Immunology.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, R; Cronenberger, H; Stein, L; Hannum, W; Reed, A M; Wilhelm, C; Hsiao, H

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, authoring, and development of interactive, computerized, multimedia clinical simulations in pediatric rheumatology/immunology and related musculoskeletal diseases, the development and implementation of a high speed information management system for their centralized storage and distribution, and analytical methods for evaluating the total system's educational impact on medical students and pediatric residents. An FDDI fiber optic network with client/server/host architecture is the core. The server houses digitized audio, still-image video clips and text files. A host station houses the DB2/2 database containing case-associated labels and information. Cases can be accessed from any workstation via a customized interface in AVA/2 written specifically for this application. OS/2 Presentation Manager controls, written in C, are incorporated into the interface. This interface allows SQL searches and retrievals of cases and case materials. In addition to providing user-directed clinical experiences, this centralized information management system provides designated faculty with the ability to add audio notes and visual pointers to image files. Users may browse through case materials, mark selected ones and download them for utilization in lectures or for editing and converting into 35mm slides. PMID:8591407

  11. Experiences of Iranian Nurses that Intent to Leave the Clinical Nursing: a Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Habibzadeh, Hosein; Alilu, Leyla; Gillespie, Mark; Shakibi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the current shortage of nurses, it is important to know the reasons nurses want to leave the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses who intend to leave clinical nursing. Methods: In a qualitative content analysis study, data obtained from 13 in-depth face-to-face semi-structured interviews with nurses working in hospitals affiliated to the Tabriz and Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran, selected through purposive sampling. A conventional content analysis was used for data analysis. Results: Four categories and eleven subcategories emerged during data analysis. The extracted categories and sub categories consisted of (I) Entry routes into nursing (implicitly entry, targeted entry), (II) Defects in dignity (lack of professional vision toward the nurses, social status of nurses), (III) Work in non-ideal working environment (lack of support, discrimination, conflict, lack of opportunities for advancement), and (IV) Dissatisfaction with working conditions (heavy workload, lack of power, unusual working hours). Conclusion: The findings of this qualitative study reflect professional turnover as a complex, ongoing, multidimensional process. By identifying the factors responsible, it could be possible to retain nurses in the field. PMID:27354981

  12. Clinical routine operation of a filmless radiology department: three years experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Hans M.; Paertan, Gerald; Hruby, Walter

    1995-05-01

    This paper communicates the operational implementation of filmless digital radiology in clinical routine, its feasibility and its effect on the radiology profession, based on the three years clinical experience from the filmless digital radiology department of the Danube Hospital, a major teaching hospital in Vienna, Austria, with currently 850 acute-care beds. Since April 1992 all radiological modalities are reported from the monitors of 16 reporting consoles in the radiology department. Images and reports are distributed by the hospital-wide network (Sienet, Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen), and can be viewed on 60 display consoles throughout the hospital. Filmless radiology primarily is an efficient hospital-wide infrastructure to deliver radiological services along with other medical information, providing safe and fast access to this information anytime and anywhere, necessary for the conduct of the diagnostic and therapeutic task of patient care. In a comparative study of the Danube Hospital with the film based Rudolfstiftung Hospital in Vienna, we found a significant decrease of the mean patient length of hospital stay (1.99 to 3.72 days) that partially might be attributed to the implementation of filmless radiology.

  13. Clinical experience with the new oral anticoagulants for treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Bacchus, Farzana; Schulman, Sam

    2015-03-01

    Four non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have been evaluated in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism, and all except edoxaban have also been studied for extended secondary prophylaxis after venous thromboembolism. Rivaroxaban, and recently also dabigatran, has been approved for this indication, and it is therefore timely to review the characteristics, efficacy, and safety of these drugs with emphasis on patients with venous thromboembolism. This review focuses on the clinical results from the phase III trials, separately for each of the drugs as compared with vitamin K antagonists. We also address the results from meta-analyses that were published recently. Finally, the results in some special groups of interest-renal impairment, elderly patients, and patients with cancer-are reviewed, although they only comprised small minorities of the study populations. All 4 drugs demonstrated noninferiority against vitamin K antagonists in the acute treatment and clear superiority against placebo in the extended treatment (not performed with edoxaban). The risk of bleeding was generally lower with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, and the reduction of risk of intracranial hemorrhage seems to mirror the experience from atrial fibrillation trials. In conclusion, during the past 30 years we have moved from a week of hospitalization and intravenous heparin therapy, via low-molecular-weight heparin injections subcutaneously and early discharge from the hospital, to the possibility of only oral outpatient therapy without coagulation monitoring, yet safe for patients with acute venous thromboembolism. PMID:25717178

  14. Pre-clinical Experience with a Multi-Chordal Patch for Mitral Valve Repair.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Surendra K; Shi, Weiwei; McIver, Bryant V; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob; Frater, Robert W M; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-04-01

    Surgical repair of flail mitral valve leaflets with neochordoplasty has good outcomes, but implementing it in anterior and bi-leaflet leaflet repair is challenging. Placing and sizing individual neochordae is time consuming and error prone, with persistent localized flail if performed incorrectly. In this study, we report our pre-clinical experience with a novel multi-chordal patch for mitral valve repair. The device was designed based on human cadaver hearts, and laser cut from expanded polytetrafluoroethylene. The prototypes were tested in: (stage 1) ex vivo hearts with leaflet flail (N = 6), (stage 2) acute swine induced with flail (N = 6), and (stage 3) two chronic swine survived to 23 and 120 days (N = 2). A2 and P2 prolapse were successfully repaired with coaptation length restored to 8.1 ± 2.2mm after posterior repair and to 10.2 ± 1.3mm after anterior repair in ex vivo hearts. In vivo, trace regurgitation was seen after repair with excellent patch durability, healing, and endothelialization at euthanasia. A new device for easier mitral repair is reported, with good early pre-clinical outcomes. PMID:26801477

  15. Clinical Experience With A High Resolution Digital Imaging System For Gastro-Intestinal Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Rowlands, J. A.; Hynes, D. M.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In our department, it is planned that the gastro-intestinal fluoroscopic area will be equipped entirely with digital imaging systems. The use of the 1024 X 1024 pixel frame store, backed by a hard disc for rapid image transfer, and the production of hard copy on a laser imager has reached the point where clinical efficacy and acceptance are assured. The further addition of facilities for annotation and the application of digital post-processing techniques are being explored both at the clinical site and at the research laboratorieS. The use of laser imaging has produced a further improvement in image quality and some of the practical problems related to this apparatus will be described. The availability of larger capacity laser disc image storage enables the local area network or "mini-PACS" system for fluoroscopy areas to become a concept worthy of investigation. We present our experience over a number of years with these systems, together with our latest investigations into potential applications of laser technology to the practice of radiology in a busy imaging centre.

