Science.gov

Sample records for clinical septic shock

  1. Septic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Septic shock is a serious condition that occurs when a body-wide infection leads to dangerously low blood ... Septic shock occurs most often in the very old and the very young. It may also occur in ...

  2. Septic shock; current pathogenetic concepts from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tsiotou, Adelais G; Sakorafas, George H; Anagnostopoulos, George; Bramis, John

    2005-03-01

    Sepsis is an infection-induced syndrome characterized by a generalized inflammatory state and represents a frequent complication in the surgical patient. The normal reaction to infection involves a series of complex immunologic processes. A potent, complex immunologic cascade ensures a prompt protective response to microbial invasion in humans. Although activation of the immune system during microbial invasion is generally protective, septic shock develops in a number of patients as a consequence of excessive or poorly regulated immune response to the offending organism (Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, viruses, or microbial toxins). This unbalanced reaction may harm the host through a maladaptive release of endogenously generated inflammatory compounds. Many mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of septic shock, including the release of cytokines, the activation of neutrophils, monocytes, and microvascular endothelial cells, as well as the activation of neuroendocrine reflexes and plasma protein cascade systems, such as the complement system, the intrinsic (contact system) and extrinsic pathways of coagulation, and the fibrinolytic system. In critically ill patients, the gastrointestinal tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. The potential for complementary and synergistic interaction of the different components in this cascade highlights the difficulty encountered in trying to identify a single means of altering the progression of sepsis and septic shock to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and multiple organ failure (MOF). PMID:15735579

  3. Steroids in the treatment of clinical septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Schumer, W

    1976-01-01

    A prospective (Part I) and a retrospective (Part II) study were used to determine the safety and efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of septic shock. In Part I, 172 consecutive patients in septic shock admitted over an 8-year period were treated with either steroid or saline: 43 received dexamethasone (DMP), 43 received methylprednisolone (MPS), and 86 received saline. The study was double-blind and randomized, and the three groups were compared for age, severity of shock, presence of underlying disease, and year of study. In the 86 saline-treated patients, the mortality rate was 38.4% (33/86); in the steroid-treated patients, it was 10.4% (9/86). With MPS the mortality rate was 11.6% (5/43), and with DMP it was 9.3% (4/43). Thus, overall mortality was significantly less in the steroid-treated group than in the control group. Further, there was no significant difference in mortality rate between the DMP- and the MPS-treated patients. In Part II, 328 patients were studied retrospectively. One-hundred sixty were treated without steroid, and 168 were treated with either DMP or MPS. Again, the two groups of patients were compared for severity of shock, underlying disease, age, and year of study. Mortality among patients treated without steroid was 42.5% (68/160) and among patients treated with steroid was 14% (24/168); there was no significant difference in mortality rate between DMP- and MPS-treated patients. In Parts I and II combined, complications occurred in 6% of steroid-treated patients with no significant difference between DMP- and MPS-treated groups. PMID:786190

  4. Developing a New Definition and Assessing New Clinical Criteria for Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shankar-Hari, Manu; Phillips, Gary S.; Levy, Mitchell L.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Liu, Vincent X.; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Angus, Derek C.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Singer, Mervyn

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Septic shock currently refers to a state of acute circulatory failure associated with infection. Emerging biological insights and reported variation in epidemiology challenge the validity of this definition. OBJECTIVE To develop a new definition and clinical criteria for identifying septic shock in adults. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine convened a task force (19 participants) to revise current sepsis/septic shock definitions. Three sets of studies were conducted: (1) a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies in adults published between January 1, 1992, and December 25, 2015, to determine clinical criteria currently reported to identify septic shock and inform the Delphi process; (2) a Delphi study among the task force comprising 3 surveys and discussions of results from the systematic review, surveys, and cohort studies to achieve consensus on a new septic shock definition and clinical criteria; and (3) cohort studies to test variables identified by the Delphi process using Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) (2005–2010; n = 28 150), University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) (2010–2012; n = 1 309 025), and Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) (2009–2013; n = 1 847 165) electronic health record (EHR) data sets. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Evidence for and agreement on septic shock definitions and criteria. RESULTS The systematic review identified 44 studies reporting septic shock outcomes (total of 166 479 patients) from a total of 92 sepsis epidemiology studies reporting different cutoffs and combinations for blood pressure (BP), fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, serum lactate level, and base deficit to identify septic shock. The septic shock–associated crude mortality was 46.5% (95%CI, 42.7%–50.3%), with significant between-study statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 99.5%; τ2 = 182.5; P < .001). The Delphi process identified

  5. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  6. Rescue treatment with terlipressin in children with refractory septic shock: a clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; Gil-Antón, Javier; Hernández, Arturo; Rey, Corsino

    2006-01-01

    children with refractory vasodilatory septic shock. The addition of TP to high doses of catecholamines, however, can induce excessive vasoconstriction. Additional studies are needed to define the safety profile and the clinical effectiveness of TP in children with septic shock. PMID:16469127

  7. Mortality Reduction in Septic Shock by Plasma Adsorption (ROMPA): a protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Colomina-Climent, Francisco; Giménez-Esparza, Carola; Portillo-Requena, Cristina; Allegue-Gallego, José Manuel; Galindo-Martínez, María; Mollà-Jiménez, Cristina; Antón-Pascual, José Luis; Rodríguez-Serra, Manuel; Martín-Ruíz, José Luis; Fernández-Arroyo, Pablo Juan; Blasco-Císcar, Eugenia María; Cánovas-Robles, José; Herrera-Murillo, Miguel; González-Hernández, Enrique; Sánchez-Morán, Fernando; Solera-Suárez, Manuel; Torres-Tortajada, Jesús; Nuñez-Martínez, José María; Martín-Langerwerf, David; Herrero-Gutiérrez, Eugenio; Sebastián-Muñoz, Isabel; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a lack of evidence in the efficacy of the coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) to reduce the mortality rate in septic shock. To fill this gap, we have designed the ROMPA study (Mortality Reduction in Septic Shock by Plasma Adsorption) to confirm whether treatment with an adequate dose of treated plasma by CPFA could confer a clinical benefit. Methods and analysis Our study is a multicentric randomised clinical trial with a 28-day and 90-day follow-up and allocation ratio 1:1. Its aim is to clarify whether the application of high doses of CPFA (treated plasma ≥0.20 L/kg/day) in the first 3 days after randomisation, in addition to the current clinical practice, is able to reduce hospital mortality in patients with septic shock in intensive care units (ICUs) at 28 and 90 days after initiation of the therapy. The study will be performed in 10 ICUs in the Southeast of Spain which follow the same protocol in this disease (based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign). Our trial is designed to be able to demonstrate an absolute mortality reduction of 20% (α=0.05; 1−β=0.8; n=190(95×2)). The severity of the process, ensuring the recruitment of patients with a high probability of death (50% in the control group), will be achieved through an adequate stratification by using both severity scores and classical definitions of severe sepsis/septic shock and dynamic parameters. Our centres are fully aware of the many pitfalls associated with previous medical device trials. Trying to reduce these problems, we have developed a training programme to improve the CPFA use (especially clotting problems). Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committees of all the participant centres. The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, as well as national and international conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02357433; Pre-results. PMID:27406647

  8. Review of a large clinical series: Predicting death for patients with abdominal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Ernst; Brause, Rüdiger; Paetz, Jürgen; Arlt, Björn

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the result of the MEDAN project that analyzes a multicenter septic shock patient data collection. The mortality prognosis based on 4 scores that are often used is compared with the prognosis of a trained neural network. We built an alarm system using the network classification results. Method. We analyzed the data of 382 patients with abdominal septic shock who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1998 to 2002. The analysis includes the calculation of daily sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA), Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II, multiple-organ dysfunction score (MODS) scores for each patient and the training and testing of an appropriate neural network. Results. For our patients with abdominal septic shock, the analysis shows that it is not possible to predict their individual fate correctly on the day of admission to the ICU on the basis of any current score. However, when the trained network computes a score value below the threshold during the ICU stay, there is a high probability that the patient will die within 3 days. The trained neural network obtains the same outcome prediction performance as the best score, the SOFA score, using narrower confidence intervals and considering three variables only: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and the number of thrombocytes. We conclude that the currently best available score for abdominal septic shock may be replaced by the output of a trained neural network with only 3 input variables. PMID:21262751

  9. Effects of Safflower Yellow on the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jin; Wang, Ru-Rong; Kang, Yan; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Zeng, Xue-Feng; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical effect of safflower yellow on the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods. 85 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were randomly selected to receive either therapy according to the international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock (Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012) (control group, n = 45) or conventional therapy plus safflower yellow (study group, n = 40). The 28-day mortality and 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared as primary outcomes. Results. The 28-day mortality from all causes and in-hospital mortality were significantly lower in the study group (50%, 17.5%) as compared to the control group (78.58%, 54.76%) (P = 0.007, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital), and the 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curve was higher in the study group than in the control group (P = 0.008, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital, Log Rank). 72 hours after treatment, secondary outcomes including heart rate, leukocyte counts, lactate levels, and platelet counts of patients in the study group were ameliorated significantly as compared with the control group. Conclusion. This study offers a potential new strategy employing safflower yellow to more effectively treat patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This trial is registered with identifier ChiCTR-TRC-14005196. PMID:26989426

  10. Effects of Safflower Yellow on the Treatment of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-jin; Wang, Ru-rong; Kang, Yan; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-xia; Zeng, Xue-feng; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical effect of safflower yellow on the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods. 85 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were randomly selected to receive either therapy according to the international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock (Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012) (control group, n = 45) or conventional therapy plus safflower yellow (study group, n = 40). The 28-day mortality and 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared as primary outcomes. Results. The 28-day mortality from all causes and in-hospital mortality were significantly lower in the study group (50%, 17.5%) as compared to the control group (78.58%, 54.76%) (P = 0.007, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital), and the 28-day Kaplan-Meier survival curve was higher in the study group than in the control group (P = 0.008, all causes, P < 0.001, in-hospital, Log Rank). 72 hours after treatment, secondary outcomes including heart rate, leukocyte counts, lactate levels, and platelet counts of patients in the study group were ameliorated significantly as compared with the control group. Conclusion. This study offers a potential new strategy employing safflower yellow to more effectively treat patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This trial is registered with identifier ChiCTR-TRC-14005196. PMID:26989426

  11. Severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Schorr, Christa A; Zanotti, Sergio; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from sepsis remains unacceptably high. Large variability in clinical practice, plus the increasing awareness that certain processes of care associated with improved critical care outcomes, has led to the development of clinical practice guidelines in a variety of areas related to infection and sepsis. The Surviving Sepsis Guidelines for Management of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock were first published in 2004, revised in 2008, and recently revised again and published in 2013. The first part of this manuscript is a summary of the 2013 guidelines with some editorial comment. The second part of the manuscript characterizes hospital based sepsis performance improvement programs and highlights the sepsis bundles from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign as a key component of such a program. PMID:24335487

  12. Vasoplegia in septic shock (review).

    PubMed

    Gamcrlidze, M M; Intskirveli, N A; Vardosanidze, K D; Chikhladze, Kh E; Goliadze, L Sh; Ratiani, L R

    2015-02-01

    Vasoplegia is considered as a key factor responsible for the death of patients with septic shock, due to persistent and irreversible hypotension. The latter associated with vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors is a significant independent prognostic factor of mortality in severe sepsis. Loss of control of the vascular tone occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. The aim of this review is to discuss in detail the recent suggested alternative mechanisms of vasoplegia in severe sepsis: Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by activation of inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; significantly elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors; inactivation of catecholamines by oxidation; over-activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP channels) during septic shock and their involvement in vascular dysfunction. The review also discusses some therapeutic approaches based on pathogenetic mechanisms of severe sepsis and their efficacy in treatment of patients with septic shock. The loss of vascular tone control occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors

  13. Massive Organ Inflammation in Experimental and in Clinical Meningococcal Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Hellerud, Bernt C; Olstad, Ole K; Nielsen, Erik W; Trøseid, Anne-Marie S; Skadberg, Øyvind; Thorgersen, Ebbe B; Vege, Åshild; Mollnes, Tom E; Brandtzæg, Petter

    2015-11-01

    Fulminant meningococcal sepsis is characterized by a massive growth of bacteria in the circulation, regarded as the primary inflammatory site, with no specific solid organ focus. Here we aimed to study the local inflammatory response in organs using a porcine model of fulminant meningococcal septic shock challenged with exponentially increasing doses of heat inactivated Neisseria meningitidis. The results were compared with those obtained in organs post mortem from three patients with lethal meningococcal septic shock. Nine patients with lethal pneumococcal disease and 14 patients with sudden infant death syndrome served as controls. Frozen tissue were thawed, homogenized and prepared for quantification of bacterial DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and key inflammatory mediators were measured by ELISA in the pig material and by multiplex in the human material. In addition, gene expression assayed by Affymetrix gene expression profiling was performed in the pig study. The porcine model revealed a major influx of N. meningitidis in lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys accompanied with major production of cardinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, far exceeding the amount detected in blood. Genes encoding for these mediators revealed a similar profile. By comparing the wild-type with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient meningococcal strain, we documented that LPS was the dominant group of molecules inducing organ inflammation and was required for IL-8 production. IL-10 production was predominantly stimulated by non-LPS molecules. The massive organ inflammation in the porcine model was present in the three patients dying of meningococcal shock and differed markedly from the patients with lethal pneumococcal infections and sudden infant death syndrome. In conclusion, in meningococcal sepsis, a massive local inflammatory response occurs in specific organs. PMID:26473439

  14. Judging quality of current septic shock definitions and criteria.

    PubMed

    Shankar-Hari, Manu; Bertolini, Guido; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Annane, Djillali; Deutschman, Clifford S; Singer, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Septic shock definitions are being revisited. We assess the feasibility, reliability, and validity characteristics of the current definitions and criteria of septic shock. Septic shock is conceptualised as cardiovascular dysfunction, tissue perfusion and cellular abnormalities caused by infection. Currently, for feasibility, septic shock is identified at the bedside by using either hypotension or a proxy for tissue perfusion/cellular abnormalities (e.g., hyperlactatemia). We propose that concurrent presence of cardiovascular dysfunction and perfusion/cellular abnormalities could improve validity of septic shock diagnosis, as we are more likely to identify a patient population with all elements of the illness concept. This epidemiological refinement should not affect clinical care and may aid study design to identify illness-specific biomarkers and interventions. PMID:26702879

  15. Clinical course of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in a cohort of infected patients from ten Colombian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sepsis has several clinical stages, and mortality rates are different for each stage. Our goal was to establish the evolution and the determinants of the progression of clinical stages, from infection to septic shock, over the first week, as well as their relationship to 7-day and 28-day mortality. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter cohort of inpatients hospitalized in general wards or intensive care units (ICUs). The general estimating equations (GEE) model was used to estimate the risk of progression and the determinants of stages of infection over the first week. Cox regression with time-dependent covariates and fixed covariates was used to determine the factors related with 7-day and 28-day mortality, respectively. Results In 2681 patients we show that progression to severe sepsis and septic shock increases with intraabdominal and respiratory sources of infection [OR = 1,32; 95%IC = 1,20-1,46 and OR = 1.21, 95%CI = 1,11-1,33 respectively], as well as according to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) [OR = 1,03; 95%CI = 1,02-1,03] and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) [OR = 1,16; 95%CI = 1,14-1,17] scores. The variables related with first-week mortality were progression to severe sepsis [HR = 2,13; 95%CI = 1,13-4,03] and septic shock [HR = 3,00; 95%CI = 1,50-5.98], respiratory source of infection [HR = 1,76; 95%IC = 1,12-2,77], APACHE II [HR = 1,07; 95% CI = 1,04-1,10] and SOFA [HR = 1,09; 95%IC = 1,04-1,15] scores. Conclusions Intraabdominal and respiratory sources of infection, independently of SOFA and APACHE II scores, increase the risk of clinical progression to more severe stages of sepsis; and these factors, together with progression of the infection itself, are the main determinants of 7-day and 28-day mortality. PMID:23883312

  16. The Effect of Early Goal-Directed Therapy on Outcome in Adult Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing-Yuan; Chen, Qi-Hong; Liu, Song-Qiao; Pan, Chun; Xu, Xiu-Ping; Han, Ji-Bin; Xie, Jian-Feng; Huang, Ying-Zi; Guo, Feng-Mei; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) improves outcome in severe sepsis and septic shock remains unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of existing clinical trials to examine whether EGDT improved outcome in the resuscitation of adult sepsis patients compared with control care. METHODS: We searched for eligible studies using MEDLINE, Elsevier, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases. Studies were eligible if they compared the effects of EGDT versus control care on mortality in adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Two reviewers extracted data independently. Data including mortality, sample size of the patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, and resuscitation end points were extracted. Data were analyzed using methods recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 4.2 software. Random errors were evaluated by trial sequential analysis (TSA). RESULTS: Nine studies compared EGDT with control care, and 5202 severe sepsis and septic shock patients were included. A nonsignificant trend toward reduction in the longest all-cause mortality was observed in the EGDT group compared with control care (relative risk, 0.89; 99% confidence interval, 0.74–1.07; P = 0.10). However, EGDT significantly reduced intensive care unit mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients (relative risk, 0.72; 99% confidence interval, 0.57–0.90; P = 0.0002). TSA indicated lack of firm evidence for a beneficial effect. CONCLUSIONS: In this meta-analysis, a nonsignificant trend toward reduction in the longest all-cause mortality in patients resuscitated with EGDT was noted. However, EGDT significantly reduced intensive care unit mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients. TSA indicated a lack of firm evidence for the results. More powered, randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the effects. PMID:27049857

  17. Antimicrobial therapy in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Bruno; Duclos, Gary; Martin, Claude; Leone, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Providing antibiotics is a life-saving intervention in patients with septic shock. Cultures as clinically appropriate before antimicrobial therapy are required. Guidelines recommend providing broad-spectrum antibiotics within the first hour after recognition of shock. The site of infection, the patient's history and clinical status, and the local ecology all affect the choice of empirical treatment. The appropriateness of this choice is an important determinant of patient outcome. At 48-96h, the antimicrobial treatment should be systematically reassessed based on the clinical course and culture results. Cessation, de-escalation, continuation, or escalation are discussed according to these variables. Unnecessary treatment should be avoided to reduce the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens. PMID:27062114

  18. Lemierre's syndrome presenting with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Marulasiddappa, Vinay; Tejesh, C A

    2013-11-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic abscesses following oropharyngeal infection. Though classically caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a number of other causative organisms have been reported in literature. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome following parapharyngeal abscess due to staphylococcus aureus which progressed to septic shock. PMID:24501493

  19. Lemierre's syndrome presenting with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Marulasiddappa, Vinay; Tejesh, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic abscesses following oropharyngeal infection. Though classically caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a number of other causative organisms have been reported in literature. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome following parapharyngeal abscess due to staphylococcus aureus which progressed to septic shock. PMID:24501493

  20. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  1. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-07-15

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  2. The clinical impact of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli in the management of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Vicas, Aurora; Opal, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Multi-antibiotic drug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacilli are becoming a major threat to the standard care of septic patients. Empiric antimicrobial drug regimens to cover likely bacterial pathogens have to be altered in keeping with the spread of MDR pathogens in the health care setting and in the community. Reliable antibiotics for broad spectrum coverage for sepsis such as extended spectrum β-lactam antibiotics, carbapenems, and fluoroquinolones can no longer be counted upon to provide activity against a range of common, virulent pathogens that cause sepsis. In some regions of Asia, South America, and Eastern Europe in particular, MDR pathogens have become a major concern, necessitating the use of potentially toxic and costly antibiotic combinations as initial antibiotic therapy for septic shock. In this brief review, we will focus on the emergence of MDR gram-negative pathogens, resistance mechanisms, and suggest some management and prevention strategies against MDR pathogens. PMID:24200870

  3. Reduced oxygen utilization in septic shock: disorder or adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Alexandre A

    2015-01-01

    A fall in oxygen utilization during septic or endotoxic shock is thought to reflect circulatory hypoxia or mitochondrial dysfunction, but these pathology-oriented hypotheses do not explain all clinical observations. Here we discuss an alternative hypothesis of how oxygen utilization could fall as the result of a physiological thermometabolic adaptation. PMID:27227060

  4. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene caused by septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Yokota, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Junpei; Okuhara, Yukako; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    We report three cases of symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG) caused by septic shock. Most of sepsis survivors with SPG require amputation of the affected extremities. To preserve the length of the thumb and fingers, we performed surgical amputation and used flaps to cover the amputated peripheral extremities.

  5. The current management of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Russel, J A

    2008-10-01

    This is a review of the management of septic shock that suggests an approach to treatment (ABCDEF: Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Drugs, Evaluate the source of sepsis, Fix the source of sepsis) for clinicians. The incidence of septic shock is increasing and mortality ranges from 30% to 70%. The commonest sources of infection are lung (25%), abdomen (25%), and other sources. Septic shock occurs because of highly complex interactions between the infecting microorganism(s) and the responses of the human host. The innate immune response is rapidly followed by the more specific adaptive immune response. Septic shock is characterized by alterations in the coagulant/anticoagulant balance such that there is a more pro-coagulant phenotype. Lung protective ventilation (which means the use of relatively low tidal volumes of 4 -6 mL/kg ideal body weight) is recommended for treatment of patients who have septic shock. Rivers early goal-directed therapy is recommended because it showed a significant increase in survival. Surviving Sepsis guidelines recommend resuscitation of septic shock with either crystalloid or colloid. Patients who have septic shock should be treated with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics as rapidly as possible and certainly within one hour. Activated protein C (APC) is a vitamin K dependent serine protease that is an anticoagulant and is also cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory. APC (24 mg/kg/hour infusion for 96 hours) decreased mortality (APC 25% vs placebo 31%, relative risk 0.81P=0.005) and improved organ dysfunction in patients at high risk of death (e.g. APACHE II >25 [APC 31% vs placebo 44%]). APC is not recommended to treat surgical patients who have one organ system dysfunction. In 2006, the European regulatory authority indicated that there must be another randomized placebo-controlled trial of APC to further establish efficacy as assessed by mortality reduction. Vasopressin is a key stress hormone in response to hypotension. The VASST

  6. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  7. Septic lung and shock lung in man.

    PubMed Central

    Clowes, G H; Hirsch, E; Williams, L; Kwasnik, E; O'Donnell, T F; Cuevas, P; Saini, V K; Moradi, I; Farizan, M; Saravis, C

    1975-01-01

    Two series of patients were studied by serial measurements of blood gas exchange and pulmonarmonary dysfunction and to evaluate the dangers of respiratory failure in post traumatic patients. There were 27 patients who had sustained profound hemorrhagic shock and massive blood replacement averaging 9.7 liters and 38 patients who suffered general peritonitis or other forms of fulminating nonthoracic sepsis. All were supported by endotrachael intubation and volume controlled ventilators. The overall mortality for the post shock patients without sepsis was 12% while in the septic patients it was 35%. The maximal pulmonary arteriovenous shunt encountered in the post hemorrhagic shock patients at 36 hours averaged 20 plus or minus 8% and was accompanied by high cardiac indices (average 5.1 plus or minus 1.3 L/M-2/min) but no significant rise of pulmonary arterial pressure or peak inspiratory pressure (PIP). Severe pulmonary dysfunction subsequently occurred only in those patients who later became septic. The studies on the septic patients were divided according to the magnitude of the cardiac indices (the high indices averaged 4.8 plus or minus 1.6L/M-2/min) and thelow indices averaged 1.9 plus or minus 1.0 L/M-2/min. In the former, the average maximal shunt of 30 plus or minus 6% was sustained for 4 or more days, accompanied by an elevation of PIP to 36 plus or minus 6 cm H2O and by Pa pressure of 28 plus or minus 5 mm Hg. The patients in low output septic shock usually had an associated bronchopneumonia and had an average venous admixture of 34 plus or minus 8% and PIP values of 41 plus or minus 8 cm H2O. The mean Pa pressure in this group was 29 plus or minus 6 mm Hg. PMID:236738

  8. Novel therapies for septic shock over the past 4 decades.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Anthony F; Munford, Robert S

    2011-07-13

    Infections that result in shock and organ failure are a major public health problem worldwide. Severe sepsis and septic shock affect patients of all ages and often complicate chronic diseases. They are the major causes of death in critical care units and contribute substantially to hospital inpatient costs. Translating the scientific advances of the last 4 decades into clinical practice has been challenging. Despite many attempts to develop new therapies, the basic elements of treatment have not changed since the 1960s. In this Grand Rounds, we summarize the results of the clinical trials conducted during the last 4 decades, discuss some lessons learned, and suggest possible directions for future investigation. PMID:21750297

  9. Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption in Gram-negative septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Hoi Ping; Leung, Yuk Wah; Lam, Sin Man; Chan, King Chung; Yan, Wing Wa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Severe sepsis and septic shock are common causes of mortality and morbidity in an intensive care unit setting. Endotoxin, derived from the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, is considered a major factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This study investigated the effect of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption device on Gram-negative septic shock patients. Materials and Methods: An open, controlled, prospective, randomized, single-center trial was conducted between February 2010 and June 2012. Patients with septic shock due to intra-abdominal sepsis were randomized to either conventional therapy (n = 8) or conventional therapy plus two 2-hourly sessions of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption (n = 7). Primary endpoint was the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score changes from 0 to 72 h. Secondary end points included vasopressor requirement, PaO2/FiO2 ratio (PFR), length of stay (LOS), and 28-day mortality. Results: This study was terminated early as interim analysis showed a low probability of significant findings. No significant difference was noted between the two groups with respect to change in SOFA score, vasopressor score, PFR, LOS, and 28-day mortality. Side-effect was minimal. Conclusions: We could not identify any clinical benefit on the addition of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption to conventional therapy in patients who suffered from intra-abdominal sepsis with shock. The side effect profile of this novel device was acceptable. PMID:25538412

  10. Initial resuscitation and management of pediatric septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kelly; Weiss, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    The pediatric sepsis syndrome remains a common cause of morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization costs worldwide. The initial resuscitation and management of pediatric sepsis is focused on 1) rapid recognition of abnormal tissue perfusion and restoration of adequate cardiovascular function, 2) eradication of the inciting invasive infection, including prompt administration of empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial medications, and 3) supportive care of organ system dysfunction. Efforts to improve early and aggressive initial resuscitation and ongoing management strategies have improved outcomes in pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock, though many questions still remain as to the optimal therapeutic strategies for many patients. In this article, we will briefly review the definitions, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and pathophysiology of sepsis and provide an extensive overview of both current and novel therapeutic strategies used to resuscitate and manage pediatric patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:25604591

  11. [Advances in the research of early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Sun, W; Yuan, H X; An, Y Z

    2016-05-20

    Nowadays, severe infection has become one of the common problems in clinic. The morbidity of severe sepsis and septic shock is increasing, which becomes a big threat to patients with burn wounds or chronic diseases. It has become a key subject about how to cure severe sepsis and septic shock. In recent years, mortality of patients in such condition has declined slightly, which might be attributed to the application of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) in certain degree. This article reviews application of EGDT in severe sepsis and septic shock, in order to analyze its effectiveness and boundedness, as well as predict its development. PMID:27188487

  12. Vasopressor and Inotropic Management Of Patients With Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Sacha; Edwin, Stephanie B.; Alaniz, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the role of vasopressors and inotropes in the management of septic shock. This review assesses available evidence for the use of specific vasopressors in the management of septic shock. Use of adjunctive vasopressor therapy is also evaluated, examining the potential value of individual agents. Lastly, inotropic agents are evaluated for use in patients with myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26185405

  13. Corticosteroids and Pediatric Septic Shock Outcomes: A Risk Stratified Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sarah J.; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z.; Thomas, Neal J.; Allen, Geoffrey L.; Anas, Nick; Bigham, Michael T.; Hall, Mark; Freishtat, Robert J.; Sen, Anita; Meyer, Keith; Checchia, Paul A.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Nowak, Jeffrey; Quasney, Michael; Weiss, Scott L.; Banschbach, Sharon; Beckman, Eileen; Howard, Kelli; Frank, Erin; Harmon, Kelli; Lahni, Patrick; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Wong, Hector R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential benefits of corticosteroids for septic shock may depend on initial mortality risk. Objective We determined associations between corticosteroids and outcomes in children with septic shock who were stratified by initial mortality risk. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of an ongoing, multi-center pediatric septic shock clinical and biological database. Using a validated biomarker-based stratification tool (PERSEVERE), 496 subjects were stratified into three initial mortality risk strata (low, intermediate, and high). Subjects receiving corticosteroids during the initial 7 days of admission (n = 252) were compared to subjects who did not receive corticosteroids (n = 244). Logistic regression was used to model the effects of corticosteroids on 28-day mortality and complicated course, defined as death within 28 days or persistence of two or more organ failures at 7 days. Results Subjects who received corticosteroids had greater organ failure burden, higher illness severity, higher mortality, and a greater requirement for vasoactive medications, compared to subjects who did not receive corticosteroids. PERSEVERE-based mortality risk did not differ between the two groups. For the entire cohort, corticosteroids were associated with increased risk of mortality (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–4.0, p = 0.004) and a complicated course (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.5, p = 0.012). Within each PERSEVERE-based stratum, corticosteroid administration was not associated with improved outcomes. Similarly, corticosteroid administration was not associated with improved outcomes among patients with no comorbidities, nor in groups of patients stratified by PRISM. Conclusions Risk stratified analysis failed to demonstrate any benefit from corticosteroids in this pediatric septic shock cohort. PMID:25386653

  14. Steroids for septic shock: back from the dead? (Pro).

    PubMed

    Balk, Robert A

    2003-05-01

    The use of corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for severe sepsis and septic shock has been a source of controversy for the past 35 years. Despite a wealth of preclinical data supporting both survival and physiologic benefit for early steroid use, the data in human sepsis have been much less convincing. There have even been reports suggesting the potential for harm associated with the administration of early high-dose corticosteroids in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Recent trials have reported hemodynamic and survival benefits associated with the use of more physiologic steroid replacement therapy in patients with vasopressor-dependent septic shock. These results coupled with the observation of "relative adrenal insufficiency" in some patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may once again establish a defined role for corticosteroid therapy in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:12740234

  15. [CLINICAL ASPECTS OF SEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, O V; Sinopal'nikov, A I; Filatov, V V; Danishevsky, S V; Styrt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy is a form of general cerebral dysfunction caused by a systemic inflammatory reaction. Its investigation encounters enormous difficulties for the lack of reliable biological markers of neuronal lesions and methods for the evaluation of consciousness in severely ill patients. Hence, the importance of correct clinical interpretation of the character and magnitude of CNS activity. Examples are presented demonstrating the difficulty of interpreting disorders in CNS activity associated with evere community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:27172727

  16. High doses of corticosteroids in the treatment of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hellman, A; Alestig, K

    1985-01-01

    High doses of corticosteroids are reported to be beneficial in the treatment of septic shock in many animal species, e.g. dog, rat and rabbit. Recent findings in baboons subjected to E. coli shock indicate that early treatment with a combination of antibiotics and steroids strongly enhance survival rate. In clinical studies the protective effects of steroids are more ambiguous, however. In part this may be explained by variations in the amount of steroids used or by the fact that in some studies the steroid is administered late in shock. The dose recommended, 30 mg/kg bw of methylprednisolone or an equivalent amount of another glucocorticoid given once or twice, is based on animal as well as clinical documentation. PMID:3911703

  17. Activated protein C downregulates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and improves clinical parameters in an in-vivo model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Nold, Marcel F; Nold-Petry, Claudia A; Fischer, Doris; Richter, Bernd; Blaheta, Roman; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Muhl, Heiko; Schranz, Dietmar; Veldman, Alex

    2007-11-01

    Despite the success of the anti-coagulant protease protein C (PC) in treating septic shock in humans, the signaling pathways used are still unclear. To explore the effects of treatment with PC zymogen and its activated form aPC in a setting of sepsis, we employed a piglet model of endotoxic shock. In the aPC group, we observed a 65%-90% reduction in plasma TNF-alpha levels and a concomitant clinical improvement. Unexpectedly, administration of aPC also resulted in stabilization of the plasma pH above 7.2. Moreover, phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was virtually absent in the livers of those piglets receiving aPC. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we observed that nanomolar concentrations of PC and aPC inhibited the phosphorylation of p38MAPK. Furthermore, we showed that the regulation of the pro-apoptotic cell cycle regulator p53 by PC and aPC is dependent on the reduction of p38MAPK activation. The transduction of these effects involves all three receptors associated with protein C signaling, namely endothelial protein C receptor, protease-activated receptor 1, and sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1. Ultimately, this study elucidates novel signaling pathways regulated by protein C and emphasises the pivotal importance of its multiple modes of action beyond anticoagulation. APC's clinical success may, in part, be due to p38MAPK inhibition. PMID:18000619

  18. Septic Shock Due to Biliary Stones in a Postcholecystectomy Patient.

    PubMed

    Azfar, Mohammad Feroz; Khan, Muhammad Faisal; Khursheed, Moazzum

    2015-10-01

    Septic shock leading to multi-organ failure is not uncommon. Early diagnosis to confirm the source is the distinctive attribute of sepsis management guidelines. Cholangitis as the source of sepsis can become a diagnostic dilemma in patients who have had cholecystectomy in the past. CT abdomen should be the investigation of choice in this group of patients. This report describes two postcholecystectomy patients who presented with septic shock secondary to biliary stones. The source of septic shock in both patients were biliary stones was confirmed with abdominal CT. Ultrasound abdomen failed to report biliary stones in these patients. Both improved on percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. PMID:26522207

  19. An unusual case of septic shock in a geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kourelis, Taxiarchis; Kannan, Subramanian; Foley, Raymond J

    2010-03-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a gram-negative rod that is a normal inhabitant of the oral flora of most dogs, cats and other animals. Clinically significant infections of humans by this common organism are extremely rare. We present a case of an 87-year-old woman who presented with septic shock and multiorgan system failure. Blood cultures were positive for a gram-negative rod that five days after admission was identified as C. canimorsus. She was treated aggressively with intravenous fluid resuscitation, vasopressors and parenteral antibiotics and recovered. The epidemiology, virulence factors, and treatment options for C. canimorsus are discussed. PMID:20391818

  20. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in neonates with septic shock.

    PubMed

    McCune, S; Short, B L; Miller, M K; Lotze, A; Anderson, K D

    1990-05-01

    Neonatal septic shock has significant morbidity and mortality with current therapeutic measures. At Children's National Medical Center, from June 1984 to October 1986, 10 of 100 patients treated with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) had a documented diagnosis of septic shock. All of these infants fulfilled criteria consistent with 80% mortality using conventional intensive medical management. However, the survival rate for the septic neonates in this study was 100%. Compared with other groups of infants treated with ECMO, these septic neonates required significantly more ventilatory support after ECMO and had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease (30% v 12%). The septic neonates were also at higher risk for intracranial hemorrhage than the other infants treated with ECMO (40% v 26%). The necessity for prolonged intubation after ECMO for patients with septic shock suggests that this condition may be associated with additional structural damage not seen with meconium aspiration syndrome or respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, for neonatal patients with septic shock unresponsive to conventional medical management, ECMO must be considered a viable alternative treatment. PMID:2352078

  1. An Elevated Percentage of Reticulated Platelet Is Associated With Increased Mortality in Septic Shock Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qin; Ren, Jianan; Hu, Dong; Jiang, Pengjun; Li, Guanwei; Anjum, Nadeem; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Wu, Xiuwen; Liu, Song; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yunzhao; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microcirculatory changes and coagulation disturbances are thought to play a key role in sepsis. Some evidence suggests that the percentage of reticulated platelets (RP%) may be a valuable and cost-effective sepsis screening parameter. This was a prospective study in surgical patients to investigate the potential value of RP% as a predictor of mortality in septic shock patients. This was a prospective study conducted in a surgical critical care center of a Chinese tertiary care hospital. Consecutive septic shock patients were enrolled at admission. Age- and sex-matched non-septic patients were recruited as control patients. RP% was determined by flow cytometry in 68 septic shock patients and 68 controls. Compared with survivors, septic patients who died presented with a significantly higher RP% (P < 0.001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for the RP% association with mortality was 0.867 (95 % CI 0.780–0.953, P < 0.001). Kaplan–Meier survival curves showed that mortality risk was significantly different when patients were stratified based on RP% (P < 0.001). This association was preserved in a multi-logistic regression analysis that included clinical confounders (P < 0.014). This prospective study demonstrates that increased RP% identifies septic shock patients who have a high risk of death. RP% has the potential to act as a marker for patient stratification in future clinical trials. PMID:25984667

  2. Right ventricular dysfunction in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Dhainaut, J F; Lanore, J J; de Gournay, J M; Huyghebaert, M F; Brunet, F; Villemant, D; Monsallier, J F

    1988-01-01

    Using a rapid computerized thermodilution method, we examined the evolution of right ventricular performance in 23 patients with septic shock. Nine survived the episode of septic shock. The other 14 patients died of refractory circulatory shock. Significant right ventricular systolic dysfunction, defined as decreased ejection fraction (-39%) and right ventricular dilation (+38%) was observed in all patients with septic shock. However, in the survivors, increased right ventricular preload may prevent hemodynamic evidence of right ventricular pump failure by utilizing the Frank-Starling mechanism to maintain stroke volume. Conversely, in the nonsurvivors, right ventricular dysfunction was more prononced two days after the onset of septic shock, leading to a fall in stroke. In the last patients, a decrease in contractility appears to be the major factor accounting for decreased right ventricular performance, as evidenced by the marked increase in end-systolic volume (+27%) without significant change in pulmonary artery pressure, during the later stage of septic shock. The observed right ventricular pump failure then appears associated with an alteration in diastolic mechanical properties of this ventricle, as suggested by a leftward displacement of the individual pressure-volume curves. PMID:3403793

  3. Mortality Prediction Model of Septic Shock Patients Based on Routinely Recorded Data

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Marta; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ferrario, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    We studied the problem of mortality prediction in two datasets, the first composed of 23 septic shock patients and the second composed of 73 septic subjects selected from the public database MIMIC-II. For each patient we derived hemodynamic variables, laboratory results, and clinical information of the first 48 hours after shock onset and we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict mortality in the following 7 days. The results show interesting features that individually identify significant differences between survivors and nonsurvivors and features which gain importance only when considered together with the others in a multivariate regression model. This preliminary study on two small septic shock populations represents a novel contribution towards new personalized models for an integration of multiparameter patient information to improve critical care management of shock patients. PMID:26557154

  4. Evaluation of a Model-Based Hemodynamic Monitoring Method in a Porcine Study of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Revie, James A.; Stevenson, David; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Pretty, Chris J.; Lambermont, Bernard C.; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Kolh, Philippe; Shaw, Geoffrey M.; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The accuracy and clinical applicability of an improved model-based system for tracking hemodynamic changes is assessed in an animal study on septic shock. Methods. This study used cardiovascular measurements recorded during a porcine trial studying the efficacy of large-pore hemofiltration for treating septic shock. Four Pietrain pigs were instrumented and induced with septic shock. A subset of the measured data, representing clinically available measurements, was used to identify subject-specific cardiovascular models. These models were then validated against the remaining measurements. Results. The system accurately matched independent measures of left and right ventricle end diastolic volumes and maximum left and right ventricular pressures to percentage errors less than 20% (except for the 95th percentile error in maximum right ventricular pressure) and all R2 > 0.76. An average decrease of 42% in systemic resistance, a main cardiovascular consequence of septic shock, was observed 120 minutes after the infusion of the endotoxin, consistent with experimentally measured trends. Moreover, modelled temporal trends in right ventricular end systolic elastance and afterload tracked changes in corresponding experimentally derived metrics. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that this model-based method can monitor disease-dependent changes in preload, afterload, and contractility in porcine study of septic shock. PMID:23585774

  5. [Septic shock in intensive care units. Current focus on treatment].

    PubMed

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Donoso F, Alejandro; Cruces R, Pablo; Díaz R, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Essential therapeutic principles in children with septic shock persist over time, although some new concepts have been recently incorporated, and fully awareness of pediatricians and intensivists is essential. Fluid resuscitation is a fundamental intervention, but the kind of ideal fluid has not been established yet, as each of these interventions has specific limitations and there is no evidence supportive of the superiority of one type of fluid. Should septic shock persists despite adequate fluid resuscitation, the use of inotropic medication and/or vasopressors is indicated. New vasoactive drugs can be used in refractory septic shock caused by vasopressors, and the use of hydrocortisone should be considered in children with suspected adrenal insufficiency, as it reduces the need for vasopressors. The indications for red blood cells transfusion or the optimal level of glycemia are still controversial, with no consensus on the threshold value for the use of these blood products or the initiation of insulin administration, respectively. Likewise, the use of high-volume hemofiltration is a controversial issue and further study is needed on the routine recommendation in the course of septic shock. Nutritional support is crucial, as malnutrition is a serious complication that should be properly prevented and treated. The aim of this paper is to provide update on the most recent advances as concerns the treatment of septic shock in the pediatric population. PMID:26323988

  6. [Beta-blockers in septic shock: a review].

