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Sample records for clinical radiobiological experience

  1. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durantel, Florent; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine; Chevalier, François; Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas; Testard, Isabelle; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  2. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    PubMed Central

    Mangoni, M.; Desideri, I.; Detti, B.; Bonomo, P.; Greto, D.; Paiar, F.; Simontacchi, G.; Meattini, I.; Scoccianti, S.; Masoni, T.; Ciabatti, C.; Turkaj, A.; Serni, S.; Minervini, A.; Gacci, M.; Carini, M.; Livi, L.

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 7680 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of ?/?. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  3. In vitro irradiation system for radiobiological experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cell cultures provide important information on basic tumor biology and radiobiology, they are not representative of the complexity of three-dimensional (3-D) solid tumors. In particular, new models reproducing clinical conditions as closely as possible are needed for radiobiological studies to provide information that can be translated from bench to bedside. Methods We developed a novel system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of 3-D tumor spheroids, the in vitro model considered as a bridge between the complex architectural organization of in vivo tumors and the very simple one of in vitro monolayer cell cultures. The system exploits the same equipment as that used for patient treatments, without the need for dedicated and highly expensive instruments. To mimic the passage of radiation beams through human tissues before they reach the target tumor mass, 96-multiwell plates containing the multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are inserted into a custom-built phantom made of plexiglass, the material most similar to water, the main component of human tissue. Results The system was used to irradiate CAEP- and A549-derived MCTS, pre-treated or not with 20?M cisplatin, with a dose of 20 Gy delivered in one session. We also tested the same treatment schemes on monolayer CAEP and A549 cells. Our preliminary results indicated a significant increment in radiotoxicity 20days after the end of irradiation in the CAEP spheroids pre-treated with cisplatin compared to those treated with cisplatin or irradiation alone. Conversely, the effect of the radio- chemotherapy combination in A549-derived MCTS was similar to that induced by cisplatin or irradiation alone. Finally, the 20Gy dose did not affect cell survival in monolayer CAEP and A549 cells, whereas cisplatin or cisplatin plus radiation caused 100% cell death, regardless of the type of cell line used. Conclusions We set up a system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of tumor cells grown in 3-D which allows for the use of the same dose intensities and schedules utilized in clinical practice. This irradiation system, coupled with 3-D cell cultures, has the potential to generate information that could be used to individually tailor radiotherapy. PMID:24180359

  4. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  5. Feasibility studies of colorless LR 115 SSNTD for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. F.; Tse, A. K. W.; Fong, W. F.; Yu, K. N.

    2006-06-01

    The feasibility of using the active layer of the colorless LR 115 SSNTD for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments was studied. The track revelation time on the bottom side (the side attached to the polyester base) was much longer than that on the top side (the side not attached to the polyester base) of the active layer so track formation on the top side was more desirable. In relation to this, culture of HeLa cells on the bottom side of the active layer was found feasible although the cultured cell number was relatively smaller. The feasibility of using this SSNTD for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments was demonstrated by culturing cells on the bottom side while performing alpha-particle irradiation and chemical etching on the top side, and by taking photographs of the cells and alpha-particle tracks together under the optical microscope.

  6. The RENT-project: radiobiological results and planned clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ries, G; Breit, A; Kummermehr, J; Breiter, N; Trott, K R

    1985-12-01

    Various preclinical tests have been performed to determine the properties of fast neutrons of a mean energy of 2 MeV produced by an U-235 converter plate in the research reactor of the Technical University of Munich. Experiments have been carried out using two specific beams denoted as RENT I and RENT II (RENT stands for Reaktor Neutron Therapy). RENT II is the unmodified beam with a dose rate of 65 rd/min and a gamma-contamination of nearly 50% in 2 cm depth of a perspex phantom. In RENT I the gamma-component is reduced to 25% after filtration of the beam with 2.5 cm lead, whereas the total dose rate is reduced to 22 rd/min. PMID:4082214

  7. Radiobiological modifiers in clinical radiation oncology: current reality and future potential.

    PubMed

    Allison, Ron R

    2014-12-01

    Radiation therapy can successfully ablate tumors. However, the same ionization process that destroys a cancer can also permanently damage surrounding organs resulting in unwanted clinical morbidity. Therefore, modern radiation therapy attempts to minimize dose to normal tissue to prevent side effects. Still, as tumors and normal tissues intercalate, the risk of normal tissue injury often may prevent tumoricidal doses of radiation therapy to be delivered. This paper will review current outcomes and limitations of radiobiological modifiers that may selectively enhance the radiosensitivity of tumors as well as parallel techniques that may protect normal tissues from radiation injury. Future endeavors based in part upon newly elucidated genetic pathways will be highlighted. PMID:25525845

  8. Bringing the heavy: carbon ion therapy in the radiobiological and clinical context

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer is undergoing an evolution, shifting to the use of heavier ion species. For a plethora of malignancies, current radiotherapy using photons or protons yields marginal benefits in local control and survival. One hypothesis is that these malignancies have acquired, or are inherently radioresistant to low LET radiation. In the last decade, carbon ion radiotherapy facilities have slowly been constructed in Europe and Asia, demonstrating favorable results for many of the malignancies that do poorly with conventional radiotherapy. However, from a radiobiological perspective, much of how this modality works in overcoming radioresistance, and extending local control and survival are not yet fully understood. In this review, we will explain from a radiobiological perspective how carbon ion radiotherapy can overcome the classical and recently postulated contributors of radioresistance (α/β ratio, hypoxia, cell proliferation, the tumor microenvironment and metabolism, and cancer stem cells). Furthermore, we will make recommendations on the important factors to consider, such as anatomical location, in the future design and implementation of clinical trials. With the existing data available we believe that the expansion of carbon ion facilities into the United States is warranted. PMID:24679134

  9. Bringing the heavy: carbon ion therapy in the radiobiological and clinical context.

    PubMed

    Schlaff, Cody D; Krauze, Andra; Belard, Arnaud; O'Connell, John J; Camphausen, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer is undergoing an evolution, shifting to the use of heavier ion species. For a plethora of malignancies, current radiotherapy using photons or protons yields marginal benefits in local control and survival. One hypothesis is that these malignancies have acquired, or are inherently radioresistant to low LET radiation. In the last decade, carbon ion radiotherapy facilities have slowly been constructed in Europe and Asia, demonstrating favorable results for many of the malignancies that do poorly with conventional radiotherapy. However, from a radiobiological perspective, much of how this modality works in overcoming radioresistance, and extending local control and survival are not yet fully understood. In this review, we will explain from a radiobiological perspective how carbon ion radiotherapy can overcome the classical and recently postulated contributors of radioresistance (?/? ratio, hypoxia, cell proliferation, the tumor microenvironment and metabolism, and cancer stem cells). Furthermore, we will make recommendations on the important factors to consider, such as anatomical location, in the future design and implementation of clinical trials. With the existing data available we believe that the expansion of carbon ion facilities into the United States is warranted. PMID:24679134

  10. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikeeva, I. D.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A. M.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  11. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Anikeeva, I. D.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied. The seeds were located inside the satellite in an open space, protected with aluminum foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminum foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival rate and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can thus be regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  12. In vivo radiobiological assessment of the new clinical carbon ion beams at CNAO.

    PubMed

    Facoetti, A; Vischioni, B; Ciocca, M; Ferrarini, M; Furusawa, Y; Mairani, A; Matsumoto, Y; Mirandola, A; Molinelli, S; Uzawa, A; Vilches, Freixas G; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the in vivo study performed to evaluate the uniformity of biological doses within an hypothetical target volume and calculate the values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at different depths in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the new CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) carbon beams is presented, in the framework of a typical radiobiological beam calibration procedure. The RBE values (relative to (60)Co ? rays) of the CNAO active scanning carbon ion beams were determined using jejunal crypt regeneration in mice as biological system at the entrance, centre and distal end of a 6-cm SOBP. The RBE values calculated from the iso-effective doses to reduce crypt survival per circumference to 10, ranged from 1.52 at the middle of the SOBP to 1.75 at the distal position and are in agreement with those previously reported from other carbon ion facilities. In conclusion, this first set of in vivo experiments shows that the CNAO carbon beam is radiobiologically comparable with the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan) and GSI (Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) ones. PMID:25877541

  13. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  14. Studies of SSNTDs made from LR-115 in view of their applicability in radiobiological experiments with alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drschel, B.; Hermsdorf, D.; Pieck, S.; Starke, S.; Thiele, H.; Weickert, F.

    2003-06-01

    Radiobiological studies on cell monolayers irradiated by charged particles need to determine the number and position of particle traversals. Solid state nuclear track detectors used as basic substrate for the cell layers are in principle suitable for this purpose. The detector foils must be as thin as possible but still guaranteeing mechanical stability. Two types of LR-115, red coloured and colourless, were tested in the present work. The studies aimed at optimisation of the etching conditions and determination of the registration efficiency for alpha particles in a wide range of energies and angles of incidence. Specific requirements have to be fulfilled for application of the detector foils under the environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments. Most important are biocompatibility between detector and cells and registration properties insensible against special treatments, as UV sterilisation and cell plating prior to irradiation as well as cell incubation after the irradiation. The experimental studies performed with alpha particles showed that environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments do not change the registration properties of LR-115 detectors significantly.

  15. Real-Time Dosimetry for Radiobiology Experiments Using 25 MeV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Mestari, Mohammed A.; Naeem, Syed F.; Wells, Douglas P.; Hunt, Alan; DeVeaux, Linda C.

    2009-03-10

    The next generation of radiobiology research requires increasingly more complex radiation sources to address questions ranging from the effects of space-based radiation to the influence of dose rate on biological systems. The Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) has developed a radiobiology research facility to address some of these questions. The irradiation challenge is to deliver stable and reproducible conditions of high dose rate with well-controlled beam uniformity, dose, and dose rate under controlled temperature. In this work, we used a 25 MeV modified medical grade linear accelerator (LINAC) to obtain a high and adjustable electron dose rate. To overcome electron beam drift we used a collimator that both assisted the LINAC operator to steer the beam and ensured that regardless of beam drift, only the fixed collimated beam would irradiate the specimens. In addition, we utilized a beam flattener to keep the beam variation as low as 3% at 2.5 cm from the beam's center, and 1% variation between the simultaneously irradiated sample tubes. We also demonstrated that a segmented Faraday 'cup'(FC) array provides a useful real-time beam scanning and monitoring system, and is promising for implementing real-time dosimetry and control.

  16. Real-Time Dosimetry for Radiobiology Experiments Using 25 MeV LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestari, Mohammed A.; Wells, Douglas P.; DeVeaux, Linda C.; Hunt, Alan; Naeem, Syed F.

    2009-03-01

    The next generation of radiobiology research requires increasingly more complex radiation sources to address questions ranging from the effects of space-based radiation to the influence of dose rate on biological systems. The Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) has developed a radiobiology research facility to address some of these questions. The irradiation challenge is to deliver stable and reproducible conditions of high dose rate with well-controlled beam uniformity, dose, and dose rate under controlled temperature. In this work, we used a 25 MeV modified medical grade linear accelerator (LINAC) to obtain a high and adjustable electron dose rate. To overcome electron beam drift we used a collimator that both assisted the LINAC operator to steer the beam and ensured that regardless of beam drift, only the fixed collimated beam would irradiate the specimens. In addition, we utilized a beam flattener to keep the beam variation as low as 3% at 2.5 cm from the beam's center, and 1% variation between the simultaneously irradiated sample tubes. We also demonstrated that a segmented Faraday "cup" (FC) array provides a useful real-time beam scanning and monitoring system, and is promising for implementing real-time dosimetry and control.

  17. Determination of radiobiological parameters for the safe clinical application of BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Hopewell, J.W.; Morris, G.M.; Coderre, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the present report the effects of BNCT irradiation on the skin and spinal cord of Fischer 344 rats, for known concentrations of {sup 10}B in the blood and these normal tissues, are compared with the effects of the neutron beam alone or photon irradiation. The biological effectiveness of irradiation in the presence of the capture agents BSH and BPA have been compared. Irradiations were carried out using the thermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Therapy experiments were also carried out as part of this study, using the rat 9L-gliosarcoma cell line, in order to establish the potential therapeutic advantage that might be achieved using the above capture agents. This cell line grows as a solid tumor in vivo as well as in vitro. The implications of these findings, with respect to the clinical use of the Petten HBII based epithermal neutron beam, will be discussed.

  18. Feasibility study on the use of polyallyldiglycol-carbonate cell dishes in TUNEL assay for alpha particle radiobiological experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. F.; Yum, E. H. W.; Wan, C. K.; Fong, W. F.; Yu, K. N.

    2007-08-01

    In the present work, we have studied the feasibility of a method based on polyallyldiglycol-carbonate (PADC) films to investigate the effects of alpha particles on HeLa cervix cancer cells. Thin PADC films with thickness of about 20 ?m were prepared from commercially available CR-39 films by chemical etching to fabricate custom-made petri dishes for cell culture, which could accurately record alpha particle hit positions. A special method involving "base tracks" for aligning the images of cell nuclei and alpha particle hits has been proposed, so that alpha particle transversals of cell nuclei can be visually counted. Radiobiological experiments were carried out to induce DNA damages, with the TdT-mediated d UTP Nick- End Labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence method employed to detect DNA strand breaks. The staining results were investigated by flow cytometer. The preliminary results showed that more strand breaks occurred in cells hit by alpha particles with lower energies. Moreover, large TUNEL positive signals were obtained even with small percentages of cells irradiated and TUNEL signals were also obtained from non-targeted cells. These provided evidence for the bystander effect.

  19. Radiobiological results from the Bacillus subtilis Biostack experiments within the Apollo and the ASTP space flights.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Bucker, H; Hildebrand, D; Horneck, G; Holtz, G; Reitz, G; Schafer, M; Toth, B

    1978-01-01

    In order to check the results of earlier Biostack experiments, new experimental techniques were developed for the Biostack III experiment in the Apollo-Soyuz test project (ASTP). These techniques resulted in an increased accuracy of localization down to 0.2 micrometers for the determination of the impact parameter, accompanied by an increase in the sample size available for biological investigation. In addition, colony forming ability, metabolic mutations, and mutations affecting UV- and x-ray sensitivity were rendered observable by these methods. The biological and physical results obtained so far from the evaluation of the Bacillus subtilis experiment within Biostack III confirm and extend the findings of the previous Biostack experiments. They also add to the questions about the mechanisms of action of the radiation field under investigation, since the observed effects cannot be interpreted in terms of standard concepts. PMID:11965659

  20. Recent results of comparative radiobiological experiments with short and long term expositions of Arabidopsis seed embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, M. W.; Gartenbach, K. E.; Kranz, A. R.; Baican, B.; Schopper, E.; Heilmann, C.; Reitz, G.

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of experimental data obtained from short (SDEF) and long duration exposure flights (LDEF) recently led to results, which will contribute for the estimation of genetic risk for long and/or repeated stay of man in space. Under orbital conditions biological stress and damage are induced in test subjects by cosmic radiation, especially the high energetic, densely ionizing component of heavy ions. Plant seeds were successful model systems for a biotest in studying the physiological damages and mutagenic effects caused by ionizing radiation in particular stem cells. In this article we present an overview of our space experiments with Arabidopis thaliana seeds. We present first results of investigations on certain damage endpoints (seed germination, plant survival, mutation frequencies), caused by cosmic ionizing radiation in dry dormant plant seeds ofArabidopsis thaliana after different short term (e.g. IML-1 and D-2) and long term (e.g. EURECA and LDEF-1) space exposures. Total dose effects of heavy ions and the other components of the mixed radiation field on damage endpoints and survival after space exposure and gamma-ray pre-irradiation were obtained. A new method of total dose spectrometry by neutron activation has been applied.

  1. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H; Wouters, B; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  2. Microirradiation techniques in radiobiological research.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Guido A; Ruiz-Gmez, Miguel J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to review the uses of laser microirradiation and ion microbeam techniques within the scope of radiobiological research. Laser microirradiation techniques can be used for many different purposes. In a specific condition, through the use of pulsed lasers, cell lysis can be produced for subsequent separation of different analytes. Microsurgery allows for the identification and isolation of tissue sections, single cells and subcellular components, using different types of lasers. The generation of different types of DNA damage, via this type of microirradiation, allows for the investigation of DNA dynamics. Ion microbeams are important tools in radiobiological research. There are only a limited number of facilities worldwide where radiobiological experiments can be performed. In the beginning, research was mostly focused on the bystander effect. Nowadays, with more sophisticated molecular and cellular biological techniques, ion microirradiation is used to unravel molecular processes in the field of radiobiology. These include DNA repair protein kinetics or chromatin modifications at the site of DNA damage. With the increasing relevance of charged particles in tumour therapy and new concepts on how to generate them, ion microbeam facilities are able to address unresolved questions concerning particle tumour therapy. PMID:26333407

  3. Non-extensive radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-14

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  4. Radiobiology challenges for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, G.

    2013-07-01

    Laser driven accelerators have been proposed for possible clinical applications facilities with the clear aim to reduce the facilities overall cost and complexity of at least one order of magnitude compared to currently employed accelerators. While significant efforts is on-going in the physics community to achieve the required ion beam parameters for medical applications and design suitable radiotherapy facilities, radiobiological investigations of the effects of such beams is also mandatory in order to validate their future therapeutic use. The main aim of these investigations has been initially to establish a procedure for cell handling, irradiation and dosimetry compatible with the mixed beam, continuous energy spread and ultra-high dose rate of the pulsed particle beams produced by high power lasers. Moreover, ions are emitted in bursts of picosecond duration at the source and their therapeutic use may result in dose rates exceeding 109 Gy/sec and the biological effects at these ultra-high dose rates are virtually unknown.

  5. Promoting a positive clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Massarweh, L J

    1999-01-01

    Why are some clinical experiences better than others? Little has been written about strategies used in the clinical classroom, yet this setting continues to be a major educational component in nursing education. The author explores specific actions aimed at promoting a positive clinical experience. Motivational principles combined with critical-thinking strategies and total quality management techniques together provide a conceptualization of clinical teaching and learning. Recommendations are made to integrate the three techniques into the clinical classroom. PMID:10640094

  6. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  7. Radiobiology challenges for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Schettino, G.

    2013-07-26

    Laser driven accelerators have been proposed for possible clinical applications facilities with the clear aim to reduce the facilities overall cost and complexity of at least one order of magnitude compared to currently employed accelerators. While significant efforts is on-going in the physics community to achieve the required ion beam parameters for medical applications and design suitable radiotherapy facilities, radiobiological investigations of the effects of such beams is also mandatory in order to validate their future therapeutic use. The main aim of these investigations has been initially to establish a procedure for cell handling, irradiation and dosimetry compatible with the mixed beam, continuous energy spread and ultra-high dose rate of the pulsed particle beams produced by high power lasers. Moreover, ions are emitted in bursts of picosecond duration at the source and their therapeutic use may result in dose rates exceeding 10{sup 9} Gy/sec and the biological effects at these ultra-high dose rates are virtually unknown.

  8. Clinical experience with bemiparin.

    PubMed

    Abad Rico, Jos Ignacio; Lozano Snchez, Francisco S; Rocha, Eduardo

    2010-12-14

    Subcutaneous bemiparin has been evaluated for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in moderate to high-risk patients undergoing surgery, and for the acute and long-term treatment of established VTE. General and orthopaedic surgery is associated with VTE incidence rates of 15-60% in the absence of thromboprophylaxis and this can be reduced by over 70% with appropriate thromboembolic prophylaxis. Bemiparin was as effective as unfractionated heparin (UFH) in the prevention of VTE, when both were initiated preoperatively, but was associated with significantly fewer bleeding episodes than UFH. Bemiparin prophylaxis initiated postoperatively was at least as effective as bemiparin initiated preoperatively and was associated with a lower incidence of bleeding complications than preoperative initiation. In terms of patients with cancer undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery, preliminary results from a recent study with bemiparin showed that extended prophylaxis for 4 weeks significantly reduced the rate of major VTE, without increasing bleeding risk, compared with prophylaxis for one week. Bemiparin, initiated postoperatively, was as effective as enoxaparin, initiated preoperatively, in the prevention of VTE in patients undergoing total knee replacement. The incidence of bleeding complications was similar between groups, although the incidence of injection site haematoma was significantly higher with enoxaparin than with bemiparin. Postoperative initiation of bemiparin thromboprophylaxis minimized the risk of spinal haematoma in patients using neuraxial anaesthesia (approximately 93% of patients). In addition, postoperative initiation is likely to reduce the total costs, because patients do not need to be admitted to hospital the day before surgery. Bemiparin was more effective than intravenous UFH in the acute treatment of established deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and was as effective as oral warfarin in the subsequent secondary prevention of VTE over 3 months of therapy, while bleeding complications over 3 months of therapy were similarly low. In a European study, acute treatment of DVT with bemiparin for one week followed by 12 weeks' secondary prevention with bemiparin (i.e. bemiparin/bemiparin) was associated with a cost saving of &U20AC;908 per patient compared with UFH/warfarin. Similarly, bemiparin/warfarin produced a cost saving of &U20AC;769 compared with UFH/warfarin. The savings were predominantly the result of reduced hospital stays during acute treatment with bemiparin. Bemiparin was also associated with increased quality-adjusted life expectancy. Observational studies in routine clinical practice demonstrated that outpatient treatment of acute VTE was as effective as inpatient treatment, but with lower costs, and bemiparin was as effective as vitamin K antagonists over 3 months for secondary prevention, with VTE recurrence rates of 0% and 0.3% over 3 months in separate studies. Bemiparin is thus an effective, well tolerated agent for thromboprophylaxis in surgery, and for the acute and long-term treatment of established VTE, having advantages over UFH and particular benefits as a result of initiating therapy postoperatively. PMID:21162607

  9. Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kenneth L.

    This book offers a systematic approach to teaching athletic training. Modules are separated into 10 content areas: direct clinical experience; policies and procedures; emergency procedures; modality operation; advanced modality operation; taping, wrapping, bracing, and padding; management of specific injuries; examination; supervision; and

  10. Introduction to Radiobiology of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Lozza, Catherine; Deshayes, Emmanuel; Boudousq, Vincent; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRTs) are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors, which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure, and low absorbed dose rate) differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure, and high absorbed dose rate), and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining doseeffect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related) and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related) of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main challenges of TRT in the future. PMID:25853132

  11. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: From genetics to biology to radiobiology to oncoimmunology and all the way back to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Emmanouil; O'Neill, Eric; Gordon-Weeks, Alex; Mukherjee, Somnath; McKenna, W Gillies; Muschel, Ruth J

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Despite improvements in the clinical management, the prognosis of PDAC remains dismal. In the present comprehensive review, we will examine the knowledge of PDAC genetics and the new insights into human genome sequencing and clonal evolution. Additionally, the biology and the role of the stroma in tumour progression and response to treatment will be presented. Furthermore, we will describe the evidence on tumour chemoresistance and radioresistance and will provide an overview on the recent advances in PDAC metabolism and circulating tumour cells. Next, we will explore the characteristics and merits of the different mouse models of PDAC. The inflammatory milieu and the immunosuppressive microenvironment mediate tumour initiation and treatment failure. Hence, we will also review the inflammatory and immune escaping mechanisms and the new immunotherapies tested in PDAC. A better understanding of the different mechanisms of tumour formation and progression will help us to identify the best targets for testing in future clinical studies of PDAC. PMID:25489989

  12. Changing paradigms in radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The last 25 years have seen a major shift in emphasis in the field of radiobiology from a DNA-centric view of how radiation damage occurs to a much more biological view that appreciates the importance of macro-and micro-environments, hierarchical organization, underlying genetics, evolution, adaptation and signaling at all levels from atoms to ecosystems. The new view incorporates concepts of hormesis, nonlinear systems, bioenergy field theory, uncertainty and homeodynamics. While the mechanisms underlying these effects and responses are still far from clear, it is very apparent that their implications are much wider than the field of radiobiology. This reflection discusses the changing views and considers how they are influencing thought in environmental and medical science and systems biology. PMID:22273762

  13. CRC handbook of radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, K.N.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents Development of Radiobiology. A Review. Basic Cell Biology. Physics of Radiation Biology. Cellular Radiation Damage. Modifications of Cellular Radiation Damage. Repair of Radiation Damage. Molecular Radiation Biology. Radiation Syndromes and their Modifications. Radiation Damage of Skin and Mucous Membrane. Radiation Damage of Nervous Tissue. Radiation Damage of Reproductive Organs. Radiation Damage of Other Organ Systems. Radiation Immunology. Background, Medical and Commercial Sources. Radiation Injuries to Human Fetuses. Radiation-Induced Genetic Damage. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Tissue Culture Model. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Animal Model. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Human Model. Radiation Carcinogenesis: Secondary Neoplasms. After Therapy of Tumors. Other Late Effects: Aging, Cataract, Aplastic Anemia. Maximum Permissible Dose (MPD). Radiation Response of Human Tumor. Radioisotopes in Biology and Medicine.

  14. [Fullerenes in radiobiology].

    PubMed

    Grebowski, Jacek; Krokosz, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Molecule of fullerene, having a spherical or ellipsoidal shape, is made of rings consisting of five or six carbon atoms, combined with conjugated pi bonds. Delocalization of pi electrons in the molecule of fullerene makes it easy to scavenge free radicals. But, despite being the effective antioxidants and radical scavengers fullerenes may be prooxidants by reactive oxygen species generation. Mammalian cells consist mainly of water (about 70%). Thus, the radical and non-radical products of water radiolysis are the basic sources of radiation damage to biomolecules. Reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl (HO*) and superoxide (O2-*) radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are responsible for radiation-induced damage in aerated systems. Free radical mechanism of radiation damage suggests that scavengers of free radicals should protect cellular structures against damage. Electron donor compounds should also exhibit protective properties towards oxidized functional groups by reducing them. However, the electron transfer from fullerene to oxygen may generate superoxide radical. The shape of fullerenes allows them to act as carriers of radioactive atoms of isotopes used in the therapy and medical diagnostics. Fullerenes and their derivatives due to its properties are new promising chemicals for application in radiobiology. Fullerenes may be radioprotectors, radiosensitizer or auxiliary compounds in diagnostic imaging. What they are depends on the experimental system used. PMID:21473050

  15. Clinical experience with intravenous fenoldopam.

    PubMed

    Holcslaw, T L; Beck, T R

    1990-06-01

    Fenoldopam (Corlopam), a new dopaminergic agent in clinical development by SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, is a dopamine-1 (DA1) agonist at post-synaptic dopamine receptors. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that it is a potent renal vasodilator as well as a peripheral vasodilator. In both normal volunteers and hypertensive patients intravenous fenoldopam causes dose-related decreases in blood pressure and important increases in renal hemodynamics and function including increased renal blood flow, diuresis and natriuresis. Fenoldopam does not alter glomerular filtration. Intravenous fenoldopam has been demonstrated to be efficacious in severe hypertensive patients in several multicenter, multinational trials. In severe hypertension efficacy trials fenoldopam was judged to be as effective as sodium nitroprusside and to produce less serious side effects. In patients with moderate to severe heart failure, fenoldopam has been demonstrated to produce dose-related acute increases in cardiac output, stroke volume and work index, decreased systemic vascular resistance but no important changes in pulmonary wedge pressure or right atrial pressure. In CHF patients fenoldopam has been demonstrated to be as efficacious as sodium nitroprusside. Fenoldopam, as a specific (DA1) agonist resulting in decreased peripheral and renal vascular resistance, diuresis, natriuresis and increases in cardiac hemodynamics on intravenous administration, appears to be an efficacious agent which offers a reasonable alternative in the treatment of severe hypertension and acute congestive heart failure. PMID:1974440

  16. [Continuous dopaminergic stimulation - clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Bogucki, Andrzej; S?awek, Jaros?aw

    2010-01-01

    Both disease progression and pulsatile stimulation of dopaminergic receptors are responsible for development of fluctuations and dyskinesia in about 50% of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) after 4-6 years of therapy with levodopa. In order to prevent motor complications, the ideal therapy should secure continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS). The concept of CDS is supported by the results of both experimental and clinical studies. Several treatment options are available to achieve CDS. Dopamine agonists have a longer half-life than levodopa and the development of dyskinesia is delayed when they are used as monotherapy in early PD. Continuous delivery of agonists can be improved with prolonged-release oral preparations, a transdermal delivery system or continuous subcutaneous infusion. Continuous enteral infusion of levodopa is another way to achieve CDS and it is very effective in reducing motor complications in advanced PD. PMID:20827612

  17. Clinical experience with CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Judd E.; Garry, John L.; Wilson, Lynn A.; Johnson, C. Daniel

    2000-04-01

    Since the introduction of Computed Tomographic Colonography (CTC) in 1995, many advances in computer equipment and software have become available. Despite these advances, the promise of colon cancer prevention has not been realized. A colorectal screening tool that performs at a high level, is acceptable to patients, and can be performed safely and at low cost holds promise of saving lives in the future. Our institution has performed over two hundred seventy five clinical CTC examinations. These scans, which each entail a supine and a prone acquisition, only differ from our research protocol in the necessity of an expeditious interpretation. Patients arrive for their CTC examination early in the morning following a period of fasting and bowel preparation. If a CTC examination has a positive finding, the patient is scheduled for colonoscopic polypectomy that same morning. To facilitate this, the patients are required to continue fasting until the CTC examination has been interpreted. It is therefore necessary to process the CTC examination very quickly to minimize patient discomfort. A positive CTC result occurred in fifteen percent of examinations. Among these positive results, the specificity has been in excess of ninety five percent. Additionally, life threatening extra-colonic lesions were discovered in two percent of the screened population.

  18. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice. PMID:1188620

  19. Assessing clinical implications of spiritual experiences.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Almeida, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Since spiritual experiences (SE) very often resemble dissociative and psychotic symptoms, there is a risk of misdiagnosis in both directions: labeling a healthy SE as a mental disorder or taking a mental disorder as an SE. There is a scarcity of well-controlled studies on this subject. The paper provides a brief overview of studies on dissociative and psychotic experiences in the non-clinical population, especially those occurring in spiritual populations. At the end, some guidelines are proposed to help clinical reasoning when making the differential diagnosis between healthy SE with psychotic and dissociative experiences and mental disorders that may resemble SE. PMID:23174443

  20. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Parajon, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Abad, E.

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 106 protons/cm2 s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  1. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students. PMID:25564334

  2. Shared-Learning Experience During a Clinical Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Awaisu, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement a shared learning approach through fourth-year students’ mentorship of third-year students and to assess the perceptions of the mentored students on the value of their shared learning experience. Design We introduced the shared learning experience in clinical pharmacy and pharmacotherapeutic practice experiences involving 87 third-year and 51 fourth-year students. Both student groups undertook the practice experiences together, with third-year students working in smaller groups mentored by fourth-year students. Assessment A majority of the students (> 75%) believed that they learned to work as a team during their practice experiences and that the shared learning approach provided an opportunity to practice their communication skills. Similarly, most respondents (> 70%) agreed that the new approach would help them become effective members of the healthcare team and would facilitate their professional relationships in future practice. Almost two-thirds of the students believed that the shared learning enhanced their ability to understand clinical problems. However, about 31% of the pharmacy students felt that they could have learned clinical problem-solving skills equally well working only with peers from their own student group. Conclusions The pharmacy students in the current study generally believed that the shared-learning approach enhanced their ability to understand clinical problems and improved their communication and teamwork skills. Both groups of students were positive that they had acquired some skills through the shared-learning approach. PMID:21769151

  3. Implementing a Clinical Experience for Student Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Rod

    Clinical experiences offered to students preparing to become athletic trainers at East Carolina University (North Carolina) are diverse and multiple. The program acquaints students with actual medical practices in sports medicine by allowing them to observe experienced trainers and doctors at work as well as providing opportunities for practical

  4. First time rounding experiences for nonclinicians: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Laura R; Nowacki, Amy S; Stoller, James K

    2015-01-01

    Clinical rounds serve several key objectives in academic medical centers: providing a forum for patient communication, clinical decision making, and teaching. Nonclinical colleagues ordinarily do not have the opportunity to round, and the idea of implementing a rounding program that includes nonclinical colleagues has received little attention to date. Reasoning that a rounding program with nonclinicians could enhance (1) understanding of the organization's clinical mission, (2) appreciation of caregivers' roles, and (3) engagement, the authors created such a program. From 2010 to 2013, 51 nonclinicians within the Cleveland Clinic Education Institute participated; 14 submitted written reflections, and 27 responded to a survey about their experience. Overall, 12 themes emerged that suggest an enhanced familiarity with the institution and increased engagement and alignment with its mission. Notably, the results align with a long-standing focus on organizational engagement and an observed increase in mean engagement scores since the program was implemented. PMID:24519444

  5. Planning a study abroad clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Wright, Dolores J

    2010-05-01

    Not only is globalization expanding areas of human activity, it is also influencing the variety of educational offerings in universities. Therefore, globalization must be considered by nurse educators as they reevaluate ways of preparing nursing students to meet the health care needs of populations they currently serve and will care for in the future. Study abroad programs have been encouraged to be part of the college experience in the United States for more than 30 years; however, these programs have been relatively lacking in nursing education. Most of the study abroad programs described in the nursing literature are research-based or first-person accounts of an experience and provide little information about planning a study abroad program. This article describes a study abroad learning experience for senior nursing students and discusses the issues such as student selection, student safety, and available clinical experiences that need to be considered before undertaking such an endeavor. PMID:20143756

  6. Nurses experiences of humour in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Shali, Mahboubeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing holistic nursing care when there is a shortage of personnel and equipment exposes nurses to stress and a higher risk of occupational burnout. Humour can promote nurses health and influence nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe nurses experiences of humour in clinical settings and factors affecting it. Methods: This qualitative study investigated nurses experiences of humour. Five hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences provided the setting for this study. The participants comprised of 17 nurses with masters and Baccalaureate degrees (BSN) in nursing. These nurses worked at educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and had minimum work experience of 12 months in various clinical wards. Nurses from all wards were invited to participate in this study. The data were collected through semi structure interviews using guides comprising probing questions. Telephonic interviews were used to further supplement the data. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Results: The data were classified into five themes including the dynamics of humour, condition enforcement, Risk making probability, Instrumental use and Change: opportunities and threats. Conclusion: Understanding nurses perceptions and experiences of humour helps identify its contributing factors and provides valuable guidelines for enhancing nurses and patients mental, emotional and physical health. Spreading a culture of humour through teaching methods can improve workplace cheerfulness and highlights the importance of humour in patient care in nurses and nursing students. PMID:26034735

  7. [Perineo-ano-rectal injuries: clinical experience].

    PubMed

    La Greca, Gaetano; Gagliardo, Salvatrice; Sofia, Maria; Barbagallo, Francesco; Chisari, Andrea; Latteri, Saverio; Pontillo, Tindaro; Politi, Antonio; Russello, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus are infrequent but difficult to treat, requiring experience with trauma and colo-proctological surgery. The aim of the treatment is to repair the lesions and to minimise the early complications which are the main cause of failure and of late complications and disability. The most complicated lesions present problems concerning either the surgical strategy or the surgical timing, both of which are essential for a successful outcome. The Authors analyse their recent clinical experience with 7 patients with complex traumatic lesions involving the rectum, perineum and anus, excluding those of gynaecological/obstetric origin and those not involving the sphincter. They evaluated the clinical history, causes and types of lesions, as well as treatment, complications and outcomes. Five of the lesions were caused by impalement, one by an explosion and one by a motorboat propeller blade. Six of the patients (85.7%) were treated by direct primary repair and one (14.3%) by secondary repair after a previous colostomy. All 7 patients achieved complete recovery of the lesions. Only two cases (28.6%) of early complications and one case (14.3%) of persistent minimal sphincter dysfunction occurred. On the basis of these good results, the clinical experience and the literature, the Authors suggest that these perineo-ano-rectal lesions, though often complex, may often be cured by early surgery, confining colostomy only to particular cases. In addition to experience with trauma and the timing of colo-proctological surgery, a knowledge of all the available surgical options is mandatory to achieve the best results. PMID:18389752

  8. Fundamental space radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle accelerators are presented along with speculation about how modified inertial conditions might perturb homeostatic responses to radiation to further complicate risk assessment for space flight.

  9. Fundamental space radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory A

    2003-06-01

    The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources, or trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts. These charged particles present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. There are three principal properties of charged particles that distinguish them from conventional radiation, i.e. gamma rays and x-rays. First, they have a defined range in matter rather than an exponential absorption profile. Second, they undergo nuclear reactions to produce secondary particles. Third, and most important, they deposit their energy along well-defined linear paths or tracks rather than diffuse fields. The structured energy deposition pattern interacts on multiple scales with the biological structures of DNA, cells and tissues to produce correlated patterns of damage that evade repair systems. Traditional concepts of dose and its associated normalization parameter, RBE (relative biological effectiveness), break down under experimental scrutiny, and probabilistic models of risk based on the number of particle traversals per cell may be more appropriate. Unique patterns of DNA damage, gene expression, mobilization of repair proteins, activation of cytokines and remodeling of cellular microenvironment are observed following exposure to high LET radiation. At low levels of exposure the communication of bioactive substances from irradiated to unirradiated "bystander" cells can amplify the damage and cause a significant deviation from linearity in dose vs. response relations. Under some circumstances, there is even a multigenerational delay in the expression of radiation-induced genetic damage (genomic instability) which is not strictly dose dependent. These issues and the experimental evidence derived from ground based experiments at particle accelerators are presented along with speculation about how modified inertial conditions might perturb homeostatic responses to radiation to further complicate risk assessment for space flight. PMID:12959129

  10. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  11. Radioembolization of Hepatic Lesions from a Radiobiology and Dosimetric Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cremonesi, Marta; Chiesa, Carlo; Strigari, Lidia; Ferrari, Mahila; Botta, Francesca; Guerriero, Francesco; De Cicco, Concetta; Bonomo, Guido; Orsi, Franco; Bodei, Lisa; Di Dia, Amalia; Grana, Chiara Maria; Orecchia, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Radioembolization (RE) of liver cancer with 90Y-microspheres has been applied in the last two decades with notable responses and acceptable toxicity. Two types of microspheres are available, glass and resin, the main difference being the activity/sphere. Generally, administered activities are established by empirical methods and differ for the two types. Treatment planning based on dosimetry is a prerogative of few centers, but has notably gained interest, with evidence of predictive power of dosimetry on toxicity, lesion response, and overall survival (OS). Radiobiological correlations between absorbed doses and toxicity to organs at risk, and tumor response, have been obtained in many clinical studies. Dosimetry methods have evolved from the macroscopic approach at the organ level to voxel analysis, providing absorbed dose spatial distributions and dose–volume histograms (DVH). The well-known effects of the external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), such as the volume effect, underlying disease influence, cumulative damage in parallel organs, and different tolerability of re-treatment, have been observed also in RE, identifying in EBRT a foremost reference to compare with. The radiobiological models – normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability – and/or the style (DVH concepts) used in EBRT are introduced in RE. Moreover, attention has been paid to the intrinsic different activity distribution of resin and glass spheres at the microscopic scale, with dosimetric and radiobiological consequences. Dedicated studies and mathematical models have developed this issue and explain some clinical evidences, e.g., the shift of dose to higher toxicity thresholds using glass as compared to resin spheres. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the literature incident to dosimetry and radiobiological issues in RE, with the aim to summarize the results and to identify the most useful methods and information that should accompany future studies. PMID:25191640

  12. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  13. A Curriculum Model for an Integrated Senior Year Clinical Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wukasch, Ruth N.; Blue, Carolyn L.; Overbay, Jane

    2000-01-01

    A flexible clinical experience for nursing seniors integrates pediatrics, public health, and nursing leadership. Experiences in hospital units, schools, nurse-directed clinics, and home visits expose students to a wide range of settings and issues. (SK)

  14. Clinical experience with ureteral metal stents

    PubMed Central

    Al Aown, Abdulrahman; Iason, Kyriazis; Panagiotis, Kallidonis; Liatsikos, Evangelos N.

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral metal stents (MSs) present a minimally invasive tool to preserve the drainage of renal pelvis whenever ureteral patency is at risk to be obstructed due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. Clinical experience with these stents demonstrates that they impose a promising alternative treatment option in ureteral pathologies that are difficult to be treated via common polymeric stents. Current application of MSs in the treatment of both benign and malignant ureteral obstruction reveals quite promising results. Nevertheless, the ideal MS that would provide uncomplicated long-term effectiveness is still lucking and current MS usage is facing several adverse effects between which stent obstruction, encrustation, infection, migration, and patient discomfort. Ongoing attempts to create more inert stent with sophisticated novel designs are expected to improve current MS efficiency. MSs will play a major role in the future as a routine management of a variety of ureteral pathologies. PMID:21369375

  15. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  16. Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, Trela

    2006-01-01

    Being a member of the Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) Staff is a great experience. I joined the FMC staff 2 years ago when I became part of the Kelsey-Seybold team. The FMC staff consists of Flight Surgeons, Family Clinic Physician, Nursing staff, Wellness Coordinator and Support staff. We serve as the Primary Care Physicians for the astronauts and their families and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. We have approximately 800 patients in the FMC. As the Family Clinic Physician, I care for the astronaut spouses and children and provide annual physicals for the retired astronauts. Since we have a small patient population, we have the opportunity to spend increased personal time with our patients, which I enjoy. We have a pretty healthy patient population, who are very interested in their overall health and preventive care. In preparation for a shuttle launch, our nursing staff assists the flight surgeons with the astronaut physical exams, which occur 10 days prior to launch and again 3 days after their return. We also provide Primary Contact physicals for the families and guests, who will be in close contact with shuttle crew members. During these physicals, we provide education, emphasizing the importance of preventing the spread of communicable diseases to shuttle crew members. Being a part of the Space Medicine Program is an honor. To know that you contribute in some way to our nation s Space Program is very special. (This article was prepared by Dr. Trela Landry, M.D. for inclusion in a Kelsey-Seybold newsletter on 25 OCT 2006.)

  17. Prediction of AVM obliteration after stereotactic radiotherapy using radiobiological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Lefkopoulos, Dimitrios; Nataf, Franois; Schlienger, Michel; Karlsson, Bengt; Lax, Ingmar; Kappas, Constantin; Lind, Bengt K.; Brahme, Anders

    2002-07-01

    This study was carried out in order to derive the radiobiological parameters of the dose-response relation for the obliteration of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) following single fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Furthermore, the accuracy by which the linear Poisson model predicts the probability of obliteration and how the haemorrhage history, location and volume of the AVM influence its radiosensitivity are investigated. The study patient material consists of 85 patients who received radiation for AVM therapy. Radiation-induced AVM obliterations were assessed on the basis of post-irradiation angiographies and other radiological findings. For each patient the dose delivered to the clinical target volume and the clinical treatment outcome were available. These data were used in a maximum likelihood analysis to calculate the best estimates of the parameters of the linear Poisson model. The uncertainties of these parameters were also calculated and their individual influence on the dose-response curve was studied. AVM radiosensitivity was assumed to be the same for all the patients. The radiobiological model used was proved suitable for predicting the treatment outcome pattern of the studied patient material. The radiobiological parameters of the model were calculated for different AVM locations, bleeding histories and AVM sizes. The range of parameter variability had considerable effect on the dose-response curve of AVM. The correlation between the dosimetric data and their corresponding clinical effect could be accurately modelled using the linear Poisson model. The derived response parameters can be introduced into the clinical routine with the calculated accuracy assuming the same methodology in target definition and delineation. The known volume dependence of AVM radiosensitivity was confirmed. Moreover, a trend relating AVM location with its radiosensitivity was observed.

  18. Radiobiological considerations in magna-field irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    Radiobiological considerations are described for total body irradiation (TBI) as given to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Although much progress has been made in the use of BMT for refractory leukemias, many patients still die from interstitial pneumonia and relapse. Fractionated TBI has been introduced in order to improve leukemic cell kill, while increasing the degree of normal tissue tolerance. Traditionally, bone marrow stem cells, leukemic cells and immunocytes have been considered as having a limited ability to repair radiation damage while cells of lung tissue and intestinal epithelial cells have a greater capacity. During fractionated radiation therapy or continuous low-dose rate exposure, repair of sublethal damage between fractions allows greater recovery in the cells of lung tissue to those in the bone marrow. Clinically, the potential benefit of six fractions over one fraction or low dose-rate TBI has yet to be proved, although there is suggestive evidence for a reduced incidence of interstitial pneumonitis. However, other extraneous factors such as doses to the lung, differences in conditioning regimens, effect of increased delay in BMT for patients receiving fractionated TBI, and the unmeasurable differences between institutions make definite conclusions impossible. Despite this, a consensus for dose fractionation has developed and most centers are moving away from the use of large single dose TBI.

  19. Modulith SL20--development and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Khrmann, K U; Henkel, T O; Potempa, D; Rassweiler, J; Heine, G; Alken, P

    1993-01-01

    A third generation lithotripter was developed incorporating the advantages of high disintegrative efficacy, anaesthesia-free treatment, combined sonographic and fluoroscopic localization system as well as a multifunctional table for interdisciplinary use. The shock wave generator consists of a cylindrical-shaped electromagnetic coil with a paraboloid reflector. The waves are coupled by means of a water cushion and an impedance adapted foil in which the patient is comfortably positioned. Stones are localized by an in-line ultrasound probe or fluoroscopically by the integrated C-arm. Preclinical trials using the in-vitro stone model demonstrated the superior disintegrative capacity. The in-vivo animal studies evaluated the dose-dependent and reversible kidney trauma, which was comparable to that induced by other lithotripters. The clinical evaluation of the Modulith SL since 1988 was divided into three phases with different technical equipment. It was indicated that sonographic stone localization enables treatment of nearly all kidney stones and 12% of the ureteric calculi. As preference was given to in situ disintegration of all ureteral stones, X-ray targeting became necessary. By increasing the generator voltage in the third phase together with advanced experience, the disintegration rate (94%) was improved. The number of auxiliary measures after ESWL (11%) and treatment time (average 39 min) was decreased. Eighty-eight percent of our patients were stone-free at follow-up. The experience demonstrated that this lithotripter is also easy to handle for gallbladder stones and highly effective (82%) in treatment of endoscopically non-extractable bile duct stones. PMID:8476331

  20. Relevance of radiobiological concepts in radionuclide therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chandan; Shetake, Neena; Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Samuel, Grace; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Purpose Radionuclide therapy (RNT) is a rapidly growing area of clinical nuclear medicine, wherein radionuclides are employed to deliver cytotoxic dose of radiation to the diseased cells/tissues. During RNT, radionuclides are either directly administered or delivered through biomolecules targeting the diseased site. RNT has been clinically used for diverse range of diseases including cancer, which is the focus of the review. Conclusions The major emphasis in RNT has so far been given towards developing peptides/antibodies and other molecules to conjugate a variety of therapeutic radioisotopes for improved targeting/delivery of radiation dose to the tumor cells. Despite that, many of the RNT approaches have not achieved their desired therapeutic success probably due to poor knowledge about complex and dynamic (i) fate of radiolabeled molecules; (ii) radiation dose delivered; (iii) cellular heterogeneity in tumor mass; and (iv) cellular radiobiological response. Based on understanding gathered during recent years, it may be stated that besides the absorbed dose, the net radiobiological response of tumor/normal cells also determines the clinical response of radiotherapeutic modalities including RNT. The radiosensitivity of tumor/normal cells is governed by radiobiological phenomenon such as radiation-induced bystander effect, genomic instability, adaptive response and low dose hyper-radiosensitivity. These concepts have been well investigated in the context of external beam radiotherapy, but their clinical implications during RNT have received meagre attention. In this direction, a few studies performed using in vitro and in vivo models envisage the possibilities of exploiting the radiobiological knowledge for improved therapeutic outcome of RNT. Abbreviations ALL Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia AML Acute Myeloid Leukaemia CEA Carcinoembryonic Antigen CD Cluster of Differentiation CLL Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia CNS Central Nervous System CPP Cell Penetrating Peptide, DC, Dendritic Cell DOTA 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-Tetraacetic Acid DTPA Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid EDTMP Ethylenediamine Tetra(methylene Phosphonic Acid); EGFR, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor EU European Union FDA Food and Drug Administration Her2 Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 HEDP 1-Hydroxy Ethylidene-1,1-Diphosphonic Acid GI Gastro Intestinal HLA Human Leukocyte Antigen HRS Hyper-radiosensitivity LET Linear Energy Transfer MCL Mantle Cell Lymphoma MIBG Metaiodobenzylguanidine MN Micronuclie 4-NCS-Bz-TCMC S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl) -1,4,7,10-tetraaza-1,4,7,10-tetra(2-carbamoylmethyl) cyclododecane NHL Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma PSMA Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen RGD Arginylglycylaspartic Acid RIAR Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response RIBE Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect RIGI Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability RNT Radionuclide Therapy TAT Targeted Alpha Therapy TATE Tyr3-octreotate TIMP Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase TOC Tyr3-octreotide VEGF Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor. PMID:26917443

  1. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia; Lopez, Jesus

    2012-10-23

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  2. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yaez, Elvia; Lpez, Jess

    2012-10-01

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerologa de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  3. Minimally invasive thymectomy: the Mayo Clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Phillip G.; Roden, Anja C.; Corl, Frank M.; Allen, Mark S.; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Nichols, Francis C.; Shen, K. Robert; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of minimally invasive thymectomy (MIT) is increasing and may have significant benefit to patients in terms of morbidity and post-operative recovery. Our aim was to review the Mayo Clinic experience of MIT. Methods We reviewed data from all MIT cases collected in a prospectively maintained database from January 1995 to February 2015. Data were collected regarding patient demographics, perioperative management and patient outcomes. Results A total of 510 thymectomies were performed in 20 years. Fifty-six patients underwent MIT (45 video-assisted thoracoscopy, 11 robotic-assisted). The median age was 55 years (range, 23-87 years) with male to female ratio of 25:31. Thymoma was the main pathologic diagnosis in 27/56 patients (48%), with 11/27 (41%) associated with myasthenia gravis (MG), and 16/27 (59%) non-MG. Other pathologies included 1/56 (2%) of each teratoma, lymphoma, lymphangioma, carcinoma and thymolipoma. There were 3/56 (5%) atrophic glands, 4/56 (7%) cysts, 6/56 (11%) benign glands and 11/56 (20%) hyperplastic. Mean blood loss (mL) and operative time (min) were significantly lower in the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) group compared to robotic (65±41 vs. 160±205 mL, P=0.04 and 102±39 vs. 178±53 min, P=0.001, respectively). There was no 30-day mortality. Post-operative morbidity occurred in 7/45 (16%) VATS patients (phrenic nerve palsy 7%, pericarditis 4%, atrial fibrillation 2%, pleural effusion 2%) and 1/11 (9%) robotic (urinary retention requiring self-catheterization). Reoperation was required in 1/3 of VATS patients with phrenic nerve palsy. There was no significant difference in length of hospital stay [VATS 1.5 days (range, 1-4 days) and robotic 2 days (range, 1-5 days) VATS; P=0.05]. Mean follow-up was 18.4 months (range, 1-50.4 months) with no tumor recurrences. Conclusions MIT can be performed with low morbidity and mortality. VATS is associated with reduced blood loss, operative times and earlier hospital discharge compared to robotic MIT. PMID:26693147

  4. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, J. C.; Smith, S. K.; Watson, C. R.

    1991-12-01

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives.

  5. The Importance of Early Experiences: Clinical, Research, and Policy Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The degree to which early adverse experiences exert long term effects on development and how much early adversity may be overcome through subsequent experiences are important mental health questions. The clinical, research and policy perspectives on these questions lead to different answers. From a clinical perspective, change is always possible,

  6. Interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinic: The Emory University Experience.

    PubMed

    Nour, Sherif G; Powell, Tracy E; Eberhardt, Joy; Bowen, Michael A; Pennington, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn Cidis

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we share our experience in establishing a clinic-based practice for MR imaging-guided interventions. Clinic resources and operational logistics are described and our institutional cost analysis for supporting the clinic activity is provided. We highlight the overall value of the clinic model in transitioning the field of interventional MR imaging from the "proof-of-concept" to the "working model" era and engage in a detailed discussion of our experience with the positive impact of the clinic on streamlining the procedural workflow, increasing awareness of the technology, expanding referral bases, and boosting the satisfaction of both patients and referring services. PMID:26499284

  7. Clinical Engineering: Experiences of assisted professional practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langone, Luis; Vanetta, Marcos; Vazquez, Marcelo; Rotger, Viviana; Olivera, Juan Manuel

    2007-11-01

    In the curricula of the Biomedical Engineering career of the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología of the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Argenitna, there are the Assisted Professional Practices. Within this framework, the students have the possibility of performing practices in the clinic Sanatorio 9 de Julio. One of the objectives of these practices is to apply the concepts, methods and procedures studied along the career in the field work under real work conditions. From the point of view of the host institution, the objective is to improve the performance of the different services and areas applying the tools of Biomedical Engineering. The present work shows an example of such practices where an equipment preliminary analysis was made, its use and maintenance corresponding to the surgical unit of the clinic.