  16. Understanding the impact of economic evidence on clinical decision making: a discrete choice experiment in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Torbica, Aleksandra; Fattore, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the impact of cost-effectiveness information on clinical decision making using discrete choice experiment (DCE) methodology. Data were collected through a self-completed questionnaire administered to Italian cardiologists in June 2007 (n = 129 respondents, 1143 observations). The questionnaire asked clinicians to make choices between paired scenarios, across which three key dimensions were identified and varied: (1) quality of clinical evidence, (2) size of health gain (reduction of relative and absolute risk), and (3) economic impact (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio). A random effects probit model was used to estimate clinicians' preferences for the different dimensions, while the heterogeneity of preferences was tested in a model with interaction terms. Dominance tests were used to assess the consistency of responses. The results indicate that Italian cardiologists regard economic impact (cost-effectiveness) as an important factor in their decision making. Economic evidence is valued more highly among clinicians with a higher self-assessed level of knowledge regarding economic evaluation techniques, as well as among younger professionals (age<45). While relevant study limitations should be acknowledged, our results suggest that DCEs can be used to elicit clinicians' decision-making criteria and to inform the allocation of resources for future research in a logical manner. Italian cardiologists appear to take cost-effectiveness information into account when deciding whether to use new treatments. PMID:20207466

  17. Clinical experience with infliximab biosimilar Remsima (CT-P13) in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Jahnsen, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Many reference biological therapies have now reached or are near to patent expiry, and therefore a number of biosimilars have been or will be developed. The term biosimilar can be defined as a biotherapeutic product that is similar in efficacy, safety and quality to the licensed reference product. Biosimilars may lead to a reduced price and significant cost savings for the health community and hopefully more patients globally will have easier access to biological therapy when indicated. CT-P13, which is a TNF-alfa inhibitor, is the first monoclonal antibody biosimilar being used in clinical practice. The drug is approved for all indications as an innovator product although clinical efficacy has only been demonstrated in rheumatic diseases. Until now the number of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with CT-P13 is confined, but experience is continuously growing. Based on current data, CT-P13 seems to be efficacious and generally well tolerated in IBD especially in patients who are naïve to biological therapy. Knowledge with regard to interchangeability between CT-P13 and the originator infliximab is however, still rather sparse and more data are desired. Immunogenicity and long-term safety related to CT-P13 are other areas of great importance and good and reliable postmarketing pharmacovigilance is therefore required in the coming years. PMID:27134662

  18. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  19. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Amerine, Lindsey B.; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N.; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T.; Rodgers, Philip T.; Williams, Dennis M.; Pinelli, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  20. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: experiences from recent studies and everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    Although spasticity of varying severity affects up to 80% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) during the course of their disease, the symptom is often overlooked and undertreated. Despite the availability of oral antispasticity treatments (baclofen, tizanidine and others), approximately one-third of MS patients in Europe and the USA experience moderate or severe nonfocalized spasticity. At present, a thorough clinical evaluation of MS-related spasticity that takes into account the patient's own perception of spasms, spasticity-related pain and other associated symptoms is not common in daily neurological practice. Some of the usual spasticity scales, such as the Ashworth and modified Ashworth scales, reflect the observer's measurement of spasticity at a particular point in time. Herbal (smoked) cannabis has long been recognized as a possible option for relief of spasticity and neuropathic pain, but pertinent concerns about psychoactive effects and addiction risk have prevented its common use. An innovative method of benefiting from the mode of action of cannabinoids while limiting their drawbacks is to reduce peak plasma levels of 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol and counteract psychoactivity with higher than naturally occurring proportions of a second cannabinoid, cannabidiol. Sativex® oromucosal spray (1:1 ratio of 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol) has recently been approved in a number of EU countries and elsewhere for use in patients with MS-related spasticity who are resistant to treatment with other antispasticity medications. In clinical trials, Sativex provided initial relief of spasticity symptoms within the first 4 weeks of treatment (trial period) in up to about half of patients resistant to other available oral antispasticity medications and demonstrated clinically significant improvement in spasticity (30% or higher reduction from baseline) in three-quarters of the initial responders. Adverse events were limited mainly to mild or moderate

  1. Worldwide clinical experience with the CorCap Cardiac Support Device.

    PubMed

    Starling, Randall C; Jessup, Mariell

    2004-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the mechanical burden associated with LV remodeling leads to increased myocardial wall stress and adverse remodeling, all of which serve to further impair cardiac performance and contribute to disease progression. The CorCap Cardiac Support Device (CSD) (Acorn Cardiovascular, Inc., St. Paul, Minnesota) is a mesh-like device that is surgically implanted around the heart. The device is designed to provide circumferential myocardial wall support, and reduce wall stress and myocyte stretch. Clinical experience with CorCap CSD implants in patients with heart failure can be divided into 3 phases: (1) initial safety studies, (2) randomized controlled trials, and (3) limited marketed release. Initial safety studies were undertaken in 48 patients recruited between April 1999 and April of 2001. In 11 patients with complete follow-up, it was noted that LV size, as measured by LV end-diastolic dimension, significantly decreased as early as 3 months postimplant, with an even greater reduction at 6 months. Most importantly, this benefit was sustained, so that the LV end-diastolic dimension stayed smaller at 1, 2, and 3 years of follow-up. There was also an improvement in LV function, as manifested by changes in LV ejection fraction. Ejection fraction was significantly increased by 3 months and appeared to reach a peak improvement by 6 months. This benefit was likewise maintained at 1, 2, and 3 years postsurgery. Hemodynamic data did not show any evidence of constrictive physiology. These preliminary safety studies had shown that the CorCap CSD could be implanted safely and without excess operative morbidity or mortality. The primary objective of the Acorn Randomized Clinical Trial is to assess the efficacy and safety of the CorCap CSD in patients with advanced heart failure despite optimal medical therapy. A randomized trial with 2 arms (mitral valve surgery randomized to CSD and cardiomyopathy randomized to medical therapy alone or with CSD

  2. Dental Students' Perceived Value of Peer-Mentoring Clinical Leadership Experiences.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Rachel A; Hammaker, Daniel J; de Peralta, Tracy L; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2016-03-01

    This pilot study compared second- and fourth-year dental students' perceived values of newly implemented clinical leadership experiences (CLEs) at one U.S. dental school during the 2012-13 academic year. In the CLEs, fourth-year (D4) students mentored second-year (D2) dental students during faculty-supervised patient treatment. The two cohorts' perceived value of the experiences was measured with questionnaires consisting of five-point Likert scale questions and open text responses. Out of a total of 114 D2 and 109 D4 students, 46 D2 students and 35 D4 students participated (response rates of 40.4% and 32.1%, respectively). While responses from both cohorts showed they highly valued the CLEs, the D2s perceived greater value: 4.07 (0.53) v. 3.51 (0.95), p<0.003. Both cohorts reported feeling that D4s were prepared to mentor D2s, that the CLEs had educational benefits, and that the CLEs increased their comfort with peer communication. Theme analysis of open text questions revealed that the respondents perceived the D4s were more accessible than faculty and provided guidance and individual attention; the CLEs increased student comfort; the CLEs reinforced D4 skills, knowledge, and confidence; and the CLEs provided management, leadership, and collaborative work experience. Theme analysis also highlighted student concerns about a lack of program structure. Overall, the majority of both groups valued CLEs in their dental education. Particular advantages they perceived were increased comfort, guidance, and attention. Further program development should address student concerns. These results suggest that similar programs should be considered and/or expanded in other dental schools' curricula. PMID:26933106

  3. The pharmaceutical management system at Shade Tree Family Clinic: a medical student-run free clinic's experience.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Patel, Sanjay G; Guyer, Dana L; Dunn, Sarah R; Herceg, Megan E; Knox, Caroline K; Miller, Robert F

    2008-09-01

    The Shade Tree Family Clinic (STFC) is a student-run free walk-in health clinic opened by Vanderbilt University medical students in October 2005 to address the acute and chronic health needs of the underinsured community in East Nashville. STFC founders decided that the clinic would provide complete medical care, including dispensing commonly prescribed medications at no charge to patients. After several months of managing the inventory in a log book, a medical student author created a Web-based pharmaceutical tracking system to manage the medication formulary. In the process, the authors found little literature available addressing the logistics of setting up an electronic pharmacy system. The system created uses the freely available RxNorm and US Department of Veterans Affairs National Drug File Reference Terminology databases for medication and classification data. Incorporation of these databases allows medical students to dispense and restock medications with ease. The system ensures accurate data entry, improves efficiency, and facilitates continuity of care at a clinic staffed by hundreds of different students and physicians. The STFC pharmaceutical tracking system has facilitated the acquisition and efficient management of medications and consequently has had a great impact on the success of STFC. PMID:18850398