    PubMed

    Vela-Vásquez, R S; Grigorov-Tzenkov, I; Aguilar, J L

    2015-02-01

    In septic shock, high adrenergic stress is associated with cardiovascular and systemic adverse effects, which can negatively affect the results. Beta-adrenergic receptor block has been shown to be effective in controlling the disproportionate increase in heart rate, maintaining a favorable hemodynamic profile and apparently improving the efficiency of the cardiovascular system in order to maintain tissue perfusion. They have also been shown to modulate favorably catecholamine-induced immunosuppression and to decrease insulin resistance, protein catabolism, and proinflammatory cytokine expression associated with cardiovascular dysfunction. Selective beta-1 blockers appear to provide better results than non-selective blockers, even suggesting a positive impact on mortality. Future clinical trials are still needed to confirm these findings and define the scope of their benefits. PMID:25152109

  7. Enterococcus hirae Bacteremia Associated with Acute Pancreatitis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.; De Aguirre, Manuel; Divito, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Enterococcus hirae has rarely been reported in humans but is not uncommon in mammals and birds. We describe a case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia associated with acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and septic shock responsive to antibiotic therapy and supportive critical care management. Unique aspects of this case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia are its association with acute pancreatitis and its geographical origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia occurring in a patient in the United States. Although human infection with this organism appears to be rare, all cases reported to date describe bacteremia associated with severe and life-threatening illness. Thus, physicians need to be cognizant of the clinical significance of this heretofore little recognized pathogen. PMID:26417465

  8. Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock (ProCESS) statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Francis; Yealy, Donald M; Kellum, John A; Huang, David T; Barnato, Amber E; Eaton, Tammy L; Angus, Derek C; Weissfeld, Lisa A

    2014-01-01

    Background The Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock study is a randomised, multicentre, prospective, three-arm, parallel-group trial of alternative resuscitation strategies for early septic shock. Objective To state our analysis plan for trial data. Methods Our plan is to guide data collection and analysis using pre-existing definitions and testing, with local consensus-based efforts where needed. We examine protocolised care (two experimental approaches) and compare this to usual “wild type” care. Results Our plan is to address three aims (clinical efficacy, biology of illness and recovery, and costs and cost-effectiveness) and four hypotheses, and we specify rules for handling data and determining outcomes. Conclusion By using measures to maintain study conduct and analysis rigour, we hope to improve understanding of early septic shock resuscitation and care of patients. PMID:24289512

  9. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-06-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  10. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  11. Methylmalonic acidemia mimicking diabetic ketoacidosis and septic shock in infants

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Navdeep; Malhotra, Ashwini; Chhabra, Sanjay; Chhabra, Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is most common inherited type of organic acidemia. It has diverse presentation in older infants without any initial apparent symptoms. MMA sometimes present with sudden metabolic decompensation, which may mimics common emergencies like septic shock and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) without early recognition can be fatal. In born error of metabolism especially organic acidemia should be suspected in any infant presented with severe high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We report two cases of MMA in infants presented acutely mimicking DKA and septic shock. PMID:25810618

  12. Cryoprecipitate infusion fails to improve organ function in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hesselvik, F; Brodin, B; Carlsson, C; Cedergren, B; Jorfeldt, L; Liedén, G

    1987-05-01

    Plasma fibronectin may be of critical importance for the septic patient through its proposed function as the major opsonin for macrophage clearance of circulating, noncellular debris. As a rule, critically ill, septic patients are depleted of fibronectin. In earlier uncontrolled studies, infusion of fibronectin-rich cryoprecipitate had resulted in improved renal and pulmonary functions and changes in peripheral hemodynamics. In this controlled study, 32 septic ICU patients (mean initial fibronectin level = 60% of normal) received cryoprecipitate or control infusions. Although the fibronectin level was significantly elevated to the normal range in the cryoprecipitate group, no effects were seen in hemodynamics, oxygen metabolism, or lung and kidney functions. Our results indicate that this form of fibronectin therapy does not influence the impaired organ function in septic shock. PMID:3552444

  13. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  14. [SEPTIC SHOCK IN PATIENT WITH SEVERE HEAD TRAUMA].

    PubMed

    Sichev, A A; Tabasaransky, T Φ; Savin, I A; Gorachev, A S; Tenedieva, V D; Abramov, T A; Oshorov, A V; Polupan, A A; Mazkovsky, I V; Gavrilov, A G; Potapov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical observation illustrates the role of screening of inflammatory markers and advanced hemodynamic monitoring in optimization of the treatment of the patient with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). The level of consciousness by the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission was 5 points. From the first day of stay the patient suffered hyperthermia to 39,0° C° The diagnosis of the aspiration pneumonia was determined by radiological signs, bronchoscopy and inflammatory blood markers, C-reactive protein, leukocytosis. From the second day the constant infusion of norepinephrine was necessary to maintain mean ABP above 80 mmHg. On the 10th day the patient's condition deteriorated sharply. Developed hyperthermia to 40, 2° and cardiovascular collapse (in spite of the high level of norepinephrine support a sharp decline in ABP up to 49/20 mmHg). Invasive advanced hemodynamic PiCCO monitoring (transpulmonary thermodilution) was started Septic shock was suspected. Standard laboratory tests did not meet the criteria for septic shock. Witnessed a slight increase in CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) was within normal limits. Diagnostic search was supplemented by a study of interleukins (IL-6 and IL-2R) in the blood plasma. The significant increase in their values, was regarded as the initial manifestations of the systemic inflammatory response. Sepsis was confirmed. The extended antibiotic therapy started Continuous Veno-Venous hemofiltration was used as part of treatment of the inflammatory-toxic condition. In two days of the therapy the patient's condition has stabilized, the patient recovered consciousness in the form of opening the eyes, simple instructions. At discharge, the patient's condition according to the Glasgow outcome scale was estimated at 4 points. PMID:26596036

  15. [Role of vasopressin in septic shock : critical evaluation].

    PubMed

    Gradwohl-Matis, I; Brunauer, A; Dankl, D; Dünser, M

    2014-06-01

    Restoration of adequate tissue perfusion is the goal of resuscitation in septic shock. A growing understanding of microcirculatory dysfunction in sepsis led to a change in resuscitation practice away from targeting arterial and central venous pressures and towards tissue perfusion-guided protocols. This change in the approach to resuscitation was accompanied by a change in the role of vasoconstrictors. This review summarizes the pathophysiological and therapeutic mainstays of septic shock resuscitation and attempts to critically evaluate the scientific evidence on the use of vasopressin as a non-adrenergic vasoconstrictor in septic shock. Based on the published study results vasopressin appears to be of potential benefit in adult patients with moderate septic shock (norepinephrine requirements < 15 μg/min) and lacking signs of systemic hypoperfusion (e.g. normal arterial lactate levels). A vasopressin infusion with the sole target to increase arterial blood pressure despite the presence of systemic hypoperfusion is dangerous and can result in a critical deterioration of tissue perfusion. PMID:24838480

  16. Management of sepsis and septic shock in infants and children.

    PubMed

    von Rosenstiel, N; von Rosenstiel, I; Adam, D

    2001-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock constitute an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Thus, the systemic response to infection and its management remains a major challenge in clinical medicine. Apart from antibiotic administration, the majority of available therapies are limited to supportive strategies, although considerable efforts are being undertaken to devise innovative approaches that modulate host inflammatory responses. In suspected sepsis, 2 or 3 days' empiric antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting results. Antibiotics should be re-evaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. The initial antibiotic (combination) is determined by the likely causative agent, susceptibility patterns within a specific institution, CNS penetration, toxicity, and the patient's hepatic and renal function. The likely offending micro-organism in turn depends primarily on the patient's age, coexistence of any premorbid condition leading to impaired immune response, and the presenting signs and symptoms. Close attention to cardiovascular, respiratory, fluid and electrolyte, haematological, renal and metabolic/nutritional support is essential to optimise outcome. Fluid resuscitation is of utmost importance to overcome hypovolaemia on the basis of a diffuse capillary leak. Monitoring and normalisation of the heart rate is essential. In case of nonresponse to fluid resuscitation, inotropic and vasoactive agents are commonly used to increase cardiac output, maintain adequate blood pressure and enhance oxygen delivery to the tissue. Because respiratory distress syndrome is seen in about 40% of critically ill children with septic shock, increased inspired oxygen is essential. To provide optimal relief from respiratory muscle fatigue and facilitate the provision of positive airway pressure, early intubation and mechanical ventilation should be considered. Renal support is

  17. Increased survival of cirrhotic patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The overall outcome of septic shock has been recently improved. We sought to determine whether this survival gain extends to the high-risk subgroup of patients with cirrhosis. Methods Cirrhotic patients with septic shock admitted to a medical intensive care unit (ICU) during two consecutive periods (1997-2004 and 2005-2010) were retrospectively studied. Results Forty-seven and 42 cirrhotic patients presented with septic shock in 1997-2004 and 2005-2010, respectively. The recent period differed from the previous one by implementation of adjuvant treatments of septic shock including albumin infusion as fluid volume therapy, low-dose glucocorticoids, and intensive insulin therapy. ICU and hospital survival markedly improved over time (40% in 2005-2010 vs. 17% in 1997-2004, P = 0.02 and 29% in 2005-2010 vs. 6% in 1997-2004, P = 0.009, respectively). Furthermore, this survival gain in the latter period was sustained for 6 months (survival rate 24% in 2005-2010 vs. 6% in 1997-2004, P = 0.06). After adjustment with age, the liver disease stage (Child-Pugh score), and the critical illness severity score (SOFA score), ICU admission between 2005 and 2010 remained an independent favorable prognostic factor (odds ratio (OR) 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.4, P = 0.004). The stage of the underlying liver disease was also independently associated with hospital mortality (Child-Pugh score: OR 1.42 per point, 95% CI 1.06-1.9, P = 0.018). Conclusions In the light of advances in management of both cirrhosis and septic shock, survival of such patients substantially increased over recent years. The stage of the underlying liver disease and the related therapeutic options should be included in the decision-making process for ICU admission. PMID:23601847

  18. The epidemiology of septic shock in French intensive care units: the prospective multicenter cohort EPISS study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To provide up-to-date information on the prognostic factors associated with 28-day mortality in a cohort of septic shock patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in ICUs from 14 French general (non-academic) and university teaching hospitals. All consecutive patients with septic shock admitted between November 2009 and March 2011 were eligible for inclusion. We prospectively recorded data regarding patient characteristics, infection, severity of illness, life support therapy, and discharge. Results Among 10,941 patients admitted to participating ICUs between October 2009 and September 2011, 1,495 (13.7%) patients presented inclusion criteria for septic shock and were included. Invasive mechanical ventilation was needed in 83.9% (n = 1248), inotropes in 27.7% (n = 412), continuous renal replacement therapy in 32.5% (n = 484), and hemodialysis in 19.6% (n = 291). Mortality at 28 days was 42% (n = 625). Variables associated with time to mortality, right-censored at day 28: age (for each additional 10 years) (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20-1.38), immunosuppression (HR = 1.63; 95%CI: 1.37-1.96), Knaus class C/D score versus class A/B score (HR = 1.36; 95%CI:1.14-1.62) and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (HR = 1.24 for each additional point; 95%CI: 1.21-1.27). Patients with septic shock and renal/urinary tract infection had a significantly longer time to mortality (HR = 0.56; 95%CI: 0.42-0.75). Conclusion Our observational data of consecutive patients from real-life practice confirm that septic shock is common and carries high mortality in general ICU populations. Our results are in contrast with the clinical trial setting, and could be useful for healthcare planning and clinical study design. PMID:23561510

  19. Gas-Forming Pyogenic Liver Abscess with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Muhammad K.; Jones, Kellie R.

    2015-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare but rapidly fatal infection. The main virulence factor of this pathogen is its α-toxin (lecithinase), which decomposes the phospholipid in cell membranes leading to cell lysis. Once the bacteria are in blood stream, massive intravascular hemolysis occurs. This can present as anemia on admission with evidence of hemolysis as indicated by low serum haptoglobin, high serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elevated indirect bilirubin, and spherocytosis. The clinical course of C. perfringens septicemia is marked by rapidly deteriorating course with a mortality rate ranging from 70 to 100%. The very rapid clinical course makes it difficult to diagnose on time, and most cases are diagnosed at autopsy. Therefore it is important to consider C. perfringens infection in any severely ill patient with fever and evidence of hemolysis. We present a case of seventy-seven-year-old male with septic shock secondary to pyogenic liver abscess with a brief review of existing literature on C. perfringens. PMID:26090240

  20. Prospective Testing and Redesign of a Temporal Biomarker Based Risk Model for Patients With Septic Shock: Implications for Septic Shock Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hector R.; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z.; Anas, Nick; Allen, Geoffrey L.; Thomas, Neal J.; Bigham, Michael T.; Weiss, Scott L.; Fitzgerald, Julie; Checchia, Paul A.; Meyer, Keith; Quasney, Michael; Hall, Mark; Gedeit, Rainer; Freishtat, Robert J.; Nowak, Jeffrey; Raj, Shekhar S.; Gertz, Shira; Howard, Kelli; Harmon, Kelli; Lahni, Patrick; Frank, Erin; Hart, Kimberly W.; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal version of the pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model (tPERSEVERE) estimates the risk of a complicated course in children with septic shock based on biomarker changes from days 1 to 3 of septic shock. We validated tPERSEVERE performance in a prospective cohort, with an a priori plan to redesign tPERSEVERE if it did not perform well. Biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort (n = 168) and study subjects were classified according to tPERSEVERE. To redesign tPERSEVERE, the validation cohort and the original derivation cohort (n = 299) were combined and randomly allocated to training (n = 374) and test (n = 93) sets. tPERSEVERE was redesigned using the training set and CART methodology. tPERSEVERE performed poorly in the validation cohort, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75). Failure analysis revealed potential confounders related to clinical characteristics. The redesigned tPERSEVERE model had an AUC of 0.83 (0.79–0.87) and a sensitivity of 93% (68–97) for estimating the risk of a complicated course. Similar performance was seen in the test set. The classification tree segregated patients into two broad endotypes of septic shock characterized by either excessive inflammation or immune suppression. PMID:26844289

  1. Prospective Testing and Redesign of a Temporal Biomarker Based Risk Model for Patients With Septic Shock: Implications for Septic Shock Biology.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hector R; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z; Anas, Nick; Allen, Geoffrey L; Thomas, Neal J; Bigham, Michael T; Weiss, Scott L; Fitzgerald, Julie; Checchia, Paul A; Meyer, Keith; Quasney, Michael; Hall, Mark; Gedeit, Rainer; Freishtat, Robert J; Nowak, Jeffrey; Raj, Shekhar S; Gertz, Shira; Howard, Kelli; Harmon, Kelli; Lahni, Patrick; Frank, Erin; Hart, Kimberly W; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    The temporal version of the pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model (tPERSEVERE) estimates the risk of a complicated course in children with septic shock based on biomarker changes from days 1 to 3 of septic shock. We validated tPERSEVERE performance in a prospective cohort, with an a priori plan to redesign tPERSEVERE if it did not perform well. Biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort (n = 168) and study subjects were classified according to tPERSEVERE. To redesign tPERSEVERE, the validation cohort and the original derivation cohort (n = 299) were combined and randomly allocated to training (n = 374) and test (n = 93) sets. tPERSEVERE was redesigned using the training set and CART methodology. tPERSEVERE performed poorly in the validation cohort, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.58-0.75). Failure analysis revealed potential confounders related to clinical characteristics. The redesigned tPERSEVERE model had an AUC of 0.83 (0.79-0.87) and a sensitivity of 93% (68-97) for estimating the risk of a complicated course. Similar performance was seen in the test set. The classification tree segregated patients into two broad endotypes of septic shock characterized by either excessive inflammation or immune suppression. PMID:26844289

  2. Management of Septic Shock in the Remote Prehospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Joynes, Emma Lucy; Martin, Jodie; Ross, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the management of septic shock by air medical retrieval teams in the remote setting. A retrospective observational study was performed over 36 months. Sixty-seven adult patients who met the criteria for septic shock were included. Respiratory sepsis was the working diagnosis for 53% of patients; this was confirmed on intensive care unit (ICU) discharge in 39% of patients. Intravenous antibiotics and oxygen were delivered in over 90% of patients. Central and arterial line insertions were performed in 48% and 40% of patients, respectively, and 79% of patients were catheterized. Thirty-three percent of patients required intubation, and 80% of patients received an initial crystalloid fluid bolus of 20 mL/kg. Vasopressors were started in 89% of patients. Upon reaching definitive care, 91% of patients were admitted to a high-dependency or ICU setting, with a median length of ICU stay of 4 days and a 30-day mortality of 13%. Of those admitted to the ICU, intubation was required in 48%, new renal support in 20%, and blood pressure support in 84% of patients, respectively. Septic shock was recognized early and managed aggressively by remote retrieval teams, which may have contributed to the low mortality rate observed. PMID:27393760

  3. The potential role of thromboxane and prostacyclin in endotoxic and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Cook, J A; Wise, W C; Butler, R R; Reines, H D; Rambo, W; Halushka, P V

    1984-01-01

    The potential role of thromboxane (TxA2), a platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor, and prostacyclin (PGI2) a platelet anti-aggregator and vasodilator, in endotoxic and septic shock was investigated. Early endotoxic shock in the rat is associated with marked elevations of plasma TxB2 (the stable metabolite of TxA2) and lesser increases in plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the stable metabolite of PGI2). Selective inhibition of TxA2 synthesis by several different chemical classes of Tx synthetase inhibitors was beneficial in endotoxic shock. In contrast, shock induced by acute intra-abdominal sepsis in the rat was characterized by high levels of plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, which exceeded plasma TxA2 six- to eight fold at most time intervals studied. Tx synthetase inhibitors were not protective in this model of acute sepsis, but treatment with fatty acid cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors, an antibiotic (gentamicin), or reduction in arachidonic acid metabolism by essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency significantly prolonged survival time. An important aspect of the latter study is that decreased arachidonic acid metabolism was an effective adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Conjoint administration of gentamicin in EFA-deficient rats or with indomethacin synergistically improved long-term survival, a result that was not evident with single treatment interventions. In addition to experimental studies, plasma TxB2 levels were measured during clinical sepsis. These studies demonstrated that plasma TxB2 levels were elevated tenfold in patients dying of septic shock compared with septic survivors or nonseptic controls. These composite experimental and clinical observations suggest that arachidonic acid metabolites play a role in the pathogenesis of endotoxic and septic shock. PMID:6440569

  4. Current haemodynamic management of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Orbegozo Cortés, Diego; Acheampong, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Early and adequate resuscitation of patients with acute circulatory failure is important to restore the balance between oxygen needs and delivery. Haemodynamic management can globally be separated into three categories according to the VIP mnemonic - Ventilate, Infuse, Pump - which should be considered simultaneously in the patient with shock. Sufficient oxygen should be given early, and endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation performed without hesitation if there is any indication that oxygenation is inadequate. Fluids should be administered using the SOSD mnemonic - Salvage, Optimization, Stabilization, De-escalation. After initial liberal administration, ongoing requirements should be guided by repeated fluid challenges using a combination of balanced crystalloid solutions and colloid. Noradrenaline is the vasopressor of choice and should be started early. Dobutamine may be needed to improve myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Haemodynamic support should be personalized according to individual patient characteristics and global and regional parameters of haemodynamic and oxygenation status. PMID:27079763

  5. Blood histamine concentrations are not elevated in humans with septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.; Kaliner, M.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Parrillo, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Histamine has been suggested as an important mediator of the cardiovascular abnormalities during septic shock. To determine if blood histamine levels were increased during human sepsis and septic shock, plasma histamine was measured using a very sensitive radioenzyme assay employing histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) in the following patient groups: normal controls (n = 76), nonseptic critically ill (n = 12), nonseptic shock (n = 2), sepsis without shock (n = 28), and septic shock (n = 41). Using this enzyme binding assay, all these groups had similar, normal plasma histamine concentrations, except those patients with septic shock whose mean histamine measurements were significantly reduced (p less than .002). This decrease was found to be due to an artifact of the assay: plasma contained a circulating inhibitor that falsely lowered the measured histamine level. Fractionation of septic shock plasma using molecular exclusion membranes and gel filtration revealed a 5000 MW inhibitory factor. After removal of this inhibitor from plasma, septic shock plasma histamine levels were normal. Thus, septic shock patients may have a circulating inhibitor of the HNMT enzyme, but plasma histamine concentrations are normal. Histaminemia is unlikely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of septic shock in humans.

  6. Management of septic shock and severe infections in migrants and returning travelers requiring critical care.

    PubMed

    Alp, E; Erdem, H; Rello, J

    2016-04-01

    During the past decade, global human movement created a virtually "borderless world". Consequently, the developed world is facing "forgotten" and now imported infectious diseases. Many infections are observed upon travel and migration, and the clinical spectrum is diverse, ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe septic shock. The severity of infection depends on the etiology and timeliness of diagnosis. While assessing the etiology of severe infection in travelers and migrants, it is important to acquire a detailed clinical history; geography, dates of travel, places visited, type of transportation, lay-overs and intermediate stops, potential exposure to exotic diseases, and activities that were undertaken during travelling and prophylaxis and vaccines either taken or not before travel are all important parameters. Tuberculosis, malaria, pneumonia, visceral leishmaniasis, enteric fever and hemorrhagic fever are the most common etiologies in severely infected travelers and migrants. The management of severe sepsis and septic shock in migrants and returning travelers requires a systematic approach in the evaluation of these patients based on travel history. Early and broad-spectrum therapy is recommended for the management of septic shock comprising broad spectrum antibiotics, source control, fluid therapy and hemodynamic support, corticosteroids, tight glycemic control, and organ support and monitoring. We here review the diagnostic and therapeutic routing of severely ill travelers and migrants, stratified by the nature of the infectious agents most often encountered among them. PMID:26825315

  7. Assessment of Neutrophil Function in Patients with Septic Shock: Comparison of Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wenisch, C.; Fladerer, P.; Patruta, S.; Krause, R.; Hörl, W.

    2001-01-01

    Patients with septic shock are shown to have decreased neutrophil phagocytic function by multiple assays, and their assessment by whole-blood assays (fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis) correlates with assays requiring isolated neutrophils (microscopic and spectrophotometric assays). For patients with similar underlying conditions but without septic shock, this correlation does not occur. PMID:11139215

  8. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for neonatal and pediatric refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rambaud, Jerome; Guellec, Isabelle; Léger, Pierre-Louis; Renolleau, Sylvain; Guilbert, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report our institutional experience of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) in children with refractory septic shock. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our ECMO database to identify patients who received VA ECMO for septic shock from January 2004 to June 2013 at our Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Armand-Trousseau Hospital. We included all neonates and children up to the age of 18 years who received VA ECMO for septic shock. For each patient, we collected the pre-ECMO inotrope score, clinical circulatory and ventilatory parameters, infecting organism, ECMO duration and complications, and length of hospital stay. Main Results: The study included 14 neonates and 8 older children (the pediatric population, with a mean age of 30 months, range: 1–113 months). Survival was 64% among newborns and 50% among pediatric patients. Multiorgan failure or severity scores did not show any correlation with mortality (Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction score, P = 0.94; the score for neonatal acute physiology-perinatal extension II, P = 0.34). In the pediatric population, the inotrope score was higher in the survivor group (127.5 vs. 332.5, P = 0.07). Blood samples taken shortly before cannulation showed that pH (P = 0.27), lactate level (P = 0.33), PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P = 0.49), or oxygenation index (P = 0.35) showed no correlation to success or failure of ECMO. Conclusion: ECMO can be safely used to resuscitate and support children with refractory septic shock. We recommend that patients with oliguria whose lactate level has not decreased within 6 h of starting maximum drug therapy be transferred to an ECMO referral center. PMID:26628825

  9. Gastric tonometry versus cardiac index as resuscitation goals in septic shock: a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Palizas, Fernando; Dubin, Arnaldo; Regueira, Tomas; Bruhn, Alejandro; Knobel, Elias; Lazzeri, Silvio; Baredes, Natalio; Hernández, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Resuscitation goals for septic shock remain controversial. Despite the normalization of systemic hemodynamic variables, tissue hypoperfusion can still persist. Indeed, lactate or oxygen venous saturation may be difficult to interpret. Our hypothesis was that a gastric intramucosal pH-guided resuscitation protocol might improve the outcome of septic shock compared with a standard approach aimed at normalizing systemic parameters such as cardiac index (CI). Methods The 130 septic-shock patients were randomized to two different resuscitation goals: CI ≥ 3.0 L/min/m2 (CI group: 66 patients) or intramucosal pH (pHi) ≥ 7.32 (pHi group: 64 patients). After correcting basic physiologic parameters, additional resuscitation consisting of more fluids and dobutamine was started if specific goals for each group had not been reached. Several clinical data were registered at baseline and during evolution. Hemodynamic data and pHi values were registered every 6 hours during the protocol. Primary end point was 28 days' mortality. Results Both groups were comparable at baseline. The most frequent sources of infection were abdominal sepsis and pneumonia. Twenty-eight day mortality (30.3 vs. 28.1%), peak Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System scores (32.6 ± 6.5 vs. 33.2 ± 4.7) and ICU length of stay (12.6 ± 8.2 vs. 16 ± 12.4 days) were comparable. A higher proportion of patients exhibited values below the specific target at baseline in the pHi group compared with the CI group (50% vs. 10.9%; P < 0.001). Of 32 patients with a pHi < 7.32 at baseline, only 7 (22%) normalized this parameter after resuscitation. Areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves to predict mortality at baseline, and at 24 and 48 hours were 0.55, 0.61, and 0.47, and 0.70, 0.90, and 0.75, for CI and pHi, respectively. Conclusions Our study failed to demonstrate any survival benefit of using pHi compared with CI as resuscitation goal in septic-shock patients. Nevertheless, a

  10. How to choose the therapeutic goals to improve tissue perfusion in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Bravim, Bruno de Arruda; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    The early recognition and treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is the key to a successful outcome. The longer the delay in starting treatment, the worse the prognosis due to persistent tissue hypoperfusion and consequent development and worsening of organ dysfunction. One of the main mechanisms responsible for the development of cellular dysfunction is tissue hypoxia. The adjustments necessary for adequate tissue blood flow and therefore of oxygen supply to metabolic demand according to the assessment of the cardiac index and oxygen extraction rate should be performed during resuscitation period, especially in high complexity patients. New technologies, easily handled at the bedside, and new studies that directly assess the impact of macro-hemodynamic parameter optimization on microcirculation and in the clinical outcome of septic patients, are needed. PMID:26313438

  11. Survival characteristics during septic shock in 39 baboons.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M F; Brackett, D J; Archer, L T; Beller-Todd, B K; Tompkins, P; Hinshaw, L B

    1982-01-01

    In septic shock nonsurvival is characterized by failure of multiple organ systems. The design of therapeutic measures to increase survival would be enhanced if critical responses could be identified early. Escherichia coli LD100 was given to 39 baboons by IV infusion over two hours followed by different therapy regimens in 31 [2--4]. There were 18 permanent survivors (seven days or more), all receiving antibiotic/steroid combination therapy. Responses of survivors and nonsurvivors were measured and compared during the first 12 hours from onset of infusion. Changes in blood pressure and acid-base parameters were not significantly different between groups. Five responses indicative of permanent survival were lower heart rates, less elevation of blood urea nitrogen, normal blood glucose at eight hours, hyperglycemia with normal insulin at 12 hours, and lower plasma lactate concentrations beginning at four hours. PMID:6753527

  12. Beyond the guidelines of paediatric septic shock: A focused review

    PubMed Central

    Temsah, Mohamad-Hani

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock continue to cause major morbidity and mortality among children, especially in the resource-limited areas. Guidelines that focus on these entities, such as “Surviving Sepsis” and “Paediatric Advanced Life Support” guidelines, are revised and updated on regular basis to incorporate new evidence based medicine. There is ongoing need to review these updated guidelines, and address potentially best available solutions for adapting them into suitable practical steps for paediatricians worldwide, especially those working in resource-limited areas. The available recommendations may help to improve sepsis management in middle- and low-income countries; however, guidelines must be wisely implemented according to the available resources, with follow up auditing to ensure appropriate implementation.

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-03-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient's condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  15. The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3)

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Seymour, Christopher Warren; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Annane, Djillali; Bauer, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Gordon R.; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Levy, Mitchell M.; Marshall, John C.; Martin, Greg S.; Opal, Steven M.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; van der Poll, Tom; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were last revised in 2001. Considerable advances have since been made into the pathobiology (changes in organ function, morphology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and circulation), management, and epidemiology of sepsis, suggesting the need for reexamination. OBJECTIVE To evaluate and, as needed, update definitions for sepsis and septic shock. PROCESS A task force (n = 19) with expertise in sepsis pathobiology, clinical trials, and epidemiology was convened by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Definitions and clinical criteria were generated through meetings, Delphi processes, analysis of electronic health record databases, and voting, followed by circulation to international professional societies, requesting peer review and endorsement (by 31 societies listed in the Acknowledgment). KEY FINDINGS FROMEVIDENCE SYNTHESIS Limitations of previous definitions included an excessive focus on inflammation, the misleading model that sepsis follows a continuum through severe sepsis to shock, and inadequate specificity and sensitivity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Multiple definitions and terminologies are currently in use for sepsis, septic shock, and organ dysfunction, leading to discrepancies in reported incidence and observed mortality. The task force concluded the term severe sepsis was redundant. RECOMMENDATIONS Sepsis should be defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. For clinical operationalization, organ dysfunction can be represented by an increase in the Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 points or more, which is associated with an in-hospital mortality greater than 10%. Septic shock should be defined as a subset of sepsis in which particularly profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities are associated with a

  16. Ibuprofen, methylprednisolone, and gentamicin as conjoint therapy in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Wise, W C; Halushka, P V; Knapp, R G; Cook, J A

    1985-01-01

    Septic shock is associated with increased metabolism of arachidonic acid to thromboxane A2 (TxA2) and prostacyclin (PGI2). The effects of ibuprofen, methylprednisolone-sodium succinate, and gentamicin alone, or in combination on survival time and, TxA2 and PGI2 production in rats in a LD100 fecal peritonitis shock model were assessed. Plasma levels of TxA2 and PGI2 were measured by radioimmunoassay of their stable metabolites immunoreactive (i) TxB2 and i6-keto-PGF1 alpha, respectively. Drugs were given 30 min before induction of fecal peritonitis. Survival times in hours were as follows: fecal peritonitis = 10.5 +/- 0.4 (n = 50); ibuprofen (15 mg/kg) = 16.1 +/- 0.8 (n = 8); methylprednisolone-sodium succinate (40 mg/kg) = 17.1 +/- 0.7 (n = 22); methylprednisolone-sodium succinate (80 mg/kg) = 46.1 +/- 10.4 (n = 25) with 8% long-term survivors (survival greater than 7 days); gentamicin (4 mg/kg) = 23.8 +/- 4.4 (n = 16); methylprednisolone-sodium succinate (40 mg/kg) + ibuprofen = 20.3 +/- 1.8 (n = 6); gentamicin + methylprednisolone-sodium succinate = 31.0 +/- 1.6 (n = 11); gentamicin + ibuprofen = 28.5 + 2.3 (n = 12); gentamicin + methylprednisolone-sodium succinate (40 mg/kg) + ibuprofen = 46.9 +/- 5.4 (n = 8). Treatment with the combination of gentamicin + ibuprofen + methylprednisolone-sodium succinate (80 mg/kg) resulted in a mean survival time of 116 +/- 13.9 h with 26% long-term survivors. Methylprednisolone-sodium succinate (40 mg/kg) reduced (P less than 0.05) plasma iTxB2 from 995 +/- 78 (n = 16) to 714 +/- 48 (n = 18) pg/ml and i6-keto-PGF1 alpha from 4,090 +/- 334 (n = 12) to 2,009 +/- 119 (n = 17) pg/ml, 4 h post-FP. Methylprednisolone-sodium succinate (80 mg/kg) produced no further decrease in either iTxB2 or i6-keto-PGF1 alpha. Ibuprofen reduced the fecal peritonitis-induced iTxB2 and i6-keto-PGF1 alpha synthesis to nondetectable levels (less than 200 pg/ml). The latter results demonstrate that methylprednisolone-sodium succinate is less effective

  17. Depressed left ventricular performance. Response to volume infusion in patients with sepsis and septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, F.P.; Parker, M.M.; Natanson, C.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Parrillo, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    Volume infusion, to increase preload and to enhance ventricular performance, is accepted as initial management of septic shock. Recent evidence has demonstrated depressed myocardial function in human septic shock. We analyzed left ventricular performance during volume infusion using serial data from simultaneously obtained pulmonary artery catheter hemodynamic measurements and radionuclide cineangiography. Critically ill control subjects (n = 14), patients with sepsis but without shock (n = 21), and patients with septic shock (n = 21) had prevolume infusion hemodynamic measurements determined and received statistically similar volumes of fluid resulting in similar increases in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. There was a strong trend (p = 0.004) toward less of a change in left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) after volume infusion in patients with sepsis and septic shock compared with control subjects. The LVSWI response after volume infusion was significantly less in patients with septic shock when compared with critically ill control subjects (p less than 0.05). These data demonstrate significantly altered ventricular performance, as measured by LVSWI, in response to volume infusion in patients with septic shock.

  18. Effectiveness of anisodamine for the treatment of critically ill patients with septic shock (ACIdoSIS study): study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiancang; Shang, You; Wang, Xin’an; Yin, Rui; Zhu, Zhenhua; Chen, Wensen; Tian, Xin; Yu, Yuetian; Zuo, Xiangrong; Chen, Kun; Ji, Xuqing; Ni, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Background Septic shock is an important contributor of mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU). Although strenuous effort has been made to improve its outcome, the mortality rate is only marginally decreased. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of anisodamine in the treatment of septic shock, in the hope that the drug will provide alternatives to the treatment of septic shock. Methods The study is a multi-center randomized controlled clinical trial. Study population will include critically ill patients with septic shock requiring vasopressor use. Blocked randomization was performed where anisodamine and control treatments were allocated at random in a ratio of 1:1 in blocks of sizes 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 to 354 subjects. Interim analysis will be performed. The primary study end point is the hospital mortality, and other secondary study endpoints include ICU mortality, length of stay in ICU and hospital, organ failure free days. Adverse events including new onset psychosis, urinary retention, significant hypotension and tachycardia will be reported. Discussion The study will provide new insight into the treatment of septic shock and can help to reduce mortality rate of septic shock. Trial registration NCT02442440 (https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/). PMID:26605292

  19. Ascorbate-dependent vasopressor synthesis: a rationale for vitamin C administration in severe sepsis and septic shock?

    PubMed

    Carr, Anitra C; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Fowler, Alpha A; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Severe systemic inflammatory response to infection results in severe sepsis and septic shock, which are the leading causes of death in critically ill patients. Septic shock is characterised by refractory hypotension and is typically managed by fluid resuscitation and administration of catecholamine vasopressors such as norepinephrine. Vasopressin can also be administered to raise mean arterial pressure or decrease the norepinephrine dose. Endogenous norepinephrine and vasopressin are synthesised by the copper-containing enzymes dopamine β-hydroxylase and peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase, respectively. Both of these enzymes require ascorbate as a cofactor for optimal activity. Patients with severe sepsis present with hypovitaminosis C, and pre-clinical and clinical studies have indicated that administration of high-dose ascorbate decreases the levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers, attenuates organ dysfunction and improves haemodynamic parameters. It is conceivable that administration of ascorbate to septic patients with hypovitaminosis C could improve endogenous vasopressor synthesis and thus ameliorate the requirement for exogenously administered vasopressors. Ascorbate-dependent vasopressor synthesis represents a currently underexplored biochemical mechanism by which ascorbate could act as an adjuvant therapy for severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:26612352

  20. Treatment of LD100 Escherichia coli septic shock with netilmicin and methylprednisolone in baboons.

    PubMed

    Flournoy, D J; Archer, L T; Beller, B K; Passey, R; Hinshaw, L B

    1986-01-01

    Treatment efficacy with netilmicin sulphate/methylprednisolone sodium succinate in a severe septic shock baboon model, using an LD100 of live Escherichia coli, was evaluated. All the animals treated with both netilmicin and methylprednisolone were permanent (greater than or equal to 7 days) survivors, whereas none of the untreated baboons lived more than 24 hours. These results indicate that, in a baboon model, netilmicin is an effective alternative to gentamicin (with methylprednisolone) in the treatment of severe septic shock. PMID:3526104

  1. Beneficial and side effects of arginine vasopressin and terlipressin for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xudong; Zhu, Yu; Zhen, Danyang; Chen, Xiao Ming; Yue, Wu; Liu, Liangming; Li, Tao

    2015-05-15

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its analog, terlipressin (TP), were all demonstrated beneficial for septic shock. What advantages and disadvantages that AVP and TP have for septic shock as well as the mechanism, however, are not completely known. With cecal ligation and puncture-induced septic shock rats and lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock rabbits, we systematically compared the beneficial and side effects of AVP and TP, in septic shock and the sex difference, and investigated their relationship to Rho kinase and calcium sensitivity. The results indicated that low dose of TP (2.6 μg/kg/h) in combination with norepinephrine (NE) improving vascular reactivity and animal survival were superior to a small dose of AVP (0.03 U/kg/h) in septic shock rats and rabbits. This improving effect of AVP and TP on vascular reactivity was closely related to the activation of Rho-kinase and Rho-kinase-mediating vascular calcium sensitization. A small dose of TP did not result in hyponatremia, did not increase blood bilirubin and decrease platelet count, whereas AVP did. Animal survival and vascular reactivity in female rats after TP or AVP administration were slightly better than male rats, while there were no significant differences. It was suggested that a small dose of TP has better beneficial effect and less side effects on septic shock than AVP. AVP and TP improving vascular reactivity is closely related to Rho-kinase activation and calcium sensitivity improvement. TP or plus NE may be more appropriate for early emergency care for severe septic shock than AVP. PMID:25769491

  2. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  3. The Role of Mannose-Binding Lectin in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Cutuli, Salvatore Lucio; Pennisi, Mariano Alberto; Antonelli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are a primary cause of death in patients in intensive care unit (ICU). Investigations upon genetic susceptibility profile to systemic complications during severe infections are a field of increasing scientific interest. Particularly when adaptive immune system is compromised or immature, innate immunity plays a key role in the immediate defense against invasive pathogens. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum protein that recognizes a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms and activates complement cascade via the antibody-independent pathway. More than 30% of humans harbor mutations in MBL gene (MBL2) resulting in reduced plasmatic levels and activity. Increased risk of infection acquisition has been largely documented in MBL-deficient patients, but the real impact of this form of innate immunosuppression upon clinical outcome is not clear. In critically ill patients higher incidence and worse prognosis of severe sepsis/septic shock appear to be associated with low-producers haplotypes. However an excess of MBL activation might be also harmful due to the possibility of an unbalanced proinflammatory response and an additional host injury. Strategies of replacement therapies in critically ill patients with severe infections are under investigation but still far to be applied in clinical practice. PMID:24223476

  4. Mortality prediction in patients with severe septic shock: a pilot study using a target metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Manuela; Cambiaghi, Alice; Brunelli, Laura; Giordano, Silvia; Caironi, Pietro; Guatteri, Luca; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Gattinoni, Luciano; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Pastorelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock remains a major problem in Intensive Care Unit, with high lethality and high-risk second lines treatments. In this preliminary retrospective investigation we examined plasma metabolome and clinical features in a subset of 20 patients with severe septic shock (SOFA score >8), enrolled in the multicenter Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis study (ALBIOS, NCT00707122). Our purpose was to evaluate the changes of circulating metabolites in relation to mortality as a pilot study to be extended in a larger cohort. Patients were analyzed according to their 28-days and 90-days mortality. Metabolites were measured using a targeted mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomic approach that included acylcarnitines, aminoacids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and sugars. Data-mining techniques were applied to evaluate the association of metabolites with mortality. Low unsaturated long-chain phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines species were associated with long-term survival (90-days) together with circulating kynurenine. Moreover, a decrease of these glycerophospholipids was associated to the event at 28-days and 90-days in combination with clinical variables such as cardiovascular SOFA score (28-day mortality model) or renal replacement therapy (90-day mortality model). Early changes in the plasma levels of both lipid species and kynurenine associated with mortality have potential implications for early intervention and discovering new target therapy. PMID:26847922

  5. Mortality prediction in patients with severe septic shock: a pilot study using a target metabolomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Manuela; Cambiaghi, Alice; Brunelli, Laura; Giordano, Silvia; Caironi, Pietro; Guatteri, Luca; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Gattinoni, Luciano; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Pastorelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock remains a major problem in Intensive Care Unit, with high lethality and high-risk second lines treatments. In this preliminary retrospective investigation we examined plasma metabolome and clinical features in a subset of 20 patients with severe septic shock (SOFA score >8), enrolled in the multicenter Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis study (ALBIOS, NCT00707122). Our purpose was to evaluate the changes of circulating metabolites in relation to mortality as a pilot study to be extended in a larger cohort. Patients were analyzed according to their 28-days and 90-days mortality. Metabolites were measured using a targeted mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomic approach that included acylcarnitines, aminoacids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and sugars. Data-mining techniques were applied to evaluate the association of metabolites with mortality. Low unsaturated long-chain phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines species were associated with long-term survival (90-days) together with circulating kynurenine. Moreover, a decrease of these glycerophospholipids was associated to the event at 28-days and 90-days in combination with clinical variables such as cardiovascular SOFA score (28-day mortality model) or renal replacement therapy (90-day mortality model). Early changes in the plasma levels of both lipid species and kynurenine associated with mortality have potential implications for early intervention and discovering new target therapy. PMID:26847922

  6. Hepatic Perfusion Alterations in Septic Shock Patients: Impact of Early Goal-directed Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Wen; Xie, Jian-Feng; Liu, Ai-Ran; Huang, Ying-Zi; Guo, Feng-Mei; Yang, Cong-Shan; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) has become an important therapeutic management in early salvage stage of septic shock. However, splenic organs possibly remained hypoperfused and hypoxic despite fluid resuscitation. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of EGDT on hepatic perfusion in septic shock patients. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out in early septic shock patients who were admitted to Intensive Care Unit within 24 h after onset and who met all four elements of the EGDT criteria after treatment with the standard EGDT procedure within 6 h between December 1, 2012 and November 30, 2013. The hemodynamic data were recorded, and oxygen metabolism and hepatic functions were monitored. An indocyanine green clearance test was applied to detect the hepatic perfusion. The patients’ characteristics were compared before treatment (T0), immediately after EGDT (T1), and 24 h after EGDT (T2). This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.org, NCT02060773. Results: Twenty-one patients were included in the study; however, the hepatic perfusion data were not included in the analysis for two patients; therefore, 19 patients were eligible for the study. Hemodynamics data, as monitored by pulse-indicator continuous cardiac output, were obtained from 16 patients. There were no significant differences in indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate (ICG-PDR) and 15-min retention rate (R15) at T0 (11.9 ± 5.0%/min and 20.0 ± 13.2%), T1 (11.4 ± 5.1%/min and 23.6 ± 14.9%), and T2 (11.0 ± 4.5%/min and 23.7 ± 15.3%) (all P > 0.05). Both of the alterations of ICG-PDR and R15 showed no differences at T0, T1, and T2 in the patients of different subgroups that achieved different resuscitation goal numbers when elected (P > 0.05). Conclusion: There were no hepatic perfusion improvements after EGDT in the early phase of patients with septic shock. Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02060773 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02060773

  7. Effect of ozone pre-conditioning on redox activity in a rat model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Guanche, Dailen; Hernandez, Frank; Zamora, Zullyt; Alonso, Yaima