  8. Tocilizumab in pediatric rheumatology: the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Gurion, Reut; Singer, Nora G

    2013-07-01

    During the last two decades, clinical use of novel biological therapy has led to increased mechanistic understanding of complex rheumatological diseases. Conversely, basic and translational studies have led to development of new and varied therapeutic agents. These new medications which "target" specific steps in one or more immune pathways have the potential to control disease symptoms, improve quality of life and long-term prognosis, and perhaps in some, restore immunological tolerance. Use of these agents in clinical trials, combined with post-marketing surveillance, has revealed both the benefits and the undesirable side-effects of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In this review we focus on the use of tocilizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the IL6 receptor (IL6R), which potently inhibits IL-6/IL6R signaling. PMID:23715975

  9. Long-term clinical experience with zofenopril.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Bacchelli, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Daniela

    2012-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are extensively used to improve clinical outcome of patients with several cardiovascular diseases. Zofenopril proved to be very effective in patients with coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, thanks to its unique effective mechanism of action for improving blood pressure control, left ventricular function and myocardial ischemia burden, as well as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. The SMILE project involved more than 3500 patients with coronary artery disease and demonstrated that zofenopril treatment may reduce mortality and morbidity in patients with myocardial infarction, also when combined with acetyl salicylic acid and to a greater extent than lisinopril and ramipril. In addition, the results of the SMILE-ISCHEMIA study have demonstrated an interesting anti-ischemic effect of zofenopril, and these properties largely contribute to the overall clinical benefit of the drug. The effects of zofenopril on blood pressure control and cardiovascular protection clearly support its primary role for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23030285

  10. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. ); Prather, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  11. Ionizing radiation microbeam facilities for radiobiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Silvia

    2009-03-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence gathered in the last 10-15 years with regard to targeted and non-targeted effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (hyper-radiosensitivity, induced radio-resistance, adaptive response, genomic instability, bystander effects) has pushed the radiobiology research towards a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these phenomena, the extent to which they are active in-vivo, and how they are inter-related. In such a way factors could be obtained and included in the estimation of potential cancer risk to the human population of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Different experimental approaches have been developed and employed to study such effects in-vitro (medium transfer experiments; broad-field irradiation at low doses also with insert or shielding systems...). In this regard, important contributions came from ionizing radiation microbeam facilities that turn to be powerful tools to perform selective irradiations of individual cells inside a population with an exact, defined and reproducible dose (i.e. number of particles, in case of charged particle microbeams). Over the last 20 years the use of microbeams for radiobiological applications increased substantially and a continuously growing number of such facilities, providing X-rays, electrons, light and heavy ions, has been developing all over the world. Nowadays, just in Europe there are 12 microbeam facilities fully-operational or under-development, out of more than 30 worldwide. An overview of the European microbeam facilities for radiobiological studies is presented and discussed in this paper. PMID:19346681

  12. Korean Supervisors' Experiences in Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, Keeyeon; Park, Jeeseon

    2009-01-01

    The demand for mental health services in Korea is increasing, and a corresponding rise in the number of trainees in counseling psychology results in a need for effective supervision. Using a grounded theory approach, this study explored Korean supervisors' experiences in supervision to better understand the current status of supervision practice

  13. Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy: Mayo Clinic Rochester Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Salma; Murray, Joseph A.; Pardi, Darrell S.; Alexander, Glenn L.; Schaffner, John A.; Russo, Pierre A.; Abraham, Susan C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Autoimmune enteropathy is a rare cause of intractable diarrhea associated with circulating gut autoantibodies and a predisposition to autoimmunity. It is rarely observed in adults with only eleven cases reported to date. Methods Fifteen adults with autoimmune enteropathy were identified at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, from May 2001 to June 2006. The demographic, clinical and treatment data were abstracted from their records. Results The study population was 87% Caucasian, 47% females, with median age of 55 years (interquartile range: 42 to 67 years). All patients had diarrhea, weight loss and malnutrition. Celiac disease was excluded by lack of response to gluten free diet or absence of the celiac disease susceptibility HLA genotypes. Fourteen patients were tested for gut epithelial cell antibodies and 93% were positive for anti-enterocyte and/or anti-goblet cell antibodies. Predisposition to autoimmune diseases was noted in 80%, as indicated by a variety of circulating autoantibodies. Small intestinal histopathologic findings included subtotal villous atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the lamina propria with relatively few surface intraepithelial lymphocytes. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies were negative in all cases. Immunosuppressive therapy was required in 93% cases. Clinical improvement was noted in 60% after 18 weeks of steroid therapy. Conclusion Autoimmune enteropathy is a heterogeneous disease and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malabsorption and small bowel villous atrophy. The presence of gut epithelial cell antibodies can help confirm the diagnosis. No single agent is unequivocally effective in inducing remission, and immunosuppressive therapy is required in most cases. PMID:17683994

  14. Clinical nurse specialist regulation: the Maryland experience.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care will continue to be a driver in the evolution of today's health care environment. Ensuring effective, cost-conscious, quality care is the core of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice. The CNS practice varies by state, depending on each state's Nurse Practice Act. Some states have separate scopes of practice for CNSs, including prescriptive authority, whereas some states do not recognize CNS practice as different from the practice of the registered nurse. The journey to state recognition and title protection for the CNS role in the state of Maryland is described. PMID:25594481

  15. Paranasal sinus mucoceles: our clinical experiments

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete; Sari, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Keskin, I Gurkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We present the clinical and radiological features, treatment protocols, and medium-long-term results of our patients following surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele, along with a review of the relevant literature. Materials and methods: A total of 18 patients (11 women and 7 men) who underwent surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele at Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, between 2006 and 2013 were examined retrospectively. The mean patient age was 41 (range 4-73). Demographic and radiological features, symptoms, treatment protocols, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Results: The most frequently affected sinus was the maxillary sinus (n=9, 50%) followed by the frontal sinus (n=6, 33%) and sphenoidal sinus (n=3, 16%). The main symptom was headache. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele was applied in all 18 patients, while frontal sinus exploration with the osteoplastic flap procedure was performed in one patient and the Caldwell-Luc operation was performed in another patient. The Caldwell-Luc procedure was subsequently required in one patient (6%) and endoscopic revision surgery was required in another patient (6%). Conclusion: Sinus mucocele that enlarges, eroding the surrounding bone tissue, and induces various clinical symptoms due to the impression of the expansile mass, is treated surgically, and must be planned carefully to prevent serious complications. PMID:26770462

  16. Clinical biophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, M.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.

    1985-01-01

    Chapters are included on clinical decision making, principles of biomedical engineering, computers and their medical uses, clinical radiobiology, diagnostic x-ray radiology, clinical applications of ultrasonics, nuclear medicine, NMR imaging, diagnostic imaging, bioelectric techniques in diagnosis and therapy, biophysical aspects of the clinical laboratory, and biophysical aspects of modern surgery.

  17. Clinical experience with Angiojet: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, A M; Xhepa, G; Piffaretti, G; Bacuzzi, A; Tozzi, M; Carbone, M; Barile, A; Squillaci, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Carrafiello, G

    2015-12-01

    The development of various sophisticated mechanical thrombectomy devices and the amassed experience of physicians in minimal invasive therapy produced a paradigm shift in vascular access management toward percutaneous declotting procedures, using pharmaceutical thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, balloon thrombectomy, and a combination of the above techniques. In this setting, in the last years, AngioJet (Possis, Minneapolis, MN, USA) rheolytic thrombectomy (RT) showed an increasing use in emergency and election patients. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in different fields of applications. PMID:26498886

  18. Educational Preparation and Experiences in the Clinical Setting: Entry-Level Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Context: The clinical job setting: (Outpatient/Ambulatory/Rehabilitation Clinic) should no longer be referred to as a nontraditional setting as it employs the greatest percentage of certified members. Understanding the experiences, knowledge, and skills necessary to be successful in the clinical setting as entry-level certified athletic trainers…

  19. Educational Preparation and Experiences in the Clinical Setting: Entry-Level Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Context: The clinical job setting: (Outpatient/Ambulatory/Rehabilitation Clinic) should no longer be referred to as a nontraditional setting as it employs the greatest percentage of certified members. Understanding the experiences, knowledge, and skills necessary to be successful in the clinical setting as entry-level certified athletic trainers

  20. Clinical experience in appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Caglar K.; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dibekoglu, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse the incidence of appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms in appendectomy specimens and establish the epidemiological and histopathological features, treatment, and clinical course. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2013, 975 patients who underwent appendectomy in Ankara Oncology Education and Research Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results Neuroendocrine neoplasm was detected in the nine of 975 (0.9%) patients. Neuroendocrine neoplasms were diagnosed in eight patients by appendectomy, which was performed because of the prediagnosis of acute appendicitis, and in one patient by the suspicious mass detection during surgical procedures that were done in the appendix for a different reason. Eight of the patients tumours were in the tip of the appendix, and one of the patients tumours was at the base of appendix. Tumour size in 77.8% of patients was equal or less than 1 cm, in 22.2% patients it was 12 cm. There was tumour invasion in the muscularis propria layer in four patients, in the serosa layer in three patients, and in the deep mesoappendix in two patients. Patients were followed for a median of 78 months. In the follow-up of patients who were operated because of colon cancer, metachronous colon tumour evolved. This patient died due to progressive disease. Other patients are still disease-free. Conclusions The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasm is often incidentally done after appendectomy. Tumour size is important in determining the extent of disease and in the selection of the surgical method during operation. PMID:26793027

  1. Clinical experience with a stereoscopic image workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher J.; Collins, D. Louis; Pike, Gordon; Olivier, A.; Peters, Terence M.

    1991-05-01

    Stereoscopic radiography has been used routinely at the Montreal Neurological Institute for many years. Recently, with the advent of stereoscopic acquisition and display techniques for digital angiography, together with the increased use of 3-D display techniques for medical images, we have developed and implemented a stereoscopic display workstation for use in a clinical context. The system is based on standard AT-bus computer hardware and includes a high performance monitor equipped with a liquid-crystal polarizing shutter to display the stereoscopic images. The most significant application of this system has been planning for the stereotactic implantation of EEG recording electrodes. Here the surgeon has the ability not only to view the imaged anatomy in three-dimensions, but he is also able to interact with the images and to plan surgical procedures in a more realistic manner than traditional 2-D approaches. Display modes include vascular anatomy (from stereoscopic digital subtraction or MR angiography), or a combination of DSA images and 3-D volume-rendered MR or CT reconstructions.

  2. Proximal forearm fractures: our clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Concari, Galeazzo; Pedrazzini, Alessio; Vaienti, Enrico; Pogliacomi, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Forearm traumas are frequent and sometimes complex; soft tissue damages associated with bone lesions could be underestimated and so compromise the final result, in spite of a good reduction and osteosynthesis. Articular and iuxta-articular proximal radius and ulna fractures, which can be associated to radio-humeral dislocations in Monteggia lesions, are less frequent compared to diaphyseal fractures and can present a lot of therapeutical difficulties and a high rate of complications. These complications are avoided and reduced if the treatment is quick and focused on stable osteosynthesis and anatomical reduction of the fragments of the fracture and followed, as soon as possible, by rehabilitation. The authors present the 10 years experience of Parma Orthopaedics Institute with a follow-up of at least 12 months. PMID:12643076

  3. Pre-clinical experience with daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Hawkey, P M

    2008-11-01

    Daptomycin is a broad-spectrum, bactericidal agent active against Gram-positive bacteria, acting largely and unusually through membrane depolarization. Activity is markedly affected in vitro by the availability of calcium ions, and its high molecular weight with associated poor diffusion means that conventional disc diffusion testing is not reliable (and as a consequence not available). In order to allow susceptibility categorization, it is recommended that the MIC be determined in the presence of a defined calcium concentration. The activity of daptomycin is concentration-dependent with a prolonged post-antibiotic effect. It has linear pharmacokinetics, with a half-life of 8-9 h, the primary route of excretion is renal, it exhibits serum protein binding of approximately 92% and there is no interaction with the P450 cytochrome. Daptomycin is inactivated by surfactant in the lung and, in consequence, is not recommended for the treatment of respiratory infections. Daptomycin is currently licensed for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and for bacteraemia and right-sided endocarditis due to methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. To date, daptomycin-resistant bacteria have rarely been isolated from patients, although increases in vancomycin MIC may be linked to reduced susceptibility to daptomycin. Close monitoring of resistance is essential to maintain the clinical utility of the drug. Using once-daily dosing, daptomycin has been generally well tolerated; however, weekly monitoring of creatinine phosphokinase is recommended, as myopathy in skeletal muscles has been seen, albeit rarely. The rapid bactericidal action of daptomycin makes it a useful addition to the therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of Gram-positive infections, providing a valuable alternative to vancomycin when it is inappropriate or resistance is a problem. PMID:18829726

  4. THREE YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Todo, Satoru; Tzakis, Andreas; Reyes, Jorge; Nour, Bakr; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Fung, John J.; Demetris, Anthony; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND After the successful evolution of hepatic transplantation during the last decade, small bowel and multivisceral transplantation remains the sole elusive achievement for the next era of transplant surgeons. Until recently, and for the last thirty years, the results of the sporadic attempts of intestinal transplantation worldwide were discouraging because of unsatisfactory graft and patient survival. The experimental and clinical demonstration of the superior therapeutic efficacy of FK 506, a new immunosuppressive drug, ushered in the current era of small bowel and multivisceral transplantation with initial promising results. STUDY DESIGN Forty-three consecutive patients with short bowel syndrome, intestinal insufficiency, or malignant tumors with or without associated liver disease, were given intestinal (n=15), hepatic and intestinal (n=21), or multivisceral allografts that contained four or more organs (n=7). Treatment was with FK 506 based immunosuppression. The ascending and right transverse colon were included with the small intestine in 13 of the 43 grafts, almost evenly distributed between the three groups. RESULTS After six to 39 months, 30 of the 43 patients are alive, 29 bearing grafts. The most rapid convalescence and resumption of diet, as well as the highest three month patient survival (100 percent) and graft survival (88 percent) were with the isolated intestinal procedure. However, this advantage was slowly eroded during the first two postoperative years, in part because the isolated intestine was more prone to rejection. By the end of this time, the best survival rate (86 percent) was with the multivisceral procedure. With all three operations, most of the patients were able to resume diet and discontinue parenteral alimentation, and in the best instances, the quality of life approached normal. However, the surveillance and intensity of care required for these patients for the first year, and in most instances thereafter, was very high, being far more than required for patients having transplants of the liver, kidney or heart. CONCLUSIONS Although intestinal transplantation has gone through the feasibility phase, strategies will be required to increase its practicality. One possibility is to combine intestinal transplantation with contemporaneous autologous bone marrow transplantation. PMID:7522850

  5. Initial clinical experience with ultrasound PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Michael J.; Huang, H. K.; Gould, Robert G.; Callen, Peter W.; Filly, Roy A.; DeMund, Eric A.; Krevzer, Lloyd B.

    1995-05-01

    A second generation PACS provides an open architecture allowing a seamless connection to other picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) modules with industrial standards. The open architecture of the UCSF PACS provides the flexibility to use commercial `off-the- shelf' components when needed. This paper describes our experience interfacing a stand-alone commercial ultrasound (US) PACS module to our departmental PACS. US PACS module (Acuson Aegis) links 7 Acuson scanners in 2 buildings. This US PACS module features a network sever with 1.5 GB disk storage used for short-term archiving, with images stored in a compressed format (DICOM compatible). The images must be compressed due to the inherently large size of the full images (640 X 480 X 24 bit/image). The interface consists of a gateway which encodes and decodes US images and related patient data to DICOM standards permitting open communication between the module and the PACS infrastructure over ethernet. The first phase of the implementation is to transmit US images to the departmental PACS optical disk library for long term archiving automatically and to retrieve US images from this archive using workstations in the US module. The second phase is to retrieve selected images acquired by other modalities from the archive for display on the US workstation. The third phase is the integration of a pre-fetch mechanism, initiated by the HIS, that sends archived prior studies of patients with scheduled appointments to the US module. Phase 1 has been completed. US images and reports can be archived and retrieved between the departmental PACS and the US module. Retrieval times for cases are between 45 to 120 seconds depending on the time of day. Performance tests have been taken, and average times for study transfers, average study sizes, and general gateway performance issues have been measured. Phases 2 and 3 will be completed shortly. With open architecture design, the US module and the departmental PACS infrastructure function as an integral image information system.

  6. Lagged Syndesmotic Fixation: Our Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Kwaadu, Kwasi Yiadom; Fleming, Justin James; Salmon, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Ankle fractures are very common, and although algorithms are in place for osseous management, consensus has not been reached regarding treatment of associated ligamentous injuries. Although tibiofibular syndesmotic stabilization can be done using different forms of fixation, the biomedical literature has long emphasized the risk of long-term restriction of ankle mobility with the use of lagged transfixation. However, when reduction cannot be maintained with positional fixation, we found that lagging the syndesmotic screw helped to maintain the reduction without causing functional restriction. In this report, we describe our experience with patients who had undergone lagged tibiofibular transfixation and were available for short- to intermediate-term follow-up to assess ankle function. A total of 31 patients (32.63% of 95 consecutive patients) were available at a mean of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months to complete the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot questionnaire. The mean score was 88.38 (range 42 to 100) points at a mean follow-up interval of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months. Of 31 patients, 19 had an AOFAS score of 90 points, 9 an AOFAS score of 80 to 89 points, 2 an AOFAS score of 60 to 69 points, and 1 an AOFAS score of <60 points. Because all syndesmotic screws were placed using the lag technique, unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb was used as the endpoint. All subjects had unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb, refuting the assertion that lagged syndesmotic screw fixation confers more restriction in ankle kinematics than positional syndesmotic fixation. PMID:25736445

  7. Workshop on radiobiological effectiveness of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, G.E.; Thomas, R.G.; Thiessen, J.W.

    1985-09-01

    The radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons has become the subject of some heated discussions in both scientific and radiation-protection oriented communities. This has become especially so since the realization that neutron exposures of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima were considerably lower than previously assumed, thus ''devaluating'' the importance of what we thought was a solid human data base. At the same time, more recent data from radiobiological research appeared to indicate that, at least for some biological endpoints, the RBE of neutrons at low doses and low dose rates was increased dramatically compared to the RBE at higher dose and dose rates. As a consequence, the protection of health against neutrons became a subject of some urgency. The objective of this workshop was to evaluate the existing data base in order to determine the need for additional research in this field. 22 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Workshop on Radiobiological Effectiveness of Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, G. E.; Thomas, R. G.; Thiessen, J. W.

    1985-09-01

    The radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons has become the subject of some heated discussions in both scientific and radiation-protection oriented communities. This has become especially so since the realization that neutron exposures of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima were considerably lower than previously assumed, thus devaluating the importance of what we thought was a solid human data base. At the same time, more recent data from radiobiological research appeared to indicate that, at least for some biological endpoints, the RBE of neutrons at low doses and low dose rates was increased dramatically compared to the RBE at higher dose and dose rates. As a consequence, the protection of health against neutrons became a subject of some urgency. The objective of this workshop was to evaluate the existing data base in order to determine the need for additional research in this field.

  9. Clinical and Applied Experience in Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschopp, Molly K.; Chronister, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Applied training of pre-practicum, practicum, and internship are important gateway experiences for rehabilitation counselors-in-training. Counselor educators and supervisors must be aware of requirements and expectations of counselor-in-training supervision and common ethical issues specific to these clinical experiences of rehabilitation

  10. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Thomas G.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Arteta, Manuel; Ramirez, Ixsy A.; Mullan, Patricia B.; Owens, Sonal T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. Methods First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Results Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Conclusions Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics. PMID:26547081

  11. Clinical Needs Finding: Developing the Virtual Experience, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vaishali; Thompson, Megan; Altman, Stuart M; Taylor, Peter; Summers, Alexander; Goodwin, Kelsey; Louie, Angelique Y

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative program at the University of California, Davis for students to engage in clinical needs finding. Using a team-based approach, students participated in clinical rotations to observe firsthand the needs of clinicians at the university affiliated medical center. The teams were asked to develop documentary-style videos to capture key experiences that would allow future viewers to use the videos as “virtual” clinical rotations. This was conceived as a strategy to allow students in prohibitively large classes, or students in programs at institutions without associated medical or veterinary school programs, to experience clinical rotations and perform needs assessments. The students' perspectives on the experience as well as instructor analysis of best practices for this type of activity are presented and discussed. We found that the internship experience was valuable to the students participating, by not only introducing the practice of needs finding but for increasing the students' confidence in the practice of engineering design and their ability to work independently. The videos produced were of such high quality that instructors from other institutions have requested copies for instructional use. Virtual clinical rotations through video experiences may provide a reasonable substitute for students who do not have the ability to participate in rotations in person. PMID:23483373

  12. Introductory Laboratory Exercises in Radiobiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, J. R. Parry; Servant, D. M.

    1970-01-01

    Describes experiments suitable for introducing use of radioisotopes in biology. Includes demonstrations of tracing food chains, uptake of ions by plants, concentration of elements by insects, tracing photosynthetic reactions, activation analysis of copper, and somatic and genetic effects. Uses autoradiographic and counting techniques. (AL)

  13. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical experience, and outcome requirements for initial approval of transplant centers. 482.80 Section... Hospitals Transplant Center Data Submission, Clinical Experience, and Outcome Requirements § 482.80 Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

  14. Dental Students' Clinical Expectations and Experiences Treating Persons with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Perusini, Darsi J; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Sigal, Michael J; Dempster, Laura J

    2016-03-01

    Persons with disabilities (PWDs) have a disproportionate level of dental disease relative to the general population. Access to care is a cause along with dentists' willingness to treat PWDs. The aim of this study was to investigate the expectations and experiences of dental students in providing treatment to these patients in a hospital-based dental clinic for PWDs. Senior dental students at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto (n=92) were surveyed prior to (Phase I) and at the end of (Phase II) mandatory clinical rotations at the Mount Sinai Hospital's Dentistry Clinic for Persons with Special Needs. Response rates were 88% for Phase I and 58% for Phase II. Before the rotations, 70% of the respondents reported little or no experience with PWDs, and 46% said they did not feel comfortable providing basic dental treatment to PWDs. However, in Phase II, significantly more students reported being comfortable than in Phase I (p=0.001). Overall, the majority of respondents (Phase I 95%; Phase II 98%) indicated they would at least attempt to provide basic dental care to PWDs after graduation. The majority also identified the opportunity to provide care and interact with PWDs as the most enjoyable aspect of their experience at the clinic. They reported that the experience helped reduce their concerns about treating PWDs including being more realistic about the time required and ideal quality of the treatment they could provide. These results suggest that their experience in the clinic significantly increased students' comfort in treating PWDs. The respondents expressed a willingness to treat PWDs once graduated and generally identified their experience as being more positive than their expectations. PMID:26933105

  15. Operation and Maintenance of the National Radiobiology Archives

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Anthony C. James; Stacey L. McCord

    2012-03-07

    The National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) are an archival program, started in 1989, to collect, organize and maintain data, laboratory notebooks, and animal tissue specimens from government (Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies) sponsored radiobiology life-span animal studies. These unique records, histopathology slides and paraffin embedded tissue blocks are maintained in a central facility and are available for further research study. The materials include electronic and paper records for each of more than 6,000 life-span-observations on dogs as well as details of major studies involving nearly 30,000 mice. Although these studies were performed over many years and at different laboratories with differing data management systems, the NRA has translated them into a standardized set of relational database tables. These can be distributed to interested individuals on written request. Specific Aims are: (1) To Maintain the Archive of Written Records from the Animal Experiments - The USTUR continued to maintain the NRA archives which consist of approximately 175 storage boxes containing laboratory notebooks, animal exposure records, animal pathologic records, and radiographs. These were stored in a 6,000 square foot leased facility in Richland, WA. Additionally, through a collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Low Dose Program, many of these records were scanned into digital files. These totaled 34 GB of data, which are saved in 2,407 separate PDF files that are organized by box number and animal identification number. (2) To Maintain the Archive of Animal Tissues at Washington State University - The USTUR continued to house the NRA dog tissue collection in the leased facility. The NRA tissue collection consisted of pathology slides and tissue blocks. Approximately 25% of the laboratory facility was dedicated to the storage of the NRA materials. (3) To Organize the Datasets of These Animals in the Context of Other Datasets so That They Can be Used by the Scientific Community at Large - As was reported in the FY2009 NRA progress report, Dr. Chuck Watson (NRA Database Consultant) completed his service as the US representative on the European Radiobiological Archives (ERA) Advisory Board during FY2009. Unfortunately, due to the lack of financial support during FY2010, the NRA was not able to make further contributions to the ERA's efforts.

  16. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Hutt, Julie A.; Padilla, Mabel T.; Gott, Katherine M.

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  17. Time Keeps on Ticking: The Experience of Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.

    2009-01-01

    The reactions by Ridley and Shaw-Ridley (EJ832451) and Lichtenberg (EJ832452) to the authors' meta-analysis on the effects of experience on judgment accuracy add positively to what is hoped will become an ever more focused discourse on this most basic question: How can mental health clinical decision making be improved? In this rejoinder, the…

  18. Teachers' Clinical Experiences and Attitudes toward Technology Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paganelli, Andrea Lynch

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multisite case study is to examine participants' attitudes toward technology, types of technology available for participant use, and the extent to which technology is used by preservice and mentor teachers during clinical experiences. Research supports the benefit of improved attitudes toward technology integration

  19. Designing Nursing Simulation Clinical Experiences to Promote Critical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Bev; Koroll, Donna; Price, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) learning opportunities in nursing education has received increased attention in the literature. This article describes the design of a systematic framework used to promote critical inquiry and provide meaningful simulation clinical experiences for second year nursing students. Critical inquiry, as defined

  20. [Cryodevitalization of the mandible. The initial clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Eckelt, U; Lerch, H; Franke, W G

    1990-01-01

    There is given a report about first clinical experiences in the partial cryodevitalization of the mandible. 3 tumor-bearing patients were treated. The resection of the mandible was not necessary. The process of revitalisation was observed by bone scanning. PMID:2150462

  1. Ambulance clinical placements A pilot study of students' experience

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Malcolm J; Williams, Brett; Cooper, Jennifer; Adams, Bridget; Alford, Kassie

    2008-01-01

    Background Undergraduate paramedic students undertake clinical placements in a variety of locations. These placements are considered an essential element for paramedic pre-employment education. However, anecdotal evidence suggests some students have not had positive experiences on their emergency ambulance placements. The objective of this study was to identify the type of experiences had by students during ambulance clinical placements and to provide feedback to the ambulance services. Methods In this pilot study we employed a cross-sectional study methodology, using a convenience sample of undergraduate paramedic students available in semester one of 2007 to ascertain the students' views on their reception by on-road paramedics and their overall experience on emergency ambulance clinical placements. Ethics approval was granted. Results There were 77 students who participated in the survey, 64% were females, with 92% of students < 25 years of age and 55% < 65 Kg in weight. There was a statistically significant difference in average height between the genders (Male 179 cm vs Female 168 cm, p < 0.001). Clinical instructors were available to 44% of students with 30% of students excluded from patient management. Thirty percent of students felt there was a lot of unproductive down time during the placement. Paramedics remarked to 40% of students that they doubted their ability to perform the physical role of a paramedic, of this group 36% were advised this more than once. Conclusion This study demonstrates that for a small group of students, emergency ambulance clinical placements were not a positive experience clinically or educationally. Some qualified paramedics doubt if a number of female students can perform the physical role of a paramedic. PMID:18400111

  2. Challenging clinical learning environments: experiences of undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Linda; McDonald, Jane; Gillespie, Mary; Brown, Helen; Miles, Lynn

    2014-03-01

    Clinical learning is an essential component of becoming a nurse. However at times, students report experiencing challenging clinical learning environments (CCLE), raising questions regarding the nature of a challenging clinical learning environment, its impact on students' learning and how students might respond within a CCLE. Using an Interpretive Descriptive study design, researchers held focus groups with 54 students from two Canadian sites, who self-identified as having experienced a CCLE. Students defined a CCLE as affected by relationships in the clinical area and by the context of their learning experiences. CCLE decreased students' learning opportunities and impacted on them as persons. As students determined which relationships were challenging, they tapped other resources and they used strategies to rebuilt, reframe, redirect and/or retreat relative to the specific challenge. Relationships also acted as buffers to unsupportive practice cultures. Implications for practice and research are addressed. PMID:24063792

  3. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    PubMed

    Geg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Hjen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other. PMID:25991150

  4. Mapping students' clinical experiences to pediatric clerkship goals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aaron; Sharkey, Angela; McGann, Kathleen; Sumner, Walton

    2006-01-01

    In anticipation of new LCME accreditation requirements, our third year clerkship students began tracking pediatric clinical experiences using a hand-held Electronic Student Encounter Log (ESEL) in June 2005. ESEL was tailored to support rapid documentation of diseases seen at a pediatric tertiary care hospital, while retaining access to primary care diagnoses. We matched encounters that 37 students documented to experiences that fulfill the pediatric clerkship's 19 educational goals. We discovered omissions in both ESEL and the goal definitions. No student documented meeting all goals, and no goal was met by all students. Handheld encounter logs are useful for tracking clinical experiences. Logs, logging instructions, and goals require regular compatibility checks. PMID:17238622

  5. Mapping Students Clinical Experiences to Pediatric Clerkship Goals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Sharkey, Angela; McGann, Kathleen; Sumner, Walton

    2006-01-01

    In anticipation of new LCME accreditation requirements, our third year clerkship students began tracking pediatric clinical experiences using a hand-held Electronic Student Encounter Log (ESEL) in June 2005. ESEL was tailored to support rapid documentation of diseases seen at a pediatric tertiary care hospital, while retaining access to primary care diagnoses. We matched encounters that 37 students documented to experiences that fulfill the pediatric clerkships 19 educational goals. We discovered omissions in both ESEL and the goal definitions. No student documented meeting all goals, and no goal was met by all students. Handheld encounter logs are useful for tracking clinical experiences. Logs, logging instructions, and goals require regular compatibility checks. PMID:17238622

  6. The renaissance in basic cellular radiobiology and its significance for radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    Cellular radiobiology is undergoing a renaissance. The renaissance provides the impetus for change in the content of graduate courses in basic cellular radiobiology, and especially those designed for residents in radiation therapy. Emphasis on radiation physics should be reduced to a bare minimum; emphasis on the roles of biochemistry, chemistry, molecular biology, molecular genetics, and so forth in the cellular radiation response must be accentuated. Improvements in radiation therapy should follow a major shift in research emphasis to the identification of enzymes involved in cellular recovery. Theoretically, it is possible to change a survival curve by modulating or inhibiting the enzymatic processes involved in the amelioration of radiation damage to DNA. Split-dose recovery at the cellular level would be eliminated. Effective clinical utilization of specific enzyme inhibitors would increase the fiscal and logistic advantages of `conventional` therapy with sparsely ionizing radiations. 59 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Oncolytic HSV-1 Virotherapy: Clinical Experience and Opportunities for Progress

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Cripe, Timothy P

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy with mutants derived from Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 exhibit significant antitumor effects in preclinical models. Several mutants have now been tested in clinical trials for a variety of cancer types, and all have been found to be safe. While there have been hints of antitumor efficacy with prolonged survival in some cases compared with historical controls, dramatic responses have been elusive. We review the clinical experience published to date and discuss some of the biologic factors that may be limiting for virus infection and spread, as well as new strategies currently under development to enhance antitumor efficacy. PMID:21740359

  8. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  9. Understanding Clinical Expertise: Nurse Education, Experience, and the Hospital Context

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Lake, Eileen T.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nursing expertise is central to quality patient care. Research on factors that contribute to expertise has focused largely on individual nurse characteristics to the exclusion of contextual factors. To address this, we examined effects of hospital contextual factors and individual nurse education and experience on clinical nursing expertise in a cross-sectional analysis of data from 8,611 registered nurses. In a generalized ordered logistic regression analysis, the composition of the hospital staff, particularly the proportion of nurses with at least a bachelor of science in nursing degree, was associated with significantly greater odds of a nurse reporting a more advanced expertise level. Our findings suggest that, controlling for individual characteristics, the hospital context significantly influences clinical nursing expertise. PMID:20645420

  10. ?-thalassemia patients and gynecological approach: review and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Ambroggio, Simona; Peris, Clementina; Picardo, Elisa; Mitidieri, Marco; Minniti, Elena; Benedetto, Chiara; Gregori, Gianluca; Ba, Maria G

    2016-03-01

    Significant improvements in therapy and life expectancy of ?-thalassemia patients in last decades result in the need of commitment for gynecologists and obstetricians as the complexity of organ impairment needs a specific multidisciplinary approach. After a review of clinical manifestations of ?-thalassemia from a gynecologic point of view, we present the experience of a gynecologic center in treating ?-thalassemia patients from more than 20 years. PMID:26492849

  11. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources. PMID:25585469

  12. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  13. BNL accelerator-based radiobiology facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenstein, D. I.

    2001-01-01

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40-3000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10(10) to 10(11) ions per pulse. The BAF Project will be described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans will be presented.

  14. Italian nurse students' and clinical preceptors' perceptions about clinical practice experiences: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Quattrin, Rosanna; Zanini, Antonietta; Bulfone, Giampiera; Farneti, Federico; Panariti, Matteo; Calligaris, Laura; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2010-01-01

    Aims of the study was to compare perception of both clinical preceptors and nursing students in relation to clinical nursing practice in Italy. The recent introduction of primary level nursing education to Italian University primed many changes in processes and required to think new methods and contents. Special attention was adopted on revaluation of clinical practice. The study was part of a large investigation conducted from 2005 until 2006 as prevalence survey throughout two questionnaire addressed to nurses student and to clinical guides. Participants were all students (tot. 172) from one School of Nursing and their clinical guides (tot.120) working in a high specialization hospital located in a large urban area in Northern Italy. Students' and nurses' perceptions differed in these fields: knowledge of students' learning objectives, explanation of students' competences and objectives already reached, prevalence execution of assistance activity, organization of briefing/debriefing meetings, planning of a learning programme with students at the beginning of tutorship, choosing occasions related to nursing subjects discussed in classroom, filling an intermediate evaluation of the student tutorship in addiction to the final. The perceptions of the students and preceptors were opposite on several factors. This means that students and clinical guides approach the clinical experience from individualized viewpoints. PMID:21358770

  15. Exploring nursing students experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  16. Describing depression: Congruence between patient experiences and clinical assessments

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Stover, Angela; Hofkens, Tara; Huisman, Emily; Shulman, Stuart; Eisen, Susan V.; Becker, Sara J.; Weinfurt, Kevin; Boland, Elaine; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Efforts to describe depression have relied on top-down methods in which theory and clinical experience define depression but may not reflect the individuals experiences with depression. We assessed the degree of overlap between academic descriptions of depression and patient-reported symptoms as conceptualized in the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). By extension, this work assesses the degree of overlap between current clinical descriptions of depression and patient-reported symptoms. Design In this content analysis study, four focus groups were conducted across two sites to elicit symptoms and the experience of depression from depressed and medically ill patients. Methods Depressed and medically ill patients were asked to describe symptoms that characterize depression. Data were transcribed and then coded using an a priori list of 43 facets of depression derived from extant depression measures. Results Participants described 93% of the symptoms from the a priori list, supporting the validity of current depression measures. Interpersonal difficulties were underscored as was anger. In general, results from the focus groups did not require the generation of new items for depression and supported the content validity of the PROMIS hierarchical framework and item pool created originally. Conclusions This work supports the validity of current depression assessment, but suggests further investigation of interpersonal functioning and anger may add to the depth and breadth of depression assessment. PMID:21332520

  17. A motivational systems approach to the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, J D; Kindler, A R

    1994-01-01

    A conception of the self and five motivational systems is applied to clinical psychoanalysis. Each motivational system develops in infancy from innate and learned patterns in response to a basic need, and each involves particular affects. Each motivational system contributes patterns from which important transferences evolve. At any given moment, motives derived from one or another system dominate a person's experience, motives from the other system being subsidiary or dormant. We describe the manner in which these concepts contribute to an explanation of foreground-background relations during analysis, and how analysts and analysands construct model scenes to give meaning to information acquired by empathic listening. We conclude with a clinical vignette illustrating the application of these concepts to the patient's transference and the analyst's response in the intersubjective realm of an analytic enactment and verbal exchange. PMID:8040549

  18. Incorporating professionalism into medical education: the Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Paul S

    2009-09-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. In this article, the statements of professional societies (e.g., the Charter on Medical Professionalism), the expectations of patients and society regarding professionalism, and a framework for defining medical professionalism are described. The framework's foundation consists of clinical competence, communication skills, and a sound understanding of the ethical and legal aspects of medicine. Rising from this foundation are attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism. The capstone of the framework is professionalism, or the complete physician. Reasons for teaching professionalism to and assessing professionalism among medical students, physicians in training, and physicians in practice are also described. These reasons include patient expectations; the association between professionalism and improved clinical outcomes (and the association between unprofessional behavior and adverse outcomes); accreditation organization requirements; and observations that professionalism can be taught, learned, and assessed. In addition, methods for teaching professionalism are described (e.g., didactic lectures, discussion groups, simulation, and role-modeling). To ensure that medical students, physicians in training, and physicians in practice are competent in professionalism, they should be assessed for professionalism. Thus, approaches to assessing professionalism are also described (e.g., multiple tools and observers). Professionalism assessments can be used for formative and summative feedback, evaluation of professionalism education programs, and generating hypotheses for professionalism research. Finally, the rich history and culture of clinical excellence and professionalism and specific programs for teaching and assessing professionalism at Mayo Clinic are described throughout this article. Indeed, the Mayo Clinic experience validates professionalism a s a core physician competency. PMID:19826207

  19. The radiobiological targets of SBRT: tumor cells or endothelial cells?

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    The development of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) techniques has revolutionized the practice of radiation oncology. The radiobiological targets that alter the therapeutic response to SBRT remain a subject of debate. The prevailing perspective has been that the radiation-induced damage to endothelial cells and changes in microvasculature facilitate tumor response to SBRT. A provocative study by Moding et al. (PMID: 25761890), challenged this notion by elucidating the role of tumor cells versus endothelial cells in mediating sarcoma eradication following high-dose SBRT. Using dual recombinase technology, they generated primary sarcomas in genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs). They also modulated the apoptotic pathway and radiosensitization profile using targeted mutations in either tumor cells or endothelial cells. Unlike transplanted tumor models, the findings here suggest that deletion of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax or of the DNA-damage response gene ATM in endothelial cells did not result in tumor eradication to high dose SBRT, despite extensive endothelial cell death. On the other hand, genetic targeting of ATM gene in tumor cells achieved local sarcoma control and tumor eradication. These findings imply that tumor cells rather than endothelial cells act as prime targets affecting a tumor eradication response to SBRT. The translational implications of these findings are of great potential significance. When targeting endothelial cells, delivery of SBRT irradiation can only result in tumor growth delay. The benefit of targeting ATM in this setting will be radiation dose dependent. Curative intent, tumor eradication and local control, on the other hand, are only possible by targeting tumor cells with high dose SBRT (50 Gy in 1 fraction) and with radiosensitization by ATM deletion. In the absence of radiosensitization, only palliation is possible with high dose SBRT. Whether these provocative findings can be extrapolated to other translational tumor models or proved valid in clinical trials remains the subject of future studies. The mechanisms by which tumors compensate to SBRTs endothelial cell damage, such as new vascular recruitment, and/or recruitment of other immune and stromal components, are also critical questions for the field of radiobiology to address. Such mechanistic understanding of the key cellular players mediating SBRT response in a model system that recapitulates human disease will be essential in designing targeted radiosensitizers ultimately aimed at improving the therapeutic ratio. PMID:26697450

  20. Trichomycosis (Trichobacteriosis): Clinical and Microbiological Experience with 56 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vquez-Gonzlez, Denisse; Fierro, Leonel; Araiza, Javier; Ponce, Rosa Mara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic bacterial infection of the axillary hairs caused by Corynebacterium sp. Objective: to bring a series of cases of trichomycosis, its clinical and microbiological experience. Materials and Methods: This report consists in a linear and observational retrospective study of 15 years of cases of trichomycosis confirmed clinically and microbiologically. Results: Fifty six confirmed cases of trichomycosis were included in this report. The majority were men 53/56 (94.6%), mean age was 32.5 years. The most commonly affected area was the axilla (92%), trichomycosis flava was the principal variant 55/56 (98.2%) and signs and symptoms associated were hyperhidrosis (87.5%), hairs texture change (57.1%) and odor (35.7%). Bacterial concretions were observed in all cases, and the predominant causative agent in 89.3% of all cases was Corynebacterium sp. Thirty patients were included in therapeutic portion of the study, and 28 (93.3%) of them experienced a clinical and microbiological cure. Conclusion: Trichomycosis is asymptomatic, superficial infection, which primarily affects axillary hairs. PMID:23960390

  1. Fingolimod Real World Experience: Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Fingolimod is a multiple sclerosis treatment licensed in Europe since 2011. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in three large phase III trials, used in the regulatory submissions throughout the world. As usual, in these trials the inclusion and exclusion criteria were designed to obtain a homogeneous population, with interchangeable characteristics in the different treatment arms. Although this is the best strategy to achieve a robust answer to the investigation question, it does not guaranty the treatment efficacy in the clinical practice, since in the real world there are concomitant treatments, comorbidities, adherence, and persistence challenges. But, to make informed treatment decision for a real life patient, we need to have evidence of the treatment efficacy, what has been called treatment effectiveness. This work aims to review fingolimod effectiveness, using, as source of information, abstracts, posters, and manuscripts. This unorthodox strategy was developed because more than half of the published experience with fingolimod is still on abstracts and posters. Only a small part of the studies reviewed are already published in peer reviewed journals. Fingolimod seems to be, at least, as effective and safe as it was on clinical trials, and with its long-term experience no new safety signals were observed. PMID:26693475

  2. Mutuality: clinical and metapsychological potentials of a failed experiment.

    PubMed

    Castillo Mendoza, Carlos Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis are often dismissed, without acknowledging the results obtained from them and his own cautionary remarks about their limits. Though ultimately failed, Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis were a source of clinical and metapsychological knowledge, despite the fact that he was unable to elaborate them in his lifetime. In this paper I connect mutuality to the development of the psyche, especially to the constitutive core of the intrapsychic. To understand the latter, it is necessary to take into account, among others, issues such as the common attribute, the mutual flux between the unconsciouses, the dialogue of unconsciouses, the maternal profundity, the primal relationship with the mother, and, above all, the primal unity between mother and child, which are fundamental for the emergence and development of the primary psychic forces. Incidences of rupture, distortion of the core of mutuality in the psychic life, its loss and disadjustment, by means of external traumatizing forces, and some clinical implications are described. PMID:22398886

  3. Artificial Pancreas: Model Predictive Control Design from Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Toffanin, Chiara; Messori, Mirko; Palma, Federico Di; Nicolao, Giuseppe De; Cobelli, Claudio; Magni, Lalo

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this research is to develop a new artificial pancreas that takes into account the experience accumulated during more than 5000 h of closed-loop control in several clinical research centers. The main objective is to reduce the mean glucose value without exacerbating hypo phenomena. Controller design and in silico testing were performed on a new virtual population of the University of Virginia/Padova simulator. Methods A new sensor model was developed based on the Comparison of Two Artificial Pancreas Systems for Closed-Loop Blood Glucose Control versus Open-Loop Control in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes trial AP@home data. The Kalman filter incorporated in the controller has been tuned using plasma and pump insulin as well as plasma and continuous glucose monitoring measures collected in clinical research centers. New constraints describing clinical knowledge not incorporated in the simulator but very critical in real patients (e.g., pump shutoff) have been introduced. The proposed model predictive control (MPC) is characterized by a low computational burden and memory requirements, and it is ready for an embedded implementation. Results The new MPC was tested with an intensive simulation study on the University of Virginia/Padova simulator equipped with a new virtual population. It was also used in some preliminary outpatient pilot trials. The obtained results are very promising in terms of mean glucose and number of patients in the critical zone of the control variability grid analysis. Conclusions The proposed MPC improves on the performance of a previous controller already tested in several experiments in the AP@home and JDRF projects. This algorithm complemented with a safety supervision module is a significant step toward deploying artificial pancreases into outpatient environments for extended periods of time. J Diabetes Sci Technol 2013;7(6):1470-1483 PMID:24351173

  4. General Practitioners’ responses to global climate change - lessons from clinical experience and the clinical method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Climate change is a global public health problem that will require complex thinking if meaningful and effective solutions are to be achieved. In this conceptual paper we argue that GPs have much to bring to the issue of climate change from their wide-ranging clinical experience and from the principles underpinning their clinical methods. This experience and thinking calls forth particular contributions GPs can and should make to debate and action. Discussion We contend that the privileged experience and GP way of thinking can make valuable contributions when applied to climate change solutions. These include a lifetime of experience, reflection and epistemological application to first doing no harm, managing uncertainty, the ability to make necessary decisions while possessing incomplete information, an appreciation of complex adaptive systems, maintenance of homeostasis, vigilance for unintended consequences, and an appreciation of the importance of transdisciplinarity and interprofessionalism. Summary General practitioners have a long history of public health advocacy and in the case of climate change may bring a way of approaching complex human problems that could be applied to the dilemmas of climate change. PMID:22873633

  5. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsaesser, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-15

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  6. Hot particle dosimetry and radiobiology--past and present.

    PubMed

    Charles, M W; Harrison, J D

    2007-09-01

    Small high-activity radioactive particles of nominal diameter ranging from approximately 1 mm down to several microm have been a radiological concern over the last 30 years in and around European and American nuclear reactor facilities. These particles have often been referred to as 'hot particles'. The 'hot particle problem' came into prominent concern in the late 1960s. The potential carcinogenic effects in lungs as the result of irradiation by discrete small particles containing alpha-emitting radionuclides, particularly (239)Pu, were claimed by some to be several orders of magnitude greater than those produced by uniform irradiation to the same mean dose. The phrase 'hot particle problem' was subsequently used to refer to the difficulty of predicting health effects for all microscopic radioactive sources. The difficulty arose because of the paucity of comparative human, animal or cell studies using radioactive particles, and the lack of validated measurement or calculational techniques for dose estimation for non-uniform exposures. Experience was largely restricted to uniform, large-area/volume exposures. The concern regarding cancer induction was extended to deterministic effects when the ICRP in 1977 failed to give adequate dose limits for dealing with 'hot particle' exposures of the skin. Since 1980, considerable efforts have been made to clarify and solve the dosimetric and radiobiological issues related to the health effects of 'hot particle' exposures. The general recommendations of the ICRP in 1991 used the latest radiobiological data to provide skin dose limits which are applicable to 'hot particle' exposures. More recently the NCRP has extended considerations to other organs. This progress is reviewed and applied to the specific case of the recent evaluation of potential health effects of Dounreay fuel fragments commissioned by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). Analyses of possible doses and risks in this case indicate that the principal concern following skin contact, ingestion or inhalation is the possibility of localised ulceration of skin or of the mucosal lining of the colon or extra-thoracic airways. PMID:17768323

  7. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary support functions are available locally, especially for early stage clinician managers. PMID:23173953

  8. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  9. The Tumor Radiobiology of SRS and SBRT: Are More Than the 5 Rs Involved?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Carlson, David J.; Brenner, David J.

    2014-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), are rapidly becoming accepted practice for the radiation therapy of certain tumors. Typically, SRS and SBRT involve the delivery of 1 or a few large-dose fractions of 8 to 30 Gy per fraction: a major paradigm shift from radiation therapy practice over the past 90 years, when, with relatively large amounts of normal tissues receiving high doses, the goal was to maximize tumor response for an acceptable level of normal tissue injury. The development of SRS and SBRT have come about because of technologic advances in image guidance and treatment delivery techniques that enable the delivery of large doses to tumors with reduced margins and high gradients outside the target, thereby minimizing doses to surrounding normal tissues. Because the results obtained with SRS and SBRT have been impressive, they have raised the question whether classic radiobiological modeling, and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, are appropriate for large doses per fraction. In addition to objections to the LQ model, the possibility of additional biological effects resulting from endothelial cell damage, enhanced tumor immunity, or both have been raised to account for the success of SRS and SBRT. In this review, we conclude that the available preclinical and clinical data do not support a need to change the LQ model or to invoke phenomena over and above the classic 5 Rs of radiobiology and radiation therapy, with the likely exception that for some tumors high doses of irradiation may produce enhanced antitumor immunity. Thus, we suggest that for most tumors, the standard radiobiology concepts of the 5 Rs are sufficient to explain the clinical data, and the excellent results obtained from clinical studies are the result of the much larger biologically effective doses that are delivered with SRS and SBRT.

  10. Molecular Radiobiology: The State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Giaccia, Amato J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional cytotoxic agents used in cancer therapy were initially discovered based on their ability to kill rapidly dividing cells. The targets of these early-generation agents were typically one or more aspects of DNA synthesis or mitosis. Thus, dose-limiting toxicities commonly associated with these agents include GI dysfunction, immunosuppression, and other consequences of injury to normal tissues in which cells are replicating under normal physiologic conditions. Although many of these agents still play an important role in cancer therapy when given concurrently with radiation therapy, the major thrust of radiobiology research in the last two decades has focused on discovering tumor-specific traits that might be exploited for more selective targeting that would enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy with less normal tissue toxicity. These newer generation molecular targeted therapies interfere with the growth of tumor cells by inhibiting genes and their protein products that are needed specifically by the tumor for survival and expansion. These agents can be complementary to radiotherapy, a spatially targeted agent. Although there have been extraordinary technical advances in radiotherapy in recent years, we are reaching the limits of improvements that radiotherapy delivery technology can bring and need different approaches. This review will highlight promising new tumor biologybased targets and other novel strategies to reduce normal tissue injury, increase tumor control, and expand the use of radiotherapy to treat widespread metastatic disease. PMID:25113768

  11. Tritium radiobiology and relative biological effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Carsten, A L

    1993-12-01

    During the past decade, a large number of radiobiological studies have become available for tritium--many of them focusing on the relative biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays. These and previous studies indicate that tritium in body water produces the same spectrum of radiogenic effects (e.g., cancer, genetic effects, developmental abnormalities, and reproductive effects) observed following whole-body exposure to penetrating radiations such as gamma rays and x rays. However, tritium beta rays are of greater biological effectiveness than gamma rays and x rays. For example, tritium in the oxide form is about 2 to 3 times more effective at low doses or low dose rates than gamma rays from 137Cs or 60Co. When tritium is bound to organic molecules, relative biological effectiveness values may be somewhat larger than those for tritium in oxide form. Tritium administered to animals or to cells in vitro as tritiated amino acids results in relative biological effectiveness values that appear similar to those obtained for tritium in oxide form; however, if administered as tritiated thymidine, the relative biological effectiveness values appear to be about two-fold higher. It is clear from the wealth of tritium data now available that relative biological effectiveness values for tritium beta rays are higher than the quality factor of unity generally used in radiation protection. PMID:8244712

  12. Biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Highlights of my biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology is presented. Early adventures involved developing state-vector models'' for specific harmful effects (cell killing, life shortening) of exposure to radiation. More recent adventures led to developing hazard-function models'' for predicting biological effects (e.g., cell killing, mutations, tumor induction) of combined exposure to different toxicants. Hazard-function models were also developed for predicting harm to man from exposure to large radiation doses. Major conclusions derived from the modeling adventures are as follows: (1) synergistic effects of different genotoxic agents should not occur at low doses; (2) for exposure of the lung or bone marrow to large doses of photon radiation, low rates of exposure should be better tolerated than high rates; and (3) for some types of radiation (e.g., alpha particles and fission neutrons), moderate doses delivered at a low rate may be more harmful than the same dose given at a high rate. 53 refs., 7 figs.

  13. The Meta-Analysis of Clinical Judgment Project: Effects of Experience on Judgment Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.; Anderson, Linda A.; Cook, Robert S.; Nichols, Cassandra N.; Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Walker, Blain S.; Cohen, Genna R.; Rush, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and educational experience is one of the most commonly studied variables in clinical judgment research. Contrary to clinicians' perceptions, clinical judgment researchers have generally concluded that accuracy does not improve with increased education, training, or clinical experience. In this meta-analysis, the authors synthesized

  14. Prescribing exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation: a clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S; Ribeiro, F; Maltais, F; Saey, D

    2014-01-01

    Built around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary, evidence-based, comprehensive approach to working with the patient as a whole and not just the pulmonary component of the disease. Integrated into the individualized treatment, this intervention aims to reduce symptoms, optimize functional status, increase participation in daily life, and reduce health care costs through stabilizing or reversing systemic manifestations of the disease. Although there are many other components that should be considered to manage the impairment and symptom burden, supervised exercise training is considered the cornerstone of effective pulmonary rehabilitation. This paper addresses our clinical experience at Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Qubec to assess and manage exercise training in line with the current recommendations and guidelines surrounding PR. PMID:24480488

  15. Clinical experience of spontaneous pneumomediastinum: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Hyun Woo; Moon, Youngkyu; Kim, Young Du; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Jae Kil

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a benign disease with a variety degree of severity but definite treatment modality is not clearly identified with its rarity. The purpose of this study was to review our experience and discuss the management of SPM according to the severity of disease. Methods From March 1996 to December 2012, total 64 patients were enrolled and classified as mild, moderate and severe groups and subsequent clinical courses were analyzed retrospectively. Results Fifty-one were males and 13 were females (M:F =3.9:1) with a mean age of 18 years old (range: 10-30 years old). Thirty-six patients were in mild, 22 in moderate and 6 in severe group. Chief complaints were chest pain (50 cases; 78.1%), neck pain (35 cases; 54.7%), dyspnea (18 cases; 28.1%), odynophagia (9 cases; 14.1%) and precipitating factors were coughing in 12 cases, feeding problems in 9 cases, and vomiting in 7 cases; however, 34 patients (53.1%) had no precipitating signs. All patients received oxygen therapy (100%), prophylactic antibiotics in 57 patients (89.1%), and pain medications in 47 patients (73.4%). The mean hospital stay was 4.6 days (range: 1-10 days). There was an increased linear trend according to time to visit (P=0.023) but clinical course demonstrated no significant trend between groups. Conclusions These data demonstrated that there was no difference in symptom, clinical course and SPM was adequately treated with conservative management regardless of the degree of severity of SPM. PMID:26623105

  16. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sor, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. PMID:26643920

  17. One Thousand Patients With Primary Myelofibrosis: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Lasho, Terra L.; Jimma, Thitina; Finke, Christy M.; Gangat, Naseema; Vaidya, Rakhee; Begna, Kebede H.; Al-Kali, Aref; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Hanson, Curtis A.; Pardanani, Animesh

    2012-01-01

    Objective To share our decades of experience with primary myelofibrosis and underscore the importance of outcomes research studies in designing clinical trials and interpreting their results. Patients and Methods One thousand consecutive patients with primary myelofibrosis seen at Mayo Clinic between November 4, 1977, and September 1, 2011, were considered. The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), dynamic IPSS (DIPSS), and DIPSS-plus were applied for risk stratification. Separate analyses were included for patients seen at time of referral (N=1000), at initial diagnosis (N=340), and within or after 1 year of diagnosis (N=660). Results To date, 592 deaths and 68 leukemic transformations have been documented. Parameters at initial diagnosis vs time of referral included median age (66 vs 65 years), male sex (61% vs 62%), red cell transfusion need (24% vs 38%), hemoglobin level less than 10 g/dL (38% vs 54%), platelet count less than 100 × 109/L (18% vs 26%), leukocyte count more than 25 × 109/L (13% vs 16%), marked splenomegaly (21% vs 31%), constitutional symptoms (29% vs 34%), and abnormal karyotype (31% vs 41%). Mutational frequencies were 61% for JAK2V617F, 8% for MPLW515, and 4% for IDH1/2. DIPSS-plus risk distributions at time of referral were 10% low, 15% intermediate-1, 37% intermediate-2, and 37% high. The corresponding median survivals were 17.5, 7.8, 3.6, and 1.8 years vs 20.0, 14.3, 5.3, and 1.7 years for patients younger than 60 years of age. Compared with both DIPSS and IPSS, DIPSS-plus showed better discrimination among risk groups. Five-year leukemic transformation rates were 6% and 21% in low- and high-risk patients, respectively. Conclusion The current document should serve as a valuable resource for patients and physicians and provides context for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:22212965

  18. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

  19. The initial Trinidad experience with Cine MRI in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C N; Maharaj, P; Bodapati, S; John, R; Rahaman, R; Henry, R; Brann, S

    2002-03-01

    We describe the initial Trinidad experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Cine MRI as a diagnostic tool in clinical cardiology. Six patients from the following categories were referred for Cine MRI evaluation: congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, aortic diseases, cardiomyopathy and intracardiac mass. All patients underwent echocardiography. MRI and Cine MRI were performed on all patients using a Siemens Magnetom 1.0 Tesla MR system at MRI Trinidad and Tobago Ltd. Selected patients underwent Angiography and/or computed tomography (CT) scanning. Clinical data and images of the six patients evaluated are described. MRI and Cine MRI provided excellent anatomical and functional details of the heart and aorta in five patients with dissection of the aorta, aneurysm of the ascending aorta, suspected left ventricular apical thrombus, infiltrative cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. Technical difficulty was experienced with one patient who had a congenital defect (common atrium). In this study, Cine MRI provided excellent images in all but one patient. This new noninvasive technique enhanced diagnostic capabilities and facilitated management in patients with certain cardiovascular diseases. PMID:12089881

  20. How Clinical Instructors Can Enhance the Learning Experience of Physical Therapy Students in an Introductory Clinical Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Beverley; Wessel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is little understanding of how physical therapy students are influenced by clinical instructors (CIs) particularly at the outset of their clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical therapy students' perceptions of their learning experiences during an introductory clinical placement. Methods: Subjects were

  1. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  2. Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Testing - Clinical Experience: 100,000 Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Ron M.; Almasri, Eyad A.; Guan, Xiaojun; Geis, Jennifer A.; Hicks, Susan C.; Mazloom, Amin R.; Deciu, Cosmin; Oeth, Paul; Bombard, Allan T.; Paxton, Bill; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Objective As the first laboratory to offer massively parallel sequencing-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal aneuploidies, Sequenom Laboratories has been able to collect the largest clinical population experience data to date, including >100,000 clinical samples from all 50 U.S. states and 13 other countries. The objective of this study is to give a robust clinical picture of the current laboratory performance of the MaterniT21 PLUS LDT. Study Design The study includes plasma samples collected from patients with high-risk pregnancies in our CLIAlicensed, CAP-accredited laboratory between August 2012 to June 2013. Samples were assessed for trisomies 13, 18, 21 and for the presence of chromosome Y-specific DNA. Sample data and ad hoc outcome information provided by the clinician was compiled and reviewed to determine the characteristics of this patient population, as well as estimate the assay performance in a clinical setting. Results NIPT patients most commonly undergo testing at an average of 15 weeks, 3 days gestation; and average 35.1 years of age. The average turnaround time is 4.54 business days and an overall 1.3% not reportable rate. The positivity rate for Trisomy 21 was 1.51%, followed by 0.45% and 0.21% rate for Trisomies 18 and 13, respectively. NIPT positivity rates are similar to previous large clinical studies of aneuploidy in women of maternal age ?35 undergoing amniocentesis. In this population 3519 patients had multifetal gestations (3.5%) with 2.61% yielding a positive NIPT result. Conclusion NIPT has been commercially offered for just over 2 years and the clinical use by patients and clinicians has increased significantly. The risks associated with invasive testing have been substantially reduced by providing another assessment of aneuploidy status in high-risk patients. The accuracy and NIPT assay positivity rate are as predicted by clinical validations and the test demonstrates improvement in the current standard of care. PMID:25289665

  3. Clinical Experiences in Teacher Education Prior to Student Teaching at Southeast Missouri State University. Report of the Task Force on Alternatives for Clinical Laboratory Experiences in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Missouri State Univ., Cape Girardeau.