  4. A Framework for Usable and Effective Clinical Decision Support: Experience from the iCPR Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kannry, Joseph; McCullagh, Lauren; Kushniruk, Andre; Mann, Devin; Edonyabo, Daniel; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The promise of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) has always been to transform patient care and improve patient outcomes through the delivery of timely and appropriate recommendations that are patient specific and, more often than not, are appropriately actionable. However, the users of CDS—providers—are frequently bombarded with inappropriate and inapplicable CDS that often are not informational, not integrated into the workflow, not patient specific, and that may present out of date and irrelevant recommendations. Methods: The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR) project was a randomized clinical trial (RCT) conducted to determine if a novel form of CDS, i.e., clinical prediction rules (CPRs), could be efficiently integrated into workflow and result in changes in outcomes (e.g., antibiotic ordering) when embedded within a commercial electronic health record (EHR). We use the lessons learned from the iCPR project to illustrate a framework for constructing usable, useful, and effective actionable CDS while employing off-the-shelf functionality in a production system. Innovations that make up the framework combine the following: (1) active and actionable decision support, (2) multiple rounds of usability testing with iterative development for user acceptance, (3) numerous context sensitive triggers, (4) dedicated training and support for users of the CDS tool for user adoption, and (5) support from clinical and administrative leadership. We define “context sensitive triggers” as being workflow events (i.e., context) that result in a CDS intervention. Discussion: Success of the framework can be measured by CDS adoption (i.e., intervention is being used), acceptance (compliance with recommendations), and clinical outcomes (where appropriate). This framework may have broader implications for the deployment of Health Information Technology (HIT). Results and Conclusion: iCPR was well adopted(57.4% of users) and accepted (42.7% of users

  5. Clinical trials in cancer: the role of surrogate patients in defining what constitutes an ethically acceptable clinical experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Mackillop, W. J.; Palmer, M. J.; O'Sullivan, B.; Ward, G. K.; Steele, R.; Dotsikas, G.

    1989-01-01

    Doctors who treat lung cancer in Ontario were previously asked how they would wish to be managed if they developed non-small cell lung cancer and whether they would consent to participate in six clinical trials for which they might be eligible. The proportion of these expert surrogate patients who would consent to each clinical trial ranged from 11 to 64%. The results of this study were transmitted to the same group of doctors who were asked to comment on the ethical acceptability of each trial in the light of this information. The majority of physicians said that those trials to which less than 50% of expert surrogates consented should not have been opened to patients. Sixty-nine per cent of doctors thought that new trials should be evaluated in this way. We also present the results of a survey of 400 lay people in Ontario who were asked to imagine that they had lung cancer and whether they would consent to participate in two of these same clinical trials. Fifty per cent of lay people consented to a randomised trial of lobectomy versus segmentectomy in early, operable disease (LCSC-821) compared to 64% of expert surrogates, and 48% of lay people consented to a randomised trial of five different forms of chemotherapy in metastatic disease (SWOG-8241) compared to 19% of doctors. It was concluded that the lay people were unable to discern differences in the acceptability of clinical trials which were clear to experts in the field. Subsequently, respondents were told about the decisions which doctors would make in the same circumstances and asked if this information would modify their previous decisions. There is no net change in the proportion of patients consenting to the surgery trial but the proportion of people consenting to the chemotherapy trial decreased by 40%. The majority of lay people said that they would wish to have access to this type of information before consenting to participate in a clinical trial. PMID:2930704

  6. One-year clinical experience of perampanel in Spain: a multicentre study of efficacy and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Garamendi-Ruiz, Iñigo; García-García, María Eugenia; Bertol-Alegre, Vicente; Mauri-Llerda, José Ángel; García-Morales, Irene; Garayoa-Irigoyen, Vanesa; Agúndez-Sarasola, Marta; De Toledo-Heras, María; García-Morales, Vanessa; García-Gomara, María José; Arcos-Sánchez, Carolina; Gago-Veiga, Ana; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Rueda-Mena, Eliana; Muñoz-Fargas, Elena; Santos-Lasaosa, Sonia; Oliván-Usieto, José Antonio; Julián, Leyre Díaz de Cerio-; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos; Marinas-Alejo, Ainhoa

    2016-06-01

    Perampanel, a non-competitive antagonist of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors, is the most recent antiepileptic drug available in Spain, marketed in January 2014. It was initially approved by the European Medicines Agency as adjunctive treatment for partial-onset seizures in patients 12 years and older, but recently also for primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although clinical trials provide essential information about the drug, they do not reflect daily clinical practice. This retrospective study shows the initial experience with perampanel in 11 Spanish hospitals during its first year post-commercialisation. All patients who started perampanel treatment were included, but efficacy and tolerability were only assessed in those patients with a minimum follow-up period of six months. In total, 256 patients were treated with perampanel before September 2014, and 253 had an observational period of one year. After six months, 216/256 patients (84%) continued on perampanel and 180/253 (71.1%) completed one year of treatment. The mean number of previous antiepileptic drugs used was 6.83 and the median number of concomitant antiepileptic drugs was 2. The mean perampanel dose was 7.06 mg and 8.26 mg at six and 12 months, respectively. The responder rate was 39.5% and 35.9% at both follow-up points, respectively. Adverse events were experienced by 91/253 (35.5%) and resulted in withdrawal in 37 (14.6%). The most common adverse events were somnolence, dizziness, and irritability. We found no significant differences between concomitant use of enzyme-inducing and non-inducing antiepileptic drugs, regarding efficacy, adverse effects, or withdrawals. Irritability was not influenced by concomitant use of levetiracetam, relative to other drugs, but was more frequently observed in patients with a history of psychiatric problems or learning disabilities. PMID:27238234

  7. Richter’s Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, René

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richter’s hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richter’s hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as “the small rupture.” In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title “Richter’s hernia.” To his work—a cornerstone to modern understanding—hardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richter’s hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richter’s hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors’ collective was 17%. Conclusion Richter’s hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  8. SU-E-J-181: Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Workflow: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Green, O; Kashani, R; Santanam, L; Wooten, H; Li, H; Rodriguez, V; Hu, Y; Mutic, S; Hand, T; Victoria, J; Steele, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aims of this work are to describe the workflow and initial clinical experience treating patients with an MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIGRT) system. Methods: Patient treatments with a novel MR-IGRT system started at our institution in mid-January. The system consists of an on-board 0.35-T MRI, with IMRT-capable delivery via doubly-focused MLCs on three {sup 60} Co heads. In addition to volumetric MR-imaging, real-time planar imaging is performed during treatment. So far, eleven patients started treatment (six finished), ranging from bladder to lung SBRT. While the system is capable of online adaptive radiotherapy and gating, a conventional workflow was used to start, consisting of volumetric imaging for patient setup using visible tumor, evaluation of tumor motion outside of PTV on cine images, and real-time imaging. Workflow times were collected and evaluated to increase efficiency and evaluate feasibility of adding the adaptive and gating features while maintaining a reasonable patient throughput. Results: For the first month, physicians attended every fraction to provide guidance on identifying the tumor and an acceptable level of positioning and anatomical deviation. Average total treatment times (including setup) were reduced from 55 to 45 min after physician presence was no longer required and the therapists had learned to align patients based on soft-tissue imaging. Presently, the source strengths were at half maximum (7.7K Ci each), therefore beam-on times will be reduced after source replacement. Current patient load is 10 per day, with increase to 25 anticipated in the near future. Conclusion: On-board, real-time MRI-guided RT has been incorporated into clinical use. Treatment times were kept to reasonable lengths while including volumetric imaging, previews of tumor movement, and physician evaluation. Workflow and timing is being continuously evaluated to increase efficiency. In near future, adaptive and gating capabilities of the system will