    2010-10-01

    The confirmed advantageous effects of oxygen/ozone therapy in several clinical conditions stimulated experimental studies on effects of the therapy in induced septic shock. This study researches the influence of Ozone Oxidative Pre-conditioning (OOP) in unbalance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity generated in liver and lung during a process of sepsis. The study was conducted on male rats. Sepsis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of fecal material and pre-treatment with ozone/oxygen mixture was administered before fecal material injection. Activities of catalase, glutathione peroxide, and superoxide dismutase were measured, as well as conjugated dienes (CD) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were estimated. The results demonstrated that OOP not cause oxidative damage. It reduced levels of pro-oxidant biomarkers in lung and liver, with decreased total pro-oxidant activity and elevated total antioxidant activity from a system for diagnosis of oxidative stress in both tissues. These results suggest that OOP protected liver and lung for oxidative stress in septic shock. PMID:20626256

  8. Current management of the septic shock patient: experimental basis for treatment.

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, L B; Beller-Todd, B K; Archer, L T

    1982-01-01

    Experimental research has shown that following the intravenous infusion of animals with bacteria or endotoxin a myriad of adverse vascular events occur resulting in deficient organ perfusion and cell death. The primary goals of therapy for sepsis and septic shock, therefore, should include elimination of the source of infection and/or infectious agents and prevention or reversal of adverse vascular events. The following review describes the evolution of an effective therapy for shock consisting of steroid in combination with antibiotic and discusses its relevance and application for humans in severe sepsis or septic shock. PMID:6756669

  9. Oxidative status in ICU patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Karapetsa, Maria; Pitsika, Marina; Goutzourelas, Nikos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Tousia Becker, Aphrodite; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate variability of oxidative stress during sepsis evolution. ICU patients with the diagnosis of septic shock were included. Thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity, protein carbonyls in plasma, reduced, oxidized glutathione and catalase activity in erythrocyte lysate were assessed in the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 8th day after sepsis appearance. A total of 17 patients were divided in two groups: survivors (n=7) and non-survivors (n=10). APACHE II was 11.5 ± 5.4 and 19.9 ± 4.97 in survivors and non-survivors respectively (p=0.005), while mean age and SOFA score at sepsis diagnosis, were similar between the two groups. GSH levels, catalase activity and protein carbonyls presented significant different course in time between survivors and non-survivors (p<0.05). Catalase activity was significantly higher in survivors (238.8 ± 51.5) than non-survivors (166.4 ± 40.2; p=0.005), while protein carbonyls levels were significantly lower in survivors (0.32 ± 0.09) than non-survivors (0.48 ± 0.16; p=0.036) on the 1st day. Yet, non-survivors exhibited a declining course in GSH levels during time, while GSH levels were maintained in survivors. Conclusively, a longstanding antioxidant deficiency in non-surviving patients was noted. This phenomenon was clearly prominent in patients' erythrocytes. PMID:23542126

  10. Transfusion requirements in septic shock (TRISS) trial - comparing the effects and safety of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion in septic shock patients in the ICU: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. Methods/Design The Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial is a multicenter trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment, randomising 1,000 patients with septic shock in 30 Scandinavian ICUs to receive transfusion with pre-storage leuko-depleted RBC suspended in saline-adenine-glucose and mannitol (SAGM) at haemoglobin level (Hb) of 7 g/dl or 9 g/dl, stratified by the presence of haematological malignancy and centre. The primary outcome measure is 90-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures are organ failure, ischaemic events, severe adverse reactions (SARs: anaphylactic reaction, acute haemolytic reaction and transfusion-related circulatory overload, and acute lung injury) and mortality at 28 days, 6 months and 1 year. The sample size will enable us to detect a 9% absolute difference in 90-day mortality assuming a 45% event rate with a type 1 error rate of 5% and power of 80%. An interim analysis will be performed after 500 patients, and the Data Monitoring and Safety Committee will recommend the trial be stopped if a group difference in 90-day mortality with P ≤0.001 is present at this point. Discussion The TRISS trial may bridge the gap between clinical practice and the lack of efficacy and safety data on RBC transfusion in septic shock patients. The effect of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategy on mortality, organ failure, ischaemic events and SARs will be evaluated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01485315. Registration date 30 November 2011. First patient was randomised 3 December 2011. PMID:23702006

  11. Protective effect of pentoxifylline plus thalidomide against septic shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    ARRIETA, OSCAR; ORTIZ-REYES, ARACELI; REMBAO, DANIEL; CALVILLO, MINERVA; RIVERA, ERIKA; SOTELO, JULIO

    1999-01-01

    Mortality caused by septic shock in experimental animals is reduced by thalidomide, an inhibitor of tumour necrosis factor α. Another drug that could act on the pathopysiological mechanisms of septic shock is pentoxifylline, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation that increases the flexibility of the erythrocyte membrane and has fibrinolytic activity. We studied the effect of pentoxifylline alone and combined with thalidomide in septic shock; 97 NIH mice were injected with lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella abortus equi and D galactosamine. Animals were separated in 4 groups; group A (n = 20) was used as control, group B (n = 15) received thalidomide 50 mg/kg, group C (n = 20) received pentoxifylline 40 mg/kg, and group D (n = 15) received thalidomide plus pentoxifylline. Mortality was recorded every hour. Additionally, 5 animals from each group were sacrificed 8 h after the induction of septic shock for histological analysis of heart, lung, brain, kidney, small intestine, adrenal glands and liver. Microscopic findings were rated as absent, mild, moderate and severe damage. In control animals histological analysis showed intense haemorrhage and necrosis in all organs studied. When compared with controls, treatment with pentoxifylline plus thalidomide reduced mortality (P < 0.03). The tissue damage was less severe in animals from the groups that received pentoxifylline or pentoxifylline plus thalidomide (P < 0.05). Pentoxifylline seems to potentiate the beneficial effects of thalidomide, reducing mortality and attenuating the pathological changes produced by septic shock. PMID:10365082

  12. Effects and mechanism analysis of combined infusion by levosimendan and vasopressin on acute lung injury in rats septic shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuebing; Ma, Shaolin; Liu, Yang; Xu, Wei; Li, Zhanxia

    2014-12-01

    This research is aimed to discover the influence and underling mechanism of combined infusion of arginine vasopressin with levosimendan on acute lung injury in rat septic shock with norepinephrine supplemented. The traditional fecal peritonitis-induced septic shock model was undergone in rats for study. It is observed that the combined infusion supplemented with norepinephrine brought about a lower mean pulmonary artery pressure; lower high-mobility group box 1 levels, pulmonary levels of interleukin-6, and arterial total nitrate/nitrite; lower apoptotic cells scores and total histological scores; but higher pulmonary gas exchange when compared with the separate infusion group and norepinephrine group. This therapy shows potential clinical beneficial assistance in sepsis-induced acute lung injury. The results suggest the mechanism of such effect is through abating pulmonary artery pressure, and more importantly suppressing inflammatory responses in lung when compared with norepinephrine infusion group and the separate infusion of levosimendan or vasopressin alone. PMID:25002345

  13. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. Results The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P = 0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (P < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.0007), dose of vasopressor at the time of initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.0001), need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.0001) and renal replacement therapy (P < 0.0001), while the impaired adrenal reserve did not affect 28-day mortality (81% versus 82%; P = 0.8679). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was still significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds

  14. Septic Shock in Advanced Age: Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Molecular Signatures in Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira da Silva Pellegrina, Diogo; Severino, Patricia; Vieira Barbeiro, Hermes; Maziero Andreghetto, Flávia; Tadeu Velasco, Irineu; Possolo de Souza, Heraldo; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Reis, Eduardo Moraes; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the highest causes of mortality in hospitalized people and a common complication in both surgical and clinical patients admitted to hospital for non-infectious reasons. Sepsis is especially common in older people and its incidence is likely to increase substantially as a population ages. Despite its increased prevalence and mortality in older people, immune responses in the elderly during septic shock appear similar to that in younger patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide gene expression analysis of circulating neutrophils from old and young septic patients to better understand how aged individuals respond to severe infectious insult. We detected several genes whose expression could be used to differentiate immune responses of the elderly from those of young people, including genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and TGF-β signaling, among others. Our results identify major molecular pathways that are particularly affected in the elderly during sepsis, which might have a pivotal role in worsening clinical outcomes compared with young people with sepsis. PMID:26047321

  15. Intraosseous and intravenous administration of antibiotics yields comparable plasma concentrations during experimental septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, G; Larsson, A; Lipcsey, M; Michalek, J; Eriksson, M

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate whether comparable antibiotic concentrations could be reached with intraosseous and intravenous administration during septic shock. Methods In this randomized, prospective experimental study conducted at an animal research laboratory at the University Hospital of Uppsala, eight anesthetized pigs, weighing 21.2 to 29.1 kg (mean: 25.2 ± 2.3 kg), received endotoxin infusion at 4 μg/kg/h for 6 h. At the onset of clinical shock, alternatively after 3 h of endotoxemia, they received 75 mg/kg of cefotaxime and 7 mg/kg of gentamicin either in a proximal tibial intraosseous catheter or in a peripheral intravenous catheter. Mixed venous samples were taken after 5, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min and analyzed for antibiotic concentrations. Results For both antibiotics, plasma concentrations after intraosseous and intravenous administration followed similar curves throughout the observation period, and peak concentrations were comparable. Mean concentration area under the curve (AUC mg × h/l) for cefotaxime was 108.1 ± 19.5 after intraosseous and 116.5 ± 11.1 after intravenous administration; ratio 0.93, (95% CI 0.71–1.19). Mean AUC for gentamicin was 28.1 ± 6.8 for intraosseous and 32.2 ± 3.5 for intravenous administration; ratio 0.87 (95% CI 0.62–1.19). Conclusions In this porcine septic shock model, intraosseous and intravenous administration of gentamicin and cefotaxime yielded comparable concentrations. In an emergency, intraosseous administration of these antibiotics may be considered in severe infections when venous access is difficult. PMID:25557933

  16. Targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway for the treatment of septic shock in patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Endotoxic shock is a serious systemic inflammatory response to an external biological stressor. The responsiveness of NF-κB is built upon rapid protein modification and degradation involving the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Using transgenic mice, we have obtained in vivo evidence that interference with this pathway can alleviate the symptoms of toxic shock. We posit that administration of proteasome inhibitors may enhance the survival of patients with septic shock. PMID:19691815

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Esmolol in Treatment of Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Long, Yun; Liu, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that β1-receptor blockers benefit septic shock patients. This study aimed to determine whether β1-receptor blockers benefit tissue perfusion in sepsis and to identify parameters to reduce the risk of this drug in sepsis. Methods: Consecutive septic shock patients were recruited from the Intensive Care Unit of Peking Union Medical College Hospital within 48 h of diagnosis. All patients were hemodynamically stable and satisfactorily sedated with a heart rate (HR) ≥100 beats/min. Esmolol therapy achieved the target HR of 10–15% lower than the baseline HR. Clinical and physiological data of patients were collected prospectively within 1 h prior to esmolol therapy and 2 h after achieving the targeted HR. Results: Sixty-three patients were recruited. After esmolol therapy, blood pressure was unaltered, whereas stroke volume (SV) was increased compared with before esmolol therapy (43.6 ± 22.7 vs. 49.9 ± 23.7 ml, t = −2.3, P = 0.047). Tissue perfusion, including lactate levels (1.4 ± 0.8 vs. 1.1 ± 0.6 mmol/L, t = 2.6, P = 0.015) and the central venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (5.6 ± 3.3 vs. 4.3 ± 2.2 mmHg, t = 2.6 P = 0.016), was also significantly decreased after esmolol therapy. For patients with increased SV (n = 42), cardiac efficiency improved, and esmolol therapy had a lower risk for a decrease in cardiac output (CO). Therefore, pretreatment cardiac systolic and diastolic parameters with (n = 42)/without (n = 21) an increase in SV were compared. Mitral lateral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSElat) in patients with increased SV was significantly higher than that in those without increased SV (1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 cm, t = 2.4, P = 0.034). Conclusions: SV of septic shock patients is increased following esmolol therapy. Although CO is also decreased with HR, tissue perfusion is not worse. MAPSElat can be used to predict an increase in SV before esmolol use. Trial Registration: Clinical

  18. Optimal Meropenem Concentrations To Treat Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Frédéric; Roisin, Sandrine; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Jacobs, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    A patient with septic shock due to extensively drug resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cured by optimizing the meropenem (MEM) regimen to obtain at least 40% of the time between two administrations in which drug levels were four times higher than the MIC of the pathogen. As the standard drug dose did not achieve these optimal concentrations, the MEM regimen was progressively increased up to 12 g/day (3 g every 6 h in a 3-h extended infusion), which eventually resulted in sepsis resolution. High MEM dosage may represent a valuable therapeutic option for infection due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, and drug monitoring would allow rapid regimen adjustment in clinical practice. PMID:22290984

  19. Changes in plasma kynurenic acid concentration in septic shock patients undergoing continuous veno-venous haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Wojciech; Kocki, Tomasz; Pilat, Jacek; Parada-Turska, Jolanta; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2014-02-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is one of the end products of tryptophan metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyse plasma KYNA concentration in septic shock patients (SSP) with acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVH). Changes in KYNA content were compared to alterations in the levels of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein and lactate. Adult SSP with AKI were examined. Measurements were conducted at seven time points: before beginning CVVH and at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after the beginning of CVVH. Based on clinical outcomes, the data were analysed separately for survivors and non-survivors. Twenty-seven patients were studied. CVVH was associated with reduced plasma KYNA concentration only in survivors. Plasma KYNA concentration correlated with the levels of lactate and PCT only in survivors. (1) CVVH reduced plasma KYNA concentration only in survivors; (2) lack of this reduction may predict fatal outcomes in SSP. PMID:24043287

  20. Lincomycin protects mice from septic shock in beta-glucan-indomethacin model.

    PubMed

    Nameda, Sachiko; Miura, Noriko N; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a septic shock model in mice by sequential administration of beta-glucan, a biological response modifier, and indomethacin (IND), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Lethality was significantly related to the translocation of gut flora to various organs and mal-adjustment of the cytokine network. In the present study, we have examined the effect of antibiotics on this model to further clarify meanings of microbial flora. Schizophyllan (SPG), antitumor beta-glucan for clinical use, obtained from the culture filtrate of Schizophyllum commune, was used to induce sepsis. Lincomycin (LCM), imipenem (IPM), cilastatine (CS), and ampicillin (ABPC) were used for antibiotics treatment. The survival rate of SPG/IND-treated mice was significantly increased by administering LCM or ABPC/IPM/CS, and the effect was more significant by LCM. In in vitro spleen cell culture, LCM decreased proinflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, prednisolone, immune suppresser treatment improved survival of SPG/IND-treated mice. These findings suggest that LCM is an effective antibiotic in this endogenous septic model by modulating gut microbial flora and, at least a part, by regulating cytokine production of leukocytes. PMID:18057718

  1. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber hemoperfusion in a high school football player with septic shock caused by osteitis pubis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsukasa; Sato, Eiichi; Fujiwara, Nobuharu; Kawagoe, Yasuhiro; Egawa, Yoshinaga; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Koide, Hikaru

    2011-01-01

    A 17-year-old male high school football player treated by polymyxin B-immobilized fiber (PMX-F) hemoperfusion for mild-moderate septic shock caused by osteitis pubis is described in this study. He was admitted for inguinal pain, gait disturbance, and high fever (40.6°C). His white blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP), endotoxin, and procalcitonin (PCT) levels were significantly elevated. His blood pressure was 76/46 mm Hg. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bone and muscle injury at the pubic symphysis. Septic shock with high blood endotoxin and PCT concentrations was diagnosed, and the patient was treated with antibiotics, γ-globulin, and dopamine on the admission day. However, the septic shock did not improve. On day 3, we performed direct hemoperfusion twice using a PMX-F column. After the second PMX-F treatment, the patient's temperature decreased to 37.0°C, and his WBC count, CRP levels, blood endotoxin, and PCT levels decreased. The inguinal pain diminished, and the patient's blood pressure increased to 112/76 mm Hg. He was discharged on day 10 after admission. This case reflects association of PMX-F with decreased endotoxin, PCT, and CRP, suggesting the association of PMX-F with clinical improvement in mild-moderate sepsis in a young athlete. PMID:21817894

  2. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  3. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Samannodi, Mohammed; Zhao, Andrew; Nemshah, Yaser; Shiley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  4. Why activated Protein C was not successful in severe sepsis and septic shock: Are we still tilting at windmills?

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Drotrecogin alpha activated (DAA), trade name Xigris, is a recombinant human protein C that has been the subject of controversy since 2001 when it became the first biologic agent approved for the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. The PROWESS trial showed a 6.1% absolute reduction in 28-day mortality although these findings were not replicated in later trials, ultimately leading to the withdrawal of DAA in 2011. Observational trials, however, have consistently shown a mortality benefit with the use of DAA, leading to the questions, did DAA truly fail and if so, why? While these questions may never be definitively answered based on available evidence, several factors may explain the conflicting results.. In clinical practice, DAA may have been preferentially given to subjects more likely to survive. Contemporary treatments including early antibiotic administration and volume resuscitation may have mitigated the inflammatory processes leading to disordered coagulation and microvascular thrombosis and thus reduced or abolished the therapeutic opportunity for DAA. Later randomized clinical trials of DAA focused on the clinical phenotype of refractory shock largely due to a strong efficacy signal in this subset from PROWESS; however, this clinical phenotype may not be tightly linked, at least after contemporary early resuscitation strategies, to the mechanistic phenotype of dysregulated coagulation that may have been a better target for DAA. Future trials of biologic therapies in severe sepsis and septic shock should use a combination of clinical phenotype and biomarkers to identify responsive populations that may benefit from such therapies. PMID:23925482

  5. Liver gluconeogenic metabolites in young and old rats during septic shock.

    PubMed

    Schumer, W

    1988-07-01

    Aged individuals have diminished resistance to severe sepsis and septic shock. Previous studies in young animals showed that the liver's gluconeogenic capacity was an important determinant of survival in shock states. This study compared hepatic carbohydrate intermediates from young rats and old rats to correlate changes during peritonitis septic shock with known differences in survival times. Old control rats had glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) concentrations two-fold higher than young controls, 354 +/- 49 nanomole/g wet liver vs 180 +/- 41, suggesting a reduced ability to convert hexose monophosphate precursor into blood sugar. There was a 53% increase in G6P levels in the peritonitis livers, to 540 +/- 155 nanomole/g liver while in young septic rats the G6P decreased 33 per cent. These opposite, highly significant changes in shock (P = 0.01) show the reduced ability of old animals to mobilize gluconeogenic precursors. Fructose 1,6-biphosphate (FBP) in old control liver was 14 +/- 3 nanomole/g liver and did not change in shock; in young rats, FBP was 7.0 +/- 3 nanomole and increased 230 per cent in shock, showing a different metabolic response in young and old animals. These data suggest older animals may be more vulnerable to shock because of lower gluconeogenic potential. PMID:3389597

  6. Intravenous catheter-related septic shock caused by Staphylococcus sciuri and Escherichia vulneris.

    PubMed

    Horii, T; Suzuki, Y; Kimura, T; Kanno, T; Maekawa, M

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus sciuri and Escherichia vulneris were isolated concurrently in a blood sample from a patient with septic shock, which was probably associated with an indwelling catheter. Our results also showed that S. sciuri is an important reservoir of genetic determinants of beta-lactam resistance as a human pathogen carrying the mecA and beta-lactamase genes. PMID:11868769

  7. Early goal-directed therapy in treatment of pediatric septic shock.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cláudio Flauzino

    2010-09-01

    In the whole world, around 29,000 children younger than 5 years die every day, and sepsis is the most common cause of death. Whereas in adult patients vasomotor paralysis represents the predominant cause of mortality, death in pediatric sepsis is associated with severe hypovolemia and low cardiac output. The purpose of this article was to review the recent evidence on early treatment of pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock. Although current American College of Critical Care Medicine-Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines represent best practice, stronger evidences are lacking to confirm the components of these recommendations. Retrospective studies showed, at the same time, the positive effects arising from the utilization of American College of Critical Care Medicine-Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines and the existing barriers to its implementation. And one randomized control trial paralleled the results observed in adult patients and revealed that early goal-directed therapy in children is one of the few therapeutic interventions that proved to be beneficial in septic shock treatment. Early goal-directed therapy in pediatric septic shock is a successful method to optimize and parameterize treatment, but there is still a long way to turn septic shock resuscitation simpler and more widely spread. PMID:20523274

  8. Impact of methylene blue in addition to norepinephrine on the intestinal microcirculation in experimental septic shock.

    PubMed

    Nantais, Jordan; Dumbarton, Tristan C; Farah, Nizam; Maxan, Alexander; Zhou, Juan; Minor, Samuel; Lehmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been used with some success as a treatment for the vasoplegia of vasopressor-refractory septic shock. The putative mechanism of action of MB is the inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide within the microvasculature and improved responsiveness to endogenous catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE)). However, to date, no study has demonstrated the microcirculatory effect of methylene blue in septic shock. The objective of this randomized, controlled, animal study was to show, in an experimentally-induced, septic shock model in rats, the effects of MB and NE on global hemodynamics and the microcirculation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was drastically reduced following bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) administration in animals not receiving vasopressors. Only the combination of NE + MB restored MAP to control levels by the end of the three hour experiment. Intravital microscopy of the microcirculation was performed in the terminal ileum in order to examine functional capillary density in intestinal muscle layers and the mucosa, as well as leukocyte activation in venules (rolling, adhesion to the endothelium). Untreated LPS animals showed a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion and a decrease in capillary perfusion in the intestinal microcirculation. In groups receiving NE or NE+MB, we observed a significant decrease in leukocyte adhesion and improved functional capillary density, indicating that microvasculature function was improved. This study suggests that methylene blue may be able to improve hemodynamics while preserving microvascular function in septic shock. PMID:25227191

  9. Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Rollé, Amélie; Schepers, Kinda; Cassadou, Sylvie; Curlier, Elodie; Madeux, Benjamin; Hermann-Storck, Cécile; Fabre, Isabelle; Lamaury, Isabelle; Tressières, Benoit; Thiery, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    During a 2014 outbreak, 450 patients with confirmed chikungunya virus infection were admitted to the University Hospital of Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe. Of these, 110 were nonpregnant adults; 42 had severe disease, and of those, 25 had severe sepsis or septic shock and 12 died. Severe sepsis may be a rare complication of chikungunya virus infection. PMID:27088710

  10. Blood pressure alterations in burn patients with septic shock under hydro-cortisone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alinejad, Faranak; Momeni, Mahnoush; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Saberi, Mohsen; Sattarzade, Mahboobeh; Babajani, Rafat; Rahbar, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hydrocortisone is widely used in septic shock cases resistant to fluid and vasopressor therapy. It may result in increased blood pressure and survival. However the efficacy is no established among patients with severe burn and septic shock. Accordingly it was assessed in this study. Materials and Methods: The patients older than 14 years of age with resistant septic shock were enrolled during one-year period. The hydrocortisone was prescribed 100 mg three times per day and the alterations in systolic and diastolic blood pressures were recorded. Results: Twenty-nine patients were enrolled including 19 men and 10 women. The mean age was 37 ± 19 years and the mean burn surface area was 60 ± 20. Fourteen patients had positive blood culture. The most common isolated microorganism were Pseudomonas aeuroginosa in 34.6%(10 cases), and then Acinetobacter in 13.8%(4 cases). The infection was from wound in 79% and the remaining 21% had pneumonia. Twenty-one patients had good response to hydrocortisone and the increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressures was significant; but the mortality rate was similar. Conclusion: Treatment with hydrocortisone would result in increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in burn patients with resistant septic shock. PMID:26885331

  11. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical. PMID:21464014

  12. Mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase participates in septic shock myocardial depression by nitric oxide overproduction and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ce; Yi, Chenju; Wang, Huiping; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is involved in septic shock myocardial depression. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) method was used to induce septic shock. There was a significant depression of hemodynamic parameters recorded in the septic shock stage. After using nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AMG), and neuronal NOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), depression of the parameters was partly attenuated. Nitric oxide production in isolated cardiac mitochondria increased obviously in the CLP-septic shock stage, L-NAME and 7-NI both decreased NO production significantly. Nitrite/nitrate (NOx) production in the septic shock stage was much greater than those in the corresponding sham groups, and NOx production in the cytosol by inducible NOS was greater. Treatment with AMG suppressed NOx production in the cytosol by iNOS, whereas treatment with 7-NI decreased NOx production in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial NOS expression increased significantly in the septic shock stage, and its overexpression was attenuated using 7-NI. There was no significant decrease in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore measurement in the CLP-septic shock group, whereas a significant decrease was observed in those treated with L-NAME or 7-NI. These results indicate that overexpression of mitochondrial NOS is involved in myocardial depression. PMID:21993446

  13. Effect of high dose corticosteroids alone or combined with other drugs on survival in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, P M; Ekström, B; Kuenzig, M; Haglund, U; Schwartz, S I

    1985-01-01

    The effect of high dose corticosteroids on survival has been studied in a limited number of canine septic shock models which are reviewed in this presentation. Following injection of live bacteria neither methylprednisolone, nor gentamicin but a combination improved survival. Methylprednisolone increased survival following a slow but not a bolus infusion of endotoxin. In a recent study the effects of short term treatment with methylprednisolone, naloxone and ibuprofen were studied in endotoxin shock. All control animals died within 36 hours. Five of 9 dogs receiving the combination methylprednisolone, naloxone and ibuprofen were permanent survivors. The combined treatment with methylprednisolone and ibuprofen also increased survival. Dogs treated with methylprednisolone alone did not differ significantly from controls. It is concluded that methylprednisolone alone has no significant effect on survival in septic shock, but seems to be an important therapeutic factor to achieve increased survival. PMID:3867205

  14. Ion transport in circulatory and/or septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sayeed, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    This review surveys investigations of membrane ion transport in animals in hemorrhagic, endotoxic, or bacteremic shock. The focus of the review is on ion transport studies in the skeletal muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport alterations have been shown during the induction of shock via hemorrhage, endotoxin, or live Gram-negative bacteria in the rodent, canine, and primate species. These alterations include impairment of active cellular K/sup +/ accumulation, increased permeability to /sup 24/Na/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/, and membrane depolarization. The ion transport alterations in the skeletal muscle are compatible with movement of extracellular fluid into the intracellular compartment. Such fluid movements can potentially lead to decreases in circulating plasma volume and thus to circulatory deficits in shock. Studies in the liver of rats subjected to hemorrhagic or endotoxic shock indicated the failure of electrogenic Na/sup +/ pump. Although the hepatic cellular membrane permeability to Na/sup +/ relative to permeability to K/sup +/ appeared unaltered in hemorrhagic shock, endotoxic shock caused an increase in permeability to Na/sup +/. Hepatic cellular /sup 45/Ca/sup +/ regulation also appeared to be adversely affected during endotoxic shock. Alterations in hepatic Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport and Ca/sup +/ regulation could contribute to impairment in hepatic glucose production during shock. Although mechanisms of altered membrane ion transport during shock states remain unknown, such changes could occur prior to any substantial loss of cellular metabolic energy.

  15. The Italian SEPSIS study: preliminary results on the incidence and evolution of SIRS, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Salvo, I; de Cian, W; Musicco, M; Langer, M; Piadena, R; Wolfler, A; Montani, C; Magni, E

    1995-11-01

    This prospective, multicenter, epidemiological study was carried out in 99 Italian ICUs, distributed throughout the country, from April 1993 to March 1994. In the study, we applied the new ACCP/SCCM classification system for sepsis (SIRS, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock) and determined the prevalence, incidence, evolution and outcome of these categories in critically ill patients. The preliminary analysis of 1101 patients showed that on admission SIRS accounted for about half of the diagnoses (52%) with sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock accounting for 4.5%, 2.1% and 3% of patients, respectively. Patients with severe sepsis or septic shock more frequently had high SAPS scores than patients without sepsis. Mortality rates were similar in patients with SIRS (26.5%) and without SIRS or infection (24%), but rose to 36% in patients with sepsis, to 52% in those with severe sepsis and to 81.8% in those with septic shock. Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock were more common in patients with medical diagnoses, and neither severe sepsis nor septic shock was observed in trauma patients. With respect to evolution, the incidence of septic shock was progressively higher in patients admitted with more severe "sepsis-related" diagnoses, while only a trivial difference in rates of incidence was observed between SIRS patients and those admitted without SIRS or any septic disorder (nil). The breakdown of the various ACCP/SCCM "sepsis-related" diagnoses at any time during the study was: SIRS in 58% of the population, sepsis in 16.3%, severe sepsis in 5.5% and septic shock in 6.1%. It seems reasonable to expect from the final evaluation of our study answers to the questions raised by the ACCP/SCCM Consensus Conference about the correlations between "sepsis-related" diagnosis, severity score, organ dysfunction score and outcome. PMID:8636531

  16. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines /sup 14/C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and /sup 3/H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM.

  17. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Daniel P.; Philippo, Sean M.; Prasad, Paritosh

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective. PMID:26744664

  18. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel P; Philippo, Sean M; Prasad, Paritosh

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective. PMID:26744664

  19. Accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system in children with septic shock: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhudesai, Sumant; Kanjani, Amruta; Bhagat, Isha; Ravikumar, Karnam G.; Ramachandran, Bala

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this prospective, observational study was to determine the accuracy of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in children with septic shock. Subjects and Methods: Children aged 30 days to 18 years admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit with septic shock were included. A real-time CGMS sensor was used to obtain interstitial glucose readings. CGMS readings were compared statistically with simultaneous laboratory blood glucose (BG). Results: Nineteen children were included, and 235 pairs of BG-CGMS readings were obtained. BG and CGMS had a correlation coefficient of 0.61 (P < 0.001) and a median relative absolute difference of 17.29%. On Clarke's error grid analysis, 222 (94.5%) readings were in the clinically acceptable zones (A and B). When BG was < 70, 70–180, and > 180 mg/dL, 44%, 100%, and 76.9% readings were in zones A and B, respectively (P < 0.001). The accuracy of CGMS was not affected by the presence of edema, acidosis, vasopressors, steroids, or renal replacement therapy. On receiver operating characteristics curve analysis, a CGMS reading <97 mg/dL predicted hypoglycemia (sensitivity 85.2%, specificity 75%, area under the curve [AUC] =0.85). A reading > 141 mg/dL predicted hyperglycemia (sensitivity 84.6%, specificity 89.6%, AUC = 0.87). Conclusion: CGMS provides a fairly, accurate estimate of BG in children with septic shock. It is unaffected by a variety of clinical variables. The accuracy over extremes of blood sugar may be a concern. We recommend larger studies to evaluate its use for the early detection of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. PMID:26730114

  20. Population Pharmacokinetics of Piperacillin in the Early Phase of Septic Shock: Does Standard Dosing Result in Therapeutic Plasma Concentrations?

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Storgaard, Merete; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte; Kreilgaard, Mads; Gjedsted, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic dosing in septic shock patients poses a challenge for clinicians due to the pharmacokinetic (PK) variability seen in this patient population. Piperacillin-tazobactam is often used for empirical treatment, and initial appropriate dosing is crucial for reducing mortality. Accordingly, we determined the pharmacokinetic profile of piperacillin (4 g) every 8 h, during the third consecutive dosing interval, in 15 patients treated empirically for septic shock. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess empirical dosing and to simulate alternative dosing regimens and modes of administration. Time above the MIC (T>MIC) predicted for each patient was evaluated against clinical breakpoint MIC for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16 mg/liter). Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) targets evaluated were 50% fT>4×MIC and 100% fT>MIC. A population PK model was developed using NONMEM, and data were best described by a two-compartment model. Central and intercompartmental clearances were 3.6 liters/h (relative standard error [RSE], 15.7%) and 6.58 liters/h (RSE, 16.4%), respectively, and central and peripheral volumes were 7.3 liters (RSE, 11.8%) and 3.9 liters (RSE, 9.7%), respectively. Piperacillin plasma concentrations varied considerably between patients and were associated with levels of plasma creatinine. Patients with impaired renal function were more likely to achieve predefined PK/PD targets than were patients with preserved or augmented renal function. Simulations of alternative dosing regimens showed that frequent intermittent bolus dosing as well as dosing by extended and continuous infusion increases the probability of attaining therapeutic plasma concentrations. For septic shock patients with preserved or augmented renal function, dose increment or prolonged infusion of the drug needs to be considered. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02306928.) PMID:26349823

  1. "Beat the Shock Clock": An Interprofessional Team Improves Pediatric Septic Shock Care.

    PubMed

    Tuuri, Rachel E; Gehrig, Madeline G; Busch, Carrie E; Ebeling, Myla; Morella, Kristen; Hunt, Lisa; Russell, W Scott

    2016-06-01

    Ideal care for septic shock (SS) is difficult. This interprofessional quality improvement intervention in a mid-volume pediatric emergency department aimed to reduce time to vascular access, fluid resuscitation, and antibiotics for SS. Intensive education, a care pathway, and an order set were applied. Outcome measures for patients with criteria for SS before and after intervention were compared. There were 43 patients pre-intervention (January 2009 to June 2011) and 63 post-intervention (June 2012 to June 2013). Median time to vascular access decreased from 37 minutes pre-intervention to 24 minutes post-intervention (p = 0.05). Median time to first fluid bolus decreased from 35 to 26 minutes (p = 0.08). Percentage of boluses delivered rapidly by pressure method increased from 21% to 74% (p < 0.0001). Median time to antibiotics decreased from 92 to 55 minutes (p = 0.02). In conclusion, a multimodal, interprofessional quality improvement intervention in a mid-sized pediatric emergency department improved the time to critical interventions for SS. PMID:26307185

  2. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4–6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions. PMID:26543849

  3. Terlipressin as rescue therapy for intractable hypotension due to septic shock in children.

    PubMed

    Matok, Ilan; Vard, Amir; Efrati, Ori; Rubinshtein, Marina; Vishne, Tali; Leibovitch, Leah; Adam, Miriam; Barzilay, Zohar; Paret, Gideon

    2005-04-01

    Intractable hypotension due to septic shock is associated with high mortality rates in critically ill children worldwide. The use of terlipressin (triglycyl-lysine-vasopressin), an analog of vasopressin with a longer duration of action, recently emerged as a treatment of hypotension not responsive to vasopressors and inotropes. This was a retrospective study set in an 18-bed pediatric critical care department in a tertiary care children's hospital. We reviewed the files of all children with septic shock who were treated with terlipressin between January 2003 and February 2004. Fourteen children (mean age, 5.6 years; range, 4 days to 17.7 years) were treated with terlipressin in 16 septic shock episodes. Significant improvements in respiratory and hemodynamic indices were noted shortly after treatment. Mean arterial blood pressure increased significantly from 54 +/- 3 to 72 +/- 5 mmHg 10 min after terlipressin administration (P = 0.001). Heart rate decreased from 153.0 +/- 6.5 beats/min to 138.0 +/- 7.5 beats/min 12 h after treatment onset (P = 0.003). Epinephrine infusion was decreased or stopped in eight patients after terlipressin administration. Urine output increased from 1.6 +/- 0.5 mL/kg/h to 4.3 +/- 1.2 mL/kg/h 1 h after treatment onset (P = 0.011). PaO2 increased from 95.1 +/- 12.3 mmHg to 110.1 +/- 20.5 mmHg, and the oxygenation index decreased from 10.2 +/- 2.2 to 9.2 +/- 1.7. Terlipressin treatment of hypotension due to septic shock was successful in eight out of 16 episodes. Six of the 14 patients with poor prognosis for survival recovered. We conclude that terlipressin improves hemodynamic indices and renal function in critically ill children. Terlipressin should be considered as a rescue therapy in intractable shock not responsive to catecholamines in children. PMID:15803052

  4. Ensuring animal welfare while meeting scientific aims using a murine pneumonia model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Huet, Olivier; Ramsey, Debbie; Miljavec, Sandra; Jenney, Adam; Aubron, Cecile; Aprico, Andrea; Stefanovic, Nada; Balkau, Beverley; Head, Geoff A; de Haan, Judy B; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2013-06-01

    With animal models, death as an intentional end point is ethically unacceptable. However, in the study of septic shock, death is still considered the only relevant end point. We defined eight humane end points into four stages of severity (from healthy to moribund) and used to design a clinically relevant scoring tool, termed "the mouse clinical assessment score for sepsis" (M-CASS). The M-CASS was used to enable a consistent approach to the assessment of disease severity. This allowed an ethical and objective assessment of disease after which euthanasia was performed, instead of worsening suffering. The M-CASS displayed a high internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.97) with a high level of agreement and an intraclass correlation coefficient equal to 0.91. The plasma levels of cytokines and markers of oxidative stress were all associated with the M-CASS score (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.05). The M-CASS allows tracking of disease progression and animal welfare requirements. PMID:23603767

  5. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06–0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock. PMID:27171076

  6. Prognostic Value of Venoarterial Carbon Dioxide Gradient in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Troskot, Rosana; Šimurina, Tatjana; Žižak, Mirza; Majstorović, Karolina; Marinac, Ivana; Šutić, Ines Mrakovčić

    2010-01-01

    Aim To investigate the changes in the venoarterial carbon-dioxide gradient (V-a Pco2) and its prognostic value for survival of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods The study was conducted in General Hospital Holy Spirit from January 2004 to December 2007 and included 71 conveniently sampled adult patients (25 women and 46 men), who fulfilled the severe sepsis and septic shock criteria and were followed for a median of 8 days (interquartile range, 12 days). The patients were divided in two groups depending on whether or not they had been mechanically ventilated. Both groups of patients underwent interventions with an aim to achieve hemodynamic stability. Mechanical ventilation was applied in respiratory failure. Venoarterial carbon dioxide gradient was calculated from the difference between the partial pressure of arterial CO2 and the partial pressure of mixed venous CO2, which was measured with a pulmonary arterial Swan-Ganz catheter. The data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, along with a calculation of the hazard ratios. Results There was a significant difference between non-ventilated and ventilated patients, with almost 4-fold greater hazard ratio for lethal outcome in ventilated patients (3.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-9.03). Furthermore, the pattern of changes of many other variables was also different in these two groups (carbon dioxide-related variables, variables related to acid-base status, mean arterial pressure, systemic vascular resistance, lactate, body mass index, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, Simplified Acute Physiology II Score, and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score). Pco2 values (with a cut-off of 0.8 kPa) were a significant predictor of lethal outcome in non-ventilated patients (P = 0.015) but not in ventilated ones (P = 0.270). Conclusion V-a Pco2 was a significant predictor of fatal outcome only in the non-ventilated group of patients. Ventilated patients are more

  7. Septic shock, necrotizing pneumonitis, and meningoencephalitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Eliane R; Souza, Daniela C; Góes, Patricia F; Bousso, Albert

    2009-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important causative agent of respiratory infection in childhood. Although the infection caused by M. pneumoniae is classically described as benign, severe and life-threatening pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications can occur. This study describes the first case of septic shock related to M. pneumoniae in a child with necrotizing pneumonitis, severe encephalitis, and multiple organs involvement, with a favorable outcome after lobectomy and systemic corticosteroids. PMID:19023109

  8. Effect of high-dose Ascorbic acid on vasopressor's requirement in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zabet, Mohadeseh Hosseini; Mohammadi, Mostafa; Ramezani, Masoud; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of ascorbic acid on hemodynamic parameters of septic shock were evaluated in nonsurgical critically ill patients in limited previous studies. In this study, the effect of high-dose ascorbic acid on vasopressor drug requirement was evaluated in surgical critically ill patients with septic shock. Methods: Patients with septic shock who required a vasopressor drug to maintain mean arterial pressure >65 mmHg were assigned to receive either 25 mg/kg intravenous ascorbic acid every 6 h or matching placebo for 72 h. Vasopressor dose and duration were considered as the primary outcomes. Duration of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay and 28-day mortality has been defined as secondary outcomes. Findings: During the study period, 28 patients (14 in each group) completed the trial. Mean dose of norepinephrine during the study period (7.44 ± 3.65 vs. 13.79 ± 6.48 mcg/min, P = 0.004) and duration of norepinephrine administration (49.64 ± 25.67 vs. 71.57 ± 1.60 h, P = 0.007) were significantly lower in the ascorbic acid than the placebo group. No statistically significant difference was detected between the groups regarding the length of ICU stay. However, 28-day mortality was significantly lower in the ascorbic acid than the placebo group (14.28% vs. 64.28%, respectively; P = 0.009). Conclusion: High-dose ascorbic acid may be considered as an effective and safe adjuvant therapy in surgical critically ill patients with septic shock. The most effective dose of ascorbic acid and the best time for its administration should be determined in future studies. PMID:27162802

  9. Septic Shock Secondary to a Urinary Tract Infection with Pediococcus Pentosaceus.

    PubMed

    Han, Amneet; Mehta, Jeet; Pauly, Rebecca R

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a urinary tract infection secondary to Pediococcus pentosaceus causing septic shock and acute kidney injury in a 70-year-old male. We demonstrate successful treatment with a 10-day course of piperacillin/tazobactam. Recently, Pediococci have been found to be the cause of opportunistic infections in humans. This has posed a challenge to treating infections caused by this species because it has been found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics, including glycopeptides. PMID:27443041

  10. Decreased organ failure in patients with severe SIRS and septic shock treated with the platelet-activating factor antagonist TCV-309: a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase II trial. TCV-309 Septic Shock Study Group.