    A study was made of the clinical experiences, offered by Southeast Missouri State University, for students preparing to be teachers. The study was conducted to determine if modifications in the current system would make possible reallocation of resources, while at the same time preserving the quality of clinical experiences for the students. The

  4. Sequencing of Simulation and Clinic Experiences in an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, Emily; DeSevo Bellottie, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine how the intrasemester sequencing of a simulation component, delivered during an ambulatory care introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE), affects student performance on a series of 3 assessments delivered during the second professional (P2) year. Design. At the Jefferson College of Pharmacy (JCP), P2 student pharmacists were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of simulation activities, followed by 6 weeks on site at an ambulatory care clinic or vice versa during either the fall or spring semesters. At the end of each semester, these students completed 3 skills-based assessments: answering a series of drug information (DI) questions; conducting medication adherence counseling; and conducting a medication history. The 2 groups’ raw scores on assessment rubrics were compared. Assessment. During academic years 2011-2012 and 2012-2013, 180 P2 student pharmacists participated in the required ambulatory care IPPE. Ninety experienced simulation first, while the other 90 experienced the clinic first. Students assessed over a 2-year time span performed similarly on each of 3 skills-based assessments, regardless of how simulation experiences were sequenced within the IPPE. Conclusion. The lack of significant difference in student performance suggests that schools of pharmacy may have flexibility with regard to how they choose to incorporate simulation into clinical ambulatory care IPPEs. PMID:26688585

  5. Sequencing of Simulation and Clinic Experiences in an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience.

    PubMed

    Leon, Nicholas; Hajjar, Emily; DeSevo Bellottie, Gina

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To examine how the intrasemester sequencing of a simulation component, delivered during an ambulatory care introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE), affects student performance on a series of 3 assessments delivered during the second professional (P2) year. Design. At the Jefferson College of Pharmacy (JCP), P2 student pharmacists were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of simulation activities, followed by 6 weeks on site at an ambulatory care clinic or vice versa during either the fall or spring semesters. At the end of each semester, these students completed 3 skills-based assessments: answering a series of drug information (DI) questions; conducting medication adherence counseling; and conducting a medication history. The 2 groups' raw scores on assessment rubrics were compared. Assessment. During academic years 2011-2012 and 2012-2013, 180 P2 student pharmacists participated in the required ambulatory care IPPE. Ninety experienced simulation first, while the other 90 experienced the clinic first. Students assessed over a 2-year time span performed similarly on each of 3 skills-based assessments, regardless of how simulation experiences were sequenced within the IPPE. Conclusion. The lack of significant difference in student performance suggests that schools of pharmacy may have flexibility with regard to how they choose to incorporate simulation into clinical ambulatory care IPPEs. PMID:26688585

  6. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  7. A laser-driven nanosecond proton source for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Jianhui; Allinger, Klaus; Assmann, Walter; Dollinger, Günther; Drexler, Guido A.; Friedl, Anna A.; Habs, Dieter; Hilz, Peter; Hoerlein, Rainer; Humble, Nicole; Karsch, Stefan; Khrennikov, Konstantin; Kiefer, Daniel; Krausz, Ferenc; Ma, Wenjun; Michalski, Dörte; Molls, Michael; Raith, Sebastian; Reinhardt, Sabine; Röper, Barbara; Schmid, Thomas E.; Tajima, Toshiki; Wenz, Johannes; Zlobinskaya, Olga; Schreiber, Joerg; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2012-12-01

    Ion beams are relevant for radiobiological studies and for tumor therapy. In contrast to conventional accelerators, laser-driven ion acceleration offers a potentially more compact and cost-effective means of delivering ions for radiotherapy. Here, we show that by combining advanced acceleration using nanometer thin targets and beam transport, truly nanosecond quasi-monoenergetic proton bunches can be generated with a table-top laser system, delivering single shot doses up to 7 Gy to living cells. Although in their infancy, laser-ion accelerators allow studying fast radiobiological processes as demonstrated here by measurements of the relative biological effectiveness of nanosecond proton bunches in human tumor cells.

  8. [Radiobiological aspects of diagnostic X-ray use in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Hoogeveen, R C; van den Aardweg, G J M J

    2015-05-01

    Soon after the discovery of X-rays, it became clear that their use can cause detrimental effects. The field of radiobiology deals with these detrimental effects. In this article, the theoretical concepts of radiobiology relevant to diagnostic X-ray use are presented. The effects of radiation on living tissues, the relationship between dose and effect, and a translation of these effects into the dental application are discussed. X-rays cannot be considered to be harmless even when used at the relatively low doses as in dentistry. If applied with justification and optimization, the risk to the patient will, however, be small. PMID:26210221

  9. Students' experiences of learning manual clinical skills through simulation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Eva; Siln, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hkan

    2013-03-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and thoughts about their learning through simulation skills training. The study was designed for an educational setting at a clinical skills centre. Ten third-year undergraduate nursing students performed urethral catheterisation, using the virtual reality simulator UrecathVision, which has haptic properties. The students practised in pairs. Each session was videotaped and the video was used to stimulate recall in subsequent interviews. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis from interviews resulted in three themes: what the students learn, how the students learn, and the simulator's contribution to the students' learning. Students learned manual skills, how to perform the procedure, and professional behaviour. They learned by preparing, watching, practising and reflecting. The simulator contributed by providing opportunities for students to prepare for the skills training, to see anatomical structures, to feel resistance, and to become aware of their own performance ability. The findings show that the students related the task to previous experiences, used sensory information, tested themselves and practised techniques in a hands-on fashion, and reflected in and on action. The simulator was seen as a facilitator to learning the manual skills. The study design, with students working in pairs combined with video recording, was found to enhance opportunities for reflection. PMID:22395307

  10. Management of laryngeal radionecrosis: Animal and clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, R.W.; Krespi, Y.P.; Einhorn, R.K.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation necrosis of the laryngeal cartilages is an uncommon complication of radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. It is a devastating process for which there is no one acceptable treatment. Medical management offers only temporary, symptomatic relief, which further necessitates surgical treatment. Surgical management may start with a tracheotomy; however, it often ends with a total laryngectomy. Physiologically, the necrotic cartilages are the source of the problem. It is a general surgical principle that nonviable tissue must be excised to promote healing. Therefore, if the affected laryngeal cartilages were removed, the larynx should heal. Total or near total removal of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages with preservation of the endolaryngeal soft tissues has not been reported in the literature. Theoretically, if the entire cartilaginous framework is removed, there would be no structural support for the airway. We have found using animal models, that submucosal resection of the laryngeal cartilages, leaving the perichondrium and endolaryngeal soft tissues intact can result in a competent airway. Animal and clinical experience will be presented.

  11. Animal experiments and clinical application of CT during percutaneous splenoportography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Lin; Qiu, Shi-Jun; Chang, Ren-Min; Zou, Chang-Jing

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To introduce computed tomography during percutaneous splenoportography (CTSP), a new method for determining hepatic diseases. METHODS: Ten hybrid dogs and 20 patients with primary hepatic cancer (PHC) were included in the study. Each dog was examined by CT, CTAP (computed tomography during arterial portography) and CTSP to compare the enhanced degrees of the liver. The 20 PHC patients were examined by CTSP and the appearance of PHC was compared with their pathological results to evaluate the diagnostic significance of CTSP. RESULTS: The animal experiments showed that both CTAP and CTSP could obviously enhance the liver (P < 0.01), but there was no significant difference in the enhanced results between the two methods (P > 0.05). On the CTSP images in the 20 patients, the density of the livers was increased to 168-192 Hu, whereas the density of the cancers remained as low as that on the images of CT scans (< 58 Hu). The CTSP findings were consistent with the surgical ones from spaceoccupying lesions. Its diagnostic value was obviously superior to that of general enhanced CT and ultrasonic examination. However, it was difficult for CTSP to show nodules less than 1 cm in size located on the surface of the liver or the hepatic portal zone. CONCLUSIONS: Like CTAP, CTSP is also a sensitive method for showing occupants in the liver. But the equipments and the procedures for CTSP are simpler than for CTAP. Therefore, it is an alternative procedure in clinical practice. PMID:11819278

  12. Monitoring clinical research: report of one hospital's experience

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Jane; Kruszewski, Zita; Lacey, Belaine; Schiff, Benjamin

    2001-01-01

    MONITORING OF RESEARCH BY RESEARCH ETHICS BOARDS HAS BEEN RECOMMENDED by various organizations that fund clinical studies and by other groups. However, little evidence has been reported on the processes, costs and outcomes of these activities, information that would be helpful to guide the boards in their current work and future policies. We report here 3 years of monitoring experience by the research ethics board of a 313-bed university-affiliated community hospital. Activities newly implemented at the beginning of the study period included the use of recruitment logs, audits of completed consent forms and interviews with research subjects. Over the study period, we monitored 33 protocols, through 188 consent form audits and interviews with 17 research subjects. In addition, 26 of 34 research investigators and collaborators responded to a survey about the monitoring. In general, the investigators were supportive of monitoring activities, but most were not willing to contribute financially. The types of monitoring we conducted are feasible and may be suitable (or could be adapted) for use in other institutions. PMID:11341145

  13. Fournier's Gangrene: A Summary of 10 Years of Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Abdullah; Gm?, Metehan; Turkoglu, Ahmet; Bozda?, Zbeyir; lger, Burak Veli; Agaayak, Elif; Byk, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to present our clinical experience with FG treatment. Fournier's gangrene (FG) is a rare but serious disease characterized by progressive necrosis in the genitourinary and perineal region. The retrospective study included 43 patients. Patients were divided into 2 groups as survivors and nonsurvivors. Included in the analysis were data pertaining to demographics, predisposing factors, comorbidities, results of bacteriologic analyses, number of debridements, duration of treatment, FG Severity Index (FGSI) score, fecal diversion methods (trephine ostomy or Flexi-Seal Fecal Management System-FMS), and dressing methods (wet or negative aspiration system). In the nonsurvivor group, urea, WBC, and age were significantly higher, whereas albumin, hematocrit, platelet count, and length of hospital stay (LOHS) were significantly lower compared to the survivor group. Mean FGSI was lower in survivors in comparison with nonsurvivors (5.00 1.86 and 10.00 1.27, respectively; P < 0.001). We conclude that FGSI is an important predictor in the prognosis of FG. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) should be performed in compliant patients in order to enhance patient comfort by reducing pain and the number of dressings. Fecal diversion should be performed as needed, preferably by using FMS. The trephine ostomy should be the method of choice in cases where an ostomy is necessary. PMID:25859652

  14. Clinical utility of noninvasive fetal trisomy (NIFTY) test early experience

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tze Kin; Chan, Mei Ki; Lo, Pui Shan Salome; Chan, Hon Yee Connie; Chan, Wai Sze Kim; Koo, Tik Yee; Ng, Hoi Yan Joyce; Pooh, Ritsuko K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report the initial experience of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal Down syndrome (The NIFTY test) in a clinical setting. Methods: The NIFTY test was offered as a screening test for fetal Down syndrome to pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy at 12 weeks of gestation or beyond. A satisfaction questionnaire was sent to the first 400 patients. Results: During a 6-month period, 567 NIFTY tests were performed. Over 90% of those studied were ethnic Chinese, and the mean age of the women studied was 36 years. The test was performed at 1213 weeks of gestation in 49.21%. The median reporting time was 9 days. The test was positive for trisomy 21 in eight cases, and for trisomy 18 in 1 case; all were confirmed by fetal karyotyping. There was no false-positive result. Of the questionnaires, 182 completed responses were received. Over 95% had complete or almost complete resolution of anxiety. Except for one, all were satisfied with the NIFTY test, and all indicated that they would recommend the test to their friends. Conclusion: The NIFTY test was a highly specific test. Unnecessary invasive tests and associated fetal losses could be avoided in almost all women who have a normal fetus. PMID:22471583

  15. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martnez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chvez, E.; Reyes-Fras, M. L.; Rodrguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vzquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  16. Clinical experience of MEK inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Boerner, Scott A; Winkler, James D; LoRusso, Patricia M

    2007-08-01

    Finding new therapies to assist in the treatment of cancer is a major challenge of clinical research. Small molecules that inhibit different molecular targets at the different levels of the MAPK pathway have been developed. Several MEK inhibitors have been examined in early-phase clinical trials and the current state of clinical results using these therapies is presented here. PMID:17194493

  17. A computational tool for patient specific dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of selective internal radiation therapy with (90)Y microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kalantzis, Georgios; Leventouri, Theodora; Apte, Aditiya; Shang, Charles

    2015-11-01

    In recent years we have witnessed tremendous progress in selective internal radiation therapy. In clinical practice, quite often, radionuclide therapy is planned using simple models based on standard activity values or activity administered per unit body weight or surface area in spite of the admission that radiation-dose methods provide more accurate dosimetric results. To address that issue, the authors developed a Matlab-based computational software, named Patient Specific Yttrium-90 Dosimetry Toolkit (PSYDT). PSYDT was designed for patient specific voxel-based dosimetric calculations and radiobiological modeling of selective internal radiation therapy with (90)Y microspheres. The developed toolkit is composed of three dimensional dose calculations for both bremsstrahlung and beta emissions. Subsequently, radiobiological modeling is performed on a per-voxel basis and cumulative dose volume histograms (DVHs) are generated. In this report we describe the functionality and visualization features of PSYDT. PMID:26296058

  18. Cultural awareness: Enhancing clinical experiences in rural Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaundel

    2013-01-01

    Students often work with clients from a cultural group different than their own. This is especially true for students completing clinical practica in Appalachia, where there is a culture unique to that geographic area. To prepare for this unique setting, common cultural scenarios experienced in the clinical setting must be addressed to help provide culturally appropriate patient care while developing required clinical competencies. Although applicable to most nursing students, the author discusses culturally specific approaches to clinical care of clients from Appalachia, specifically applied to nurse practitioner students, preceptors, and clinical faculty. PMID:23969755

  19. Low LET protons focused to submicrometer shows enhanced radiobiological effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, T. E.; Greubel, C.; Hable, V.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Michalski, D.; Girst, S.; Siebenwirth, C.; Schmid, E.; Molls, M.; Multhoff, G.; Dollinger, G.

    2012-10-01

    This study shows that enhanced radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) values can be generated focusing low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and thus changing the microdose distribution. 20 MeV protons (LET = 2.65 keV m-1) are focused to submicrometer diameter at the ion microprobe superconducting nanoprobe for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments of the Munich tandem accelerator. The RBE values, as determined by measuring micronuclei (RBEMN = 1.48 0.07) and dicentrics (RBED = 1.92 0.15), in human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells are significantly higher when 117 protons were focused to a submicrometer irradiation field within a 5.4 5.4 m2 matrix compared to quasi homogeneous in a 1 1 m2 matrix applied protons (RBEMN = 1.28 0.07; RBED = 1.41 0.14) at the same average dose of 1.7 Gy. The RBE values are normalized to standard 70 kV (dicentrics) or 200 kV (micronuclei) x-ray irradiation. The 117 protons applied per point deposit the same amount of energy like a 12C ion with 55 MeV total energy (4.48 MeV u-1). The enhancements are about half of that obtained for 12C ions (RBEMN = 2.20 0.06 and RBED = 3.21 0.10) and they are attributed to intertrack interactions of the induced damages. The measured RBE values show differences from predictions of the local effect model (LEM III) that is used to calculate RBE values for irradiation plans to treat tumors with high LET particles.

  20. Clinical Experience With A Portable 3-D Reconstruction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holshouser, Barbara A.; Christiansen, Edwin L.; Thompson, Joseph R.; Reynolds, R. Anthony; Goldwasser, Samuel M.

    1988-06-01

    Clinical experience with a computer program for reconstructing and visualizing three-dimensional (3-D) structures is reported. Applications to the study of soft-tissue and skeletal structures, such as the temporomandibular joint and craniofacial anatomy, using computed tomography (CT) data are described. Several features specific to the computer algorithm are demonstrated and evaluated. These include: (1) manipulation of density windows to selectively visualize bone or soft tissue structures; (2) the efficacy of gradient shading algorithms in revealing fine surface detail; and (3) the rapid generation of cut-away views revealing details of internal structures. Also demonstrated is the importance of high resolution data as input to the 3-D program. The implementation of the program (VoxelView-32) described here, is on a MASSCOMP computer running UNIX. Data were collected with General Electric or Siemens CT scanners and transferred to the MASSCOMP for off-line 3-D recon-struction, via magnetic tape or Ethernet. An interactive graphics facility on the MASSCOMP allows viewing of 2-D slices, subregioning, and selection of lower and upper density thresholds for segmentation. The software then enters a pre-processing phase during which a volume representation of the segmented object (soft tissue or bone) is automatically created. This is followed by a rendering phase during which multiple views of the segmented object are automatically generated. The pre-processing phase typically takes 4 to 8 minutes (although very large datasets may require as much as 30 minutes) and the rendering phase typically takes 1 to 2 minutes for each 3-D view. Volume representation and rendering techniques are used at all stages of the processing, and gradient shading is used for enhanced surface detail.

  1. Research in radiobiology. Annual report, Internal Irradiation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Buster, D.S.

    1985-12-31

    The annual progress report for the Radiobiology Division of the University of Utah College of Medicine is presented. Summaries of twenty-four projects concerning the metabolism, dosimetry and toxicity of a variety of actinide elements in beagles or rats are given. Individual papers within this report have been separately indexed and abstracted for the data base.

  2. Tritium radiobiology research in the US DOE program

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The history of the original US Atomic Energy Commission, its replacement, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the present Department of Energy's interest and sponsorship of tritium radiobiology is reviewed beginning in 1971 and continuing through 1986. In particular, the four remaining US Department of Energy, Division of Health and Environmental Research programs are described in some detail.

  3. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  4. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  5. Preparatory study of a ground-based space radiobiology program in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has long been acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures, NASA initiated several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program, which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently established an ambitious exploration program (AURORA), and within this program it has been decided to include a space radiation research program. Europe has a long tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators, generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy. This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk. To support research in this field in Europe, ESA issued a call for tender in 2005 for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation (IBER). This study will provide guidance on future ESA-supported activities in space radiation research by identifying the most appropriate European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation, and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities. The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics, and a detailed proposal for experimental campaigns for the following 5 10 years.

  6. A new research program for ground-based space radiobiology in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has been long acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures NASA started several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton NY Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan The European Space Agency ESA has recently established an ambitious exploration program AURORA and within this program it has been decided to start a space radiation research program Europe has a wide tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk To support research in this field in Europe ESA issued in 2005 a call for tender for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation IBER This study will prepare future ESA supported-activities in space radiation research by selecting the best European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics and a detailed proposal

  7. Femtosecond laser eye surgery: the first clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Kurtz, Ron M.; Horvath, Christopher; Suarez, Carlos G.; Nordan, Lee; Slade, Steven

    2002-04-01

    A brief review of commercial applications of femtosecond lasers in a clinical setting with emphasis on applications to corneal surgery is presented. The first clinical results of 208 procedures conducted from June to November 2000 is reported. The results show that femtosecond lasers may be safely used as keratome for use in LASIK procedures.

  8. Differences in Clinical Experiences of ADN and BSN Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oermann, Marilyn H.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 211 associate degree (AD) and 204 baccalaureate nursing students, AD students reported significantly higher stress in clinical practice. Stress for both groups increased as they progressed. Instructors were the predominant source of stress. Students had the most difficulty coping with the demands of patient care and the clinical

  9. The radiobiology of radiosurgery: Rationale for different treatment regimes for AVMs and malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Brenner, D.J. )

    1993-01-15

    Based on basic radiobiological principles, we suggest that the radiosurgery technique of delivering a radiation dose in a single fraction, whilst appropriate for benign brain lesions such as arteriovenous malformations (AVM), is not optimal for treating malignant tumors. Radiosurgery was originally developed to treat benign lesions in the brain, such as AVMs, and has been successfully used for this purpose for over four decades. Recently, the technique has been adopted for treating small primary malignant brain tumors or single metastases. We argue, and derive radiobiological data to support the view that, treating malignant tumors with a single fraction will result in a suboptimal therapeutic ratio between tumor control and late effects, even for small tumors; and that improved therapeutic ratios would be expected if the treatment were divided into a small number of fractions. On the other hand, no therapeutic gain is to be expected from fractionating treatment of AVMs. A new generation of noninvasive relocatable stereotactic head frames makes feasible the use of fractionated stereotactic external-beam radiotherapy, and may allow significant benefits over single, radiosurgical, treatments for malignant brain tumors. As stereotactic fractionation/protraction regimes become more widespread, a uniform approach for determining equivalent fractionation schemes become important for intercomparing clinical results, and such calculations can be reliably carried out using the linear-quadratic formalism.

  10. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic: The Keele experience.

    PubMed

    Katali, Hamza Mahamadu; Parry-Smith, William Rhys; Eliot, Rees L; O'Mahony, Fidelma

    2016-02-01

    Much discussion in the literature centres on how best to teach medical students the intricacies of gynaecological assessment and the subsequent formulation of a management plan. At Keele University skills are initially developed in a simulated setting and then transferred to the workplace where students continue to develop their skills. A dedicated undergraduate gynaecology teaching clinic has been developed and comprises of 2-3 students and a tutor. All 38 students rotating through the department between January and June 2013 were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire to evaluate this clinic and 36 (95%) of them responded. Respondents felt significantly more comfortable taking a gynaecology history, ensuring privacy during examination and formulating a management plan post-clinic (all p < 0.001), with female students feeling significantly more comfortable than their male counterparts (p = 0.04). The use of this clinic shows great promise to help students learn an unfamiliar and challenging skill. PMID:26492580

  11. Preclinical and clinical experience with a viscoelastic total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Ross, Raymond S.; Jollenbeck, Boris A.; Zimmers, Kari B.; Defibaugh, Neal D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe the mechanical durability and the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR). The human intervertebral disc is a complex, viscoelastic structure, permitting and constraining motion in 3 axes, thus providing stability. The ideal disc replacement should be viscoelastic and deformable in all directions, and it should restore disc height and angle. Methods Mechanical testing was conducted to validate the durability of the VTDR, and a clinical study was conducted to evaluate safety and performance. Fifty patients with single-level, symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease at L4-5 or L5-S1 were enrolled in a clinical trial at 3 European sites. Patients were assessed clinically and radiographically for 2 years by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), a visual analog scale (VAS), and independent radiographic analyses. Results The VTDR showed a fatigue life in excess of 50 million cycles (50-year equivalent) and a physiologically appropriate level of stiffness, motion, geometry, and viscoelasticity. We enrolled 28 men and 22 women in the clinical study, with a mean age of 40 years. Independent quantitative radiographic assessment indicated that the VTDR restored and maintained disc height and lordosis while providing physiologic motion. Mean ODI scores decreased from 48% preoperatively to 23% at 2 years’ follow-up. Mean VAS low-back pain scores decreased from 7.1 cm to 2.9 cm. Median scores indicated that half of the patient population had ODI scores below 10% and VAS low-back pain scores below 0.95 cm at 2 years. Conclusions The VTDR has excellent durability and performs clinically and radiographically as intended for the treatment of symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease. Clinical Relevance The VTDR is intended to restore healthy anatomic properties and stability characteristics to the spinal segment. This study is the first to evaluate a VTDR in a 50-patient, multicenter European study. PMID:25802675

  12. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  13. How to Conduct Clinical Qualitative Research on the Patient's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    From a perspective of patient-centered healthcare, exploring patients' (a) preconceptions, (b) treatment experiences, (c) quality of life, (d) satisfaction, (e) illness understandings, and (f) design are all critical components in improving primary health care and research. Utilizing qualitative approaches to discover patients' experiences can

  14. Clinical interdisciplinary health team care: an educational experiment.

    PubMed

    Mazur, H; Beeston, J J; Yerxa, E J

    1979-09-01

    With increasing concern for teamwork in clinical practice in health care settings, the need to identify the concepts, methods, and learning processes for improving interdisciplinary team skills is apparent. This paper describes patient-centered, clinical-research-demonstration programs for teams of students, preceptors, and faculty members from six disciplines who provided patient care in a long-term rehabilitation setting. The teams were involved in the theory and practice of team-building, including weekly sessions on leadership styles, communication, group decision-making, and team effectiveness assessment. Objective and subjective measurements were administered throughout the program. The results indicate that task-oriented patient care favors the learning of team skills, especially when all levels of administration support and participate in the processes. Question are raised concerning the effect of clinical teams on the quality of patient care, their cost-effectiveness, and the low priority given to teaching interdisciplinary team skills in professional education. PMID:158089

  15. Review of clinical experience with ion beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A D; Mnter, M W; Debus, J

    2011-12-01

    The article describes both the early development of oncology as a core discipline at the University of Heidelberg Hospital and the first steps towards ion beam treatment, from the pilot project carried out in co-operation with the Gesellschaft fr Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt to the initial start-up of clinical service at the Heidelberg Heavy Ion Centre (HIT). We present an overview, based on data published in the literature, of the available clinical evidence relating the use of ion beam therapy to treat major indications in active particle centres. A rationale for the use of particle therapy in each of these indications is given. In view of the limited availability of data, we discuss the necessity to conduct clinical trials. We also look forward towards the next activities to be undertaken at the HIT. PMID:21427183

  16. Clinical Experience of the Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyung Min; Lee, Seok Jong; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Cho, Byung Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is characterized by three clinical features, namely cutaneous capillary malformations, venous malformations, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy of the extremities. The varied manifestations are attributed to the unpredictable clinical nature and prognosis of the syndrome. To elucidate the clinical characteristics of this disease, we reviewed a relatively large number of KTS patients who presented to our vascular anomalies center. Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 19 patients who were diagnosed with KTS and treated in our vascular anomalies clinic between 2003 and 2014, and examined their demographic characteristics, their clinical features, and the treatments administered. Results The sex distribution was balanced, with 9 (47%) males and 10 (53%) females. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years (range, 7 months-9 years). Most of the patients received conservative treatments such as medication or physiotherapy. Compression therapies such as wearing of elastic garments/bandages were also administered, and surgical interventions were considered only when the patients became excessively symptomatic. Other treatments included laser therapy and sclerotherapy, and all the treatments were adjusted according to each case, tailored to the conditions of the individual patients. Conclusions KTS is an extremely rare, multifactorial disorder that induces widely varied symptoms. Because of this unique feature, plastic surgeons, when not careful, tend to attach a one-sided importance to typical symptoms such as limb hypertrophy or capillary malformation and thus overlook other symptoms and clinical features. KTS can be suspected in all infants who show capillary malformations or limb hypertrophy and require a multi-disciplinary approach for comprehensive management. PMID:26430625

  17. Review of clinical and laboratory experiences with molindone hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Claghorn, J L

    1985-08-01

    The literature concerning the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, receptor physiology, and clinical use of molindone is reviewed. Unanswered questions about the drug are addressed. Although molindone is reputed to have a short half-life (1.5 hours), clinical observations report a prolonged effect from a once-daily dose. Early in treatment, some patients show intolerance due to akathisia or extrapyramidal symptoms. This may be withdrawal dyskinesia due to discontinuation of another drug or an early adverse effect of molindone. Different effects on dopamine receptors have been described, but the significance of these properties for the development of tardive dyskinesia remains unclear. PMID:3894340

  18. [Clinical ethics in psychiatry: the experience at Douglas Hospital].

    PubMed

    Zacchia, Camillo; Tremblay, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a brief overview of the clinical ethics committee within their mental health university institute as well as its evolving mandates over the past few decades. The main functions include case consultation, input on elaboration of institutional policy, and staff education as well as public information on issues of ethics and mental illness. With examples and questions brought to the committee's attention, the authors demonstrate how these functions are intertwined. The authors conclude that ethical questioning helps examine clinical practices and serves ultimately in guiding towards best practices in mental health. PMID:17111061

  19. Our experience in a psychodermatology liaison clinic at manipal, India.

    PubMed

    Shenoi, Shrutakirthi D; Prabhu, Smitha; Nirmal, B; Petrolwala, Shailee

    2013-01-01

    Psychodermatology is an emerging specialty in dermatology which deals with the interactions between mind and skin. Psychocutaneous diseases can be either primary psychiatric or primary cutaneous, with various degrees of associations between psyche and skin. Unless the dermatologist cultivates a special interest in this field, many an invisible mental disorder may be missed leading to sub optimal treatment of the visible skin condition. Though Dermatology Psychiatry liaison clinics are common in Europe and other western countries, it is just an emerging concept in India. Here we describe the working pattern of psychodermatology liaison clinic established in Manipal in August 2010 and describe briefly the type of cases attended to. PMID:23372214

  20. Our Experience in a Psychodermatology Liaison Clinic at Manipal, India

    PubMed Central

    Shenoi, Shrutakirthi D; Prabhu, Smitha; Nirmal, B; Petrolwala, Shailee

    2013-01-01

    Psychodermatology is an emerging specialty in dermatology which deals with the interactions between mind and skin. Psychocutaneous diseases can be either primary psychiatric or primary cutaneous, with various degrees of associations between psyche and skin. Unless the dermatologist cultivates a special interest in this field, many an invisible mental disorder may be missed leading to sub optimal treatment of the visible skin condition. Though Dermatology Psychiatry liaison clinics are common in Europe and other western countries, it is just an emerging concept in India. Here we describe the working pattern of psychodermatology liaison clinic established in Manipal in August 2010 and describe briefly the type of cases attended to. PMID:23372214

  1. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been

  2. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference

  3. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been…

  4. Characteristics of effective simulated clinical experience instructors: interviews with undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Parsh, Bridget

    2010-10-01

    Effective clinical nursing instructors are essential for maximizing nursing students' educational experience. Due to a shortage of clinical placement sites and advancements in technology, nursing students are increasingly learning clinical judgment and decision making in the simulated clinical experience (SCE) with human patient simulators. In this environment, SCE instructors help students acquire knowledge and skills in decision making in a controlled, risk-free, hospital-like clinical environment. Using informal student interviews, this study examined nursing student perceptions of the characteristics of an effective instructor in the simulated clinical experience. To capture information about the characteristics of effective SCE instructors, interviews were conducted with students (N = 8) from two universities in Northern California. All participants had experience working with human patient simulators in the simulation laboratory. Students identified six themes for SCE instructors: Personality, Teaching Ability, Evaluation, Nursing Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Realism. Further research on the similarities and differences of this new educational environment is recommended. PMID:20669874

  5. Geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway: the Hong Kong experience

    PubMed Central

    Leung, F.; Siu, D.; Wong, G.; Luk, K. D. K.

    2010-01-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is one of the commonest fractures in orthopaedic trauma. There is a trend of further increase in its incidence in the coming decades. Besides the development of techniques and implants to overcome the difficulties in fixation of osteoporosis bone, the general management of the hip fracture is also very challenging in terms of the preparation of the generally poorer pre-morbid state and complicate social problems associated with this group of patients. In order to cope with the increasing demand, our hospital started a geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway in 2007. The aim of this pathway is to provide better care for this group of patients through multidisciplinary approach. From year 2007 to 2009, we had managed 964 hip fracture patients. After the implementation of the pathway, the pre-operative and the total length of stay in acute hospital were shortened by over 5 days. Other clinical outcomes including surgical site infection, 30 days mortality and also incidence of pressure sore improved when compared to the data before the pathway. The rate of surgical site infection was 0.98%, and the 30 days mortality was 1.67% in 2009. The active participation of physiotherapists, occupational therapists as well as medical social workers also helped to formulate the discharge plan as early as the patient is admitted. In conclusion, a well-planned and executed clinical pathway for hip fracture can improve the clinical outcomes of the geriatric hip fractures. PMID:19543764

  6. The Clinical/Practicum Experience in Professional Preparation: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Edwin George; Walker, Keith; Wimmer, Randy

    2008-01-01

    The authors synthesize preliminary findings from an interdisciplinary study of the practicum/clinical phase of undergraduate pre-service education in the professions. Early data analysis identified similarities and differences across disciplines in terms of: (a) the terminology describing each practicum program, (b) the programs' key

  7. The drug discovery by nanomedicine and its clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    It is expected that the incidence of various adverse effects of anticancer agents maybe decreased owing to the reduced drug distribution in normal tissue. Anticancer agent incorporating nanoparticles including micelles and liposomes can evade non-specific capture by the reticuloendothelial system because the outer shell of the nanoparticles is covered with polyethylene glycol. Consequently, the micellar and liposomal carrier can be delivered selectively to a tumor by utilizing the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Presently, several anticancer agent-incorporating nano-carrier systems are under preclinical and clinical evaluation. Several drug delivery system formulations have been approved worldwide. Regarding a pipeline of clinical development of anticancer agent incorporating micelle carrier system, several clinical trials are now underway not only in Japan but also in other countries. A Phase 3 trial of NK105, a paclitaxel incorporating micelle is now underway. In this paper, preclinical and clinical studies of NK105, NC-6004, cisplatin incorporating micelle, NC-6300, epirubicin incorporating micelle and the concept of cancer stromal targeting therapy using nanoparticles and monoclonal antibodies against cancer related stromal components are reviewed. PMID:24755547

  8. Manual Aspiration Thrombectomy in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Pollack, Simcha; Chichra, Astha; Moustakakis, Emmanuel; Park, Chong; Kerwin, Todd

    2016-03-01

    Multiple clinical studies have failed to establish the role of routine use of thrombectomy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. There is a paucity of data on the impact of thrombectomy in unselected STEMI patients outside clinical trials. We sought to evaluate the clinical variables and outcomes associated with the performance of thrombectomy in STEMI patients. We retrospectively examined the clinical outcomes in all STEMI patients who underwent successful percutaneous intervention (PCI) at our center. Patients were divided into two groups, one with patients who underwent conventional PCI and another with patients who had thrombus aspiration in addition to conventional PCI. We compared the baseline clinical characteristics, laboratory investigations, re-infarction rates, and all-cause mortality. Total 477 consecutive STEMI patients were identified. Overall, 29% (139) of the patients underwent conventional PCI and 71% (338) of the patients were treated with aspiration thrombectomy and PCI. In addition to the presence of thrombus, patients with nonanterior infarction, and patients with hemodynamic instability requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support were more likely to undergo thrombectomy. Thrombectomy was associated with higher enzymatic infarction (creatine kinase: 2,796 [2,575] vs. 1,716 [1,662]; p < 0.0001; CK-MB: 210.6 [156.0] vs. 142.0 [121.9], p < 0.0001). However, thrombectomy was not associated with any difference in 30 day reinfarction rate (3.3 vs. 2.9%, p = 0.83), mortality (5.0 vs. 7.2%, p = 0.35), or composite of death and 30 day reinfarction (7.7 vs. 9.4%, p = 0.55). We observed that STEMI patients with anterior infarction and hemodynamic instability were more likely to undergo thrombectomy during primary PCI. PMID:26900308

  9. Effect of different cell cluster models on the radiobiological output for (211)At-radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Xu, Yuanying

    2011-02-01

    The cell cluster modeling is a widely used method to estimate the small-scale dosimetry and provides the implication for a clinic. This work evaluated the effect of different regular cluster models on the radiobiological outputs for (211)At-radioimmunotherapy. The cell activity threshold was estimated using a tumor control probability of 0.90. Basically, regular models show similar features with cluster configuration and cell dimension variation. However, their individual results such as the cumulated activity threshold per cell and the prescription dose per volume should not be substituted reciprocally. The tissue composed of smaller cells or midcell packing will need a little more high prescription dose per volume. The radiation sensitivity parameters in a linear-quadratic model are critical to decide the radiobiological response with dose. The cumulated cell activity threshold increases exponentially with ? decreasing, and its influence on the big cell dimension is more than on the small one. The different subsources affect radioresistant organs or tissues more remarkably than radiosensitive ones, especially the cells with large cytoplasm. The heterogeneous activity of Gaussian distribution will decrease the therapeutical effectiveness for the nucleus source, but its influence on the cytoplasm and cell surface sources is a little uncertain, as their real mean value is always higher than its set mean value by assuming the cell activity uptakes from zero. Careful usage of underdose with heterogeneous activity distribution should be practiced in clinics. The deteriorated heterogeneous distribution will salvage the potential subversive and lead to the failure of tumor local control. Some cells with no or little activity that are located on the edge or vertex of cube or corner models will have the ability to survive, as there is a lack of a part of the cross-fire dose effect, and so more attention should be paid in selecting the dosage. Although this work focuses on the clinic implication of (211)At in ?-radioimmunotherapy, these cell cluster models can be generalized to other radionuclides. PMID:21355780

  10. [Clinical experience with imipenem-cilastatin in intensive therapy].

    PubMed

    Verre, M; D'Antona, R; Macrina, E

    1991-02-28

    The authors describe their experience with imipenem-cilastatin in 36 patients in critical conditions due to multiresistant bacterial infections. The efficacy and tolerability of the antibiotic are stressed. PMID:1827390

  11. Reactor facility, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sholtis, J.A. Jr.; Moore, M.L.

    1981-05-01

    The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) reactor is a TRIGA (Training, Research, and Isotope Production General Atomics Reactor) Mark-F pool-type thermal research reactor, capable of both pulsed and steady-state operation at a variety of locations in the pool. Designed and built by General Atomics, it first achieved criticality in 1962 with aluminum-clad fuel. In 1965, stainless-steel-clad fuel was installed and is still in use today. The AFRRI reactor serves as a mixed neutron and gamma source for Department of Defense radiation research. Although most of this research involves radiobiology including radioisotope production, the AFRRI reactor has also been used in support of Federal criminal investigations, studies of transient radiation effects on electronics, and artifact analysis.

  12. Dosimetry for radiobiological studies of the human hematopoietic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, W. L.; Stokes, T. R.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    A system for estimating individual bone marrow doses in therapeutic radiation exposures of leukemia patients was studied. These measurements are used to make dose response correlations and to study the effect of dose protraction on peripheral blood cell levels. Three irradiators designed to produce a uniform field of high energy gamma radiation for total body exposures of large animals and man are also used for radiobiological studies.

  13. Clinical use of Insulin Degludec: Practical Experience and Pragmatic Suggestions

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-01-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is an ultralong acting basal insulin. IDeg has unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties which allow once a daily dosage, at any time of the day. Its use is associated with a significantly lower risk of hypoglycemia. This review discusses the pragmatic use of IDeg, based on available evidence. A complete search of all nine original research papers (BEGIN clinical trial program) pertaining to IDeg, listed in PubMed, was made to prepare this article. PMID:25838998

  14. Laboratory and clinical experience with neodymium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1991, we have undertaken extensive laboratory and clinical studies of the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser for surgical treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Side-firing optical fibers which emit a divergent, relatively low energy density Nd:YAG laser beam produce coagulation necrosis of obstructing periurethral prostate tissue, followed by gradual dissolution and slough in the urinary stream. Laser-tissue interactions and Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for prostatectomy have been studied in canine and human prostate model systems, enhancing clinical application. Ongoing studies examine comparative Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for various beam configurations produced by available side-firing optical fibers and continue to refine operative technique. We have documented clinical outcomes of Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy in 230 consecutive patients treated with the UrolaseTM side-firing optical fiber. Nd:YAG laser coagulation the prostate produces a remarkably low acute morbidity profile, with no significant bleeding or fluid absorption. No postoperative incontinence has been produced. Serial assessments of voiding outcomes over more than 3 years of followup show objective and symptomatic improvement following Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy which is comparable to older but more morbid electrosurgical approaches. Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy is a safe, efficacious, durable and cost-effective treatment for BPH.

  15. Clinical experience in cell-based therapeutics: intervention and outcome.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans Joerg; Ganey, Timothy; Hutton, William C; Libera, Jeanette; Minkus, Yvonne; Alasevic, Olivera

    2006-08-01

    Disc herniation treated by discectomy results in a significant loss of nucleus material and disc height. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation (ADCT) offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. Nucleus regeneration using autologous cultured disc-derived chondrocytes has been demonstrated in a canine model and in clinical pilot studies. In 2002 a prospective, controlled, randomized, multicentre study comparing safety and efficacy of ADCT plus discectomy, with discectomy alone was initiated. The clinical goals were to provide long-term pain relief, maintain disc height, and prevent adjacent segment disease. Interim analysis was performed after 2 years; Oswestry (Low Back Pain/disability), Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale, as well as Prolo and VAS Score were used for the evaluation. Disc height was assessed by MRI. A clinically significant reduction of low back pain in the ADCT-treated group was shown by all three pain score systems. The median total Oswestry Score was 2 in the ADCT group compared with 6 in the control group. Decreases in the Disability index in ADCT-treated patients correlated with the reduction of low back pain. Decreases in disc height over time were only found in the control group, and of potential significance, intervertebral discs in adjacent segments appeared to retain hydration when compared to those adjacent to levels that had undergone discectomy without cell intervention. PMID:16850291

  16. Exploring FROC paradigm: initial experience with clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokh, Lana; Liu, Chi; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2006-03-01

    Design of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC)-based paradigm and data analysis methods that capture and adequately address the complexity of clinical decision-making will facilitate the development and evaluation of new image acquisition, reconstruction and processing techniques. We compare the JAFROC (Jackknife free-response ROC) to traditional ROC paradigm and analysis in two image evaluation studies. The first study is designed to address advantages of "free response" features of JAFROC paradigm in a breast lesion detection task. We developed tools allowing the acquisition of FROC-type rating data and use them on a set of simulated scintimammography images. Four observers participated in a small preliminary study. Rating data are then analyzed using traditional ROC and JAFROC techniques. The second study is aimed at comparing the diagnostic quality of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) images obtained with different quantitative image reconstruction and compensation methods in an ongoing clinical trial. The observer assesses status of each of the three main vascular territories for each patient. This experimental set-up uses standardized locations of vascular territories on myocardial polar plot images, and a fixed number of three rating scores per patient. We compare results from the newly available JAFROC versus the traditional ROC analysis technique previously applied in similar studies, using a set of data from an on-going clinical trial. Comparison of two analysis methodologies reveals generally consistent behavior, corresponding to theoretical predictions.

  17. The application of charged-particle microbeams in radiobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkard, Melvyn; Vojnovic, Boris; Prise, Kevin M.; Michael, Barry D.

    2002-04-01

    For radiobiological applications, the strength of the microirradiation technique lies in its ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub-cellular targets) in vitro. There is particular interest in studying the risks associated with environmental exposures to ?-particle emitting isotopes (which are predominantly due to single-particle effects) and for investigating the so-called `bystander effect' where non-irradiated cells are seen to respond to signals from nearby irradiated cells. The Gray Cancer Institute charged particle microbeam is one of only two facilities currently in routine use for radiobiology; although a number other facilities are at various stages of development. To be useful in a radiobiological study, a microbeam facility is required to reliably deliver an exact number of particles to a pre-selected sub-cellular target. Furthermore, the low incidence of some biological endpoints means that a large number of cells may have to be individually irradiated (>100,000 cells), therefore some form of automation is essential. Our microbeam uses a 1 ?m diameter bore glass capillary to vertically collimate protons, or helium ions accelerated by a 4 MV Van de Graaff. Using 3He 2+ ions, 99% of cells are targeted with an accuracy of 2 ?m, and with a particle counting accuracy >99%. Using automated cell finding and irradiation procedures, up to 10,000 cells per hour can be individually irradiated.

  18. (Radio)Biological Optimization of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nahum, Alan E.; Uzan, Julien

    2012-01-01

    “Biological optimization” (BIOP) means planning treatments using (radio)biological criteria and models, that is, tumour control probability and normal-tissue complication probability. Four different levels of BIOP are identified: Level I is “isotoxic” individualization of prescription dose Dpresc at fixed fraction number. Dpresc is varied to keep the NTCP of the organ at risk constant. Significant improvements in local control are expected for non-small-cell lung tumours. Level II involves the determination of an individualized isotoxic combination of Dpresc and fractionation scheme. This approach is appropriate for “parallel” OARs (lung, parotids). Examples are given using our BioSuite software. Hypofractionated SABR for early-stage NSCLC is effectively Level-II BIOP. Level-III BIOP uses radiobiological functions as part of the inverse planning of IMRT, for example, maximizing TCP whilst not exceeding a given NTCP. This results in non-uniform target doses. The NTCP model parameters (reflecting tissue “architecture”) drive the optimizer to emphasize different regions of the DVH, for example, penalising high doses for quasi-serial OARs such as rectum. Level-IV BIOP adds functional imaging information, for example, hypoxia or clonogen location, to Level III; examples are given of our prostate “dose painting” protocol, BioProp. The limitations of and uncertainties inherent in the radiobiological models are emphasized. PMID:23251227

  19. Quantitative modeling of chronic myeloid leukemia: insights from radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Hlatky, Lynn; Landaw, Julian; Sachs, Rainer K

    2012-05-10

    Mathematical models of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell population dynamics are being developed to improve CML understanding and treatment. We review such models in light of relevant findings from radiobiology, emphasizing 3 points. First, the CML models almost all assert that the latency time, from CML initiation to diagnosis, is at most ?10 years. Meanwhile, current radiobiologic estimates, based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data, indicate a substantially higher maximum, suggesting longer-term relapses and extra resistance mutations. Second, different CML models assume different numbers, between 400 and 10(6), of normal HSCs. Radiobiologic estimates favor values>10(6) for the number of normal cells (often assumed to be the HSCs) that are at risk for a CML-initiating BCR-ABL translocation. Moreover, there is some evidence for an HSC dead-band hypothesis, consistent with HSC numbers being very different across different healthy adults. Third, radiobiologists have found that sporadic (background, age-driven) chromosome translocation incidence increases with age during adulthood. BCR-ABL translocation incidence increasing with age would provide a hitherto underanalyzed contribution to observed background adult-onset CML incidence acceleration with age, and would cast some doubt on stage-number inferences from multistage carcinogenesis models in general. PMID:22353999

  20. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Durante, M

    2014-03-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, ?-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  1. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, ?-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  2. An enzymatic clinical chemistry laboratory experiment incorporating an introduction to mathematical method comparison techniques.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-07-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference plots. The experiment may also be undertaken using simple glucose solutions by general biochemistry students. PMID:21706732

  3. Support for Clinical Experiences in Educational Administration Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    School administration is an applied field requiring synthesis of ideas from diverse sources and application of these ideas in skillful practice. Administrator preparation programs must include opportunities for new administrators to practice their craft in nonthreatening environments and share experiences with peers while being supervised by

  4. Co-Learning: Maximizing Learning in Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merk, Hillary; Waggoner, Jacqueline; Carroll, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and teacher educators have given increased attention to co-teaching during the student teaching experience. Co-teaching facilitates an apprenticeship arrangement that encourages modeling of classroom practice for the candidate and a chance to implement directly what is being learned by the apprentice. The co-teaching model can be…

  5. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and

  6. Clinical Notes regarding the Experience of 'Presences' in Mourning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Michael F.

    1980-01-01

    Cases are described in which 'presences' or 'energies' were experienced as part of relinquishing attachments to lost persons. The evidence does not support any ready 'scientific' account; and it is emphasized that such experiences should be recognized and not discounted for lack of a clear theoretical explanation. (Author)

  7. Perampanel for focal epilepsy: insights from early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Trinka, E; Steinhoff, B J; Nikanorova, M; Brodie, M J

    2016-03-01

    Perampanel is approved for adjunctive therapy of focal epilepsy with or without secondarily generalized seizures in patients aged >12 years. This narrative review uses real-world and clinical trial data to elucidate perampanel's role in the clinic. Audit data show good tolerability with perampanel and higher freedom-from-seizure rates in elderly vs younger patients. When using perampanel in elderly patients, special attention should be given to comorbidities and co-medication to avoid potential interactions or adverse events. Slower titration is generally recommended, and seizure control should be reassessed at a dose of 4 mg before further dose increases. Perampanel efficacy is similar in adolescents and adults; however, somnolence, nasopharyngitis, and aggression are more frequent in adolescents vs the overall population. Individualized and slow-dose titration can minimize adverse events. Low serum concentrations of perampanel may occur in patients also receiving some enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs; a perampanel dose increase may be required. Adverse events of importance with perampanel include dizziness; anger, aggression, and hostile behavior (particularly in adolescents); and falls (particularly in patients >65 years). An individualized approach to dosing, including slower up-titration and bedtime dosing, reduces dizziness risk. Other drugs may cause or aggravate dizziness; reducing concomitant drugs may be necessary when up-titrating perampanel. It would seem clinically appropriate to give due consideration to avoiding use in patients with a history of anger or hostile/aggressive behavior. The possibility of such behaviors should be discussed with patients before starting perampanel, with monitoring during up-titration. Slower up-titration of perampanel in older patients helps reduce fall risk. PMID:26506904

  8. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery: Cleveland Clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive surgery has become a routine approach for aortic valve disease over the last 18 years at the Cleveland Clinic. It is performed in isolation or in combination with other procedures. The objective of this study is to review trends and outcomes in these patients. Methods Cleveland Clinic Cardiovascular Information Registry (CVIR) was searched for aortic valve procedures from 1996 to 2013. All patients undergoing isolated or combined aortic valve operations were included for analysis. The incision type and procedure type were reviewed and trends were evaluated over time. Cleveland Clinic outcomes with minimally invasive approaches to the aortic valve are reviewed. Results A total of 22,766 aortic valve surgical procedures were performed in this 18-year timeframe. Of these, 3,385 (14.9%) were minimally invasive procedures (MIPs) and 2,379 (10.5%) were isolated minimally invasive aortic valves. MIPs increased from 12.4% to 29.6% of the total aortic valve volume over the period of the study. Combined procedures, including concomitant surgery on the aorta, mitral valve, tricuspid valve, and arrhythmia surgery increased over time as well. Overall mortality for primary and reoperative aortic valve operations continues to decline and has consistently been less than 1% for several years. Conclusions A programmed approach to minimally invasive aortic valve surgery (MIAVS) with careful patient selection, appropriate use of preoperative imaging, and selective conversion to sternotomy when necessary, allows for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and a wide range of concomitant procedures to be performed safely in a large number of patients. PMID:25870809

  9. Lesch-Nyhan disease: clinical experience with nineteen patients.

    PubMed

    Christie, R; Bay, C; Kaufman, I A; Bakay, B; Borden, M; Nyhan, W L

    1982-06-01

    The clinical phenotype in Lesch-Nyhan disease has been analyzed in 19 patients studied in hospital. In each case the diagnosis was made on the basis of inactivity of the enzyme hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in erythrocyte lysates. All had hyperuricemia, and the presence of 'orange sand' in the diaper was a prominent early complaint. All had self-mutilative behavior, of which the most characteristic form was biting the fingers or lips. All had the neurological syndrome of spasticity and choreoathetoid involuntary movements. All but one had less-than-normal intelligence. PMID:7095300

  10. SU-E-T-399: Determination of the Radiobiological Parameters That Describe the Dose-Response Relations of Xerostomia and Disgeusia From Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mavroidis, P; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Peixoto Xavier, C; Costa Ferreira, B; Khouri, L; Carmo Lopes, M do

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters that describe the doseresponse relations of xerostomia and disgeusia from head and neck cancer radiotherapy. To identify the organs that are best correlated with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodnessof- fit by comparing the model predictions against the actual clinical results. Methods: In this study, 349 head and neck cancer patients were included. For each patient the dose volume histograms (DVH) of parotids (separate and combined), mandible, submandibular glands (separate and combined) and salivary glands were calculated. The follow-up of those patients was recorded at different times after the completion of the treatment (7 weeks, 3, 7, 12, 18 and 24 months). Acute and late xerostomia and acute disgeusia were the clinical endpoints examined. A maximum likelihood fitting was performed to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the relative seriality model. The statistical methods of the error distribution, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the Pearson's test and the Akaike's information criterion were utilized to assess the goodness-of-fit and the agreement between the pattern of the radiobiological predictions with that of the clinical records. Results: The estimated values of the radiobiological parameters of salivary glands are D50 = 25.2 Gy, γ = 0.52, s = 0.001. The statistical analysis confirmed the clinical validity of those parameters (area under the ROC curve = 0.65 and AIC = 38.3). Conclusion: The analysis proved that the treatment outcome pattern of the patient material can be reproduced by the relative seriality model and the estimated radiobiological parameters. Salivary glands were found to have strong volume dependence (low relative seriality). Diminishing the biologically effective uniform dose to salivary glands below 30 Gy may significantly reduce the risk of complications to the patients irradiated for prostate cancer.