  9. A reappraisal of the clinical efficacy of nebulized flunisolide in pediatric asthma: the Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Ahmad; Mroueh, Salman; Fiocchi, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Flunisolide (FLU) is a synthetic corticosteroid with potent topical anti-inflammatory activity. Its oral bioavailability is poor (6.7%). After gastrointestinal and lung absorption, the drug undergoes rapid and extensive first-pass metabolism by the liver to an inactive 6beta-hydroxylated metabolite. Plasma half-life is estimated to be 3.9 to 4.6 hours. FLU has a low volume of distribution at steady state and a short terminal half-life after inhalation (96 L and 1.6 hour, respectively). FLU, like budesonide, has a short pulmonary residence time and it is hypothesized that it may undergo esterification in the cell due to the presence of a free hydroxyl group at C21. Nebulization may offer important advantages over other inhalation methods. Nebulizers allow drug delivery in very young children through passive inhalation, depending less on patient coordination and cooperation. Comparative studies indicate that FLU is nebulized to a better advantage than beclomethasone dipropionate and budesonide. This is attributed to its elevated water solubility. The aim of this article is to outline the factors that influence drug nebulization and the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics of FLU compared to other inhaled corticosteroids. In addition, we report a series of clinical data regarding the efficacy of nebulized FLU with focus on the Italian experience. Overall, the physicochemical characteristics and pharmacokinetic profile of FLU favor its use for nebulization. Clinical data indicate that nebulized FLU is effective in asthma treatment in infants and children. Side effects were not reported at the commonly used doses. PMID:17883883

  10. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Cardiomyopathy in Barth Syndrome: The UK Experience.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sok-Leng; Forsey, Jonathan; Dudley, Declan; Steward, Colin G; Tsai-Goodman, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked disorder characterised by cardiomyopathy, neutropenia, skeletal myopathy and growth delay. This study describes the UK national clinical experience and outcome of cardiomyopathy in BTHS. The clinical course and echocardiographic changes of all patients with BTHS in the UK were reviewed from 2004 to 2014. In addition, strain analysis using 2D speckle tracking echocardiography was performed to further assess left ventricular function in the most recent follow-up. At last follow-up, 22 of 27 patients were alive with a median age of 12.6 (2.0-23.8) years; seven underwent cardiac transplantation at a median age of 2 (0.33-3.6) years, and five died (18.5 %) at a median age of 1.8 (0.02-4.22) years. All deaths were related to cardiomyopathy or its management. Left ventricular diastolic dimension and systolic function measured by fractional shortening tended to normalise and stabilise after the first 3 years of life in the majority of patients. However, patients with BTHS (n = 16) had statistically significant reduction in global longitudinal and circumferential strain compared to controls (n = 18), (p < 0.001), despite apparent normal conventional measures of function. There was also reduced or reversed apical rotation and reduced left ventricular twist. Sustained ventricular arrhythmia was not seen at follow-up. Cardiac phenotype in BTHS is variable; however, longer-term outcome in our cohort suggests good prognosis after the first 5 years of life. Most patients appeared to have recovered near normal cardiac function by conventional echocardiographic measures, but strain analysis showed abnormal myocardial deformation and rotational mechanics. PMID:26337810

  11. Radiobiological intercomparison of clinical neutron beams for growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots

    SciTech Connect

    Beauduin, M.; Gueulette, J.; Vynckier, S.; Wambersie, A.

    1989-02-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) values of different neutron beams produced at the variable energy cyclotron Cyclone of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) were determined. The neutrons were obtained by bombarding a beryllium target with 34-, 45-, 65-, or 75-MeV protons or with 50-MeV deuterons. The biological system was growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots. Taking the p(65) + Be neutron beam as a reference, RBE values were found equal to 1.36 +/- 0.2, 1.20 +/- 0.1, 1.00 (ref), 0.98 +/- 0.1, and 1.18 +/- 0.1, respectively; the doses corresponding to 50% growth inhibition were 0.39, 0.44, 0.53, 0.54, and 0.45 Gy. For the same beams, OER values were found equal to 1.55 +/- 0.1, 1.38 +/- 0.1, 1.29 +/- 0.1, 1.41 +/- 0.1, and 1.60 +/- 0.2, respectively.

  12. V.A.C. Therapy in the management of paediatric wounds: clinical review and experience.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona; Amjad, Ibrahim; Bookout, Kim; Fleck, Tatjana; Gabriel, Allen; Kaufman, David; McCord, Shannon Stone; Moores, Donald C; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Salazar, Jorge D; Song, David H; Teich, Steven; Gupta, Subhas

    2009-08-01

    Usage of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of acute and chronic wounds has grown exponentially in the past decade. Hundreds of studies have been published regarding outcomes and methods of therapy used for adult wounds. This treatment is increasingly being used to manage difficult-to-treat paediatric wounds arising from congenital defects, trauma, infection, tumour, burns, pressure ulceration and postsurgical complications in children, although relatively few studies have been aimed at this population. Given the anatomical and physiological differences between adults and children, a multidisciplinary expert advisory panel was convened to determine appropriate use of NPWT with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C. Therapy, KCI Licensing, Inc., San Antonio, TX) for the treatment of paediatric wounds. The primary objectives of the expert advisory panel were to exchange state-of-practice information on paediatric wound care, review the published data regarding the use of NPWT/ROCF in paediatric wounds, evaluate the strength of the existing data and establish guidelines on best practices with NPWT/ROCF for the paediatric population. The proposed paediatrics-specific clinical practice guidelines are meant to provide practitioners an evidence base from which decisions could be made regarding the safe and efficacious selection of pressure settings, foam type, dressing change frequency and use of interposing contact layer selections. The guidelines reflect the state of knowledge on effective and appropriate wound care at the time of publication. They are the result of consensus reached by expert advisory panel members based on their individual clinical and published experiences related to the use of NPWT/ROCF in treating paediatric wounds. Best practices are described herein for novice and advanced users of NPWT/ROCF. Recommendations by the expert panel may not be appropriate for use in all

  13. Silent loss and the clinical encounter: Parents’ and physicians’ experiences of stillbirth–a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the United States, an estimated 70 stillbirths occur each day, on average 25,000 each year. Research into the prevalence and causes of stillbirth is ongoing, but meanwhile, many parents suffer this devastating loss, largely in silence, due to persistent stigma and taboo; and many health providers report feeling ill equipped to support grieving parents. Interventions to address bereavement after neonatal death are increasingly common in U.S. hospitals, and there is growing data on the nature of parent bereavement after a stillbirth. However, further research is needed to evaluate supportive interventions and to investigate the parent-clinician encounter during hospitalization following a stillbirth. Qualitative inquiry offers opportunities to better understand the lived experience of parents against the backdrop of clinicians’ beliefs, intentions, and well-meaning efforts to support grieving parents. Methods We present a secondary qualitative analysis of transcript data from 3 semi-structured focus groups conducted with parents who had experienced a stillbirth and delivered in a hospital, and 2 focus groups with obstetrician-gynecologists. Participants were drawn from the greater Seattle region in Washington State. We examine parents’ and physicians’ experiences and beliefs surrounding stillbirth during the clinical encounter using iterative discourse analysis. Results Women reported that the cheery, bustling environment of the labor and delivery setting was a painful place for parents who had had a stillbirth, and that the well-meaning attempts of physicians to offer comfort often had the opposite effect. Parents also reported that their grief is deeply felt but not socially recognized. While physicians recognized patients’ grief, they did not grasp its depth or duration. Physicians viewed stillbirth as an unexpected clinical tragedy, though several considered stillbirth less traumatic than the death of a neonate. In the months and years