    PubMed

    Poeze, M; Froon, A H; Ramsay, G; Buurman, W A; Greve, J W

    2000-10-01

    Sepsis and organ failure remain the main cause of death on the ICU. Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response, in which platelet-activating factor (PAF) is considered to play an important role. This study investigated whether treatment with the PAF-antagonist TCV-309 reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with septic shock. The study was conducted as a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled multicenter study. The included patients had to fulfill the SIRS criteria with a clinical suspicion of infection, an admission APACHE II score greater than 15, and shock, defined as a mean arterial pressure <70 mmHg and/or a decrease > or =40 mmHg despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Patients received 1.0 mg/kg TCV-309 or placebo, twice daily, intravenously during 14 days. The prospectively set goals were MOF score, recovery from shock, mortality, and assessment of the safety of the medication. A total of 98 patients were included of which 97 were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The overall survival at day 56 of TCV-309 treated patients was similar compared to placebo treated patients (51.0% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.47). In contrast, the mean percentage of failed organs per patient present after 14 days in the TCV-309 treated patients was significantly lower compared to the placebo treated patients (11.9% vs. 25.1%, P = 0.04), leading to a reduced need for vasopressors, dialysis, and ventilatory support. Furthermore, the mean APACHE-II score during treatment with TCV-309 was significantly lower and the number of patients recovered from shock after day 14 was significantly higher in the TCV-309 treated patient group (2/32 vs. 9/29, P = 0.01). The number of adverse events was not significantly different between the TCV-309 and placebo treated patients. TCV-309 did not change overall mortality of septic shock, however a substantial reduction in organ dysfunction and morbidity, frequently associated with septic shock was achieved, without significant

  11. Oxygen challenge test in septic shock patients: prognostic value and influence of respiratory status.

    PubMed

    Mari, Arnaud; Vallée, Fabrice; Bedel, Jérome; Riu, Béatrice; Ruiz, Jean; Sanchez-Verlaan, Pascale; Geeraerts, Thomas; Génestal, Michèle; Silva, Stein; Fourcade, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (PtcO2) value in response to an increase of FiO2 or oxygen challenge test (OCT) in ventilated patients has been reported to be related to peripheral perfusion and outcome during septic shock. However, patients with sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome could demonstrate compromised arterial oxygenation with OCT impairment decoupled to circulatory failure. The aims of this study were to confirm the prognostic value of OCT and to explore the influence of respiratory status on OCT results. This was a prospective study set in an intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. Fifty-six mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock criteria were studied. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure was measured at baseline and after OCT, at intensive care unit admittance (T0), and 24 h later (T24). Survival at day 28 and hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were analyzed and compared according to outcome and respiratory status. Central hemodynamic parameters or static transcutaneous data did not differ between survivors and nonsurvivors at enrollment. The OCT was statistically different at T24 according to outcome (P < 0.001), but sensitivity was low (53%). Moreover, patients with low OCT results at T24 exhibited more severe respiratory failure (P < 0.01). The OCT at T24 is related to outcome but is influenced by the severity of respiratory failure. Our results suggest considering with caution hemodynamic management based on OCT in septic shock patients with altered pulmonary function. PMID:24667627

  12. Effects of vasopressinergic receptor agonists on sublingual microcirculation in norepinephrine-dependent septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The present study was designed to determine the effects of continuously infused norepinephrine (NE) plus (1) terlipressin (TP) or (2) arginine vasopressin (AVP) or (3) placebo on sublingual microcirculation in septic shock patients. The primary study end point was a difference of ≥ 20% in the microvascular flow index of small vessels among groups. Methods The design of the study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. NE was titrated to maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP) between 65 and 75 mmHg after establishment of normovolemia in 60 septic shock patients. Thereafter patients (n = 20 per group) were randomized to receive continuous infusions of either TP (1 μg/kg/hour), AVP (0.04 U/minute) or placebo (isotonic saline). In all groups, open-label NE was adjusted to maintain MAP within threshold values if needed. The sublingual microcirculatory blood flow of small vessels was assessed by sidestream dark-field imaging. All measurements, including data from right heart catheterization and norepinephrine requirements, were obtained at baseline and 6 hours after randomization. Results TP and AVP decreased NE requirements at the end of the 6-hour study period. The data are medians (25th and 75th interquartile ranges (IQRs)): 0.57 μg/kg/minute (0.29 to 1.04) vs. 0.16 μg/kg/minute (0.03 to 0.37) for TP and 0.40 μg/kg/minute (0.20 to 1.05) vs. 0.23 μg/kg/minute (0.03 to 0.77) for AVP, with statistical significance of P < 0.05 vs. baseline and vs. placebo. There were no differences in sublingual microcirculatory variables, systemic hemodynamics, oxygen transport and acid-base homeostasis among the three study groups during the entire observation period. The proportions of perfused vessels increased in relation to baseline within all study groups, and there were no significant differences between groups. The specific data were as follows (median (IQR)): 9.7% (2.6 to 19.8) for TP, 8.9% (0.0 to 17.8) for AVP, and 6.9% (3.5 to 10.1) for

  13. Rescue therapy with terlipressin by continuous infusion in a child with catecholamine-resistant septic shock.

    PubMed

    Zeballos, Gonzalo; López-Herce, Jesús; Fernández, Carmen; Brandstrup, Kay B; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A 2-month-old female infant presented with septic shock, refractory to high doses of catecholamines. Continuous infusion of terlipressin at a rate of 10 mcg/kgh produced a significant increase in the mean arterial pressure that was evident within half and hour, so allowing a reduction in the rate of catecholamine infusion. However, 18 h later, the blood pressure fell again and finally the patient died. This case shows the potential value of terlipressin infusion to restore normal mean arterial pressure in children with vasodilatory shock and hypotension refractory to catecholamines. PMID:16325320

  14. What happens to the fluid balance during and after recovering from septic shock?

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Andrea Regina Lopes; Lobo, Suzana Margareth Ajeje

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the cumulative fluid balance during the period of shock and determine what happens to fluid balance in the 7 days following recovery from shock. Methods A prospective and observational study in septic shock patients. Patients with a mean arterial pressure ≥ 65mmHg and lactate < 2.0mEq/L were included < 12 hours after weaning from vasopressor, and this day was considered day 1. The daily fluid balance was registered during and for seven days after recovery from shock. Patients were divided into two groups according to the full cohort’s median cumulative fluid balance during the period of shock: Group 1 ≤ 4.4L (n = 20) and Group 2 > 4.4L (n = 20). Results We enrolled 40 patients in the study. On study day 1, the cumulative fluid balance was 1.1 [0.6 - 3.4] L in Group 1 and 9.0 [6.7 - 13.8] L in Group 2. On study day 7, the cumulative fluid balance was 8.0 [4.5 - 12.4] L in Group 1 and 14.7 [12.7 - 20.6] L in Group 2 (p < 0.001 for both). Afterwards, recovery of shock fluid balance continued to increase in both groups. Group 2 had a more prolonged length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital compared to Group 1. Conclusion In conclusion, positive fluid balances are frequently seen in patients with septic shock and may be related to worse outcomes. During the shock period, even though the fluid balance was previously positive, it becomes more positive. After recovery from shock, the fluid balance continues to increase. The group with a more positive fluid balance group spent more time in the intensive care unit and hospital. PMID:25909308

  15. The Role of ACTH and Corticosteroids for Sepsis and Septic Shock: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a common disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. It is now defined as an abnormal host response to infection, resulting in life-threatening dysfunction of organs. There is evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in various animal models and in patients that endotoxin or sepsis may directly and indirectly alter the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal response to severe infection. These alterations may include necrosis or hemorrhage or inflammatory mediator-mediated decreased ACTH synthesis, steroidogenesis, cortisol delivery to tissues, clearance from plasma, and decreased sensitivity of tissues to cortisol. Disruption of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis may translate in patients with sepsis into cardiovascular and other organ dysfunction, and eventually an increase in the risk of death. Exogenous administration of corticosteroids at moderate dose, i.e., <400 mg of hydrocortisone or equivalent for >96 h, may help reversing sepsis-associated shock and organ dysfunction. Corticosteroids may also shorten the duration of stay in the ICU. Except for increased blood glucose and sodium levels, treatment with corticosteroids was rather well tolerated in the context of clinical trials. The benefit of treatment on survival remains controversial. Based on available randomized controlled trials, the likelihood of survival benefit is greater in septic shock versus sepsis patients, in sepsis with acute respiratory distress syndrome or with community-acquired pneumonia versus patients without these conditions, and in patients with a blunted cortisol response to 250 μg of ACTH test versus those with normal response. PMID:27379022

  16. Efficacy of selective mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid agonists in canine septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Danner, Robert L.; Eichacker, Peter Q.; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Feng, Jing; Sun, Junfeng; Behrend, Ellen N.; Solomon, Steven B.; Natanson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Background Corticosteroid regimens that stimulate both mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid pathways consistently reverse vasopressor-dependent hypotension in septic shock, but have variable effects on survival. Objective and Methods To determine if exogenous mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid stimulation have distinct effects, and whether the timing on such stimulation alters their effects, in septic shock. Desoxycorticosterone (DOC), a selective mineralocorticoid agonist; dexamethasone (DEX), a selective glucocorticoid agonist; and placebo were administered either several days before (prophylactic) or immediately after (therapeutic) infectious challenge and continued for 96 h in 74 canines with staphylococcal pneumonia. Measurements and Main Results Effects of DOC and DEX were different and opposite depending on timing of administration for survival (p=0.05); fluid requirements (p=0.05); central venous pressures (p≤0.007); indicators of hemoconcentration [i.e. sodium (p=0.0004), albumin (p=0.05), and platelet counts (p=0.02)]; IL-6 levels (p=0.04); and cardiac dysfunction (p=0.05). Prophylactic DOC treatment significantly improved survival, shock, and all the other outcomes above, but therapeutic DOC did not. Conversely, prophylactic DEX was much less effective for improving these outcomes compared to therapeutic DEX, with the exception of shock reversal. Prophylactic DEX given before sepsis induction also significantly reduced serum aldosterone and cortisol levels and increased body temperature and lactate levels compared to therapeutic DEX (p≤0.05), consistent with adrenal suppression. Conclusions In septic shock, mineralocorticoids are only beneficial if given prophylactically, while glucocorticoids are most beneficial when given close to the onset of infection. Prophylactic mineralocorticoids should be further investigated in patients at high risk to develop sepsis, whereas glucocorticoids should only be administered therapeutically to prevent adrenal

  17. The cathelicidin-derived tritrpticin enhances the efficacy of ertapenem in experimental rat models of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Roberto; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea; Mocchegiani, Federico; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Licci, Alberto; Della Vittoria, Agnese; Scalise, Giorgio; Saba, Vittorio

    2006-08-01

    Sepsis remains a serious clinical problem despite intense efforts to improve survival. In this study, the efficacy of ertapenem combined with the cathelicidin tritrpticin was investigated in two rat models of septic shock. Main outcome measures were bacterial growth in blood, peritoneum, spleen, liver, and mesenteric lymph nodes; endotoxin, interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha concentrations in plasma; and lethality. Adult male Wistar rats were given (1) an intraperitoneal injection of 1 mg Escherichia coli serotype 0111:B4 LPS or (2) intra-abdominal sepsis induced via cecal ligation and puncture. For each model, all animals were randomized to receive intraperitoneally isotonic sodium chloride solution, 1 mg/kg tritrpticin, 15 mg/kg ertapenem, and 1 mg/kg tritrpticin combined with 15 mg/kg ertapenem. Each group included 20 animals. All compounds significantly reduced bacterial growth and lethality as compared with saline treatment. Treatment with tritrpticin resulted in significant decrease in plasma endotoxin and cytokine levels, whereas ertapenem exerted opposite effect. The combination between tritrpticin and ertapenem proved to be the most effective treatment in reducing all variables measured. In conclusion, tritrpticin enhances ertapenem efficacy in gram-negative septic shock rat models. PMID:16878029

  18. Erythrocyte selenium concentration predicts intensive care unit and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Selenoenzymes can modulate the extent of oxidative stress, which is recognized as a key feature of septic shock. The pathophysiologic role of erythrocyte selenium concentration in patients with septic shock remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association of erythrocyte selenium concentration with glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activity, GPx1 polymorphisms and with ICU and hospital mortality in septic shock patients. Methods This prospective study included all patients older than 18 years with septic shock on admission or during their ICU stay, admitted to one of the three ICUs of our institution, from January to August 2012. At the time of the patients’ enrollment, demographic information was recorded. Blood samples were taken within the first 72 hours of the patients’ admission or within 72 hours of the septic shock diagnosis for determination of selenium status, protein carbonyl concentration, GPx1 activity and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism (rs 1050450) genotyping. Results A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated. The mean age was 57.6 ± 15.9 years, 63.6% were male. Regarding selenium status, only erythrocyte selenium concentration was lower in patients who died in the ICU. The frequencies for GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism were 55%, 38% and 7% for Pro/Pro, Pro/Leu and Leu/Leu, respectively. In the logistic regression models, erythrocyte selenium concentration was associated with ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock even after adjustment for protein carbonyl concentration and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II) or sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA). Conclusions Erythrocyte selenium concentration was a predictor of ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock. However, this effect was not due to GPx1 activity or Pro198Leu polymorphism. PMID:24887198

  19. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems) Hypovolemic shock (caused by too little blood volume) Anaphylactic shock (caused by allergic reaction) Septic shock ( ... as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in ...

  20. Hitch-hiker taken for a ride: an unusual cause of myocarditis, septic shock and adult respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kushawaha, Anurag; Brown, Mark; Martin, Ismael; Evenhuis, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a serious tick-borne illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii that is endemic in southeastern USA. Although RMSF has been described as causing the classic clinical triad of fever, headache and a characteristic rash, serious and potentially life-threatening manifestations can occur. Cardiopulmonary involvement, although infrequent, may occur with severe cases of RMSF. Rickettsial myocarditis is an uncommon occurrence. We present a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old man, who was hitch-hiking across the southeastern USA, with serologically proven RMSF causing adult respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock and myocarditis manifested by elevated cardiac enzymes and decrease in myocardial function. After treatment with antibiotics, the myocarditis resolved. Therefore, although unusual, clinicians should be aware of possible myocardial involvement in patients with appropriate tick-exposure histories or other clinical signs of RMSF. PMID:23314875

  1. Pressor Response to Noradrenaline in the Setting of Septic Shock: Anything New under the Sun—Dexmedetomidine, Clonidine? A Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Géloën, A.; Pichot, C.; Leroy, S.; Julien, C.; Ghignone, M.; May, C. N.; Quintin, L.

    2015-01-01

    Progress over the last 50 years has led to a decline in mortality from ≈70% to ≈20% in the best series of patients with septic shock. Nevertheless, refractory septic shock still carries a mortality close to 100%. In the best series, the mortality appears related to multiple organ failure linked to comorbidities and/or an intense inflammatory response: shortening the period that the subject is exposed to circulatory instability may further lower mortality. Treatment aims at reestablishing circulation within a “central” compartment (i.e., brain, heart, and lung) but fails to reestablish a disorganized microcirculation or an adequate response to noradrenaline, the most widely used vasopressor. Indeed, steroids, nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, or donors have not achieved overwhelming acceptance in the setting of septic shock. Counterintuitively, α2-adrenoceptor agonists were shown to reduce noradrenaline requirements in two cases of human septic shock. This has been replicated in rat and sheep models of sepsis. In addition, some data show that α2-adrenoceptor agonists lead to an improvement in the microcirculation. Evidence-based documentation of the effects of alpha-2 agonists is needed in the setting of human septic shock. PMID:26783533

  2. Alterations of T helper lymphocyte subpopulations in sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Li, Ming; Su, Longxiang; Wang, Huijuan; Xiao, Kun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Yanhong; Han, Gencheng; Xie, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Circulating lymphocyte number was significantly decreased in patients with sepsis. However, it remains unknown which severity phase (sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock) does it develop and what happen on each subpopulation. Eight patients with differing severities of sepsis (31 sepses, 33 severe sepses, and 16 septic shocks) were enrolled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of Th1, Th2, and Th17; regulatory T (Treg) cell-specific transcription factor T-bet; GATA-3; RORgammat (RORγt); forkhead box P3 (FOXP3); and IL-17 mRNA were performed, and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, and IL-10. In this study, the Th1, Th2, Treg transcription factors, and related cytokines IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 levels of sepsis and severe sepsis patients in peripheral blood were significantly higher than those of the normal controls. Except for IL-17, the T-bet, GATA-3, and IFN-γ levels of septic shock patients were lower than those of sepsis patients. We also observed that the proportions of Th17/Treg in the sepsis and septic shock groups were inversed. From the above, the inflammatory response especially the adaptive immune response is still activated in sepsis and severe sepsis, but significant immunosuppression was developed in septic shock. In addition, the proportion of Th17/Treg inversed may be associated with the illness aggravation of patients with sepsis. PMID:25403265

  3. Effect of methylguanidine in a model of septic shock induced by LPS.

    PubMed

    Marzocco, Stefania; Di Paola, Rosanna; Ribecco, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Domenico, Britti; Genesio, Massimini; Pinto, Aldo; Autore, Giuseppina; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2004-11-01

    Septic shock, a severe form of sepsis, is characterized by cardiovascular collapse following microbial invasion of the body. The progressive hypotension, hyporeactivity to vasopressor agents and vascular leak leads to circulatory failure with multiple organ dysfunction and death. Many inflammatory mediators (e.g. TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6) are involved in the pathogenesis of shock and, among them, nitric oxide (NO). The overproduction of NO during septic shock has been demonstrated to contribute to circulatory failure, myocardial dysfunction, organ injury and multiple organ failure. We have previously demonstrated with in vitro and in vivo studies that methylguanidine (MG), a guanidine compound deriving from protein catabolism, significantly inhibits iNOS activity, TNF-alpha release and carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in rats. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible anti-inflammatory activity of MG in a model of septic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. MG was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at the dose of 30 mg/kg 1 h before and at 1 and 6 h after LPS-induced shock. LPS injection (10 mg/kg in 0.9% NaCl; 0.1 ml/mouse; i.p.) in mouse developed a shock syndrome with enhanced NO release and liver, kidney and pancreatic damage 18 h later. NOx levels, evaluated as nitrite/nitrate serum levels, was significantly reduced in MG-treated rats (78.6%, p < 0.0001; n = 10). Immunohistochemistry revealed, in the lung tissue of LPS-treated group, a positive staining for nitrotyrosine and poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP] ribose) synthase, both of which were reduced in MG-treated mice. Furthermore, enzymatic evaluation revealed a significant reduction in liver, renal and pancreatic tissue damage and MG treatment also improved significantly the survival rate. This study provides evidence that MG attenuates the degree of inflammation and tissue damage associated with endotoxic shock in mice. The mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effect

  4. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  5. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Eom, Joong Sik

    2016-03-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  6. Success of applying early goal-directed therapy for septic shock patients in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Worapratya, Panita; Wanjaroenchaisuk, Apisit; Joraluck, Jutharat; Wuthisuthimethawee, Prasit

    2016-01-01

    Background Since early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) became standard care in severe sepsis and septic shock patients in intensive care units many years ago, we suppose that the survival rate of severe sepsis and septic shock patients improves if the resuscitative procedure is quickly implemented and is initiated in the emergency room. Objective We aimed at recording emergency department time to improve our patient care system as well as determine the rate at which EGDT goals can be achieved. The second analysis is to find out how much we can improve the survival rate. Methods This was a prospective observational study in an emergency room setting at a tertiary care facility where EGDT was applied for resuscitation of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. The data recorded were the initial vital signs, APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II) score, SAP II (Simplified Acute Physiology II) score, SOFA (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment) score, time at which EGDT goals were achieved (central venous oxygen saturation [ScvO2] >70%), initial and final diagnosis, and outcome of treatment. The t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare between the achieved goal and nonachieved goal groups. Results There were 63 cases of severe sepsis in the study period. Only 55 patients submitted a signed consent form and had central line insertion. Twenty-eight (50.9%) cases were male. Thirty-nine (70.9%) patients achieved the goal, and the mean SAP II score was 8. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (P-value =0.097). Thirty of the 39 patients (70.9%) survived in the achieved goal group, which was a statistically significant improvement of the survival rate when compared with only one of 16 patients (6.3%) surviving in the nonachieved goal group (P<0.001).

  7. Hypertonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Haren, Frank M P; Sleigh, James; Boerma, E Christiaan; La Pine, Mary; Bahr, Mohamed; Pickkers, Peter; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the short-term effects of hypertonic fluid versus isotonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock. This was a double-blind, prospective randomized controlled trial in a 15-bed intensive care unit. Twenty-four patients with septic shock were randomized to receive 250 mL 7.2% NaCl/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HT group) or 500 mL 6% hydroxyethyl starch (IT group). Hemodynamic measurements included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), central venous pressure, stroke volume index, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index, gastric tonometry, and sublingual microcirculatory flow as assessed by sidestream dark field imaging. Systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities of the medial mitral annulus were measured using echocardiography to assess left ventricular contractility. Log transformation of the ratio MAP divided by the norepinephrine infusion rate (log MAP/NE) quantified the combined effect on both parameters. Compared with the IT group, hypertonic solution treatment resulted in an improvement in log MAP/NE (P = 0.008), as well as an increase in systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities (P = 0.03) and stroke volume index (P = 0.017). No differences between the groups were found for preload parameters (central venous pressure, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index) or for afterload parameters (systemic vascular resistance index, MAP). Hypertonic solution treatment decreased the need for ongoing fluid resuscitation (P = 0.046). No differences between groups were observed regarding tonometry or the sublingual microvascular variables. In patients with septic shock, hypertonic fluid administration did not promote gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion or sublingual microcirculatory blood flow in comparison to isotonic fluid. Independent of changes in preload or afterload, hypertonic fluid administration improved the cardiac contractility and vascular tone compared with isotonic fluid. The need for ongoing fluid

  8. Levosimendan Versus Dobutamine in Myocardial Injury Patients with Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jian-biao; Hu, Ma-hong; Lai, Zhi-zhen; Ji, Chun-lian; Xu, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Geng; Tian, Shuyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the effect of levosimendan on biomarkers of myocardial injury and systemic hemodynamics in patients with septic shock. Material/Methods After achieving normovolemia and a mean arterial pressure of at least 65 mmHg, 38 septic shock patients with low cardiac output (left ventricular ejective fraction), LEVF ≤45%) were randomly divided into two groups: levosimendan dobutamine. Patients in the levosimendan and dobutamine groups were maintained with intravenous infusion of levosimendan (0.2 μg/kg/minute) and dobutamine (5 μg/kg/minute) for 24 hours respectively. During treatment we monitored hemodynamics and LVEF, and measured levels of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (HFABP), troponin I (TNI), and brain natriuretic peptide(BNP). In addition, the length of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, hospital stay, and 28-day mortality were compared between the two groups. Results The levosimendan group and the dobutamine group were well matched with respect to age (years, 55.4±1 7.5 versus 50.2±13.6) and gender (males, 68.4% versus 57.9%). Levosimendan-treated patients had higher stroke volume index (SVI), cardiac index (CI), LVEF, and left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI), and lower extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) compared to dobutamine-treated patients (p<0.05). HFABP, TNI, and BNP in the levosimendan group were less than in the dobutamine group (p<0.05). There was no difference in the mechanical ventilation time, length of stay in ICU and hospital, and 28-day mortality between the two groups. Conclusions Compared with dobutamine, levosimendan reduces biomarkers of myocardial injury and improves systemic hemodynamics in patients with septic shock. However, it does not reduce the days on mechanical ventilation, length of stay in ICU and hospital, or 28-day mortality. PMID:27138236

  9. Impact of positive fluid balance on mortality and length of stay in septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    Koonrangsesomboon, Wachiraporn; Khwannimit, Bodin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fluid management is important in critically patients. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between fluid balance and adverse outcomes of septic shock. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in the medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary university hospital in Thailand, over a 7-year period. Results: A total of 1048 patients with an ICU mortality rate of 47% were enrolled. The median cumulative fluid intake at 24, 48, and 72 h from septic shock onset were 4.2, 7.7, and 10.5 L, respectively. Nonsurvivors had a significantly higher median cumulative fluid intake at 24, 48, and 72 h (4.6 vs. 3.9 L, 8.2 vs. 7.1 L, and 11.4 vs. 9.9 L, respectively, P < 0.001 for all). Nonsurvivors also had a significantly higher cumulative and mean fluid balance within 72 h (5.4 vs. 4.4 L and 2.8 vs. 1.6 L, P < 0.001 for both). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, mean fluid balance quartile within 72 h, was independently associated with an increase in ICU and hospital mortality. Quartile 3 and 4 have statistically significant increases in mortality compared with quartile 1 (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 3.04 [1.9–4.48] and 4.16 [2.49–6.95] for ICU mortality and 2.75 [1.74–4.36] and 3.16 [1.87–5.35] for hospital mortality, respectively, P < 0.001 for all). In addition, the higher amount of mean fluid balance was associated with prolonged ICU stays. Conclusions: Positive fluid balance over 3 days is associated with increased ICU and hospital mortality along with prolonged ICU stays in septic shock patients. PMID:26813080

  10. Gender Differences in Mortality in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Pietropaoli, Anthony P.; Glance, Laurent G.; Oakes, David; Fisher, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the incidence of sepsis is higher in men than women, it is controversial whether there are gender differences in sepsis-associated mortality. Objective To test the hypothesis that hospital mortality is higher in men compared to women with severe sepsis or septic shock and requiring intensive care. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 18,757 intensive care unit (ICU) patients, including 8,702 women (46%), with severe sepsis or septic shock in the Cerner Project IMPACT database. Results Hospital mortality was higher in women vs. men (35% vs. 33%, p = 0.006). After adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics and processes of care, women had a higher likelihood of hospital mortality than men (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 – 1.19, p = 0.002). Women were less likely than men to receive deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.84 – 0.97), invasive mechanical ventilation (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.76 – 0.86), and hemodialysis catheters (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.78 – 0.93). Women were more likely than men to receive red blood cell transfusions (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.09 – 1.22) and code status limitations (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.18 – 1.47). Conclusions In this large cohort of ICU patients, women with severe sepsis or septic shock had a higher risk of dying in the hospital than men. This difference remained after multivariable adjustment. We also found significant gender disparities in some aspects of care delivery, but these did not explain the higher mortality in women. PMID:21056869

  11. Effects of dopamine, norepinephrine and dobutamine on gastric mucosal pH of septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yifen; Zhang, Ning; Wu, Yifu; Zheng, Yanping; You, Xiaoen; Cao, Zhuo; Xu, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different vasoactive drugs on the pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] of gastric mucosa in patients with septic shock was evaluated in the present study. According to the vasoactive drugs applied, 48 patients with septic shock were divided into 3 groups: A, B and C, with 16 cases each. Cases of group A were treated with dopamine, those of group B with norepinephrine while those of group C were treated with norepinephrine plus dobutamine. The changes of pH of gastric mucosa were observed before treatment (baseline) and 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment, and the hemodynamic indicators were observed before treatment (baseline) and 6 h after administration. The gastric mucosal pH was not significantly different between two of the three groups before treatment (each at P>0.05). The gastric mucosal pH of group A did not change 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment with drugs compared with the baseline (all at P>0.05), while the gastric mucosal pH in groups B and C were each statistically higher at the time points of 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment with drugs compared with the respective baselines (all at P<0.05). Following treatment with drugs, the gastric mucosal pH of group C at all the time points of 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment were significantly higher than those of groups A and B at the same time points after treatment, while there were some statistical differences between groups A and B at these time points (6, 12, 24 and 48 h after treatment; P<0.05). The hemodynamic indicators of the patients before treatment were not significantly different between two of the three groups (all at P>0.05). Compared with the baseline values, the mean arterial pressure and the cardiac index of each group after treatment were significantly increased, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and the central venous pressure of groups B and C significantly increased (all at P<0.05) and the heart rate of group A was significantly increased (P<0.05). In conclusion, the

  12. Pathophysiology of septic shock: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of sepsis and its resultant outcomes remains a paradox. On the one hand, we know more about the pathophysiology of sepsis than ever before. However, this knowledge has not been successfully translated to the bedside, as the vast majority of clinical trials for sepsis have been negative. Yet even in the general absence of positive clinical trials, mortality from sepsis has fallen to its lowest point in history, in large part due to educational campaigns that stress timely antibiotics and hemodynamic support. While additional improvements in outcome will assuredly result from further compliance with evidence based practices, a deeper understanding of the science that underlies the host response in sepsis is critical to the development of novel therapeutics. In this review, we outline immunopathologic abnormalities in sepsis, and then look at potential approaches to therapeutically modulate them. Ultimately, an understanding of the science underlying sepsis should allow the critical care community to utilize precision medicine to combat this devastating disease on an individual basis leading to improved outcomes. PMID:27085986

  13. SPG/IND-induced septic shock in a LPS-low responder strain, C3H/HeJ mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Maki; Nameda, Sachiko; Miura, Noriko N; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2008-05-01

    The administration of beta-glucan (sonifilan; SPG) in combination with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin (IND), induced lethal septic shock in mice. To demonstrate the influence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in this lethal toxicity, LPS non-responder C3H/HeJ mice were used to compare features of sepsis and physicochemical parameters in the present study. The administration of SPG and IND induced the death of C3H/HeJ mice, lowering rectal temperature, reducing body weight, increasing serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, shortening the gastrointestinal tract, and increasing the GOT/GPT level. Microbial translocation to various organs was also significantly increased. These results strongly suggested that LPS-non-responding strain also induced septic shock in this experimental model, and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) may significantly contribute to the septic shock. PMID:18093793

  14. Procalcitonin determined at emergency department as an early indicator of progression to septic shock in patient with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Ji, Yoon Seob; Park, Sin-Youl; Kim, Su Jin; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To investigate the role of initial procalcitonin (PCT) level as an early predictor of septic shock for the patient with sepsis induced by acute pyelonephritis (APN) secondary to ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods: The data from 49 consecutive patients who met criteria of sepsis due to APN following ureteral stone were collected and divided into two groups: with (n=15) or without (n=34) septic shock. The clinical variables including PCT level for this outcome were retrospectively compared by univariate analysis, followed by multivariable logistic regression model. Results: All subjects had hydronephrosis, and were hospitalized with the mean of 11.8 days (3–42 days). The mean size of the ureteral stones was 7.5mm (3–30mm), and 57% were located in upper ureter. At univariate analysis, patients with septic shock were significantly older, a higher proportion had hypertension, lower platelet count and serum albumin level, higher CRP and PCT level, and higher positive blood culture rate. Multivariate models indicated that lower platelet count and higher PCT level are independent risk factors (p=0.043 and 0.046, respectively). In ROC curve, the AUC was significantly wider in PCT (0.929), compared with the platelet count (0.822, p=0.004). At the cut-off of 0.52ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% and 85.3%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated elevated initial PCT levels as an early independent predictor to progress into septic shock in patients with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi. PMID:27256181

  15. “Immunonutrition” Has Failed to Improve Peritonitis-Induced Septic Shock in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Meyer, Grégory; Degirmenci, Su Emmanuelle; Burban, Mélanie; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Cynober, Luc; De Bandt, Jean-Pascal; Hasselmann, Michel; Meziani, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunonutrition in sepsis, including n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or L-arginine supplementation, is a controversial issue that has yielded a great number of studies for the last thirty-five years, and the conclusions regarding the quantity and quality of this support in patients are deceiving. The aim of the present experimental study is to investigate the effects of a pretreatment with enteral nutrition enriched with n-3 PUFAs or L-arginine on vascular dysfunctions, inflammation and oxidative stress during septic shock in rats. Design Rats were fed with enteral Peptamen® HN (HN group), Peptamen® AF containing n-3 PUFAs (AF group) or Peptamen® AF enriched with L-arginine (AFA group). On day 4, peritonitis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was performed. Rats were resuscitated (H18) once septic shock was established. After a 4-hour resuscitation, vessels and organs were harvested to assess inflammation, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and prostacyclin levels. Ex-vivo vascular reactivity was also performed. Results Compared to CLP-AF or CLP-HN groups, 47.6% of CLP-AFA rats died before the beginning of hemodynamic measurements (vs. 8.0% and 20.0% respectively, p<0.05). AF and AFA rats required significantly increased norepinephrine infusion rates to reach the mean arterial pressure objective, compared to CLP-HN rats. Both CLP-AF and CLP-AFA reduced mesenteric resistance arterial contractility, decreased vascular oxidative stress, but increased NF-κB (0.40±0.15 in CLP-AF and 0.69±0.06 in CLP-AFA vs. 0.09±0.03 in SHAM rats and 0.30±0.06 in CLP-HN, ß-actin ratio, p<0.05) and pIκB expression (0.60±0.03 in CLP-AF and 0.94±0.15 in CLP-AFA vs. 0.04±0.01 in SHAM rats and 0.56±0.07 in CLP-HN, ß-actin ratio, p<0.05), nitric oxide and prostacyclin production in septic rats. Conclusions Although n-3 PUFAs or L-arginine supplementation exhibited an antioxidant effect, it worsened the septic shock-induced vascular dysfunction. Furthermore

  16. Low-dose hydrocortisone in patients with cirrhosis and septic shock: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Yaseen M.; Aljumah, Abdulrahman; Dabbagh, Ousama; Tamim, Hani M.; Rishu, Asgar H.; Al-Abdulkareem, Abdulmajeed; Knawy, Bandar Al; Hajeer, Ali H.; Tamimi, Waleed; Cherfan, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of relative adrenal insufficiency in patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the effect of corticosteroid replacement on mortality in this high-risk group remains unclear. We examined the effect of low-dose hydrocortisone in patients with cirrhosis who presented with septic shock. Methods We enrolled patients with cirrhosis and septic shock aged 18 years or older in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Relative adrenal insufficiency was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 250 nmol/L or 9 μg/dL from baseline after stimulation with 250 μg of intravenous corticotropin. Patients were assigned to receive 50 mg of intravenous hydrocortisone or placebo every six hours until hemodynamic stability was achieved, followed by steroid tapering over eight days. The primary outcome was 28-day all-cause mortality. Results The trial was stopped for futility at interim analysis after 75 patients were enrolled. Relative adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed in 76% of patients. Compared with the placebo group (n = 36), patients in the hydrocortisone group (n = 39) had a significant reduction in vasopressor doses and higher rates of shock reversal (relative risk [RR] 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98–2.55, p = 0.05). Hydrocortisone use was not associated with a reduction in 28-day mortality (RR 1.17, 95% CI 0.92–1.49, p = 0.19) but was associated with an increase in shock relapse (RR 2.58, 95% CI 1.04–6.45, p = 0.03) and gastrointestinal bleeding (RR 3.00, 95% CI 1.08–8.36, p = 0.02). Interpretation Relative adrenal insufficiency was very common in patients with cirrhosis presenting with septic shock. Despite initial favourable effects on hemodynamic parameters, hydrocortisone therapy did not reduce mortality and was associated with an increase in adverse effects. (Current Controlled Trials registry no. ISRCTN99675218.) PMID:21059778

  17. Predicting treatment failure in severe sepsis and septic shock: looking for the Holy Grail

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Procalcitonin has been proposed as a specific biomarker of bacterial infections and has been related to the severity of sepsis. The prognostic ability of the initial concentrations of procalcitonin in sepsis is controversial. Some studies find higher initial concentrations in non-survivors but others find no differences. Prognostic assessment based on follow-up of procalcitonin levels may be better than evaluation of the initial levels of procalcitonin. The persistence of elevated procalcitonin levels is indicative of poor prognosis and is associated with mortality. Procalcitonin kinetics could be a tool for assessing the evolution of severe sepsis and sepsis shock. Procalcitonin should find its place as a biomarker for predicting treatment failure of severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:24004571

  18. Coagulation phenotypes in septic shock as evaluated by calibrated automated thrombography.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Julien; Charron, Cyril; François, Jean-Hugues; Cramer-Bordé, Elisabeth; Lévy, Bruno; Borgel, Delphine; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis induces alterations of coagulation suggesting both hypercoagulable or hypocoagulable features. The result of their combination remains unknown, making it difficult to predict whether one prevails over the other. Thrombin generation tests (TGTs) stand as an interesting tool to establish an integrative phenotype of coagulation. It has been reported that septic patients display a hypocoagulable trait using TGT. However, protein C (PC) system response was not evaluated. We aimed at describing the thrombin generation profile in patients with septic shock under conditions that are sensitive to PC system to evaluate the net results of coagulation abnormalities and to determine whether hypercoagulable or hypocoagulable traits coexist within a given individual. Thrombin generation was studied in plasma from patients presenting with septic shock at diagnosis and 6 h after a conventional therapeutic management using calibrated automated thrombography with or without thrombomodulin (TM) addition. Patients exhibit clear alterations of TGT that present as both consumption-related hypocoagulability (evidenced without TM addition) but also hypercoagulability by decreased sensitivity to the PC system evidenced with TM addition. No difference could be demonstrated between survivors and nonsurvivors at Day 28, but patients who do not respond to therapeutics at 6 h seem to be more hypercoagulable. More importantly, if our results evidence heterogeneity between patients, we show that alterations of coagulation result in an equilibrium in the majority of patients, thus suggesting "normocoagulability"; but, in the presence of a biological imbalance between baseline thrombin generation and sensitivity to TM, the global effect mostly tends toward hypercoagulability. Thus, TGT may help identify distinct biological coagulation phenotypes in the complex alterations induced by sepsis. PMID:25255379

  19. A Selective V1A Receptor Agonist, Selepressin, Is Superior to Arginine Vasopressin and to Norepinephrine in Ovine Septic Shock*

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinrong; Su, Fuhong; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Laporte, Régent; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Keliang; Moussa, Mouhamed Djahoum; Reinheimer, Torsten Michael

    2016-01-01

    interleukin-6 and nitrite/nitrate levels. Selepressin-treated animals survived longer than the other animals. Conclusions: In this clinically relevant model, selepressin, a selective V1A receptor agonist, was superior to arginine vasopressin and to norepinephrine in the treatment of septic shock, especially when administered early. PMID:26496451

  20. Anthrapyrazolone analogues intercept inflammatory JNK signals to moderate endotoxin induced septic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Karothu Durga; Trinath, Jamma; Biswas, Ansuman; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Balaji, Kithiganahalli N.; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2014-11-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is one of the rising causes for mortality worldwide representing nearly 10% of intensive care unit admissions. Susceptibility to sepsis is identified to be mediated by innate pattern recognition receptors and responsive signaling pathways of the host. The c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-mediated signaling events play critical role in bacterial infection triggered multi-organ failure, cardiac dysfunction and mortality. In the context of kinase specificities, an extensive library of anthrapyrazolone analogues has been investigated for the selective inhibition of c-JNK and thereby to gain control over the inflammation associated risks. In our comprehensive biochemical characterization, it is observed that alkyl and halogen substitution on the periphery of anthrapyrazolone increases the binding potency of the inhibitors specifically towards JNK. Further, it is demonstrated that hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions generated by these small molecules effectively block endotoxin-induced inflammatory genes expression in in vitro and septic shock in vivo, in a mouse model, with remarkable efficacies. Altogether, the obtained results rationalize the significance of the diversity oriented synthesis of small molecules for selective inhibition of JNK and their potential in the treatment of severe sepsis.

  1. Effect of nitric oxide on beta-glucan/indomethacin-induced septic shock.

    PubMed

    Nameda, Sachiko; Saito, Maki; Miura, Noriko N; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown that repeated administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to mice treated with beta-glucan, a biological response modifier, induced severe lethality. The lethality would be strongly related to the translocation of enterobacterial flora to the peritoneal cavity and disruption of the cytokine network. Reports suggest that nitric oxide (NO) can have an effective or detrimental role in septic shock. In the present study, we examined the effect of NO, an inflammatory mediator, on beta-glucan/indomethacin (IND)- induced septic shock by inhibiting its synthesis with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nonselective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Nitrite concentration was used as an indicator of NO generation. Mortality in beta-glucan/IND-treated mice was increased by administering L-NAME. Numbers of bacteria in various organs of mice treated with beta-glucan/IND rose significantly within a couple of days of the administration of L-NAME. Additionally, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 concentrations were enhanced in peritoneal exuded cells in culture. These results suggest a significant loss of the bactericidal activity of macrophages on the administration of a NOS inhibitor which enhanced the rate of enterobacterial invasion to the peritoneal cavity, resulting in systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The production of NO, therefore, provides a protective effect in beta-glucan/IND-induced sepsis. PMID:15997109

  2. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient. PMID:26798544

  3. Early goal-directed resuscitation of patients with septic shock: current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi G; Hartigan, Sarah M; Kashiouris, Markos G; Sessler, Curtis N; Bearman, Gonzalo M L

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are among the leading causes of mortality in the intensive care unit. Over a decade ago, early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) emerged as a novel approach for reducing sepsis mortality and was incorporated into guidelines published by the international Surviving Sepsis Campaign. In addition to requiring early detection of sepsis and prompt initiation of antibiotics, the EGDT protocol requires invasive patient monitoring to guide resuscitation with intravenous fluids, vasopressors, red cell transfusions, and inotropes. The effect of these measures on patient outcomes, however, remains controversial. Recently, three large randomized trials were undertaken to re-examine the effect of EGDT on morbidity and mortality: the ProCESS trial in the United States, the ARISE trial in Australia and New Zealand, and the ProMISe trial in England. These trials showed that EGDT did not significantly decrease mortality in patients with septic shock compared with usual care. In particular, whereas early administration of antibiotics appeared to increase survival, tailoring resuscitation to static measurements of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation did not confer survival benefit to most patients. In the following review, we examine these findings as well as other evidence from recent randomized trials of goal-directed resuscitation. We also discuss future areas of research and emerging paradigms in sepsis trials. PMID:26316210

  4. [A case of severe hypotension with catecholamine-resistant septic shock in the perioperative period].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Eisuke; Kawano, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    We report general anesthesia of a 79-year-old man complicated with septic shock from abdominal artery graft infection. When he entered the operating room, intravenous dopamine, dobutamine, and noradrenaline had been administered and his bood pressure was 50/32 mmHg. General anesthesia was induced with inhalation of oxygen-sevoflurane and rocuronium, and maintained with sevoflurane-oxygen. During the operation, the patient's blood pressure was 40-50/30-35 mmHg, and heart rate decreased gradually to 50 beats x min(-1). Although various vasopressors (dopamine, dobutamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, ephedrine, phenylephrine, atropine and vasopressin) were administered, they were not effective to improve severe hypotension. After the operation, we started blood purification (PMX-DHP+CHDF), and in consequence blood pressure increased. It was thought that hemodynamics improved remarkably by reducing humoral mediators. In conclusion, it is considered that patients with septic shock should undergo immediate diagnosis and the source control should be performed in the minimum period, because it is possible that any vasopressor become ineffective when hypercytokinemia developes. PMID:22590945

  5. Receptors, Mediators, and Mechanisms Involved in Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Kuiper, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis and septic shock result from the overproduction of inflammatory mediators as a consequence of the interaction of the immune system with bacteria and bacterial wall constituents in the body. Bacterial cell wall constituents such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycans, and lipoteichoic acid are particularly responsible for the deleterious effects of bacteria. These constituents interact in the body with a large number of proteins and receptors, and this interaction determines the eventual inflammatory effect of the compounds. Within the circulation bacterial constituents interact with proteins such as plasma lipoproteins and lipopolysaccharide binding protein. The interaction of the bacterial constituents with receptors on the surface of mononuclear cells is mainly responsible for the induction of proinflammatory mediators by the bacterial constituents. The role of individual receptors such as the toll-like receptors and CD14 in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, the roles of a number of other receptors that bind bacterial compounds such as scavenger receptors and their modulating role in inflammation are described. Finally, the therapies for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and septic shock are discussed in relation to the action of the aforementioned receptors and proteins. PMID:12857774

  6. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient. PMID:26798544

  7. Anthrapyrazolone analogues intercept inflammatory JNK signals to moderate endotoxin induced septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Karothu Durga; Trinath, Jamma; Biswas, Ansuman; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Balaji, Kithiganahalli N.; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2014-01-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is one of the rising causes for mortality worldwide representing nearly 10% of intensive care unit admissions. Susceptibility to sepsis is identified to be mediated by innate pattern recognition receptors and responsive signaling pathways of the host. The c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-mediated signaling events play critical role in bacterial infection triggered multi-organ failure, cardiac dysfunction and mortality. In the context of kinase specificities, an extensive library of anthrapyrazolone analogues has been investigated for the selective inhibition of c-JNK and thereby to gain control over the inflammation associated risks. In our comprehensive biochemical characterization, it is observed that alkyl and halogen substitution on the periphery of anthrapyrazolone increases the binding potency of the inhibitors specifically towards JNK. Further, it is demonstrated that hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions generated by these small molecules effectively block endotoxin-induced inflammatory genes expression in in vitro and septic shock in vivo, in a mouse model, with remarkable efficacies. Altogether, the obtained results rationalize the significance of the diversity oriented synthesis of small molecules for selective inhibition of JNK and their potential in the treatment of severe sepsis. PMID:25428720

  8. Septic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body Complete blood count (CBC) and blood chemistry Presence of bacteria or other organisms Low blood oxygen level Disturbances in the body's acid-base balance Poor organ function or organ failure Other ...