  11. Caring touch - patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context.

    PubMed

    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte; Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act. PMID:26178972

  12. Clinical profile and outcomes in brainstem glioma: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Lachi, Pavan Kumar; Irrakula, Monica; Ahmed, Syed Fayaz; Joseph, Deepa; Pamidighantam, Suresh; Jagannath Rao Naidu, Kotiyala V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: This study was to analyze the clinical outcomes of brain stem glioma treated with radiation therapy (RT) in our institution. Material and Methods: Records of 48 patients with brainstem glioma treated between January 2007 and January 2013 were reviewed. Demographic variables, clinical variables, radiological findings and treatment details with respect to age, sex, location of tumor ( pontine Vs non pontine ), signs and symptoms, RT dose, follow up period and outcomes were recorded. Patients were subdivided into two groups based on their age, age <15 years (Group I) and age >=15 yrs (Group II). Results: The median age at diagnosis was 10 years (range 4-50). Male to female ratio was 11:10. Of the 48 cases analyzed, 27 patients (56%) were in group I and 21 (44%) were in group II. Radiologically, 90.5% had involvement of pons. 10 (21%) patients received RT dose >60 Gy and 38 (79 %) patients received RT dose of 54-60 Gy. Median overall survival was 7months (range 3-44 months). Median overall survival in Group I and Group II was 4 months and 10 months respectively (P = 0.042). Conclusions: Brain stem glioma in pediatric age group is associated with worse outcomes than in adults. PMID:26425160

  13. Clinical experience with thalidomide and lenalidomide in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Moehler, T

    2012-05-01

    Thal has antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory activity. Clinical research provided clear evidence that Thal belongs to the most active drugs for the treatment of multiple myeloma e.g. leading to decrease of monoclonal protein of at least 50 % in 30 % of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. Randomized trials that were designed based on a large body of evidence from phase II trials determined that Thal significantly increases total response rate, progression-free and in some studies overall survival in combination regimens (dexamethason and or chemotherapy) for relapsed as well as newly diagnosed patients and was therefore approved for first-line treatment of Multiple Myeloma. Strict guidelines apply due to the teratogenic effects of Thal and to monitor and prevent other potential adverse events as neuropathy and thrombosis has been recognized by leading organizations as part of the treatment concept for patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The success of Thal has sparked the development of Thal analogues with Lenalidomide (Len) the most advanced compound which was approved for relapsed multiple myeloma. As Len has a lower incidence of polyneuropathy, constipation and somnolence compared to Thalidomid but at least equal if not higher efficacy Len is meanwhile used more frequently in clinical routine and has advantages in combination therapies with Bortezomib. Additional randomized studies will now define the status of Thal and Len for maintenance therapy and their optimal integration in multi-agent treatment regimen. PMID:22229246

  14. Clinical and experimental experience with factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Viles-Gonzalez, Juan F; Gaztanaga, Juan; Zafar, Urooj M; Fuster, Valentin; Badimon, Juan J

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality in the industrial world today. We are constantly moving towards new and better ways of fighting this epidemic. Advances have been made in various fields such as patient education, imaging techniques, interventional cardiology, and novel therapeutic agents. In particular, antithrombotics are being studied with great interest and hope. Amid this class of agents, factor Xa inhibitors have already begun to show promising results in trials involving patients with acute coronary syndromes. Whereas DX-9065a is in late stage clinical trials, fondaparinux sodium is available for clinical use. Promising results have been obtained with fondaparinux sodium in patients with coronary artery disease in the PENTUA (Pentasaccharide in Unstable Angina) and PENTALYSE (Pentasaccharide as an Adjunct to Fibrinolysis in ST-Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction) trials. Besides having a direct effect on the coagulation cascade, they have shown properties that indirectly influence the remodeling of plaques in the coronary circulation. Available evidence on factor Xa inhibitors does not ensure a remedy to acute coronary syndromes but it gives hope of improving current treatments and reducing the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease. The efficacy and tolerability of fondaparinux sodium in the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (with or without pulmonary embolism) has been established in several large trials such as PENTATHLON (Pentasaccharide in Total Hip Replacement Surgery), PENTAMAKS (Pentasaccharide in Major Knee Surgery), EPHESUS (European Pentasaccharide Hip Elective Surgery), PENTHIFRA (Pentasaccharide in Hip-Fracture Surgery), and PENTHIFRA-Plus. Whereas fondaparinux sodium offers benefits over low molecular weight heparins and unfractionated heparin, the incidence of bleeding complications was greater with fondaparinux sodium than with unfractionated heparin. Treatment with factor VIIa can reverse the anticoagulant effect of fondaparinux sodium and this may be particularly important in patients who need to undergo emergency surgical procedures. Fondaparinux sodium has been recently approved for use, in conjunction with warfarin, in patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis or acute pulmonary embolism based on the results of two large trials conducted by the Matisse investigators. In conclusion, these observations strongly suggest the clinical potential of this class of agents in preventing arterial and venous thrombosis. PMID:15554723

  15. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience. PMID:26218009

  16. Clinical events in mad honey poisoning: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Mehmet; Bostan, Habib; Kaya, Ali Osman; Bilir, Ozlem; Satiroglu, Omer; Kazdal, Hizir; Karadag, Zakir; Bozkurt, Engin

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the clinical findings of patients who admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of grayanotoxin/mad honey poisoning. Thirty-three patients were included in this study. Three patients were female (9%) and the others male (91%). Median age of patients was 52 (42-68). The most frequently observed findings were sinus bradycardia (91%), nausea-vomiting (81.8%), and dizziness (78.8%). Average heart rate was 55.35 +/- 6.72 beats/min. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 77.86 +/- 16.64 mmHg and 46.42 +/- 12.30 mmHg, respectively. Mad honey poisoning is an important problem that is life-threatening in the Black Sea region of Turkey. PMID:19937314

  17. Fat emulsion for intravenous administration: clinical experience with intralipid 10%.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L M; Hardie, B S; Hidalgo, J

    1976-01-01

    A 10% soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid 10%), used extensively in Europe for intravenous alimentation, has now been clinically evaluated in the United States. Controlled studies have shown that the soybean oil emulsion can be substituted for glucose to supply one-third to two-thirds of the total calories, and can be administered peripherally without significant vein irritation. Essential fatty acid deficiencies, frequently encountered in patients dependent on parenteral alimentation with fat-free solutions, are prevented and corrected by use of this preparation. Data on long-term tolerance to Intralipid 10% infusions are presented for 292 patients treated for more than 6,000 patient days. The soybean oil emulsion was usually well tolerated. Side effects were reported in two of 133 adults and 12 of 159 pediatric patients. PMID:820291

  18. A training programme for clinical photographers - theCardiff experience.

    PubMed

    Lake, Amy; Young, Stephen

    2007-09-01

    The formal training and education of trainee clinical photographers started in Cardiff in 1969. Between 1974 and 1995 the trainees' foundation knowledge and skills were taught in purpose built accommodation, but since then has been in the main department, the Media Resources Centre, at the University Hospital of Wales. Prior to 1990 the trainee intake undertook the British Institute of Professional Photographers (BIPP) Qualifying Examination in Medical Photography, and between 1990 and 2001 they undertook this together with the Master of Science (MSc) in Medical Illustration. In preparation for state registration the Postgraduate Certificate (PGC) in Medical Illustration was developed with content that was appropriate to new entrants into the profession, and trainees were registered for this rather than the MSc in Medical Illustration. Since 2003 the on-job training scheme has been developed to follow a more formal structure closely integrated with the PGC. The authors describe the rationale for and implementation of these changes. PMID:17968722

  19. An R package for simulation experiments evaluating clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Day, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an open-source application for evaluating competing clinical trial (CT) designs using simulations. The S4 system of classes and methods is utilized. Using object-oriented programming provides extensibility through careful, clear interface specification; using R, an open-source widely-used statistical language, makes the application extendible by the people who design CTs: biostatisticians. Four key classes define the specifications of the population models, CT designs, outcome models and evaluation criteria. Five key methods define the interfaces for generating patient baseline characteristics, stopping rule, assigning treatment, generating patient outcomes and calculating the criteria. Documentation of their connections with the user input screens, with the central simulation loop, and with each other faciliates the extensibility. New subclasses and instances of existing classes meeting these interfaces can integrate immediately into the application. To illustrate the application, we evaluate the effect of patient pharmacokinetic heterogeneity on the performance of a common Phase I "3+3" design. PMID:21347151

  20. Clinical experience with aurora kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Boss, David S; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2009-08-01

    The aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members, designated auroras A, B, and C. Auroras A and B are essential components of the mitotic pathway, ensuring proper chromosome assembly, formation of the mitotic spindle, and cytokinesis. The role of aurora C is less clear. Overexpression of aurora A and B has been observed in several tumor types, and has been linked with a poor prognosis of cancer patients. Several small molecules targeting aurora kinases A and B or both have been evaluated preclinically and in early phase I trials. In this review we aim to summarize the most recent advances in the development of aurora kinase inhibitors, with a focus on the clinical data. PMID:19684075

  1. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  2. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  3. Expertise in Clinical Psychology. The Effects of University Training and Practical Experience on Expertise in Clinical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Sabine; Spada, Hans; Caspar, Franz; Burri, Salome

    2013-01-01

    How do university training and subsequent practical experience affect expertise in clinical psychology? To answer this question we developed methods to assess psychological knowledge and the competence to diagnose, construct case conceptualizations, and plan psychotherapeutic treatment: a knowledge test and short case studies in a first study, and a complex, dynamically evolving case study in the second study. In our cross-sectional studies, psychology students, trainees in a certified postgraduate psychotherapist curriculum, and behavior therapists with more than 10?years of experience were tested (100 in total: 20 each of novice, intermediate, and advanced university students, postgraduate trainees, and therapists). Clinical knowledge and competence increased up to the level of trainees but unexpectedly decreased at the level of experienced therapists. We discuss the results against the background of expertise research and the training of clinical psychologists (in Germany). Important factors for the continuing professional development of psychotherapists are proposed. PMID:23543213

  4. [Organizational model and clinical evaluation in Day Surgery: our experience].

    PubMed

    Rossitto, M; Buonamonte, S; Panacea, D; Manfré, A; Ardizzone, A; Ciccolo, A

    2005-01-01

    Surgical treatments in Day Surgery (DS) are characterised by limited hospitalisation during daytime on the base of an organizational model established by appropriate protocols. According to it, the patient at low operational risk and the patient whose post-operative management is easy is admitted to the programme. The Authors report their experience of DS focusing on the surgical and anaesthesiological qualifications that help to control the risk factors reducing the complications and thus guaranteeing the safety and effectiveness of the service. PMID:15847097

  5. Assessing Research Participants Perceptions of their Clinical Research Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Rhonda G.; Lee, Laura M.; Yessis, Jennifer; Coller, Barry S.; Henderson, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Participants perceptions of their research experiences provide valuable measures of ethical treatment, yet no validated instruments exist to measure these experiences. We conducted focus groups of research participants and professionals as the initial step in developing a validated instrument. Methods Research participants enrolled in twelve focus groups, consisting of: 1) individuals with disorders undergoing interventions or 2) in natural history studies; or 3) healthy volunteers. Research professionals participated in six separate groups of 1) IRB members, ethicists, Research Subject Advocates, 2) research nurses/coordinators, or 3) investigators. Focus groups used standard methodologies. Results 85 participants and 29 professionals enrolled at 8 academic centers. Altruism and personal relevance of the research were commonly identified motivators; financial compensation was less commonly mentioned. Participants were satisfied with informed consent processes but disappointed if not provided test results, or study outcomes. Positive relationships with research teams were valued highly. Research professionals were concerned about risks, undue influence, and informed consent. Conclusions Participants join studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. They value staff relationships, health gains, new knowledge, and compensation, and expect professionalism and good organization. Based on these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention and satisfaction. PMID:22212221

  6. Experience in international clinical research: the HIV Prevention Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Nirupama Deshmane; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Hinson, Kathy; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H; Vermund, Sten H

    2012-01-01

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) is supported by the NIH to conduct randomized clinical trials to assess the efficacy of HIV prevention strategies and technologies to reduce HIV transmission between adults. A special focus of attention is on the use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV transmission, both by reducing infectiousness among HIV-infected persons taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and also by reducing susceptibility among HIV-uninfected persons taking antiretrovirals for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Studies may be developmental in nature to assess novel ideas for interventions or for assessing trial feasibility. However, pivotal efficacy trials to test HIV-specific prevention strategies and technologies are the main HPTN priority. Examples include a major protocol investigating the impact of expanded testing and linkage to care on HIV surveillance indicators in the USA (HPTN 065). Another protocol is addressing similar issues while also investigating how combinations of prevention approaches are best deployed to make a community-level impact in southern Africa (HPTN 071). HPTN 068 is evaluating a novel conditional cash transfer structural intervention to increase school completion rates in young girls and thereby reduce their HIV risk. Studies outside the US address the epidemic in most at-risk populations and include an assessment of opiate agonist therapy to reduce risk of HIV seroconversion among injection drug users (HTPN 058), methods to increase HIV testing rates (HTPN 043), as well as methods for reducing high-risk behaviors, and increasing adherence to cART in HIV-infected individuals (HPTN 062 and HPTN 063, respectively). The recent HPTN 052 study demonstrated that a 96% reduction in HIV transmission could be achieved between serodiscordant sexual partners by providing the infected partners with cART at a CD4+ cell count (350–550/µl) above the level that would usually qualify them for therapy in low- and middle-income countries. The immediate relevance to public health policy showcased in these trials is a paradigm for the HPTN: design and conduct of clinical trials using available licensed tools that can be rapidly translated for implementation (‘Prevention NOW!’). PMID:22348195

  7. Clinical experience in treatment of diffuse unilateral subretinal neuroretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Relhan, Nidhi; Pathengay, Avinash; Raval, Vishal; Nayak, Sameera; Choudhury, Himadri; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features, management, and outcomes of patients with diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN). Methods A noncomparative, consecutive analysis of case series from two tertiary care campuses of LV Prasad Eye Institute, India, between January 2011 and April 2014 was performed. Medical records of the patients presenting with DUSN (early or late stage) were reviewed. Results The current study included 13 patients. The majority (10/13, 76.92%) of the patients were aged 20 years or less. All patients had unilateral eye involvement. Visual acuity at presentation was 20/200 or worse in 9/13 (69.23%) patients. A delay in diagnosis occurred in 6/13 patients, and initial diagnosis in these patients included retinitis pigmentosa (4 patients) and posterior uveitis (2 patients). Clinical features included early presentation (prominent vitritis, localized retinitis, and vasculitis) in 7/13 (53.85%) patients and late presentation (attenuation of vessels, retinal pigment epithelium atrophic changes, and optic atrophy) in 6/13 (46.15%) patients. Worm could not be identified in any of the cases. All the patients received laser photocoagulation of retina and oral albendazole treatment for a period of 30 days. With treatment, visual acuity improved in seven patients (six early stage, one late stage) and remained unchanged in six patients. Mean follow-up period was 8.69 months (range, 121 months). The mean central foveal thickness in the affected eye, done by optical coherence tomography, during the late stage of the disease was 188.2040 m (range, 111242 m), which was significantly thinner than the fellow eye, 238.7036.90 m (range, 186319 m), P=0.008. Conclusion DUSN is a serious vision threatening disease, which may progress to profound vision loss in the later stage of the disease. Visualization of subretinal worm is usually not possible. Treatment with high-dose albendazole therapy and laser photocoagulation may alter the bloodretinal barrier and may be useful in achieving visual recovery. PMID:26491239

  8. Clinical Experience of Patients Referred to a Multidisciplinary Cardiac Oncology Clinic: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sulpher, Jeffrey; Mathur, Shrey; Graham, Nadine; Crawley, Freya; Turek, Michele; Johnson, Christopher; Stadnick, Ellamae; Law, Angeline; Wentzell, Jason; Dent, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the second leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. The purpose of this retrospective observational study is to report on the clinical and cardiac outcomes in patients with early stage and advanced cancer who were referred to our multidisciplinary cardiac oncology clinic (COC). A total of 428 patients were referred to the COC between October 2008 and January 2013. The median age of patients at time of cancer diagnosis was 60. Almost half of patients who received cancer therapy received first-line chemotherapy alone (169, 41.7%), of which 84 (49.7%) were exposed to anthracyclines. The most common reasons for referral to the cardiac oncology clinic were decreased LVEF (34.6%), prechemotherapy assessment (11.9%), and arrhythmia (8.4%). A total of 175 (40.9%) patients referred to the COC were treated with cardiac medications. The majority (331, 77.3%) of patients were alive as of January 2013, and 93 (21.7%) patients were deceased. Through regular review of cardiac oncology clinic referral patterns, management plans, and patient outcomes, we aim to continuously improve delivery of cardiac care to our patient population and optimize cardiac health. PMID:26300917

  9. Clinical Experience of Patients Referred to a Multidisciplinary Cardiac Oncology Clinic: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sulpher, Jeffrey; Mathur, Shrey; Graham, Nadine; Crawley, Freya; Turek, Michele; Johnson, Christopher; Stadnick, Ellamae; Law, Angeline; Wentzell, Jason; Dent, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the second leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. The purpose of this retrospective observational study is to report on the clinical and cardiac outcomes in patients with early stage and advanced cancer who were referred to our multidisciplinary cardiac oncology clinic (COC). A total of 428 patients were referred to the COC between October 2008 and January 2013. The median age of patients at time of cancer diagnosis was 60. Almost half of patients who received cancer therapy received first-line chemotherapy alone (169, 41.7%), of which 84 (49.7%) were exposed to anthracyclines. The most common reasons for referral to the cardiac oncology clinic were decreased LVEF (34.6%), prechemotherapy assessment (11.9%), and arrhythmia (8.4%). A total of 175 (40.9%) patients referred to the COC were treated with cardiac medications. The majority (331, 77.3%) of patients were alive as of January 2013, and 93 (21.7%) patients were deceased. Through regular review of cardiac oncology clinic referral patterns, management plans, and patient outcomes, we aim to continuously improve delivery of cardiac care to our patient population and optimize cardiac health. PMID:26300917

  10. Transdermal buprenorphine in chronic pain: indications and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Kusnik, Stefan; Likar, Rudolf; Sittl, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine has been shown to be effective in managing moderate-to-severe cancer pain and severe pain that is unresponsive to nonopioid analgesics. In clinical trials, it provided better pain relief than placebo, despite a higher consumption of rescue analgesia by placebo patients. Analgesia was rated as satisfactory or better by 90% of patients in a long-term follow-up study and 94.6% considered the buprenorphine matrix patch to be user friendly. Transdermal buprenorphine is well tolerated; most adverse events are transient local reactions to the patch or systemic effects typical of treatment with opioids. Even in opioid-experienced volunteers, buprenorphine does not cause respiratory depression at doses up to 70-times higher than those used for analgesia. No problems have been encountered when switching from another opioid to transdermal buprenorphine, or in combining the buprenorphine patch with intravenous morphine or tramadol for breakthrough pain. There is a growing body of evidence that transdermal buprenorphine may be particularly useful for managing neuropathic pain. Most notably, it appears to be effective in treating hyperalgesic states and syndromes characterized by pronounced central sensitization. PMID:24410602

  11. [Percutaneous biliary endoprostheses. Clinical experience of 6 years].

    PubMed

    Fava, M; Cruz, F; Lastra, M; Aguilar, J; Loyola, S

    1993-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness and long term permeability of percutaneous biliary endoprostheses. Seventy three patients with biliary tract obstruction due to a primary malignant tumor (n = 60), lymph node metastases at the porta hepatis (n = 10) and benign stenosis of a biliary-enteric anastomosis (n = 3), were treated between 1985 and 1990. Plastic prostheses were installed in 63 patients and metallic in 10. The procedure had a 30% incidence of complications. Thirty three percent of the prostheses remained patent until patient's death. In 15 and 40% of patients, signs of prosthesis obstruction were observed three and six months after installation respectively, bearing in mind a mean survival of 24 weeks. In 90% of patients there was a clinical and laboratory improvement. Mortality was 30% at 30 days in the group of patients with malignant diseases. It is concluded that the installation of percutaneous biliary endoprostheses is a relatively safe and well tolerated procedure, with a low incidence of complications or mortality and that allows an effective biliary decompression. PMID:8296079

  12. Clinical experiences of NBI laryngoscope in diagnosis of laryngeal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xinmeng; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Xue; Jin, Chunshun; Sun, Changling; Liu, Xueshibojie; Cheng, Jinzhang; Zhang, Dejun

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy is essential for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers derived from the larynx. However, a laryngoscope with conventional white light (CWL) has technical limitations in detecting small or superficial lesions on the mucosa. Narrow band imaging especially combined with magnifying endoscopy (ME) is useful for the detection of superficial squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) within the oropharynx, hypopharynx, and oral cavity. A total of 3675 patients who have come to the outpatient clinic and complained of inspiratory stridor, dyspnea, phonation problems or foreign body sensation, were enrolled in this study. We describe the glottic conditions of the patients. All 3675 patients underwent laryngoscopy equipped with conventional white light (CWL) and NBI system. 1149 patients received a biopsy process. And 1153 lesions were classified into different groups according to their histopathological results. Among all the 1149 patients, 346 patients (312 males, 34 females; mean age 62.2±10.5 years) were suspected of having a total of 347 precancerous or cancerous (T1 or T2 without lymphnode involvement) lesions of the larynx under the CWL. Thus, we expected to attain a complete vision of what laryngeal lesions look like under the NBI view of a laryngoscope. The aim was to develop a complete description list of each laryngeal conditions (e.g. polyps, papilloma, leukoplakia, etc.), which can serve as a criteria for further laryngoscopic examinations and diagnosis. PMID:25419362

  13. Initial Clinical Experience Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, David J.; Kessel, David O. Nicholson, Anthony A.; Patel, Jai V.; McPherson, Simon J.; Shaw, David R.

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a self-expanding nitinol wire mesh vascular embolization device derived from the Amplatz septal occluder. We assessed the results of vascular embolization obtained using the AVP. Methods. A retrospective review was carried out of 23 consecutive cases of vascular embolization using the AVP in a variety of different clinical settings. The AVP was chosen to have a diameter approximately 30-50% greater than the target vessel. The device was delivered via an appropriately sized guide catheter and was released when satisfactorily positioned. Additional embolic agents were used in some cases. Results. All target vessels were successfully occluded with no device malpositioning or malfunction. In 14 (61%) patients the AVP was the sole embolic material. In the remaining patients additional agents were used, particularly in preoperative embolization of highly vascular renal tumors. The AVP does not cause instantaneous thrombosis and in high-flow situations thrombosis typically takes up to 15 min. Conclusion. The AVP is a safe, effective embolization device that provides a useful adjunct to the therapeutic armamentarium. It is particularly suited to the treatment of short high-flow vessels where coil migration and catheter dislodgment might occur. In the majority of cases no additional embolic agents are necessary but it may take up to 15 min for complete thrombosis to occur.

  14. The universal serial bus endoscope: design and initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Zendejas, Gregorio; Dobke, Marek K; Guerrerosantos, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic forehead lift is a well-established procedure in aesthetic plastic surgery. Many agree that currently available video-endoscopic equipment is bulky, multipieced and sometimes cumbersome in the operating theater. A novel system, the Universal Serial Bus Endoscope (USBE) was designed to simplify and reduce the number of necessary equipment pieces in the endoscopic setup. The USBE is attached by a single cable to a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port of a laptop computer. A built-in miniaturized cold light source provides illumination. A built-in digital camera chip enables procedure recording. The real-time images and movies obtained with USBE are displayed on the computer's screen and recorded on the laptop's hard disk drive. In this study, 25 patients underwent endoscopic browlift using the USBE system to test its clinical usefulness, all with good results and without complications or need for revision. The USBE was found to be reliable and easier to use than current video-endoscope equipment. The operative time needed to complete the procedure by the authors was reduced approximately 50%. The design and main technical characteristics of the USBE are presented. PMID:15383889

  15. [Clinical experience in systemic lupus erythematosus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lin, S C; Jeng, G S; Yang, I J; Liao, S T; Wei, C F; Siauw, C P; Chen, P H

    1982-05-01

    Thirty-four cases of SLE treated during the past seven years (1974-1981) in Taipei Municipal Jen-Ai Hospital are reported and analyzed. Diagnosis of SLE was based on ARA preliminary criteria and Hahn's preliminary criteria. There were 32 females (94.2%) and 2 males (5.8%). The mean age at diagnosis was 28.5 years (range 14-51). Clinical manifestations were as follows: facial erythema 24 cases (70.6%), Raynaud's phenomenon 4 cases (11.4%), oral or nasopharyngeal ulceration 7 cases (20.6%), arthritis without deformity 22 cases (64.7%), proteinuria 21 cases (61.8%), pleural or pericardial effusions 13 cases (38.2%), psychosis or convulsions 9 cases (26.5%), hematological abnormalities 25 cases (73.5%). Laboratory findings were as follows: positive ANA test 33/34 (97.0%), hypocomplementemia 10/13 (76.9%), direct Coombs' test 4/18 (22.2%), indirect Coombs' test 1/13 (7.6%), LE cell 19/34 (55.9%), RA Latex 7/17 (41.7%), polyclonal gammopathy 15/17 (88.2%), anemia 25/34 (73.5%), leukopenia 12/34 (35.3%), thrombocytopenia 10/34 (29.4%). Three cases were complicated by herpes zoster, one by hyperthyroidism, and one by autoimmune thyroiditis. Ten cases died, including 4 renal failure, 2 heart failure, 2 cases of committed suicide and 1 case of CNS involvement. PMID:7094684

  16. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Marshall, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represent a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space.

  17. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and ?-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  18. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and ?-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  19. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G A; Schubert, W W; Marshall, T M

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represent a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space. PMID:11537531

  20. 42 CFR 482.80 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... center. (3) A pancreas transplant center is not required to comply with the clinical experience... pancreas transplants performed at the center. (4) A center that is requesting initial Medicare approval...

  1. Clinical Experience of a Diet Designed to Reduce Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Ron; Westman, Eric C.; Konhilas, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Aging is associated with elevated levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides. Our objective was to assess the effect of a nutritional program designed to reduce these correlates of aging. Design: This is a retrospective chart review of patients attending an outpatient metabolic management program including a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, nutritional supplementation and periodic individual visits. Outcomes measured at baseline and follow-up included body weight, fasting serum glucose, insulin, leptin, lipids, and thyroid hormone. Results: Thirty-one patients were identified with complete information. The mean age of patients was 57.6 2.4 consisting of 53% female and 47% male patients. The average duration between follow up visits was 91.5 8.5 days. Of the parameters measured at the follow-up visit, body weight, serum leptin, insulin, fasting glucose, triglyceride, and free T3 significantly decreased by 8.1 0.8%, 48.2 3.8%, 40.1 4.7%, 7.6 2.1%, 28.3 5.7%, and 10.8 1.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the triglyceride/high density lipoprotein ratio decreased from 5.1 1.7 to 2.6 0.5. Conclusions: In the context of an outpatient medical clinic, a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet with nutritional supplementation led to improvements in serum factors related to the aging process. Further research regarding this dietary approach and its relationship to aging is in order. PMID:20204146

  2. Clinical experiences of bixalomer usage at our hospital.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hideaki; Makino, Ryojiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Ban, Akihiko; Funao, Kiyoaki; Sugita, Syouzou; Furumitsu, Yutaka; Inoue, Keisuke; Yoshimoto, Mitsuru; Okamura, Mikio

    2014-06-01

    In 2012, bixalomer was launched as new non-calcium (Ca) containing phosphorus (P) binder, increasing the choices available for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. In this study, among the maintenance dialysis patients at our hospital, we newly administered bixalomer to 21 patients who were not receiving any P binders, and switched to bixalomer for 13 patients who had been receiving sevelamer hydrochloride and 23 patients who had been receiving lanthanum carbonate. The initial dosage of bixalomer was set as 1500?mg/day for new administration patients and dosage equivalent to that of the previously-used P binder for patients who were switched to bixalomer. The dosage of bixalomer was increased if the effects were insufficient. The serum P, Ca and intact parathyroid hormone concentrations as well as serum pH, HCO3 concentration and base excess were evaluated prior to administering bixalomer, 3 months and 6 months after administering bixalomer. For the group who were newly administered bixalomer, significant reductions in serum P concentrations were seen (P<0.01) and no significant changes were seen in clinical test items that serve as indices for acidosis. For the group who were switched from sevelamer hydrochloride to bixalomer, significant reductions in serum P concentrations were seen (P<0.01) together with significant improvements in acidosis (P<0.01). For the group who were switched from lanthanum carbonate to bixalomer, by increasing the dosage of bixalomer to approximately three times the dosage of lanthanum carbonate, it was possible to maintain post-switch serum P concentrations at almost the same levels as before the switch. Furthermore, there were minor, yet significant improvements in acidosis (P<0.01). From these results, it was shown that bixalomer can be useful treatment alternative in dialysis patients for whom it is necessary to change the P binder due to insufficient management of serum P concentrations or development of acidosis. PMID:24975890

  3. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  4. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  5. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the

  6. Cooperating Teacher Evaluation of Candidates in Clinical Practice and Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, David W.; Zhou, Yunfang

    2009-01-01

    The Investigators hypothesized cooperating teachers' evaluations of candidates in clinical practice and field experiences would possess higher scores than those provided by clinical and education division faculty. However, the reasons for the higher scores proved to be much more complex than originally thought. While it was assumed that teachers

  7. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive

  8. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,

  9. Experiences of Student Speech-Language Pathology Clinicians in the Initial Clinical Practicum: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Speech-language pathology literature is limited in describing the clinical practicum process from the student perspective. Much of the supervision literature in this field focuses on quantitative research and/or the point of view of the supervisor. Understanding the student experience serves to enhance the quality of clinical supervision. Of

  10. The Impact of Clinical Experiences from Athletic Training Student and Preceptor Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an integral part of athletic training programs. This is where students should develop their professional identities and become socialized into the profession. Understanding the student and preceptor perspectives of the impact that clinical experiences have on students can provide valuable insight into this aspect of

  11. Using a Web-Based Database to Record and Monitor Athletic Training Students' Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kirk W.; Williams, Lisa; Janicki, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to introduce a documentation recording system employing the Microsoft Structured Query Language (MS-SQL) database used by the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) for recording and monitoring of athletic training student (ATS) clinical experiences and hours. Background: Monitoring ATSs clinical

  12. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed

  13. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  14. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed…

  15. The Impact of Clinical Experiences from Athletic Training Student and Preceptor Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an integral part of athletic training programs. This is where students should develop their professional identities and become socialized into the profession. Understanding the student and preceptor perspectives of the impact that clinical experiences have on students can provide valuable insight into this aspect of…

  16. Role of Clinical Education Experiences on Athletic Training Students' Development of Professional Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Context: Limited evidence exists on the role clinical education can play in the development of athletic training student commitment for the profession. Objective: Investigating the role clinical education experiences play on the development of passion for athletic training. Design: Exploratory qualitative study. Setting: Athletic training…

  17. Efficiency of Clinical Decision Support Systems Improves with Experience.

    PubMed

    Meulendijk, Michiel C; Spruit, Marco R; Willeboordse, Floor; Numans, Mattijs E; Brinkkemper, Sjaak; Knol, Wilma; Jansen, Paul A F; Askari, Marjan

    2016-04-01

    Efficiency, or the resources spent while performing a specific task, is widely regarded as one the determinants of usability. In this study, the authors hypothesize that having a group of users perform a similar task over a prolonged period of time will lead to improvements in efficiency of that task. This study was performed in the domain of decision-supported medication reviews. Data was gathered during a randomized controlled trial. Three expert teams consisting of an independent physician and an independent pharmacist conducted 150 computerized medication reviews on patients in 13 general practices located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results were analyzed with a linear mixed model. A fixed effects test on the linear mixed model showed a significant difference in the time required to conduct medication reviews over time; F(31.145)?=?14.043, p?experience over time. PMID:26791992

  18. Clinical review: The Israeli experience: conventional terrorism and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Aschkenasy-Steuer, Gabriella; Shamir, Micha; Rivkind, Avraham; Mosheiff, Rami; Shushan, Yigal; Rosenthal, Guy; Mintz, Yoav; Weissman, Charles; Sprung, Charles L; Weiss, Yoram G

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years there have been 93 multiple-casualty terrorist attacks in Israel, 33 of them in Jerusalem. The Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center is the only Level I trauma center in Jerusalem and has therefore gained important experience in caring for critically injured patients. To do so we have developed a highly flexible operational system for managing the general intensive care unit (GICU). The focus of this review will be on the organizational steps needed to provide operational flexibility, emphasizing the importance of forward deployment of intensive care unit personnel to the trauma bay and emergency room and the existence of a chain of command to limit chaos. A retrospective review of the hospital's response to multiple-casualty terror incidents occurring between 1 October 2000 and 1 September 2004 was performed. Information was assembled from the medical center's trauma registry and from GICU patient admission and discharge records. Patients are described with regard to the severity and type of injury. The organizational work within intensive care is described. Finally, specific issues related to the diagnosis and management of lung, brain, orthopedic and abdominal injuries, caused by bomb blast events associated with shrapnel, are described. This review emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in caring for these patients. PMID:16277738

  19. [Application of portfolio in teaching dermatology clinic: an experience in teaching of medicine].

    PubMed

    de Cabalier, M E; Chalub, D M

    2009-01-01

    We present a learning experience conducted in the Chair of Dermatology Clinic of the Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of Cordoba in the context of curriculum change. For comprehension,present a theoretical framework and practical from the conceptualization of the "portfolio" teaching and its role teaching and learning paradigms sustained constructivist medical education. The portfolio Teach-ing is not a collection of papers, but a coherent set of experiences led thoughtful learning between teachers and students. This resource allows to account for the "qualitative achievements" of students from their work produced, sorted and evaluated in a carefully planned sequence of experiences and case Dermatology Clinic. To introduce the teaching portfolio, the planned new student grouping shapes and a sequence of learning experiences for the construction of this resource, namely: "The development of theoretical material iconographic resources and working guidelines for students. "The clinical reasoning on a case or laboratory experience-Clinical case Discussion and bibliography. -The development of records to from observation of patients. "The study of clinical cases: diagnosis and evolution of clinical cases. Interconsultations-Registration and referrals. "The magazine room and sharing experiences. In each of these, production, tutorial feedback Team teaching and assessment tasks allowed assessment approach to learning and improving he achievements of the students to the approval of the subject. PMID:21138664

  20. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AND IMPACT OF A COMMUNITY-LED VOLUNTEER ATMOSPHERIC HAZE CLINIC IN SINGAPORE.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Benson; Liew, Choon Fong; Oon, Hazel H

    2014-11-01

    The Pollutant Standards Index reached a life-threatening level of 401 in Singapore on 21 June 2013. Grassroot leaders in Ulu Pandan Constituency conducted the first community-led free atmospheric Haze Clinic from 25 June 2013 to 11 July 2013 to provide accessible medical assessment for affected community members. This provided insight into the common conditions afflicting that community during the haze period while allaying public anxiety. Seventy-two consultations were conducted over the 3 week period, of which 26 (36.1%) were haze related, 18 (25%) were possibly haze related and 28 (38.9%) were non-haze related. The majority of haze-related complaints were respiratory, eye and skin-related. During a haze crisis, such adhoc community-led clinics may help alleviate the surge in patients seen at emergency departments and public primary health clinics. Many of the patients seen were from low income families and a significant number (38.9%) sought help for non-haze related medical conditions. PMID:26466431

  1. An in vitro study of the radiobiological effects of flattening filter free radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. B.; Hyland, W. B.; Cole, A. J.; Butterworth, K. T.; McMahon, S. J.; Redmond, K. M.; Trainer, C.; Prise, K. M.; McGarry, C. K.; Hounsell, A. R.

    2013-03-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators allow for an increase in instantaneous dose-rate of the x-ray pulses by a factor of 2-6 over the conventional flattened output. As a result, radiobiological investigations are being carried out to determine the effect of these higher dose-rates on cell response. The studies reported thus far have presented conflicting results, highlighting the need for further investigation. To determine the radiobiological impact of the increased dose-rates from FFF exposures a Varian Truebeam medical linear accelerator was used to irradiate two human cancer cell lines in vitro, DU-145 prostate and H460 non-small cell lung, with both flattened and FFF 6 MV beams. The fluence profile of the FFF beam was modified using a custom-designed Nylon compensator to produce a similar dose profile to the flattened beam (6X) at the cell surface but at a higher instantaneous dose-rate. For both cell lines there appeared to be no significant change in cell survival. Curve fitting coefficients for DU145 cells irradiated with constant average dose-rates were 6X: ? = 0.09 0.03, ? = 0.03 0.01 and 6FFF: ? = 0.14 0.13, ? = 0.03 0.02 with a significance of p = 0.75. For H460 cells irradiated with the same instantaneous dose-rate but different average dose-rate the fit coefficients were 6FFF (low dose-rate): ? = 0.21 0.11, 0.07 0.02 and 6FFF (high dose-rate): ? = 0.21 0.16, 0.07 0.03, with p = 0.79. The results indicate that collective damage behaviour does not occur at the instantaneous dose-rates investigated here and that the use of either modality should result in the same clinical outcome, however this will require further validation in vivo.

  2. Radiobiological speculations on therapeutic total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Unexpected total body irradiation (TBI) of human beings, involved in nuclear warfare or in accidents in nuclear reactors can be lethal. In the 1950s, bone marrow transplantation was discovered as a potentially life saving procedure after TBI in the dose range of 5.0 to 12.0 Gy. Since that time, deliberate or therapeutic TBI has been used to condition patients with a lethal bone marrow disorder for bone marrow replacement. The therapeutic ratio of TBI followed by bone marrow transplantation is small. Many potentially lethal complications can occur, such as acute TBI side effects, late TBI side effects or immunological complications of bone marrow transplantation such as graft versus host disease or graft rejection. The benefits of TBI and bone marrow transplantation are that they offer a chance for cure of previously lethal bone marrow disorders. The optimal parameters for TBI remain to be defined. The review discusses the current clinical and experimental animal data, as they relate to the future definition of less toxic TBI procedures with a better therapeutic ratio. Different TBI procedures are required for patients with malignant vs. non-malignant disorders or for patients with histoincompatible vs. histocompatible bone marrow donors.77 references.

  3. Evidence That a Psychopathology Interactome Has Diagnostic Value, Predicting Clinical Needs: An Experience Sampling Study

    PubMed Central

    van Os, Jim; Lataster, Tineke; Delespaul, Philippe; Wichers, Marieke; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2014-01-01

    Background For the purpose of diagnosis, psychopathology can be represented as categories of mental disorder, symptom dimensions or symptom networks. Also, psychopathology can be assessed at different levels of temporal resolution (monthly episodes, daily fluctuating symptoms, momentary fluctuating mental states). We tested the diagnostic value, in terms of prediction of treatment needs, of the combination of symptom networks and momentary assessment level. Method Fifty-seven patients with a psychotic disorder participated in an ESM study, capturing psychotic experiences, emotions and circumstances at 10 semi-random moments in the flow of daily life over a period of 6 days. Symptoms were assessed by interview with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS); treatment needs were assessed using the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN). Results Psychotic symptoms assessed with the PANSS (Clinical Psychotic Symptoms) were strongly associated with psychotic experiences assessed with ESM (Momentary Psychotic Experiences). However, the degree to which Momentary Psychotic Experiences manifested as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms was determined by level of momentary negative affect (higher levels increasing probability of Momentary Psychotic Experiences manifesting as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms), momentary positive affect (higher levels decreasing probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms), greater persistence of Momentary Psychotic Experiences (persistence predicting increased probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms) and momentary environmental stress associated with events and activities (higher levels increasing probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms). Similarly, the degree to which momentary visual or auditory hallucinations manifested as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms was strongly contingent on the level of accompanying momentary paranoid delusional ideation. Momentary Psychotic Experiences were associated with CAN unmet treatment needs, over and above PANSS measures of psychopathology, similarly moderated by momentary interactions with emotions and context. Conclusion The results suggest that psychopathology, represented as an interactome at the momentary level of temporal resolution, is informative in diagnosing clinical needs, over and above traditional symptom measures. PMID:24466189

  4. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Gretchen M.; Edwards, Mary E.; Butson, Linda C.; Auten, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n=21), interviews (n=2), and an online survey (n=167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly effective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians’ perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics. PMID:26211792

  5. A systematic review of evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Cathal; Lennox, Laura; Bell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness outcomes. Design Systematic review. Setting A wide range of settings within primary and secondary care including hospitals and primary care centres. Participants A wide range of demographic groups and age groups. Primary and secondary outcome measures A broad range of patient safety and clinical effectiveness outcomes including mortality, physical symptoms, length of stay and adherence to treatment. Results This study, summarising evidence from 55 studies, indicates consistent positive associations between patient experience, patient safety and clinical effectiveness for a wide range of disease areas, settings, outcome measures and study designs. It demonstrates positive associations between patient experience and self-rated and objectively measured health outcomes; adherence to recommended clinical practice and medication; preventive care (such as health-promoting behaviour, use of screening services and immunisation); and resource use (such as hospitalisation, length of stay and primary-care visits). There is some evidence of positive associations between patient experience and measures of the technical quality of care and adverse events. Overall, it was more common to find positive associations between patient experience and patient safety and clinical effectiveness than no associations. Conclusions The data presented display that patient experience is positively associated with clinical effectiveness and patient safety, and support the case for the inclusion of patient experience as one of the central pillars of quality in healthcare. It supports the argument that the three dimensions of quality should be looked at as a group and not in isolation. Clinicians should resist sidelining patient experience as too subjective or mood-oriented, divorced from the real clinical work of measuring safety and effectiveness. PMID:23293244

  6. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  7. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery

  8. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a

  9. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  10. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  11. Left atrial appendage isolation using percutaneous (endocardial/epicardial) devices: Pre-clinical and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jorge; Natale, Andrea; Engstrom, Krysthel; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the elderly population and it is associated with a four-fold to five-fold increased risk of thromboembolic events. It was not until the mid-1950s that the left atrial appendage (LAA) was identified as the main location of thrombus formation, particularly in patients with non-valvular AF. In this review, we explain at some extent its embryology, anatomy and physiology, and as well as the clinical and pre-clinical trials published to date testing the safety and efficacy of most LAA closure devices. Among those devices, the most studied include the PLAATO system (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN), the Amplatzer cardiac plug (St Jude, Golden Valley, MN; St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN), the WATCHMAN device (Boston Scientific, Plymouth, MN; Atritech Inc., Plymouth, MN), and the LARIAT device (SentreHEART, Palo Alto, CA). Similarly, newer LAA closure devices currently under investigation such as the Transcatheter Patch (Custom Medical Devices, Athens, Greece), AEGIS, and the Coherex WaveCrest (Salt Lake City, UT) will also be discussed. Future perspectives and the need for well-designed prospective studies between devices and new oral anticoagulant drugs are also proposed. PMID:26141854

  12. Prehospital Emergency Nursing students' experiences of learning during prehospital clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kim; Fridlund, Bengt; Thorn, Ann-Britt

    2013-07-01

    Clinical placements play an important role in learning a new profession, but students report about poor placement experiences. Standards have been laid down for improvements within clinical training in Prehospital Emergency Nursing programmes in Sweden, but no studies have been carried out in this field in a Swedish context. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the experiences of Prehospital Emergency Nursing (PEN) students of their clinical placement and the effect on their learning process. Data were collected in 28 individual interviews and analyzed in accordance with Flanagan's Critical Incident Technique. Three main areas emerged: the professional clinical supervisor, the clinical placement setting and the learning strategy. All these areas played a significant role in the PEN students' learning progress and development into a new professional role. The choice of clinical supervisor (CS) and clinical placement is important if PEN students' learning is to be an effective and positive experience. The prehospital environment is unique and can have positive and negative effects on student learning depending on the support and structure given during their clinical placement. A learning strategy based on reflective dialogue, CS continuity and a learning structure based on the prehospital environment is presented. PMID:23140791

  13. 42 CFR 482.82 - Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for re...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., clinical experience, and outcome requirements for re-approval of transplant centers. 482.82 Section 482.82... Hospitals Transplant Center Data Submission, Clinical Experience, and Outcome Requirements § 482.82 Condition of participation: Data submission, clinical experience, and outcome requirements for...

  14. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks.

    PubMed

    Komisopoulos, Georgios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, Georgios C; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p+), the overall probability of injury (pI), the overall probability of control/benefit (pB), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D¯¯). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D¯¯ diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p+ index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of pB are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of pI are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (DB¯¯) for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8Gy, respectively. Regarding the risk for secondary cancer, for the heart, the lowest average risk is produced by IMRT (0.10%) compared with the HT (0.17%) and CRT (0.12%) modalities, whereas the 3 radiation modalities show almost equivalent results regarding the contralateral lung (0.8% for HT, 0.9% for IMRT, and 0.9% for CRT). The use of radiobiologic parameters in the evaluation of different treatment plans and estimation of their expected clinical outcome is shown to provide very useful clinical information. The radiobiologic analysis of the response probabilities showed that different radiation modalities appear to be more effective in different patient geometries and target sizes and locations. Furthermore, there is not a clear pattern between the plans that appear to be more effective for the treatment and the risk of secondary malignancy. It seems that radiobiologically based treatment planning taking into account the risk of secondary cancer can be established as an effective clinical tool for a more clinically relevant treatment optimization. PMID:25168596

  15. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    SciTech Connect

    Komisopoulos, Georgios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8 Gy, respectively. Regarding the risk for secondary cancer, for the heart, the lowest average risk is produced by IMRT (0.10%) compared with the HT (0.17%) and CRT (0.12%) modalities, whereas the 3 radiation modalities show almost equivalent results regarding the contralateral lung (0.8% for HT, 0.9% for IMRT, and 0.9% for CRT). The use of radiobiologic parameters in the evaluation of different treatment plans and estimation of their expected clinical outcome is shown to provide very useful clinical information. The radiobiologic analysis of the response probabilities showed that different radiation modalities appear to be more effective in different patient geometries and target sizes and locations. Furthermore, there is not a clear pattern between the plans that appear to be more effective for the treatment and the risk of secondary malignancy. It seems that radiobiologically based treatment planning taking into account the risk of secondary cancer can be established as an effective clinical tool for a more clinically relevant treatment optimization.

  16. Er:YAG laser: clinical experience based upon scientific evidence: clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Souza-Campos, Dilma H.; Vieira de Medeiros, Urubatan

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate, based upon scientific evidence, the efficacy of dental treatment using the Er:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser is able of quick cavitation of dental structure with minimal thermal effect. It is also well known that most treatment is carried out without the need of local anesthesia. It is also recognized that its work with no vibration and in a non-contact mode. This paper reports the clinical results of 590 dental procedures carried out with the Er:YAG laser on selected patients. The laser was used for composite removal, cavity enamel preparation, carious dentine removal and conditioning of both dentin and enamel. Dental treatment with the Er:YAG laser as a secure and efficient method of treatment with more comfort for the patients, high acceptance form patients and less need of using local anesthesia.

  17. Uncertainty in the Translation of Preclinical Experiments to Clinical Trials. Why do Most Phase III Clinical Trials Fail?

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    A large majority of Phase III, large scale, clinical trials will fail, including gene therapy trials. This paper attempts to address some of the causes that may have inadvertently led to such a high failure rate. After briefly reviewing the detailed and high quality work that goes both into the preparation and conduct of such large Phase III clinical trials, and the preclinical science that is used to support and originate such trials, this paper proposes a novel approach to translational medicine which would increase the predictability of success of Phase III clinical trials. We propose that a likely cause of such failures is the lack of “robustness” in the preclinical science underpinning the Phase I/II and III clinical trials. Robustness is defined as stability/reproducibility in the face of challenges. Many times preclinical experiments are tested in a very narrow set of experimental conditions. Thus, when such approaches are finally tested in the context of human disease, the challenge provided by the varied age of patients, the complex genetic makeup of human populations, and the complexities of the diseases to be treated provide challenges which were never tested or modeled. We believe that the introduction of revised approaches to preclinical science, including the use of the latest developments in statistical, scientific, mathematical, and biological models, ought to lead to more robust preclinical experimentation with its subsequent translation, to more robust Phase III clinical trials. PMID:19860651

  18. A fuzzy convolution model for radiobiologically optimized radiotherapy margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mzenda, Bongile; Hosseini-Ashrafi, Mir; Gegov, Alex; Brown, David J.

    2010-06-01

    In this study we investigate the use of a new knowledge-based fuzzy logic technique to derive radiotherapy margins based on radiotherapy uncertainties and their radiobiological effects. The main radiotherapy uncertainties considered and used to build the model were delineation, set-up and organ motion-induced errors. The radiobiological effects of these combined errors, in terms of prostate tumour control probability and rectal normal tissue complication probability, were used to formulate the rule base and membership functions for a Sugeno type fuzzy system linking the error effect to the treatment margin. The defuzzified output was optimized by convolving it with a Gaussian convolution kernel to give a uniformly varying transfer function which was used to calculate the required treatment margins. The margin derived using the fuzzy technique showed good agreement compared to current prostate margins based on the commonly used margin formulation proposed by van Herk et al (2000 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 47 1121-35), and has nonlinear variation above combined errors of 5 mm standard deviation. The derived margin is on average 0.5 mm bigger than currently used margins in the region of small treatment uncertainties where margin reduction would be applicable. The new margin was applied in an intensity modulated radiotherapy prostate treatment planning example where margin reduction and a dose escalation regime were implemented, and by inducing equivalent treatment uncertainties, the resulting target and organs at risk doses were found to compare well to results obtained using currently recommended margins.

  19. Clinical Outcome and Safety of Multilevel Vertebroplasty: Clinical Experience and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mailli, Leto Filippiadis, Dimitrios K.; Brountzos, Elias N.; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kelekis, Alexios

    2013-02-15

    To compare safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) when treating up to three vertebrae or more than three vertebrae per session. We prospectively compared two groups of patients with symptomatic vertebral fractures who had no significant response to conservative therapy. Pathologic substrate included osteoporosis (n = 77), metastasis (n = 24), multiple myeloma (n = 13), hemangioma (n = 15), and lymphoma (n = 1). Group A patients (n = 94) underwent PVP of up to three treated vertebrae (n = 188). Group B patients (n = 36) underwent PVP with more than three treated vertebrae per session (n = 220). Decreased pain and improved mobility were recorded the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery per clinical evaluation and the use of numeric visual scales (NVS): the Greek Brief Pain Inventory, a linear analogue self-assessment questionnaire, and a World Health Organization questionnaire. Group A presented with a mean pain score of 7.9 {+-} 1.1 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.1 {+-} 1.6, 2.0 {+-} 1.5 and 2.0 {+-} 1.5 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Group B presented with a mean pain score of 8.1 {+-} 1.3 NVS units before PVP, which decreased to 2.2 {+-} 1.3, 2.0 {+-} 1.5, and 2.1 {+-} 1.6 NVS units the day after surgery and at 12 and 24 months after surgery, respectively. Overall pain decrease and mobility improvement throughout the follow-up period presented no statistical significance neither between the two groups nor between different underlying aetiology. Reported cement leakages presented no statistical significance between the two groups (p = 0.365). PVP is an efficient and safe technique for symptomatic vertebral fractures independently of the vertebrae number treated per session.

  20. The role of technological progress vs. accidental discoveries and clinical experience in the evolution of dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of dialysotherapy celebrated by nephrologists around the world in 2012 provided an opportunity for discussion on the role of clinical experience in relation to technological progress in the evolution of dialysis, especially of recently observed inadequate decrease in mortality/morbidity rates of patients on chronic dialysis. My report, based on almost 50 years of career in nephrology, refers the evolution of dialysis, from catharsis to modern dialysotherapy with special attention devoted to nowadays gravely underestimated role of clinical experience and personalized professional care for patients. PMID:24226207

  1. Asian Americans and Cancer Clinical Trials: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Understanding Awareness and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Paterniti, Debora A.; Chen, Moon S.; Chiechi, Christine; Beckett, Laurel A.; Horan, Nora; Turrell, Corinne; Smith, Ligaya; Morain, Claudia; Montell, Lisa; Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Davis, Sharon; Lara, Primo N.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials have been based on low accrual rates. Barriers to recruitment of minority populations affect the generalizability and impact of trial findings for those populations. The authors undertook a mixed-methods approach to understanding levels of awareness and experiences with cancer clinical trials. A survey was administered to new cancer patients and their caretakers (family, close friends, or other social support) at outpatient oncology clinics. Field observations of the trial accrual process also were conducted by employing the grounded theory approach in qualitative methods. Comparison of survey results for Asian-American respondents and non-Asian respondents indicated that Asians were less likely to have heard the term clinical trial and were more likely to define a clinical trial as an experiment or a test procedure in a clinic than non-Asians. Asians were more likely to have employer-based insurance and to report understanding issues related to cost reimbursement. Asians were less likely to have been involved in or to know someone in a trial and reported less willingness than white respondents to consider trial participation. Qualitative observations suggested that Asians who presented for a potential trial were interested in the availability of a novel cancer therapy but were not eligible for available trials. Multiple strategies will be necessary to enhance awareness of and experience with accrual to cancer clinical trials for Asians, including richer understanding and increased involvement of Asians in cancer clinical trials and greater attention to the location and diversity of the Asian population in structuring study centers and evaluating trial results. PMID:16247795

  2. Women’s Management of Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis and Experiences of Clinical Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Jade; Walker, Sandra; McNair, Ruth; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher; Chen, Marcus; Bradshaw, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Background Few data are available on how women manage recurring bacterial vaginosis (BV) and their experiences of the clinical care of this condition. This study aimed to explore women’s recurrent BV management approaches and clinical care experiences, with a view to informing and improving the clinical management of BV. Methods A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty-five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past 5 years took part in semi-structured interviews. Results The majority of women reported frustration and dissatisfaction with current treatment regimens and low levels of satisfaction with the clinical management of BV. Overall, women disliked taking antibiotics regularly, commonly experienced adverse side effects from treatment and felt frustrated at having symptoms recur quite quickly after treatment. Issues in clinical care included inconsistency in advice, misdiagnosis and inappropriate diagnostic approaches and insensitive or dismissive attitudes. Women were more inclined to report positive clinical experiences with sexual health physicians than primary care providers. Women’s frustrations led most to try their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications in an attempt to treat symptoms and prevent recurrences, including well-known risk practices such as douching. Conclusion In the face of considerable uncertainty about the cause of BV, high rates of recurrence, unacceptable treatment options and often insensitive and inconsistent clinical management, women are trying their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications to prevent recurrences, often with little effect. Clinical management of BV could be improved through the use of standardised diagnostic approaches, increased sensitivity and understanding of the impact of BV, and the provision of evidence based advice about known BV related risk factors. PMID:27010725

  3. Appraisals and Responses to Experimental Symptom Analogues in Clinical and Nonclinical Individuals With Psychotic Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Thomas A.; Gaynor, Keith J.; Hunter, Mike D.; Woodruff, Peter W. R.; Garety, Philippa A.; Peters, Emmanuelle R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive models of psychosis suggest that anomalous experiences alone do not always lead to clinical psychosis, with appraisals and responses to experiences being central to understanding the transition to “need for care”. Methods: The appraisals and response styles of Clinical (C; n = 28) and Nonclinical (NC; n = 34) individuals with psychotic experiences were compared following experimental analogues of thought interference (Cards Task) and auditory hallucinations (Virtual Acoustic Space Paradigm). Results: The groups were matched in terms of their psychotic experiences. As predicted, the C group scored higher than the NC group on maladaptive appraisals following both tasks, rated the experience as more personally significant, and was more likely to incorporate the experimental setup into their ongoing experiences. The C group also appraised the Cards Task as more salient, distressing, and threatening; this group scored higher on maladaptive—and lower on adaptive—response styles, than the NC group on both tasks. Conclusions: The findings are consistent with cognitive models of psychosis, with maladaptive appraisals and response styles characterizing the C group only. Clinical applications of both tasks are suggested to facilitate the identification and modification of maladaptive appraisals. PMID:23858493

  4. An Exploration of Dental Students' Assumptions About Community-Based Clinical Experiences.

    PubMed

    Major, Nicole; McQuistan, Michelle R

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain which assumptions dental students recalled feeling prior to beginning community-based clinical experiences and whether those assumptions were fulfilled or challenged. All fourth-year students at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics participate in community-based clinical experiences. At the completion of their rotations, they write a guided reflection paper detailing the assumptions they had prior to beginning their rotations and assessing the accuracy of their assumptions. For this qualitative descriptive study, the 218 papers from three classes (2011-13) were analyzed for common themes. The results showed that the students had a variety of assumptions about their rotations. They were apprehensive about working with challenging patients, performing procedures for which they had minimal experience, and working too slowly. In contrast, they looked forward to improving their clinical and patient management skills and knowledge. Other assumptions involved the site (e.g., the equipment/facility would be outdated; protocols/procedures would be similar to the dental school's). Upon reflection, students reported experiences that both fulfilled and challenged their assumptions. Some continued to feel apprehensive about treating certain patient populations, while others found it easier than anticipated. Students were able to treat multiple patients per day, which led to increased speed and patient management skills. However, some reported challenges with time management. Similarly, students were surprised to discover some clinics were new/updated although some had limited instruments and materials. Based on this study's findings about students' recalled assumptions and reflective experiences, educators should consider assessing and addressing their students' assumptions prior to beginning community-based dental education experiences. PMID:26933101

  5. Clinical experiences in using cognitive-behavior therapy to treat panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Abraham W; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of research to support the use of psychological treatments for specific disorders, there has been no way for practitioners to provide feedback to researchers on the barriers they encounter in implementing these treatments in their day-to-day clinical work. In order to provide practitioners a means to give researchers information about their clinical experience, the Society of Clinical Psychology and the Division of Psychotherapy of the American Psychological Association collaborated on an initiative to build a two-way bridge between practice and research. A questionnaire was developed on the therapist, patient, and contextual variables that undermine the effective use of CBT in reducing the symptoms of panic disorder, a clinical problem that occurs frequently in clinical practice and has an extensive research base. An Internet-based survey was advertised internationally in listservs and professional newsletters, asking clinicians to indicate all aspects of CBT that they used in treating panic disorder, and to respond to a series of questions with variables that presumably limited successful symptom reduction in clinical work using CBT to treat panic disorder. The final database included responses from 338 participants who varied in experience in applying CBT to the treatment of panic disorders. Participants identified a wide range of patient factors that were barriers to symptom reduction, including symptoms related to panic, motivation, social system, and the psychotherapy relationship, in addition to specific problems with implementing CBT for the treatment of panic disorder. PMID:24411112

  6. Clinical placements in Australian general practice: (Part 1) the experiences of pre-registration nursing students.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An international shift towards strengthening primary care services has stimulated the growth of nursing in general (family) practice. As learning in the clinical setting comprises a core component of pre-registration nursing education, it is logical that clinical placement opportunities would follow the workforce growth in this setting. Beyond simply offering placements in relevant clinical areas, it is vital to ensure high quality learning experiences that meet the educational needs of pre-registration nurses. Part 1 of a two part series reports on the qualitative study of a mixed methods project. Fifteen pre-registration nursing students participated in semi-structured interviews following a clinical placement in an Australian general practice. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and underwent a process of thematic analysis. Findings are presented in the following four themes; (1) Knowledge of the practice nurse role: I had very limited understanding, (2) Quality of the learning experience: It was a fantastic placement, (3) Support, belonging and mutual respect: I really felt part of the team, (4) Employment prospects: I would really, really love to go to a general practice but …… General practice placements exposed students to a diverse range of clinical skills which would equip them for future employment in primary care. Exposure to nursing in general practice also stimulated students to consider a future career in this clinical setting. PMID:25979152

  7. The Use of Student Time Task Measures in Pre Student Teaching Clinical Experiences: A Panel Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waimon, Morton D.; And Others

    Illinois State University's teacher education program's professional sequence is organized around separate teaching skills, each of which relates to student outcomes in classrooms. Initially, a group of University High (U-High) Laboratory School supervisors was formed to develop clinical experiences which would enable prospective teachers to

  8. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both

  9. Why Clinical Experience and Mentoring Are Replacing Student Teaching on the Best Campuses. A White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, James W.; Watson, Audra M.