  14. Clinical Outcome of Parotidectomy with Reconstruction: Experience of a Regional Head and Neck Cancer Unit

    PubMed Central

    Okoturo, Eyituoyo; Osasuyi, Anslem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salivary gland pathologies represent a histologically diverse group of benign and malignant neoplasms. Currently, World Health Organization recognizes 13 benign and 24 malignant variants of all salivary gland neoplasms. Surgery continues to remain the main-stay for treatment of parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study was to document our experiences of the patients treated for parotid tumors and find out if any compelling variable predicted the relative clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study, from records of parotidectomies performed at the operating theatre by the head and neck cancer division of the study institution between 2010 and 2013. Eligibility for study inclusion included cases with benign or malignant parotid neoplasms requiring surgical management with or without adjunct radiotherapy. The predictors of postoperative complications, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed. Results: A total of 20 patients underwent parotidectomy. The mean age was 42 years. Tumors were located on the left parotid in 13 cases (65%) and the right parotid in 7 cases (35%). The surgical procedures comprised 16 superficial parotidectomies, 1 total parotidectomy, and 3 radical parotidectomy (inclusive of facial nerve sacrifice) and 2 neck dissections levels II–V. The reconstructive procedures were 2 facial nerve branch cable grafts, 1 end-to-end facial-facial nerve branch anastomoses, and 2 facial re-animation surgeries (temporalis muscle suspensions). A total of five cases (33.3%) had postoperative complications. 2 variables (length of surgery and neck dissection) were found to have an impact on postoperative complications that were statistically significant. Additionally, length of surgery was a significant predictor on the 2 years OS and DFS. Conclusion: The result of this study showed good clinical outcome, especially in the benign cases. The comprehensive clinical outcome of the malignant

  15. Termino-lateral nerve suture in lesions of the digital nerves: clinical experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Artiaco, S; Tos, P; Conforti, L G; Geuna, S; Battiston, B

    2010-02-01

    Documented experience of treatment of digital nerve lesions with the termino-lateral (end-to-side) nerve suture is limited. Our clinical experience of this technique is detailed here alongside a systematic review of the previous literature. We performed, from 2002 to 2008, seven termino-lateral sutures with epineural window opening for digital nerve lesions. Functional outcome was analysed using the two-point discrimination test and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. The results showed a sensory recovery of S3+ in six cases and S3 in one case. The mean distance found in the two-point discrimination test was 12.7 mm (range 8-18 mm). After a review of the literature, we were able to obtain homogeneous data from 17 additional patients operated by termino-lateral coaptation. The overall number of cases included in our review was 24. A sensory recovery was observed in 23 out of 24 patients. The functional results were S0 in one case, S3 in one case, S3+ in twenty cases and S4 in two cases. Excluding the one unfavourable case, the mean distance in the two-point discrimination test was 9.7 mm (range 3-18 mm). It can thus be concluded that the treatment of digital nerve lesions with termino-lateral suture showed encouraging results. Based on the results obtained in this current study we believe that in case of loss of substance, end-to-side nerve coaptation may be an alternative to biological and synthetic tubulisation when a digital nerve reconstruction by means of nerve autograft is declined by the patient. PMID:19687081

  16. Experiences and challenges in data monitoring for clinical trials within an international tropical disease research network

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Mok, M; VanRaden, MJ; Higgs, ES; Dominik, R

    2014-01-01

    Background Models for the structure and procedures of data and safety monitoring boards (DSMBs) continue to evolve in response to issues of new and of old concern. Some authors have called for an open dialogue on these questions through publication of the experiences of DSMBs in addressing them. Purpose The goal of this paper is to add to the current discussion about acceptable models for establishing, serving on, and reporting to monitoring committees, particularly those that oversee multiple studies in less developed countries. The paper seeks to do so by describing the establishment and subsequent operation of one such multi-trial DSMB over a five-year period. This DSMB was formed to monitor trials conducted by members of the International Centers for Tropical Disease Research (ICTDR) network of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). Methods The operational model and experiences are summarized by the authors, who had immediate responsibilities for directing the DSMB's activities. Results The board played an active, traditional role in assuring that patient safety was maintained and that current standards for clinical research were met. In addition, both NIAID and the board members viewed education of investigators to be an important role for the board to play in this particular setting. This affected the threshold for identifying which trials would be monitored, and it impacted several procedures adopted by the board. Limitations This report reflects the observations of those involved in managing the DSMB, including comments offered by the DSMB and by investigators, but not data gathered in a systematic way. Conclusions The operational model described here has allowed the DSMB to fulfill its role in the oversight of the trials. We hope that the ideas we present may help others facing similar situations and may stimulate further critical thinking about DSMB structure and function. PMID:17060220

  17. In vitro and in vivo studies on radiobiological effects of prolonged fraction delivery time in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ling; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Chao-Su; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Zhu, Guo-Pei; Ying,, Hong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, when used in the clinic, prolongs fraction delivery time. Here we investigated both the in vivoand in vitroradiobiological effects on the A549 cell line, including the effect of different delivery times with the same dose on A549 tumor growth in nude mice. The in vitroeffects were studied with clonogenic assays, using linear-quadratic and incomplete repair models to fit the dose-survival curves. Fractionated irradiation of different doses was given at one fraction per day, simulating a clinical dose-time-fractionation pattern. The longer the interval between the exposures, the more cells survived. To investigate the in vivoeffect, we used sixty-four nude mice implanted with A549 cells in the back legs, randomly assigned into eight groups. A 15 Gy radiation dose was divided into different subfractions. The maximum and minimum tumor diameters were recorded to determine tumor growth. Tumor growth was delayed for groups with prolonged delivery time (40 min) compared to the group receiving a single dose of 15 Gy (P< 0.05), and tumors with a 20 min delivery time had delayed growth compared to those with a 40 min delivery time [20′ (7.5 Gy × 2 F) vs 40′ (7.5 Gy × 2 F), P= 0.035; 20′ (3 Gy × 5 F) vs 40′ (3 Gy × 5 F); P= 0.054; 20′ (1.67 Gy × 9 F) vs 40′ (1.67 Gy × 9 F), P= 0.028]. A prolonged delivery time decreased the radiobiological effects, so we strongly recommend keeping the delivery time as short as possible. PMID:23090953

  18. In vitro and in vivo studies on radiobiological effects of prolonged fraction delivery time in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Chao-Su; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Zhu, Guo-Pei; Ying, Hong-Mei

    2013-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, when used in the clinic, prolongs fraction delivery time. Here we investigated both the in vivoand in vitroradiobiological effects on the A549 cell line, including the effect of different delivery times with the same dose on A549 tumor growth in nude mice. The in vitroeffects were studied with clonogenic assays, using linear-quadratic and incomplete repair models to fit the dose-survival curves. Fractionated irradiation of different doses was given at one fraction per day, simulating a clinical dose-time-fractionation pattern. The longer the interval between the exposures, the more cells survived. To investigate the in vivoeffect, we used sixty-four nude mice implanted with A549 cells in the back legs, randomly assigned into eight groups. A 15 Gy radiation dose was divided into different subfractions. The maximum and minimum tumor diameters were recorded to determine tumor growth. Tumor growth was delayed for groups with prolonged delivery time (40 min) compared to the group receiving a single dose of 15 Gy (P< 0.05), and tumors with a 20 min delivery time had delayed growth compared to those with a 40 min delivery time [20' (7.5 Gy × 2 F) vs 40' (7.5 Gy × 2 F), P= 0.035; 20' (3 Gy × 5 F) vs 40' (3 Gy × 5 F); P= 0.054; 20' (1.67 Gy × 9 F) vs 40' (1.67 Gy × 9 F), P= 0.028]. A prolonged delivery time decreased the radiobiological effects, so we strongly recommend keeping the delivery time as short as possible. PMID:23090953