  9. A high angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 ratio is associated with a high risk of septic shock in patients with febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endothelial barrier breakdown is a hallmark of septic shock, and proteins that physiologically regulate endothelial barrier integrity are emerging as promising biomarkers of septic shock development. Patients with cancer and febrile neutropenia (FN) present a higher risk of sepsis complications, such as septic shock. Nonetheless, these patients are normally excluded or under-represented in sepsis biomarker studies. The aim of our study was to validate the measurement of a panel of microvascular permeability modulators as biomarkers of septic shock development in cancer patients with chemotherapy-associated FN. Methods This was a prospective study of diagnostic accuracy, performed in two distinct in-patient units of a university hospital. Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and angiopoietin (Ang) 1 and 2 were measured after the onset of neutropenic fever, in conditions designed to mimic the real-world use of a sepsis biomarker, based on our local practice. Patients were categorized based on the development of septic shock by 28 days as an outcome. Results A total of 99 consecutive patients were evaluated in the study, of which 20 developed septic shock and 79 were classified as non-complicated FN. VEGF-A and sFlt-1 levels were similar between both outcome groups. In contrast, Ang-2 concentrations were increased in patients with septic shock, whereas an inverse finding was observed for Ang-1, resulting in a higher Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio in patients with septic shock (5.29, range 0.58 to 57.14) compared to non-complicated FN (1.99, range 0.06 to 64.62; P = 0.01). After multivariate analysis, the Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio remained an independent factor for septic shock development and 28-day mortality. Conclusions A high Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio can predict the development of septic shock in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. PMID:23915833

  10. Skin necrosis after a low-dose vasopressin infusion through a central venous catheter for treating septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Sae Hwan; Byun, Seung Woon; Kang, Ho Suk; Koo, Dong Hoe; Park, Hyun-Gu; Hong, Sang Bum

    2006-12-01

    This is a report on a case of severe skin necrosis in a vasodilatory septic shock patient after the infusion of low-dose vasopressin through a central venous catheter. An 84-year-old male was hospitalized for edema on both legs at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. On hospital day 8, the patient began to complain of dyspnea and he subsequently developed severe septic shock caused by E. coli. After being transferred to the medical intensive care unit, his hypotension, which was refractory to norepinephrine, was controlled by an infusion of low-dose vasopressin (0.02 unit/min) through a central venous catheter into the right subclavian vein. After the infusion of low-dose vasopressin, severe skin necrosis with bullous changes developed, necessitating discontinuation of the low-dose vasopressin infusion. The patient expired from refractory septic shock. Although low-dose vasopressin can control hypotension in septic shock patients, low-dose vasopressin must be used with caution because ischemic complications such as skin necrosis can develop even with administration through a central venous catheter. PMID:17249516

  11. Steroid therapy in septic shock. Survival studies in a laboratory model.

    PubMed

    Fabian, T C; Patterson, R

    1982-12-01

    The efficacy of pharmacologic doses of steroids in the treatment of septic shock was evaluated using a laboratory model. The model produced a septic insult of gradual onset followed by a rapid progression, allowing for the evaluation of postcontamination therapeutic regimens. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the cecum was ligated distal to the ileocecal valve and doubly punctured. Control animals (n = 41) received no postoperative therapy. Mortality was 37 per cent at 24 hours and 90 per cent at 48 hours. Approximately 25 animals were assigned to each of five experimental groups. Pharmacologic doses of methylprednisolone at four and eight hours postoperatively did not alter survival. Short-term gentamicin (STG) at four and eight hours improved early survival, which then declined to control values. Addition of steroid to STG had no effect. Long-term gentamicin (LTG) administered through the third postoperative day produced significant increased survival over controls throughout the study. Pharmacologic doses of steroid at four and eight hours added to LTG resulted in a significant increase (P less than 0.05) in survival rate over the treatment with LTG alone. PMID:6760756

  12. Circulating high sensitivity troponin T in severe sepsis and septic shock: distribution, associated factors, and relation to outcome

    PubMed Central

    Røsjø, Helge; Varpula, Marjut; Hagve, Tor-Arne; Karlsson, Sari; Ruokonen, Esko; Pettilä, Ville

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical utility of a recently developed highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) assay for providing prognostic information on patients with sepsis. Methods cTnT levels were measured by the novel hs-cTnT assay at two time points (inclusion and 72 h thereafter) in a subgroup of patients from the FINNSEPSIS study and associations with clinical outcomes were examined. Results for the hs-cTnT assay were compared to those of the established fourth-generation cTnT assay. Results cTnT measured by the fourth-generation and hs-cTnT assay was detectable in 124 (60%) and 207 (100%) patients, respectively, on inclusion in this study. hs-cTnT levels on inclusion correlated with several indices of risk in sepsis, including the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores. The level of hs-cTnT on inclusion was higher in hospital non-survivors (n = 47) than survivors (n = 160) (median 0.054 [Q1–3, 0.022–0.227] versus 0.035 [0.015–0.111] μg/L, P = 0.047), but hs-cTnT level was not an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. hs-cTnT levels on inclusion were also higher in patients with septic shock during the hospitalization (0.044 [0.024–0.171] versus 0.033 [0.012–0.103] μg/L, P = 0.03), while this was not the case for the fourth-generation cTnT assay or NT-proBNP levels. Conclusions Circulating hs-cTnT is present in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, associates with disease severity and survival, but does not add to SAPS II score for prediction of mortality. hs-cTnT measurement could still have a role in sepsis as an early marker of shock. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-2051-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20938765

  13. Survival of primates in lethal septic shock following delayed treatment with steroid.

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, L B; Archer, L T; Beller-Todd, B K; Benjamin, B; Flournoy, D J; Passey, R

    1981-01-01

    We recently developed a methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS)/gentamicin sulfate (GS) regimen that prevented death in baboons given a 2-hour infusion of LD100 E coli (J. Surg. Res. 28:151, 1980). Steroid treatment was begun in that study 30 minutes after initiation of E coli. Our current aim was to determine if baboons would survive if MPSs treatment was delayed until all E coli were infused and severe hypotension had ensued. Fourteen lightly anesthetized baboons (P.c. cynocephalus) were administered E. coli and seven were then treated with MPSS and GS for 10 hours. All nontreated baboons died, while six of seven treated animals survived. In the treated group, hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia were reversed, tachycardia was reduced and neutrophil recovery was improved. Baboons with delayed MPSS, however, evidenced diminished perfusion and recovered more slowly than those with earlier MPSs treatment. In conclusion, primates in septic shock are clearly protected with delayed steroid/antibiotic therapy. PMID:7018730

  14. Glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis and septic shock: no hard evidence yet

    PubMed Central

    van der Horst, Iwan CC; Ligtenberg, Jack JM; Bilo, Henk JG; Zijlstra, Felix; Gans, Rijk OB

    2003-01-01

    There is no hard evidence yet for a positive effect of glucose–insulin–potassium infusion in sepsis, septic shock or burn patients. Each individual element of the glucose–insulin–potassium regimen, and eventually euglycaemia, should theoretically be beneficial. At present, evidence exists only for reduced mortality with strict metabolic treatment (i.e. blood glucose levels of 4.4–6.1 mmol/l) in critically ill patients admitted to surgical intensive care units, and for better metabolic regulation (i.e. blood glucose levels of 7.0–10.0 mmol/l) in patients with hyperglycaemia and/or diabetes mellitus, and in patients without signs of heart failure (i.e. Killip class I) during acute myocardial infarction. PMID:12617733

  15. Septic shock during platelet transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haesebaert, Julie; Bénet, Thomas; Michallet, Mauricette; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Although rare, transfusion-associated bacterial contamination (TABC) is nowadays the main risk associated with platelet concentrate (PC) transfusion. Consequences vary from spontaneously resolving symptoms to severe sepsis and death. In this report we have summarised a case of bacterial contamination and sepsis during PC transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia. Fifteen minutes after the PC transfusion began, she developed chills and rapidly worsened to septic shock. The episode was managed appropriately. The patient's blood cultures and PC unit cultures grew Escherichia coli. The microbiological susceptibilities of isolates from the patient and platelet bag were identical. No other source of E coli was found. Donor and blood products issued from the same donation investigations were negative. The causality between sepsis and PC transfusion might be difficult to confirm. As no method is available in daily practice to eliminate TABC risk, physicians should always consider TABC by immediately stopping the transfusion and conducting appropriate investigations. PMID:24172770

  16. Soluble Heparan Sulfate in Serum of Septic Shock Patients Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Murine Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; Peters, Carsten; Schmitz, Susanne; Moellmann, Julia; Martincuks, Antons; Heussen, Nicole; Lehrke, Michael; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    The heart is one of the most frequently affected organs in sepsis. Recent studies focused on lipopolysaccharide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction; however myocardial dysfunction is not restricted to gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The purpose of this study was to investigate circulating heparan sulfate (HS) as an endogenous danger associated molecule causing cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. We used an in vitro model with native sera (SsP) and sera eliminated from HS (HS-free), both of septic shock patients, to stimulate murine cardiomyocytes. As determined by extracellular flux analyzing, SsP increased basal mitochondrial respiration, but reduced maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Cells stimulated with HS-free serum revealed unaltered basal and maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P = 0.1174 and P = 0.8992, respectively). Cellular ATP-level were decreased in SsP-stimulated cells but unaltered in cells stimulated with HS-free serum compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.1593, respectively). Live-cell imaging revealed an increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells stimulated with SsP compared with cells stimulated with HS-free serum (P < 0.0001). Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα and PPARγ) and their co-activators PGC-1α, which regulate mitochondrial function, were studied using PCR. Cells stimulated with SsP showed downregulated PPARs and PGC-1α mRNA-levels compared with HS-free serum (P = 0.0082, P = 0.0128, and P = 0.0185, respectively). Blocking Toll-like receptor 4 revealed an inhibition of HS-dependent downregulation of PPARs and PGC-1α (all P < 0.0001). In conclusion, circulating HS in serum of septic shock patients cause cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that HS may be targets of therapeutics in septic

  17. Multifaceted interventions to decrease mortality in patients with severe sepsis/septic shock-a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Siontis, Brittany; Elmer, Jennifer; Dannielson, Richard; Brown, Catherine; Park, John; Surani, Salim; Ramar, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that EGDT improves outcomes in septic patients, staff education on EGDT and compliance with the CPOE order set has been variable. Based on results of a resident survey to identify barriers to decrease severe sepsis/septic shock mortality in the medical intensive care unit (MICU), multifaceted interventions such as educational interventions to improve awareness to the importance of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT), and the use of the Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) order set, were implemented in July 2013. CPOE order set was established to improve compliance with the EGDT resuscitation bundle elements. Orders were reviewed and compared for patients admitted to the MICU with severe sepsis/septic shock in July and August 2013 (controls) and 2014 (following the intervention). Similarly, educational slide sets were used as interventions for residents before the start of their ICU rotations in July and August 2013. While CPOE order set compliance did not significantly improve (78% vs. 76%, p = 0.74), overall EGDT adherence improved from 43% to 68% (p = 0.0295). Although there was a trend toward improved mortality, this did not reach statistical significance. This study shows that education interventions can be used to increase awareness of severe sepsis/septic shock and improve overall EGDT adherence. PMID:26500811

  18. Cardiac Troponin Is a Predictor of Septic Shock Mortality in Cancer Patients in an Emergency Department: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi; Qdaisat, Aiham; Hu, Zhihuang; Wagar, Elizabeth A.; Reyes-Gibby, Cielito; Meng, Qing H.; Yeung, Sai-Ching J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock may be associated with myocardial damage; however, the prognostic value of cardiac enzymes in cancer patients with septic shock is unknown. In this study, we evaluated the prognostic significance of cardiac enzymes in combination with established prognostic factors in predicting the 7-day mortality rate of patients with septic shock, and we constructed a new scoring system, Septic Oncologic Patients in Emergency Department (SOPED), which includes cardiac enzymes, to predict 7-day mortality rates. Methods and Findings We performed a retrospective cohort study of 375 adult cancer patients with septic shock who visited the emergency department of a comprehensive cancer center between 01/01/2004 and 12/31/2013. The 7-day and 28-day mortality rates were 19.7% and 37.6%, respectively. The creatine kinase myocardial band fraction and troponin-I were significantly higher in patients who died in ≤7 days and ≤28 days than in those who did not. In Cox regression models, troponin-I >0.05 ng/mL plus Predisposition, Infection, Response, and Organ Failure (PIRO2011) or Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS) score was a significant predictor of survival for ≤7 days. With our new SOPED scoring system, the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve was 0.836, higher than those for PIRO2011 and MEDS. Conclusions Troponin-I >0.05 ng/mL was an important predictor of short-term mortality (≤7 days). The SOPED scoring system, which incorporated troponin-I, was more prognostically accurate than were other scores for 7-day mortality. Large multicenter studies are needed to verify our results and prospectively validate the prognostic performance of the SOPED score. PMID:27077648

  19. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beyers, Rebekah; Baldwin, Michael; Dalabih, Sevilay; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC) database) infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU) for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS. PMID:24891968

  20. Neurohypophyseal response to fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline during septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Michael Brian; Vieira, Alexandre Antonio; Elias, Lucila L K; Rodrigues, José Antunes; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2013-02-01

    Septic shock is a serious condition with a consequent drop in blood pressure and inadequate tissue perfusion. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HS) has been proposed to restore physiological haemodynamics during haemorrhagic and endotoxic shock. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects produced by an HS infusion in rats subjected to caecal ligation and perforation (CLP). Male Wistar rats were randomly grouped and submitted to either CLP or sham surgery. Either HS (7.5% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) or isotonic saline (IS; 0.9% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) was administered 6 h after CLP. Recordings of mean arterial pressure and heart rate were made during this protocol. Moreover, measurements of electrolyte, vasopressin and oxytocin secretion were analysed after either the HS or the IS treatment. Six hours after CLP, we observed a characteristic decrease in mean arterial pressure that occurs after CLP. The HS infusion in these rats produced a transient elevation of the plasma sodium concentration and osmolality and increased plasma vasopressin and oxytocin levels. Moreover, the HS infusion could restore the mean arterial pressure after CLP, which was completely blunted by the previous injection of the vasopressin but not the oxytocin antagonist. The present study demonstrated that rats subjected to CLP and an infusion of hypertonic saline respond with secretion of neurohypophyseal hormones and a transient increase in blood pressure mediated by the V(1) receptor. PMID:22903979

  1. Septic shock caused by Klebsiella oxytoca: An autopsy case and a survival case with driving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, S; Murata, M; Aoki, M; Kaneko, M; Oshima, K

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of Klebsiella oxytoca bacteremia. Case 1 was a 56-year-old man who was transferred to our hospital by ambulance due to diarrhea and general fatigue. On arrival, he was clearly conscious. However he was in septic shock. We injected broad spectrum antibacterial agents and started intensive care. Though intensive care included continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF), he died 22 hours after admission. Case 2 was a 69-year-old man with a history of gastrectomy for gastric cancer. He had been admitted to a previous hospital due to ileus. His ileus tube was removed on the eighth day, and he then developed a fever of 38 ºC on the following day. He went into shock and became unconscious; he was therefore transferred to our hospital. We diagnosed septic shock and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We injected broad spectrum antibacterial agents, and recombinant thrombomodulin alpha (rTM). Although he was started in intensive care, his hemodynamics were unstable on the day following admission. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) were started to maintain his hemodynamics. His condition gradually improved, and he was transferred to the previous hospital for rehabilitation on the 28th day. ECMO for septic shock in adults is unusual; however ECMO can be introduced even in patients with severe sepsis under careful monitoring. The new anti-DIC agent rTM is useful for safe driving of ECMO in patients with DIC. PMID:24376326

  2. Use of venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference to guide resuscitation therapy in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Jihad; Lemyze, Malcolm; Tronchon, Laurent; Vallet, Benoît; Thevenin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The mixed venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) tension difference [P (v-a) CO2] is the difference between carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) in mixed venous blood (sampled from a pulmonary artery catheter) and the PCO2 in arterial blood. P (v-a) CO2 depends on the cardiac output and the global CO2 production, and on the complex relationship between PCO2 and CO2 content. Experimental and clinical studies support the evidence that P (v-a) CO2 cannot serve as an indicator of tissue hypoxia, and should be regarded as an indicator of the adequacy of venous blood to wash out the total CO2 generated by the peripheral tissues. P (v-a) CO2 can be replaced by the central venous-to-arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2), which is calculated from simultaneous sampling of central venous blood from a central vein catheter and arterial blood and, therefore, more easy to obtain at the bedside. Determining the ΔPCO2 during the resuscitation of septic shock patients might be useful when deciding when to continue resuscitation despite a central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) > 70% associated with elevated blood lactate levels. Because high blood lactate levels is not a discriminatory factor in determining the source of that stress, an increased ΔPCO2 (> 6 mmHg) could be used to identify patients who still remain inadequately resuscitated. Monitoring the ΔPCO2 from the beginning of the reanimation of septic shock patients might be a valuable means to evaluate the adequacy of cardiac output in tissue perfusion and, thus, guiding the therapy. In this respect, it can aid to titrate inotropes to adjust oxygen delivery to CO2 production, or to choose between hemoglobin correction or fluid/inotrope infusion in patients with a too low ScvO2 related to metabolic demand. The combination of P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2 with oxygen-derived parameters through the calculation of the P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2/arteriovenous oxygen content difference ratio can detect the presence of global anaerobic metabolism

  3. Use of venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference to guide resuscitation therapy in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Jihad; Lemyze, Malcolm; Tronchon, Laurent; Vallet, Benoît; Thevenin, Didier

    2016-02-01

    The mixed venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) tension difference [P (v-a) CO2] is the difference between carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) in mixed venous blood (sampled from a pulmonary artery catheter) and the PCO2 in arterial blood. P (v-a) CO2 depends on the cardiac output and the global CO2 production, and on the complex relationship between PCO2 and CO2 content. Experimental and clinical studies support the evidence that P (v-a) CO2 cannot serve as an indicator of tissue hypoxia, and should be regarded as an indicator of the adequacy of venous blood to wash out the total CO2 generated by the peripheral tissues. P (v-a) CO2 can be replaced by the central venous-to-arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2), which is calculated from simultaneous sampling of central venous blood from a central vein catheter and arterial blood and, therefore, more easy to obtain at the bedside. Determining the ΔPCO2 during the resuscitation of septic shock patients might be useful when deciding when to continue resuscitation despite a central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) > 70% associated with elevated blood lactate levels. Because high blood lactate levels is not a discriminatory factor in determining the source of that stress, an increased ΔPCO2 (> 6 mmHg) could be used to identify patients who still remain inadequately resuscitated. Monitoring the ΔPCO2 from the beginning of the reanimation of septic shock patients might be a valuable means to evaluate the adequacy of cardiac output in tissue perfusion and, thus, guiding the therapy. In this respect, it can aid to titrate inotropes to adjust oxygen delivery to CO2 production, or to choose between hemoglobin correction or fluid/inotrope infusion in patients with a too low ScvO2 related to metabolic demand. The combination of P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2 with oxygen-derived parameters through the calculation of the P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2/arteriovenous oxygen content difference ratio can detect the presence of global anaerobic metabolism

  4. Comparative analysis of survival between elderly and non-elderly severe sepsis and septic shock resuscitated patients

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Henrique; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Silva, Eliézer; Pardini, Andreia; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes between elderly (≥65 years old) and non-elderly (<65 years old) resuscitated severe sepsis and septic shock patients and determine predictors of death among elderly patients. Methods Retrospective cohort study including 848 severe sepsis and septic shock patients admitted to the intensive care unit between January 2006 and March 2012. Results Elderly patients accounted for 62.6% (531/848) and non-elderly patients for 37.4% (317/848). Elderly patients had a higher APACHE II score [22 (18-28) versus 19 (15-24); p<0.001], compared to non-elderly patients, although the number of organ dysfunctions did not differ between the groups. No significant differences were found in 28-day and in-hospital mortality rates between elderly and non-elderly patients. The length of hospital stay was higher in elderly compared to non-elderly patients admitted with severe sepsis and septic shock [18 (10-41) versus 14 (8-29) days, respectively; p=0.0001]. Predictors of death among elderly patients included age, site of diagnosis, APACHE II score, need for mechanical ventilation and vasopressors. Conclusion In this study population early resuscitation of elderly patients was not associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Prospective studies addressing the long-term impact on functional status and quality of life are necessary. PMID:26313436

  5. Fc gamma receptor IIa (CD32) polymorphism in fulminant meningococcal septic shock in children.

    PubMed

    Bredius, R G; Derkx, B H; Fijen, C A; de Wit, T P; de Haas, M; Weening, R S; van de Winkel, J G; Out, T A

    1994-10-01

    Antibodies are essential in host defense against Neisseria meningitidis. Therefore, interactions among IgG and Fc receptors (Fc gamma R) on phagocytes may be crucial. Genetic polymorphic forms of Fc gamma RIIa (CD32) express different functional activities. In a retrospective study, Fc gamma R polymorphisms were determined in 25 children who survived fulminant meningococcal septic shock: 11 had Fc gamma RIIa-R/R131, the poor IgG2-binding allotype, which is a significantly more frequent rate than found in a healthy white population (44% vs. 23%; P = .028; odds ratio = 2.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-6.53). The relevance of this finding was further supported by the fact that neutrophils with the Fc gamma RIIa-R/R131 allotype phagocytized N. meningitidis opsonized with polyclonal IgG2 antibodies less effectively than did IIa-H/H131 neutrophils. Our findings suggest an important role for anti-N. meningitidis IgG2 and the Fc gamma RIIa polymorphism in host defense against systemic meningococcal infections. PMID:7930726

  6. Choice of Fluid Therapy in the Initial Management of Sepsis, Severe Sepsis, and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ronald; Holcomb, John B

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis results in disruption of the endothelial glycocalyx layer and damage to the microvasculature, resulting in interstitial accumulation of fluid and subsequently edema. Fluid resuscitation is a mainstay in the initial treatment of sepsis, but the choice of fluid is unclear. The ideal resuscitative fluid is one that restores intravascular volume while minimizing edema; unfortunately, edema and edema-related complications are common consequences of current resuscitation strategies. Crystalloids are recommended as first-line therapy, but the type of crystalloid is not specified. There is increasing evidence that normal saline is associated with increased mortality and kidney injury; balanced crystalloids may be a safer alternative. Albumin is similar to crystalloids in terms of outcomes in the septic population but is costlier. Hydroxyethyl starches appear to increase mortality and kidney injury in the critically ill and are no longer indicated in these patients. In the trauma population, the shift to plasma-based resuscitation with decreased use of crystalloid and colloid in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock has led to decreased inflammatory and edema-mediated complications. Studies are needed to determine if these benefits also occur with a similar resuscitation strategy in the setting of sepsis. PMID:26844975

  7. Immature Platelet Fraction in Septic Patients: Clinical Relevance of Immature Platelet Fraction is Limited to the Sensitive and Accurate Discrimination of Septic Patients From Non-Septic Patients, Not to the Discrimination of Sepsis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Ha, Sang Ook; Cho, Young-Uk; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2016-01-01

    Background The immature platelet fraction (IPF) reflects the degree of reticulated platelets. We evaluated performances of IPF as a biomarker for the discrimination of septic patients from non-septic patients and sepsis severity. Methods Total 312 patients admitted between March and July 2013 were enrolled and samples were obtained at admission. Lactate (LA), procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), immature granulocyte fraction (IG), immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF), and IPF were analyzed as sepsis biomarkers and their performances were compared. Results The performance of IPF (area under the curve [AUC]=0.868) in the discrimination of septic patients from non-septic patients was comparable to PCT/CRP/LA/IG (AUC=0.923/0.940/0.781/0.812, P=0.233/0.106/0.186/0.353, respectively), and was significantly better than the IRF (AUC=0.658, P=0.007). Sensitivity (89.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 84.9-99.8%) and accuracy (83.2%, 95% CI 78.8-90.0%) of IPF were the best among all biomarkers. The performance of IPF in discriminating septic patients from non-septic patients with local infection showed similar results. However, the IPF could not efficiently discriminate sepsis severity (AUC=0.599), similar to other biomarkers (AUC=0.519-0.752). Conclusions The IPF possessed high sensitivity/accuracy in discriminating septic patients from non-septic patients, regardless of local infection status. However, the IPF did not efficiently discriminate sepsis severity. The clinical relevance of IPF as a sepsis biomarker is, therefore, limited to sensitive and accurate discrimination of septic patients from non-septic patients, not discrimination of sepsis severity. PMID:26522752

  8. Multicountry survey of emergency and critical care medicine physicians’ fluid resuscitation practices for adult patients with early septic shock

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lauralyn; Rowe, Brian H; Walsh, Timothy S; Gray, Alasdair; Arabi, Yaseen; Perner, Anders; Gordon, Anthony; Marshall, John; Cook, Deborah; Fox-Robichaud, Alison; Bagshaw, Sean M; Green, Robert; Schweitzer, Irwin; Turgeon, Alexis; Zarychanski, Ryan; English, Shane; Chassé, Michaël; Stiell, Ian; Fergusson, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence to guide fluid resuscitation evidence in sepsis continues to evolve. We conducted a multicountry survey of emergency and critical care physicians to describe current stated practice and practice variation related to the quantity, rapidity and type of resuscitation fluid administered in early septic shock to inform the design of future septic shock fluid resuscitation trials. Methods Using a web-based survey tool, we invited critical care and emergency physicians in Canada, the UK, Scandinavia and Saudi Arabia to complete a self-administered electronic survey. Results A total of 1097 physicians’ responses were included. 1 L was the most frequent quantity of resuscitation fluid physicians indicated they would administer at a time (46.9%, n=499). Most (63.0%, n=671) stated that they would administer the fluid challenges as quickly as possible. Overall, normal saline and Ringer's solutions were the preferred crystalloid fluids used ‘often’ or ‘always’ in 53.1% (n=556) and 60.5% (n=632) of instances, respectively. However, emergency physicians indicated that they would use normal saline ‘often’ or ‘always’ in 83.9% (n=376) of instances, while critical care physicians said that they would use saline ‘often’ or ‘always’ in 27.9% (n=150) of instances. Only 1.0% (n=10) of respondents indicated that they would use hydroxyethyl starch ‘often’ or ‘always’; use of 5% (5.6% (n=59)) or 20–25% albumin (1.3% (n=14)) was also infrequent. The majority (88.4%, n=896) of respondents indicated that a large randomised controlled trial comparing 5% albumin to a crystalloid fluid in early septic shock was important to conduct. Conclusions Critical care and emergency physicians stated that they rapidly infuse volumes of 500–1000 mL of resuscitation fluid in early septic shock. Colloid use, specifically the use of albumin, was infrequently reported. Our survey identifies the need to conduct a trial on the efficacy of albumin and

  9. Early goal-directed therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: insights and comparisons to ProCESS, ProMISe, and ARISE.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H Bryant; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Jayaprakash, Namita; Semler, Matthew W; Hegab, Sara; Yataco, Angel Coz; Tatem, Geneva; Salem, Dhafer; Moore, Steven; Boka, Kamran; Gill, Jasreen Kaur; Gardner-Gray, Jayna; Pflaum, Jacqueline; Domecq, Juan Pablo; Hurst, Gina; Belsky, Justin B; Fowkes, Raymond; Elkin, Ronald B; Simpson, Steven Q; Falk, Jay L; Singer, Daniel J; Rivers, Emanuel P

    2016-01-01

    Prior to 2001 there was no standard for early management of severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department. In the presence of standard or usual care, the prevailing mortality was over 40-50 %. In response, a systems-based approach, similar to that in acute myocardial infarction, stroke and trauma, called early goal-directed therapy was compared to standard care and this clinical trial resulted in a significant mortality reduction. Since the publication of that trial, similar outcome benefits have been reported in over 70 observational and randomized controlled studies comprising over 70,000 patients. As a result, early goal-directed therapy was largely incorporated into the first 6 hours of sepsis management (resuscitation bundle) adopted by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and disseminated internationally as the standard of care for early sepsis management. Recently a trio of trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe), while reporting an all-time low sepsis mortality, question the continued need for all of the elements of early goal-directed therapy or the need for protocolized care for patients with severe and septic shock. A review of the early hemodynamic pathogenesis, historical development, and definition of early goal-directed therapy, comparing trial conduction methodology and the changing landscape of sepsis mortality, are essential for an appropriate interpretation of these trials and their conclusions. PMID:27364620

  10. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide temporin L with lipopolysaccharide in vitro and in experimental rat models of septic shock caused by gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Mocchegiani, Federico; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Bozzi, Argante; Di Giulio, Antonio; Luzi, Carla; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Barra, Donatella; Saba, Vittorio; Scalise, Giorgio; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2006-07-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, despite intense efforts to improve survival. The primary lead for septic shock results from activation of host effector cells by endotoxin, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) associated with cell membranes of gram-negative bacteria. For these reasons, the quest for compounds with antiendotoxin properties is actively pursued. We investigated the efficacy of the amphibian skin antimicrobial peptide temporin L in binding Escherichia coli LPS in vitro and counteracting its effects in vivo. Temporin L strongly bound to purified E. coli LPS and lipid A in vitro, as proven by fluorescent displacement assay, and readily penetrated into E. coli LPS monolayers. Furthermore, the killing activity of temporin L against E. coli was progressively inhibited by increasing concentrations of LPS added to the medium, further confirming the peptide's affinity for endotoxin. Antimicrobial assays showed that temporin L interacted synergistically with the clinically used beta-lactam antibiotics piperacillin and imipenem. Therefore, we characterized the activity of temporin L when combined with imipenem and piperacillin in the prevention of lethality in two rat models of septic shock, measuring bacterial growth in blood and intra-abdominal fluid, endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations in plasma, and lethality. With respect to controls and single-drug treatments, the simultaneous administration of temporin L and beta-lactams produced the highest antimicrobial activities and the strongest reduction in plasma endotoxin and TNF-alpha levels, resulting in the highest survival rates. PMID:16801429

  11. Angiopoietin Balance in Septic Shock Patients With Acute Kidney Injury: Effects of Direct Hemoperfusion With Polymyxin B-Immobilized Fiber.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Itaru; Hirayama, Kouichi; Nagai, Miho; Shiina, Eri; Koda, Megumi; Gunji, Masanobu; Okubo, Yuki; Sato, Chihiro; Usui, Joichi; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in approximately 50% of patients in septic shock, and mortality from septic AKI is extremely high. Angiopoietin levels may play a role in the pathogenesis of vascular permeability. It was reported that direct hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column (DHP-PMX) therapy ameliorates the angiopoietin balance in patients with sepsis. Although dysregulated angiopoietin balance in sepsis has been demonstrated, mechanisms underlying the development of AKI in sepsis have not been identified. We investigated angiopoietin levels in septic patients with/without AKI treated with DHP-PMX therapy. We used an enzyme-linked immunoassay to measure serum angiopoietin-1 and -2 levels in 38 septic shock patients treated with DHP-PMX. The renal function of all patients was normal for less than 3 months. Twenty-seven of the patients were diagnosed with AKI. The angiopoietin-1 level of the AKI group was significantly lower than that of the non-AKI group at the initiation of DHP-PMX therapy, but there was no significant difference between the two groups at the end of DHP-PMX therapy. In the AKI group with recovery, the mean angiopoietin-1 level at the end of DHP-PMX therapy was significantly elevated compared to the level before DHP-PMX therapy, and the mean angiopoietin-2 level at the end of DHP-PMX therapy was significantly decreased compared to the level before DHP-PMX therapy. These results suggest that angiopoietins may play a role in the pathogenesis of AKI and that DHP-PMX therapy may ameliorate the angiopoietin balance in AKI patients with sepsis. PMID:27523077

  12. Clinical and microbiological outcome in septic patients with extremely low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at initiation of critical care.

    PubMed

    De Pascale, G; Vallecoccia, M S; Schiattarella, A; Di Gravio, V; Cutuli, S L; Bello, G; Montini, L; Pennisi, M A; Spanu, T; Zuppi, C; Quraishi, S A; Antonelli, M

    2016-05-01

    A relationship between vitamin D status and mortality in patients in intensive care units (ICU) has been documented. The present study aims to describe the clinical profile and sepsis-related outcome of critically ill septic patients with extremely low (<7 ng/mL) vitamin D levels at ICU admission. We conducted an observational study in the ICU of a teaching hospital including all patients admitted with severe sepsis/septic shock and undergoing 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) testing within the first 24 hours from admission. We studied 107 patients over 12 months. At ICU admission vitamin D deficiency (≤20 ng/mL) was observed in 93.5% of the patients: 57 (53.3%) showed levels <7 ng/mL. As primary outcome, sepsis-related mortality rate was higher in patients with vitamin D levels <7 ng/mL (50.9% versus 26%). Multivariate regression analysis showed that vitamin D concentration <7 ng/mL on ICU admission (p 0.01) and higher mean SAPS II (p <0.01) score were independent predictors of sepsis-related mortality. Patients with very low vitamin D levels suffered higher rate of microbiologically confirmed infections but a lower percentage of microbiological eradication with respect to patients whose values were >7 ng/mL (80.7% versus 58%, p 0.02; 35.3% versus 68%; p 0.03, respectively). Post hoc analysis showed that, in the extremely low vitamin D group, the 52 patients with pneumonia showed a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (9 days (3.75-12.5 days) versus 4 days (2-9 days), p 0.04) and the 66 with septic shock needed vasopressor support for a longer period of time (7 days (4-10 days) versus 4 days (2-7.25 days), p 0.02). Our results suggest that in critical septic patients extremely low vitamin D levels on admission may be a major determinant of clinical outcome. Benefits of vitamin D replacement therapy in this population should be elucidated. PMID:26721785

  13. TNFAIP2 Inhibits Early TNFα-Induced NF-x03BA;B Signaling and Decreases Survival in Septic Shock Patients.

    PubMed

    Thair, Simone A; Topchiy, Elena; Boyd, John H; Cirstea, Mihai; Wang, Catherine; Nakada, Taka-Aki; Fjell, Christopher D; Wurfel, Mark; Russell, James A; Walley, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    During septic shock, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is an early response gene and induces a plethora of genes and signaling pathways. To identify robust signals in genes reliably upregulated by TNFα, we first measured microarray gene expression in vitro and searched methodologically comparable, publicly available data sets to identify concordant signals. Using tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes common to all data sets, we identified a genetic variant of the TNFAIP2 gene, rs8126, associated with decreased 28-day survival and increased organ dysfunction in an adult cohort in the Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial. Similar to this cohort, we found that an association with rs8126 and increased organ dysfunction is replicated in a second cohort of septic shock patients in the St. Paul's Hospital Intensive Care Unit. We found that TNFAIP2 inhibits NF-x03BA;B activity, impacting the downstream cytokine interleukin (IL)-8. The minor G allele of TNFAIP2 rs8126 resulted in greater TNFAIP2 expression, decreased IL-8 production and was associated with decreased survival in patients experiencing septic shock. These data suggest that TNFAIP2 is a novel inhibitor of NF-x03BA;B that acts as an autoinhibitor of the TNFα response during septic shock. PMID:26347487

  14. Effects of Shenfu Injection in the Treatment of Septic Shock Patients: A Multicenter, Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinchao; Lin, Peihong; Wei, Jie; Cao, Yu; Pan, Shuming; Walline, Joseph; Qian, Chuanyun; Shan, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of Shenfu on biochemical parameters and survival during resuscitation in patients with septic shock was examined. This was a multicenter, controlled, randomized, open-label trial carried out in 210 patients with septic shock from seven medical centers in China. They were randomized to Shenfu or saline. The primary outcome was lactate clearance. The secondary outcomes were shock index normalization, dose of vasopressors, ICU stay, hospital stay, and mortality. A total of 199 patients completed the trial. Blood pressure, heart rate, and other routine lab tests showed no difference between the groups. Lactate levels and lactate clearance were similar between the two groups. Hospital and ICU stay were similar between the two groups. When considering all patients, the 7- and 28-day mortality were similar between the two groups, but when considering only patients with lactate levels ≥4.5 mmol/L, the Shenfu group showed a better 7-day survival than the control group (7 days: 83.3% versus 54.5%, P = 0.034; 28 days: 72.7% versus 47.6%, P = 0.092). Shenfu may improve the 7-day survival in patients with impaired lactate clearance (≥4.5 mmol/L), but the mechanism for this effect is unclear. Additional studies are necessary to characterize the hemodynamic changes after Shenfu infusion. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-TRC-11001369. PMID:27446222

  15. Overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein is protective in a murine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M; Leiper, James M; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-11-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock. PMID:25046538

  16. Overexpression of GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 Feedback Regulatory Protein Is Protective in a Murine Model of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A.; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D.; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M.; Leiper, James M.; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock. PMID:25046538

  17. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber hemoperfusion with low priming volume in an elderly septic shock patient with marked endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsukasa; Kawagoe, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiko; Koide, Hikaru

    2005-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman with septic shock caused by pyelonephritis is described herein. She was admitted for severe back pain and high fever. Her white blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP) and endotoxin levels were elevated at 38,000/microl, 40.0 mg/dl, and 8,400 pg/ml, respectively. Her blood pressure was 80/34 mm Hg. Urinalysis revealed occult blood with innumerable WBCs. Plain abdominal radiography showed calcium stones in both kidneys. Septic shock with endotoxemia was diagnosed, and the patient was treated with antibiotics, gamma-globulin, and dopamine. However, her plasma endotoxin level remained high for 3 days. We performed direct hemoperfusion twice using a polymyxin B-immobilized fiber (PMX-F) column with a low priming volume. After PMX-F treatment, the patient's temperature decreased to 36.8 degrees C; her WBC count and CRP level decreased to 9,200/microl and 3.8 mg/dl, respectively. Her plasma endotoxin level decreased to 840 pg/ml after the first treatment and to 188 pg/ml after the second treatment. The next day, her blood endotoxin level further decreased to 32 pg/ml. Her blood pressure increased to 92/60 mm Hg after the first treatment and to 118/76 mm Hg after the second treatment. The patient was discharged on day 26 after admission. Our experience in this case suggests that PMX-F treatment with a low priming volume may be beneficial in elderly patients with septic shock and marked endotoxemia. PMID:16156319

  18. Intravenous ketamine for treatment of super-refractory convulsive status epilepticus with septic shock: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Joshi, Pankaj; Chhetri, Santosh; Karn, Ragesh; Acharya, Subhash Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Refractory and super-refractory status epilepticus is a life-threatening neurological emergency, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Treatment should be aimed to stop seizure and to avoid cerebral damage and another morbidity. Published data about effectiveness, safety and outcome of various therapies and treatment approaches are sparse and are mainly based on small case series and retrospective data. Here we report successful management of two cases of super-refractory status epilepticus refractory to anesthetic therapy with midazolam and complicated by septic shock, managed successfully with ketamine infusion. PMID:25983437

  19. Patterns of central venous oxygen saturation, lactate and veno-arterial CO2 difference in patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Rubina Khullar; Peter, John Victor; John, George; Graham, Petra L.; Rao, Shoma V.; Pinsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Tissue hypoperfusion is reflected by metabolic parameters such as lactate, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and the veno-arterial CO2 (vaCO2) difference. We studied the relation of these parameters over time and with outcome in patients with severe septic shock. Materials and Methods: In this single-center, prospective observational cohort study, adult patients (≥18 years) with circulatory shock were included. Echocardiography and simultaneous arterial and venous blood gases were done on enrolment (0 h) and at 24, 48 and 72 h. The partial pressure of CO2, lactate and ScvO2 were recorded from the central venous blood samples. The vaCO2 was calculated as the difference in CO2 between paired venous and arterial blood gas samples. Results: Of the 104 patients with circulatory shock, 79 patients (44 males) with septic shock aged 49.8 (standard deviation ± 14.6) years and with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score of 11.0 ± 3.4 were included. 71 patients (89.9%) were ventilated (11.4 ± 12.3 ventilator-free days). The duration of hospitalization was 16.6 ± 12.8 days and hospital mortality 50.6%. Lactate significantly decreased over time with a greater decrement in survivors than nonsurvivors (−0.35 vs. −0.10, P < 0.001). For every l/min increase in cardiac output, vaCO2 decreased by 0.34 mmHg (P = 0.006). There was no association between ScvO2 and mortality (P = 0.930). 0 h SOFA and vaCO2 ≤6 mmHg were strongly associated (P = 0.005, P = 0.018, respectively) with higher odds of mortality. However, this association was evident only in those with ScvO2 >70% and not in ScvO2 ≤70%. Conclusion: In septic shock, vaCO2 ≤6 mmHg is independently associated with mortality, particularly in those with normalized ScvO2 consistent with metabolic microcirculatory abnormalities in these patients. PMID:26628822