    2014-01-01

    Woodrow Wilson Senior Fellow James W. Fraser and Audra Watson, the Foundation's Director of Mentoring and Induction Strategy, take a look at emerging trends in clinical preparation for new teachers. This new white paper is based on experience with the Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowships, and includes observations from some of the colleges and…

  10. The Use of Student Time Task Measures in Pre Student Teaching Clinical Experiences: A Panel Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waimon, Morton D.; And Others

    Illinois State University's teacher education program's professional sequence is organized around separate teaching skills, each of which relates to student outcomes in classrooms. Initially, a group of University High (U-High) Laboratory School supervisors was formed to develop clinical experiences which would enable prospective teachers to…

  11. The Experience of a Department of Medicine with a Clinical Medical Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Naomi; Kaye, Donald

    1985-01-01

    Five years of experience using the services of a clinical medical librarian at the Hospital of the Medical College of Pennsylvania are reviewed. There were increases in the use of the librarian for patient-related queries, research, and oral presentations. (Author/MLW)

  12. Preservice Teachers' Reflection on Clinical Experiences: A Comparison of Blog and Final Paper Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Darci J.; Wondra, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the depth of reflection in the writing of preservice teachers who completed end-of-the-semester reflective papers or reflective blogs for undergraduate education courses associated with clinical experiences. Coders rated the depth of reflection as one of four categories: non-reflection, understanding, reflection, or critical…

  13. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops

  14. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  15. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  16. A Tool To Evaluate How to Learn from Experience in Clinical Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Louise; Villeneuve, Jean; Chevrier, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation tool for the process of learning from experience in a clinical practicum at baccalaureate nursing level was developed and validated. This reflective type of process evaluation helps students link theory to practice and think critically. (Contains 50 references.) (JOW)

  17. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and

  18. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and…

  19. Constructing a nursing identity within the clinical environment: The student nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sandra; Dwyer, Trudy; Broadbent, Marc; Moxham, Lorna; Sander, Teresa; Edwards, Kristin

    2014-11-28

    Abstract Background: Nursing identity is an important element of being a nurse. Student nurses begin the construction of their nursing identity during their clinical placements. Aim: The aim of this research was to examine how the student nurses of a regional Australian university construct their identity when on off-campus clinical placement. Methods/Design: Using a constructivist approach an online survey was used to elicit data in response to the question 'What elements are needed during the work integrated learning experience to enable undergraduate nursing students to construct their nursing identity?' Results/Findings: Findings reveal five key elements to the construction of students' nursing identity; positive role models, belonging, peer support, critical thinking abilities and confidence. Conclusion: Such findings are important as they provide information for student nurses, preceptors and educators in guiding clinical placement experiences that are able to facilitate the development of the nursing identity. PMID:25429770

  20. Comprehensive ExperimentClinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a standard clinical biochemistry exercise. The students are not only exposed to techniques and equipment but are also inspired to think more about the biochemical mechanisms of diseases. When linked with lecture topics about the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, the students obtain a better understanding of the relevance of abnormal metabolism in relation to diseases. Such understanding provides a solid foundation for the medical students' future research and for other clinical applications. PMID:25521692

  1. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor control probability based on Poisson statistics model, and normal tissue complication probabilities based on Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, were efficient to estimate the radiobiological outcomes of the treatments by taking into account of the dose-volume effects in the organs. Furthermore, a novel technique of spatial DVH analysis was also found to be useful to determine the primary cause of the complications in the critical organs in the treatments. The study also showed that the 3DCRT and IMRT techniques offer the promising results in the XRT treatment of the left-breast and the prostate cancer patients respectively. Unfortunately, several organs such as salivary glands and larynx, and esophagus, were found to be significantly vulnerable to the radiation toxicity in the treatment of the head and neck (HN), and left-lung cancer patients respectively. The radiobiological outcomes were also found to be consistent with the clinical results of the IMRT based treatments of a significant number of the HN cancer patients.

  2. [Zhu Lian's characteristics and experiences in clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wei, Li fu; Pan, Xiaoria; Liu, Bing; Yue, Jin; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing the clinical characteristics and experiences of ZHU Lian, the renowned contemporary acupuncture master from the following three aspects: "characteristics of clinical manipulations and techniques", "thoughts on diagnosis and treatment" and "examples of clinical cases". The study has shown that ZHU Lian invented the slow insertion technique by rotating needle and the embedding needle technique, improved moxibustion technique with moxa roll and proposed the three keys on the treatment with acupuncture and moxibustion, as well as discovered new acupoints for treatment. The pioneering and distinguished achievements she con tributed play the great demonstrating and driving role in the development of clinical study and practice of acupuncture and moxibustion. PMID:25906582

  3. [Personal experiences with induced abortions in private clinics in Northeast Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Paloma; McCallum, Cecilia; Menezes, Greice

    2016-01-01

    Based on a qualitative study conducted in 2012, the article analyzes middle-class individuals' experiences with induced abortions performed in private clinics. Thirty-four stories of induced abortions were narrated by 19 women and five men living in two state capitals in Northeast Brazil. Thematic analysis revealed differences in types of clinics and care provided by the physicians. The article shows that abortion in private clinics fails to guarantee safe or humane care. The narratives furnish descriptions of diverse situations and practices, ranging from flaws such as lack of information on medicines to others involving severe abuses like procedures performed without anesthesia. The article concludes that criminalization of abortion in Brazil allows clinics to operate with no state regulation; it does not prevent women from having abortions, but exposes them to total vulnerability and violation of human rights. PMID:26958817

  4. The effect of clinical experience on cue trading for the /r-w/ contrast.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Virginia; Martin, David; Borton, Thomas; Youngblood, Heather Conner

    2003-05-01

    Although the ability of clinicians to perceptually process speech sound productions is a key ingredient in the evaluation and remediation of articulatory disorders, very little attention has been given to this important skill. This study explored the potential of a perceptual task, known as cue trading, to assess perceptual skill among students with varying clinical experience. A cue-trading paradigm for the /r-w/ contrast was used in which a temporal-spectral cue on F2 was balanced against a spectral cue on F3. Results indicated a trading relationship for all students. However, students without clinical experience demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the acoustic cues for /w/ and identification functions that were less clearly separated compared to students with clinical experience. Furthermore, the magnitude of the difference between functions (the trading relationship) was significantly smaller for students without practicum experience: They showed weaker phonetic percepts for /r/ and /w/ than did the students with practicum experience. Preliminary results suggest that a task based on cue trading could be useful in assessing perceptual sensitivity to the acoustic cues representative of misarticulated /r/. PMID:12828535

  5. Detailed characterization of the 1087 MeV/nucleon iron-56 beam used for radiobiology at the alternating gradient synchrotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.

    1998-01-01

    We report beam characterization and dosimetric measurements made using a 56Fe beam extracted from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a kinetic energy of 1087 MeV/nucleon. The measurements reveal that the depth-dose distribution of this beam differs significantly from that obtained with a 600 MeV/nucleon iron beam used in several earlier radiobiology experiments at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's BEVALAC. We present detailed measurements of beam parameters relevant for radiobiology, including track- and dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET), fragment composition and LET spectra measured behind sample holders used in irradiations of biological samples. We also report measurements of fluence behind three depths (1.94, 4.68 and 9.35 g cm(-2)) of polyethylene targets with the 1087 MeV/nucleon beam, and behind 1.94 g cm(-2) of polyethylene with a 610 MeV/nucleon beam delivered by the AGS. These results are compared to earlier measurements with the 600 MeV/nucleon beam at the BEVALAC.

  6. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    PubMed Central

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching. PMID:26109975

  7. QIN. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Doot, Robert K.; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E.; Allberg, Keith C.; Linden, Hannah M.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging is a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  8. A web application for recording and analyzing the clinical experiences of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Linda; Sedlmeyer, Robert; Carlson, Cathy; Modlin, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A primary focus in nursing education is to provide students with a diverse range of clinical experiences. Historically, the collection and assessment of data from students' clinical experiences have been paper-and-pencil tasks that are arduous for both students and nursing faculty. The volume of collected information also has made it difficult to produce ad hoc statistical reports without additional intensive manual labor. To facilitate recording and analysis of these data, the Nursing and Computer Science Departments at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne have collaborated to create a Web application: Essential Clinical Behaviors. The use of the Web-accessible database represents a major change in nursing education by alteration of format used by students to record their clinical experiences in nursing courses. The application was designed to enhance nursing students' learning and to assist faculty in making student assignments, evaluating student progress, and supporting curriculum decisions. This report discusses the rationale for the development of the Web application, a description of its data entry and reporting mechanisms, an overview of the system architecture, its use in the nursing curriculum, and planned enhancements. PMID:12869872

  9. Perceived Experience of Fatigue in Clinical and General Population: Descriptors and Associated Reactivities.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Mrquez, Sandra; Senn-Caldern, Cristina; Rodrguez-Testal, Juan F; Carrasco, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is the analysis of different descriptors and reactions related to the experience of fatigue. Two groups were compared: a clinical sample (n = 92, 31 males, mean age = 38.87) and a non-clinical (n = 225, 135 males, mean age = 32.45) sample. The total sample was composed of 317 participants (52% males), ranging in age from 18 to 76 years. Findings show the experience of fatigue was mainly related to somatic terms (76% of the total sample). Specific results were found only for the clinical group: (a) significant relationships between fatigue and anxiety, ?2(1) = 34.71, p < .01; tension, ?2(1) = 16.80, p < .01; and sadness, ?2(1) = 24.59, p < .01; (b) higher intensity of fatigue (F = 84.15, p = .001), and predominance of the cognitive components of fatigue. Results showed that fatigue in subjects with a clinical disorder (versus those without) was associated both, to negative emotional states, and to a higher intensity of fatigue, especially in its cognitive elements. Important clinical implications for its assessment and intervention are discussed. PMID:26055395

  10. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  11. The association between demographic factors, user reported experiences and user satisfaction: results from three casualty clinics in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background User reported experiences and satisfaction are increasingly used as basis for quality indicators in the health sector. However, there is limited understanding of factors associated with user reported experiences and satisfaction with casualty clinics. Methods A random sample of 542 patients that had contacted any of three casualty clinics from mid April to mid May 2008 was mailed a questionnaire. A reminder was sent to non-respondents after six weeks. Descriptive statistics for four user reported experiences scales and 20 single items are presented. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess associations between background variables and user reported experiences, and between user reported experiences and user satisfaction. Results 225 (41.5%) patients, carers and guardians returned a completed questionnaire. Users reported most positive experiences with the doctor services and the nursing services at the casualty clinics; on a scale from 0 to 100, where 100 is the best possible experience the doctor scale was 82 and the nursing scale 81. Users reported least positive experiences with the organization of the casualty clinic, with a scale score of 65. Self perceived health was associated with user satisfaction, while self perceived health and age were associated with user reported experiences with organization of the clinics. A range of user reported experience domains were related to user satisfaction, after controlling for socio-demographic variables, including experiences with doctor services at the clinics, organization of the clinics, information and self perceived incorrect treatment. Conclusions Users report positive experiences with the three casualty clinics, with organization as the aspect with largest improvement potential. The importance of age and health status for users' experiences and satisfaction with casualty clinics was shown, but a range of user reported experiences with the clinics were the most important predictors for user satisfaction. PMID:20925930

  12. A comparative analysis of radiobiological models for cell surviving fractions at high doses.

    PubMed

    Andisheh, B; Edgren, M; Belki?, D; Mavroidis, P; Brahme, A; Lind, B K

    2013-04-01

    For many years the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been widely used to describe the effects of total dose and dose per fraction at low-to-intermediate doses in conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Recent advances in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have increased the interest in finding a reliable cell survival model, which will be accurate at high doses, as well. Different models have been proposed for improving descriptions of high dose survival responses, such as the Universal Survival Curve (USC), the Kavanagh-Newman (KN) and several generalizations of the LQ model, e.g. the Linear-Quadratic-Linear (LQL) model and the Pade Linear Quadratic (PLQ) model. The purpose of the present study is to compare a number of models in order to find the best option(s) which could successfully be used as a fractionation correction method in SRT. In this work, six independent experimental data sets were used: CHOAA8 (Chinese hamster fibroblast), H460 (non-small cell lung cancer, NSLC), NCI-H841 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), CP3 and DU145 (human prostate carcinoma cell lines) and U1690 (SCLC). By detailed comparisons with these measurements, the performance of nine different radiobiological models was examined for the entire dose range, including high doses beyond the shoulder of the survival curves. Using the computed and measured cell surviving fractions, comparison of the goodness-of-fit for all the models was performed by means of the reduced ? (2)-test with a 95% confidence interval. The obtained results indicate that models with dose-independent final slopes and extrapolation numbers generally represent better choices for SRT. This is especially important at high doses where the final slope and extrapolation numbers are presently found to play a major role. The PLQ, USC and LQL models have the least number of shortcomings at all doses. The extrapolation numbers and final slopes of these models do not depend on dose. Their asymptotes for the cell surviving fractions are exponentials at low as well as high doses, and this is in agreement with the behaviour of the corresponding experimental data. This is an important improvement over the LQ model which predicts a Gaussian at high doses. Overall and for the highlighted reasons, it was concluded that the PLQ, USC and LQL models are theoretically well-founded. They could prove useful compared to the other proposed radiobiological models in clinical applications for obtaining uniformly accurate cell surviving fractions encountered in stereotactic high-dose radiotherapy as well as at medium and low doses. PMID:23098282

  13. Worklists, preloading and archiving strategies; 3 years of clinical experience in the Barcelona PACS.

    PubMed

    Piqueras, J; Carreo, J C; Ovelleiro, M; Lucaya, J; Enriquez, G; Creixell, S

    1994-01-01

    We present data on 3 years of clinical experience using PACS involving developments on worklists, preloading and archiving strategies in a teaching paediatric hospital with all modalities connected to a commercial PACS. A method allowing generation of and handling of different worklists for computed radiography examinations has been developed in our centre. Worklists and archiving strategies are presented and discussed. We conclude that, with adequate worklists and efficient preloading implementation, current PACS could be used successfully in several clinical settings of a multimodality department. PMID:7799687

  14. Experimenting Clinical Pathways in General Practice: a Focus Group Investigation with Italian General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Lucia; Cattaneo, Cesarina; Peduzzi, Paolo; Lopiccoli, Silvia; Auxilia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB), Italy, to develop general practitioners (GPs) care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients and professionals satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs) held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results Four major themes emerged: i) clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii) they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs role; iii) nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv) the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs adherence and commitment. Acknowledgments the Authors thank Dr. AP. Cant and Dr D. Cereda who participated in the two focus groups as observers. PMID:25181354

  15. The Safe use of Radioactive Isotopes in Teaching Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawcroft, D. M.; Stewart, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    This article briefly discusses some of the dangers involved in the use of radioisotopes and includes a comprehensive list of precautions and laboratory rules for use during radiobiology experiments. (Author)

  16. Systematic reviews of animal experiments demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive Scopus biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. In 20 reviews in which clinical utility was examined, the authors concluded that animal models were either significantly useful in contributing to the development of clinical interventions, or were substantially consistent with clinical outcomes, in only two cases, one of which was contentious. These included reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments--those involving the species considered most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes, such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments, which was evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which the majority of animal experiments were of good methodological quality. Whilst the effects of some of these problems might be minimised with concerted effort (given their widespread prevalence), the limitations resulting from interspecies differences are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Non-animal models are generally required to pass formal scientific validation prior to their regulatory acceptance. In contrast, animal models are simply assumed to be predictive of human outcomes. These results demonstrate the invalidity of such assumptions. The consistent application of formal validation studies to all test models is clearly warranted, regardless of their animal, non-animal, historical, contemporary or possible future status. Likely benefits would include, the greater selection of models truly predictive of human outcomes, increased safety of people exposed to chemicals that have passed toxicity tests, increased efficiency during the development of human pharmaceuticals and other therapeutic interventions, and decreased wastage of animal, personnel and financial resources. The poor human clinical and toxicological utility of most animal models for which data exists, in conjunction with their generally substantial animal welfare and economic costs, justify a ban on animal models lacking scientific data clearly establishing their human predictivity or utility. PMID:18186670

  17. The first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma compared with topical hydroquinone: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Adalatkhah, Hassan; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of melasma is unsatisfactory most of the times. Hormonal role is shown to exist in pathogenesis of the melasma, and sex-hormone related drugs may have an effect on melasma. Aim To investigate efficacy of 1% flutamide cream versus 4% hydroquinone cream on melasma. Methods In a parallel randomized clinical trial, 74 women with melasma were allocated to receive a sunscreen along with 4% hydroquinone cream or 1% flutamide cream. Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI), mexameter melanin assay, and patient satisfaction were investigated. Results Mean age of the participants was 33.8 years. Mean length of time suffering from Melasma was 96.3 months. The subjects reported in average 1.1 hours per day of exposure to sunlight. Mean standardized total patient satisfaction score was 28.8 (standard deviation [SD] 17.2) in flutamide group patients versus 18 (SD 15.5) in control group (P<0.01). Regardless of treatment group, the skin darkness assessed upon MASI scales was reduced over the treatment course (P<0.001). Using mixed effects, longitudinal modeling showed better treatment efficacy based on MASI scale for flutamide group compared to the hydroquinone group (P<0.05). However, longitudinal analysis of mexameter scores did not reveal any significant difference in melanin measurements between flutamide and hydroquinone. Conclusion Topical flutamide appeared as effective as topical hydroquinone in treating melasma using mexameter assessment but with a better MASI improvement trend and higher patient satisfaction in flutamide treatment versus topical hydroquinone. As the present study is possibly the first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma, it would be quite unreasonable to recommend clinical use of it before future studies replicate the results on its efficacy and safety. PMID:26345129

  18. An Eight-Year Clinic Experience with Clozapine Use in a Parkinsons Disease Clinic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Nawaz; Fayad, Sarah M.; Monari, Erin H.; Akbar, Umer; Hardwick, Angela; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Malaty, Irene A.; Romrell, Janet; Shukla, Aparna A. Wagle.; McFarland, Nikolaus; Ward, Herbert E.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine our eight year clinic-based experience in a Parkinsons disease expert clinical care center using clozapine as a treatment for refractory psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods The study was a retrospective chart review which covered eight years of clozapine registry use. Statistical T-tests, chi-square, correlations and regression analysis were used to analyze treatment response for potential associations of age, disease duration, and Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) score, and degree of response to clozapine therapy. Results There were 36 participants included in the analysis (32 PD, 4 parkinsonism-plus). The characteristics included 30.6% female, age 4587 years (mean 68.310.15), disease duration of 17240 months (mean 108.1451.13) and H&Y score of 2 to 4 (mean 2.510.51). The overall retention rate on clozapine was 41% and the most common reasons for discontinuation were frequent blood testing (28%), nursing home (NH) placement (11%) and leucopenia (8%). Responses to clozapine across the cohort were: complete (33%), partial (33%), absent (16%), and unknown (16%). Age (r?=??0.36, p<0.01) and H&Y score (r?=??0.41, p<0.01) were shown to be related to response to clozapine therapy, but disease duration was not an associated factor (r?=?0.21, p>0.05). Conclusions This single-center experience highlights the challenges associated with clozapine therapy in PD psychosis. Frequent blood testing remains a significant barrier for clozapine, even in patients with therapeutic benefit. Surprisingly, all patients admitted to a NH discontinued clozapine due to logistical issues of administration and monitoring within that setting. Consideration of the barriers to clozapine therapy will be important to its use and to its continued success in an outpatient setting. PMID:24646688

  19. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sook; Kim, Wonwoo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eunjin; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Lawrence Chinsoo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS. PMID:26756026

  20. Emulating cognitive diagnostic skills without clinical experience: a report of medical students using Quick Medical Reference and Iliad in the diagnosis of difficult clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Gozum, M E

    1994-01-01

    Diagnosing complex internal medicine cases has traditionally been the domain and hallmark of clinical expertise. However, the creation of a differential diagnosis list using abstracted case information can be seen as a database query function and has been emulated by software such as QMR and Iliad. To test this premise, twenty two sophomore medical students were taught how to abstract clinical data, and use QMR and Iliad to diagnose complex clinical cases from the New England Journal of Medicine. Half of the students were able to provide correct diagnoses within a list of ten. These preliminary results supports a notion that clinical diagnosis may be a skill independent of clinical experience. PMID:7950096

  1. Clinical experiences with molecular targeted therapy in lung cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, a dramatic shift has been witnessed in cancer therapy in China. Although traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy still remains the treatment of choice for many malignancies, targeted therapies are now a component of treatment for many types of cancer, including lung cancer. As molecular target agents are widely used in clinical practice and relevant studies have been conducted, we have accumulated valuable experience in the treatment strategy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. On this basis we have successfully developed our Class-I new drug through independent research, which significantly accelerates the clinical development of targeted therapy for lung cancer. This article summarizes the clinical practice and relevant studies of current targeted therapies for lung cancer in China. PMID:26273390

  2. Clinical Experience in Late Antiquity: Alexander of Tralles and the Therapy of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouras-vallianatos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Alexander of Tralles, writing in the late sixth century, combined his wide-ranging practical knowledge with earlier medical theories. This article shows how clinical experience is used in Alexander’s works by concentrating on his therapeutic advice on epilepsy and, in particular, on pharmacology and the group of so-called natural remedies. I argue that clinical testing is used not only for the introduction of new medicines but also as an instrument for checking the therapeutic effect of popular healing practices. On another level, this article discusses Alexander’s role as the author of a medical compendium; it suggests that by marking the cases of clinical testing with a set of recurrent expressions, Alexander leads his audience to reflect on his medical authority and personal contribution. PMID:25045178

  3. Experience with hyperphenylalaninemia in a developing country: unusual clinical manifestations and a novel gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Karam, Pascale E; Daher, Rose T; Moller, Lisbeth B; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2011-02-01

    We report our experience in a cohort of patients with hyperphenylalaninemia in a tertiary care referral center in Lebanon. Forty-one sequential patients were studied: 34 classical phenylketonuria (PKU), 3 hyperphenylalaninemia (non-PKU), and 4 biopterin metabolism defects. The majority of cases were clinically diagnosed at variable ages with variable neurological outcomes. Only 29.3% were detected by neonatal screening. Two unusual cases were observed in the context of inadequate treatment in 1 and delayed therapy in the other: a newborn with PKU developed severe keratomalacia; and a 5-year-old girl with dihydropteridine reductase deficiency due to a novel mutation identified in the quinoid dihydropteridine reductase gene developed Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and white matter changes with periventricular cysts. Part of our experience parallels that in the West. However, the clinical manifestations observed in our patients emphasize the importance of a national newborn screening program with efficient management of diagnosed cases. PMID:20823030

  4. Enhancing Prostate Cancer Care Through the Multidisciplinary Clinic Approach: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gomella, Leonard G.; Lin, Jianqing; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Dugan, Patricia; Guiles, Fran; Lallas, Costas D.; Singh, Jaspreet; McCue, Peter; Showalter, Timothy; Valicenti, Richard K.; Dicker, Adam; Trabulsi, Edouard J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the 15-year prostate cancer experience of our multidisciplinary genitourinary cancer clinic established in 1996 at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) –designated Jefferson Kimmel Cancer Center. Patients with genitourinary cancers were evaluated weekly by multiple specialists at a single site, and we focus on the 83% of patients with prostate cancer. To our knowledge, our multidisciplinary genitourinary cancer clinic is the longest continuously operating center of its kind at an NCI Cancer Center in the United States. Methods: Data from Jefferson's Oncology Data Services were compared to SEER prostate cancer outcomes. Data on treatment changes in localized disease, patient satisfaction, and related parameters were also assessed. Results: Ten-year survival data approach 100% in stage I and II prostate cancer. Ten-year data for stage III (T3 N0M0) and stage IV (T4 N0M0) disease show that our institutional survival rate exceeds SEER. There is a shift toward robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and a slight decrease in brachytherapy relative to external beam radiation therapy in localized disease. Patient satisfaction is high as measured by survey instruments. Conclusion: Our long-term experience suggests a benefit of the multidisciplinary clinic approach to prostate cancer, most pronounced for high-risk, locally advanced disease. A high level of satisfaction with this patient-centered model is seen. The multidisciplinary clinic approach to prostate cancer may enhance outcomes and possibly reduce treatment regret through a coordinated presentation of all therapeutic options. This clinic model serves as an interdisciplinary educational tool for patients, their families, and our trainees and supports clinical trial participation. PMID:21358951

  5. Monte Carlo application based on GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a laser-plasma electron beam line for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, D.; Russo, G.; Casarino, C.; Gagliano, L.; Candiano, G. C.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Fulgentini, L.; Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Palla, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a Monte Carlo application, based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the characterization and optimization of electron beams for clinical applications produced by a laser-driven plasma source. The GEANT4 application is conceived so as to represent in the most general way the physical and geometrical features of a typical laser-driven accelerator. It is designed to provide standard dosimetric figures such as percentage dose depth curves, two-dimensional dose distributions and 3D dose profiles at different positions both inside and outside the interaction chamber. The application was validated by comparing its predictions to experimental measurements carried out on a real laser-driven accelerator. The work is aimed at optimizing the source, by using this novel application, for radiobiological studies and, in perspective, for medical applications.

  6. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) with 124I PET for 131I therapy of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Atkins, Francis B.; Van Nostrand, Douglas; Ladenson, Paul W.; Wahl, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer was the first and remains among the most successful radiopharmaceutical (RPT) treatments of cancer although its clinical use is based on imprecise dosimetry. The positron emitting radioiodine, 124I, in combination with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has made it possible to measure the spatial distribution of radioiodine in tumors and normal organs at high resolution and sensitivity. The CT component of PET/CT has made it simpler to match the activity distribution to the corresponding anatomy. These developments have facilitated patient-specific dosimetry (PSD), utilizing software packages such as three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD), which can account for individual patient differences in pharmacokinetics and anatomy. We highlight specific examples of such calculations and discuss the potential impact of 124I PET/CT on thyroid cancer therapy. PMID:21484384

  7. Animal experiments scrutinised: systematic reviews demonstrate poor human clinical and toxicological utility.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The assumption that animal models are reasonably predictive of human outcomes provides the basis for their widespread use in toxicity testing and in biomedical research aimed at developing cures for human diseases. To investigate the validity of this assumption, the comprehensive "Scopus" biomedical bibliographic databases were searched for published systematic reviews of the human clinical or toxicological utility of animal experiments. Of 20 reviews examining clinical utility, authors concluded that the animal models were substantially consistent with or useful in advancing clinical outcomes in only two cases, and the conclusion in one case was contentious. Included were reviews of the clinical utility of experiments expected by ethics committees to lead to medical advances, of highly-cited experiments published in major journals, and of chimpanzee experiments - the species most likely to be predictive of human outcomes. Seven additional reviews failed to clearly demonstrate utility in predicting human toxicological outcomes such as carcinogenicity and teratogenicity. Consequently, animal data may not generally be assumed to be substantially useful for these purposes. Possible causes include interspecies differences, the distortion of experimental outcomes arising from experimental environments and protocols, and the poor methodological quality of many animal experiments evident in at least 11 reviews. No reviews existed in which a majority of animal experiments were of good quality. While the latter problems might be minimised with concerted effort, given their widespread nature, the interspecies limitations are likely to be technically and theoretically impossible to overcome. Yet, unlike non-animal models, animal models are not normally subjected to formal scientific validation. Instead of simply assuming they are predictive of human outcomes, the consistent application of formal validation studies to all test models is clearly warranted, regardless of their animal, non-animal, historical, contemporary or possible future status. Expected benefits would include greater selection of models truly predictive of human outcomes, increased safety of people exposed to chemicals that have passed toxicity tests, increased efficiency during the development of human pharmaceuticals, and decreased wastage of animal, personnel and financial resources. The poor human clinical and toxicological utility of most animal models for which data exists, in conjunction with their generally substantial animal welfare and economic costs, justify a ban on animal models lacking scientific data clearly establishing their human predictivity or utility. PMID:18288428

  8. Clinical evaluation of music perception, appraisal and experience in cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Ward. R.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Gfeller, Kate; Crosson, Jillian; Driscoll, Virginia D.; Won, Jong Ho; Anderson, Elizabeth S.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objectives were to evaluate the relationships among music perception, appraisal, and experience in cochlear implant users in multiple clinical settings and to examine the viability of two assessments designed for clinical use. Design Background questionnaires (IMBQ) were administered by audiologists in 14 clinics in the United States and Canada. The CAMP included tests of pitch-direction discrimination, and melody and timbre recognition. The IMBQ queried users on prior musical involvement, music listening habits pre and post implant, and music appraisals. Study sample One-hundred forty-five users of Advanced Bionics and Cochlear Ltd cochlear implants. Results Performance on pitch direction discrimination, melody recognition, and timbre recognition tests were consistent with previous studies with smaller cohorts, as well as with more extensive protocols conducted in other centers. Relationships between perceptual accuracy and music enjoyment were weak, suggesting that perception and appraisal are relatively independent for CI users. Conclusions Perceptual abilities as measured by the CAMP had little to no relationship with music appraisals and little relationship with musical experience. The CAMP and IMBQ are feasible for routine clinical use, providing results consistent with previous thorough laboratory-based investigations. PMID:25177899

  9. BLAST model: an innovative approach to prepare second-degree accelerated BSN students for inpatient psychiatric clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Lang, Carol S; Hahn, Joyce A

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the design, development, and implementation of an innovative teaching/learning model involving integration of classroom teaching, clinical simulation, and debriefing/critical thinking to prepare accelerated baccalaureate nursing students for clinical practice experiences in the inpatient psychiatric setting. Lessons learned and future directions for simulation experiences involving standardized patient scenarios in undergraduate psychiatric nursing education are shared. PMID:23394963

  10. A novel platform to simplify human observer performance experiments in clinical reading environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J.; Zanca, F.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Human observer performance experiments (HOPE) are frequently carried out in controlled environments in order to maximize the influence of the performance parameter under study. As an example, the amount of ambient reading variables can be kept as low as possible during HOPE. This is contrasting with the dynamic nature of a clinical reading environment that may therefore be suboptimal for the majority of the experiments. The aim of current work was to extend our previously developed software platform Sara² to cope with the influences of the reading environment on HOPE experiments. Generic modules for ROC, LROC, FROC, MAFC and visual grading analysis/image quality criteria (VGA/IQC) experiments were developed for 2D and 3D input images. Additional modules were included in the platform for finding unexpected interruptions due to clinical emergencies by means of idle time and for mouse trajectory monitoring. Also a generic approach towards the inclusion of reading questionnaires and a RFID enabled secured login system was added. Next, we created a sensor network consisting of off-the-shelf components which continuously monitor ambient reading conditions like: temperature, ambient lighting, humidity, ambient noise levels and observer reading distance. These measured parameters can be synchronized with the reading findings. Finally we included a link to incorporate the use of specialized 3rd party PACS viewers in our software framework. Using the proposed software and hardware solution, we could simplify the setup and the performing of HOPE in clinical reading environments and we can now properly control our reading experiments.

  11. Impact of microgravity on radiobiological processes and efficiency of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Horneck, G

    1999-12-01

    To study the influence of microgravity on radiobiological processes in space, space experiments have been performed, using an on-board 1xg reference centrifuge as in-flight control. The trajectory of individual heavy ions was localized in relation to the biological systems by use of the Biostack concept, or an additional high dose of radiation was applied either before the mission or during the mission from an on-board radiation source. In embryonic systems, such as early developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster and Carausius morosus, the occurrence of chromosomal translocations and larval malformations was dramatically increased in response to microgravity and radiation. It has been hypothesized that these synergistic effects might be caused by an interference of microgravity with DNA repair processes. However, recent studies on bacteria, yeast cells and human fibroblasts suggest that a disturbance of cellular repair processes in the microgravity environment might not be a complete explanation for the reported synergism of radiation and microgravity. As an alternative explanation, an impact of microgravity on signal transduction, on the metabolic/physiological state or on the chromatin structure at the cellular level, or modification of self-assembly, intercellular communication, cell migration, pattern formation or differentiation at the tissue and organ level should be considered. PMID:10631336

  12. Two-dimensional inverse planning and delivery for precision preclinical radiobiological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J. M. P.; Lindsay, P. E.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2014-03-01

    Advances in preclinical radiotherapy systems have provided the technical foundations for delivering highly heterogeneous dose distributions for unique radiobiological experiments, but methods to deliver arbitrary dose distributions are in their infancy. This study developed a method to optimize and automatically deliver planar dose distributions on a recently developed preclinical radiotherapy platform. The method was based on empirically determined dose kernel distributions from radiochromic film measurements. These kernels were used to determine optimal animal stage positions and beam weights to deliver a desired dose distribution at a given depth using a sequential quadratic programming optimization algorithm. The method was validated by end-to-end delivery of two dosimetric challenges designed to quantify targeting and dosimetric accuracy. The results revelead an overall targeting accuracy of 112 ?m and a dosimetric delivery error, calculated along four line profiles in radiochromic film measurements, of 6.8%. Mean absolute delivery error across a linear dose gradient between 0 and 1 Gy over 7.5 mm was 0.03 Gy. These results confirm the optimization framework is an effective platform for delivery of millimetre scale heterogeneous dose distributions with sub-millimetre accuracy.

  13. Amchitka Radiobiological Program progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, L.D.; Sibley, T.H.; Nakatani, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of the Amchitka Radiobiological Program for the period 1970-1979 was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from world-wide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear blasts on Amchitka Island. The objective is achieved, by the collection and radiological analyses of biological and environmental samples and by background radiation measurements. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground sites of the Amchitka nuclear detonations would be suspected if the contamination was significntly greater than would be expected from world fallout. An account of the program from July 1970 to December 1978 has been given in nine previous reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1979. The results of analyses of the samples collected in 1979 lead to the same conclusions as in previous years; i.e., there is no evidence that the radionuclide contamination at Amchitka Island is greater than would be expected from world fallout except for a slight contamination of the Long Shot Mud Pits with tritium.

  14. Application of radiobiological dosimetry to radionuclide directed therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Millar, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The standard linear quadratic model, which has been used to assess the radiobiological damage to tissue by external beam fractionated radiotherapy, has been extended to encompass a general continuous time varying dose rate protocol such as radionuclide therapy. If the radionuclide clearance from the tissue is purely exponential, the effect is readily calculated. Otherwise, the effect can be evaluated by numerical integration if the dose rate time-1 profile is known. It can be shown that if the maximum percentage initial uptake g-1 uptake in normal or tumour tissue is less than 0.046 or 0.23 for an administered activity of 50 mCi of 90Y or 131I respectively, then the radiation-induced damage will certainly be less than for 2 Gy fraction-1 external beam therapy for the same total dose. Preliminary imaging and knowledge of the radionuclide kinetics using a non-therapeutic dose may be used to calculate the predicted radiation damage to tissues for a particular therapeutic dose provided the tracer and therapy doses have identical kinetics. PMID:2383484

  15. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Final report, July 1970-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, T.H.; Tornberg, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program, to collect biological and environmental samples for radiological analyses, began in 1970 and continued through 1979. The principal objective was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from worldwide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground test sites would be suspected if the amount of contamination was significantly greater than could be attributed to worldwide fallout or if an unexpected assemblage of radionuclides was detected. No radionuclides from the underground sites were detected, except for tritium from the Long Shot test (1965) which produced increased tritium concentrations in surface water and freshwater plants near the test site. This final report compiles all previous data into one report and considers the temporal trends in these data. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, /sup 40/K and /sup 7/Be, were the most abundantly occurring radionuclides in most samples; in lichen samples either /sup 137/Cs or /sup 144/Ce had the highest activity. All samples were below applicable Radiation Protection Guides and by 1979 most samples were near or below the statistical detection limits. Increased concentrations of short-lived fallout radionuclides following the Chinese atmospheric tests were found in freshwater and seawater samples and in most indicator organisms.

  16. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  17. Learning experience of Chinese nursing students in an online clinical English course: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anson C Y; Wong, Nick; Wong, Thomas K S

    2015-02-01

    The low English proficiency of Chinese nurse/nursing students affects their performance when they work in English-speaking countries. However, limited resources are available to help them improve their workplace English, i.e. English used in a clinical setting. To this end, it is essential to look for an appropriate and effective means to assist them in improving their clinical English. The objective of this study is to evaluate the learning experience of Chinese nursing students after they have completed an online clinical English course. Focus group interview was used to explore their learning experience. 100 students in nursing programs at Tung Wah College were recruited. The inclusion criteria were: (1) currently enrolled in a nursing program; and (2) having clinical experience. Eligible participants self-registered for the online English course, and were required to complete the course within 3 months. After that, semi-structured interviews were conducted on students whom completed the whole and less than half of the course. One of the researchers joined each of the interviews as a facilitator and an observer. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Finally, 7 themes emerged from the interviews: technical issues, adequacy of support, time requirement, motivation, clarity of course instruction, course design, and relevancy of the course. Participants had varied opinions on the 2 themes: motivation and relevancy of the course. Overall, results of this study suggest that the online English course helped students improve their English. Factors which support their learning are interactive course design, no time constraint, and relevancy to their work/study. Factors which detracted from their learning are poor accessibility, poor technical and learning support and no peer support throughout the course. PMID:25497137

  18. Radiobiologic Parameters and Local Effect Model Predictions for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Exposed to High Linear Energy Transfer Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beuve, Michael Alphonse, Gersende Ph.D.; Maalouf, Mira; Colliaux, Anthony M.S.; Battiston-Montagne, Priscilla; Jalade, Patrice; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Demeyer, Albert; Bajard, Marcel; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To establish the radiobiologic parameters of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) in response to ion irradiation with various linear energy transfer (LET) values and to evaluate the relevance of the local effect model (LEM) in HNSCC. Methods and Materials: Cell survival curves were established in radiosensitive SCC61 and radioresistant SQ20B cell lines irradiated with [33.6 and 184 keV/n] carbon, [302 keV/n] argon, and X-rays. The results of ion experiments were confronted to LEM predictions. Results: The relative biologic efficiency ranged from 1.5 to 4.2 for SCC61 and 2.1 to 2.8 for SQ20B cells. Fixing an arbitrary D{sub 0} parameter, which characterized survival to X-ray at high doses (>10 Gy), gave unsatisfying LEM predictions for both cell lines. For D{sub 0} = 10 Gy, the error on survival fraction at 2 Gy amounted to a factor of 10 for [184 keV/n] carbon in SCC61 cells. We showed that the slope (s{sub max}) of the survival curve at high doses was much more reliable than D{sub 0}. Fitting s{sub max} to 2.5 Gy{sup -1} gave better predictions for both cell lines. Nevertheless, LEM could not predict the responses to fast and slow ions with the same accuracy. Conclusions: The LEM could predict the main trends of these experimental data with correct orders of magnitude while s{sub max} was optimized. Thus the efficiency of carbon ions cannot be simply extracted from the clinical response of a patient to X-rays. LEM should help to optimize planning for hadrontherapy if a set of experimental data is available for high-LET radiations in various types of tumors.

  19. Haemophilia in a real-world setting: the value of clinical experience in data collection.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Gerry; Iorio, Alfonso; Jokela, Vuokko; Juusola, Kristian; Lassila, Riitta

    2016-02-01

    At the 8th Annual Congress of the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) held in Helsinki, Finland, in February 2015, Pfizer sponsored a satellite symposium entitled: 'Haemophilia in a real-world setting: The value of clinical experience in data collection' Co-chaired by Riitta Lassila (Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland) and Gerry Dolan (Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK); the symposium provided an opportunity to explore the practical value of real-world data in informing clinical decision-making. Gerry Dolan provided an introduction to the symposium by describing what is meant by real-world data (RWD), stressing the role RWD can play in optimising patient outcomes in haemophilia and highlighting the responsibility of all stakeholders to collaborate in continuous data collection. Kristian Juusola (Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland) then provided personal experience as a haemophilia nurse around patient views on adherence to treatment regimes, and how collecting insights into real-world use of treatment can shape approaches to improving adherence. The importance of elucidating pharmacokinetic parameters in a real-world setting was then explored by Vuokko Jokela (Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland). Finally, Alfonso Iorio (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) highlighted the importance of quality data collection in translating clinical reality into scientific advances. PMID:26809546

  20. What Factors Facilitate Good Learning Experiences in Clinical Studies in Nursing: Bachelor Students' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Leland, Arne; Dale, Jan Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies constitute 50% of the bachelor program in nursing education in Norway, and the quality of these studies may be decisive for the students' opportunities to learn and develop their professional competences. The aim of this study was to explore what bachelor students' in nursing perceived to be important for having good learning experiences in clinical studies. Data was collected in a focus group interview with eight nursing students who were in the last year of the educational program. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used for exploring and interpreting the content of the interview text. One main theme emerged from the analysis: being in a vulnerable and exposed position characterized by conflicting needs. Four categories were found: aspects related to the clinical setting, aspects related to the nurse supervisor, aspects related to the student, and aspects related to the student-supervisor relationship. The findings revealed that the students' learning experiences and motivation were related to individual, relational, and organizational aspects. The students highlighted their own as well as their supervisors' attitudes and competences and the importance of positive relationships. In addition, feeling welcomed, included, and valued in the ward improved their motivation, self-confidence, and self-respect. PMID:24455300

  1. Vertigo in childhood: proposal for a diagnostic algorithm based upon clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Casani, A P; Dallan, I; Navari, E; Sellari Franceschini, S; Cerchiai, N

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse, after clinical experience with a series of patients with established diagnoses and review of the literature, all relevant anamnestic features in order to build a simple diagnostic algorithm for vertigo in childhood. This study is a retrospective chart review. A series of 37 children underwent complete clinical and instrumental vestibular examination. Only neurological disorders or genetic diseases represented exclusion criteria. All diagnoses were reviewed after applying the most recent diagnostic guidelines. In our experience, the most common aetiology for dizziness is vestibular migraine (38%), followed by acute labyrinthitis/neuritis (16%) and somatoform vertigo (16%). Benign paroxysmal vertigo was diagnosed in 4 patients (11%) and paroxysmal torticollis was diagnosed in a 1-year-old child. In 8% (3 patients) of cases, the dizziness had a post-traumatic origin: 1 canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal and 2 labyrinthine concussions, respectively. Menière's disease was diagnosed in 2 cases. A bilateral vestibular failure of unknown origin caused chronic dizziness in 1 patient. In conclusion, this algorithm could represent a good tool for guiding clinical suspicion to correct diagnostic assessment in dizzy children where no neurological findings are detectable. The algorithm has just a few simple steps, based mainly on two aspects to be investigated early: temporal features of vertigo and presence of hearing impairment. A different algorithm has been proposed for cases in which a traumatic origin is suspected. PMID:26246662

  2. What factors facilitate good learning experiences in clinical studies in nursing: bachelor students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Dale, Bjrg; Leland, Arne; Dale, Jan Gunnar

    2013-12-17

    Clinical studies constitute 50% of the bachelor program in nursing education in Norway, and the quality of these studies may be decisive for the students' opportunities to learn and develop their professional competences. The aim of this study was to explore what bachelor students' in nursing perceived to be important for having good learning experiences in clinical studies. Data was collected in a focus group interview with eight nursing students who were in the last year of the educational program. The interview was transcribed verbatim, and qualitative content analysis was used for exploring and interpreting the content of the interview text. One main theme emerged from the analysis: "being in a vulnerable and exposed position characterized by conflicting needs." Four categories were found: "aspects related to the clinical setting", "aspects related to the nurse supervisor," "aspects related to the student," and "aspects related to the student-supervisor relationship". The findings revealed that the students' learning experiences and motivation were related to individual, relational, and organizational aspects. The students highlighted their own as well as their supervisors' attitudes and competences and the importance of positive relationships. In addition, feeling welcomed, included, and valued in the ward improved their motivation, self-confidence, and self-respect. PMID:24455300

  3. Clinical experience and minority group students. A perspective from Harvard Medical School.

    PubMed

    Poussaint, A F

    1999-05-01

    Medical educators realize that there are no simple predictors for student performance in the clinical training years. College grades and Medical College Admission Test scores may suggest the strength of a student's achievement in the basic sciences but cannot be relied on to predict efficacy in patient care. There is no fool proof way of assessing noncognitive abilities critical to clinical competence. However, in admissions, extracurricular activities, community service, leadership abilities, recommendations, and interviews are examined to assess personal strengths. The author's observations suggest that noncognitive attributes are important in the success of disadvantaged students. Although some, but not all, with low Medical College Admission Test scores may not excel in the basic sciences, once they reach the clinical years, a leveling of the playing field gives them an opportunity to show their special competence with patients. Minority students, perhaps because of their own life experiences, often are alert to the needs and sensitivities of patients. As a group, they are respectful of the dignity of patients. Many embrace the dictum: treat every patient as you would want a family member to be treated. Most minority students, despite pressures of being a minority in predominantly white environments, perform at a very high level in the clinical years and thereafter. PMID:10335283

  4. Implementation Of A Digital Multiple Viewing Station And Early Clinical Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. K.; Mankovich, Nicholas J.; Taira, Ricky K.; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    1986-06-01

    The Clinical Radiology Imaging System (CRIS) developed in the UCLA Image Processing Laboratory (IPL) is designed to allow radiologists, clinicians, and technologists to review and manipulate radiological images in digital form on a multiple viewing station (MVS). The system is composed of a multiple viewing station located at a clinical site and a centralized computer system consisting of a VAX-11/750 minicomputer, a Gould/DeAnza IP8500 image processor, and optical and magnetic disk storage. A broadband network allows video and digital communication between the remote clinical site and the IPL research laboratory. The station allows the real-time presentation of six 512x512x8 bit images from any combination of CT, MRI, DF, ultrasound, and digitized radiographs. The user interacts with the system by way of menus, icons, and a trackball. The CRIS system has been implemented in the Pediatric Radiology Section of the UCLA Medical Center. This paper describes the hardware and software architecture of the system and some early clinical experience.