  19. Predictive power of individual factors and clinical learning experience on academic success: findings from a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dante, Angelo; Fabris, Stefano; Palese, Alvisa

    2015-01-01

    Academic failure is the inability of a nursing student to graduate or to complete the nursing degree on time. This longitudinal cohort study, involving 2 Italian universities, documents the effects of selected individual variables and the quality of the clinical learning experience as perceived by students on academic success. Factors related to the clinical learning experience were the quality of the supervisory relationship, pedagogical atmosphere, and commitment of the ward related to the level of personalized nursing care delivered and clarity of nursing documentation. PMID:25643319

  20. Internet-based virtual classroom and educational management software enhance students' didactic and clinical experiences in perfusion education programs.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Austin, Jon W; Holt, David W; Searles, Bruce E; Darling, Edward M

    2004-09-01

    A challenge faced by many university-based perfusion education (PE) programs is the need for student clinical rotations at hospital locations that are geographically disparate from the main educational campus. The problem has been addressed through the employment of distance-learning environments. The purpose of this educational study is to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching model as it is applied to PE. Web-based virtual classroom (VC) environments and educational management system (EMS) software were implemented independently and as adjuncts to live, interactive Internet-based audio/video transmission from classroom to classroom in multiple university-based PE programs. These Internet environments have been used in a variety of ways including: 1) forum for communication between the university faculty, students, and preceptors at clinical sites, 2) didactic lectures from expert clinicians to students assigned to distant clinical sites, 3) small group problem-based-learning modules designed to enhance students analytical skills, and 4) conversion of traditional face-to-face lectures to asynchronous learning modules. Hypotheses and measures of student and faculty satisfaction, clinical experience, and learning outcomes are proposed, and some early student feedback was collected. For curricula that emphasize both didactic and clinical education, the use of Internet-based VC and EMS software provides significant advancements over traditional models. Recognized advantages include: 1) improved communications between the college faculty and the students and clinical preceptors, 2) enhanced access to a national network of clinical experts in specialized techniques, 3) expanded opportunity for student distant clinical rotations with continued didactic course work, and 4) improved continuity and consistency of clinical experiences between students through implementation of asynchronous learning modules. Students recognize the learning efficiency of on

  1. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho; Lee, Yoonho

    2015-09-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  2. Unsupervised Biomedical Named Entity Recognition: Experiments with Clinical and Biological Texts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaodian; Elhadad, Nóemie

    2013-01-01

    Named entity recognition is a crucial component of biomedical natural language processing, enabling information extraction and ultimately reasoning over and knowledge discovery from text. Much progress has been made in the design of rule-based and supervised tools, but they are often genre and task dependent. As such, adapting them to different genres of text or identifying new types of entities requires major effort in re-annotation or rule development. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised approach to extracting named entities from biomedical text. We describe a stepwise solution to tackle the challenges of entity boundary detection and entity type classification without relying on any handcrafted rules, heuristics, or annotated data. A noun phrase chunker followed by a filter based on inverse document frequency extracts candidate entities from free text. Classification of candidate entities into categories of interest is carried out by leveraging principles from distributional semantics. Experiments show that our system, especially the entity classification step, yields competitive results on two popular biomedical datasets of clinical notes and biological literature, and outperforms a baseline dictionary match approach. Detailed error analysis provides a road map for future work. PMID:23954592

  3. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25790510

  4. Designing new collaborative learning spaces in clinical environments: experiences from a children's hospital in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bines, Julie E; Jamieson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Hospitals are complex places that provide a rich learning environment for students, staff, patients and their families, professional groups and the community. The "new" Royal Children's Hospital opened in late 2011. Its mission is focused on improving health and well-being of children and adolescents through leadership in healthcare, research and education. Addressing the need to create "responsive learning environments" aligned with the shift to student-centred pedagogy, two distinct learning environments were developed within the new Royal Children's Hospital; (i) a dedicated education precinct providing a suite of physical environments to promote a more active, collaborative and social learning experience for education and training programs conducted on the Royal Children's Hospital campus and (ii) a suite of learning spaces embedded within clinical areas so that learning becomes an integral part of the daily activities of this busy Hospital environment. The aim of this article is to present the overarching educational principles that lead the design of these learning spaces and describe the opportunities and obstacles encountered in the development of collaborative learning spaces within a large hospital development. PMID:23701214

  5. Unsupervised biomedical named entity recognition: experiments with clinical and biological texts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaodian; Elhadad, Noémie

    2013-12-01

    Named entity recognition is a crucial component of biomedical natural language processing, enabling information extraction and ultimately reasoning over and knowledge discovery from text. Much progress has been made in the design of rule-based and supervised tools, but they are often genre and task dependent. As such, adapting them to different genres of text or identifying new types of entities requires major effort in re-annotation or rule development. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised approach to extracting named entities from biomedical text. We describe a stepwise solution to tackle the challenges of entity boundary detection and entity type classification without relying on any handcrafted rules, heuristics, or annotated data. A noun phrase chunker followed by a filter based on inverse document frequency extracts candidate entities from free text. Classification of candidate entities into categories of interest is carried out by leveraging principles from distributional semantics. Experiments show that our system, especially the entity classification step, yields competitive results on two popular biomedical datasets of clinical notes and biological literature, and outperforms a baseline dictionary match approach. Detailed error analysis provides a road map for future work. PMID:23954592

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life in the Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Judith; Saag, Michael; Squires, Kathleen; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Coate, Bruce; Mrus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Background. We report health-related QoL (HRQoL) from GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) study by sex and race over 48 weeks. Methods. 429 treatment-experienced adults (HIV-1 RNA ≥ 1000 copies/mL) received darunavir/ritonavir 600/100 mg twice daily plus an appropriate background regimen. QoL was measured by the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection (FAHI) questionnaire. Results. 67% women and 77% men, including 67.4% black, 76.0% Hispanic, and 73.8% white patients, completed the trial. Baseline total FAHI scores were similar between sexes and races. Total FAHI of the entire population improved by Week 4 (P < .05); near-maximum changes obtained by Week 12 were maintained through Week 48. Women and black patients demonstrated larger improvements in total FAHI versus men, and Hispanic and white patients, respectively. Conclusion. HRQoL improved in all sex and racial/ethnic groups. Sex-based and race-based differences in improvements in FAHI subscales may provide insight into subtle differences of HIV-1 and treatment on HRQoL in different populations. PMID:21904672

  7. Comparisons between MCNP, EGS4 and experiment for clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Jeraj, R; Keall, P J; Ostwald, P M

    1999-03-01

    Understanding the limitations of Monte Carlo codes is essential in order to avoid systematic errors in simulations, and to suggest further improvement of the codes. MCNP and EGS4, Monte Carlo codes commonly used in medical physics, were compared and evaluated against electron depth dose data and experimental backscatter results obtained using clinical radiotherapy beams. Different physical models and algorithms used in the codes give significantly different depth dose curves and electron backscattering factors. The default version of MCNP calculates electron depth dose curves which are too penetrating. The MCNP results agree better with experiment if the ITS-style energy-indexing algorithm is used. EGS4 underpredicts electron backscattering for high-Z materials. The results slightly improve if optimal PRESTA-I parameters are used. MCNP simulates backscattering well even for high-Z materials. To conclude the comparison, a timing study was performed. EGS4 is generally faster than MCNP and use of a large number of scoring voxels dramatically slows down the MCNP calculation. However, use of a large number of geometry voxels in MCNP only slightly affects the speed of the calculation. PMID:10211804