  20. Prognosis Biomarkers of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock by 1H NMR Urine Metabolomics in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Modesto-Alapont, Vicente; Gonzalez-Marrachelli, Vannina; Vento-Rehues, Rosa; Jorda-Miñana, Angela; Blanquer-Olivas, Jose; Monleon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and patient stratification may improve sepsis outcome by a timely start of the proper specific treatment. We aimed to identify metabolomic biomarkers of sepsis in urine by 1H-NMR spectroscopy to assess the severity and to predict outcomes. Urine samples were collected from 64 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock in the ICU for a 1H NMR spectra acquisition. A supervised analysis was performed on the processed spectra, and a predictive model for prognosis (30-days mortality/survival) of sepsis was constructed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). In addition, we compared the prediction power of metabolomics data respect the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Supervised multivariate analysis afforded a good predictive model to distinguish the patient groups and detect specific metabolic patterns. Negative prognosis patients presented higher values of ethanol, glucose and hippurate, and on the contrary, lower levels of methionine, glutamine, arginine and phenylalanine. These metabolites could be part of a composite biopattern of the human metabolic response to sepsis shock and its mortality in ICU patients. The internal cross-validation showed robustness of the metabolic predictive model obtained and a better predictive ability in comparison with SOFA values. Our results indicate that NMR metabolic profiling might be helpful for determining the metabolomic phenotype of worst-prognosis septic patients in an early stage. A predictive model for the evolution of septic patients using these metabolites was able to classify cases with more sensitivity and specificity than the well-established organ dysfunction score SOFA. PMID:26565633

  1. Serum Procalcitonin and Procalcitonin Clearance as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Yi; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chien, Ju-Huei; Wu, Kun-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the tendency of the plasma concentration and procalcitonin (PCT) clearance (PCTc) to act as biomarkers of prognosis in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. From 2011 to 2013, we prospectively analyzed patients with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The serum PCT was evaluated at the time of sepsis diagnosis and again after 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5). PCTc after 48 h (PCTc-day 3) and 96 h (PCTc-day 5) was also calculated to evaluate the prognostic value for survival in patients with sepsis. A total of 48 patients were included. Overall mortality was 16.7% (8 patients). PCTc was higher in survivors than in nonsurvivors, with significant differences on day 3 and day 5 (p = 0.033; p = 0.002, resp.); however, serum PCT levels on day 1, day 3, and day 5 were not significant prognostic factors for survival. The prognosis of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may be associated with PCTc. Dynamic changes of PCT reflected as PCTc at 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5) after admission to the ICU may serve as a predictor of survival in critically ill patients with severe sepsis. PMID:27088084

  2. Serum Procalcitonin and Procalcitonin Clearance as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Yi; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chien, Ju-Huei; Wu, Kun-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the tendency of the plasma concentration and procalcitonin (PCT) clearance (PCTc) to act as biomarkers of prognosis in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. From 2011 to 2013, we prospectively analyzed patients with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The serum PCT was evaluated at the time of sepsis diagnosis and again after 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5). PCTc after 48 h (PCTc-day 3) and 96 h (PCTc-day 5) was also calculated to evaluate the prognostic value for survival in patients with sepsis. A total of 48 patients were included. Overall mortality was 16.7% (8 patients). PCTc was higher in survivors than in nonsurvivors, with significant differences on day 3 and day 5 (p = 0.033; p = 0.002, resp.); however, serum PCT levels on day 1, day 3, and day 5 were not significant prognostic factors for survival. The prognosis of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may be associated with PCTc. Dynamic changes of PCT reflected as PCTc at 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5) after admission to the ICU may serve as a predictor of survival in critically ill patients with severe sepsis. PMID:27088084

  3. Cathelicidin peptide sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide-29 prevents endotoxin-induced mortality in rat models of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Mocchegiani, Federico; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Circo, Raffaella; Orlando, Fiorenza; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Silvestri, Carmela; Saba, Vittorio; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio

    2004-01-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the antiendotoxin activity and therapeutic efficacy of sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide (SMAP)-29, a cathelicidin-derived peptide. The in vitro ability of SMAP-29 to bind LPS from Escherichia coli 0111:B4 was determined using a sensitive limulus chromogenic assay. Two rat models of septic shock were performed: (1) rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg E. coli 0111:B4 LPS and (2) intraabdominal sepsis was induced via cecal ligation and single puncture. All animals were randomized to receive parenterally isotonic sodium chloride solution, 1 mg/kg SMAP-29, 1 mg/kg polymyxin B or 20 mg/kg imipenem. The main outcome measures were: abdominal exudate and plasma bacterial growth, plasma endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentrations, and lethality. The in vitro study showed that SMAP-29 completely inhibited the LPS procoagulant activity at approximately 10 microM peptide concentration. The in vivo experiments showed that all compounds reduced the lethality when compared with control animals. SMAP-29 achieved a substantial decrease in endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha plasma concentrations when compared with imipenem and saline treatment and exhibited a slightly lower antimicrobial activity than imipenem. No statistically significant differences were noted between SMAP-29 and polymyxin B. SMAP-29, because of its double antiendotoxin and antimicrobial activities, could be an interesting compound for septic shock treatment. PMID:14563656

  4. Fulminant course of unilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis revealing a renal actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces meyeri, an unknown cause of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Herbland, Alexandre; Leloup, Maxime; Levrat, Quentin; Guillaume, Frédéric; Verrier, Virginie; Bouillard, Philippe; Landois, Thierry; Ouaki, Charlie Frédéric; Lesieur, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe the first case of renal actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces meyeri presenting as severe emphysematous pyelonephritis and complicated by septic shock and multi-organ failure. Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a potentially life-threatening infection mostly described in diabetic patients and predominantly caused by uropathogenic bacteria. Actinomycosis is an uncommon chronic infection due to anaerobic gram-positive bacteria that unusually involves the urinary tract. We report the first case of emphysematous pyelonephritis caused by A. meyeri in a 75-year-old non-diabetic woman. The patient presented with an altered status, fever, nausea, and vomiting lasting for 2 days. A computed tomography scan revealed unilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis. She was rapidly admitted to intensive care unit for a septic shock with multiple organ dysfunctions. A conservative management consisting in renal percutaneous drainage, supportive measures, and prolonged adapted antibiotic therapy resulted in complete recovery. This case report illustrates that renal actinomycosis should be considered in case of emphysematous pyelonephritis given the good prognosis of this infection with conservative medical treatment. PMID:25878793

  5. Creating a Pro-survival and Anti-inflammatory Phenotype by Modulation of Acetylation in Models of Hemorrhagic and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqing

    2016-01-01

    Shock, regardless of etiology, is characterized by decreased tissue perfusion resulting in cell death, organ dysfunction, and poor survival. Current therapies largely focus on restoring tissue perfusion through resuscitation but have failed to address the specific cellular dysfunction caused by shock. Acetylation is rapidly emerging as a key mechanism that regulates the expression of numerous genes (epigenetic modulation through activation of nuclear histone proteins), as well as functions of multiple cytoplasmic proteins involved in key cellular functions such as cell survival, repair/healing, signaling, and proliferation. Cellular acetylation can be increased immediately through the administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI). A series of studies have been performed using: (1) cultured cells; (2) single-organ ischemia-reperfusion injury models; (3) rodent models of lethal septic and hemorrhagic shock; (4) swine models of lethal hemorrhagic shock and multi-organ trauma; and (5) tissues from severely injured trauma patients, to fully characterize the changes in acetylation that occur following lethal insults and in response to treatment with HDACI. These data demonstrate that: (1) shock causes a decrease in acetylation of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins; (2) hypoacetylation can be rapidly reversed through the administration of HDACI; (3) normalization of acetylation prevents cell death, decreases inflammation, attenuates activation of pro-apoptotic pathways, and augments pro-survival pathways; (4) the effect of HDACI significantly improves survival in lethal models of septic shock, hemorrhagic shock, and complex poly-trauma without need for conventional fluid resuscitation or blood transfusion; and (5) improvement in survival is not due to better resuscitation but due to an enhanced ability of cells to tolerate lethal insults. As different models of hemorrhagic or septic shock have specific strengths and limitations, this chapter will summarize our

  6. Creating a pro-survival and anti-inflammatory phenotype by modulation of acetylation in models of hemorrhagic and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqing; Alam, Hasan B

    2012-01-01

    Shock, regardless of etiology, is characterized by decreased tissue perfusion resulting in cell death, organ dysfunction, and poor survival. Current therapies largely focus on restoring tissue perfusion through resuscitation but have failed to address the specific cellular dysfunction caused by shock. Acetylation is rapidly emerging as a key mechanism that regulates the expression of numerous genes (epigenetic modulation through activation of nuclear histone proteins), as well as functions of multiple cytoplasmic proteins involved in key cellular functions such as cell survival, repair/healing, signaling, and proliferation. Cellular acetylation can be increased immediately through the administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI). A series of studies have been performed using: (1) cultured cells; (2) single-organ ischemia-reperfusion injury models; (3) rodent models of lethal septic and hemorrhagic shock; (4) swine models of lethal hemorrhagic shock and multi-organ trauma; and (5) tissues from severely injured trauma patients, to fully characterize the changes in acetylation that occur following lethal insults and in response to treatment with HDACI. These data demonstrate that: (1) shock causes a decrease in acetylation of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins; (2) hypoacetylation can be rapidly reversed through the administration of HDACI; (3) normalization of acetylation prevents cell death, decreases inflammation, attenuates activation of pro-apoptotic pathways, and augments pro-survival pathways; (4) the effect of HDACI significantly improves survival in lethal models of septic shock, hemorrhagic shock, and complex poly-trauma without need for conventional fluid resuscitation or blood transfusion; and (5) improvement in survival is not due to better resuscitation but due to an enhanced ability of cells to tolerate lethal insults.As different models of hemorrhagic or septic shock have specific strengths and limitations, this chapter will summarize our

  7. The Early Expression of HLA-DR and CD64 Myeloid Markers Is Specifically Compartmentalized in the Blood and Lungs of Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Małgorzata; Hoser, Grażyna; Zielińska-Borkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Identification of reliable biomarkers is key to guide targeted therapies in septic patients. Expression monitoring of monocyte HLA-DR and neutrophil CD64 could fulfill the above need. However, it is unknown whether their expression on circulating cells reflects the status of tissue resident cells. We compared expressions of HLA-DR and CD64 markers in the circulation and airways of septic shock patients and evaluated their outcome prognostic value. The expression of CD64 on neutrophils and HLA-DR on monocytes was analyzed in the peripheral blood and mini-bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells by flow cytometry. Twenty-seven patients with septic shock were enrolled into the study. The fluorescence intensity of HLA-DR on circulating monocytes was 3.5-fold lower than on the pulmonary monocytes (p = 0.01). The expression of CD64 on circulating and airway neutrophils was similar (p = 0.47). Only the expression of CD64 on circulating neutrophils was higher in nonsurvivors versus survivors (2.8-fold; p = 0.031). Pulmonary monocytes display a higher level of HLA-DR activation compared to peripheral blood monocytes but the expression of neutrophil CD64 is similar on lung and circulating cells. Death in septic patients was effectively predicted by neutrophil CD64 but not monocytic HLA-DR. Prognostic value of cellular activation markers in septic shock appears to strongly depend on their level of compartmentalization. PMID:27413252

  8. Vagus nerve electrical stimulation inhibits serum levels of S100A8 protein in septic shock rats.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Liu, Xin-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The vagus nerve and the released acetylcholine exert anti-inflammatory effects and inhibit septic shock. However, their detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of vagus nerve electrical stimulation on serum S100A8 levels in septic shock rats. A total of 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six equal groups: i) Sham group, receiving sham operation; ii) CLP group, subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to establish a model of polymicrobial sepsis; iii) VGX group, subjected to CLP and bilateral cervical vagotomy; iv) STM group, subjected to CLP, bilateral cervical vagotomy and electrical stimulation on the left vagus nerve trunk; v) α‑bungarotoxin (BGT) group was administered α‑BGT prior to electrical stimulation; vi) Anti‑receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) group, administered intraperitoneal injection of anti‑RAGE antibody prior to electrical stimulation. The right carotid artery was cannulated to monitor mean artery pressure (MAP). The serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were measured to assess the liver function. Serum S100A8 and advanced glycation end product (AGE) levels were measured using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assays. The expression of hepatic RAGE was determined by western blotting. The present study revealed that Sprague‑Dawley rats exhibited progressive hypotension and significantly increased serum AST and ALT levels following CLP challenge compared with the sham group. The levels of S100A8 and AGEs, and the protein expression of hepatic RAGE were significantly increased following CLP compared with the sham group. Vagus nerve electrical stimulation significantly prevented the development of CLP‑induced hypotension, alleviated the hepatic damage, reduced serum S100A8 and AGEs production, and reduced the expression of hepatic RAGE. The inhibitory effect of vagus nerve electrical

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  10. Variation in the use of renal replacement therapy in patients with septic shock: a substudy of the prospective multicenter observational FINNAKI study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Indications for renal replacement therapy (RRT) have not been generally standardized and vary among intensive care units (ICUs). We aimed to assess the proportion, indications, and modality of RRT, as well as the association between the proportion of RRT use and 90-day mortality in patients with septic shock in Finnish adult ICUs. Methods We identified patients with septic shock from the prospective observational multicenter FINNAKI study conducted between 1 September 2011 and 1 February 2012. We divided the ICUs into high-RRT and low-RRT ICUs according to the median of the proportion of RRT-treated patients with septic shock. Differences in indications, and modality of RRT between ICU groups were assessed. Finally, we performed an adjusted logistic regression analysis to evaluate the possible association of the ICU group (high vs. low-RRT) with 90-day mortality. Results Of the 726 patients with septic shock, 131 (18.0%, 95% CI 15.2 to 20.9%) were treated with RRT. The proportion of RRT-treated patients varied from 3% up to 36% (median 19%) among ICUs. High-RRT ICUs included nine ICUs (354 patients) and low-RRT ICUs eight ICUs (372 patients). In the high-RRT ICUs patients with septic shock were older (P = 0.04), had more cardiovascular (P <0.001) and renal failures (P = 0.003) on the first day in the ICU, were more often mechanically ventilated, and received higher maximum doses of norepinephrine (0.25 μg/kg/min vs. 0.18 μg/kg/min, P <0.001) than in the low-RRT ICUs. No significant differences in indications for or modality of RRT existed between the ICU groups. The crude 90-day mortality rate for patients with septic shock was 36.2% (95% CI 31.1 to 41.3%) in the high-RRT ICUs compared to 33.9% (95% CI 29.0 to 38.8%) in the low-RRT ICUs, P = 0.5. In an adjusted logistic regression analysis the ICU group (high-RRT or low-RRT ICUs) was not associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusions Patients with septic shock in ICUs with a high

  11. Clinical Features, Short-Term Mortality, and Prognostic Risk Factors of Septic Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Units: Results of an Italian Multicenter Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Antonino; Dentali, Francesco; La Regina, Micaela; Foglia, Emanuela; Gambacorta, Maurizia; Garagiola, Elisabetta; Bonardi, Giorgio; Clerici, Pierangelo; Concia, Ercole; Colombo, Fabrizio; Campanini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies provided data on the clinical history of sepsis within internal Medicine units. The aim of the study was to assess the short-term mortality and to evaluate the prognostic risk factors in a large cohort of septic patients treated in internal medicine units. Thirty-one internal medicine units participated to the study. Within each participating unit, all admitted patients were screened for the presence of sepsis. A total of 533 patients were included; 78 patients (14.6%, 95%CI 11.9, 18.0%) died during hospitalization; mortality rate was 5.5% (95% CI 3.1, 9.6%) in patients with nonsevere sepsis and 20.1% (95%CI 16.2, 28.8%) in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 4.41, 95%CI 1.93, 10.05), immune system weakening (OR 2.10, 95%CI 1.12, 3.94), active solid cancer (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16, 3.94), and age (OR 1.03 per year, 95% CI 1.01, 1.06) were significantly associated with an increased mortality risk, whereas blood culture positive for Escherichia coli was significantly associated with a reduced mortality risk (OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24, 0.88). In-hospital mortality of septic patients treated in internal medicine units appeared similar to the mortality rate obtained in recent studies conducted in the ICU setting. PMID:26825876

  12. Preliminary Safety and Efficacy of L-carnitine Infusion for the Treatment of Vasopressor-Dependent Septic Shock: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Puskarich, Michael A.; Kline, Jeffrey A.; Krabill, Virginia; Claremont, Heather; Jones, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis is characterized by metabolic disturbances, and previous data suggest a relative carnitine deficiency may contribute to metabolic dysfunction. Studies regarding safety and patient-centered efficacy of carnitine during septic shock are lacking. Methods This was a double-blind randomized control trial of levocarnitine (L-carnitine) infusion vs normal saline for the treatment of vasopressor-dependent septic shock. Patients meeting consensus definition for septic shock with a cumulative vasopressor index ≥3 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score ≥5 enrolled within 16 hours of the recognition of septic shock were eligible. The primary safety outcome was difference in serious adverse events (SAEs) per patient between groups. Efficacy outcomes included proportion of patients demonstrating a decrease in SOFA score of 2 or more points at 24 hours and short- and long-term survival. Results Of the 31 patients enrolled, 16 were in the L-carnitine and 15 were in the placebo arm. There was no difference in SAEs between placebo and intervention (2.1 vs 1.8 SAEs per patient, P = .44). There was no difference in the proportion of patients achieving a decrease in SOFA score of 2 or more points at 24 hours between placebo and treatment (53% vs 44%, P = .59). Mortality was significantly lower at 28 days in the L-carnitine group (4/16 vs 9/15, P = .048), with a nonsignificant improved survival at 1 year (P = .06). Conclusion L-carnitine infusion appears safe in vasopressor-dependent septic shock. Preliminary efficacy data suggest potential benefit of L-carnitine treatment, and further testing is indicated. PMID:23851424

  13. Interleukin-1 receptor blockade improves survival and hemodynamic performance in Escherichia coli septic shock, but fails to alter host responses to sublethal endotoxemia.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, E; Marano, M A; Van Zee, K J; Rock, C S; Hawes, A S; Thompson, W A; DeForge, L; Kenney, J S; Remick, D G; Bloedow, D C

    1992-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the extent to which an endogenous interleukin-1 (IL-1) response contributes to the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of sublethal endotoxemia or lethal Gram-negative septic shock. Young, healthy baboons received either a sublethal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an LD100 of live Escherichia coli bacteria, and one half of the animals in each group were continuously infused with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Plasma IL-1 beta was not detected in this model of endotoxemia. Administration of IL-1ra had only minimal effects on the modest hemodynamic and metabolic responses to sublethal endotoxemia, and did not attenuate the plasma cytokine response. In contrast, high circulating levels of IL-1 beta (range 300-800 pg/ml) were seen during lethal E. coli septic shock. IL-1ra treatment significantly attenuated the decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) (from -72 +/- 8 to -43 +/- 6 mm Hg; P less than 0.05) and cardiac output (from -0.81 +/- 0.17 to -0.48 +/- 0.15 liter/min; P less than 0.05), and significantly improved survival from 43 to 100% at 24 h (P less than 0.05). The plasma IL-1 beta and IL-6 responses to lethal E. coli septic shock were also significantly diminished by IL-1ra treatment (P less than 0.05), whereas tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) concentrations were unaffected. We conclude that an exaggerated systemic IL-1 beta response is characteristic of lethal E. coli septic shock, and contributes significantly to the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of E. coli septic shock. IL-1ra can significantly attenuate the cytokine cascade and improve survival. PMID:1533231

  14. Predictors of outcome in ICU patients with septic shock caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Falcone, M; Russo, A; Iacovelli, A; Restuccia, G; Ceccarelli, G; Giordano, A; Farcomeni, A; Morelli, A; Venditti, M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with mortality in intensive care unit patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) septic shock. A retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients with KPC-Kp infection and septic shock observed in a large teaching hospital from November 2010 to December 2014 was performed. A total of 111 patients were included in the study. The most frequent source of infection was unknown-focus bacteraemia in 53 patients (47.7%). The rate of resistance to colistin was 51.3%; 30-day mortality was reported for 44 patients (39.6%). Surviving patients were more frequently treated with an initial therapy (within 24 hours) including two or more antibiotics displaying in vitro activity against the isolated KPC-Kp strain (41.8 vs. 18.1%, p 0.01) and were also more likely to receive a definitive therapy including two or more in vitro active antibiotics (85.1 vs. 15.9%, p <0.001). Cox regression analysis revealed that a colistin-containing antibiotic regimen (hazard ratio (HR) 0.21, confidence interval (CI) 95% 0.05-0.72, p <0.001), use of two or more in vitro active antibiotics as definite therapy (HR 0.08, CI 95% 0.02-0.21, p <0.001) and control of removable source of infection (HR 0.14, CI 95% 0.04-0.25, p <0.001) were associated with favourable outcome; colistin resistance (HR 8.09, CI 95% 3.14-11.23, p 0.001) and intra-abdominal source of infection (HR 2.92, CI 95% 2.11-4.12, p 0.002) were associated with death. In conclusion, use of a definitive therapy with at least two antibiotics displaying in vitro activity against the KPC-Kp isolates was the most important determinant of favourable outcome, whilst isolation of colistin-resistant strains was associated with death in septic patients with KPC-Kp infection. PMID:26850826

  15. The Impact of Timing of Antibiotics on Outcomes in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Miller, W. Ryan; Pryor, Jason; Puskarich, Michael A.; Jones, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to systematically review and meta-analyze the available data on the association between timing of antibiotic administration and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock. Data Sources and Study Selection A comprehensive search was performed using a pre-defined protocol. Inclusion criteria: adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, reported time to antibiotic administration in relation to ED triage and/or shock recognition, and mortality. Exclusion criteria: immunosuppressed populations, review article, editorial, or non-human studies. Data Extraction Two reviewers screened abstracts with a third reviewer arbitrating. The effect of time to antibiotic administration on mortality was based on current guideline recommendations: 1) administration within 3 hours of ED triage; 2) administration within 1 hour of severe sepsis/septic shock recognition. Odds Ratios (OR) were calculated using a random effect model. The primary outcome was mortality. Data Synthesis 1123 publications were identified and 11 were included in the analysis. Among the 11 included studies, 16,178 patients were evaluable for antibiotic administration from ED triage. Patients who received antibiotics more than 3 hours after ED triage (< 3 hours reference), had a pooled OR for mortality of 1.16 (0.92 to 1.46, p = 0.21). A total of 11,017 patients were evaluable for antibiotic administration from severe sepsis/septic shock recognition. Patients who received antibiotics more than 1 hour after severe sepsis/shock recognition (< 1 hour reference) had a pooled OR for mortality of 1.46 (0.89 to 2.40, p = 0.13). There was no increased mortality in the pooled ORs for each hourly delay from <1 to >5 hours in antibiotic administration from severe sepsis/shock recognition. Conclusion Using the available pooled data we found no significant mortality benefit of administering antibiotics within 3 hours of ED triage or within 1 hour of shock recognition in severe sepsis and septic shock

  16. Association of susceptibility to septic shock with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 gene Leu125Val polymorphism and serum sPECAM-1 levels in sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Fang-Shun; Zhang, Yuan-Huai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Chao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection and includes severe sepsis, septic shock and death. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is one cell adhesion molecule expressed on platelets and leukocytes. It regulates platelet activation and mediates transendothelial migration of leukocytes, thus maintaining the integrity of the vasculature. There are some animal experiments associated with the protective role of PECAM-1 against septic shock. However few host genetic risk factors have been identified for sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. A case-control study was conducted, which included 217 patients with sepsis and 90 control subjects recruited from our hospital. One single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of PECAM-1 gene Leu125Val (C373G) was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Serum soluble PECAM-1 (sPECAM-1) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that the CG and GG genotypes of SNP in Leu125Val of PECAM-1 (rs668: C>G) was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to septic shock compared with CC genotype in sepsis patients (CG genotype, OR: 2.493, 95% CI: 1.175~5.287, P = 0.016; GG genotype: OR: 3.328, 95% CI: 1.445~7.666, P = 0.004). The serum levels of sPECAM-1 in the sepsis patients (47.1 ± 17.5 ng/ml) were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls (61.3 ± 20.9 ng/ml, P<0.01). Among sepsis patients, the serum levels of sPECAM-1 were significantly higher in CG and GG genotype than in CC genotype. In septic shock patients, nonsurvivors (83.7 ± 12.6 ng/ml, n = 69) had a significantly higher serum sPECAM-1 level than the survivors (76.9 ± 12.7 ng/ml, n = 53) (P<0.01). In conclusion, PECAM-1 Leu125Val polymorphism and its sPECAM-1 levels are associated with sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. PMID:26884965

  17. Association of susceptibility to septic shock with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 gene Leu125Val polymorphism and serum sPECAM-1 levels in sepsis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Li, Fang-Shun; Zhang, Yuan-Huai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Chao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection and includes severe sepsis, septic shock and death. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is one cell adhesion molecule expressed on platelets and leukocytes. It regulates platelet activation and mediates transendothelial migration of leukocytes, thus maintaining the integrity of the vasculature. There are some animal experiments associated with the protective role of PECAM-1 against septic shock. However few host genetic risk factors have been identified for sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. A case-control study was conducted, which included 217 patients with sepsis and 90 control subjects recruited from our hospital. One single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of PECAM-1 gene Leu125Val (C373G) was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Serum soluble PECAM-1 (sPECAM-1) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that the CG and GG genotypes of SNP in Leu125Val of PECAM-1 (rs668: C>G) was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to septic shock compared with CC genotype in sepsis patients (CG genotype, OR: 2.493, 95% CI: 1.175~5.287, P = 0.016; GG genotype: OR: 3.328, 95% CI: 1.445~7.666, P = 0.004). The serum levels of sPECAM-1 in the sepsis patients (47.1 ± 17.5 ng/ml) were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls (61.3 ± 20.9 ng/ml, P<0.01). Among sepsis patients, the serum levels of sPECAM-1 were significantly higher in CG and GG genotype than in CC genotype. In septic shock patients, nonsurvivors (83.7 ± 12.6 ng/ml, n = 69) had a significantly higher serum sPECAM-1 level than the survivors (76.9 ± 12.7 ng/ml, n = 53) (P<0.01). In conclusion, PECAM-1 Leu125Val polymorphism and its sPECAM-1 levels are associated with sepsis severity and susceptibility to septic shock. PMID:26884965

  18. Meropenem Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients with Septic Shock and Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Influence of Residual Diuresis on Dose Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Llaurado-Serra, Mireia; Vaquer, Sergi; Castro, Pedro; Rodríguez, Alejandro H.; Pontes, Caridad; Calvo, Gonzalo; Torres, Antoni; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Meropenem dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is complex, with the recommended maintenance doses being 500 mg to 1,000 mg every 8 h (q8h) to every 12 h. This multicenter study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of meropenem in this population to identify the sources of PK variability and to evaluate different dosing regimens to develop recommendations based on clinical parameters. Thirty patients with septic shock and CRRT receiving meropenem were enrolled (153 plasma samples were tested). A population PK model was developed with data from 24 patients and subsequently validated with data from 6 patients using NONMEM software (v.7.3). The final model was characterized by CL = 3.68 + 0.22 · (residual diuresis/100) and V = 33.00 · (weight/73)2.07, where CL is total body clearance (in liters per hour), residual diuresis is the volume of residual diuresis (in milliliters per 24 h), and V is the apparent volume of distribution (in liters). CRRT intensity was not identified to be a CL modifier. Monte Carlo simulations showed that to maintain concentrations of the unbound fraction (fu) of drug above the MIC of the bacteria for 40% of dosing interval T (referred to as 40% of the ƒuT>MIC), a meropenem dose of 500 mg q8h as a bolus over 30 min would be sufficient regardless of the residual diuresis. If 100% of the ƒuT>MIC was chosen as the target, oligoanuric patients would require 500 mg q8h as a bolus over 30 min for the treatment of susceptible bacteria (MIC < 2 mg/liter), while patients with preserved diuresis would require the same dose given as an infusion over 3 h. If bacteria with MICs close to the resistance breakpoint (2 to 4 mg/liter) were to be treated with meropenem, a dose of 500 mg every 6 h would be necessary: a bolus over 30 min for oligoanuric patients and an infusion over 3 h for patients with preserved diuresis. Our results suggest that residual diuresis may be an easy and

  19. Abnormal activation of potassium channels in aortic smooth muscle of rats with peritonitis-induced septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jiunn-Horng; Chen, Shiu-Jen; Shih, Chih-Chin; Lue, Wei-Ming; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2009-07-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of membrane hyperpolarization in mediating vascular hyporeactivity induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in endothelial-denuded strips of rat thoracic aorta ex vivo. The CLP for 18 h elicited a significant fall of blood pressure and a severe vascular hyporeactivity to norepinephrine as seen in severe sepsis. At the end of the in vivo experiments, thoracic aortas were removed from both CLP-treated and control rats. After removal of the endothelium, aortic segments were mounted in myographs for the recording of isometric tension and smooth muscle membrane potential. The membrane potential recording showed that a hyperpolarization was observed in the CLP-treated rats when compared with the control rats. This hyperpolarization was reversed by iberiotoxin (a large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker), 4-aminopyridine (a voltage-dependent K+ channel blocker), barium (an inward rectifier K+ channels blocker), N-(1-adamantyl)-N'-cyclohexyl-4-morpholinecarboxamidine hydrochloride (a pore-forming blocker of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ channels [KATP]), or methylene blue (a nonspecific guanylyl cyclase [GC] inhibitor). However, this hyperpolarization was not significantly affected by apamin (a small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker), glibenclamide (a sulfonylurea blocker of KATP), N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (a NOS inhibitor), or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (an NO-sensitive GC inhibitor). In addition, the basal tension of the tissues obtained from CLP rats was increased simultaneously, whereas membrane potential was reversed. In contrast, none of these inhibitors had significant effects on the membrane potential or the basal tension in control tissues. Thus, we provide electrophysiological and functional evidence demonstrating that an abnormal activation of K+ channels in vascular smooth muscle in animals with septic shock induced by CLP. Our observations

  20. Vitamin D deficiency at admission is not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: Observational FINNAKI cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ala-Kokko, Tero I; Mutt, Shivaprakash J; Nisula, Sara; Koskenkari, Juha; Liisanantti, Janne; Ohtonen, Pasi; Poukkanen, Meri; Laurila, Jouko J; Pettilä, Ville; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with increased mortality in patients that are critically ill. This study explored whether vitamin D levels were associated with 90-day mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Plasma vitamin D levels were measured on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) in a prospective multicentre observational study. Results 610 patients with severe sepsis were included; of these, 178 (29%) had septic shock. Vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/L) was present in 333 (55%) patients. The 90-day mortality did not differ among patients with or without vitamin D deficiency (28.3% vs. 28.5%, p = 0.789). Diabetes was more common among patients deficient compared to those not deficient in vitamin D (30% vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Hospital-acquired infections at admission were more prevalent in patients with a vitamin D deficiency (31% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). A multivariable adjusted Cox regression model showed that low vitamin D levels could not predict 90-day mortality (<50 nmol/L: hazard ratio (HR) 0.99 (95% CI: 0.72-1.36), p > 0.9; and <25 nmol/L: HR 0.44 (95% CI: 0.22-0.87), p = 0.018). Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency detected upon ICU admission was not associated with 90-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Key messages In severe sepsis and septic shock, a vitamin D deficiency upon ICU admission was not associated with increased mortality. Compared to patients with sufficient vitamin D, patients with deficient vitamin D more frequently exhibited diabetes, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and hospital-acquired infections upon ICU admission, and they more frequently developed acute kidney injury. PMID:26800186

  1. Incidence and Predictors of New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Septic Shock Patients in a Medical ICU: Data from 7-Day Holter ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Guenancia, Charles; Binquet, Christine; Laurent, Gabriel; Vinault, Sandrine; Bruyère, Rémi; Prin, Sébastien; Pavon, Arnaud; Charles, Pierre-Emmanuel; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated incidence, risk factors for new-onset atrial fibrillation (NAF), and prognostic impact during septic shock in medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Methods Prospective, observational study in a university hospital. Consecutive patients from 03/2011 to 05/2013 with septic shock were eligible. Exclusion criteria were age <18 years, history of AF, transfer with prior septic shock. Included patients were equipped with long-duration (7 days) Holter ECG monitoring. NAF was defined as an AF episode lasting >30 seconds. Patient characteristics, infection criteria, cardiovascular parameters, severity of illness, support therapies were recorded. Results Among 66 patients, 29(44%) developed NAF; 10 (34%) would not have been diagnosed without Holter ECG monitoring. NAF patients were older, with more markers of heart failure (troponin and NT-pro-BNP), lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), longer QRS duration and more nonsustained supra ventricular arrhythmias (<30s) on day 1 than patients who maintained sinus rhythm. By multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.06; p = 0.01) and LVEF<45% (OR: 13.01, p = 0.03) were associated with NAF. NAF did not predict 28 or 90 day mortality. Conclusions NAF is common, especially in older patients, and is associated with low ejection fraction. We did not find NAF to be independently associated with higher mortality. PMID:25965915

  2. Gram-negative bacteremia produces both severe systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction in a canine model that simulates human septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Natanson, C; Fink, M P; Ballantyne, H K; MacVittie, T J; Conklin, J J; Parrillo, J E

    1986-01-01

    A canine sepsis model that simulates the human cardiovascular response to septic shock was produced in 10 conscious unsedated dogs by implanting an Escherichia coli-infected clot into the peritoneum, resulting in bacteremia. By employing serial, simultaneous measurements of radionuclide scan-determined left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and thermodilution cardiac index (CI), the end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) was calculated (EDVI = stroke volume index divided by EF). By using three different methods of quantifying serial ventricular performance (EF, shifts in the Starling ventricular function curve using EDVI vs. stroke work index, and the ventricular function curve response to volume infusion), this study provides evidence (P less than 0.01) that septic shock produces a profound, but reversible, decrease in systolic ventricular performance. This decreased performance was not seen in controls and was associated with ventricular dilatation (P less than 0.01); the latter response was dependent on an adequate volume infusion. Further studies of EDVI and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure during diastole revealed a significant, though reversible, shift (P less than 0.001) in the diastolic volume/pressure (or compliance) relationship during septic shock. PMID:3722379

  3. Severe sepsis and septic shock in pre-hospital emergency medicine: survey results of medical directors of emergency medical services concerning antibiotics, blood cultures and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Casu, Sebastian; Häske, David

    2016-06-01

    Delayed antibiotic treatment for patients in severe sepsis and septic shock decreases the probability of survival. In this survey, medical directors of different emergency medical services (EMS) in Germany were asked if they are prepared for pre-hospital sepsis therapy with antibiotics or special algorithms to evaluate the individual preparations of the different rescue areas for the treatment of patients with this infectious disease. The objective of the survey was to obtain a general picture of the current status of the EMS with respect to rapid antibiotic treatment for sepsis. A total of 166 medical directors were invited to complete a short survey on behalf of the different rescue service districts in Germany via an electronic cover letter. Of the rescue districts, 25.6 % (n = 20) stated that they keep antibiotics on EMS vehicles. In addition, 2.6 % carry blood cultures on the vehicles. The most common antibiotic is ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin). In total, 8 (10.3 %) rescue districts use an algorithm for patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Although the German EMS is an emergency physician-based rescue system, special opportunities in the form of antibiotics on emergency physician vehicles are missing. Simultaneously, only 10.3 % of the rescue districts use a special algorithm for sepsis therapy. Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock do not appear to be prioritized as highly as these deadly diseases should be in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:26719078

  4. Ozonotherapy in an induced septic shock. I. Effect of ozonotherapy on rat organs in evaluation of free radical reactions and selected enzymatic systems.

    PubMed

    Madej, Pawel; Plewka, Andrzej; Madej, Janusz A; Nowak, Marcin; Plewka, Danuta; Franik, Grzegorz; Golka, Darek

    2007-04-01

    The confirmed advantageous effects of oxygen/ozone therapy in several clinical conditions stimulated experimental studies on effects of the therapy in rats with an induced septic shock. The studies were conducted on adult male rats of Wistar strain. Four groups of the animals, each of 15 rats, included: I--control group, (C); II--animals intraperitoneally administered with O(2)/O(3) (CO), III--rats given of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide-LPS) (CL), IV--rats administered with the lipopolysaccharide plus administered with the oxygen/ozone mixture (OL). Activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase and of free radical reactions were estimated. The exposure to LPS augmented activities of SOD and of catalase in liver, lungs and heart. In all the examined organs LPS induced significant changes in levels of free radicals. Except of the lungs, parallel administration of the rats with LPS and ozone/oxygen revoked development of the alterations. The obtained results point to a strong, stabilizing and regenerative effect of ozonotherapy. PMID:17372841

  5. Aetiology of Bacteraemia as a Risk Factor for Septic Shock at the Onset of Febrile Neutropaenia in Adult Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Regis Goulart; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2014-01-01

    Septic shock (SS) at the onset of febrile neutropaenia (FN) is an emergency situation that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The impact of the specific aetiology of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in the development of SS at the time of FN is not well established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the aetiology of BSIs and SS at the time of FN in hospitalised adult cancer patients. This prospective cohort study was performed at a single tertiary hospital from October 2009 to August 2011. All adult cancer patients admitted consecutively to the haematology ward with FN were evaluated. A stepwise logistic regression was conducted to verify the association between the microbiological characteristics of BSIs and SS at the onset of FN. In total, 307 cases of FN in adult cancer patients were evaluated. There were 115 cases with documented BSI. A multivariate analysis showed that polymicrobial bacteraemia (P = 0.01) was associated with SS. The specific blood isolates independently associated with SS were viridans streptococci (P = 0.02) and Escherichia coli (P = 0.01). Neutropaenic cancer patients with polymicrobial bacteraemia or BSI by viridans streptococci or Escherichia coli are at increased risk for SS at the time of FN. PMID:24804223

  6. Fatal Candida septic shock during systemic chemotherapy in lung cancer patient receiving corticosteroid replacement therapy for hypopituitarism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morichika, Daisuke; Sato-Hisamoto, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Iwaki, Noriko; Uchida, Koji; Minami, Daisuke; Kubo, Toshio; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2014-05-01

    Invasive candidiasis has increased as nosocomial infection recently in cancer patients who receive systemic chemotherapy, and the timely risk assessment for developing such specific infection is crucial. Especially in those concomitantly with hypopituitarism, febrile neutropenia with candidiasis can cause severe stress and lead potentially to sudden fatal outcome when the temporal steroid coverage for the adrenal insufficiency is not fully administered. We report a 72-year-old male case diagnosed as non-small-cell lung cancer, Stage IIIA. He had received a steroid replacement therapy for the prior history of hypophysectomy due to pituitary adenoma with hydrocortisone of 3.3 mg/day, equivalent to prednisolone of 0.8 mg/day. This very small dosage of steroid was hardly supposed to weaken his immune system, but rather potentially led to an inappropriate supplementation of his adrenal function, assuming that the serum sodium and chlorine levels decreased. On Day 6 of second cycle of chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, he developed sudden febrile neutropenia, septic shock and ileus, leading to death. After his death, the venous blood culture on Day 7 detected Candida albicans. Autopsy findings showed a massive necrotizing enterocolitis with extensive Candida invasion into submucous tissue. In conclusion, this case may suggest that (i) immediate initiation of antifungal therapy soon after the careful risk assessment of Candida infection and (ii) adequate administration of both basal steroid replacement therapy and temporal steroid coverage for febrile neutropenia might have improved his fatal outcome. PMID:24646812

  7. Effects of ATP-sensitive potassium channel blockers on vascular hyporeactivity, mesenteric blood flow, and survival in lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock model.