  5. Implementation of Electronic Checklists in an Oncology Medical Record: Initial Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Kevin V.; Miller, Alexis A.; Roeske, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of any medical treatment depends on the accurate processing of multiple complex components of information, with proper delivery to the patient. This is true for radiation oncology, in which treatment delivery is as complex as a surgical procedure but more dependent on hardware and software technology. Uncorrected errors, even if small or infrequent, can result in catastrophic consequences for the patient. We developed electronic checklists (ECLs) within the oncology electronic medical record (EMR) and evaluated their use and report on our initial clinical experience. Methods: Using the Mosaiq EMR, we developed checklists within the clinical assessment section. These checklists are based on the process flow of information from one group to another within the clinic and enable the processing, confirmation, and documentation of relevant patient information before the delivery of radiation therapy. The clinical use of the ECL was documented by means of a customized report. Results: Use of ECL has reduced the number of times that physicians were called to the treatment unit. In particular, the ECL has ensured that therapists have a better understanding of the treatment plan before the initiation of treatment. An evaluation of ECL compliance showed that, with additional staff training, > 94% of the records were completed. Conclusion: The ECL can be used to ensure standardization of procedures and documentation that the pretreatment checks have been performed before patient treatment. We believe that the implementation of ECLs will improve patient safety and reduce the likelihood of treatment errors. PMID:22043184

  6. Does experience in general practice influence the clinical thinking of foundation trainees?

    PubMed

    Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha; Wilson, Sally; Odbert, Reg; Lyon-Maris, Johnny; Leach, Camilla

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to capture and identify changes in clinical thinking amongst foundation trainees after a four-month attachment in general practice, and to develop a means of analysing the data collected to inform understanding about how clinical thinking develops and changes for a trainee - the learner - in the context of clinical experience. We use the term 'clinical thinking' consistently throughout our paper to refer to the trainees' general thinking about a case, and do so in the same way as other academics. Through the innovative use of Mind Maps, we have sought to demonstrate whether there was a significant change in the themes and key features contained in maps drawn by foundation year 2 trainees before and after an attachment in general practice, and to locate the nature of the change if present. Being able to identify such change is potentially valuable as it can assist in revealing a trainee's learning needs and shape future learning. PMID:25693153

  7. Results of extracorporeal life support implementation in routine clinical practice: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Bio?ina, Bojan; Petri?evi?, Mate; Belina, Draen; Gaparovi?, Hrvoje; Svetina, Lucija; Konosi?, Sanja; White, Alexandra; Ivan?an, Vinja; Kopjar, Tomislav; Mili?i?, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe our experience in the clinical application of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) and analyze whether ECLS leads to acceptable clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac failure. Methods Data from clinical database of University Hospital Center Zagreb, Croatia, on 75 patients undergoing ECLS support from 2009 to 2014 due to cardiac failure were retrospectively analyzed. Outcomes were defined as procedural and clinical outcomes. ECLS as a primary procedure and ECLS as a postcardiotomy procedure due to inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass were analyzed. Results ECLS was used in 75 adult patients, and in 24 (32%) of those procedural success was noted. ECLS was implemented as a primary procedure in 36 patients and as a postcardiotomy procedure in 39 patients. Nine out of 39 (23.08%) patients had postcardiotomy ECLS after heart transplantation. Bleeding complications occurred in 30 (40%) patients, both in primary (11/36 patients) and postcardiotomy group (19/39 patients). ECLS was established by peripheral approach in 46 patients and by central cannulation in 27 patients. In 2 patients, combined cannulation was performed, with an inflow cannula placed into the right atrium and an outflow cannula placed into the femoral artery. Eleven patients treated with peripheral approach had ischemic complications. Conclusion ECLS is a useful tool in the treatment of patients with refractory cardiac failure and its results are encouraging in patients who otherwise have an unfavorable prognosis. PMID:25559831

  8. Consequences of anorectal cancer atlas implementation in the cooperative group setting: Radiobiologic analysis of a prospective randomized in silico target delineation study

    PubMed Central

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Giantsoudis, Drosoula; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Duppen, Joop C.; Thomas, Charles R.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Kachnicc, Lisa A.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to ascertain the subsequent radiobiological impact of using a consensus guideline target volume delineation atlas. Materials and methods Using a representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed IMRT rectal cancer clinical trial, gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical/planning target volumes (CTV/PTV) were contoured by 13 physician observers (Phase 1). The observers were then randomly assigned to follow (atlas) or not-follow (control) a consensus guideline/atlas for anorectal cancers, and instructed to re-contour the same case (Phase 2). Results The atlas group was found to have increased tumor control probability (TCP) after the atlas intervention for both the CTV (p < 0.0001) and PTV1 (p = 0.0011) with decreasing normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for small intestine, while the control group did not. Additionally, the atlas group had reduced variance in TCP for all target volumes and reduced variance in NTCP for the bowel. In Phase 2, the atlas group had increased TCP relative to the control for CTV (p = 0.03). Conclusions Visual atlas and consensus treatment guidelines usage in the development of rectal cancer IMRT treatment plans reduced the inter-observer radiobiological variation, with clinically relevant TCP alteration for CTV and PTV volumes. PMID:24996454

  9. Supporting positive experiences and sustained participation in clinical trials: looking beyond information provision.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Kate; Entwistle, Vikki A

    2012-12-01

    Recruitment processes for clinical trials are governed by guidelines and regulatory systems intended to ensure participation is informed and voluntary. Although the guidelines and systems provide some protection to potential participants, current recruitment processes often result in limited understanding and experiences of inadequate decision support. Many trials also have high drop-out rates among participants, which are ethically troubling because they can be indicative of poor experiences and they limit the usefulness of the knowledge the trials were designed to generate. Drawing on recent social-psychological and philosophical-ethical research on trial recruitment and patient participation in treatment decision-making, this paper identifies possibilities for improving communicative support for both initial decisions and ongoing participation in clinical trials. It highlights the potential of a shift in thinking about 'voluntariness', underpinned by relational understandings of autonomy, to encourage more nuanced judgements about the ethics of communication between trial staff and (potential) participants. The paper suggests that the idea of responsively enabling people to consider invitations or requests to participate in particular trials could serve as a general guide to communication. This might help ensure decisions about trial participation are meaningfully informed and voluntary, and that relationships between trial staff and participants contribute to positive experiences of trial participation and ultimately to the generation of the robust knowledge. PMID:22875981

  10. Psychotic experiences as indicators of suicidal ideation in a non-clinical college sample.

    PubMed

    DeVylder, Jordan E; Thompson, Elizabeth; Reeves, Gloria; Schiffman, Jason

    2015-04-30

    Suicide is a leading cause of preventable death. Epidemiological studies have shown strong associations between sub-threshold psychotic experiences and risk for suicidal ideation and behavior. Screens designed to assess psychotic experiences may have clinical utility in improving suicide prevention efforts. In the current study, we hypothesized that the Prodromal Questionnaire-Brief (PQ-B) would reliably distinguish levels of suicidal ideation within a sample of college students (n=376). As predicted, PQ-B scores varied significantly across levels of suicidal ideation, both when treated as a raw count of sub-threshold psychotic experiences and when taking into account subjective distress associated with those symptoms. In addition, we explored the feasibility of developing a short screen based on the most discriminating items, finding that a six-item version of the PQ-B yielded higher accuracy for detecting elevated suicidal ideation over the full measure. The PQ-B has the potential for clinical utility in detecting groups that might be at increased risk for suicidal ideation. PMID:25746171

  11. Teaching Residents to Work with Torture Survivors: Experiences from the Bronx Human Rights Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Ramin G.; Cooperman, Nina; Smith, Clyde L.; Du, Evelyn; Modali, Laxmi; Sacajiu, Galit

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Despite the 1984 United Nations’s Convention Against Torture calling to train doctors to work with torture survivors, many physicians are unaware of their obligation and few are taught the requisite clinical skills. Aim To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a curriculum to teach residents to work with torture survivors. Participants Medicine residents in New York City Program Description A 2-component curriculum consisting of a series of workshops and clinical experiences, which provide content, skills, and practices regarding the medical, psychological, ethical, and legal aspects of evaluating and caring for torture survivors. Curriculum Evaluation All 22 trainees received surveys before and after training. Surveys assessed residents’ relevant prior experience, beliefs, skills, and attitudes regarding working with torture survivors. At baseline, 23% of residents described previous human rights trainings and 17% had work experiences with torture survivors. Before the curriculum, 81% of residents reported doctors should know how to evaluate survivors, although only 5% routinely screened patients for torture. After the curriculum, residents reported significant improvements in 3 educational domains—general knowledge, sequelae, and self-efficacy to evaluate torture survivors. Discussion This curriculum addresses the disparity between doctors’ obligations, and training to work with torture survivors. It is likely to achieve its educational goals, and can potentially be adapted to other residencies. PMID:18612740

  12. Accuracy of Reporting the Hyperdense Middle Cerebral Artery Sign as a Function of Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aouad, Patrick; Hughes, Andrew; Neeman, Terry; Lueck, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim The hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS) is a useful clinical sign in the management of acute stroke and may alter time-critical decisions within an emergency setting. Though gold standards have been published, these are rarely used in clinical practice and scans tend to be reported subjectively. It is therefore possible that the level of experience of the doctor reporting the scan may impact on the accuracy of the reporting and hence patient management. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy in detecting HMCAS across doctors with varying levels of experience. Methods Forty doctors were recruited into four categories of experience. Each subject received a brief computer-based tutorial on how to identify an HMCAS and was then asked to report on the presence or absence of an HMCAS in 19 pre-prepared CT scans using a standardised viewing template. Results The mean (±SE) percentage correct scores increased with experience from 76.8 ± 3.69 among interns and residents to 90.1 ± 2.23 (neurologists and radiologists; p < 0.01). Sensitivity and specificity as well as positive and negative predictive values all increased with experience. In addition, more experienced clinicians were better able to distinguish scans which met the radiological criteria for HMCAS from those which only just failed to do so. Conclusions Experienced neurologists and radiologists consistently and accurately reported the presence or absence of HMCAS, whereas less experienced clinicians tended to over-report the presence of HMCAS. This may have implications for the acute management of thromboembolic stroke. PMID:25759709

  13. Clinical experience with In-Ceram Spinell crowns: 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fradeani, Mauro; Aquilano, Augusto; Corrado, Marcantonio

    2002-12-01

    Prompted by increased patient requests for esthetic treatment, restorative clinicians have evaluated a variety of new materials and procedures. This study reports on 5 years' experience with In-Ceram Spinell all-ceramic crowns. A total of 40 anterior crowns were positioned in 13 patients from October 1995 to December 1998. The clinical examination was made following modified California Dental Association/Ryge criteria. Final evaluation was carried out in October 2000, for an observation period of 22 to 60 months (mean 50 months). Only one failure was recorded, and the fractured crown needed to be replaced; according to Kaplan-Meier analysis, the estimated success rate was 97.5%. A thorough description of the clinical procedures through which anterior teeth can be successfully treated with all-ceramic Spinell crowns is described. PMID:12516824

  14. [Professor ZHENG Kuishan's experience in the clinical treatment of bi syndrome with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohu; Zheng, Jiatai; Guo, Yongming

    2015-06-01

    Professor ZHENG Kuishan has been engaged in the education and clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion for over 60 years. Professor ZHENG is strict in scholarly research and exquisite in medical techniques and he is good at treatment of bi syndrome induced by invasion of wind, cold and damp with warming and, promoting therapy. He emphasizes on syndrome differentiation and acupoint combination and selects the accurate manipulations. Not only are the symptoms relieved apparently, but also the body state is improved. As a result, the primary and secondary are treated simultaneously. In the paper, professor ZHENG's experience is introduced in the treatment of bi syndrome in the aspects of theory, method, formula, acupoint and technique. And his clinical therapeutic approaches have been deeply analyzed. PMID:26480566

  15. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  16. Clinical research for older adults in rural areas: the MINDED study experience.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Bertrand; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine; Demougeot, Laurent; Cluzan, Céline; Cesari, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing need to make clinical decisions based on valid and objective scientific evidence, the number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has increased over the last three decades. Nevertheless, evidence-based medicine has still limited applicability in older adults, because they are often excluded from clinical trials. Evidence-based medicine is even more challenging in rural areas, as its remote environment provides additional barriers. Nevertheless, given the high prevalence of older adults living in rural settings, research in this type of environment has become crucial. This can only be accomplished by considering the multiple additional challenges of these regions. In this paper, we examine potential environmental, procedural, and participants' barriers to the management of a RCT in a rural area. Possible solutions and suggestions are provided based on our experience-from the Multidomain Intervention to preveNt Disability in ElDers (MINDED) project. PMID:26891623

  17. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

    PubMed

    Lounsbery, Jody L; Pereira, Chrystian R; Harris, Ila M; Moon, Jean Y; Westberg, Sarah M; Kolar, Claire

    2016-02-25

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students' competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  18. Practical guide for implementing hybrid PET/MR clinical service: lessons learned from our experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nainesh; Friedman, Kent P.; Shah, Shetal N.; Chandarana, Hersh

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging, until recently, have been performed on separate PET and MR systems with varying temporal delay between the two acquisitions. The interpretation of these two separately acquired studies requires cognitive fusion by radiologists/nuclear medicine physicians or dedicated and challenging post-processing. Recent advances in hardware and software with introduction of hybrid PET/MR systems have made it possible to acquire the PET and MR images simultaneously or near simultaneously. This review article serves as a road-map for clinical implementation of hybrid PET/MR systems and briefly discusses hardware systems, the personnel needs, safety and quality issues, and reimbursement topics based on experience at NYU Langone Medical Center and Cleveland Clinic. PMID:25985966

  19. Amelioration of erectile dysfunction following a switch from carbamazepine to oxcarbazepine: recent clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Sachdeo, Rajesh; Sathyan, Revathi R

    2005-07-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an antiepileptic drug (AED) indicated for use as monotherapy and add-on therapy in adults and children 4 years of age and older. Despite being structurally related to carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine differs substantially in its pharmacokinetic and safety profile; oxcarbazepine has a much lower risk of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions than carbamazepine. Carbamazepine has also been shown to induce the hepatic synthesis of sex hormone-binding globulin, thus reducing free serum testosterone levels and possibly causing erectile dysfunction (ED) in some men; these effects have not been observed with oxcarbazepine. This paper provides a discussion of recent clinical experience with men who presented in private clinical practice with complaints of ED while being treated with carbamazepine for seizure disorders. The four illustrative case studies presented in this report suggest that switching AED treatment from carbamazepine to oxcarbazepine in men with epilepsy can reduce the ED side effects observed with carbamazepine. PMID:16004674

  20. Clinical evaluation of the antishock trouser: retrospective analysis of five years of experience.

    PubMed

    Wayne, M A; Macdonald, S C

    1983-06-01

    A retrospective study of five years of experience in using pneumatic antishock trousers was undertaken to provide data for analysis of clinical response and complications associated with use of the suit. Of 1,120 patients who received pneumatic antishock trousers, 821 (73.3%) survived more than 24 hours, and their response and clinical course were analyzed. Response was not uniform: most exhibited blood pressure response, and some showed changes in only pulse rate or evidence of improved tissue perfusion. Different responses were noted for different shock etiologies. Of all the potential complications theoretically possible, a prevalence of only 4% for ischemic skin changes (none requiring grafting) and 0.97% for renal perfusion failure were noted. The pneumatic antishock trouser is thought to be beneficial and safe. PMID:6859628

  1. The Usefulness of Systematic Reviews of Animal Experiments for the Design of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rob B. M.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Avey, Marc T.; Stephens, Martin L.; Sena, Emily S.; Leenaars, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The question of how animal studies should be designed, conducted, and analyzed remains underexposed in societal debates on animal experimentation. This is not only a scientific but also a moral question. After all, if animal experiments are not appropriately designed, conducted, and analyzed, the results produced are unlikely to be reliable and the animals have in effect been wasted. In this article, we focus on one particular method to address this moral question, namely systematic reviews of previously performed animal experiments. We discuss how the design, conduct, and analysis of future (animal and human) experiments may be optimized through such systematic reviews. In particular, we illustrate how these reviews can help improve the methodological quality of animal experiments, make the choice of an animal model and the translation of animal data to the clinic more evidence-based, and implement the 3Rs. Moreover, we discuss which measures are being taken and which need to be taken in the future to ensure that systematic reviews will actually contribute to optimizing experimental design and thereby to meeting a necessary condition for making the use of animals in these experiments justified. PMID:25541545

  2. Ketamine: an update on the first twenty-five years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Reich, D L; Silvay, G

    1989-03-01

    In nearly 25 years of clinical experience, the benefits and limitations of ketamine analgesia and anaesthesia have generally been well-defined. The extensive review of White et al. and the cardiovascular review of Reves et al. are broad in their scope and have advanced the understanding of dissociative anaesthesia. Nevertheless, recent research continues to illuminate different aspects of ketamine pharmacology, and suggests new clinical uses for this drug. The identification of the N-methylaspartate receptor gives further support to the concept that ketamine's analgesic and anaesthetic effects are mediated by separate mechanisms. The stereospecific binding of (+)ketamine to opiate receptors in vitro, more rapid emergence from anaesthesia, and the lower incidence of emergence sequelae, make (+)ketamine a promising drug for future research. Clinical applications of ketamine that have emerged recently, and are likely to increase in the future, are the use of oral, rectal, and intranasal preparations for the purposes of analgesia, sedation, and anaesthetic induction. Ketamine is now considered a reasonable option for anaesthetic induction in the hypotensive preterm neonate. The initial experience with epidural and intrathecal ketamine administration has not been very promising but the data are only preliminary in this area. The use of ketamine in military and catastrophic settings is likely to become more common. The clinical availability of midazolam will complement ketamine anaesthesia in several ways. This rapidly metabolized benzodiazepine reduces ketamine's cardiovascular stimulation and emergence phenomena, and does not have active metabolites. It is dispensed in an aqueous medium, which is usually non-irritating on intravenous injection, unlike diazepam. The combination of ketamine and midazolam is expected to achieve high patient acceptance, which never occurred with ketamine as a sole agent. Finally, it is necessary to point out the potential for abuse of ketamine. While ketamine is not a controlled substance (in the United States), the prudent physician should take appropriate precautions against the unauthorized use of this drug. PMID:2650898

  3. Radiobiological studies using synchrotron-produced ultrasoft X-rays.

    PubMed

    Gould, M N; Nelms, B E; Hill, C K; Mackay, J F; Lindstrom, M J; Mackie, T R; Deluca, P M

    1999-12-01

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been extensively used to explore radiobiological mechanisms surrounding cell killing. These studies for the most part have been linked to a small number of X-ray energies. Recently, this field of study has been broadened by the availability of synchrotron-produced ultrasoft X-rays which can be produced at any desired energy. We have taken advantage of the University of Wisconsin Synchrotron to reexamine two fundamental radiobiological questions: Dose RBE vary with different ultrasoft X-ray energies? Dose the fraction of the nuclear volume exposed to equal total X-ray energy modify cell cytotoxicity? The first study focuses on the survival of Chinese hamster V79 and mouse C3H10T1/2 cells irradiated with synchrotron-produced 273 eV and 860 eV ultrasoft X-rays. These two energies, which are available by multilayer monochromatization of the synchrotron output spectrum, exhibit equal attenuation within living cells. Such an isoattenuating energy pair allows the direct examination of how biological effectiveness varies with the energy of the ultrasoft X-rays. In comparing survival results, we find similar biological effectiveness of these two energies for both the C3H10T1/2 and the V79 cells. These results are no consistent with previous findings of increasing RBE with decreasing ultrasoft X-ray energies. In addition, after correcting for mean nuclear based on measurements of cell thickness obtained with confocal microscopy, we find no significant differences in survival between the two ultrasoft X-ray energies and 250 kVp X-rays. These results suggest that RBE does not increase with decreasing energy of ultrasoft X-ray between 860 eV and 273 eV. In a second study we introduced an method which allows partial-volume irradiation of live cells using synchrotron-produced ultrasoft X-rays and micro-fabricated irradiation masks. The masks were made by X-ray lithography at the University of Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center, and they consist of 1.85-micron-wide stripes of gold 1.35 microns apart plated onto thin silicon nitrate membranes. When placed adjacent to mylar on which live cells are plated, these masks allow cells to be irradiated in a striped pattern with dimensions much smaller than the cell nuclei. Using 1340 eV synchrotron-produced X-rays, we compare the survival of cells subjected to uniform irradiation and cells subjected to partial-volume irradiation. Our results show that, at equal mean dose to the nucleus (i.e. equal total energies deposited), survival is not statistically different for the two treatments over a wide range of doses. Thus, imparting equal energies to smaller intranuclear volumes does not appear to modulate cell killing. PMID:10804996

  4. SU-E-T-385: 4D Radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Fourkal, E; Hossain, M; Veltchev, I; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Horwitz, E; Nahum, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The linear-quadratic model is the most prevalent model for planning dose fractionation in radiation therapy in the low dose per fraction regimens. However for high-dose fractions, used in SRS/SBRT/HDR treatments the LQ model does not yield accurate predictions, due to neglecting the reduction in the number of sublethal lesions as a result of their conversion to lethal lesions with subsequent irradiation. Proper accounting for this reduction in the number of sublethally damaged lesions leads to the dependence of the survival fraction on the temporal structure of the dose. The main objective of this work is to show that the functional dependence of the dose rate on time in each voxel is an important additional factor that can significantly influence the TCP. Methods: Two SBRT lung plans have been used to calculate the TCPs for the same patient. One plan is a 3D conformal plan and the other is an IMRT plan. Both plans are normalized so that 99.5% of PTV volume receives the same prescription dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The dose rate in each individual voxel is calculated as a function of treatment time and subsequently used in the calculation of TCP. Results: The calculated TCPs show that shorter delivery times lead to greater TCP, despite all delivery times being short compared to the repair half-time for sublethal lesions. Furthermore, calculated TCP(IMRT) =0.308 for the IMRT plan is smaller than TCP(3D) =0.425 for 3D conformal, even though it shows greater tumor hot spots and equal PTV coverage. The calculated TCPs are considerably lower compared to those based on the LQ model for which TCP=1 for both plans. Conclusion: The functional dependence of the voxel-by-voxel dose rate on time may be an important factor in predicting the treatment outcome and cannot be neglected in radiobiological modeling.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters in Linear-Quadratic Radiobiologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Jack F.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiobiologic modeling is increasingly used to estimate the effects of altered treatment plans, especially for dose escalation. The present article shows how much the linear-quadratic (LQ) (calculated biologically equivalent dose [BED] varies when individual parameters of the LQ formula are varied by {+-}20% and by 1%. Methods: Equivalent total doses (EQD2 = normalized total doses (NTD) in 2-Gy fractions for tumor control, acute mucosal reactions, and late complications were calculated using the linear- quadratic formula with overall time: BED = nd (1 + d/ [{alpha}/{beta}]) - log{sub e}2 (T - Tk) / {alpha}Tp, where BED is BED = total dose x relative effectiveness (RE = nd (1 + d/ [{alpha}/{beta}]). Each of the five biologic parameters in turn was altered by {+-}10%, and the altered EQD2s tabulated; the difference was finally divided by 20. EQD2 or NTD is obtained by dividing BED by the RE for 2-Gy fractions, using the appropriate {alpha}/{beta} ratio. Results: Variations in tumor and acute mucosal EQD ranged from 0.1% to 0.45% per 1% change in each parameter for conventional schedules, the largest variation being caused by overall time. Variations in 'late' EQD were 0.4% to 0.6% per 1% change in the only biologic parameter, the {alpha}/{beta} ratio. For stereotactic body radiotherapy schedules, variations were larger, up to 0.6 to 0.9 for tumor and 1.6% to 1.9% for late, per 1% change in parameter. Conclusions: Robustness occurs similar to that of equivalent uniform dose (EUD), for the same reasons. Total dose, dose per fraction, and dose-rate cause their major effects, as well known.

  6. Vas deferens occlusion by percutaneous injection of polyurethane elastomer plugs: clinical experience and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S C

    1990-05-01

    A non-incision method of vas occlusion based on the percutaneous injection of polyurethane elastomer solution to form plugs is described. The results are based on clinical experience in 12,000 men in which only 56 cases of minor complications were recorded. Follow-up of 500 men for up to 3 years demonstrated an azoospermia rate of 98%. Plugs have been removed from 86 men and, to date, 51 have made their wives pregnant. In those from which the plugs have been removed for more than 1 year (n = 31), the pregnancy rate is 100%. PMID:2347193

  7. Credentialing in carotid angiography and carotid angioplasty/stenting: experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert D; Sullivan, Timothy M

    2005-06-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting is an evolving technique in the treatment of patients with carotid occlusive disease who are at increased risk for carotid endarterectomy. The literature has largely focused on the short and long-term results of this novel procedure. Due to the involvement of multiple disciplines, all of whom have legitimate claims to the carotid territory, credentialing has been a contentious issue at the local hospital level. This article describes the experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester in developing, in a multi-disciplinary manner, documents for credentialing in carotid angiography, carotid intervention, and guidelines for the use of this novel procedure. PMID:15986329

  8. Clinical experience with a high-performance ATM-connected DICOM archive for cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Harry P.

    1997-05-01

    A system to archive large image sets, such as cardiac cine runs, with near realtime response must address several functional and performance issues, including efficient use of a high performance network connection with standard protocols, an architecture which effectively integrates both short- and long-term mass storage devices, and a flexible data management policy which allows optimization of image distribution and retrieval strategies based on modality and site-specific operational use. Clinical experience with such as archive has allowed evaluation of these systems issues and refinement of a traffic model for cardiac angiography.

  9. [MA Shao-qun's clinical experience of warm moxibustion for the liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong-Qing; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Bai-Xiao

    2012-03-01

    To summarize MA Shao-qun's clinical experience of warm moxibustion for the liver diseases. The warm moxibustion was put to use by MA Shao-qun to treat many diseases, including hepatitis, cirrhosis and liver functional disorder. Under the human-oriented theory, he focuses on regulating the whole function of the body and tonifying the original qi to increase physical fitness and avoid illness. Besides, he is good at the combination of multi-acupoints for long-term and circulating moxibustion treatment, and also pays attention to nourishing the spleen-stomach, adjusting the fu-qi and resolving the dampness in the body. PMID:22471143

  10. Clinical experience with high power (140 mj.), large fiber (320 micron) pulsed dye laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Dretler, S P; Bhatta, K M

    1991-11-01

    The pulsed dye laser, at 504 nm. wavelength with a pulse duration of 1 microsecond, was used at 140 mj. per pulse via a 320 mu. (core) fiber for fragmentation of 72 ureteral calculi. The fragmentation efficiency and clinical results using the 140 mj./320 mu. fiber were compared to previous experience using the 60 mj./200 mu. (core) fiber. Fragmentation efficiency was significantly improved requiring many fewer laser pulses to fragment calculi of similar size and composition, and decreasing the need for auxiliary methods to complete stone fragmentation. The higher energy and larger fiber allowed for more efficient ureteroscopic ureteral stone fragmentation without compromising tissue safety. PMID:1682511

  11. The Subjective Experience of Youths at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Shelly; Birnbaum, Michael; Eilenberg, Mara; DeVylder, Jordan; Gill, Kelly; Schienle, Jessica; Azimov, Neyra; Lukens, Ellen P.; Davidson, Larry; Corcoran, Cheryl Mary

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the experience of individuals across stages of schizophrenia is important for development of services to promote recovery. As yet, little is known about the experience of individuals who exhibit prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Audiotaped interviews were conducted with 27 participants at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis (15 males; 12 females; mean age 21; ethnically diverse). Phenomenological qualitative research techniques of coding, consensus, and comparison were used. Results Emergent themes differed by gender. Themes for males were feeling abnormal or “broken”; focus on going “crazy”; fantasy and escapism; and alienation and despair, with a desire for relationships. Themes for females were psychotic illness in family members; personal trauma; struggle with intimate relationships; and career and personal development. Conclusions The finding of relative social engagement and future-orientation of females identified as at risk for psychosis is novel, and has implications for outreach and treatment. PMID:25179420

  12. Participants' experiences of being debriefed to placebo allocation in a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Felicity L; Jacobson, Eric E; Shaw, Jessica; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2012-08-01

    Participants in placebo-controlled clinical trials give informed consent to be randomized to verum or placebo. However, researchers rarely tell participants which treatment they actually received. We interviewed 4 participants in a trial of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome before, during, and after they received a course of placebo treatments over 6 weeks. During the final interview, we informed participants that they had received a course of placebo treatments. We used an idiographic phenomenological approach based on the Sheffield School to describe each participant's experiences of being blinded to and then debriefed to placebo allocation. The participants' experiences of blinding and debriefing were embodied, related to their goals in undertaking the study, and social (e.g., embedded in trusting and valued relationships with acupuncturists). We suggest ways in which debriefing to placebo allocation can be managed sensitively to facilitate positive outcomes for participants. PMID:22673094

  13. DoD's Medical Radiobiology Advisory Team: experts on the ground.

    PubMed

    VanHorne-Sealy, Jama; Livingston, Brian; Alleman, Lee

    2012-05-01

    The Medical Radiobiology Advisory Team (MRAT) is the operations arm of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), located at Naval Support Activity in Bethesda, MD. AFRRI is internationally recognized as expert in the biological effects of ionizing radiation research, training, and mitigation. During the U.S. Department of Defense's (DoD) response to the Fukushima Daiichi reactor incident, Operation Tomodachi, the MRAT provided guidance and advice to the U.S. Military leaders in Japan. This support helped ensure the safety of U.S. service members, family members, and civilians and supported the humanitarian relief in a coordinated effort with the Government of Japan (GOJ). PMID:22469928

  14. Cobalt chromium-based biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent: rationale, evidence and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Pan, D R; Zhu, H; Hu, Z Y; Pang, S; Wu, W; Tian, N L; Xu, B; Iqbal, J; Zhang, Y J

    2015-10-01

    Metallic drug-eluting stents (DES) are the first choice for percutaneous coronary interventional treatment of coronary artery disease at present. Although they have overcome some disadvantages and limitations of plain balloon angioplasty and bare-metal stents, chronic local inflammatory reactions related to permanent polymer existence and poor vascular healing after first generation DES implantation may translate into the increased risk of late and very late stent thrombosis. There have been technological developments in stent design, materials and coatings, including more conformable platform designs, biocompatible or biodegradable polymers and improved kinetics of drug release. The newer generation DES have proven superior to previous DES technology in terms of both safety and efficacy. Accumulating evidence has suggested that DES with cobalt chromium stent platform, modified biodegradable polymer coatings, and rapamycin derivative drugs are associated with improved clinical outcomes. Currently, several new cobalt chromium biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents have been introduced to clinical practice. This review will describe basic concept and rationale behind the newer cobalt chromium biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents, systematically present the new clinical experiences with several representative devices. PMID:26173625

  15. Eight years' experience of regional audit: an assessment of its value as a clinical governance tool.

    PubMed

    John, H; Paskins, Z; Hassell, A; Rowe, I F

    2010-02-01

    Strengthening clinical audit is crucial for improving the quality of healthcare provision. The West Midlands Rheumatology Service and Training Committee coordinates an innovative programme of regional audits and the experience of rheumatology healthcare professionals involved was surveyed. This was a questionnaire-based study in which respondents rated statements relating to regional audit on Likert scales. Out of 105 staff, 70 replied. There was consensus that results of regional audit have been robust, valid and reliable; regional audits benefit patients and units; provide educational opportunities for specialist registrars (SpRs); and are more efficient than local audit by allowing comparison between units. Opinion was divided about how well informed respondents were and how effective they are at closing the audit loop. Many units reported changes in practice. Regional audit is widely perceived to be a valuable clinical governance tool supporting significant changes to clinical practice, and an excellent training opportunity for SpRs. Recommendations for a successful regional audit scheme are described in this article. PMID:20408300

  16. Clinical analysis on anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis cases: Chinese experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Fan, Chunqiu; Wu, Jian; Ye, Jing; Zhan, Shuqin; Song, Haiqing; Liu, Aihua; Su, Yingying; Jia, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of autoimmune encephalitis which was just identified, the clinical manifestations of the anti-N methyl-D aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis are complex, diverse and in severe condition. The immunotherapy has shown good effect on the treatment but in generally, the diagnosis and treatment are still in the experience accumulation stage. More clinical research in different population is necessary, for example, in the Chinese population. This study was completed in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients who were diagnosed in Beijing Xuan Wu Hospital (China) during the time from 2011 to 2013. Total 33 patients were involved with the average age of 29.7 years old when the diseases were onset. With diverse clinical manifestations, most patients displayed positively by NMDAR antibody test and 63.6% of them were associated with elevated CSF-lgA. Patients also showed abnormal MRI and EEG. Only three patients had teratomas. With hormone therapy, gamma globulin treatment or plasma exchange, more than three quarters of patients fully recovered and the others had moderate symptoms. Based on our results, we suggest that NMDAR antibody test would be helpful to make a timely diagnosis and to administer immunotherapy. PMID:26770517

  17. Experiences of using the Theoretical Domains Framework across diverse clinical environments: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Cameron J; Marshall, Andrea P; Chaves, Nadia J; Jankelowitz, Stacey K; Lin, Ivan B; Loy, Clement T; Rees, Gwyneth; Sakzewski, Leanne; Thomas, Susie; To, The-Phung; Wilkinson, Shelley A; Michie, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) is an integrative framework developed from a synthesis of psychological theories as a vehicle to help apply theoretical approaches to interventions aimed at behavior change. Purpose This study explores experiences of TDF use by professionals from multiple disciplines across diverse clinical settings. Methods Mixed methods were used to examine experiences, attitudes, and perspectives of health professionals in using the TDF in health care implementation projects. Individual interviews were conducted with ten health care professionals from six disciplines who used the TDF in implementation projects. Deductive content and thematic analysis were used. Results Three main themes and associated subthemes were identified including: 1) reasons for use of the TDF (increased confidence, broader perspective, and theoretical underpinnings); 2) challenges using the TDF (time and resources, operationalization of the TDF) and; 3) future use of the TDF. Conclusion The TDF provided a useful, flexible framework for a diverse group of health professionals working across different clinical settings for the assessment of barriers and targeting resources to influence behavior change for implementation projects. The development of practical tools and training or support is likely to aid the utility of TDF. PMID:25834455

  18. Clinical experiences in treating PTSD patients by combining individual and group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bili?, Vedran; Nemci?-Moro, Iva; Karsi?, Vana; Grgi?, Vesna; Stojanovi?-Spehar, Stanislava; Marcinko, Darko

    2010-06-01

    PTSD is a complex psychobiological disorder that causes disfunctionality in many areas. In treating PTSD different models have been applied, however, no general consensus on the method of treatment has yet been achieved. At the Clinic for Psychological Medicine we have developed the model of combined treatment for PTSD patients that involves outpatient individual psychotherapy, psychopharmacotherapy and group psychotherapeutic techniques introduced within repeated day-hospital treatments. In this paper the efficiency of the above mentioned model has been explored. Three PTSD patients have been presented. We assessed changes in psychological functioning of our subjects on the basis of clinical observation and analysis of the session protocols. The model of combined and long-term treatment of PTSD in which the approach to traumatized patients has been mostly supportive, including supportive psychotherapeutic interventions and psychopharmacotherapy, has proved to be efficient in achieving integration of traumatic experiences and consolidation of the traumatised Self. Combination of individual and group approach facilitates the analysis of traumatic transference, whereas more mature defence patterns become stronger and integration of traumatic experiences improved. Consolidation of the Self leads to better socialization. PMID:20562742

  19. Three clinical experiences with SNP array results consistent with parental incest: a narrative with lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Helm, Benjamin M; Langley, Katherine; Spangler, Brooke; Vergano, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays have the ability to reveal parental consanguinity which may or may not be known to healthcare providers. Consanguinity can have significant implications for the health of patients and for individual and family psychosocial well-being. These results often present ethical and legal dilemmas that can have important ramifications. Unexpected consanguinity can be confounding to healthcare professionals who may be unprepared to handle these results or to communicate them to families or other appropriate representatives. There are few published accounts of experiences with consanguinity and SNP arrays. In this paper we discuss three cases where molecular evidence of parental incest was identified by SNP microarray. We hope to further highlight consanguinity as a potential incidental finding, how the cases were handled by the clinical team, and what resources were found to be most helpful. This paper aims to contribute further to professional discourse on incidental findings with genomic technology and how they were addressed clinically. These experiences may provide some guidance on how others can prepare for these findings and help improve practice. As genetic and genomic testing is utilized more by non-genetics providers, we also hope to inform about the importance of engaging with geneticists and genetic counselors when addressing these findings. PMID:24222483

  20. Clinical experiences in conducting cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia.

    PubMed

    McAleavey, Andrew A; Castonguay, Louis G; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have identified a disconnect between psychotherapy research, including research on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and real-world psychotherapy practice. This disconnect has several negative consequences, potentially including less-than-optimal practice standards as well as a lack of input from practicing psychotherapists on how research can be improved and made more relevant in their day-to-day clinical work. As part of an ongoing effort to engage practicing psychotherapists in a feedback loop with psychotherapy researchers, this study reports the results of a survey of CBT therapists who have used CBT in the treatment of social phobia (SP). The survey was designed primarily to document how often certain potential problems, identified by expert researchers and CBT manuals, actually act as barriers to successful treatment when CBT is employed in nonresearch environments. The participants were 276 psychotherapists responding to email, online, and print advertisements completing the online survey. Participants varied considerably in psychotherapy experience, work environment, experience in using CBT for SP, and in some ways varied in their usual CBT techniques when treating SP. Among the most prominent barriers identified by many of the participants were patient motivation, comorbidity, logistical problems (especially with exposures), patient resistance, and severity and chronicity of SP symptoms. These findings may be useful for psychotherapy researchers as areas for potential study. The results may also suggest topics requiring clinical guidelines, innovations within CBT, and dissemination of successful techniques to address the barriers identified here. PMID:24411111

  1. Insights on GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) from the patient's perspective: GRACE participant survey.

    PubMed

    Squires, Kathleen; Feinberg, Judith; Bridge, Dawn Averitt; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Seyedkazemi, Setareh; Dayaram, Yaswant K; Mrus, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The Gender, Race And Clinical Experience (GRACE) study was conducted between October 2006 and December 2008 to evaluate sex- and race-based differences in outcomes after treatment with a darunavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral regimen. Between June 2010 and June 2011, former participants of the GRACE trial at participating sites were asked to complete a 40-item questionnaire as part of the GRACE Participant Survey study, with a primary objective of assessing patients' characteristics, experiences, and opinions about participation in GRACE. Of 243 potential survey respondents, 151 (62%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of the overall GRACE population and were predominantly female (64%); fewer were black, and more reported recreational drug use compared with nonrespondents (55% vs. 62% and 17% vs. 10%, respectively). Access to treatment (41%) and too many blood draws (26%) were reported as the best and worst part of GRACE, respectively. Support from study site staff was reported as the most important factor in completing the study (47%). Factors associated with nonadherence, study discontinuation, and poor virologic response in univariate analyses were being the primary caregiver for children, unemployment, and transportation difficulties, respectively. Patients with these characteristics may be at risk of poor study outcomes and may benefit from additional adherence and retention strategies in future studies and routine clinical care. PMID:23701200

  2. Critical periods after stroke study: translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dromerick, Alexander W.; Edwardson, Matthew A.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Giannetti, Margot L.; Barth, Jessica; Brady, Kathaleen P.; Chan, Evan; Tan, Ming T.; Tamboli, Irfan; Chia, Ruth; Orquiza, Michael; Padilla, Robert M.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Mapstone, Mark E.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Federoff, Howard J.; Newport, Elissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seven hundred ninety-five thousand Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS) is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 h of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2–3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 1 year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial. PMID:25972803

  3. Assessing decentering: validation, psychometric properties, and clinical usefulness of the Experiences Questionnaire in a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    Soler, Joaquim; Franquesa, Alba; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Cebolla, Ausias; García-Campayo, Javier; Tejedor, Rosa; Demarzo, Marcelo; Baños, Rosa; Pascual, Juan Carlos; Portella, Maria J

    2014-11-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings in a detached manner. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) is a self-report instrument that originally assessed decentering and rumination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of EQ-Decentering and to explore its clinical usefulness. The 11-item EQ-Decentering subscale was translated into Spanish and psychometric properties were examined in a sample of 921 adult individuals, 231 with psychiatric disorders and 690 without. The subsample of nonpsychiatric participants was also split according to their previous meditative experience (meditative participants, n=341; and nonmeditative participants, n=349). Additionally, differences among these three subgroups were explored to determine clinical validity of the scale. Finally, EQ-Decentering was administered twice in a group of borderline personality disorder, before and after a 10-week mindfulness intervention. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable model fit, sbχ(2)=243.8836 (p<.001), CFI=.939, GFI=.936, SRMR=.040, and RMSEA=.06 (.060-.077), and psychometric properties were found to be satisfactory (reliability: Cronbach's α=.893; convergent validity: r>.46; and divergent validity: r<-.35). The scale detected changes in decentering after a 10-session intervention in mindfulness (t=-4.692, p<.00001). Differences among groups were significant (F=134.8, p<.000001), where psychiatric participants showed the lowest scores compared to nonpsychiatric meditative and nonmeditative participants. The Spanish version of the EQ-Decentering is a valid and reliable instrument to assess decentering either in clinical and nonclinical samples. In addition, the findings show that EQ-Decentering seems an adequate outcome instrument to detect changes after mindfulness-based interventions. PMID:25311294

  4. Fetoscopic surgery: encouraged by clinical experience and boosted by instrument innovation.

    PubMed

    Deprest, Jan; Jani, Jacques; Lewi, Liesbeth; Ochsenbein-Klble, Nicole; Cannie, Mieke; Don, Elisa; Roubliova, Xenia; Van Mieghem, Tim; Debeer, Anne; Debuck, Frederik; Sbragia, Laureno; Toelen, Jaan; Devlieger, Roland; Lewi, Paul; Van de Velde, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Today, modern ultrasound equipment and the wide implementation of screening programmes allow the timely diagnosis of many congenital anomalies. For some of these, fetal surgery may be a life-saving option. In Europe, open fetal surgery became poorly accepted because of its invasiveness and the high incidence of postoperative premature labour and rupture of the fetal membranes. In the 1990s, the merger of fetoscopy and advanced video-endoscopic surgery formed the basis for endoscopic fetal surgery. We review the current applications of fetal surgery via both methods of access. The first clinical fetoscopic surgeries were interventions on the umbilical cord and the placenta, often referred to as obstetrical endoscopy. The outcome of a randomized clinical trial demonstrating that fetoscopic laser coagulation of chorionic plate vessels is the most effective treatment for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) has revived interest in endoscopic fetal therapy. Operating on the fetus is another more challenging enterprise. Clinical fetal surgery programmes were virtually non-existent in Europe until minimally invasive fetoscopic surgery made such operations clinically possible as well as maternally acceptable. At present, most experience has been gathered with fetal tracheal occlusion as a therapy for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia. As in other fields, minimally invasive surgery has pushed back boundaries and now allows safe operations to be performed on the fetal patient. Whereas minimal access seems to solve the problem of preterm labour, all procedures remain invasive, and carry a risk to the mother and a substantial risk of preterm prelabour rupture of the membranes (PPROM). The latter problem may prove to be a bottleneck for further developments, although treatment modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:17056307

  5. The need for oncogenetic counselling. Ten years' experience of a regional oncogenetic clinic.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Karin; Olsson, Hkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf

    2004-01-01

    A monogenic inheritance, mainly seen as a dominant pattern, accounts for 5-10% of all cancer cases. The increased knowledge and identification of high-risk genes have led to a need for specialized cancer family clinic was the expression used by Eeles and Murday. The Oncogenetic Clinic at the University Hospital in Lund was started in 1993 and the authors' 10-year experience is summarized in this paper. The clinic offers service to the South Swedish Health Care Region comprising a total of 1.6 million inhabitants. During these first 10 years a total of 1059 individuals from 789 families have been individually counselled. The most common reason for referral was a family history of breast cancer, followed by a family history of colorectal cancer. According to the commonly used criteria, 437 (55%) of the families were considered as autosomal dominantly inherited; 147 families (19%) did not fulfil these criteria but had a strong clustering of breast/ovarian or colorectal/endometrial cancer. The remaining 205 families (26%) were not recognized as any previously described hereditary cancer syndrome with early onset. However, most of these families had a family history of cancer. Mutation analysis was performed in 386/789 (49%) of the families. In families with breast and ovarian cancer a genetic aberration was identified in 45/76 (59%) and in breast-only families in 27/129 (21%). In MSI-positive colon cancer families 16/34 (47%) of the families had a germline mutation. Thus, the majority of the families referred to the clinic were in obvious need of genetic counselling concerning cancer and heredity and in a substantial number of the families a germline mutation could be identified. PMID:15545184

  6. Developing a new mid-level health worker: lessons from South Africa's experience with clinical associates

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Jane; Conco, Daphney; Couper, Ian; Fonn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Background Mid-level medical workers play an important role in health systems and hold great potential for addressing the human resource shortage, especially in low- and middle-income countries. South Africa began the production of its first mid-level medical workers – known as clinical associates – in small numbers in 2008. Objective We describe the way in which scopes of practice and course design were negotiated and assess progress during the early years. We derive lessons for other countries wishing to introduce new types of mid-level worker. Methods We conducted a rapid assessment in 2010 consisting of a review of 19 documents and 11 semi-structured interviews with a variety of stakeholders. A thematic analysis was performed. Results Central to the success of the clinical associate training programme was a clear definition and understanding of the interests of various stakeholders. Stakeholder sensitivities were taken into account in the conceptualisation of the role and scope of practice of the clinical associate. This was achieved by dealing with quality of care concerns through service-based training and doctor supervision, and using a national curriculum framework to set uniform standards. Conclusions This new mid-level medical worker can contribute to the quality of district hospital care and address human resource shortages. However, a number of significant challenges lie ahead. To sustain and expand on early achievements, clinical associates must be produced in greater numbers and the required funding, training capacity, public sector posts, and supervision must be made available. Retaining the new cadre will depend on the public system becoming an employer of choice. Nonetheless, the South African experience yields positive lessons that could be of use to other countries contemplating similar initiatives. PMID:23364079

  7. SU-E-T-344: Validation and Clinical Experience of Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo Algorithm (EMC)

    SciTech Connect

    Pokharel, S; Rana, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to validate Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo (Algorithm for routine clinical uses. Methods: The PTW inhomogeneity phantom (T40037) with different combination of heterogeneous slabs has been CT-scanned with Philips Brilliance 16 slice scanner. The phantom contains blocks of Rando Alderson materials mimicking lung, Polystyrene (Tissue), PTFE (Bone) and PMAA. The phantom has 30×30×2.5 cm base plate with 2cm recesses to insert inhomogeneity. The detector systems used in this study are diode, tlds and Gafchromic EBT2 films. The diode and tlds were included in CT scans. The CT sets are transferred to Eclipse treatment planning system. Several plans have been created with Eclipse Monte Carlo (EMC) algorithm 11.0.21. Measurements have been carried out in Varian TrueBeam machine for energy from 6–22mev. Results: The measured and calculated doses agreed very well for tissue like media. The agreement was reasonably okay for the presence of lung inhomogeneity. The point dose agreement was within 3.5% and Gamma passing rate at 3%/3mm was greater than 93% except for 6Mev(85%). The disagreement can reach as high as 10% in the presence of bone inhomogeneity. This is due to eclipse reporting dose to the medium as opposed to the dose to the water as in conventional calculation engines. Conclusion: Care must be taken when using Varian Eclipse EMC algorithm for dose calculation for routine clinical uses. The algorithm dose not report dose to water in which most of the clinical experiences are based on rather it just reports dose to medium directly. In the presence of inhomogeneity such as bone, the dose discrepancy can be as high as 10% or even more depending on the location of normalization point or volume. As Radiation oncology as an empirical science, care must be taken before using EMC reported monitor units for clinical uses.

  8. The principles of Katz's cellular track structure radiobiological model.

    PubMed

    Waligrski, M P R; Grzanka, L; Korcyl, M

    2015-09-01

    The cellular track structure theory (TST), introduced by Katz in 1968, applies the concept of action cross section as the probability of targets in the radiation detector being activated to elicit the observed endpoint (e.g. cell killing). The ion beam radiation field is specified by the charge Z, speed ? (or energy), fluence and linear energy transfer (LET) of the ion, rather than by its total absorbed dose or dose-averaged LET. The detector is represented by radiosensitive elements of size a0 and radiosensitivity D0, its gamma-ray response being represented by c-hit or multi-target expressions rather than by the linear-quadratic formula. Key to TST is the D?(r) formula describing the radial distribution of delta-ray dose (RDD) around the ion path. This formula, when folded with the dose response of the detector and radially integrated, yields the 'point target' action cross section value, ?PT. The averaged value of the cross section, ?, is obtained by radially integrating the a0-averaged RDD. In the 'track width' regime which may occur at the distal end of the ion's path, the value of ? may considerably exceed its geometrical value, [Formula: see text]. Several scaling principles are applied in TST, resulting in its simple analytic formulation. Multi-target detectors, such as cells, are represented in TST by m, D0, ?0 (the 'saturation value' of the cross section which replaces a0) and ? (a 'detector saturation index'), as the fourth model parameter. With increasing LET of the ion, the two-component formulation of TST allows for successive transition from shouldered survival curves at low LET values to exponential ones at radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) maximum, followed by 'thindown' at the end of the ion track. For a given cell line, having best-fitted the four model parameters (m, D0, ?0 and ?) to an available data set of measured survival curves, TST is able to quantitatively predict cell survival and RBE for this cell line after any other ion irradiation. PMID:25904694

  9. A Radiobiological Analysis of Multicenter Data for Postoperative Keloid Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, John C.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To identify factors significantly affecting recurrence rates after postoperative external beam radiotherapy (XRT) of keloids, and to delineate any radiation dose response and effects of radiation dose per fraction. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive literature review was performed to compile a database of 2,515 resected keloids (36.9% earlobe). Postoperative XRT was 45- to 100-kV X-rays in 27.0% or 120- to 250-kV X-rays in 11.1%, Co-60 in 1.9%, Sr-90 in 4.7%, 1.5- to 9-MeV electrons in 26.5%, and no XRT in 28.8%. In the 1,791 irradiated patients, the median radiation parameters were as follows: total dose, 15 Gy (range, 6-30 Gy); dose per fraction, 5.0 Gy (range, 2-15 Gy); fractions, 3 (range, 1-10); and time, 7 days (range, 0-33 days). Results: Multivariate stepwise logistic regression correlated decreased keloid recurrence with earlobe location (p = 1.98E-10; odds ratio, 0.34), biologically effective dose (p = 1.01E-27), and treatment with electron beam or Co-60 vs. other techniques (p = 0.0014; odds ratio, 0.72). Different radiobiological models calculated values of {alpha}/{beta} = 1.12 to 2.86 (mean, 2.08) and time (repopulation) correction factors for biologically effective dose from 0.98 to 2.13 Gy per day (mean, 1.34) starting 10 days after surgery. Different models (with {alpha}/{beta} = 2.08) predicted that doses needed for 90% and 95% control with 3 fractions of postoperative electron beam were 16.0 to 16.2 Gy and 18.3 to 19.2 Gy, respectively, in less than 10 days for earlobe keloids and 21.5 to 22.2 Gy and 23.4 to 24.8 Gy, respectively, in less than 10 days for other sites. Conclusions: Postoperative keloid radiotherapy requires moderately high doses and optimal technique to be effective. The relatively low {alpha}/{beta} ratio indicates that radiotherapy with a limited number of fractions and high doses per fraction is the best strategy.

  10. Experiences of women with a diagnosis of breast cancer: a clinical pathway approach.

    PubMed

    Lindop, E; Cannon, S

    2001-06-01

    The study presented in this paper formed the first part of a large survey of breast cancer patients in one health authority in England, UK looking at individual needs expressed by women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The paper provides an account of the experiences of 12 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The women represent a wide age range and different stages of illness. The transcribed accounts of the women were analysed by means of Qualitative Solutions and Research, Non-Numerical Unstructured Data Indexing Searching and Theorising (QSR*NUDIST). The study examined the individual experiences of women with a diagnosis of breast cancer and its aftermath as they passed through different stages related to it. The women's experiences are presented within the conceptual framework of the clinical pathway and their accounts represent their journey along the pathway. Various significant points in this journey are portrayed representing the women's reactions to diagnosis, treatment, femininity and body image, support, family and friends, information and after care. PMID:12849036

  11. Clinical Audits in a Postgraduate General Practice Training Program: An Evaluation of 8 Years' Experience

    PubMed Central

    Al-Baho, Abeer; Serour, Maleka; Al-Weqayyn, Adnan; AlHilali, Mohammed; Sadek, Ali A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical audit can be of valuable assistance to any program which aims to improve the quality of health care and its delivery. Yet without a coherent strategy aimed at evaluating audits' effectiveness, valuable opportunities will be overlooked. Clinical audit projects are required as a part of the formative assessment of trainees in the Family Medicine Residency Program (FMRP) in Kuwait. This study was undertaken to draw a picture of trainees' understanding of the audit project with attention to the knowledge of audit theory and its educational significance and scrutinize the difficulties confronted during the experience. Methodology/Principal Findings The materials included the records of 133 audits carried out by trainees and 165 post course questionnaires carried out between 2004 and 2011. They were reviewed and analyzed. The majority of audit projects were performed on diabetic (44.4%) and hypertensive (38.3%) care. Regarding audits done on diabetic care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (8.6%), microalbuminuria (19.3%), hemoglobin A1c (15.5%), retinopathy (10.3%), dyslipidemia (15.8%), peripheral neuropathy (8.8%), and other problems (21.7%). As for audits concerning hypertensive care, they were carried out to assess doctors' awareness about screening for smoking status (38.0%), obesity (26.0%), dyslipidemia (12.0%), microalbuminuria (10.0%) and other problems (14.0%). More than half the participants (68.48%) who attended the audit course stated that they definitely agreed about understanding the meaning of clinical audit. Most of them (75.8%) definitely agreed about realizing the importance of clinical audit in improving patients' care. About half (49.7%) of them agreed that they can distinguish between criteria and standards. Conclusion The eight years of experience were beneficial. Trainees showed a good understanding of the idea behind auditing the services provided. They demonstrated their ability to improve the care given in health centers in which these projects were undertaken. PMID:22970146

  12. Radiobiologically guided optimisation of the prescription dose and fractionation scheme in radiotherapy using BioSuite

    PubMed Central

    Uzan, J; Nahum, A E

    2012-01-01

    Objective Radiobiological models provide a means of evaluating treatment plans. Keeping in mind their inherent limitations, they can also be used prospectively to design new treatment strategies which maximise therapeutic ratio. We propose here a new method to customise fractionation and prescription dose. Methods To illustrate our new approach, two non-small cell lung cancer treatment plans and one prostate plan from our archive are analysed using the in-house software tool BioSuite. BioSuite computes normal tissue complication probability and tumour control probability using various radiobiological models and can suggest radiobiologically optimal prescription doses and fractionation schemes with limited toxicity. Results Dose–response curves present varied aspects depending on the nature of each case. The optimisation process suggests doses and fractionation schemes differing from the original ones. Patterns of optimisation depend on the degree of conformality, the behaviour of the normal tissue (i.e. “serial” or “parallel”), the volume of the tumour and the parameters of clonogen proliferation. Conclusion Individualising the prescription dose and number of fractions with the help of BioSuite results in improved therapeutic ratios as evaluated by radiobiological models. PMID:22457318

  13. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  14. Fluctuations in energy loss and their implications for dosimetry and radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Steigerwalt, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Serious consideration of the physics of energy deposition indicates that a fundamental change in the interpretation of absorbed dose is required at least for considerations of effects in biological systems. In addition, theoretical approaches to radiobiology and microdosimetry seem to require statistical considerations incorporating frequency distributions of the magnitude of the event sizes within the volume of interest.

  15. Clinical Experiences With Clients Who Are Low-Income: Mental Health Practitioners' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mindi N; Nitzarim, Rachel S; Cole, Odessa D; Frost, Nickholas D; Ramirez Stege, Alyssa; Vue, Pa Tou

    2015-12-01

    The experiences of nine licensed mental health practitioners regarding their work with clients from low-income backgrounds were examined utilizing grounded theory methodology. Themes that emerged from the semi-structured interviews highlighted a rich narrative that portrayed the work as both deeply satisfying and inherently complex. Participants described the personal nature of this work, including countertransference elicited because of their own personal economic contexts and emotional reactions experienced within and outside the therapy room. Their stories acknowledged systematic challenges that act as barriers to treatment. Some participants noted that this has contributed to feelings of disillusionment toward the field as well as fears about the future of the mental health care. Based on these findings, we discuss implications for training, future research, and clinical practice. PMID:25583959

  16. A qualitative study of patients' experiences of a nurse-led memory clinic.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Christine; Campbell, Briony; Bentley, Michael; Bucher, Hazel; Morrissey, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about patients' decision-making to attend a nurse-led memory clinic (NLMC) or of their experiences in the months following attendance. This paper reports qualitative follow-up data from 13 participants who attended a NLMC run by a Nurse Practitioner, and who were interviewed later in their own homes. Participants attended the NLMC seeking 'benchmarking' against the broader population or confirmation of diagnosis, with the Nurse Practitioner perceived as having more time to talk. Although we anticipated that participants would have changed some behaviours to incorporate 'brain health material', we found that the focus was on maintaining current capacity and lifestyle with most participants delaying planning and decisions about future lifestyle changes until 'necessary'. Understanding why people contact a NLMC and how their participation influences future planning can help us better target health care messages with the aim of improving health literacy. PMID:24381213

  17. Gadolinium-DTPA as a contrast agent in MRI: initial clinical experience in 20 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.H.; Brown, J.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Weinmann, H.J.; Speck, U.; Hall, A.S.; Young, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 20 patients before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Twelve of the patients had clinical and histologic diagnoses of cerebral tumor, six had hepatic tumors, one had hepatic cysts, and one had transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Contrast enhancement was seen with all tumors, but not with the hepatic cysts. The degree of enhancement was greater than that seen with computed tomography (CT) in 13 cases, equal to it in six, and less in one. No short-term side effects were encountered and no significant change was seen in urea, creatinine, electrolytes, liver function tests, blood coagulation, or urine testing after injection of Gd-DTPA. Although much more work will be required to evaluate this contrast agent, these initial experiences are very promising.

  18. [A new psycho-dermatology clinic in Israel: our first year experience].

    PubMed

    Orion, Edith; Ben-Avi, Orit

    2011-01-01

    Psychodermatology involves the interrelationships between the skin and the mind, especially when considering the formation and evolution of certain common skin conditions. It appears that 30-40% of dermatology patients suffer from certain psychological problems as defined by the ICD-10, in a way that influences their disease severity and progression, as well as their quality of Life. Treatment of such cases requires a multi-disciplinary approach and should involve both a dermatologist and a mental health specialist working together In this article, the authors summarize the preliminary experience of the first year of the only psychodermatology clinic in Israel in several decades, work methods and patients' characteristics and preliminary conclusions. PMID:21449148

  19. Migrating toward a Next-Generation Clinical Decision Support Application: The BJC HealthCare Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Noirot, Laura A.; Heard, Kevin M.; Reichley, Richard M.; Dunagan, Wm. Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    The next-generation model outlined in the AMIA Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support (CDS) is aimed to optimize the effectiveness of CDS interventions, and to achieve widespread adoption. BJC HealthCare re-engineered its existing CDS system in alignment with the AMIA roadmap and plans to use it for guidance on further enhancements. We present our experience and discuss an incremental approach to migrate towards the next generation of CDS applications from the viewpoint of a healthcare institution. Specifically, a CDS rule engine service with a standards-based rule representation format was built to simplify maintenance and deployment. Rules were separated from execution code and made customizable for multi-facility deployment. Those changes resulted in system improvements in the short term while aligning with long-term strategic objectives. PMID:18693855

  20. [FlU Zhonghua's clinical experience of Fu's subcutaneous needling for cervical spondylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Minying; Zhang, Xiyu

    2015-08-01

    Professor FU Zhonghua's unique clinical experience of Fu's subcutaneous needling (FSN) for cervical spondylosis (CS) is discussed in this paper, which is analyzed from the aspects of recognition of CS pathogenesis, treatment mechanism of FSN, advantage indications of FSN for CS and examples of medical cases. Professor FU introduced the theory of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) into the field of the management of CS. The site of neck MTrP should be carefully examined, and FSN needles for single use are used to sweep the affected area or subcutaneous layer of adjacent upper limb. This method can rapidly improve ischemia and hypoxia state of the relevant muscles and prompt the self-recovery of neck muscles. During FSN treatment, reperfusion approach is recommended to adopt to improve the qi and blood circulation and recovery of neck function. PMID:26571902

  1. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience

    PubMed Central

    Žilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009–2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1–3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists. PMID:24689080

  2. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience.