  8. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  9. Clinical experience with single-port access laparoscopic cystectomy and myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Yu-Ri; Hong, Kil-Pyo; Ha, Jae-Eun; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Hong, Da-Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to assess our clinical experience with single-port access (SPA) laparoscopic cystectomy and myomectomy and the surgical outcomes of those procedures at our institution. Methods The authors evaluated the surgical outcomes of SPA laparoscopic cystectomy in 293 patients and SPA laparoscopic myomectomy in 246 patients. The surgical outcomes comprised operation time, the amount of blood loss during the operation, the change in hemoglobin (before and after the operation), the change in hematocrit (before and after the operation), switching to the multi-port access method, complications, transfusions, and the duration of the postoperative hospital stay. Results The Pearson correlation coefficient and the Spearman correlation coefficient between the operation time and the amount of blood loss were 0.312 and 0.321 for SPA laparoscopic cystectomy, respectively, and 0.706 and 0.674 for SPA laparoscopic myomectomy, respectively. The drops in hemoglobin and hematocrit were 1.33±0.78 g/dL and 4.14%±2.45%, respectively, in SPA laparoscopic cystectomy, while the corresponding figures were 1.34±1.13 g/dL and 4.17%±3.24% in SPA laparoscopic myomectomy, respectively. Conclusion This study reported the surgical outcomes of SPA laparoscopic cystectomy and myomectomy and compared them to previously published findings on traditional laparoscopic cystectomy and myomectomy. No significant differences were found in the surgical outcomes between SPA and traditional laparoscopic cystectomy and myomectomy. PMID:27104157

  10. CT Lesion Model-Based Structural Allografts: Custom Fabrication and Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Jan Claas; Hesselbarth, Uwe; Seifert, Philipp; Nowack, Dimitri; von Versen, Rüdiger; Smith, Mark David; Seifert, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Patients requiring knee and hip revision arthroplasty often present with difficult anatomical situations that limit options for surgery. Customised mega-implants may be one of few remaining treatment options. However, extensive damage to residual bone stock may also be present, and in such cases even customised prosthetics may be difficult to implant. Small quantities of lost bone can be replaced with standard allografts or autologous bone. Larger defects may require structural macro-allografts, sometimes in combination with implants (allograft-prosthesis composites). Methods Herein, we describe a process for manufacturing lesion-specific large structural allografts according to a 3D, full-scale, lithographically generated defect model. These macro-allografts deliver the volume and the mechanical stability necessary for certain complex revisions. They are patient-and implant-matched, negate some requirements for additional implants and biomaterials and save time in the operating theatre by eliminating the requirement for intra-operative sizing and shaping of standard allografts. Conclusion While a robust data set from long-term follow-up of patients receiving customised macro-allografts is not yet available, initial clinical experience and results suggest that lesion-matched macro-allografts can be an important component of revision joint surgery. PMID:23800856

  11. Segmental composition of whole-body impedance cardiogram estimated by computer simulations and clinical experiments.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Kööbi, T; Hyttinen, J; Malmivuo, J

    2000-03-01

    Whole-body impedance cardiography (ICGWB) has been proposed as a feasible means of measuring cardiac output (CO). However, the source distribution of heart-related impedance variations in the whole body is not known. To establish how much of a signal originates in each segment of the body and what the contribution of each is to stroke volume (SV) in ICGWB, impedance in the extremities and trunk were investigated in 15 healthy volunteers. In addition, the theoretical measurement properties of ICGWB were studied using a computer model of the whole-body anatomy as a volume conductor. The model confirmed the expected result that most of the basal impedance originates from the extremities. Clinical experiments revealed that the heart-related amplitude variations in the ICGWB signal originate more evenly from various body segments, the trunk slightly more than the arms or legs. The heart-related ICGWB signal represents a weighted sum of segmental pulsatile events in the body yielding physiologically meaningful data on almost the whole circulatory system. PMID:10735977

  12. Clinical implementation of dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Dosimetric aspects and initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, S. S.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Davis, C. A.; Ravichandran, R.; Kannadhasan, S.; Biunkumar, J. P.; El Ghamrawy, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the initial experience of quality assurance (QA) tests performed on the millennium multi-leaf collimator (mMLC) for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using sliding window technique. The various QA tests verified the mechanical and dosimetric stability of the mMLC of linear accelerator when operated in dynamic mode (dMLC). The mechanical QA tests also verified the positional accuracy and kinetic properties of the dMLC. The stability of dMLC was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using radiographic film and Omnipro IMRT software. The output stability, variation in output for different sweeping gap widths, and dosimetric leaf separation were measured. Dose delivery with IMRT was verified against the dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS). Monitor units (MUs) calculated by the planning system for the IMRT were cross-checked with independent commercial dose management software. Visual inspection and qualitative analysis showed that the leaf positioning accuracy was well within the acceptable limits. Dosimetric QA tests confirmed the dosimetric stability of the mMLC in dynamic mode. The verification of MUs using commercial software confirmed the reliability of the IMRT planning system for dose computation. The dosimetric measurements validated the fractional dose delivery. PMID:19893693

  13. Clinical Experience of Bronchoscopy-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation for Peripheral-Type Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Tsushima, Kenji; Yasuo, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new internal cooled electrode for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (Japan Application no. 2006-88228) suitable for forceps channel bronchoscopy. Here, we present our clinical experience with bronchoscopy-guided RFA under computed tomography (CT) monitoring for patients with peripheral-type non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Bronchoscopy-guided RFA was performed in two patients (80 and 70 years old) with NSCLC, who had no lymph node involvement and distant metastases (T1N0M0), but not indicated for surgery because of other complications, such as advanced age, poor pulmonary function, and refusal of thoracic surgery. The locations of the tumors were right S2 and left S3, respectively. Although the tumors showed ground-glass opacity (GGO) with solid components in both cases, radiographic findings changed to reduced mass-like shadow and remained stable for 4 and 3.5 years after bronchoscopy-guided RFA. As the former case developed progressive disease on chest CT, bronchoscopy-guided RFA was repeated in the same lesion, resulting in no change for the subsequent 1 year. There were no adverse reactions during the procedures. Thus, bronchoscopy-guided RFA is a safe and feasible procedure that represents a potentially useful therapeutic tool in local control in medically inoperable patients with stage I NSCLC. PMID:24106625

  14. [Professor Li Shi-zhen's clinical experiences on compatibility application of hegu (LI 4)].