    PubMed

    Boz, Mustafa; Atilla, Pergin; Iskit, Alper B; Ilhan, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the possible therapeutic effects of various ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) blockers (glibenclamide, repaglinide, 5-HD, HMR-1098) have been tested in experimental septic shock model. Rats were given lipopolysaccharide (1 mg·kg(-1)) to create experimental shock model and 4 h later, under 400 mg·kg(-1) chloral hydrate anesthesia, parameters such as blood pressure, mesenteric blood flow, the response of mesenteric circulation to phenylephrine (vasoconstrictor stimulation), and organ and oxidative damage were analyzed. Also 75 mg·kg(-1) lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide was given to mice and effects of KATP blockers on survival have been tested. Non-selective blocker glibenclamide with sulphonylurea structure and sarcolemmal KATP channel blocker HMR-1098, which have the similar chemical structure, have improved the pathological parameters such as decrease in mesenteric blood flow, vascular hyporeactivity, but could not prevent the decrease in blood pressure, and oxidative and organ damage that were observed in the shock model. Also, both blockers have decreased the mortality rate from 80% to 40%-50%. Similar (preventive) therapeutic effects were not observed with non-selective blocker repaglinide and mitochondrial KATP channel blocker 5-HD, which were non-sulphonylurea structure. As a result, only KATP channel blockers that have sulphonylurea structure can be a new therapeutic approach in septic shock. PMID:27239899

  8. Cardiac tamponade and septic shock caused by viral infection in a previously healthy woman.

    PubMed

    Laurila, J J; Ala-Kokko, T I; Tuokko, H; Syrjälä, H

    2005-10-01

    A previously healthy woman was admitted to hospital after 'flu-like' symptoms for 5 days followed by acute intense abdominal and lower back pain. On admission she was found to be in severe shock and was transferred to the ICU. Echocardiography revealed cardiac tamponade, and pericardiocentesis was performed immediately. Thereafter her cardiovascular state improved, but she developed hypotension with low systemic vascular resistance and required vasoactive treatment for 4 days. Nine days after admission the patient was transferred to the ward, after which she recovered rapidly and completely. The cause of her illness was extensively screened. No underlying disease was found, and all bacterial cultures remained negative. Acute virus infection was confirmed by diagnostic elevations of antibody titers to Influenza A and adenovirus. Adenovirus was also isolated from her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. PMID:16146481

  9. StO₂ guided early resuscitation in subjects with severe sepsis or septic shock: a pilot randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Olivier; Polito, Andrea; Aboab, Jérôme; Colin, Gwenhael; Maxime, Virginie; Clair, Bernard; Friedman, Diane; Orlikowski, David; Sharshar, Tarek; Annane, Djillali

    2013-06-01

    The scientific community has agreed upon developing accurate monitoring of tissue perfusion and oxygenation to improve the management of subjects with sepsis. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility of targeting tissue oxygen saturation (StO₂) in addition to the currently recommended resuscitation goals, central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure and central venous oxygen saturation, in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. A pilot, single-centre, randomised, non-blinded trial recruited 30 subjects with severe sepsis upon intensive care unit admission at an academic medical centre in France. Subjects were randomly assigned to a 6 h resuscitation strategy following the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines with (experimental) or without (control) StO₂. StO₂ was measured over several muscles (masseter, deltoid and pectoral or thenar muscles), and a StO₂ above 80 % over at least 2 muscles was the therapeutic goal. The primary outcome was evaluated as follows: 7-day mortality or worsening of SOFA score between day 7 and study onset, i.e., DSOFA > 0). Thirty subjects were included in the study over a period of 40 weeks. Fifteen subjects were included in each group. Monitoring of StO₂ over three areas was performed in the experimental group. However, measures over the pectoral muscle provided poor results. At study day 7, there were 5/15 (33.3 %) subjects who died or had a DSOFA > 0 in the experimental arm and 4/15 (26.6 %) who died or had a DSOFA > 0 in the control arm (p = 1.00). This pilot study was the first randomised controlled trial using an algorithm derived from the SSC recommendations, which included StO₂ as a treatment goal. However, the protocol showed no clear trend for or against targeting StO₂. PMID:23381608

  10. Transfusion of Red Blood Cells Is Associated With Improved Central Venous Oxygen Saturation But Not Mortality in Septic Shock Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadaka, Farid; Trottier, Steven; Tannehill, David; Donnelly, Paige L; Griffin, Mia T; Bunaye, Zerihun; O’Brien, Jacklyn; Korobey, Matthew; Lakshmanan, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the optimum hemoglobin (H) concentration for patients with septic shock (SS) has not been specifically investigated, current guidelines suggest that H of 7 - 9 g/dL, compared with 10 - 12 g/dL, was not associated with increased mortality in critically ill adults. This contrasts with early goal-directed resuscitation protocols that use a target hematocrit of 30% in patients with low central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) during the first 6 hours of resuscitation of SS. Methods Data elements were prospectively collected on all patients with SS patients (lactic acid (LA) > 4 mmol/L, or hypotension). Out of a total of 396 SS patients, 46 patients received red blood cell (RBC) transfusion for ScvO2 < 70% (RBC group). We then matched 71 SS patients that did not receive RBC transfusion (NRBC group) on the following goals (G): LA obtained within 6 hours (G1), antibiotics given within 3 hours (G2), 20 mL/kg fluid bolus followed by vasopressors (VP) if needed to keep mean arterial pressure > 65 mm Hg (G3), central venous pressure > 8 mm Hg within 6 hours (G4) and ScvO2 > 70% within 6 hours (G5). Results In the RBC group, after one unit of RBC transfusion, ScvO2 improved from average of 63% (± 12%) to 68% (± 10%) (P = 0.02). Sixteen patients required another unit of RBC, and this resulted in increase of ScvO2 to 78% (± 11%) (P < 0.01). The RBC and NRBC groups were matched on sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores and all five goals. There was no difference in mortality between the two groups: 41% vs. 39.4% (OR: 0.8, 95% CI: 0.4 - 1.7, P = 0.6). Conclusions In our study, transfusion of RBC was not associated with decreased mortality in SS patients. PMID:25247015

  11. Treatment with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Attenuates MAP Kinase Mediated Liver Injury in a Lethal Model of Septic Shock1

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Robert A.; Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling; Shuja, Fahad; Fukudome, Eugene; Velmahos, George C.; deMoya, Marc; Alam, Hasan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite global efforts to improve the treatment of sepsis, it remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. We have previously shown that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, markedly improves survival in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced shock. SAHA has anti-inflammatory properties that have not been fully characterized. The liver plays an important role in the production of acute phase reactants involved in the inflammatory cascade and is also one of the major organs that can become dysfunctional in septic shock. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of SAHA treatment on MAP kinases and associated inflammatory markers in murine liver after LPS-induced injury. Methods C57B1/6J mice were randomly divided into three groups: (A) experimental-given intraperitoneal (i.p.) SAHA (50 mg/kg) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) vehicle solution (n =12); (B) control-given vehicle only (n = 12), and; (C) sham-given no treatment (n = 7). Two hours later, experimental and control mice were injected with LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.) and experimental mice received a second dose of SAHA. Livers were harvested at 3, 24, and 48 h for analysis of inflammatory markers using Western Blot, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) techniques. Results After 3 h, the livers of animals treated with SAHA showed significantly (P < 0.05) decreased expression of the pro-inflammatory MAP kinases phosphorylated p38, phosphorylated ERK, myeloperoxidase and interleukin-6, and increased levels of the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 compared with controls. Phospho-p38 expression remained low in the SAHA treated groups at 24 and 48 h. Conclusion Administration of SAHA is associated with attenuation of MAPK activation and alteration of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in murine liver after a lethal LPS insult. The suppression of MAPK activity is rapid (within 3 h

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic shock associated with ecthyma gangrenosum in an infant with agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João Fernando Lourenço de; Sztajnbok, Jaques; Troster, Eduardo Juan; Vaz, Flávio Adolfo Costa

    2002-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare and invasive infection that can be associated with agammaglobulinemia. The cornerstone of the treatment is based on prompt recognition with appropriate antibiotic coverage and intravenous immunoglobulin. The authors report a case of EG emphasizing the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this condition. PMID:12163911

  13. Effects of Ringer’s sodium pyruvate solution on serum tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 upon septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Guannan; Qu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of Ringer’s sodium pyruvate solution on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) upon septic shock. Methods: Ninety emergency patients with septic shock were divided into a treatment group and a control group by random draw. The control group was resuscitated with 50 ml of compound sodium chloride (Ringer’s solution), and the treatment group was given 50 ml of Ringer’s sodium pyruvate solution. Both groups were basically treated. Results: All patients were successfully resuscitated. After treatment, extravascular lung water index, intrathoracic blood volume index, systemic vascular resistance index and cardiac index of the two groups were significantly improved compared with those before treatment (P<0.05). However, there were no significant inter-group differences at different time points (P>0.05). Blood lactic acid level, central venous oxygen saturation index and urine output were also improved after treatment, with significant inter-group differences (P<0.05). Serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels of both groups significantly decreased after treatment (P<0.05), and the levels of the treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). During 28 days of follow-up, the mortality rate of the treatment group (4.4%) was significantly lower than that of the control group (20.0%) (P<0.05). Conclusion: Patients with septic shock are complicated with disordered expressions of inflammatory factors. During resuscitation, Ringer’s sodium pyruvate solution can effectively promote blood circulation, mitigate inflammation and maintain acid-base equilibrium, thus decreasing the prognostic mortality rate. PMID:26150866

  14. [A pilot study comparing pulse high volume hemofiltration (pHVHF) and coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) in septic shock patients].

    PubMed

    Lentini, P; Cruz, D; Nalesso, F; de Cal, M; Bobek, I; Garzotto, F; Zanella, M; Brendolan, A; Piccinni, P; Ronco, C

    2009-01-01

    High-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) and coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) have shown potential to improve the treatment of sepsis in animals, but there have been no studies comparing these two treatments in humans. Our aim was to compare the hemodynamic effects of HVHF and CPFA in septic shock patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). We performed a cross-over study enrolling patients with septic shock and AKI who were receiving CRRT. Patients were treated with pulse HVHF and continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVV H) on day 1 and CPFA and CVV H on day 2 or vice versa. HVHF was performed for 8-10 hours with a replacement fluid rate of 85 mL/kg/h. CPFA was performed for 8-10 hours with a plasma flow rate of 15%. CVV H was performed for the rest of the day with a replacement fluid rate of 35 mL/kg/h. The primary endpoints were changes in mean arterial pressure, vasopressor requirement (expressed as vasopressor score, VS), and noradrenaline dose after pulse HVHF and CPFA. The two treatments were compared using nonparametric tests. We enrolled 8 patients (median age 70.5 years, SOFA 12.5, SAPS II 69.5). There was a trend towards a reduction in VS with HVHF and CPFA (HVHF p=0.13, CPFA p<0.05). There was no significant difference between the two treatments in terms of percentage change in VS score (p=0.22). The data from this pilot study provide no evidence for a difference in hemodynamic effects between pulse HVHF and CPFA in patients with septic shock already receiving CRRT. A larger sample size is needed to adequately explore this issue. PMID:19918752

  15. Surviving lethal septic shock without fluid resuscitation in a rodent model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling; Fukudome, Eugene Y.; Kochanek, Ashley R.; Finkelstein, Robert A.; Chong, Wei; Jin, Guang; Lu, Jennifer; deMoya, Marc A.; Velmahos, George C.; Alam, Hasan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background We have recently demonstrated that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, before a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) improves survival in mice. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether SAHA treatment would attenuate LPS-induced shock and improve survival when given postinsult in a rodent model. Methods C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally (IP) injected with LPS (30 mg/kg), and 2 hours later randomized into 2 groups: (1) vehicle animals (n = 10) received dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution only; and (2) SAHA animals (n = 10) were given SAHA (50 mg/kg, IP) in DMSO solution. Survival was monitored over the next 7 days. In a second study, LPS-injected mice were treated with either DMSO or SAHA as described, and normal (sham) animals served as controls. Lungs were harvested at 4, 6, and 8 hours after LPS injection for analysis of gene expression. In addition, RAW264.7 mouse macrophages were cultured to assess the effects of SAHA post-treatment on LPS-induced inflammation using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results All LPS-injected mice that received the vehicle agent alone died within 24 hours, whereas the SAHA-treated animals displayed a significant improvement in 1 week survival (80% vs 0%; P < .001). LPS insult significantly enhanced gene expression of MyD88, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6, and was associated with an increased protein secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 into the cell culture medium. In contrast, SAHA treatment significantly attenuated all of these LPS-related alterations. Conclusion We report for the first time that administration of SAHA (50 mg/kg IP) after a lethal dose of LPS significantly improves long-term survival, and attenuates expression of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α and IL-6. Furthermore, our data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of SAHA may be due to downregulation of the MyD88-dependent pathway, and decreased

  16. Skeletal muscle oxygen saturation does not estimate mixed venous oxygen saturation in patients with severe left heart failure and additional severe sepsis or septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Podbregar, Matej; Možina, Hugon

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Low cardiac output states such as left heart failure are characterized by preserved oxygen extraction ratio, which is in contrast to severe sepsis. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows noninvasive estimation of skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation (StO2). The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between StO2 and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) in patients with severe left heart failure with or without additional severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Sixty-five patients with severe left heart failure due to primary heart disease were divided into two groups: groups A (n = 24) and B (n = 41) included patients without and with additional severe sepsis/septic shock, respectively. Thenar muscle StO2 was measured using NIRS in the patients and in 15 healthy volunteers. Results StO2 was lower in group A than in group B and in healthy volunteers (58 ± 13%, 90 ± 7% and 84 ± 4%, respectively; P < 0.001). StO2 was higher in group B than in healthy volunteers (P = 0.02). In group A StO2 correlated with SvO2 (r = 0.689, P = 0.002), although StO2 overestimated SvO2 (bias -2.3%, precision 4.6%). In group A changes in StO2 correlated with changes in SvO2 (r = 0.836, P < 0.001; ΔSvO2 = 0.84 × ΔStO2 - 0.67). In group B important differences between these variables were observed. Plasma lactate concentrations correlated negatively with StO2 values only in group A (r = -0.522, P = 0.009; lactate = -0.104 × StO2 + 10.25). Conclusion Skeletal muscle StO2 does not estimate SvO2 in patients with severe left heart failure and additional severe sepsis or septic shock. However, in patients with severe left heart failure without additional severe sepsis or septic shock, StO2 values could be used to provide rapid, noninvasive estimation of SvO2; furthermore, the trend in StO2 may be considered a surrogate for the trend in SvO2. Trial Registration: NCT00384644 PMID:17227587

  17. Peptide inhibition of p22phox and Rubicon interaction as a therapeutic strategy for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Ram; Koh, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Yun, Jin-Seung; Jang, Kiseok; Lee, Joo-Youn; Jung, Jae U; Yang, Chul-Su

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that complicates severe infection and is characterized by the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), is a life threatening disease characterized by inflammation of the entire body. Upon microbial infection, p22phox-gp91phox NADPH oxidase (NOX) complexes produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are critical for the elimination of invading microbes. However, excess production of ROS represents a key element in the cascade of deleterious processes in sepsis. We have previously reported direct crosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis machineries by demonstrating that the Rubicon protein interacts with p22phox upon microbial infection, facilitating phagosomal trafficking of the p22phox-gp91phox NOX complex to induce a ROS burst, inflammatory cytokine production, and thereby, potent anti-microbial activities. Here, we showed N8 peptide, an N-terminal 8-amino acid peptide derived from p22phox, was sufficient for Rubicon interaction and thus, capable of robustly blocking the Rubicon-p22phox interaction and profoundly suppressing ROS and inflammatory cytokine production. Consequently, treatment with the Tat-N8 peptide or a N8 peptide-mimetic small-molecule dramatically reduced the mortality associated with Cecal-Ligation-and-Puncture-induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice. This study demonstrates a new anti-sepsis therapeutic strategy by blocking the crosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis innate immunity machineries, representing a potential paradigm shift for urgently needed therapeutic intervention against this life-threatening SIRS. PMID:27267627

  18. The Role of Hepatic Invariant (I)NKT Cells in Systemic/Local Inflammation and Mortality During Polymicrobial Septic Shock1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Caroline K.; Venet, Fabienne; Heffernan, David S.; Wang, Yvonne L.; Horner, Brian; Huang, Xin; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Gregory, Stephen H.; Ayala, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT)4 cells have been described as “innate regulatory cells” because of their rapid response to conserved glycolipids presented on CD1d via their invariant TCR. However, little is known about the contribution of the hepatic NKT cell to the development of a local and/or systemic immune response to acute septic challenge (cecal ligation & puncture; CLP). We found not only that mice deficient in invariant [i] NKT cells (Jα18 -/-) had a marked attenuation in CLP induced mortality, but also exhibited an oblation of the systemic inflammatory response (with little effect on splenic/ peritoneal immune responsiveness). Flow cytometric data indicated that following CLP, there was a marked decline in the % of CD3+αGalCer-CD1d-tetramer+ cells in the mouse C57BL/6J and Balb/c liver non-parenchymal cell population. This was associated with the marked activation of these cells (increased expression of CD69 and CD25) as well as a rise in the frequency of NKT cells positive for both Th1 and Th2 intracellular cytokines. In this respect, when mice were pre-treated in vivo with anti-CD1d blocking antibody we observed not only that this inhibited the systemic rise of IL-6 and IL-10 levels in septic mice and improved overall septic survival, but that the CLP induced changes in liver macrophage IL-6 and IL-10 expressions were inversely effected by this treatment. Together, these findings suggest that the activation of hepatic iNKT cells plays a critical role in regulating the innate immune/ systemic inflammatory response and survival in a model of acute septic shock. PMID:19201902

  19. Temperature variability analysis using wavelets and multiscale entropy in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even though temperature is a continuous quantitative variable, its measurement has been considered a snapshot of a process, indicating whether a patient is febrile or afebrile. Recently, other diagnostic techniques have been proposed for the association between different properties of the temperature curve with severity of illness in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), based on complexity analysis of continuously monitored body temperature. In this study, we tried to assess temperature complexity in patients with systemic inflammation during a suspected ICU-acquired infection, by using wavelets transformation and multiscale entropy of temperature signals, in a cohort of mixed critically ill patients. Methods Twenty-two patients were enrolled in the study. In five, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, group 1) developed, 10 had sepsis (group 2), and seven had septic shock (group 3). All temperature curves were studied during the first 24 hours of an inflammatory state. A wavelet transformation was applied, decomposing the signal in different frequency components (scales) that have been found to reflect neurogenic and metabolic inputs on temperature oscillations. Wavelet energy and entropy per different scales associated with complexity in specific frequency bands and multiscale entropy of the whole signal were calculated. Moreover, a clustering technique and a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied for permitting pattern recognition in data sets and assessing diagnostic accuracy of different wavelet features among the three classes of patients. Results Statistically significant differences were found in wavelet entropy between patients with SIRS and groups 2 and 3, and in specific ultradian bands between SIRS and group 3, with decreased entropy in sepsis. Cluster analysis using wavelet features in specific bands revealed concrete clusters closely related with the groups in focus. LDA after wrapper-based feature selection was able to classify

  20. Pathology Image Of the Month: Rapidly Progressive Hemorrhagic Cellulitis of Bilateral Lower Extremities with Subsequent Septic Shock and Death.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ellen E; Jackson, Nicole R; McGoey, Robin R

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented to a community based emergency department with bilateral lower extremity swelling that began four days prior and that had evolved into recent blister formation on the left lower extremity. Medical history was significant only for hypertension and a recent self-described episode of "food poisoning" five days earlier characterized by diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting that quickly resolved. Physical exam revealed marked bilateral lower extremity edema and an ecchymotic rash below the knee. In addition to the rash, there were large flaccid bullae on the left leg, mostly intact but some notable for draining of scanty serosanguinous fluid. The patient was tachycardic with a rate of 114 bpm and initial labs showed thrombocytopenia (platelets 56 x 103/uL [140-440 x 103/uL]), hypoglycemia (15mg/dl [70-105mg/dl]), an elevated creatinine (2.7mg/dL [0.7- 1.25mg/dL]), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST 156U/L [5- 34U/L]). Two sets of blood cultures were drawn, broad spectrum antibiotics including doxycycline were empirically initiated and then he was subsequently transported to a tertiary care hospital for escalation of care. Within hours of presentation to the tertiary care facility, the rash appeared progressively hemorrhagic and bullous, lactic acidosis and coagulopathy developed and hemodynamic instability and septic shock necessitated endotracheal intubation and vasopressors. He was taken to the operating room for skin debridement but was emergently converted to bilateral above the knee lower extremity amputations due to the extent of the soft tissue necrosis. The patient remained intubated and in critical condition following surgery and the ecchymotic rash reappeared at the amputation sites. A newly developed ecchymotic rash with bullae formation was noted on the right upper extremity forearm. At that time, the clinicians were notified that four out of four blood culture bottles from admission were rapidly growing a microorganism. The family

  1. Impact on mortality of the timing of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in septic shock: the IDEAL-ICU study (initiation of dialysis early versus delayed in the intensive care unit): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most dreaded complications of septic shock is acute kidney injury. It occurs in around 50% of patients, with a mortality rate of about 60% at 3 months. There is no consensus on the optimal time to initiate renal replacement therapy. Retrospective and observational studies suggest that early implementation of renal replacement therapy could improve the prognosis for these patients. Methods/design This protocol summarizes the rationale and design of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial investigating the effect of early versus delayed renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in early septic shock. In total, 864 critically ill adults with septic shock and evidence of acute kidney injury, defined as the failure stage of the RIFLE classification, will be enrolled. The primary outcome is mortality at 90 days. Secondary outcomes include safety, number of days free of mechanical ventilation, number of days free of renal replacement therapy, intensive care length of stay, in-hospital length of stay, quality of life as evaluated by the EQ-5D and renal replacement therapy dependence at hospital discharge. The primary analysis will be intention to treat. Recruitment started in March 2012 and will be completed by March 2015. Discussion This protocol for a randomized controlled study investigating the impact of the timing of renal replacement therapy initiation should provide an answer to a key question for the management of patients with acute kidney injury in the context of septic shock, for whom the mortality rate remains close to 60% despite improved understanding of physiopathology and recent therapeutic advances. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01682590, registered on 10 September 2012. PMID:24998258

  2. Mass transfer, clearance and plasma concentration of procalcitonin during continuous venovenous hemofiltration in patients with septic shock and acute oliguric renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Level, Claude; Chauveau, Philippe; Guisset, Olivier; Cazin, Marie Cécile; Lasseur, Catherine; Gabinsky, Claude; Winnock, Stéphane; Montaudon, Danièle; Bedry, Régis; Nouts, Caroline; Pillet, Odile; Benissan, Georges Gbikpi; Favarel-Guarrigues, Jean Claude; Castaing, Yves

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To measure the mass transfer and clearance of procalcitonin (PCT) in patients with septic shock during continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH), and to assess the mechanisms of elimination of PCT. Setting The medical department of intensive care. Design A prospective, observational study. Patients Thirteen critically ill patients with septic shock and oliguric acute renal failure requiring continuous venovenous postdilution hemofiltration with a high-flux membrane (AN69 or polyamide) and a 'conventional' substitution volume (< 2.5 l/hour). Measurements and main results PCT was measured with the Lumitest PCT Brahms® in the prefilter and postfilter plasma, in the ultrafiltrate at the beginning of CVVH (T0) and 15 min (T15'), 60 min (T60') and 6 hours (T6h) after setup of CVVH, and in the prefilter every 24 hours during 4 days. Mass transfer was determined and the clearance and the sieving coefficient were calculated according to the mass conservation principle. Plasma and ultrafiltrate clearances, respectively, at T15', T60' and T6h were 37 ± 8.6 ml/min (not significant) and 1.8 ± 1.7 ml/min (P < 0.01), 34.7 ± 4.1 ml/min (not significant) and 2.3 ± 1.8 ml/min (P < 0.01), and 31.5 ± 7 ml/min (not significant) and 5 ± 2.3 ml/min (P < 0.01). The sieving coefficient significantly increased from 0.07 at T15' to 0.19 at T6h, with no difference according to the nature of the membrane. PCT plasma levels were not significantly modified during the course of CCVH. Conclusions We conclude that PCT is removed from the plasma of patients with septic shock during CCVH. Most of the mass is eliminated by convective flow, but adsorption also contributes to elimination during the first hours of CVVH. The effect of PCT removal with a conventional CVVH substitution fluid rate (<2.5 l/hour) on PCT plasma concentration seems to be limited, and PCT remains a useful diagnostic marker in these septic patients. The impact of high-volume hemofiltration on the PCT clearance

  3. Role of endotoxemia in cardiovascular dysfunction and mortality. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus challenges in a canine model of human septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Natanson, C; Danner, R L; Elin, R J; Hosseini, J M; Peart, K W; Banks, S M; MacVittie, T J; Walker, R I; Parrillo, J E

    1989-01-01

    Using different types of bacteria and a canine model simulating human septic shock, we investigated the role of endotoxin in cardiovascular dysfunction and mortality. Either Escherichia coli (a microorganism with endotoxin) or Staphylococcus aureus (a microorganism without endotoxin) were placed in an intraperitoneal clot in doses of viable or formalin-killed bacteria. Cardiovascular function of conscious animals was studied using simultaneous radionuclide heart scans and thermodilution cardiac outputs. Serial plasma endotoxin levels were measured. S. aureus produced a pattern of reversible cardiovascular dysfunction over 7-10 d that was concordant (P less than 0.01) with that of E. coli. Although this cardiovascular pattern was not altered by formalin killing (S. aureus and E. coli), formalin-killed organisms produced a lower mortality and less myocardial depression (P less than 0.01). S. aureus, compared to E. coli, produced higher postmortem concentrations of microorganisms and higher mortality (P less than 0.025). E. coli produced significant endotoxemia (P less than 0.01), though viable organisms (versus nonviable) resulted in higher endotoxin blood concentrations (P less than 0.05). Significant endotoxemia did not occur with S. aureus. Thus, in the absence of endotoxemia, S. aureus induced the same cardiovascular abnormalities of septic shock as E. coli. These findings indicate that structurally and functionally distinct microorganisms, with or without endotoxin, can activate a common pathway resulting in similar cardiovascular injury and mortality. PMID:2642920

  4. Salmonella Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  5. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  6. Harmonizing international trials of early goal-directed resuscitation for severe sepsis and septic shock: methodology of ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe and compare the design of three independent but collaborating multicenter trials of early goal-directed resuscitation for severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods We reviewed the three current trials, one each in the USA (ProCESS: protocolized care for early septic shock), Australasia (ARISE: Australasian resuscitation in sepsis evaluation), and the UK (ProMISe: protocolised management in sepsis). We used the 2010 CONSORT (consolidated standards of reporting trials) statement and the 2008 CONSORT extension for trials assessing non-pharmacologic treatments to describe and compare the underlying rationale, commonalities, and differences. Results All three trials conform to CONSORT guidelines, address the same fundamental questions, and share key design elements. Each trial is a patient-level, equal-randomized, parallel-group superiority trial that seeks to enroll emergency department patients with inclusion criteria that are consistent with the original early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) trial (suspected or confirmed infection, two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria, and refractory hypotension or elevated lactate), is powered to detect a 6–8 % absolute mortality reduction (hospital or 90-day), and uses trained teams to deliver EGDT. Design differences appear to primarily be driven by between-country variation in health care context. The main difference between the trials is the inclusion of a third, alternative resuscitation strategy arm in ProCESS. Conclusions Harmonization of study design and methods between severe sepsis trials is feasible and may facilitate pooling of data on completion of the trials. PMID:23958738

  7. A novel ligand-independent peptide inhibitor of TREM-1 suppresses tumor growth in human lung cancer xenografts and prolongs survival of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2014-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) amplifies the inflammatory response and plays a role in cancer and sepsis. Inhibition of TREM-1 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in macrophages suppresses cancer cell invasion in vitro. In the clinical setting, high levels of TREM-1 expression on tumor-associated macrophages are associated with cancer recurrence and poor survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TREM-1 upregulation on peritoneal neutrophils has been found in human sepsis patients and in mice with experimental lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic shock. However, the precise function of TREM-1 and the nature of its ligand are not yet known. In this study, we used the signaling chain homooligomerization (SCHOOL) model of immune signaling to design a novel, ligand-independent peptide-based TREM-1 inhibitor and demonstrated that this peptide specifically silences TREM-1 signaling in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing two human lung tumor xenograft nude mouse models (H292 and A549) and mice with LPS-induced sepsis, we show for the first time that blockade of TREM-1 function using non-toxic and non-immunogenic SCHOOL peptide inhibitors: 1) delays tumor growth in xenograft models of human NSCLC, 2) prolongs survival of mice with LPS-induced septic shock, and 3) substantially decreases cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. In addition, targeted delivery of SCHOOL peptides to macrophages utilizing lipoprotein-mimicking nanoparticles significantly increased peptide half-life and dosage efficacy. Together, the results suggest that ligand-independent modulation of TREM-1 function using small synthetic peptides might be a suitable treatment for sepsis and NSCLC and possibly other types of inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:24836682

  8. Interleukin-6 Kinetics can be Useful for Early Treatment Monitoring of Severe Bacterial Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Cantara, Giulio; Sechtem, Udo; Athanasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Early appropriate anti-microbial therapy is necessary to improve outcomes of septic patients. We describe 20 case histories of patients with severe bacterial sepsis regarding kinetics of several biomarkers. We found that interleukin-6 is able to predict survival and might be able to evaluate appropriateness of anti-microbial therapy. PMID:27103972

  9. Effect of early goal-directed therapy on mortality in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Chi, Dongmei; Wang, Siyang; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patients with severe sepsis or septic shock could benefit from a strict and early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) protocol recommended by Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) Guidelines. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE/OVID and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched between March 1983 and March 2015. Eligible studies evaluated the outcomes of EGDT versus usual care or standard therapy in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The primary outcomes were mortality within 28 days, 60 days and 90 days. Included studies must report at least one metric of mortality. Results 5 studies that enrolled 4303 patients with 2144 in the EGDT group and 2159 in the control group were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, there were slight decreases of mortality within 28 days, 60 days and 90 days in the random-effect model in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock receiving EGDT resuscitation. However, none of the differences reached statistical significance (RR=0.86; 95% CI 0.69 to 1.06; p=0.16; p for heterogeneity=0.008, I2=71%; RR=0.94; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.10; p=0.46; p for heterogeneity=0.16, I2=43%; RR=0.98; 95% CI 0.88 to 1.10; p=0.75; p for heterogeneity=0.87, I2=0%, respectively). Conclusions The current meta-analysis pooled data from five RCTs and found no survival benefit of EGDT in patients with sepsis. However, the included trials are not sufficiently homogeneous and potential confounding factors in the negative trials (ProCESS, ARISE and ProMISe) might bias the results and diminish the treatment effect of EGDT. Further well-designed studies should eliminate all potential source of bias to determine if EGDT has a mortality benefit. PMID:26932135

  10. [Lateral Approach Tracheal Intubation in a Semi-sitting Position Utilizing a Videolaryngoscope in a Patient with Respiratory Failure due to Septic Shock].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Atsushi; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nishihara, Isao; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-05-01

    Here we report our success in performing lateral approach tracheal intubation in a patient with severe respiratory failure due to septic shock caused by shoulder joint abscess. A 71-year-old woman presented with severe respiratory difficulty due to sepsis from a shoulder joint abscess and was scheduled for emergent drainage and irrigation. She could not breathe sufficiently in the supine position and thus maintained a semi-sitting position. She was also unable to move from the ward bed to the operating table due to severe shoulder pain. We induced anesthesia in a semi-sitting position in the ward bed. Mask ventilation was performed using the two-hand technique from the lateral approach. Tracheal intubation was also performed with a left lateral approach utilizing the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope (AWS). Lateral approach for tracheal intubation utilizing AWS may be useful in patients who present with severe respiratory difficulty. PMID:26422963

  11. [Septic shock in 23 year old female patient after surgical correction of the nasal septum effectively treated in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Greberski, Krzysztof; Kilanowska, Magdalena; Bugajski, Paweł; Rzymski, Stanisław; Jarząbek, Radosław; Kalawski, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    A female patient 23 years old was admitted to the medical intensive care unit due to sudden loss of consciousness and seizures. At the time of admition observed lack of consciousness, seizures and severe critical condition was observed. Meningitis and septic shock were diagnosed. Based on computed tomography performed on the first day--inflammation of the sinuses soft tissues was diagnosed. Suspected cause of infection was performed 6 weeks earlier surgical correction of the nasal septum. In the next stage of treatment on the seventh day after admission the functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed. Due to massive tissue hypoperfusion the necrosis in the skin of the lower limbs occurred. Due to the lack of effectiveness antimicrobial therapy use of intravenous ceftaroline was administrated. Effective treatment allowed in day 11 to wean the patient from the ventilator. At the day 26 the patient was transferred to a hospital in the place of residence. PMID:26802691

  12. Use of a Cholestyramine Washout in a Patient With Septic Shock on Leflunomide Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Laub, Melissa; Fraser, Robert; Kurche, Jonathan; Lara, Abigail; Kiser, Tyree H; Reynolds, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    Patients presenting with infections while receiving disease-modifying antirheumatic agents (DMARD) may be predisposed to a higher degree illness due to immunosuppression. This can be particularly problematic in patients who are receiving DMARDs with prolonged pharmacokinetic profiles. Leflunomide is a DMARD that has a prolonged half-life due to enterohepatic recirculation. We report a case of a patient with severe septic shock secondary to a prosthetic joint infection in which therapeutic levels of leflunomide were discovered, despite the patient ceasing therapy several weeks prior to admission. An orogastric cholestyramine washout was given to the patient to expedite the removal of the drug. Serum levels rapidly declined over the next several days, corresponding with resolution of her sepsis. A review of the literature relevant to the incidence of DMARD-related infections was conducted as well as discussion regarding the role of leflunomide drug monitoring and cholestyramine-facilitated removal of the drug in episodes of acute infectious syndromes. PMID:26446104

  13. Clinical application of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics: focused versus unfocused shock waves.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Kearney, Cathal; Spector, Myron

    2012-10-01

    For the past decade extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been applied to a wide range of musculoskeletal disorders. The many promising results and the introduction of shock wave generators that are less expensive and easier to handle has added to the growing interest. Based on their nature of propagation, shock waves can be divided into two types: focused and unfocused. Although several physical differences between these different types of shock waves have been described, very little is known about the clinical outcome using these different modalities. The aim of the present review is to investigate differences in outcome in select orthopaedic applications using focused and unfocused shock waves. PMID:22920552

  14. Population Pharmacokinetics and Monte Carlo Dosing Simulations of Meropenem during the Early Phase of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock in Critically Ill Patients in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Thengyai, Suriyan; Wongpoowarak, Wibul; Wattanavijitkul, Thitima; Tangkitwanitjaroen, Kanyawisa; Sukarnjanaset, Waroonrat; Jullangkoon, Monchana; Samaeng, Maseetoh

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiological changes during the early phase of severe sepsis and septic shock in critically ill patients, resulting in altered pharmacokinetic (PK) patterns for antibiotics, are important factors influencing therapeutic success. The aims of this study were (i) to reveal the population PK parameters and (ii) to assess the probability of target attainment (PTA) for meropenem. The PK studies were carried out following administration of 1 g of meropenem every 8 h during the first 24 h of severe sepsis and septic shock in nine patients, and a Monte Carlo simulation was performed to determine the PTA of achieving 40% exposure time during which the free plasma drug concentration remains above the MIC (fT>MIC) and 80% fT>MIC. The volume of distribution (V) and total clearance (CL) of meropenem in these patients were 23.7 liters and 7.82 liters/h, respectively. For pathogens with MICs of 4 μg/ml, the PTAs of 40% fT>MIC following administration of meropenem as a 1-h infusion of 1 g every 8 h and a 4-h infusion of 0.5 g every 8 h were 92.52% and 90.29%, respectively. For pathogens with MICs of 2 μg/ml in immunocompromised hosts, the PTAs of 80% fT>MIC following administration of 1-h and 4-h infusions of 2 g of meropenem every 8 h were 84.32% and 94.72%, respectively. These findings indicated that the V of meropenem was greater and the CL of meropenem was lower than the values obtained in a previous study with healthy subjects. The maximum recommended dose, i.e., 2 g of meropenem every 8 h, may be required for treatment of life-threatening infections in this patient population. PMID:25753628

  15. Associations and Outcomes of Septic Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Umesh; Brenes, Jorge A; Punjabi, Gopal V; LeClaire, Michele M; Williams, David N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Septic pulmonary embolism is a serious but uncommon syndrome posing diagnostic challenges because of its broad range of clinical presentation and etiologies. Objective: To understand the clinical and radiographic associations of septic pulmonary embolism in patients presenting to an acute care safety net hospital. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of imaging and electronic health records of all patients diagnosed with septic pulmonary embolism in our hospital between January 2000 and January 2013. Results: 41 episodes of septic pulmonary embolism were identified in 40 patients aged 17 to 71 years (median 46); 29 (72%) were men. Presenting symptoms included: febrile illness (85%); pulmonary complaints (66%) including pleuritic chest pain (22%), cough (19%) and dyspnea (15%); and those related to the peripheral foci of infection (24%) and shock (19%). Sources of infection included: skin and soft tissue (44%); infective endocarditis (27%); and infected peripheral deep venous thrombosis (17%). 35/41 (85%) were bacteremic with staphylococcus aureus. All patients had peripheral nodular lesions on chest CT scan. Treatment included intravenous antibiotics in all patients. Twenty six (63%) patients required pleural drainage and/or drainage of peripheral abscesses. Seven (17%) patients received systemic anticoagulants. Eight (20%) patients died due to various complications. Conclusion: The epidemiology of septic pulmonary embolism has broadened over the past decade with an increase in identified extrapulmonary, non-cardiac sources. In the context of an extrapulmonary infection, clinical features of persistent fever, bacteremia and pulmonary complaints should raise suspicion for this syndrome, and typical findings on the chest CT scans confirm the diagnosis. Antibiotics, local drainage procedures and increasingly, anticoagulation are keys to successful outcomes. PMID:25184008

  16. Death due to fulminant toxic-shock syndrome: differential diagnosis of a multilayered clinical picture.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, M; Dissmann, W

    1991-03-01

    Reported is the case study of a 27-year-old top-performance sportswoman who died of a fulminant illness with multiple organ failure. Long-term polypragmatic therapy and pharmacotherapy as well as acute analgesic and non-steroid antirheumatic treatment due to lumbago led to the diagnosis of a "complex toxic-allergic process". Numerous pathologic-anatomical findings, including the absence of septic spleen reaction and the demonstration of hyperacute polyradiculitis, supported this diagnosis. The present article discusses the possible differential diagnoses of the illness with the conclusion that its symptoms, clinical course, laboratory constellation and pathologic-anatomical findings better correspond to infection-caused toxic-shock syndrome (TSS) than to a toxic-allergic process. PMID:1861478

  17. High Mortality in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Patients with Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Ko, Wen-Je; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis is a potentially deadly illness and always requires intensive care. Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders remain a debated issue in critical care and limited data exist about its impact on care of septic patients, particularly in East Asia. We sought to assess outcome of severe sepsis patients with regard to DNR status in Taiwan. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units (ICUs) between 2008 and 2010. All severe sepsis patients were included for analysis. Primary outcome was association between DNR orders and ICU mortality. Volume of interventions was used as proxy indicator to indicate aggressiveness of care. Results Sixty-seven (9.4%) of 712 patients had DNR orders on ICU admission, and these patients were older and had higher disease severity compared with patients without DNR orders. Notably, DNR patients experienced high ICU mortality (90%). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of DNR orders was independently associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio: 6.13; 95% confidence interval: 2.66–14.10). In propensity score-matched cohort, ICU mortality rate (91%) in the DNR group was statistically higher than that (62%) in the non-DNR group (p <0.001). Regarding ICU interventions, arterial and central venous catheterization were more commonly used in DNR patients than in non-DNR patients. Conclusions From the Asian perspective, septic patients placed on DNR orders on ICU admission had exceptionally high mortality. In contrast to Western reports, DNR patients received more ICU interventions, reflecting more aggressive approach to dealing with this patient population. The findings in some ways reflect differences between East and West cultures and suggest that DNR status is an important confounder in ICU studies involving severely septic patients. PMID:27416064

  18. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013:chap 109. Krogstad P. Septic arthritis. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. Earliest Bedside Assessment of Hemodynamic Parameters and Cardiac Biomarkers: Their Role as Predictors of Adverse Outcome in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sasko, Benjamin; Butz, Thomas; Prull, Magnus Wilhelm; Liebeton, Jeanette; Christ, Martin; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early assessment and aggressive hemodynamic treatment have been shown to increase the survival of patients in septic shock. Current and past sepsis guidelines recommend a resuscitation protocol including central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), urine output and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) for resuscitation within the first six hours. Currently, the established severity score systems like APACHE II score, SOFA score or SAPS II score predict the outcome of critically ill patients on the bases of variables obtained only after the first 24 hours. The present study aims to evaluate the risk of short-term mortality for patients with septic shock by the earliest possible assessment of hemodynamic parameters and cardiac biomarkers as well as their role for the prediction of the adverse outcome. Methods: 52 consecutive patients treated for septic shock in the intensive care unit of one centre (Marien Hospital Herne, Ruhr University Bochum, Germany) were prospectively enrolled in this study. Hemodynamic parameters (MAP, CVP, ScvO2, left ventricular ejection fraction, Hematocrit) and cardiac biomarkers (Troponin I) at the ICU admission were evaluated in regard to their influence on mortality. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality within 28 days after the admission. Results: A total of 52 patients (31 male, 21 female) with a mean age of 71.4±8.5 years and a mean APACHE II score of 37.0±7.6 were enrolled in the study. 28 patients reached the primary endpoint (mortality 54%). Patients presenting with hypotension (MAP <65 mmHg) at ICU admission had significantly higher rates of 28-day mortality as compared with the group of patients without hypotension (28-day mortality rate 74 % vs. 32 %, p<0.01). Furthermore, the patients in the hypotension present group had significantly higher lactate concentration (p=0.002), higher serum creatinin (p=0.04), higher NTproBNP (p=0.03) and after the first 24 hours higher APACHE II

  20. CLINICAL FACTORS FOR DEVELOPING SHOCK IN RADIOCONTRAST MEDIA INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Min; Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Ha, Sang Ook; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Kim, Won Young

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time interval between radiocontrast media (RCM) administration and the development of anaphylactic shock, and risk factors associated with RCM-induced anaphylactic shock. We reviewed the medical records of 154 patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. Clinical features of RCM-induced anaphylaxis were analyzed, and patients were categorized into shock and non-shock groups to identify associated factors in affected patients. Of the 154 cases of RCM-induced anaphylaxis, 101 (65.9%) patients experienced shock. The median time between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was 11 min (interquartile range, 7.0-18.8). In patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis accompanying shock, the median time from RCM to the first symptom onset was 6 min (interquartile range, 5.0-10.0). In the multivariate analysis, age, neurological manifestations, and allergy history except RCM were associated with the development of shock. RCM-induced anaphylaxis was commonly accompanied with shock, and the time interval between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was short. Physicians should pay attention to the development of potential cardiovascular collapse in anaphylaxis patients of old age and with neurologic manifestations. PMID:26506069

  1. Therapeutic plasma exchange as rescue therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: retrospective observational single-centre study of 23 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several case series and small randomized controlled trials suggest that therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) improves coagulation, hemodynamics and possibly survival in severe sepsis. However, the exact role of TPE in modern sepsis therapy remains unclear. Methods We performed a retrospective observational single-centre study on the use of TPE as rescue therapy in 23 consecutive patients with severe sepsis or septic shock from 2005 to 2012. Main surrogate markers of multiple organ failure (MOF) before, during and after TPE as well as survival rates are reported. Results At baseline, mean SOFA score was 13 (standard deviation [SD] 4) and median number of failed organ-systems was 5 (interquartile range [IQR] 4–5). TPEs were performed 3 days (IQR 2–10) after symptom onset and 1 day (IQR 0–8) after ICU admission. The median total exchange volume was 3750 ml (IQR 2500–6000), which corresponded to a mean of 1.5 times (SD 0.9) the individual plasma volume. Fresh frozen plasma was used in all but one treatments as replacement fluid. Net fluid balance decreased significantly within 12 hrs following the first TPE procedure by a median of 720 mL (p = 0.002), irrespective of outcome. Reductions of norepinephrine dose and improvement in cardiac index were observed in individual survivors, but this was not significant for the overall cohort (p = 0.574). Platelet counts decreased irrespective of outcome between days 0 and 2 (p < 0.003), and increased thereafter in many survivors. There was a non-significant trend towards younger age and higher procalcitonin levels among survivors. Nine out of 23 TPE treated patients (39%) survived until ICU discharge (among them 3 patients with baseline SOFA scores of 15, 17, and 20). Conclusions Our data suggest that some patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may experience hemodynamic stabilisation by early TPE therapy. PMID:24708653