    PubMed

    Zilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mlter-Vr, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Ounap, Katrin

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009-2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1-3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5?Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists. PMID:24689080

  3. Review of 10 years of clinical experience with Chinese domestic trivalent influenza vaccine Anflu

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Jun-Yu; Wang, Xu; Chen, Jiang-Ting; Xia, Ming; Hu, Wei; Zou, Yong; Yin, Wei-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual winter epidemics globally and influenza vaccination is most effective way to prevent the disease or severe outcomes from the illness, especially in developing countries. However, the majority of the worlds total production capacity of influenza vaccine is concentrated in several large multinational manufacturers. A safe and effective preventive vaccine for the developing countries is urgent. Anflu, a Chinese domestic preservative-free, split-virus trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV), was introduced by Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in 2006. Until now, 20.6 million doses worldwide of Anflu were sold. Since 2003, 13 company-sponsored clinical studies investigating the immunogenicity and safety of Anflu have been completed, in which 6642 subjects participated and were vaccinated by Anflu. Anflu was generally well tolerated in all age groups, and highly immunogenic in healthy adults and elderly and exceeded the licensure criteria in Europe. This review presents and discusses the experience with Anflu during the past decade. A new Chinese domestic, preservative-free, unadjuvanted, inactivated split-virus trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV), Anflu, was introduced into human clinical trials in 2003 and then licensed in China in 2006. The vaccine contains 15 g /0.5 ml hemagglutinin from each of the 3 influenza virus strains (including an H1N1 influenza A virus subtype, an H3N2 influenza A virus subtype, and an influenza B virus) that are expected to be circulating in the up-coming influenza season. The clinical data pertaining to Anflu will be reviewed and compared with other TIVs available at present. PMID:24104060

  4. Use of antidepressants in the treatment of depression in Asia: guidelines, clinical evidence, and experience revisited.

    PubMed

    Treuer, Tams; Liu, Chia-Yih; Salazar, Gerardo; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Jia, Fujun; Habil, Hussain; Lee, Min-Soo; Lowry, Amanda; Dueas, Hctor

    2013-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is prevalent worldwide, and only about half of those affected will experience no further episodes or symptoms. Additionally, depressive symptoms can be challenging to identify, with many patients going undiagnosed despite a wide variety of available treatment options. Antidepressants are the cornerstone of depression treatment; however, a large number of factors must be considered in selecting the treatment best suited to the individual. To help support physicians in this process, international and national treatment guidelines have been developed. This review evaluates the current use of antidepressant treatment for major depressive disorder in six Asian countries (China, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, and Thailand). No remarkable differences were noted between Asian and international treatment guidelines or among those from within Asia as these are adapted from western guidelines, although there were some local variations. Importantly, a shortage of evidence-based information at a country level is the primary problem in developing guidelines appropriate for Asia, so most of the guidelines are consensus opinions derived from western research data utilized in western guidelines. Treatment guidelines need to evolve from being consensus based to evidence based when evidence is available, taking into consideration cost/effectiveness or cost/benefit with an evidence-based approach that more accurately reflects clinical experience as well as the attributes of each antidepressant. In everyday practice, physicians must tailor their treatment to the patient's clinical needs while considering associated external factors; better tools are needed to help them reach the best possible prescribing decisions which are of maximum benefit to patients. PMID:23857712

  5. Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience

    PubMed Central

    Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa; Brigham, Greg; Babcock, Dean; L.C.S.W.; Muir, Joan A.; Buchan, Betty J.; Horton, Terry

    2005-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opioid-dependent men and women were randomized to a thirteen-day buprenorphine-naloxone taper regimen for short-term opioid detoxification. The 234 buprenorphine-naloxone patients averaged 37 years old and used mostly intravenous heroin. Direct and rapid induction onto buprenorphine-naloxone was safe and well tolerated. Most patients (83%) received 8 mg buprenorphine-2 mg naloxone on the first day and 90% successfully completed induction and reached a target dose of 16mg buprenorphine-4 mg naloxone in three days. Medication compliance and treatment engagement was high. An average of 81% of available doses was ingested, and 68% of patients completed the detoxification. Most (80.3%) patients received some ancillary medications with an average of 2.3 withdrawal symptoms treated. The safety profile of buprenorphine-naloxone was excellent. Of eighteen serious adverse events reported, only one was possibly related to buprenorphine-naloxone. All providers successfully integrated buprenorphine-naloxone into their existing treatment milieus. Overall, data from the CTN field experience suggest that buprenorphine-naloxone is practical and safe for use in diverse community treatment settings, including those with minimal experience providing opioid-based pharmacotherapy and/or medical detoxification for opioid dependence. PMID:15204675

  6. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields

    PubMed Central

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baos, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans. PMID:25525309

  7. Clinical Experience With A High Resolution Digital Imaging System For Gastro-Intestinal Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Rowlands, J. A.; Hynes, D. M.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In our department, it is planned that the gastro-intestinal fluoroscopic area will be equipped entirely with digital imaging systems. The use of the 1024 X 1024 pixel frame store, backed by a hard disc for rapid image transfer, and the production of hard copy on a laser imager has reached the point where clinical efficacy and acceptance are assured. The further addition of facilities for annotation and the application of digital post-processing techniques are being explored both at the clinical site and at the research laboratorieS. The use of laser imaging has produced a further improvement in image quality and some of the practical problems related to this apparatus will be described. The availability of larger capacity laser disc image storage enables the local area network or "mini-PACS" system for fluoroscopy areas to become a concept worthy of investigation. We present our experience over a number of years with these systems, together with our latest investigations into potential applications of laser technology to the practice of radiology in a busy imaging centre.

  8. Clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided prostate biopsy: Preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Adam J.; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Wang, Zhen J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided biopsy in patients with known or suspected prostate cancer. Methods We prospectively recruited 24 men with known or suspected prostate cancer in whom MRI-guided biopsy was clinically requested after multiparametric endorectal MRI showed one or more appropriate targets. One to six 18-gauge biopsy cores were obtained from each patient. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy results and post MRI-guided biopsy complications were also recorded. Results MRI-guided biopsy was positive in 5 of 7 patients with suspected prostate cancer (including 2 of 4 with prior negative ultrasound-guided biopsies), in 8 of 12 with known untreated prostate cancer (including 5 where MRI-guided biopsy demonstrated a higher Gleason score than ultrasound guided biopsy results), and in 3 of 5 with treated cancer. MRI-guided biopsies had a significantly higher maximum percentage of cancer in positive cores when compared to ultrasound guided biopsy (mean of 37 8% versus 13 4%; p = 0.01). No serious post-biopsy complications occurred. Conclusion Our preliminary experience suggests endorectal MRI-guided biopsy may safely contribute to the management of patients with known or suspected prostate cancer by making a new diagnosis of malignancy, upgrading previously diagnosed disease, or diagnosing local recurrence. PMID:24924999

  9. Isavuconazole: Pharmacology, Pharmacodynamics, and Current Clinical Experience with a New Triazole Antifungal Agent.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Jeffrey M; Marx, Kayleigh R; Nishimoto, Andrew T; Rogers, P David

    2015-11-01

    Coinciding with the continually increasing population of immunocompromised patients worldwide, the incidence of invasive fungal infections has grown over the past 4 decades. Unfortunately, infections caused by both yeasts such as Candida and molds such as Aspergillus or Mucorales remain associated with unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. In addition, the available antifungals with proven efficacy in the treatment of these infections remain severely limited. Although previously available second-generation triazole antifungals have significantly expanded the spectrum of the triazole antifungal class, these agents are laden with shortcomings in their safety profiles as well as formulation and pharmacokinetic challenges. Isavuconazole, administered as the prodrug isavuconazonium, is the latest second-generation triazole antifungal to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. Approved for the treatment of both invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis, and currently under investigation for the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis, isavuconazole may have therapeutic advantages over its predecessors. With clinically relevant antifungal potency against a broad range of yeasts, dimorphic fungi, and molds, isavuconazole has a spectrum of activity reminiscent of the polyene amphotericin B. Moreover, clinical experience thus far has revealed isavuconazole to be associated with fewer toxicities than voriconazole, even when administered without therapeutic drug monitoring. These characteristics, in an agent available in both a highly bioavailable oral and a β-cyclodextrin-free intravenous formulation, will likely make isavuconazole a welcome addition to the triazole class of antifungals. PMID:26598096

  10. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Flores, Eileen S; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy(RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeons examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner. PMID:25706821

  11. Designing clinical trials and experiments efficiently with the program package CADEMO.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Dieter; Kubinger, Klaus D

    2009-07-01

    This paper suggests the use of the program package CADEMO when designing clinical trials. Using this package a number of frequently incorrect or inefficient applications of statistical methods can be avoided. For instance, by determining the sample size for statistical tests in advance, the type-II-risk is guaranteed to be taken into account and, foremost, only relevant effects are likely to become significant. Although this is also true for some other program packages, CADEMO in addition exclusively analyzes data by sequential testing, specifically by sequential triangular tests according to Schneider [Schneider, B. 1992. An interactive computer program for design and monitoring of sequential clinical trials. In Proceedings of the XVIth international biometric conference (pp. 237-250). Hamilton, New Zealand.]; which on average lead to a lower sample size. Moreover CADEMO serves to determine the sample size for a confidence estimation of an unknown parameter and for the so-called selection procedures, which should be applied instead of using multiple comparisons of means, if the true objective of a study is to select only the best of all possibilities. Finally, CADEMO serves to factually randomize subjects into any more-way designed experiment. For each of the indicated applications an example is given and the respective handling of CADEMO is illustrated. PMID:19341821

  12. New Embolization Microcoil Consisting of Firm and Flexible Segments: Preliminary Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To describe the preliminary clinical experience with a new embolization microcoil. Methods. The microcoil was made of a platinum coil spring, and consisted of firm and flexible segments. The firm segment functioned as an anchor and the flexible segment was well compacted to occlude the arteries. No Dacron fiber was attached. Seventy-one new microcoils were placed via microcatheters in 28 visceral arteries of 17 patients. Two other types of microcoils with Dacron fibers were used together in 8 arteries. Results. Sixty-nine new microcoils were placed and compacted successfully. Two coils were misplaced; one was retrieved and the other was left in the migrated artery, which remained patent 5 months later. All 28 arteries were occluded, and the goals of intervention were achieved successfully in all 17 cases. Conclusion. The new microcoils anchored and compacted well in the arteries. The clinical feasibility of this coil design was confirmed. The additional use of other types of microcoils with Dacron fiber was necessary to obtain rapid occlusion in some cases.

  13. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields.

    PubMed

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baos, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-10-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond() (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans. PMID:25525309

  14. Intraoperative imaging during Mohs surgery with reflectance confocal microscopy: initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Eileen S.; Cordova, Miguel; Kose, Kivanc; Phillips, William; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2015-06-01

    Mohs surgery for the removal of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) is performed in stages, while being guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology. However, preparation of frozen pathology at each stage is time consuming and labor intensive. Real-time intraoperative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), combined with video mosaicking, may enable rapid detection of residual tumor directly in the surgical wounds on patients. We report our initial experience on 25 patients, using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast. Imaging was performed in quadrants in the wound to simulate the Mohs surgeon's examination of pathology. Images and videos of the epidermal and dermal margins were found to be of clinically acceptable quality. Bright nuclear morphology was identified at the epidermal margin and detectable in residual NMSC tumors. The presence of residual tumor and normal skin features could be detected in the peripheral and deep dermal margins. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on patients during Mohs surgery, and may serve as an adjunct for frozen pathology. Ultimately, for routine clinical utility, a stronger tumor-to-dermis contrast may be necessary, and also a smaller microscope with an automated approach for imaging in the entire wound in a rapid and controlled manner.

  15. Developing clinical competency: Experiences and perceptions of Advanced Midwifery Practitioners in training.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Lynne; Beaton, Susan

    2015-07-01

    This paper will describe the experiences and perception of a cohort of trainee Advanced Midwifery Practitioners (AMP's) during their training on an MSc in Advanced Practice. The educational philosophy underpinning the master's programme is interprofessional learning linked closely to work based learning and assessment. The focus group explored how the AMP's were developing core competencies within four domains: The links between the university and clinical assessments were instrumental in developing both midwifery and specialised skills required for extending their scope of practice. The changing demographics of their client group facilitated the need to provide safe assessment and management of ladies with complex health and social needs in pregnancy and childbirth; provide specialised clinics and the development of a robust staff training and assessment process. The generic competencies they gained improved collaborative working with their medical colleagues, raising the trainees profile and acceptance of their extended role. In addition to this, development of specialised midwifery skills promoted a high degree of decision making responsibilities within midwifery to facilitate service development and promote evidence based care. PMID:25892367

  16. SIADH-related hyponatremia in hospital day care units: clinical experience and management with tolvaptan.

    PubMed

    De Las Peñas, Ramón; Ponce, Santiago; Henao, Fernando; Camps Herrero, Carlos; Carcereny, Enric; Escobar Álvarez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, César A; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; López López, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (Na ˂135 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in clinical practice, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the commonest cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Correcting hyponatremia in these patients can reduce morbidity and mortality, increase the response to anti-cancer agents, and help reduce hospital length of stay and costs. Tolvaptan is an oral medication used to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia patients that needs to be initiated at hospital so patients can have their serum sodium monitored. If tolvaptan could be initiated in hospital day care units (DCUs), performing the same tests, hospitalization could be avoided, quality of life improved, and costs reduced. This is the first publication where a panel of oncologists are sharing their experience and making some recommendations with the use of tolvaptan to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia in DCU after collecting and examining 35 clinical cases with these type of patients. The conclusion from this retrospective observational analysis is that the use of tolvaptan in DCU is safe and effective in the therapeutic management of SIADH-related hyponatremia. PMID:26431960

  17. FDDI information management system for centralizing interactive, computerized multimedia clinical experiences in pediatric rheumatology/Immunology.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, R; Cronenberger, H; Stein, L; Hannum, W; Reed, A M; Wilhelm, C; Hsiao, H

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, authoring, and development of interactive, computerized, multimedia clinical simulations in pediatric rheumatology/immunology and related musculoskeletal diseases, the development and implementation of a high speed information management system for their centralized storage and distribution, and analytical methods for evaluating the total system's educational impact on medical students and pediatric residents. An FDDI fiber optic network with client/server/host architecture is the core. The server houses digitized audio, still-image video clips and text files. A host station houses the DB2/2 database containing case-associated labels and information. Cases can be accessed from any workstation via a customized interface in AVA/2 written specifically for this application. OS/2 Presentation Manager controls, written in C, are incorporated into the interface. This interface allows SQL searches and retrievals of cases and case materials. In addition to providing user-directed clinical experiences, this centralized information management system provides designated faculty with the ability to add audio notes and visual pointers to image files. Users may browse through case materials, mark selected ones and download them for utilization in lectures or for editing and converting into 35mm slides. PMID:8591407

  18. The Depressive Experiences Questionnaire: validity and psychological correlates in a clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Riley, W T; McCranie, E W

    1990-01-01

    This study sought to compare the original and revised scoring systems of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) and to assess the construct validity of the Dependent and Self-Critical subscales of the DEQ in a clinically depressed sample. Subjects were 103 depressed inpatients who completed the DEQ, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hopelessness Scale, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS), and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The original and revised scoring systems of the DEQ evidenced good concurrent validity for each factor scale, but the revised system did not sufficiently discriminate dependent and self-critical dimensions. Using the original scoring system, self-criticism was significantly and positively related to severity of depression, whereas dependency was not, particularly for males. Factor analysis of the DEQ scales and the other scales used in this study supported the dependent and self-critical dimensions. For men, the correlation of the DEQ with the MMPI scales indicated that self-criticism was associated with psychotic symptoms, hostility/conflict, and a distress/exaggerated response set, whereas dependency did not correlate significantly with any MMPI scales. Females, however, did not exhibit a differential pattern of correlations between either the Dependency or the Self-Criticism scales and the MMPI. These findings suggest possible gender differences in the clinical characteristics of male and female dependent and self-critical depressive subtypes. PMID:2348339

  19. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  20. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  1. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C.; Pyakuryal, A; Narayanasamy, Ganesh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  2. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Amerine, Lindsey B; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T; Rodgers, Philip T; Williams, Dennis M; Pinelli, Nicole R

    2015-11-25

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  3. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Amerine, Lindsey B.; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N.; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T.; Rodgers, Philip T.; Williams, Dennis M.; Pinelli, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  4. Determination of Variation Parameters as a Crucial Step in Designing TMT-Based Clinical Proteomics Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Evelyne; Valkenborg, Dirk; Baggerman, Geert; Willems, Hanny; Landuyt, Bart; Schoofs, Liliane; Mertens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    In quantitative shotgun proteomic analyses by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, a rigid study design is necessary in order to obtain statistically relevant results. Hypothesis testing, sample size calculation and power estimation are fundamental concepts that require consideration upon designing an experiment. For this reason, the reproducibility and variability of the proteomic platform needs to be assessed. In this study, we evaluate the technical (sample preparation), labeling (isobaric labels), and total (biological + technical + labeling + experimental) variability and reproducibility of a workflow that employs a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach in combination with TMT peptide labeling for the quantification of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proteome. We illustrate that the variability induced by TMT labeling is small when compared to the technical variation. The latter is also responsible for a substantial part of the total variation. Prior knowledge about the experimental variability allows for a correct design, a prerequisite for the detection of biologically significant disease-specific differential proteins in clinical proteomics experiments. PMID:25775046

  5. Understanding women's experiences with medical abortion: In-depth interviews with women in two Indian clinics.

    PubMed

    Ganatra, B; Kalyanwala, S; Elul, B; Coyaji, K; Tewari, S

    2010-01-01

    We explored women's perspectives on using medical abortion, including their reasons for selecting the method, their experiences with it and their thoughts regarding demedicalisation of part or all of the process. Sixty-three women from two urban clinics in India were interviewed within four weeks of abortion completion using a semi-structured in-depth interview guide. While women appreciated the non-invasiveness of medical abortion, other factors influencing method selection were family support and distance from the facility. The degree of medicalisation that women wanted or felt was necessary also depended on the way expectations were set by their providers. Confirmation of abortion completion was a source of anxiety for many women and led to unnecessary interventions in a few cases. Ultimately, experiences depended more on women's expectations about the method, and on the level of emotional and logistic support they received rather than on inherent characteristics of the method. These findings emphasise the circumstances under which women make reproductive choices and underscore the need to tailor service delivery to meet women's needs. Women-centred counselling and care that takes into consideration individual circumstances are needed. PMID:19431005

  6. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: experiences from recent studies and everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    Although spasticity of varying severity affects up to 80% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) during the course of their disease, the symptom is often overlooked and undertreated. Despite the availability of oral antispasticity treatments (baclofen, tizanidine and others), approximately one-third of MS patients in Europe and the USA experience moderate or severe nonfocalized spasticity. At present, a thorough clinical evaluation of MS-related spasticity that takes into account the patient's own perception of spasms, spasticity-related pain and other associated symptoms is not common in daily neurological practice. Some of the usual spasticity scales, such as the Ashworth and modified Ashworth scales, reflect the observer's measurement of spasticity at a particular point in time. Herbal (smoked) cannabis has long been recognized as a possible option for relief of spasticity and neuropathic pain, but pertinent concerns about psychoactive effects and addiction risk have prevented its common use. An innovative method of benefiting from the mode of action of cannabinoids while limiting their drawbacks is to reduce peak plasma levels of 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol and counteract psychoactivity with higher than naturally occurring proportions of a second cannabinoid, cannabidiol. Sativex oromucosal spray (1:1 ratio of 9-delta-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol) has recently been approved in a number of EU countries and elsewhere for use in patients with MS-related spasticity who are resistant to treatment with other antispasticity medications. In clinical trials, Sativex provided initial relief of spasticity symptoms within the first 4 weeks of treatment (trial period) in up to about half of patients resistant to other available oral antispasticity medications and demonstrated clinically significant improvement in spasticity (30% or higher reduction from baseline) in three-quarters of the initial responders. Adverse events were limited mainly to mild or moderate cases of somnolence and dizziness. Under everyday clinical practice conditions, Sativex at a mean daily dose of <7 sprays/day, was shown to relieve spasticity in about 70% of patients previously resistant to treatment. Clear improvements were also noted in associated symptoms such as sleep disturbances, bladder problems, loss of mobility and cramps. In large observational studies, >80% of patients reported no adverse events with the use of Sativex and interim data from safety registries in the UK and Spain indicate a low risk for serious adverse drug reactions. Follow-up studies in Sativex responders support continued benefit without the need to increase doses for at least 1 year. Sativex appears to be a promising solution for a meaningful proportion of patients with MS-related spasticity who have inadequate response to current antispasticity medications. PMID:24289844

  7. The pharmaceutical management system at Shade Tree Family Clinic: a medical student-run free clinic's experience.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Patel, Sanjay G; Guyer, Dana L; Dunn, Sarah R; Herceg, Megan E; Knox, Caroline K; Miller, Robert F

    2008-09-01

    The Shade Tree Family Clinic (STFC) is a student-run free walk-in health clinic opened by Vanderbilt University medical students in October 2005 to address the acute and chronic health needs of the underinsured community in East Nashville. STFC founders decided that the clinic would provide complete medical care, including dispensing commonly prescribed medications at no charge to patients. After several months of managing the inventory in a log book, a medical student author created a Web-based pharmaceutical tracking system to manage the medication formulary. In the process, the authors found little literature available addressing the logistics of setting up an electronic pharmacy system. The system created uses the freely available RxNorm and US Department of Veterans Affairs National Drug File Reference Terminology databases for medication and classification data. Incorporation of these databases allows medical students to dispense and restock medications with ease. The system ensures accurate data entry, improves efficiency, and facilitates continuity of care at a clinic staffed by hundreds of different students and physicians. The STFC pharmaceutical tracking system has facilitated the acquisition and efficient management of medications and consequently has had a great impact on the success of STFC. PMID:18850398

  8. A Framework for Usable and Effective Clinical Decision Support: Experience from the iCPR Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kannry, Joseph; McCullagh, Lauren; Kushniruk, Andre; Mann, Devin; Edonyabo, Daniel; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The promise of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) has always been to transform patient care and improve patient outcomes through the delivery of timely and appropriate recommendations that are patient specific and, more often than not, are appropriately actionable. However, the users of CDS—providers—are frequently bombarded with inappropriate and inapplicable CDS that often are not informational, not integrated into the workflow, not patient specific, and that may present out of date and irrelevant recommendations. Methods: The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR) project was a randomized clinical trial (RCT) conducted to determine if a novel form of CDS, i.e., clinical prediction rules (CPRs), could be efficiently integrated into workflow and result in changes in outcomes (e.g., antibiotic ordering) when embedded within a commercial electronic health record (EHR). We use the lessons learned from the iCPR project to illustrate a framework for constructing usable, useful, and effective actionable CDS while employing off-the-shelf functionality in a production system. Innovations that make up the framework combine the following: (1) active and actionable decision support, (2) multiple rounds of usability testing with iterative development for user acceptance, (3) numerous context sensitive triggers, (4) dedicated training and support for users of the CDS tool for user adoption, and (5) support from clinical and administrative leadership. We define “context sensitive triggers” as being workflow events (i.e., context) that result in a CDS intervention. Discussion: Success of the framework can be measured by CDS adoption (i.e., intervention is being used), acceptance (compliance with recommendations), and clinical outcomes (where appropriate). This framework may have broader implications for the deployment of Health Information Technology (HIT). Results and Conclusion: iCPR was well adopted(57.4% of users) and accepted (42.7% of users). Usability testing identified and fixed many issues before the iCPR RCT. The level of leadership support and clinical guidance for iCPR was key in establishing a culture of acceptance for both the tool and its recommendations contributing to adoption and acceptance. The dedicated training and support lead to the majority of the residents reporting a high level of comfort with both iCPR tools strep pharyngitis (64.4 percent) and pneumonia (62.7 percent) as well as a high likelihood of using the tools in the future. A surprising framework addition resulted from usability testing: context sensitive triggers. PMID:26290888

  9. Dental Students' Perceived Value of Peer-Mentoring Clinical Leadership Experiences.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Rachel A; Hammaker, Daniel J; de Peralta, Tracy L; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2016-03-01

    This pilot study compared second- and fourth-year dental students' perceived values of newly implemented clinical leadership experiences (CLEs) at one U.S. dental school during the 2012-13 academic year. In the CLEs, fourth-year (D4) students mentored second-year (D2) dental students during faculty-supervised patient treatment. The two cohorts' perceived value of the experiences was measured with questionnaires consisting of five-point Likert scale questions and open text responses. Out of a total of 114 D2 and 109 D4 students, 46 D2 students and 35 D4 students participated (response rates of 40.4% and 32.1%, respectively). While responses from both cohorts showed they highly valued the CLEs, the D2s perceived greater value: 4.07 (0.53) v. 3.51 (0.95), p<0.003. Both cohorts reported feeling that D4s were prepared to mentor D2s, that the CLEs had educational benefits, and that the CLEs increased their comfort with peer communication. Theme analysis of open text questions revealed that the respondents perceived the D4s were more accessible than faculty and provided guidance and individual attention; the CLEs increased student comfort; the CLEs reinforced D4 skills, knowledge, and confidence; and the CLEs provided management, leadership, and collaborative work experience. Theme analysis also highlighted student concerns about a lack of program structure. Overall, the majority of both groups valued CLEs in their dental education. Particular advantages they perceived were increased comfort, guidance, and attention. Further program development should address student concerns. These results suggest that similar programs should be considered and/or expanded in other dental schools' curricula. PMID:26933106

  10. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry of kidneys for treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Boubaker, Ariane; Buchegger, Franz; He Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) delivers high absorbed doses to kidneys and may lead to permanent nephropathy. Reliable dosimetry of kidneys is thus critical for safe and effective PRRT. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of planning PRRT based on 3D radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) in order to optimize both the amount of activity to administer and the fractionation scheme, while limiting the absorbed dose and the biological effective dose (BED) to the renal cortex. Methods: Planar and SPECT data were available for a patient examined with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide at 0.5 (planar only), 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection. Absorbed dose and BED distributions were calculated for common therapeutic radionuclides, i.e., {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, using the 3D-RD methodology. Dose-volume histograms were computed and mean absorbed doses to kidneys, renal cortices, and medullae were compared with results obtained using the MIRD schema (S-values) with the multiregion kidney dosimetry model. Two different treatment planning approaches based on (1) the fixed absorbed dose to the cortex and (2) the fixed BED to the cortex were then considered to optimize the activity to administer by varying the number of fractions. Results: Mean absorbed doses calculated with 3D-RD were in good agreement with those obtained with S-value-based SPECT dosimetry for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu. Nevertheless, for {sup 111}In, differences of 14% and 22% were found for the whole kidneys and the cortex, respectively. Moreover, the authors found that planar-based dosimetry systematically underestimates the absorbed dose in comparison with SPECT-based methods, up to 32%. Regarding the 3D-RD-based treatment planning using a fixed BED constraint to the renal cortex, the optimal number of fractions was found to be 3 or 4, depending on the radionuclide administered and the value of the fixed BED. Cumulative activities obtained using the proposed simulated treatment planning are compatible with real activities administered to patients in PRRT. Conclusions: The 3D-RD treatment planning approach based on the fixed BED was found to be the method of choice for clinical implementation in PRRT by providing realistic activity to administer and number of cycles. While dividing the activity in several cycles is important to reduce renal toxicity, the clinical outcome of fractionated PRRT should be investigated in the future.

  11. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation improves medical students' clinical skills: the Pavia pilot experience.

    PubMed

    Perlini, Stefano; Salinaro, Francesco; Santalucia, Paola; Musca, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Clinical evaluation is the cornerstone of any cardiac diagnosis, although excessive over-specialisation often leads students to disregard the value of clinical skills, and to overemphasize the approach to instrumental cardiac diagnosis. Time restraints, low availability of "typical" cardiac patients on whom to perform effective bedside teaching, patients' respect and the underscoring of the value of clinical skills all lead to a progressive decay in teaching. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation may improve clinical training in medical students and residents. Harvey(©) is a mannequin encompassing more than 50 cardiac diagnoses that was designed and developed at the University of Miami (Florida, USA). One of the advantages of Harvey(©) simulation resides in the possibility of listening, comparing and discussing "real" murmurs. To objectively assess its teaching performance, the capability to identify five different cardiac diagnoses (atrial septal defect, normal young subject, mitral stenosis with tricuspid regurgitation, chronic mitral regurgitation, and pericarditis) out of more than 50 diagnostic possibilities was assessed in 523 III-year medical students (i.e. at the very beginning of their clinical experience), in 92 VI-year students, and in 42 residents before and after a formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©). None of them had previously experienced simulation-based cardiac auscultation in addition to formal lecturing (all three groups) and bedside teaching (VI-year students and residents). In order to assess the "persistence" of the acquired knowledge over time, the test was repeated after 3 years in 85 students, who did not repeat the formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©) after the III year. As expected, the overall response was poor in the "beginners" who correctly identified 11.0 % of the administered cardiac murmurs. After simulation-guided training, the ability to recognise the correct cardiac diagnoses was much better (72.0 %; p < 0.001 vs. baseline). Rather unexpectedly, before the tutorial, the performance of VI-year students and of residents was not significantly different from their III-year colleagues, since the two groups correctly identified 14.2 and 16.2 % of the diagnoses, respectively. After the tutorial, the VI-year students and the residents also improved their overall performance (to 73.1 and 76.1 %, respectively; p < 0.001 for both when compared to before the tutorial). The persistence of this capability after 3 years was remarkable, since the 85 students who repeated the test without any further exposure to the 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©) correctly identified 68.4 % of the possible cardiac diagnoses (p < 0.001 vs. baseline). These data underscore the importance of clinical training in order to improve auscultation skills in our academic setting, prompting to redesign teaching curricula. Simulation-based cardiac auscultation should be considered as the "missing link" between formal lecturing and bedside teaching of heart sounds and murmurs. PMID:22767224

  12. Contents of supervision needed by physical and occupational therapists for ability development: focusing on their clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sugiura, Yoshito; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the contents of supervision needed by novice therapists to develop clinical abilities, focusing on their clinical experience and using an original evaluation table. [Subjects and Methods] An evaluation of clinical abilities basic attitudes, therapeutic skills, and clinical practice-related thoughts was conducted in 29, 21, and 9 therapists with clinical experience of 0–1 (1 year group), 1–2 (2 years group), and 2–3 (3 years group) years, respectively. [Results] There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in basic attitudes. Therapeutic skills markedly varied between the 1 and 3 years groups. In clinical practice-related thoughts, significant differences were observed between the 1 and 3 years groups and between the 2 and 3 years groups. [Conclusion] It may be appropriate for educators to provide technical education regarding skills that are achievable for students in the early stages in consideration of applied movements. Also, education for novices should be provided with importance attached to abilities influenced by clinical experience. PMID:26957745

  13. Estimation of a Self-Consistent Set of Radiobiological Parameters From Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A method to estimate intrinsic radiosensitivity (α), fractionation sensitivity (α/β), repopulation doubling time, number of clonogens, and kick-off time for accelerated repopulation of prostate cancer has been developed. Based on the generalized linear-quadratic model and without assuming the isoeffective hypothesis, the potential applications of the method were investigated using the clinical outcome of biochemical relapse-free survival recently reviewed in the literature. The strengths and limitations of the method, regarding the fitted parameters and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), are also discussed. Results: Our best estimate of α/β is 2.96 Gy (95% CI 2.41-3.53 Gy). The corresponding α value is 0.16 Gy{sup −1} (95% CI 0.14-0.18 Gy{sup −1}), which is compatible with a realistic number of clonogens: 6.5 × 10{sup 6} (95% CI 1.5 × 10{sup 6}-2.1 × 10{sup 7}). The estimated cell doubling time is 5.1 days (95% CI 4.2-7.2 days), very low if compared with that reported in the literature. This corresponds to the dose required to offset the repopulation occurring in 1 day of 0.52 Gy/d (95% CI 0.32-0.68 Gy/d). However, a long kick-off time of 31 days (95% CI 22-41 days) from the start of radiation therapy was found. Conclusion: The proposed analytic/graphic method has allowed the fitting of clinical data, providing a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer. With our analysis we confirm a low value for α/β with a correspondingly high value of intrinsic radiosensitivity, a realistic average number of clonogens, a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation, and a surprisingly fast repopulation that suggests the involvement of subpopulations of specifically tumorigenic stem cells during continuing radiation therapy.

  14. Richters Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, Ren

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richters hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richters hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as the small rupture. In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title Richters hernia. To his worka cornerstone to modern understandinghardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richters hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richters hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors collective was 17%. Conclusion Richters hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  15. Preliminary Clinical Experience with a Bifurcated Y-Graft Fontan ProcedureA Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, Kirk R.; Haggerty, Christopher M.; Restrepo, Maria; de Zelicourt, Diane A.; Rossignac, Jarek; Parks, W. James; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Optimizing flow and diminishing power loss in the Fontan circuit can improve hemodynamic efficiency potentially improving long-term outcomes. Computerized modeling has predicted improved energetics with a Y-graft Fontan. METHODS From August to December, 2010, six consecutive children had a completion Fontan (n=3) or a Fontan revision (n=3) using a bifurcated polytetrafluoroethylene Y-graft (1899 mm in 2, 201010 mm in 4) connecting the inferior vena cava (IVC) to the right and left pulmonary arteries (PAs) with separate graft limbs. Patents were imaged by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n-5) or computerized tomography (n=1). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) assessed Fontan hemodynamics, power loss, and IVC flow splits to the branch PAs. Clinical parameters were compared with 12 patients immediately preceding this series who had a lateral Fontan procedure. RESULTS Despite longer crossclamp and bypass times (not statistically significant), the Y-graft Fontan patients had postoperative courses similar to the conventional Fontan patients. Other than two early readmissions for pleural effusions managed with diuretics, on 612 months follow-up (mean 8 months), all six patients have done well. Postoperative flow modeling demonstrated balanced distribution of IVC flow to both PAs with minimal flow disturbance. Improvements in hemodynamics and efficiency were noted when the Y-graft branches were anastomosed distally and aligned tangentially with the branch PAs. CONCLUSIONS This preliminary surgical experience demonstrates clinical feasibility of the bifurcated Y-graft Fontan. CFD shows acceptable hemodynamics with low calculated power losses and balanced distribution of IVC flow to the PAs as long as the branch grafts are anastomosed distally. PMID:22698555

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Cardiomyopathy in Barth Syndrome: The UK Experience.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sok-Leng; Forsey, Jonathan; Dudley, Declan; Steward, Colin G; Tsai-Goodman, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked disorder characterised by cardiomyopathy, neutropenia, skeletal myopathy and growth delay. This study describes the UK national clinical experience and outcome of cardiomyopathy in BTHS. The clinical course and echocardiographic changes of all patients with BTHS in the UK were reviewed from 2004 to 2014. In addition, strain analysis using 2D speckle tracking echocardiography was performed to further assess left ventricular function in the most recent follow-up. At last follow-up, 22 of 27 patients were alive with a median age of 12.6 (2.0-23.8) years; seven underwent cardiac transplantation at a median age of 2 (0.33-3.6) years, and five died (18.5 %) at a median age of 1.8 (0.02-4.22) years. All deaths were related to cardiomyopathy or its management. Left ventricular diastolic dimension and systolic function measured by fractional shortening tended to normalise and stabilise after the first 3 years of life in the majority of patients. However, patients with BTHS (n = 16) had statistically significant reduction in global longitudinal and circumferential strain compared to controls (n = 18), (p < 0.001), despite apparent normal conventional measures of function. There was also reduced or reversed apical rotation and reduced left ventricular twist. Sustained ventricular arrhythmia was not seen at follow-up. Cardiac phenotype in BTHS is variable; however, longer-term outcome in our cohort suggests good prognosis after the first 5 years of life. Most patients appeared to have recovered near normal cardiac function by conventional echocardiographic measures, but strain analysis showed abnormal myocardial deformation and rotational mechanics. PMID:26337810

  17. First clinical experience in carbon ion scanning beam therapy: retrospective analysis of patient positional accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shinichiro; Shibayama, Kouichi; Tanimoto, Katsuyuki; Kumagai, Motoki; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Our institute has constructed a new treatment facility for carbon ion scanning beam therapy. The first clinical trials were successfully completed at the end of November 2011. To evaluate patient setup accuracy, positional errors between the reference Computed Tomography (CT) scan and final patient setup images were calculated using 2D-3D registration software. Eleven patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate and pelvis receiving carbon ion scanning beam treatment participated. The patient setup process takes orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images and the therapists adjust the patient table position in six degrees of freedom to register the reference position by manual or auto- (or both) registration functions. We calculated residual positional errors with the 2D-3D auto-registration function using the final patient setup orthogonal FPD images and treatment planning CT data. Residual error averaged over all patients in each fraction decreased from the initial to the last treatment fraction [1.09mm/0.76 (averaged in the 1st and 2nd fractions) to 0.77mm/0.61 (averaged in the 15th and 16th fractions)]. 2D-3D registration calculation time was 8.0s on average throughout the treatment course. Residual errors in translation and rotation averaged over all patients as a function of date decreased with the passage of time (1.6mm/1.2 in May 2011 to 0.4mm/0.2 in December 2011). This retrospective residual positional error analysis shows that the accuracy of patient setup during the first clinical trials of carbon ion beam scanning therapy was good and improved with increasing therapist experience. PMID:22927632

  18. SU-E-J-181: Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Workflow: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Green, O; Kashani, R; Santanam, L; Wooten, H; Li, H; Rodriguez, V; Hu, Y; Mutic, S; Hand, T; Victoria, J; Steele, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aims of this work are to describe the workflow and initial clinical experience treating patients with an MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIGRT) system. Methods: Patient treatments with a novel MR-IGRT system started at our institution in mid-January. The system consists of an on-board 0.35-T MRI, with IMRT-capable delivery via doubly-focused MLCs on three {sup 60} Co heads. In addition to volumetric MR-imaging, real-time planar imaging is performed during treatment. So far, eleven patients started treatment (six finished), ranging from bladder to lung SBRT. While the system is capable of online adaptive radiotherapy and gating, a conventional workflow was used to start, consisting of volumetric imaging for patient setup using visible tumor, evaluation of tumor motion outside of PTV on cine images, and real-time imaging. Workflow times were collected and evaluated to increase efficiency and evaluate feasibility of adding the adaptive and gating features while maintaining a reasonable patient throughput. Results: For the first month, physicians attended every fraction to provide guidance on identifying the tumor and an acceptable level of positioning and anatomical deviation. Average total treatment times (including setup) were reduced from 55 to 45 min after physician presence was no longer required and the therapists had learned to align patients based on soft-tissue imaging. Presently, the source strengths were at half maximum (7.7K Ci each), therefore beam-on times will be reduced after source replacement. Current patient load is 10 per day, with increase to 25 anticipated in the near future. Conclusion: On-board, real-time MRI-guided RT has been incorporated into clinical use. Treatment times were kept to reasonable lengths while including volumetric imaging, previews of tumor movement, and physician evaluation. Workflow and timing is being continuously evaluated to increase efficiency. In near future, adaptive and gating capabilities of the system will be implemented.

  19. Initial clinical laboratory experience in noninvasive prenatal testing for fetal aneuploidy from maternal plasma DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Futch, Tracy; Spinosa, John; Bhatt, Sucheta; de Feo, Eileen; Rava, Richard P; Sehnert, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to report the experience of noninvasive prenatal DNA testing using massively parallel sequencing in an accredited clinical laboratory. Methods Laboratory information was examined for blood samples received for testing between February and November 2012 for chromosome 21 (Chr21), Chr18, and Chr13. Monosomy X (MX) testing was available from July 2012 for cystic hygroma indication. Outcomes were collected from providers on samples with positive results. Results There were 5974 samples tested, and results were issued within an average of 5.1 business days. Aneuploidy was detected in 284 (4.8%) samples (155 Chr21, 66 Chr18, 19 Chr13, 40 MX, and four double aneuploidy). Follow-ups are available for 245/284 (86%), and 77/284 (27.1%) are confirmed, including one double-aneuploidy case concordant with cytogenetics from maternal malignancy. Fourteen (0.2%) discordant (putative false-positive) results (one Chr21, six Chr18, three Chr13, three MX, and one Chr21/13) have been identified. Five (0.08%) false-negative cases are reported (two trisomy 21, two trisomy 18, and one MX). In 170 (2.8%) cases, the result for a single chromosome was indefinite. Conclusions This report suggests that clinical testing of maternal cell-free DNA for fetal aneuploidy operates within performance parameters established in validation studies. Noninvasive prenatal testing is sensitive to biological contributions from placental and maternal sources. 2013 Verinata Health, Inc. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23592485

  20. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using proton beams: Initial clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Smith, Barbara L.; Adams, Judith C.; Kornmehl, Ellen; Katz, Angela; Gadd, Michele; Specht, Michelle; Hughes, Kevin; Gioioso, Valeria; Lu, H.-M.; Braaten, Kristina; Recht, Abram; Powell, Simon N.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Taghian, Alphonse G. . E-mail: ataghian@partners.org

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: We present our initial clinical experience with proton, three-dimensional, conformal, external beam, partial-breast irradiation (3D-CPBI). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated with proton 3D-CPBI in a Phase I/II clinical trial. Patients were followed at 3 to 4 weeks, 6 to 8 weeks, 6 months, and every 6 months thereafter for recurrent disease, cosmetic outcome, toxicity, and patient satisfaction. Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 8-22 months), no recurrent disease has been detected. Global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians to be good or excellent in 89% and 100% of cases at 6 months and 12 months, respectively. Patients rated global breast cosmesis as good or excellent in 100% of cases at both 6 and 12 months. Proton 3D-CPBI produced significant acute skin toxicity with moderate to severe skin color changes in 79% of patients at 3 to 4 weeks and moderate to severe moist desquamation in 22% of patients at 6 to 8 weeks. Telangiectasia was noted in 3 patients. Three patients reported rib tenderness in the treated area, and one rib fracture was documented. At last follow-up, 95% of patients reported total satisfaction with proton 3D-CPBI. Conclusions: Based on our study results, proton 3D-CPBI offers good-to-excellent cosmetic outcomes in 89% to 100% of patients at 6-month and 12-month follow-up and nearly universal patient satisfaction. However, proton 3D-CPBI, as used in this study, does result in significant acute skin toxicity and may potentially be associated with late skin (telangiectasia) and rib toxicity. Because of the dosimetric advantages of proton 3D-CPBI, technique modifications are being explored to improve acute skin tolerance.

  1. Analysis of stress fractures in athletes based on our clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze stress fractures in athletes based on experience from our sports medicine clinic. METHODS: We investigated the association between stress fractures and age, sex, sports level, sports activity, and skeletal site in athletes seen at our sports medicine clinic between September 1991 and April 2009. Stress fractures of the pars interarticularis were excluded from this analysis. RESULTS: During this period (18 years and 8 mo), 14276 patients (9215 males and 5061 females) consulted our clinic because of sports-related injuries, and 263 patients (1.8%) [171 males (1.9%) and 92 females (1.8%)] sustained stress fractures. The average age of the patients with stress fractures was 20.2 years (range 10-46 years); 112 patients (42.6%) were 15-19 years of age and 90 (34.2%) were 20-24 years of age. Altogether, 90 patients (34.2%) were active at a high recreational level and 173 (65.8%) at a competitive level. The highest proportion of stress fractures was seen in basketball athletes (21.3%), followed by baseball (13.7%), track and field (11.4%), rowing (9.5%), soccer (8.4%), aerobics (5.3%), and classical ballet (4.9%). The most common sites of stress fractures in these patients were the tibia (44.1%), followed by the rib (14.1%), metatarsal bone (12.9%), ulnar olecranon (8.7%) and pelvis (8.4%). The sites of the stress fractures varied from sport to sport. The ulnar olecranon was the most common stress fracture site in baseball players, and the rib was the most common in rowers. Basketball and classical ballet athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and metatarsal bone. Track and field and soccer athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and pubic bone. Aerobics athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia. Middle and long distance female runners who sustained multiple stress fractures had the female athlete triad. CONCLUSION: The results of this analysis showed that stress fractures were seen in high-level young athletes, with similar proportions for males and females, and that particular sports were associated with specific sites for stress fractures. Middle and long distance female runners who suffered from multiple stress fractures had the female athlete triad. PMID:22474626

  2. Clinical Outcome of Parotidectomy with Reconstruction: Experience of a Regional Head and Neck Cancer Unit

    PubMed Central

    Okoturo, Eyituoyo; Osasuyi, Anslem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salivary gland pathologies represent a histologically diverse group of benign and malignant neoplasms. Currently, World Health Organization recognizes 13 benign and 24 malignant variants of all salivary gland neoplasms. Surgery continues to remain the main-stay for treatment of parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study was to document our experiences of the patients treated for parotid tumors and find out if any compelling variable predicted the relative clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study, from records of parotidectomies performed at the operating theatre by the head and neck cancer division of the study institution between 2010 and 2013. Eligibility for study inclusion included cases with benign or malignant parotid neoplasms requiring surgical management with or without adjunct radiotherapy. The predictors of postoperative complications, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed. Results: A total of 20 patients underwent parotidectomy. The mean age was 42 years. Tumors were located on the left parotid in 13 cases (65%) and the right parotid in 7 cases (35%). The surgical procedures comprised 16 superficial parotidectomies, 1 total parotidectomy, and 3 radical parotidectomy (inclusive of facial nerve sacrifice) and 2 neck dissections levels II–V. The reconstructive procedures were 2 facial nerve branch cable grafts, 1 end-to-end facial-facial nerve branch anastomoses, and 2 facial re-animation surgeries (temporalis muscle suspensions). A total of five cases (33.3%) had postoperative complications. 2 variables (length of surgery and neck dissection) were found to have an impact on postoperative complications that were statistically significant. Additionally, length of surgery was a significant predictor on the 2 years OS and DFS. Conclusion: The result of this study showed good clinical outcome, especially in the benign cases. The comprehensive clinical outcome of the malignant cases could not be objectively assessed, as the OS and DFS were 50% at 2-years follow-up. It is our submission that a larger sample size is utilized in subsequent studies and quality of life evaluation is included in the methodology. PMID:27013855

  3. Silent loss and the clinical encounter: Parents’ and physicians’ experiences of stillbirth–a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the United States, an estimated 70 stillbirths occur each day, on average 25,000 each year. Research into the prevalence and causes of stillbirth is ongoing, but meanwhile, many parents suffer this devastating loss, largely in silence, due to persistent stigma and taboo; and many health providers report feeling ill equipped to support grieving parents. Interventions to address bereavement after neonatal death are increasingly common in U.S. hospitals, and there is growing data on the nature of parent bereavement after a stillbirth. However, further research is needed to evaluate supportive interventions and to investigate the parent-clinician encounter during hospitalization following a stillbirth. Qualitative inquiry offers opportunities to better understand the lived experience of parents against the backdrop of clinicians’ beliefs, intentions, and well-meaning efforts to support grieving parents. Methods We present a secondary qualitative analysis of transcript data from 3 semi-structured focus groups conducted with parents who had experienced a stillbirth and delivered in a hospital, and 2 focus groups with obstetrician-gynecologists. Participants were drawn from the greater Seattle region in Washington State. We examine parents’ and physicians’ experiences and beliefs surrounding stillbirth during the clinical encounter using iterative discourse analysis. Results Women reported that the cheery, bustling environment of the labor and delivery setting was a painful place for parents who had had a stillbirth, and that the well-meaning attempts of physicians to offer comfort often had the opposite effect. Parents also reported that their grief is deeply felt but not socially recognized. While physicians recognized patients’ grief, they did not grasp its depth or duration. Physicians viewed stillbirth as an unexpected clinical tragedy, though several considered stillbirth less traumatic than the death of a neonate. In the months and years following a stillbirth, these parents continue to memorialize their children as part of their family. Conclusions Hospitals need to examine the physical environment for deliveries and, wherever possible, offer designated private areas with staff trained in stillbirth care. Training programs in obstetrics need to better address the bereavement needs of parents following a stillbirth, and research is needed to evaluate effective bereavement interventions, accounting for cultural variation. Critical improvements are also needed for mental health support beyond hospitalization. Finally, medical professionals and parents can play an important role in reversing the stigma that surrounds stillbirth. PMID:23181615

  4. Expansive learning in the university setting: the case for simulated clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Jacquelyn

    2007-03-01

    This paper argues that simulated practice in the university setting is not just a second best to learning in the clinical area but one which offers the potential for deliberation and deep learning [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. The context of student learning in an undergraduate midwifery programme is analysed using human activity theory [Engestrm, Y., 2001. Expansive learning at work: toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14, 133-156]. The advantages of this approach to student learning as opposed to situated learning theory and the concept of legitimate peripheral participation [Lave, J., Wenger, E., 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, New York] are discussed. An activity system changes as a result of contradictions and tensions between what it purports to produce and the views of stakeholders (multi-voicedness) as well as its historical context (Historicity of activity). A focus group with students highlights their expressed need for more simulated practice experience. The views of midwifery lecturers are sought as an alternative voice on this tension in the current programme. Qualitative differences in types of simulated experience are explored and concerns about resources are raised in the analysis. Discussion considers the value of well planned simulations in encouraging the expression of tacit understanding through a group deliberative learning process [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. PMID:17689430

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life in the Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Judith; Saag, Michael; Squires, Kathleen; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Coate, Bruce; Mrus, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Background. We report health-related QoL (HRQoL) from GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) study by sex and race over 48 weeks. Methods. 429 treatment-experienced adults (HIV-1 RNA ≥ 1000 copies/mL) received darunavir/ritonavir 600/100 mg twice daily plus an appropriate background regimen. QoL was measured by the Functional Assessment of HIV Infection (FAHI) questionnaire. Results. 67% women and 77% men, including 67.4% black, 76.0% Hispanic, and 73.8% white patients, completed the trial. Baseline total FAHI scores were similar between sexes and races. Total FAHI of the entire population improved by Week 4 (P < .05); near-maximum changes obtained by Week 12 were maintained through Week 48. Women and black patients demonstrated larger improvements in total FAHI versus men, and Hispanic and white patients, respectively. Conclusion. HRQoL improved in all sex and racial/ethnic groups. Sex-based and race-based differences in improvements in FAHI subscales may provide insight into subtle differences of HIV-1 and treatment on HRQoL in different populations. PMID:21904672

  6. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25790510

  7. Clinical judgment and decision-making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25882591

  8. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho; Lee, Yoonho

    2015-09-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  9. "Distally based dorsal hand flaps": clinical experience, cadaveric studies and an update.

    PubMed

    Vuppalapati, Gunasekar; Oberlin, C; Balakrishnan, G

    2004-10-01

    Many developments have taken place in the area of distally based dorsal hand flaps since 1988. This paper reported these developments as well as our clinical experience and cadaveric studies. Thirty-three reverse dorsal metacarpal artery (RDMA) flaps, 11 reverse dorsal digital artery (RDDA) flaps and five extended RDMA flaps done in the Institute for Research and Rehabilitation of Hand, Stanley Hospital, Chennai, India during the period between 1996 and 2002 are reviewed. In our series, we used simple, composite, fasciocutaneous and adipofascial flaps, encountered 4% total loss and 6% partial loss. A series of injected cadaveric hands were studied in the Institute D'Anatomie de Paris. An important anatomical finding in this cadaveric study is the dorsal metacarpal artery terminating at the confluence of common digital artery branching into digital arteries proper to the neighbouring digits in all the eight hands dissected. We undertake a critical review of the literature, highlighting the sequence of developments in the knowledge of relevant anatomy and various flap designs as distally based dorsal hand flaps since their first popular report in 1990. PMID:15380699

  10. Development of Facial Rejuvenation Procedures: Thirty Years of Clinical Experience with Face Lifts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Jun; Choi, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation procedures can be roughly divided into face lift surgery and nonoperative, less invasive procedures, such as fat grafts, fillers, botulinum toxin injections, thread lifts, or laserbrasion. Face lift surgery or rhytidectomy is the procedure most directly associated with rejuvenation, due to its fundamental ability to restore the anatomical changes caused by aging. Various methods of face lift surgery have been developed over the last hundred years, thanks to advances in the understanding of facial anatomy and the mechanisms of aging, as well as the dedication of innovative surgeons. However, no generally applicable standard method exists, because the condition of each patient is different, and each operative method has advantages and disadvantages. Specific characteristics of the skin of Asians and their skeletal anatomy should be considered when determining the operative method to be used on Asian patients. Plastic surgeons should improve their ability to analyze the original aesthetic properties and problem areas of each patient, drawing on scientific knowledge about the aging process, and they should develop the skills necessary to perform various rejuvenative techniques. In the present article, we reviewed various face lift procedures and the current methods of modified double plane face lift, based on our clinical experience of over 30 years. PMID:26430622

  11. CT Lesion Model-Based Structural Allografts: Custom Fabrication and Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Jan Claas; Hesselbarth, Uwe; Seifert, Philipp; Nowack, Dimitri; von Versen, Rüdiger; Smith, Mark David; Seifert, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Patients requiring knee and hip revision arthroplasty often present with difficult anatomical situations that limit options for surgery. Customised mega-implants may be one of few remaining treatment options. However, extensive damage to residual bone stock may also be present, and in such cases even customised prosthetics may be difficult to implant. Small quantities of lost bone can be replaced with standard allografts or autologous bone. Larger defects may require structural macro-allografts, sometimes in combination with implants (allograft-prosthesis composites). Methods Herein, we describe a process for manufacturing lesion-specific large structural allografts according to a 3D, full-scale, lithographically generated defect model. These macro-allografts deliver the volume and the mechanical stability necessary for certain complex revisions. They are patient-and implant-matched, negate some requirements for additional implants and biomaterials and save time in the operating theatre by eliminating the requirement for intra-operative sizing and shaping of standard allografts. Conclusion While a robust data set from long-term follow-up of patients receiving customised macro-allografts is not yet available, initial clinical experience and results suggest that lesion-matched macro-allografts can be an important component of revision joint surgery. PMID:23800856

  12. Initial clinical experience using the EchoNavigator®-system during structural heart disease interventions

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Jan; Zeus, Tobias; Hellhammer, Katharina; Veulemans, Verena; Eschenhagen, Silke; Kehmeier, Eva; Meyer, Christian; Rassaf, Tienush; Kelm, Malte

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present our initial clinical experience using this innovative software solution for guidance of percutaneous structural heart disease interventions. METHODS: Left atrial appendage, atrial septal defect and paravalvular leak closure, transaortic valve repair and MitraClip® procedures were performed in the catheter laboratory under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic guidance. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional images generated by the transesophageal echocardiography probe were interfaced with the fluoroscopic images in real-time using the EchoNavigator®-system. RESULTS: The application of the novel image fusion technology was safe and led to a better appreciation of multimodality imaging guidance due to improved visualization of the complex relationship between catheter devices and anatomical structures. CONCLUSION: The EchoNavigator®-system is a feasible and safe tool for guidance of interventional procedures in structural heart disease. This innovative technology may improve confidence of interventional cardiologists in targeting and positioning interventional devices in order to increase safety, accuracy, and efficacy of percutaneous interventions in the catheter laboratory. PMID:26413233

  13. Unsupervised biomedical named entity recognition: experiments with clinical and biological texts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaodian; Elhadad, Nomie

    2013-12-01

    Named entity recognition is a crucial component of biomedical natural language processing, enabling information extraction and ultimately reasoning over and knowledge discovery from text. Much progress has been made in the design of rule-based and supervised tools, but they are often genre and task dependent. As such, adapting them to different genres of text or identifying new types of entities requires major effort in re-annotation or rule development. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised approach to extracting named entities from biomedical text. We describe a stepwise solution to tackle the challenges of entity boundary detection and entity type classification without relying on any handcrafted rules, heuristics, or annotated data. A noun phrase chunker followed by a filter based on inverse document frequency extracts candidate entities from free text. Classification of candidate entities into categories of interest is carried out by leveraging principles from distributional semantics. Experiments show that our system, especially the entity classification step, yields competitive results on two popular biomedical datasets of clinical notes and biological literature, and outperforms a baseline dictionary match approach. Detailed error analysis provides a road map for future work. PMID:23954592

  14. Clinical and practical requirements of online software for anesthesia documentation an experience report.

    PubMed

    Benson, M; Junger, A; Quinzio, L; Fuchs, C; Sciuk, G; Michel, A; Marquardt, K; Hempelmann, G

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this paper is the presentation of a new version of the anesthesia documentation software, NarkoData, that has been used in routine clinical work in our department as part of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) since 1995. The performance of this software is presented along with requirements for future development of such a system. The originally used version, NarkoData 3.0, is an online anesthesia documentation software established by the software company ProLogic GmbH. It was primarily developed as a disk-based system for the MacOS operating system (Apple Computer Inc.). Based on our routine experience with the system, a catalogue of requirements was developed that concentrated on improvement in the sequence of work, administration and data management. In 1996, the concepts developed in our department, in close co-operation with medical personnel and the software company, led to a considerable enlargement of the program functions and the subsequent release of a new version of NarkoData. Since 1997, more than 20 000 anesthesia procedures have been recorded annually with this new version at 115 decentralized work stations at our university hospital. PMID:10961571

  15. [Professor Li Shi-zhen's clinical experiences on compatibility application of hegu (LI 4)].