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-qi

    2010-02-01

    The present paper introduces professor LI Shi-zhen's clinical experiences on compatibility application of Hegu (LI 4). Hegu (LI 4) is mostly used to treat acute pyreticosis, exterior syndrome of exogenous diseases, mind diseases and deficiency of vital energy. Acupuncture at this acupoint by using reducing method can dispel wind to relieve exterior syndrome, clear away heat to disperse lung. Powerful stimulation by needle can dredge stagnant meridian, open orifice to activate spirit. Acupuncture at this acupoint by using reinforcing method can invigorate qi to strengthen superficies and replenish qi to prevent collapse. Based on this method, reinforcing Zusanli (ST 36) and Baihui (GV 20) can strengthen middle energizer to nourish qi, which show the same benefits as Buzhong Yiqi Decoction; reinforcing Sanyinjiao (SP 6) can nourish both qi and blood, which show the same benefits as Decoction of Eight Ingredients; reducing Neiting (ST 44) can clear away evil heat of qifen in yangming meridians, which show the same benefits as Baihu Decoction. PMID:20214075

  15. Experiences with Capnography in Acute Care Settings: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Clinical Staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.; Riera, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While capnography is being incorporated into clinical guidelines, it is not used to it's full potential. We investigated reasons for limited implementation of capnography in acute care areas and explored facilitators and barriers to its implementation. Methods A purposeful sample of physicians and nurses in emergency departments (ED) and intensive care units (ICU) participated in semistructured interviews. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to analyze the data to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Nineteen providers were interviewed from five hospitals. Six themes were identified: variability in use of capnography among acute care units, availability and accessibility of capnography equipment, the evidence behind capnography use, the impact of capnography on patient care, personal experiences impacting use of capnography, and variable knowledge about capnography. Barriers and facilitators to use were found within each theme. Conclusions We observed varied responsiveness to capnography and identified factors that work to foster or discourage its use. This data can guide future implementation strategies. A deliberate strategy to foster utilization, mitigate barriers and broadly accelerate implementation has the potential to profoundly impact use of capnography in acute care areas with the goal of improving patient care. PMID:25129575

  16. Clinical and practical requirements of online software for anesthesia documentation an experience report.

    PubMed

    Benson, M; Junger, A; Quinzio, L; Fuchs, C; Sciuk, G; Michel, A; Marquardt, K; Hempelmann, G

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this paper is the presentation of a new version of the anesthesia documentation software, NarkoData, that has been used in routine clinical work in our department as part of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) since 1995. The performance of this software is presented along with requirements for future development of such a system. The originally used version, NarkoData 3.0, is an online anesthesia documentation software established by the software company ProLogic GmbH. It was primarily developed as a disk-based system for the MacOS operating system (Apple Computer Inc.). Based on our routine experience with the system, a catalogue of requirements was developed that concentrated on improvement in the sequence of work, administration and data management. In 1996, the concepts developed in our department, in close co-operation with medical personnel and the software company, led to a considerable enlargement of the program functions and the subsequent release of a new version of NarkoData. Since 1997, more than 20 000 anesthesia procedures have been recorded annually with this new version at 115 decentralized work stations at our university hospital. PMID:10961571

  17. Creating an educationally minded schedule: one approach to minimize the impact of duty hour standards on intern continuity clinic experience.

    PubMed

    DeBlasio, Dominick; Kerrey, M Kathleen; Sucharew, Heidi; Klein, Melissa

    2014-11-01

    To determine if implementing an educationally minded schedule utilizing consecutive night shifts can moderate the impact of the 2011 duty hour standards on education and patient continuity of care in longitudinal primary care experience (continuity clinic). A 14-month pre-post study was performed in continuity clinic with one supervising physician group and two intern groups. Surveys to assess attitudes and education were distributed to the supervising physicians and interns before and after the changes in duty hour standards. Intern groups' schedules were reviewed for the number of regular and alternative day clinic (i.e. primary care experience on a different weekday) sessions and patient continuity of care. Fifteen supervising physicians and 51 interns participated (25 in 2011, 26 in 2012). Intern groups' comfort when discussing patient issues, educational needs and teamwork perception did not differ. Supervising physicians' understanding of learning needs and provision of feedback did not differ between groups. Supervising physicians indicated a greater ability to provide feedback and understand learning needs during regular continuity clinic sessions compared with alternative day clinics (all p < 0.05). No significant difference was detected between intern groups in the number of regularly scheduled continuity clinics, alternative day clinics or patient continuity of care. The 2011 duty hour standards required significant alterations to intern schedules, but educationally minded scheduling limited impact on education and patient continuity in care. PMID:24841768

  18. A balancing act: a phenomenological exploration of medical students' experiences of using mobile devices in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Rashid-Doubell, F; Mohamed, S; Elmusharaf, K; O'Neill, C S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to describe the experiences of senior students using mobile devices in a clinical setting while learning and interacting with clinical teachers, patients and each other, and to identify challenges that facilitated or impeded the use of such devices in the hospital. Design Interpretative phenomenology was chosen to guide our enquiry. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to examine the experiences of five senior medical students using mobile devices in the clinical setting. Setting and participants Senior medical students at an international medical school in the Middle East. Results Three main themes emerged from the data analysis: learning; professional identity and transitioning from student to doctor. The findings showed that using mobile devices in the clinical area as a learning tool was not a formalised process. Rather, it was opportunistic learning at the bedside and on occasion a source of distraction from clinical teaching. Students needed to negotiate relationships between themselves, the clinical teacher and patients in order to ensure that they maintained an acceptable professional image. Participants experienced and negotiated the change from student to doctor making them mindful of using their devices at the bedside. Conclusions Mobile devices are part of daily life for a medical student and there is a need to adapt medical education in the clinical setting, to allow the students to use their devices in a sensitive manner. PMID:27142860

  19. Beagle Dog Tissue Archive (previously part of National Radiobiology Archives): from the Janus Tissue Archive at Northwestern University

    DOE Data Explorer

    Watson, Charles R.

    Following the advent of the atomic age, many nations have investigated the effects of radioactive exposure in animal models. Some of these investigations involved costly and unique experiments that produced tissue and data archives which are unlikely to be reproduced. In an effort to extract the value from these collections, programs have started in Japan, Europe, and America to preserve and make public the data and tissues from these studies for further investigation. The Beagle Dog Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1952 to 1991 by Thomas Fritz, William Norris, and Tom Seed and supported by grants from the Atomic Energy Commission, investigated the effects of Cobalt-60 radiation on beagle dogs. Documentation from these studies is availible in pdf form. This web portal seeks to make accessible the animal tissues and study data from the Beagle Dog Experiments using data organized by Charles Watson. Use the search form to the left to look for dog data from particular experimental conditions. Click a dog number to return the full dog record. Use the dog record to find tissues of interest and make a sample tissue request. These tissue samples and the data were known until recently as the the U.S. National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) and were maintained as the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) at Washington State University. Life-span studies using beagle dogs were done at the Argonne National Laboratory, University of California at Davis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and the University of Utah. The results and many microscope slides from these life-span studies, totaling some 6000 dogs, are now available to researchers. A seminal work included in the Archive is The Atlas of Experimentally-Induced Neoplasia in the Beagle Dog (Watson et al, 1997).

  20. Experience as a doctor in the developing world: does it benefit the clinical and organisational performance in general practice?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Many physicians have medical experience in developing countries early in their career, but its association with their medical performance later is not known. To explore possible associations we compared primary care physicians (GPs) with and without professional experience in a developing country in performance both clinical and organisational. Methods A retrospective survey using two databases to analyse clinical and organisational performance respectively. Analysis was done at the GP level and practice level. 517 GPs received a questionnaire regarding relevant working experience in a developing country. Indicators for clinical performance were: prescription, referral, external diagnostic procedures and minor procedures. We used the district health insurance data base covering 570.000 patients. Explorative secondary analysis of practice visits of 1004 GPs in 566 practices in the Netherlands from 1999 till 2001. We used a validated practice visit method (VIP; 385 indicators in 51 dimensions of practice management) to compare having experience in a developing country or not. Results Almost 8% of the GPs had experience in a developing country of at least two years. These GPs referred 9,5% less than their colleagues and did more surgical procedures. However, in the multivariate analysis 'experience in a developing country' was not significantly associated with clinical performance or with other GP- and practice characteristics. 16% of the practices a GP or GPs with at least two years experience in a developing country. They worked more often in group and rural practices with less patients per fte GP and more often part-time. These practices are more hygienic, collaborate more with the hospital and score better on organisation of the practice. These practices score less on service and availability, spend less time on patients in the consultation and the quality of recording in the EMD is lower. Conclusions We found interesting differences in clinical and