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-qi

    2010-02-01

    The present paper introduces professor LI Shi-zhen's clinical experiences on compatibility application of Hegu (LI 4). Hegu (LI 4) is mostly used to treat acute pyreticosis, exterior syndrome of exogenous diseases, mind diseases and deficiency of vital energy. Acupuncture at this acupoint by using reducing method can dispel wind to relieve exterior syndrome, clear away heat to disperse lung. Powerful stimulation by needle can dredge stagnant meridian, open orifice to activate spirit. Acupuncture at this acupoint by using reinforcing method can invigorate qi to strengthen superficies and replenish qi to prevent collapse. Based on this method, reinforcing Zusanli (ST 36) and Baihui (GV 20) can strengthen middle energizer to nourish qi, which show the same benefits as Buzhong Yiqi Decoction; reinforcing Sanyinjiao (SP 6) can nourish both qi and blood, which show the same benefits as Decoction of Eight Ingredients; reducing Neiting (ST 44) can clear away evil heat of qifen in yangming meridians, which show the same benefits as Baihu Decoction. PMID:20214075

  16. Segmental composition of whole-body impedance cardiogram estimated by computer simulations and clinical experiments.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Kbi, T; Hyttinen, J; Malmivuo, J

    2000-03-01

    Whole-body impedance cardiography (ICGWB) has been proposed as a feasible means of measuring cardiac output (CO). However, the source distribution of heart-related impedance variations in the whole body is not known. To establish how much of a signal originates in each segment of the body and what the contribution of each is to stroke volume (SV) in ICGWB, impedance in the extremities and trunk were investigated in 15 healthy volunteers. In addition, the theoretical measurement properties of ICGWB were studied using a computer model of the whole-body anatomy as a volume conductor. The model confirmed the expected result that most of the basal impedance originates from the extremities. Clinical experiments revealed that the heart-related amplitude variations in the ICGWB signal originate more evenly from various body segments, the trunk slightly more than the arms or legs. The heart-related ICGWB signal represents a weighted sum of segmental pulsatile events in the body yielding physiologically meaningful data on almost the whole circulatory system. PMID:10735977

  17. Recruitment of ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials: experience from the front lines

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, R P; Lord, K; Mitchell, A J; Raghavan, D

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the world there are problems recruiting ethnic minority patients into cancer clinical trials. A major barrier to trial entry may be distrust of research and the medical system. This may be compounded by the regulatory framework governing research with an emphasis on written consent, closed questions and consent documentation, as well as fiscal issues. The Leicester UK experience is that trial accrual is better if British South Asian patients are approached by a senior doctor rather than someone of perceived lesser hierarchical status and a greater partnership between the hospital and General Practitioner may increase trial participation of this particular ethnic minority. In Los Angeles, USA, trial recruitment was improved by a greater utilisation of Hispanic staff and a Spanish language-based education programme. Involvement of community leaders is essential. While adhering to national, legal and ethnical standards, information sheets and consent, it helps if forms can be tailored towards the local ethnic minority population. Written translations are often of limited value in the recruitment of patients with no or limited knowledge of English. In some cultural settings, tape-recorded verbal consent (following approval presentations) may be an acceptable substitute for written consent, and appropriate legislative changes should be considered to facilitate this option. Approaches should be tailored to specific minority populations, taking consideration of their unique characteristics and with input from their community leadership. PMID:23011540

  18. Adult ADHD patient experiences of impairment, service provision and clinical management in England: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence of the unmet needs and experiences of adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the published scientific literature. This study aimed to explore the experiences of adults in England with ADHD regarding access to diagnostic and treatment services, ADHD-related impairment and to compare experiences between patients diagnosed during adulthood and childhood. Methods In this qualitative study, 30 adults with ADHD were recruited through an ADHD charity (n = 17) and two hospital outpatient clinics for adults with ADHD in England (n = 13). Half of the participants were diagnosed with ADHD during childhood or adolescence and the remainder during adulthood. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data was analysed using a thematic approach based on Grounded Theory principles. Results Analysis revealed five core themes: ‘An uphill struggle’: the challenge of accessing services, ‘Accumulated Psychosocial Burden and the Impact of ADHD’, ‘Weighing up Costs vs. Benefits of ADHD Pharmacological Treatment’, ‘Value of Non-pharmacological Treatment’ and ‘Barriers to Treatment Adherence’. Accessing services and the challenges associated with securing a definitive diagnosis of ADHD in adulthood was an ‘uphill struggle’, often due to sceptical and negative attitudes towards ADHD by healthcare professionals. ADHD-related impairment had an overwhelmingly chaotic impact on every aspect of patients’ lives and many felt ill equipped to cope. A persistent sense of failure and missed potential from living with the impact of ADHD impairment had led to an accumulated psychosocial burden, especially among those diagnosed from late adolescence onwards. In contrast, positive adjustment was facilitated by a younger age at diagnosis. Although medication was perceived as necessary in alleviating impairment, many felt strongly that by itself, it was inadequate. Additional support in the form of psychological therapies or psycho-education was strongly desired. However, few patients had access to non-pharmacological treatment. In some, medication use was often inadequately monitored with little or no follow-up by healthcare professionals, leading to poor adherence and a sense of abandonment from the healthcare system. Conclusion The findings suggest that the unmet needs of adults with ADHD are substantial and that there is a wide gap between policy and current practice in England. PMID:23692803

  19. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on shield design for a 60-day lunar mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Schimmerling, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray exposure are analyzed to determine their effect on engineering designs for a first lunar outpost - a 60-day mission. Quantitative estimates of shield mass requirements as a function of a radiobiological uncertainty factor are given for a simplified vehicle structure. The additional shield mass required for compensation is calculated as a function of the uncertainty in galactic cosmic ray exposure, and this mass is found to be as large as a factor of 3 for a lunar transfer vehicle. The additional cost resulting from this mass is also calculated. These cost estimates are then used to exemplify the cost-effectiveness of research.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): method and early clinical experiences in diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Huk, W J; Gademann, G

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has undergone a rapid development which is still continuing. In this article a survey is given of the present status of this new diagnostic tool in the evaluation of diseases of the central nervous system. When atoms with uneven numbers of protons or neutrons in a homogeneous magnetic field are tilted against the main vector of this field by a radiofrequency pulse, nuclear magnetic resonance can be observed. During the relaxation of the little dipoles back to the direction of the underlying magnetic field, a resonance signal is generated. The superposition of variable field gradients enables the scanning of sectional images in the axial, frontal and sagittal plane. The variables of H+-magnetic resonance which can be utilized for imaging are: the proton density, the relaxation times T1 (spin-lattice) and T2 (spin-spin) and flow effects. While the proton density in organic tissue fluctuates only by some 10%, the relaxation times may vary by several hundred per cent. Tissue contrast, therefore, is mainly based on relaxation times differences. The image character can also be influenced by variations of imaging parameters (i.e. repetition rate, interpulse delay, read out or echo delay) in different imaging sequences, such as the spin-echo and the inversion recovery technique. Depending on these imaging parameters T1 and T2 will contribute to the signal to a varying degree. This fact is most important for the diagnostic information of MRI. In initial clinical experiences in the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity in the detection of lesions (such as oedema, neoplasms, demyelinating disease), but less significance in lesion discrimination. In spinal disease the direct sagittal imaging of MRI enables MRI-myelography without contrast medium, superior to conventional myelography in many cases. For detailed evaluation of disc disease, however, the spatial resolution still has to be improved. Promising results have been obtained from flow effects. Depending on the flow velocity of blood, vessels appear white with intensive signals (slow flow) or black due to low signal intensities (rapid flow). MRI-angiography including measurement of blood flow seems possible. MRI-contrast media are not yet available for routine clinical use. Promising results have been reported on the basis of rare-earth elements, such as gadolinium Gd3+. These substances decrease T1 and T2 with subsequent increase in signal intensity. Concerning harmful side-effects of MRI, three possible sources have to be considered: the static magnetic field, the changing magnetic field, and radiofrequency heating.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6397697

  1. A meta-synthesis of behavioral outcomes from telemedicine clinical trials for type 2 diabetes and the Clinical User-Experience Evaluation (CUE).

    PubMed

    Jalil, Sakib; Myers, Trina; Atkinson, Ian

    2015-03-01

    A worldwide demographic shift is in progress and the aged population proportion is projected to more than double across the next four decades. Our current healthcare models may not be adequate to handle this shift in demography, which may have serious consequences for the ageing population who are more prone to chronic diseases. One proposed remediation is to provide in-home assisted healthcare with technology-intervened approaches. Telemedicine, telehealth, e-health are paradigms found in scientific literature that provide clinical treatment through a technology intervention. In evidence-based medical science, these technology interventions are evaluated through clinical trials, which are targeted to measure improvements in medical conditions and the treatment's cost effectiveness. However, effectiveness of a technology also depends on the interaction pattern between the technology and its' users, especially the patients. This paper presents (1) a meta-synthesis of clinical trials for technology-intervened treatments of type 2 diabetes and (2) the Clinical User-Experience Evaluation (CUE). CUE is a recommendation for future telemedicine clinical trials that focuses on the patient as the user from Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) perspective and was developed as part of this research. The clinical trials reviewed were interpreted from a technology perspective and the non-medical or non-biological improvements of the users (patients) rather than the medical outcome. Results show that technology-intervened treatments provide positive behavior changes among patients and are potentially highly beneficial for chronic illness management such as type 2 diabetes. The results from the CUE method show how it complements clinical trials to capture patients' interaction with a technology. PMID:25677954

  2. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more-advanced parameter reconstruction algorithms.

  3. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data.

    PubMed

    Chvetsov, Alevei V; Sandison, George A; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more-advanced parameter reconstruction algorithms. PMID:26485348

  4. Diversity characteristics and the experiences of nursing students' during clinical placements: A qualitative study of students and supervisors views.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jane; Everett, Bronwyn; Phillips, Jane; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-11-10

    Abstract Background: Little is known about which diversity characteristics if any, impact on nursing students' clinical placements or how these may affect the quality of their learning experiences. There is therefore a need to better understand these effects not only from the student's perspective but also from the perspective of the staff who supervise them, in order to ensure students obtain maximal benefit from their placements. Aim: To describe the clinical experiences of nursing students and the diversity characteristics that affect this learning experience. Methods: Data were collected from a series of open-ended questions embedded within a larger anonymous web-based survey, from August 2011 to March 2012. Participants included first, second and third year undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing students (N=704) and faculty members involved in the clinical learning environment (N = 165) from seven Australian universities. Findings: Qualitative findings were clustered into three main themes, differences, difficulty and discrimination, each with three subthemes. Conclusion: Findings suggest a need to offer appropriate support for nursing students who feel different because of diversity characteristics. Whilst some of the participant perceptions are confronting they provide valuable insights for universities developing curricula and the clinical placement facilities where students obtain their experience. PMID:25381798

  5. Events and Experiences Impacting the Development of Clinical Self Confidence: A Study of the First Year of Client Contact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischoff, Richard J.; Barton, Marci; Thober, Jody; Hawley, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Research was conducted to identify the events and experiences influencing the development of clinical self-confidence during the first year of client contact for beginning marriage and family therapists. Thirty-nine recent graduates of a master's degree training program participated in a semistructured interview in which they were asked to

  6. 21st L H Gray Conference: the radiobiology/radiation protection interface.

    PubMed

    West, C M L; Martin, C J; Sutton, D G; Wright, E G

    2009-05-01

    The 21st L H Gray Conference, organised by the L H Gray Trust with the Society for Radiological Protection, brought together international experts in radiobiology, epidemiology and risk assessment, and scientists involved in diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure. The meeting - held in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 4-6 June 2008 - aimed to raise awareness, educate and share knowledge of important issues in radiation protection. A distinguished group of speakers discussed topics that included (i) non-targeted effects of radiation, (ii) exposure to high natural background radiation, (iii) non-cancer effects in Japanese bomb survivors, (iv) lessons learnt from Chernobyl, (v) radiation in the workplace, (vi) biokinetic modelling, (vii) uncertainties in risk estimation, (viii) issues in diagnostic medical exposures, (ix) lessons leant from the polonium-210 incidence and (x) how the radiobiology/radiation oncology community is needed to help society prepare for potential future acts of radiation terrorism. The conference highlighted the importance, relevance and topicality of radiobiology today. PMID:19386958

  7. Initial Image Quality and Clinical Experience with New CR Digital Mammography System: A Phantom and Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gaona, Enrique; Enriquez, Jesus Gabriel Franco; Alfonso, Beatriz Y. Alvarez; Castellanos, Gustavo Casian

    2008-08-11

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the first CR digital mammography system ( registered Konica-Minolta) in Mexico in clinical routine for cancer detection in a screening population and to determine if high resolution CR digital imaging is equivalent to state-of-the-art screen-film imaging. The mammograms were evaluated by two observers with cytological or histological confirmation for BIRADS 3, 4 and 5. Contrast, exposure and artifacts of the images were evaluated. Different details like skin, retromamillary space and parenchymal structures were judged. The detectability of microcalcifications and lesions were compared and correlated to histology. The difference in sensitivity of CR Mammography (CRM) and Screen Film Mammography (SFM) was not statistically significant. However, CRM had a significantly lower recall rate, and the lesion detection was equal or superior to conventional images. There is no significant difference in the number of microcalcifications and highly suspicious calcifications were equally detected on both film-screen and digital images. Different anatomical regions were better detectable in digital than in conventional mammography.

  8. Early initial clinical experience with intravitreal aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ferrone, Philip J; Anwar, Farihah; Naysan, Jonathan; Chaudhary, Khurram; Fastenberg, David; Graham, Kenneth; Deramo, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative process that leads to severe vision loss. Wet AMD is defined by choroidal neovascularisation, leading to the accumulation of subretinal fluid (SRF), macular oedema (ME), and pigment epithelium detachments (PED). Purpose To evaluate the initial clinical experience of conversion from bevacizumab or ranibizumab to aflibercept in wet AMD patients. Methods Records of 250 consecutive wet AMD patients were retrospectively reviewed. Of 250 patients, 29 were naive (with no previous treatment), and 221 were previously treated with bevacizumab (1/3) or ranibizumab (2/3). On average, converted patients received 14 injections every 6 weeks on a treat-and-extend regimen with Avastin or Lucentis before being converted to aflibercept every 7 weeks on average (no loading dose) for three doses. For the purposes of this study, we concentrated on the patients converted to aflibercept since the number of naive patients was too small to draw any conclusion from. Snellen (as logMar) visual acuities, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were compared predrug and postdrug conversion. Results Converted patients did not show a significant difference in visual acuity or average OCT thickness from preconversion values; however, small improvements in ME (p=0.0001), SRF (p=0.0001), and PED (p=0.008) grading were noted on average after conversion to aflibercept. Conclusions No significant difference in visual outcome or average OCT thickness was observed when switched from bevacizumab or ranibizumab q6 week to aflibercept 7-week dosing, on average. Mild anatomic improvements did occur in converted patients with regard to ME, SRF and PED improvement, on average, after conversion to aflibercept, and aflibercept was injected less frequently. No serious adverse reactions, including ocular infections or inflammation, as well as ocular and systemic effects were noted. PMID:24795335

  9. How can the research potential of the clinical quality databases be maximized? The Danish experience.

    PubMed

    Nrgaard, M; Johnsen, S P

    2016-02-01

    In Denmark, the need for monitoring of clinical quality and patient safety with feedback to the clinical, administrative and political systems has resulted in the establishment of a network of more than 60 publicly financed nationwide clinical quality databases. Although primarily devoted to monitoring and improving quality of care, the potential of these databases as data sources in clinical research is increasingly being recognized. In this review, we describe these databases focusing on their use as data sources for clinical research, including their strengths and weaknesses as well as future concerns and opportunities. The research potential of the clinical quality databases is substantial but has so far only been explored to a limited extent. Efforts related to technical, legal and financial challenges are needed in order to take full advantage of this potential. PMID:26785952

  10. Developing Regulatory-compliant Electronic Case Report Forms for Clinical Trials: Experience with The Demand Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Carminati, Sergio; Antiga, Luca; Rubis, Nadia; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic case report forms (CRF) to gather data in randomized clinical trials has grown to progressively replace paper-based forms. Computerized form designs must ensure the same data quality expected of paper CRF, by following Good Clinical Practice rules. Electronic data capture (EDC) tools must also comply with applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. Here the authors focus on the development of computerized systems for clinical trials implementing FDA and EU recommendations and regulations, and describe a laptop-based electronic CRF used in a randomized, multicenter clinical trial. PMID:19261946

  11. Validation for clinical use of, and initial clinical experience with, a novel approach to population-based carrier screening using high-throughput, next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Stephanie; Nelson, Heather; Greger, Valerie; Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Davie, Jocelyn; Faulkner, Nicole; Neitzel, Dana; Casey, Kristie; Umbarger, Mark A; Chennagiri, Niru; Kramer, Alexander C; Porreca, Gregory J; Kennedy, Caleb J

    2014-03-01

    Traditional carrier screening assays are designed to look for only the most common mutations within a gene owing to cost considerations. Although this can yield high detection rates in specific populations for specific genes (such as cystic fibrosis in Caucasians), they are suboptimal for other ethnicities or for patients of mixed or unknown ethnic background. Next-generation DNA sequencing provides an opportunity to provide carrier screening using more comprehensive mutation panels that are limited primarily by information about the clinical impact of detected sequence changes. We describe a next-generation DNA sequencing-based assay capable of reliably screening patient samples in a timely and comprehensive manner. The analytic accuracy in a research setting has been documented. Here, we describe the additional studies performed to ensure the accuracy (analytic validity) and robustness of our assay for use in clinical practice and provide data from our experience offering this testing. Our clinical experience using this approach to screen 11,691 in vitro fertilization patients has identified 449 mutant alleles: 447 in carriers and 2 in an affected individual. In total, we found 87 distinct mutations in 14 different genes. Approximately one quarter of the mutations found are not included in traditional, limited, mutation panels, including 16 known mutations unique to our panel, and novel truncating mutations in several genes. PMID:24374108

  12. Supportive relationship: Experiences of Iranian students and teachers concerning student-teacher relationship in clinical nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Yaghoubinia, Fariba; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Student-teacher relationship is a salient issue in nursing education and has long-lasting implication in professional development of nursing students. Nowadays, this relationship in clinical settings is different from the past due to changing in nursing education paradigm. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of students and teachers about student-teacher relationship in the context of clinical nursing education in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study that has been carried out adopting conventional qualitative content analysis approach, six bachelor nursing students and six clinical teachers in school of Nursing and Midwifery, were selected through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interview and participant observation were used for data collection. Interviews transcribed verbatim and analyzed using conventional content analysis through the process of data reduction and condensation, coding and also generating the categories and themes. Results: Results of the study showed the existence of a type of relationship in clinical education in which supportive actions of clinical teachers were prominent. These supportive actions appeared as three major categories including educational support, emotional support and social support which emerged from data. Conclusion: The results of this study explicit the ways that support could be provided for students in their relationship with clinical teachers. It also determines the teachers’ need to know more about the influence of their supportive relationship on students’ learning and the best possible outcomes of their education in clinical settings. PMID:24554945

  13. Experiences of clinical tutors with English as an additional language (EAL) students.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongyan; Maithus, Caroline

    2012-11-01

    Clinical tutors, referred to in the international literature as clinical supervisors, facilitators, mentors or instructors, are responsible for providing and supervising workplace learning opportunities for groups of Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students. They also play a key role in assessing students. The role modeling and support provided by both clinical tutors and registered nurses (RN) or nurse preceptors helps students become familiar with the language in which nursing work is realised. As BN student cohorts in New Zealand have become more diverse in terms of cultures, ethnicities and language backgrounds, clinical tutors have to directly facilitate the development of context-specific and client-focused communication skills for students who speak English as an additional language. We undertook a study which looked at the perceptions of new nursing graduates with English as an additional language (EAL) on the development of spoken language skills for the clinical workplace. As well as interviewing graduates, we spoke to four clinical tutors in order to elicit their views on the language development of EAL students in previous cohorts. This article reports on the themes which emerged from the interviews with the tutors. These include goal setting for communication, integrating students into nursing work, making assessment less stressful, and endorsing independent learning strategies. Based on their observations and on other published research we make some suggestions about ways both clinical tutors and EAL students within their teaching groups could be supported in the development of communication skills for clinical practice. PMID:23421011

  14. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Satisfaction and Self-Confidence with Clinical Simulation Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omer, Tagwa

    2016-01-01

    Nursing and other health professionals are increasingly using simulation as a strategy and a tool for teaching and learning at all levels that need clinical training. Nursing education for decades used simulation as an integral part of nursing education. Recent studies indicated that simulation improves nursing knowledge, clinical practice,…

  15. Radiobiological intercomparison of clinical neutron beams for growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots

    SciTech Connect

    Beauduin, M.; Gueulette, J.; Vynckier, S.; Wambersie, A.

    1989-02-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) values of different neutron beams produced at the variable energy cyclotron Cyclone of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) were determined. The neutrons were obtained by bombarding a beryllium target with 34-, 45-, 65-, or 75-MeV protons or with 50-MeV deuterons. The biological system was growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots. Taking the p(65) + Be neutron beam as a reference, RBE values were found equal to 1.36 +/- 0.2, 1.20 +/- 0.1, 1.00 (ref), 0.98 +/- 0.1, and 1.18 +/- 0.1, respectively; the doses corresponding to 50% growth inhibition were 0.39, 0.44, 0.53, 0.54, and 0.45 Gy. For the same beams, OER values were found equal to 1.55 +/- 0.1, 1.38 +/- 0.1, 1.29 +/- 0.1, 1.41 +/- 0.1, and 1.60 +/- 0.2, respectively.

  16. Radiobiological intercomparison of clinical neutron beams for growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots.

    PubMed

    Beauduin, M; Gueulette, J; Vynckier, S; Wambersie, A

    1989-02-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) values of different neutron beams produced at the variable energy cyclotron "Cyclone" of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) were determined. The neutrons were obtained by bombarding a beryllium target with 34-, 45-, 65-, or 75-MeV protons or with 50-MeV deuterons. The biological system was growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots. Taking the p(65) + Be neutron beam as a reference, RBE values were found equal to 1.36 +/- 0.2, 1.20 +/- 0.1, 1.00 (ref), 0.98 +/- 0.1, and 1.18 +/- 0.1, respectively; the doses corresponding to 50% growth inhibition were 0.39, 0.44, 0.53, 0.54, and 0.45 Gy. For the same beams, OER values were found equal to 1.55 +/- 0.1, 1.38 +/- 0.1, 1.29 +/- 0.1, 1.41 +/- 0.1, and 1.60 +/- 0.2, respectively. PMID:2922470

  17. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP): from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Drion, Pierre; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon’s healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26195890

  18. A methodology for mining clinical data: experiences from TRANSFoRm project.

    PubMed

    Danger, Roxana; Corrigan, Derek; Soler, Jean K; Kazienko, Przemyslaw; Kajdanowicz, Tomasz; Majeed, Azeem; Curcin, Vasa

    2015-01-01

    Data mining of electronic health records (eHRs) allows us to identify patterns of patient data that characterize diseases and their progress and learn best practices for treatment and diagnosis. Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) are a form of clinical evidence that quantifies the contribution of different clinical data to a particular clinical outcome and help clinicians to decide the diagnosis, prognosis or therapeutic conduct for any given patient. The TRANSFoRm diagnostic support system (DSS) is based on the construction of an ontological repository of CPRs for diagnosis prediction in which clinical evidence is expressed using a unified vocabulary. This paper explains the proposed methodology for constructing this CPR repository, addressing algorithms and quality measures for filtering relevant rules. Some preliminary application results are also presented. PMID:25991107

  19. Learning pathways during clinical placement of physiotherapy students: a Malaysian experience of using learning contracts and reflective diaries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Learning contracts and reflective diaries are educational tools that have been recently introduced to physiotherapy students from Malaysia during clinical education. It is unclear how students perceive the experience of using a learning contract and reflective diary. This study explores the learning pathways of the students after using a learning contract and a reflective diary for the first time in their clinical placement. Methods: A total of 26 final-year physiotherapy students completed a learning contract and a reflective diary during clinical placements. Two researchers explored the data qualitatively by the thematic content analysis method using NVivo. Results: A total of four and six main learning themes were identified from the data of the students through a learning contract and reflective diary. Conclusion: These learning themes reflected the views of the students about what they have considered to be important learning pathways during their clinical placements. They give valuable insights into the experiences and opinions of students during their clinical education process, which should be useful for enhancing teaching and learning methods in physiotherapy education. PMID:23997897

  20. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  1. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with

  2. Experience-Based Quality Control of Clinical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Brame, R. Scott; Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To incorporate a quality control tool, according to previous planning experience and patient-specific anatomic information, into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan generation process and to determine whether the tool improved treatment plan quality. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 42 IMRT plans demonstrated a correlation between the fraction of organs at risk (OARs) overlapping the planning target volume and the mean dose. This yielded a model, predicted dose = prescription dose (0.2 + 0.8 [1 - exp(-3 overlapping planning target volume/volume of OAR)]), that predicted the achievable mean doses according to the planning target volume overlap/volume of OAR and the prescription dose. The model was incorporated into the planning process by way of a user-executable script that reported the predicted dose for any OAR. The script was introduced to clinicians engaged in IMRT planning and deployed thereafter. The script's effect was evaluated by tracking {delta} = (mean dose-predicted dose)/predicted dose, the fraction by which the mean dose exceeded the model. Results: All OARs under investigation (rectum and bladder in prostate cancer; parotid glands, esophagus, and larynx in head-and-neck cancer) exhibited both smaller {delta} and reduced variability after script implementation. These effects were substantial for the parotid glands, for which the previous {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.24 was reduced to {delta} = 0.13 {+-} 0.10. The clinical relevance was most evident in the subset of cases in which the parotid glands were potentially salvageable (predicted dose <30 Gy). Before script implementation, an average of 30.1 Gy was delivered to the salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 20.3 Gy. After implementation, an average of 18.7 Gy was delivered to salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 17.2 Gy. In the prostate cases, the rectum model excess was reduced from {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.20 to {delta} = 0.07 {+-} 0.15. On surveying dosimetrists at the end of the study, most reported that the script both improved their IMRT planning (8 of 10) and increased their efficiency (6 of 10). Conclusions: This tool proved successful in increasing normal tissue sparing and reducing interclinician variability, providing effective quality control of the IMRT plan development process.

  3. Strategic infarcts in vascular dementia. A clinical and brain imaging experience.

    PubMed

    Tatemichi, T K; Desmond, D W; Prohovnik, I

    1995-03-01

    The mechanisms of dementia resulting from small deep infarctions are incompletely understood. The thesis underlying the concept of "multi-infarct dementia" is that multiple lesions have a synergistic effect on mental functions, resulting in dementia irrespective of specific location or volume. In this report, we summarize our experience with six patients reported previously along with additional patients examined subsequently, whose clinical features and brain imaging findings allow an alternative formulation for dementia resulting from lacunar stroke. The six initial patients presented with an abrupt change in behavior after acute infarction involving the inferior genu of the internal capsule documented by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The acute syndrome featured fluctuating alertness, inattention, memory loss, apathy, abulia, and psychomotor retardation suggesting frontal lobe dysfunction. Contralateral hemiparesis and dysarthria were generally mild, except when the infarct extended into the posterior limb. Neuropsychological testing in five patients with left-sided infarcts revealed severe verbal memory loss. Additional cognitive deficits consistent with dementia were evident in four patients. A right-sided infarct caused transient impairment in visuospatial memory. Functional brain imaging in three patients using 133xenon regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed focal reduction in hemispheric perfusion most prominent in the ipsilateral inferior and medial frontal cortex. Perfusion was also defective in the medial and laterial temporal cortex. Important pathways of the limbic system traverse the inferior capsule in the region of the genu. Corticothalamic and thalamocortical fibers form the thalamic peduncles which detach from the internal capsule and enter the thalamus at its rostral and caudal poles and along its dorsal surface. The anterior thalamic peduncle, conveys reciprocal connections between the dorsomedial nucleus and the cingulate gyrus, as well as the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex. The inferior thalamic peduncle carries fibers which connect the thalamus with orbitofrontal, insular, and temporal cortex, as well as the amygdala via the ansa peduncularis to the ventral amygdalofugal pathway. Thus, damage to one or both white-matter tracts may occur with infarctions in the region of the inferior genu, causing striking frontal behavioral effects and memory loss in our patients associated with functional deactivation of the ipsilateral frontal and temporal cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7763329

  4. Initial clinical experience with a radiation oncology dedicated open 1.0T MR-simulation.

    PubMed

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K; Wen, Ning; Hearshen, David; Kim, Joshua; Pantelic, Milan; Zhao, Bo; Mancell, Tina; Levin, Kenneth; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe our experience with 1.0T MR-SIM including characterization, quality assurance (QA) program, and features necessary for treatment planning. Staffing, safety, and patient screening procedures were developed. Utilization of an external laser positioning system (ELPS) and MR-compatible couchtop were illustrated. Spatial and volumetric analyses were conducted between CT-SIM and MR-SIM using a stereotactic QA phantom with known landmarks and volumes. Magnetic field inhomogeneity was determined using phase difference analysis. System-related, in-plane distortion was evaluated and temporal changes were assessed. 3D distortion was characterized for regions of interest (ROIs) 5-20 cm away from isocenter. American College of Radiology (ACR) recommended tests and impact of ELPS on image quality were analyzed. Combined ultrashort echotime Dixon (UTE/Dixon) sequence was evaluated. Amplitude-triggered 4D MRI was implemented using a motion phantom (2-10 phases, ~ 2 cm excursion, 3-5 s periods) and a liver cancer patient. Duty cycle, acquisition time, and excursion were evaluated between maximum intensity projection (MIP) datasets. Less than 2% difference from expected was obtained between CT-SIM and MR-SIM volumes, with a mean distance of < 0.2 mm between landmarks. Magnetic field inhomogeneity was < 2 ppm. 2D distortion was < 2 mm over 28.6-33.6 mm of isocenter. Within 5 cm radius of isocenter, mean 3D geometric distortion was 0.59 0.32 mm (maximum = 1.65 mm) and increased 10-15 cm from isocenter (mean = 1.57 1.06 mm, maximum = 6.26 mm). ELPS interference was within the operating frequency of the scanner and was characterized by line patterns and a reduction in signal-to-noise ratio (4.6-12.6% for TE = 50-150 ms). Image quality checks were within ACR recommendations. UTE/Dixon sequences yielded detectability between bone and air. For 4D MRI, faster breathing periods had higher duty cycles than slow (50.4% (3 s) and 39.4% (5 s), p < 0.001) and ~fourfold acquisition time increase was measured for ten-phase versus two-phase. Superior-inferior object extent was underestimated 8% (6 mm) for two-phase as compared to ten-phase MIPs, although < 2% difference was obtained for ? 4 phases. 4D MRI for a patient demonstrated acceptable image quality in ~ 7 min. MR-SIM was integrated into our workflow and QA procedures were developed. Clinical applicability was demonstrated for 4D MRI and UTE imaging to support MR-SIM for single modality treatment planning. PMID:26103190

  5. The relationship between different types of dissociation and psychosis-like experiences in a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Humpston, Clara S; Walsh, Eamonn; Oakley, David A; Mehta, Mitul A; Bell, Vaughan; Deeley, Quinton

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated whether detachment-type dissociation, compartmentalisation-type dissociation or absorption was most strongly associated with psychosis-like experiences in the general population. Healthy participants (N=215) were tested with the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES, for detachment-related dissociative experiences); the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS: A, for dissociative compartmentalisation); the Tellegen Absorption Scale (TAS, for non-clinical 'functional' dissociative experience); and two measures of psychotic-like experiences, the 21-item Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (PDI-21) and the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS). In multiple regression analyses, DES and TAS but not HGSHS: A scores were found to be significantly associated with PDI-21 and CAPS overall scores. A post hoc hierarchical cluster analysis checking for cluster overlap between DES and CAPS items, and the TAS and CAPS items showed no overlap between items on the DES and CAPS and minimal overlap between TAS and CAPS items, suggesting the scales measure statistically distinct phenomena. These results show that detachment-type dissociation and absorption, but not compartmentalisation-type dissociation are significantly associated with psychosis-like experiences in a non-clinical population. PMID:26896781

  6. Quality assurance of research protocols conducted in the community: The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee; Kleppinger, Cynthia; Sampson, Royce; Tyson, Clare; Mamay-Gentilin, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Background: Quality assurance (QA) of clinical trials is essential to protect the welfare of trial participants and the integrity of the data collected. However, there is little detailed information available on specific procedures and outcomes of QA monitoring for clinical trials. Purpose: This article describes the experience of the National Institute on Drug Abuse's (NIDA) National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) in devising and implementing a three-tiered QA model for rigorous multi-site randomized clinical trials implemented in community-based substance abuse treatment programs. The CTN QA model combined local and national resources and was developed to address the unique needs of clinical trial sites with limited research experience. Methods: The authors reviewed internal records maintained by the sponsor, a coordinating site (Lead Nodes), and a local site detailing procedural development, training sessions, protocol violation monitoring, and site visit reporting. Results: Between January 2001 and September 2005, the CTN implemented 21 protocols, of which 18 were randomized clinical trials, one was a quality improvement study and two were surveys. Approximately 160 community-based treatment programs participated in the 19 studies that were monitored, with a total of 6560 participants randomized across the sites. During this time 1937 QA site visits were reported across the three tiers of monitoring and the cost depended on the location of the sites and the salaries of the staff involved. One study reported 109 protocol violations (M = 15.6). Examples are presented to highlight training, protocol violation monitoring, site visit frequency and intensity and cost considerations. Limitations: QA data from the entire network were not easily available for review as much of the data were not electronically accessible. The authors reviewed and discussed a representative sample of internal data from the studies and participating sites. Conclusions: The lessons learned from the CTN's experience include the need for balancing thoroughness with efficiency, monitoring early, assessing research staff abilities in order to judge the need for proactive, focused attention, providing targeted training sessions, and developing flexible tools. The CTN model can work for sponsors overseeing studies at sites with limited research experience that require more frequent, in-depth monitoring. We recommend that sponsors not develop a rigid monitoring approach, but work with the study principal investigators to determine the intensity of monitoring needed depending on trial complexity, the risks of the intervention(s), and the experience of the staff with clinical research. After careful evaluation, sponsors should then determine the best approach to site monitoring and what resources will be needed. PMID:19342468

  7. Sociodemographic, Socio-economic, Clinical and Behavioural Factors Modifying Experience and Prevalence of Dental Caries in the Permanent Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, MS; Medina-Solis, CE; Islas-Granillo, H; Lara-Carrillo, E; Scougall-Vilchis, RJ; Escoffi-Ramrez, M; la Rosa-Santillana, R De; Avila-Burgos, L

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the sociodemographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavioural factors that modify the experience of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) and caries prevalence in Nicaraguan children 9-12 years old. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 800 school children 9-12 years old in the city of Len, Nicaragua. The clinical oral examinations to identify caries experience were undertaken by two trained and certified examiners. Sociodemographic, socio-economic and behavioural data were collected using questionnaires. Negative binomial regression (NBR) and binary logistic regression (BLR) models were used to model caries experience and caries prevalence, respectively. Results: Mean DMFT index was 0.98 1.74 and caries prevalence (DMFT > 0) was 37.9%. In the NBR model, the categories that increase the expected DMFT mean were: older age, female gender, presence of plaque, and if the school children received curative and curative/preventive dental care in the last year. In the BLR model, the odds of presenting with caries in the permanent dentition were increased in older children, those from large families, mothers with a positive dental attitude, and those school children who received curative and curative/preventive dental care in the last year. Conclusions: Using different models, we identified several sociodemographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavioural factors that modify the experience (NBR) and prevalence (BLR) of dental caries. PMID:25867561

  8. Further Radiobiologic Modeling of Palliative Radiotherapy: Use of Virtual Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn Dale, Roger G.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To study duration of response in palliative radiotherapy in a population of tumors. Methods and Materials: Models of dynamic changes in cell number with time were used to develop a function for the remission time (T{sub rem}) after palliative radiotherapy: T{sub rem}=(BED)/K -t{sub 1}(1+({alpha}.K)/z ), where BED is the biologically effective dose, t{sub 1} the duration of symptoms (i.e., the time between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of radiotherapy), K the daily BED repopulation equivalent, {alpha} the linear radiosensitivity parameter in the linear-quadratic model, and z the tumor regression rate. Results: Simulations of clinical trials show marked variations in remission statistics depending on the tumor characteristics and are highly compatible with the results of clinical trials. Dose escalation produces both a higher proportion and extended duration of remissions, especially in tumors with high {alpha}/{beta} ratios and K values, but the predicted dose responses of acute and late side effects show that caution is necessary. The prospect of using particle beam therapy to reduce normal tissue radiation exposures or using hypoxic sensitizers to improve the tumor cell kill might significantly improve the results of palliative radiotherapy in carefully selected patients and could also be used for safer palliative re-treatments in patients with the potential for prolonged survival. The effect of tumor heterogeneity in determining palliative responses probably exceeds that in radical radiotherapy; as few as 100 patients in each treatment arm produce statistically unreliable results. Conclusions: Virtual trials of palliative radiotherapy can be useful to test the effects of competing schedules and better determine future strategies, including improved design of clinical trials as well as combinations of radiotherapy with other anticancer modalities.

  9. Radiobiological evaluation of forward and inverse IMRT using different fractionations for head and neck tumours

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the radiobiological advantages obtained by an Improved Forward Planning technique (IFP) and two IMRT techniques using different fractionation schemes for the irradiation of head and neck tumours. The conventional radiation therapy technique (CONVT) was used here as a benchmark. Methods Seven patients with head and neck tumours were selected for this retrospective planning study. The PTV1 included the primary tumour, PTV2 the high risk lymph nodes and PTV3 the low risk lymph nodes. Except for the conventional technique where a maximum dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed to the PTV1, 70.2 Gy, 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy were prescribed respectively to PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3. Except for IMRT2, all techniques were delivered by three sequential phases. The IFP technique used five to seven directions with a total of 15 to 21 beams. The IMRT techniques used five to nine directions and around 80 segments. The first, IMRT1, was prescribed with the conventional fractionation scheme of 1.8 Gy per fraction delivered in 39 fractions by three treatment phases. The second, IMRT2, simultaneously irradiated the PTV2 and PTV3 with 59.4 Gy and 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, respectively, while the PTV1 was boosted with six subsequent fractions of 1.8 Gy. Tissue response was calculated using the relative seriality model and the Poisson Linear-Quadratic-Time model to simulate repopulation in the primary tumour. Results The average probability of total tumour control increased from 38% with CONVT to 80% with IFP, to 85% with IMRT1 and 89% with IMRT2. The shorter treatment time and larger dose per fraction obtained with IMRT2 resulted in an 11% increase in the probability of control in the PTV1 with respect to IFP and 7% relatively to IMRT1 (p < 0.05). The average probability of total patient complications was reduced from 80% with CONVT to 61% with IFP and 31% with IMRT. The corresponding probability of complications in the ipsilateral parotid was 63%, 42% and 20%; in the contralateral parotid it was 50%, 20% and 9%; in the oral cavity it was 2%, 15% and 4% and in the mandible it was 1%, 5% and 3%, respectively. Conclusions A significant improvement in treatment outcome was obtained with IMRT compared to conventional radiation therapy. The practical and biological advantages of IMRT2, employing a shorter treatment time, may outweigh the small differences obtained in the organs at risk between the two IMRT techniques. This technique is therefore presently being used in the clinic for selected patients with head and neck tumours. A significant improvement in the quality of the dose distribution was obtained with IFP compared to CONVT. Thus, this beam arrangement is used in the clinical routine as an alternative to IMRT. PMID:20569482

  10. Skill Learning Through Early Clinical Exposure: An Experience of Indian Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Jagzape, Arunita; Srivastava, Tripti; Gotarkar, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Indian Medical curriculum being discipline based, there is a line of demarcation between preclinical and clinical subjects. The challenges in medical education include the methods that would enhance the clinical education quality; one such method been Early Clinical Exposure (ECE). ECE can help to instill the skill component of medical education in the first year students helping to minimize the line of demarcation. Hence this study was undertaken to assess the skill learning of students through early clinical exposure and to collate the perception of them. Materials and Methods: In the present study, students of 1st MBBS were exposed to ECE as an adjunct teaching method with preset modules. They were evaluated by Objectively Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Feedback was obtained from 1st MBBS and also from the same students after passing the 1st MBBS in 4th semester. Results Significant differences in pre and post OSCE scores were noted (p<0.0001). Seventy six percent students rated ECE as an excellent tool. Second year students also perceived ECE held in 1st year was helpful to correlate topics and increasing confidence. Conclusion ECE had an effective influence on learning as manifested in skills gained by the students and their perceptions of ECE being helpful prospectively in their routine clinical posting. PMID:26894088

  11. The adaptive response in radiobiology: evolving insights and implications.

    PubMed

    Wolff, S

    1998-02-01

    The first of the regularly reproducible experiments to show that very low doses of ionizing radiation, like very low doses of chemical agents, could induce mechanisms whereby cells become better fit to cope with subsequent exposures to high doses were carried out on the induction of chromosome aberrations in cultures of human lymphocytes. If cells that had been exposed to a very low dose (1 cGy) of X rays were subsequently exposed to a relatively high dose (1 Gy), approximately half as many chromosome breaks were induced. Subsequent experiments showed that this adaptive response to low doses requires a certain minimal dose before it becomes active; occurs only within a relatively small window of dose; is dose-rate dependent; and depends on the genetic constitution of the people or animals exposed, with some being unresponsive. It was further shown that the response to the low-dose preexposure was not instantaneous but took approximately 4 to 6 hr to become fully active, and could be prevented if during this period protein synthesis was inhibited, i.e., a necessary protein (enzyme) was being induced. In fact, subsequent experiments with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed new proteins in cells irradiated with 1 to 2 cGy. The adaptation induced by low doses of radiation was therefore attributed to the induction of a novel efficient chromosome break repair mechanism that if active at the time of challenge with high doses would lead to less residual damage. This hypothesis was strengthened by a series of experiments in which it was found that inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, an enzyme implicated in DNA strand break rejoining, could prevent the adaptive response. Although the phenomenon is well established in cellular systems, it is still problematical as to whether or not it will have any utility in establishing risks of ionizing radiation to humans. Newer experiments have now been carried out on the mechanisms underlying the effect and whether or not the effect can manifest itself as a decrease in the number of induced cancers and radiation-induced mortality. Experiments with restriction enzymes now indicate that double-strand breaks in DNA can be triggering events in adaptation. In addition, preliminary experiments on the survival of whole-body irradiated mice have shown that multiple exposures to low adapting doses can have profound effects on survival, and other experiments have shown that adaptation can affect the induction of thymic lymphoma in irradiated mice. It therefore appears that the initial experiments behind the adaptive response have led to a vigorous worldwide effort to understand the basic mechanisms behind it. This effort is stimulated both by a desire to understand the basic cell biology behind the response and a desire to see if indeed this phenomenon affects the estimation of risks of low-level radiation exposure. PMID:9539019

  12. Investigation into the radiobiological consequences of pre-treatment verification imaging with megavoltage X-rays in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, W B; McMahon, S J; Butterworth, K T; Cole, A J; King, R B; Redmond, K M; Prise, K M; Hounsell, A R; McGarry, C K

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pre-treatment verification imaging with megavoltage X-rays on cancer and normal cell survival in vitro and to compare the findings with theoretically modelled data. Since the dose received from pre-treatment imaging can be significant, the incorporation of this dose at the planning stage of treatment has been suggested. Methods: The impact of imaging dose incorporation on cell survival was investigated by clonogenic assay of irradiated DU-145 prostate cancer, H460 non-small-cell lung cancer and AGO-1522b normal tissue fibroblast cells. Clinically relevant imaging-to-treatment times of 7.5 and 15 min were chosen for this study. The theoretical magnitude of the loss of radiobiological efficacy due to sublethal damage repair was investigated using the Lea–Catcheside dose protraction factor model. Results: For the cell lines investigated, the experimental data showed that imaging dose incorporation had no significant impact on cell survival. These findings were in close agreement with theoretical results. Conclusion: For the conditions investigated, the results suggest that allowance for the imaging dose at the planning stage of treatment should not adversely affect treatment efficacy. Advances in knowledge: There is a paucity of data in the literature on imaging effects in radiotherapy. This article presents a systematic study of imaging dose effects on cancer and normal cell survival, providing both theoretical and experimental evidence for clinically relevant imaging doses and imaging-to-treatment times. The data provide a firm foundation for further study into this highly relevant area of research. PMID:24472729

  13. Expectations and experiences of investigators and parents involved in a clinical trial for Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Peay, Holly L; Tibben, Aad; Fisher, Tyler; Brenna, Ethan; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    Background The social context of rare disease research is changing, with increased community engagement around drug development and clinical trials. This engagement may benefit patients and families, but may also lead to heightened trial expectations and therapeutic misconception. Clinical investigators are also susceptible to harboring high expectations. Little is known about parental motivations and expectations for clinical trials for rare pediatric disorders. Purpose We describe the experience of parents and clinical investigators involved in a phase II clinical trial for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy: their expectations, hopes, motivations, and reactions to the termination of the trial. Methods This qualitative study was based on interviews with clinical investigators and parents of sons with DBMD who participated in the phase IIa or IIb ataluren clinical trial in the United States. Interviews were transcribed and coded for thematic analysis. Results Participants were twelve parents of affected boys receiving active drug and nine clinical investigators. High trial expectations of direct benefit were reported by parents and many clinicians. Investigators described monitoring and managing parents’ expectations; several worried about their own involvement in increasing parents’ expectations. Most parents were able to differentiate their expectations from their optimistic hopes for a cure. Parents’ expectations arose from other parents, advocacy organizations, and the sponsor. All parents reported some degree of clinical benefit to their children. Secondary benefits were hopefulness and powerful feelings associated with active efforts to affect the disease course. Parents and clinical investigators reported strong, close relationships that were mutually important. Parents and clinicians felt valued by the sponsor for the majority of the trial. When the trial abruptly stopped, they described loss of engagement, distress, and feeling unprepared for the possibility of trial termination. Limitations This was a retrospective study of one clinical trial. We were unable to recruit participants whose children received placebo. The interviews occurred during a time of significant uncertainty and distress for many of the participants. Conclusions This pilot study reflects complex outcomes of strong community engagement. The findings highlight a need for renewed education about, and support for, clinical trial termination and loss of drug access. The primary positive outcome was demonstration of strong relationships among committed parents and study teams. These relationships were highly valued by both parties, and may suggest an ideal intervention opportunity for efforts to improve psychological wellbeing. A negative outcome attributed, in part, to community engagement was inappropriately high trial expectations. More optimistically, high expectations were attributed, in part, to the importance of hope and powerful feelings associated with active efforts to affect the disease course. PMID:24311736

  14. Crossing over: The lived experiences of clinical laboratory science education teachers as they transition from traditional to online instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldkamp, Ruth B.

    A phenomenological study was undertaken to understand and describe the nature and meaning of the live experiences of faculty transition from traditional to teaching online clinical laboratory science courses. In order to gain insight into the lived experiences of faculty, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 faculty members. The task of the researcher was to allow the participants to speak for themselves, and reveal the meaning of the experiences, rather than to discover causal connections or patterns of correlation. The key criterion in choosing purposeful sampling procedure was to obtain the deepest understanding possible of the lived experiences of faculty transitioning to online teaching, which were likely to be a rich source of the data of interest. Analyses of the interview text were based on three essential considerations. The three essential considerations were (a) the traditional role of the faculty, (b) factors affecting the changing role of the faculty, and (c) the effects of web-based technology on teaching role.

  15. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty: quantitative angiography and clinical results in a large experience of a single medical center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Clinical experience with the mid IR holmium:YAG laser in a single medical center (St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, St. Paul, MN) includes 112 patients who underwent holmium laser coronary angioplasty. Utilizing a unique lasing technique; `pulse and retreat,' we applied this laser to thrombotic and nonthrombotic lesions in patients presenting with unstable angina, stable angina, and acute myocardial infarction. A very high clinical success and very low complication rates were achieved. Holmium:YAG laser is effective and safe therapy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Unlike excimer lasers, the clinical success, efficacy and safety of holmium laser angioplasty is not compromised when thrombus is present.

  16. Beagle Dog Tissue Archive (previously part of National Radiobiology Archives): from the Janus Tissue Archive at Northwestern University

    DOE Data Explorer

    Watson, Charles R.

    Following the advent of the atomic age, many nations have investigated the effects of radioactive exposure in animal models. Some of these investigations involved costly and unique experiments that produced tissue and data archives which are unlikely to be reproduced. In an effort to extract the value from these collections, programs have started in Japan, Europe, and America to preserve and make public the data and tissues from these studies for further investigation. The Beagle Dog Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1952 to 1991 by Thomas Fritz, William Norris, and Tom Seed and supported by grants from the Atomic Energy Commission, investigated the effects of Cobalt-60 radiation on beagle dogs. Documentation from these studies is availible in pdf form. This web portal seeks to make accessible the animal tissues and study data from the Beagle Dog Experiments using data organized by Charles Watson. Use the search form to the left to look for dog data from particular experimental conditions. Click a dog number to return the full dog record. Use the dog record to find tissues of interest and make a sample tissue request. These tissue samples and the data were known until recently as the the U.S. National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) and were maintained as the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) at Washington State University. Life-span studies using beagle dogs were done at the Argonne National Laboratory, University of California at Davis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and the University of Utah. The results and many microscope slides from these life-span studies, totaling some 6000 dogs, are now available to researchers. A seminal work included in the Archive is The Atlas of Experimentally-Induced Neoplasia in the Beagle Dog (Watson et al, 1997).

  17. Experience with DICOM for the clinical specialties in the healthcare enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmak, Peter M.; Dayhoff, Ruth E.

    2003-05-01

    DICOM is a success for radiology and cardiology and it is now beginning to be used for other clinical specialties. The US Department of Veterans Affairs has been instrumental in promoting this technological advancement. We have worked with a number of non-radiology imaging vendors over the past several years, encouraging them to support DICOM, providing requirement specifications, validating their implementations, installing their products, and integrating their systems with the VA healthcare enterprise. We require each new non-radiology vendor to support the DICOM Modality Worklist and Storage services, as specified in the IHE Technical Framework, and insist that they perform validation testing with us over the Internet before installing at a VA site. Three years ago we began working with commercial DICOM image acquisition applications in ophthalmology and endoscopy. Today we are interfacing with six vendors in ophthalmology, six in dental, and two in endoscopy. Getting imaging modality vendors to support DICOM is only part of the story, however. We have also developed the capabilities of the VistA hospital information system to properly handle DICOM interfaces to the different clinical specialties. The workflow in the clinical specialties is different than that of radiology, and is much more diverse. We designed the VistA DICOM image acquisition and display interface to use the generic order entry, result entry, result reporting, and appointment scheduling applications of our hospital information system, which are common to other hospital information systems, in order to maintain existing clinical workflow, minimize operational disruptions, simplify training, and win user acceptance. This software is now being field tested with dental and ophthalmology systems at a large number of VA medical centers. We have learned several things from this field test. The DICOM Modality Worklist and Storage services can be successfully used for image acquisition in the clinical specialties, although the specifications for some of the clinical specialty image types need to be enhanced. Special consideration needs to be given to the healthcare provider workflow in order to support DICOM requirements and to minimize change. The clinical specialties handle a large number of different kinds of requests, and imaging procedures may comprise only a small subset, which may need to be isolated out for efficient operation of DICOM Modality Worklist. The clinical specialties will acquire a large volume of images. Our goal is to incorporate all of the patient"s data into the electronic medical record and DICOM is making this easier for everyone. The work involved in extending DICOM to the clinical specialties and integrating them with the hospital information systems continues to be an ongoing and worthwhile challenge.

  18. Early diagnosis of breast cancer: experience in a consultant breast clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, L. J.; Bird, B. L.; Cooke, G. M.; Ball, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Of 2839 women referred to a consultant breast clinic for clinical, mammographic and thermographic examination, 480 underwent biopsy and 126 were found to have cancer. Ten percent of the tumours were occult and were classified as very early biologic disease; they were identified by routine mammography in women whose breasts were clinically normal. Biopsy of solid mass lesions non-suspicious on mammography identified 20% of the cancers; half these lesions, classified as early biologic disease, were discovered by doctors at routine annual clinical breast examination, though the earliest cancers were detected by women who were confident and competent in monthly self-examination of the breasts. Biopsy of solid mass lesions suspicious on mammography identified 70% of the cancers; these were classified as late biologic disease. Skin or nipple dimpling or retraction was evident in two thirds of the patients; their lesions seemed to be later biologically than the lesions of the patients without clinical signs, and 75% had discovered the lesions themselves accidentally. PMID:861862

  19. Monitoring Students' Clinical Experiences during a Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowlowitz, Vicki; And Others

    1996-01-01

    In a documentation system designed to monitor medical student progress in clerkships at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, students completed an optical scan card for each patient seen, eliciting information on the patient and the experience. Results highlight students' lack of certain experiences and allow comparison of student…

  20. The Effects of Early Clinical Teaching Experiences on Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Androzzi, Jared

    2011-01-01

    In-service teachers are often lack sufficient teaching experience (Block et al., 2010) that leads to being psychologically unprepared to confront many challenges in teaching. Providing ample experiences for Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) students in a pedagogical setting parallel to that which they will one day teach (Kirk &…