  2. The adverse effect of emergency department crowding on compliance with the resuscitation bundle in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of emergency department (ED) crowding on the implementation of tasks in the early resuscitation bundle during acute care of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. Methods We analyzed the sepsis registry from August 2008 to March 2012 for patients presenting to an ED of a tertiary urban hospital and meeting the criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock. The ED occupancy rate, which was defined as the total number of patients in the ED divided by the total number of ED beds, was used for measuring the degree of ED crowding. It was categorized into three groups (low; intermediate; high crowding). The primary endpoint was the overall compliance with the entire resuscitation bundle. Results A total of 770 patients were enrolled. Of the eligible patients, 276 patients were assigned to the low crowding group, 250 patients to the intermediate crowding group, and 244 patients to the high crowding group (ED occupancy rate: ≤ 115; 116–149; ≥ 150%). There was significant difference in compliance rates among the three groups (31.9% in the low crowding group, 24.4% in the intermediate crowding group, and 16.4% in the high crowding group, P < 0.001). In a multivariate model, the high crowding group had a significant association with lower compliance (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26 to 0.76; P = 0.003). When the ED occupancy rate was included as a continuous variable in the model, it had also a negative correlation with the overall compliance (OR of 10% increase of the ED occupancy rate, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84 to 0.96, P = 0.002). Conclusions ED crowding was significantly associated with lower compliance with the entire resuscitation bundle and decreased likelihood of the timely implementation of the bundle elements. PMID:24093643

  3. Deletion of scavenger receptor A gene in mice resulted in protection from septic shock and modulation of TLR4 signaling in isolated peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Robert; Cauvi, David M; Hawisher, Dennis; Song, Donghuan; Niño, Diego F; Coimbra, Raul; Bickler, Stephen; De Maio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptor A (Sra), also known as macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (Msr1), is a surface glycoprotein preferentially present in macrophages that plays a primary role in innate immunity. Previous studies have shown that Sra is a modifier gene for the response to bacterial LPS in mice at the level of IL-10 production, in particular. In the present study, we found that Sra(−/−) mice are more resistant to septic shock induced by cecal ligation and puncture than wild-type C57BL/6 J (B6) mice. In addition, Sra(−/−) mice displayed initial elevated high density lipoprotein (HDL) circulating levels. Naïve peritoneal macrophages (PMϕs) were isolated from Sra(−/−) mice to understand the possible protective mechanism. Incubation of these cells with LPS was found to modulate TLR4 signaling, leading to a reduction in IL-10 and IL-6 mRNA levels, but not TNF-α expression, at low concentrations of LPS in comparison with PMϕs isolated from B6 mice. No differences were found in LPS binding between PMϕs derived from Sra(−/−) or B6 mice. The lack of Sra binding to LPS was confirmed after transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the Sra gene. The contribution of Sra to the outcome of sepsis may be a combination of changes in TLR4 signaling pathway and elevated levels of HDL in circulation, but also LPS toxicity. PMID:22751446

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced CD300b Receptor Binding to Toll-like Receptor 4 Alters Signaling to Drive Cytokine Responses that Enhance Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Voss, Oliver H; Murakami, Yousuke; Pena, Mirna Y; Lee, Ha-Na; Tian, Linjie; Margulies, David H; Street, Jonathan M; Yuen, Peter S T; Qi, Chen-Feng; Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E

    2016-06-21

    Receptor CD300b is implicated in regulating the immune response to bacterial infection by an unknown mechanism. Here, we identified CD300b as a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding receptor and determined the mechanism underlying CD300b augmentation of septic shock. In vivo depletion and adoptive transfer studies identified CD300b-expressing macrophages as the key cell type augmenting sepsis. We showed that CD300b, and its adaptor DAP12, associated with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) upon LPS binding, thereby enhancing TLR4-adaptor MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling that resulted in an elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine storm. LPS engagement of the CD300b-TLR4 complex led to the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K). This resulted in an inhibition of the ERK1/2 protein kinase- and NF-κB transcription factor-mediated signaling pathways, which subsequently led to a reduced interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. Collectively, our data describe a mechanism of TLR4 signaling regulated by CD300b in myeloid cells in response to LPS. PMID:27261276

  5. Transient Unexplained Shock in 30-year-old Trauma Patient.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Farzad; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Mohammadi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Shock as an inadequate tissue perfusion is one of the frequent causes of death in trauma patients. In this context, there are various reasons for hemodynamic instability and shock including hypovolemic (hemorrhagic), obstructive (cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax), cardiogenic, neurogenic, and rarely septic. In the present report, a 30-year-old trauma patient with full clinical signs and symptoms of shock referred while had unknown origin; it was finally recognized as anaphylactic shock. PMID:26495357

  6. An interesting septic embolism

    PubMed Central

    Uluorman, Funda; Tanrıverdi, Zülkif; Sevinç, Can; Badak, Özer; Çatalyürek, Hüdai

    2014-01-01

    Septic pulmonary embolism is a rare disease but mortality and morbidity of it is high. Septic pulmonary emboli comes from infected heart valves, thrombophlebitis, and pulmonary artery catheter or infected pacemaker wires as many sources [1,2]. In recent years, pacemaker is a common treatment of the bradiarrhythmia that is persisted in the etiology of septic embolism, its applications has started to pick up [3]. There is the growing number of patients with pacemaker, according to this the frequency of pacemaker lead infection and the number of patients at risk for right-sided endocarditis increase [4]. The patients don't have specific clinical and radiological features because of this it is very difficult to define, so the diagnosis is often delayed [5]. A detailed medical history, a detailed physical examination in diagnosis and evaluation of good additional imaging methods is very important. Early diagnosis and proper treatment, the implementation of the management, can provide good results. PMID:26029562

  7. NO contributes to abnormal vascular calcium regulation and reactivity induced by peritonitis-associated septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiu-Jen; Li, Shaio-Yun; Shih, Chih-Chin; Liao, Mei-Huei; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2010-05-01

    Calcium plays an important role in determining vascular smooth muscle tone. Norepinephrine (NE)-induced vascular contraction contains two components: 1) Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum as the fast phase and 2) Ca2+ influx via a voltage-dependent calcium channel as the slow phase. This study used functional isometric tension recording to evaluate mediators contributing to abnormal NE-induced Ca2+ handling and reactivity in isolated thoracic aortas from septic rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and thoracic aortas were removed at 18 h after CLP. Our results showed that rats that received CLP for 18 h manifested severe hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity to NE in vivo. This vascular hyporeactivity to NE was also observed in the aorta obtained from CLP-induced sepsis rat. Both the fast and slow phases of NE-induced contraction were reduced in aortas from sepsis rats. To clarify what possible mediators contribute to the abnormal Ca2+ handling in aortas from sepsis animals, inhibitors of Ca2+ channel and release were used. Inhibition by 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borane, ryanodine, and cyclopiazonic acid of the NE-induced contraction in Ca2+-free solution was greater in the aorta from sepsis rats and inhibitions of cyclopiazonic acid and ryanodine, but not of 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borane, were attenuated by NOS inhibitor N[omega]-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. In addition, the attenuation of NE-induced contraction by nifedipine in the aorta was also greater in the CLP group. Our results suggest that abnormal NE-induced Ca2+ handling associated with vascular hyporeactivity in the CLP-induced sepsis is caused by a major decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum function and a minor impairment of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels on membrane to Ca2+ handling, at least, in the aorta, and this could be attributed to an overproduction of NO in sepsis. PMID:19749606

  8. Procalcitonin kinetics – prognostic and diagnostic significance in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mierzchała-Pasierb, Magdalena; Durek, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe sepsis and septic shock are advanced clinical conditions representing the patient's response to infection and having a variable but high mortality rate. Early evaluation of sepsis stage and choice of adequate treatment are key factors for survival. Some study results suggest the necessity of daily procalcitonin (PCT) monitoring because of its prognostic and discriminative value. Material and methods An observational and prospective study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic and discriminative value of PCT kinetics in comparison to PCT absolute value measurements. In a group of 50 intensive care unit patients with diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock, serum PCT measurements were performed on admission, and on the 2nd, 3rd and 5th day of therapy. The level of PCT was determined with a commercially available test according to the manufacturer's protocol. Results The kinetics of PCT assessed by ΔPCT was statistically significant in the survivors vs. the non-survivors subgroup (ΔPCT3/1, p = 0.022; ΔPCT5/1, p = 0.021). ΔPCT has no statistical significance in the severe sepsis and septic shock subgroups for all analyzed days. Only the 5th day PCT level was significantly higher in the non-survivors vs. survivors group (p = 0.008). The 1st day PCT level in the severe sepsis vs. septic shock group has a discriminative impact (p = 0.009). Conclusions According to the results, single serum PCT measurement, regardless of absolute value, has a discriminative impact but no prognostic significance, during the first 2 days of therapy. The PCT kinetics is of prognostic value from the 3rd day and is of earlier prognostic significance in comparison to changes in the patient's clinical condition evaluated by SOFA score kinetics. PMID:26925126

  9. Howell-Jolly bodies on peripheral smear leading to the diagnosis of congenital hyposplenism in a patient with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Hannah; Dittus, Christopher; Malek, Anita; Negroiu, Andreea

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a case of isolated congenital hyposplenism that was discovered after the peripheral smear revealed Howell-Jolly bodies. This case serves as the basis for a review of hyposplenism for the general practitioner. PMID:26331020

  10. Simvastatin and a Plant Galactolipid Protect Animals from Septic Shock by Regulating Oxylipin Mediator Dynamics through the MAPK-cPLA2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Apaya, Maria Karmella; Lin, Chih-Yu; Chiou, Ching-Yi; Yang, Chung-Chih; Ting, Chen-Yun; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a major medical issue despite decades of research. Identification of important inflammatory cascades and key molecular mediators are crucial for developing intervention and prevention strategies. In this study, we conducted a comparative oxylipin metabolomics study to gain a comprehensive picture of lipid mediator dynamics during the initial hyperinflammatory phase of sepsis, and demonstrated, in parallel, the efficacy of simvastatin and plant galactolipid, 1,2-di-O-α-linolenoyl-3-O-β-­galactopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (dLGG) in the homeostatic regulation of the oxylipin metabolome using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis C57BL/6J mouse model. LPS increased the systemic and organ levels of proinflammatory metabolites of linoleic acid including leukotoxin diols (9-,10-DHOME, 12-,13-DHOME) and octadecadienoic acids (9-HODE and 13-HODE) and arachidonic acid-derived prostanoid, PGE2, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (8-, 12- and 15-HETE). Treatment with either compound decreased the levels of proinflammatory metabolites and elevated proresolution lipoxin A4, 5(6)-EET, 11(12)-EET and 15-deoxy-PGJ2. dLGG and simvastatin ameliorated the effects of LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent activation of cPLA2, cyclooxygenase-2, lipoxygenase, cytochrome P450 and/or epoxide hydrolase lowered systemic TNF-α and IL-6 levels and aminotransferase activities and decreased organ-specific infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and macrophages, and septic shock-induced multiple organ damage. Furthermore, both dLGG and simvastatin increased the survival rates in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis model. This study provides new insights into the role of oxylipins in sepsis pathogenesis and highlights the potential of simvastatin and dLGG in sepsis therapy and prevention. PMID:26701313

  11. Circulating plasma factors induce tubular and glomerular alterations in septic burns patients

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Filippo; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Stella, Maurizio; Romanazzi, Giuseppe Mauriello; Assenzio, Barbara; Cairo, Monica; Biancone, Luigi; Triolo, Giorgio; Ranieri, V Marco; Camussi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe burn is a systemic illness often complicated by sepsis. Kidney is one of the organs invariably affected, and proteinuria is a constant clinical finding. We studied the relationships between proteinuria and patient outcome, severity of renal dysfunction and systemic inflammatory state in burns patients who developed sepsis-associated acute renal failure (ARF). We then tested the hypothesis that plasma in these patients induces apoptosis and functional alterations that could account for proteinuria and severity of renal dysfunction in tubular cells and podocytes. Methods We studied the correlation between proteinuria and indexes of systemic inflammation or renal function prospectively in 19 severe burns patients with septic shock and ARF, and we evaluated the effect of plasma on apoptosis, polarity and functional alterations in cultured human tubular cells and podocytes. As controls, we collected plasma from 10 burns patients with septic shock but without ARF, 10 burns patients with septic shock and ARF, 10 non-burns patients with septic shock without ARF, 10 chronic uremic patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Results Septic burns patients with ARF presented a severe proteinuria that correlated to outcome, glomerular (creatinine/urea clearance) and tubular (fractional excretion of sodium and potassium) functional impairment and systemic inflammation (white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts). Plasma from these patients induced a pro-apoptotic effect in tubular cells and podocytes that correlated with the extent of proteinuria. Plasma-induced apoptosis was significantly higher in septic severe burns patients with ARF with respect to those without ARF or with septic shock without burns. Moreover, plasma from septic burns patients induced an alteration of polarity in tubular cells, as well as reduced expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and of the endocytic receptor megalin. In podocytes, plasma from septic burns patients increased

  12. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  13. A scarlet pimpernel for the resolution of inflammation? The role of supra-therapeutic doses of cobalamin, in the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic or traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin carrier proteins,the Transcobalamins (TCS), are elevated during trauma, infections and chronic inflammatory conditions. This remains un-explained. It is proposed that such TC elevations signal a need for cobalamin central to the resolution of inflammation. Thus Cobalamin may regulate the transcription factor, NFkappaB, activation or suppression of which determines the inflammatory response and its resolution. Such regulation may involve at least 5 separate mechanisms: (i) hormone-like regulation of TNFalpha, through reduction of excess NO by cobalamin, as well as through the selective inhibition, in tandem with glutathione, of inducible nitric oxide synthase; (ii) quenching of nitric oxide radicals and reactive oxygen species, enhanced by cobalamin's glutathione sparing effect; (iii) the promotion of acetylcholine synthesis, central to the neuro-immune cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway; (iv) the promotion of oxidative phosphorylation; (v) and a bacteriostatic role of the TCS released by neutrophil secondary granules during phagocytosis, which also appears to modulate the inflammatory response. TC elevations are dependent on NFkappaB activation, through crosstalk between NFkappaB and Sp1, another member of the helix-loop-helix protein family, which directly mediates transcription of the TCII gene. Sp1 also has binding sites on the TNFalpha and EGF gene promoters. NFkappaB may thus ensure sufficient cobalamin to determine its own eventual suppression. Cobalamin's established regulation of EGF may additionally preserve normal function of macrophages and the coagulation cascade in wound healing. By regulating NFkappaB, Cobalamin may also be the as yet unidentified mediator needed to potentiate the anti-inflammatory action of eicosanoids derived from omega-3 essential fatty acids. Moreover, animal and human clinical data suggests that high dose cobalamin may prove a promising approach to SIRS/sepsis/septic and traumatic shock. PMID:16545917

  14. STAT5 phosphorylation in T cell subsets from septic patients in response to recombinant human interleukin-7: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Demaret, Julie; Dupont, Guillaume; Venet, Fabienne; Friggeri, Arnaud; Lepape, Alain; Rimmelé, Thomas; Morel, Jérôme; Monneret, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    Septic shock is characterized by lymphocyte alterations associated with increased risk of nosocomial infections and mortality. IL-7, a cytokine required for T cell survival, is thought as a novel therapy for septic patients with severe lymphopenia. We assessed CD4(+) lymphocyte responsiveness to rhIL-7 in septic shock patients ex vivo. Thirteen septic shock patients and 10 controls were included. The MFI of pSTAT5, a key signaling molecule for IL-7, was measured by flow cytometry in CD4(+)FOXP3- (Teffs) and CD4(+)FOXP3(+) (Tregs) lymphocytes after whole-blood incubation with increasing doses of rhIL-7. The basal level of pSTAT5 in nonstimulated T cells was higher in patients. However, the maximal activation level in response to the highest doses of rhIL-7 was similar in both groups. Importantly, low doses of rhIL-7 preferentially activated Teff versus Treg in patients and nonsurvivors tended to present with decreased pSTAT5 expression. This pilot study is the first to highlight, in septic patients, the interest of pSTAT5 measurement in whole blood for the monitoring of rhIL-7 therapy. Such a method could represent an innovative, biologic tool for monitoring leukocyte pharmacological responses to biotherapies in daily clinical practice in other clinical contexts. PMID:25691382

  15. Maternal Death Following Cardiopulmonary Collapse after Delivery: Amniotic Fluid Embolism or Septic Shock Due to Intrauterine Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Kadar, Nicholas; Vaisbuch, Edi; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Problem The amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) syndrome is a catastrophic complication of pregnancy frequently associated with maternal death. The causes and mechanisms of disease responsible for this syndrome remain elusive. Methods of study We report two cases of maternal deaths attributed to AFE: 1) one woman presented with spontaneous labor at term, developed intrapartum fever, and after delivery had sudden cardiovascular collapse and disseminated intravascular coagulation(DIC), leading to death; 2) another woman presented with preterm labor and foul-smelling amniotic fluid, underwent a Cesarean section for fetal distress, and also had postpartum cardiovascular collapse and DIC, leading to death. Results Of major importance is that in both cases, the maternal plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α at the time of admission to the hospital and when patients had no clinical evidence of infection was in the lethal range (a lethal range is considered to be above 0.1 ng/mL). Conclusions We propose that subclinical intra-amniotic infection may be a cause of postpartum cardiovascular collapse and DIC and resemble AFE. Thus, some patients with the clinical diagnosis of AFE may have infection/systemic inflammation as a mechanism of disease. These observations have implications for the understanding of the mechanisms of disease of patients who develop cardiovascular collapse and DIC, frequently attributed to AFE. It may be possible to identify a subset of patients who have biochemical and immunological evidence of systemic inflammation at the time of admission, and before a catastrophic event occurs. PMID:20236259

  16. Chorioamnionitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus with intact membranes in a term pregnancy: A case of maternal and fetal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Sorano, Sumire; Goto, Maki; Matsuoka, Sakiko; Tohyama, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Sumie; Fukami, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Ryoei; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Eguchi, Fuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Chorioamnionitis is usually caused by migration of cervicovaginal flora through the cervical canal in women with ruptured membranes. Common causative pathogens are genital mycoplasmas, anaerobes, enteric gram-negative bacilli, and group B streptococcus. There have been only seven previous reports of chorioamnionitis due to Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical courses are characterized by rapid disease progression and poor prognosis. This case report describes a case of acute chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus, which was successfully managed with immediate cesarean section and postoperative intensive care. A 22-year-old woman presented at 39 weeks' gestation with a fever and acute lower abdominal pain. Fetal heart monitoring showed fetal distress. Immediate cesarean delivery was performed under general anesthesia. A male infant weighing 2450 g was born. He had Apgar scores of 3 and 7 at 1 and 5 min, respectively. He was immediately intubated and admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Maternal blood culture, vaginal culture, neonatal nares, and blood and gastric fluid culture all showed methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. Histopathology of the placenta demonstrated focal acute funisitis and acute chorioamnionitis. Interestingly, most of the patients in the previous reports developed chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus despite the presence of intact membranes, as in our case. Bacterial spread in the absence of membrane rupture and the presence of bacteremia suggests hematogenous, rather than ascending, etiology of S. aureus chorioamnionitis. PMID:26705749

  17. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome (DRESS) syndrome associated with azithromycin presenting like septic shock: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome is a potentially life-threatening cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterized by extensive mucocutaneous eruption, fever, hematologic abnormalities including eosinophilia and/or atypical lymphocytosis, and extensive organ involvement. The drugs most often responsible for causing drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome are anticonvulsants, antimicrobial agents and antipyretic or anti-inflammatory analgesics. Although azithromycin is widely prescribed in clinical practice, serious cutaneous reactions from this agent have been rarely described. We report the first adult case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome associated with azithromycin. Case presentation A 44-year-old previously healthy Caucasian man with history of tobacco use presented to his primary care physician with fever and productive cough. He was prescribed azithromycin, promethazine hydrochloride and dextromethorphan hydrobromide syrup. One week later, he developed a blistering erythematous rash over both hands, which over the next two weeks spread to involve nearly his entire body surface, sparing only his face. He was admitted to an outside hospital with signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and severe sepsis, presumably from a skin infection. Despite aggressive therapy he deteriorated, with worsening diffuse erythema, and was transferred to our institution. He developed multiple organ failure requiring ventilatory and hemodynamic support. Pertinent laboratory studies included a leukocytosis with a white blood cell count of 17.6×109/L and 47% eosinophils. A skin biopsy showed evidence of spongiotic lichenoid dermatitis with eosinophils and neutrophils, compatible with a systemic drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction. Our patient was started on high-dose steroids and showed dramatic improvement within 48 hours. Conclusions We report the first adult case of

  18. Maternal Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chebbo, Ahmad; Tan, Susanna; Kassis, Christelle; Tamura, Leslie; Carlson, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ignaz Semmelweis, the Hungarian physician who identified unhygienic practices of physicians as a major cause of childbed fever or puerperal sepsis. Although such practices have largely disappeared as a factor in the development of chorioamnionitis and postpartum or puerperal endometritis, it is appropriate that this article on sepsis in pregnancy acknowledges his contributions to maternal health. This review describes the incidence and mortality of sepsis in pregnancy, methods to identify and define sepsis in this population, including scoring systems, causes, and sites of infection during pregnancy and parturition and management guidelines. PMID:26600449

  19. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Shock Shock is a serious, often life-threatening medical condition ... of death for critically ill or injured people. Shock results when the body is not getting enough ...

  20. Septic acute kidney injury: the glomerular arterioles.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo; Wan, Li; Langenberg, Christoph; Ishikawa, Ken; May, Clive N

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious condition that affects many intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The most common causes of AKI in the ICU are severe sepsis and septic shock. The mortality of AKI in septic critically ill patients remains high despite our increasing ability to support vital organs. This is partly due to our poor understanding of the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced renal dysfunction. However, new concepts are emerging to explain the pathogenesis of septic AKI, which challenge previously held dogma. Throughout the past half century, septic AKI has essentially been considered secondary to tubular injury, which, in turn, has been considered secondary to renal ischemia. This belief is curious because the hallmark of septic AKI and AKI in general is the loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). It would seem logical, therefore, to focus on the glomerulus in trying to understand why such loss of GFR occurs. Recent experimental observations suggest that, at least in the initial phases of septic AKI, profound changes occur which involve glomerular hemodynamics and lead to loss of GFR. These observations imply that changes in the vasoconstrictor tone of both the afferent and efferent arterioles are an important component of the pathogenesis of septic AKI. PMID:21921614

  1. Technetium phosphate bone scan in the diagnosis of septic arthritis in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, S.B.; Savage, J.P.; Foster, B.K. )

    1989-09-01

    The technetium phosphate bone scans of 106 children with suspected septic arthritis were reviewed to determine whether the bone scan can accurately differentiate septic from nonseptic arthropathy. Only 13% of children with proved septic arthritis had correct blind scan interpretation. The clinically adjusted interpretation did not identify septic arthritis in 30%. Septic arthritis was incorrectly identified in 32% of children with no evidence of septic arthritis. No statistically significant differences were noted between the scan findings in the septic and nonseptic groups and no scan findings correlated specifically with the presence or absence of joint sepsis.

  2. Cardiogenic Shock: Failure of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Utilization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong Sern

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a highly lethal condition. Conventional therapy including revascularization and mechanical circulatory support aims to improve cardiac output and oxygen delivery, but increasing basic and clinical observations indicate wider circulatory and cellular abnormalities, particularly at the advanced stages of shock. Progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. Cardiogenic shock is initially characterized by a failure to maintain global oxygen delivery; however, progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, derangement of the regulation of regional blood flow, microcirculatory abnormalities, and cellular dysoxia. These abnormalities are analogous to septic shock and may not be reversed by increase in oxygen delivery, even to supranormal levels. Earlier mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock may limit the development of microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. PMID:27509355

  3. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  4. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy. PMID:25441032

  5. Non Activated Protein C Supplementation in Septic Pediatric Hematological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perillo, Teresa; Muggeo, Paola; Arcamone, Giampaolo; Leonardis, Francesco De; Santoro, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine safety and efficacy of non-activated Protein C (PC) supplementation in our cohort of septic pediatric hematological patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 22 septic patients receiving human plasma-derived PC concentrate from 2008 to 2015 at our Pediatric Oncology Center (Bari, Italy). The Surviving sepsis campaign definitions for sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock were used to define the patients’ septic status. For each patient, we calculated Lansky performance status scale (LPSS) and a risk score defined the Hematologic risk score (HRS) that we created in 2007. Patients were defined as High risk for severe sepsis/septic shock in case of HRS>3. HRS<3 identified low risk patients. Baseline serum PC levels, PC administration dosage and duration and days until a 20% improvement in LPSS. Observed baseline serum PC levels (bPC) blood concentrations ranged from 31 to 80%. Patients received PC supplementation in case of low age-related bPC levels or >10% PC concentration decrease within 12 hours from the first evaluation. All patients received 80 U/kg/day PC, intravenously, every twenty-four hours. No drug-related adverse event was observed. The observed sepsis-related mortality rate in our cohort was 9%. PC supplementation in our cohort appeared to be safe, and, probably due to prompt PC administration, we observed an overall mortality that was much lower than expected mortality in cancer severe septic patients. PMID:27433305

  6. Methylene Blue for Acute Septic Cardiomyopathy in a Burned Patient.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Joseph J; Burger, Christina F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this case summary was to describe the use of methylene blue (MB) in a burned patient with acute septic cardiomyopathy. A 60-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Burn Intensive Care Unit with 45% TBSA burns after a house explosion. During the course of his care, he experienced hypotension that was refractory to fluid therapy and vasoactive medications. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed new acute systolic dysfunction with concurrent elevated systemic vascular resistance (SVR). High-dose inotropic agents did not improve cardiac function, and septic shock rendered him a poor candidate for mechanical intra-aortic balloon pump support. MB was administered to sensitize the myocardium to catecholamines and improve contractility with the goal of weaning the other vasoactive medications and diuresing for afterload reduction when hemodynamic stability was achieved. MB has been described in critical care medicine predominately for vasoplegia after cardiopulmonary bypass and vasodilatory septic shock., Our patient had acute septic cardiomyopathy that was refractory to standard pharmacologic approaches to inotropy with concurrent elevated SVR. Hypothesizing the differential temporal effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase on the vasculature and myocardium, we administered MB to improve contractility and support the impending vasodilatory effects of distributive shock. Although MB is not a new drug, the application for septic cardiomyopathy with a supranormal SVR is a unique application. Because of the risk profile associated with MB, we recommend drug monitoring utilizing serial echocardiography and/or right heart catheterization. PMID:25798807

  7. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  8. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:24879397

  9. Vasopressin in cirrhosis and sepsis: physiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wagener, G; Bakker, J

    2015-12-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) is an important hormone in the regulation of plasma osmolality and blood volume/pressure. In clinical practice it is frequently used in the treatment of septic shock and decompensated cirrhosis. In this review the physiology of AVP and its analogues is presented. In addition the use of AVP in cirrhosis and sepsis is reviewed. PMID:25384691

  10. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis. PMID:24067292

  11. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints. PMID:26189923

  12. The Shock of Practice: Effects on Clinical Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshuizen, Henny P. A.

    One of the processes supposed to take place during development toward medical expertise is knowledge encapsulation. In this process detailed biomedical concepts are gradually clustered together and reorganized under fewer, clinically relevant terms. A large-scale investigation was made of the process of biomedical knowledge application using…

  13. Adjunctive treatment in septic shock: What's next?

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death and long-term sequels worldwide. For more than a decade, the scientific community is providing physicians, patients and policy makers with regularly updated guidelines. There is some evidence that implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines is associated with improved patients outcomes. Though there were major advances in the understanding of sepsis, the management of sepsis mainly relies on anti-infective treatments and restoration of cardiovascular and respiratory function according to quantitative protocolized care. Except some hormonal interventions such as insulin to maintain blood glucose levels of less than 180mg/dL and low doses of corticosteroids and vasopressin in highly selected patients, there is no adjunct therapy for the routine management of sepsis. Recent years have shown some interest in revolutionary concepts such as selective beta-1 receptor antagonists or interventions to boost the immune system. These provocative approaches yielded promising results in various experimental models of sepsis and in preliminary data in humans. The current narrative review summarized some of the numerous adjunct therapies that are currently being investigated in sepsis. PMID:27085987

  14. Septic arthritis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with BPTB allograft.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Mann, Gideon; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Ballester, Soleda J; Cugat, Ramon Bertomeu; Alvarez, Pedro Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an uncommon but a serious complication resulting in six times greater hospital costs than that of uncomplicated ACL surgery and an inferior postoperative activity level. Promptly initiating a specific antibiotic therapy is the most critical treatment, followed by open or arthroscopic joint decompression, debridement and lavage. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus predominantly infecting the skin and soft tissue. The few reported cases of bone and joint infections by S. lugdunensis indicate that the clinical manifestations were severe, the diagnosis elusive, and the treatment difficult. If the microbiology laboratory does not use the tube coagulase (long) test to confirm the slide coagulase test result, the organism might be misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. S. lugdunensis is more virulent than other coagulase-negative staphylococcus; in many clinical situations it behaves like S. aureus, further increasing the confusion and worsening the expected outcome. S. lugdunensis is known to cause infective endocarditis with a worse outcome, septicemia, deep tissue infection, vascular and joint prosthesis infection, osteomyelitis, discitis, breast abscess, urine tract infections, toxic shock and osteitis pubis. We present the first case report in the literature of septic arthritis with S. lugdunensis following arthroscopic ACL revision with bone-patellar-tendon-bone allograft. PMID:17684731

  15. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from -2 to -11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  16. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  17. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  18. Albumin in Burn Shock Resuscitation: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, David G.; Wilkes, Mahlon M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical appraisal of outcomes after burn shock resuscitation with albumin has previously been restricted to small relatively old randomized trials, some with high risk of bias. Extensive recent data from nonrandomized studies assessing the use of albumin can potentially reduce bias and add precision. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of burn shock resuscitation with albumin on mortality and morbidity in adult patients. Randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies evaluating mortality and morbidity in adult patients receiving albumin for burn shock resuscitation were identified by multiple methods, including computer database searches and examination of journal contents and reference lists. Extracted data were quantitatively combined by random-effects meta-analysis. Four randomized and four nonrandomized studies with 688 total adult patients were included. Treatment effects did not differ significantly between the included randomized and nonrandomized studies. Albumin infusion during the first 24 hours showed no significant overall effect on mortality. However, significant statistical heterogeneity was present, which could be abolished by excluding two studies at high risk of bias. After those exclusions, albumin infusion was associated with reduced mortality. The pooled odds ratio was 0.34 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.19 to 0.58 (P < .001). Albumin administration was also accompanied by decreased occurrence of compartment syndrome (pooled odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.07–0.50; P < .001). This meta-analysis suggests that albumin can improve outcomes of burn shock resuscitation. However, the scope and quality of current evidence are limited, and additional trials are needed. PMID:25426807

  19. Close to recommended caloric and protein intake by enteral nutrition is associated with better clinical outcome of critically ill septic patients: secondary analysis of a large international nutrition database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current international sepsis guidelines recommend low-dose enteral nutrition (EN) for the first week. This contradicts other nutrition guidelines for heterogenous groups of ICU patients. Data on the optimal dose of EN in septic patients are lacking. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of energy and protein amount given by EN on clinical outcomes in a large cohort of critically ill septic patients. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of pooled data collected prospectively from international nutrition studies. Eligible patients had a diagnosis of sepsis and/or pneumonia and were admitted to the ICU for ≥3 days, mechanically ventilated within 48 hours of ICU admission and only receiving EN. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition were excluded. Data were collected from ICU admission up to a maximum of 12 days. Regression models were used to examine the impact of calorie and protein intake on 60-day mortality and ventilator-free days. Results Of the 13,630 patients included in the dataset, 2,270 met the study inclusion criteria. Patients received a mean amount of 1,057 kcal/d (14.5 kcal/kg/day) and 49 g protein/day (0.7 g/kg/d) by EN alone. Patients were mechanically ventilated for a median of 8.4 days and 60-day mortality was 30.5%. An increase of 1,000 kcal was associated with reduced 60-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.77, P <0.001) and more ventilator-free days (2.81 days, 95% CI 0.53 to 5.08, P = 0.02) as was an increase of 30 g protein per day (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87, P <0.001 and 1.92 days, 95% CI 0.58 to 3.27, P = 0.005, respectively). Conclusions In critically ill septic patients, a calorie and protein delivery closer to recommended amounts by EN in the early phase of ICU stay was associated with a more favorable outcome. PMID:24506888

  20. Mitral and Aortic Valvulitis in Primary Chronic Septic Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bushmanova, G M; Zorina, I G; Nikityuk, D B; Nepomnyashchikh, R D; Lapii, G A; Postnikova, O A; Semenov, D E

    2015-05-01

    Results of long-term prospective follow-up of patients with early stages of mitral and aortic valvulitis and primary chronic septic endocarditic are presented. Clinical diagnostics of the diseases is described and the key role is assigned to pathognomic (absolute) clinical symptoms. The tendency to progressive fibrosis of endocardial structures with subsequent gradual development of valve dysfunction and stenosis (especially for the mitral valve) is revealed. It is shown that early treatment increases the effective valve area and promotes reversion of mitral stenosis. The possibility of early diagnostics of primary chronic septic endocarditis in combination with adequate etiopathogenetic therapy provide the basis for prevention of acquired valvular disease. PMID:26033580

  1. The severity of shock is associated with impaired rates of net alveolar fluid clearance in clinical acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zeyed, Yosaf F; Bastarache, Julie A; Matthay, Michael A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2012-09-15

    The rate of alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) is associated with mortality in clinical acute lung injury (ALI). Patients with ALI often develop circulatory shock, but how shock affects the rate of AFC is unknown. To determine the effect of circulatory shock on the rate of AFC in patients with ALI, the rate of net AFC was measured in 116 patients with ALI by serial sampling of pulmonary edema fluid. The primary outcome was the rate of AFC in patients with shock compared with those without shock. We also tested the effects of shock severity and bacteremia. Patients with ALI and shock (n = 86) had significantly slower rates of net AFC compared with those without shock (n = 30, P = 0.03), and AFC decreased significantly as the number of vasopressors increased. Patients with positive blood cultures (n = 21) had slower AFC compared with patients with negative blood cultures (n = 96, P = 0.023). In addition, the edema fluid-to-plasma protein ratio, an index of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability, was highest in patients requiring the most vasopressors (P < 0.05). Patients with ALI complicated by circulatory shock and bacteremia had slower rates of AFC compared with patients without shock or bacteremia. An impaired capacity to reabsorb alveolar edema fluid may contribute to high mortality among patients with sepsis-induced ALI. These findings also suggest that vasopressor use may be a marker of alveolar-capillary barrier permeability in ALI and provide justification for new therapies that enhance alveolar epithelial and endothelial barrier integrity in ALI, particularly in patients with shock. PMID:22821995

  2. Predictability of the individual clinical outcome of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for cellulite

    PubMed Central

    Schlaudraff, Kai-Uwe; Kiessling, Maren C; Császár, Nikolaus BM; Schmitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been successfully introduced for the treatment of cellulite in recent years. However, it is still unknown whether the individual clinical outcome of cellulite treatment with extracorporeal shock wave therapy can be predicted by the patient’s individual cellulite grade at baseline, individual patient age, body mass index (BMI), weight, and/or height. Methods Fourteen Caucasian females with cellulite were enrolled in a prospective, single-center, randomized, open-label Phase II study. The mean (± standard error of the mean) cellulite grade at baseline was 2.5±0.09 and mean BMI was 22.8±1.17. All patients were treated with radial extracorporeal shock waves using the Swiss DolorClast® device (Electro Medical Systems, S.A., Nyon, Switzerland). Patients were treated unilaterally with 2 weekly treatments for 4 weeks on a randomly selected side (left or right), totaling eight treatments on the selected side. Treatment was performed at 3.5–4.0 bar, with 15,000 impulses per session applied at 15 Hz. Impulses were homogeneously distributed over the posterior thigh and buttock area (resulting in 7,500 impulses per area). Treatment success was evaluated after the last treatment and 4 weeks later by clinical examination, photographic documentation, contact thermography, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. Results The mean cellulite grade improved from 2.5±0.09 at baseline to 1.57±0.18 after the last treatment (ie, mean δ-1 was 0.93 cellulite grades) and 1.68±0.16 at follow-up (ie, mean δ-2 was 0.82 cellulite grades). Compared with baseline, no patient’s condition worsened, the treatment was well tolerated, and no unwanted side effects were observed. No statistically significant (ie, P<0.05) correlation was found between individual values for δ-1 and δ-2 and cellulite grade at baseline, BMI, weight, height, or age. Conclusion Radial shock wave therapy is a safe and effective treatment option for cellulite. The

  3. [Characteristics of the clinical course and treatment of trauma to various areas of the body combined with facial and jaw injury].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, I I; Kabakov, B D; Luk'ianenko, A V

    1978-09-01

    The cases with combined maxillofacial injuries and traumas of other localization should be considered as cases of a higher risk of septic complications. The specialized stomatologic acid ought to be rendered to such cases with the nearest post-shock period, not later then within 36 hours after trauma. The analysis of 291 clinical observations is set forth. PMID:706107

  4. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection. PMID:26511731

  5. Complement depletion aggravates Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia and septic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sakiniene, E; Bremell, T; Tarkowski, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of the complement system in Staphylococcus aureus arthritis and septicaemia. The murine model of haematogenously acquired septic arthritis was used, injecting intravenously toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), producing S. aureus LS-1. Complement was depleted using cobra venom factor (CVF). Evaluation of arthritis was performed clinically and histopathologically. In addition, the effect of complement depletion on the phagocytic activity of leucocytes was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Six days after inoculation of S. aureus the prevalence of arthritis in decomplemented mice was three-fold higher than that in controls (91% versus 25%). The clinical severity of arthritis at the end of the experiment, expressed as arthritic index, was 7.3 and 1.9, respectively. These findings were confirmed by histological index of synovitis as well as of cartilage and/or bone destruction being significantly higher in decomplemented mice than in controls (9.8 ± 1.7 versus 4.9 ± 1.2, P < 0.05; and 7.9 ± 1.7 versus 3.0 ± 0.9, P < 0.05, respectively). Also, the septicaemia-induced mortality was clearly higher in decomplemented mice compared with the controls. CVF treatment significantly reduced in vivo polymorphonuclear cell-dependent inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of olive oil and mirroring the capacity of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) to migrate and/or extravasate. Besides, the decomplementation procedure significantly impaired phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leucocytes in vitro, since the number of phagocytes being able to ingest bacteria decreased by 50% when the cells were maintained in decomplemented serum compared with those in intact serum. The conclusion is that complement depletion aggravates the clinical course of S. aureus arthritis and septicaemia, possibly by a combination of decreased migration/extravasation of PMNC and an impairment of phagocytosis. PMID:9933426

  6. The Clinical Significance of Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSPB1) in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Mitsuru; Adachi, Seiji; Kozawa, Osamu; Shimizu, Masahito; Yasuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most aggressive forms of cancer. After clinical detection it exhibits fast metastatic growth. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; HSPB1) has been characterized as a molecular chaperone which modifies the structures and functions of other proteins in cells when they are exposed to various stresses, such as chemotherapy. While the administration of gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, has been the standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, accumulating evidence shows that HSP27 plays a key role in the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, phosphorylated HSP27 induced by gemcitabine has been associated with the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In this review, we summarize the role of phosphorylated HSP27, as well as HSP27, in the regulation of chemosensitivity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26805817

  7. The Clinical Significance of Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSPB1) in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Mitsuru; Adachi, Seiji; Kozawa, Osamu; Shimizu, Masahito; Yasuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most aggressive forms of cancer. After clinical detection it exhibits fast metastatic growth. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; HSPB1) has been characterized as a molecular chaperone which modifies the structures and functions of other proteins in cells when they are exposed to various stresses, such as chemotherapy. While the administration of gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, has been the standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, accumulating evidence shows that HSP27 plays a key role in the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, phosphorylated HSP27 induced by gemcitabine has been associated with the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In this review, we summarize the role of phosphorylated HSP27, as well as HSP27, in the regulation of chemosensitivity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26805817

  8. Anti-septic effects of dabrafenib on HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Byeongjin; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Wonhwa; Noh, Hyun Jin; Kim, You-Sun; Han, Min-Su; Baek, Moon-Chang; Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    A nucleosomal protein, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is known to be a late mediator of sepsis. Dabrafenib is a B-Raf inhibitor and initially used for the treatment of metastatic melanoma therapy. Inhibition of HMGB1 and renewal of vascular integrity is appearing as an engaging therapeutic strategy in the administration of severe sepsis or septic shock. Here, we examined the effects of dabrafenib (DAB) on the modulation of HMGB1-mediated septic responses. DAB inhibited the release of HMGB1 and downregulated HMGB1-dependent inflammatory responses by enhancing the expressions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in human endothelial cells. In addition, treatment with DAB inhibited the HMGB1 secretion by CLP and sepsis-related mortality and pulmonary injury. This study demonstrated that DAB could be alternative therapeutic options for sepsis or septic shock via the inhibition of the HMGB1 signaling pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 214-219] PMID:26592934

  9. Campylobacter Fetus Septic Arthritis: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Robert B.; Isturiz, Raul; Cadman, Ed C.

    1979-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by the fastidious gram-negative rod Campylobacter fetus. We suggest that the organism may be part of the endogenous flora and that the clinical infections tend to occur in compromised hosts. Our patient is the first to be described with multiple myeloma and C. fetus septic arthritis. The documented cases of culture-proven C. fetus septic arthritis reported to date have occurred in three men and one woman, all in the seventh and eighth decades of life, with a mono-articular large joint distribution. The septic arthritis always occurred in previously injured joints and curiously enough need not be associated with a toxic-appearing patient. C. fetus infections are also associated with the signs and symptoms of clinical thrombophlebitis. We stress caution in establishing this diagnosis of phlebitis on clinical evaluation only and urge differentiation of true deep vein thrombophlebitis from pseudothrombophlebitis or dissected popliteal synovial cyst. This latter diagnosis may be made non-invasively by ultrasound techniques. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:494668

  10. Ultrasonographic findings in 38 horses with septic arthritis/tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Beccati, Francesca; Gialletti, Rodolfo; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Nannarone, Sara; Di Meo, Antonio; Pepe, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in the horse can have life-threatening consequences. The purpose of this cross-sectional retrospective study was to describe ultrasound characteristics of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis in a group of horses. Diagnosis of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis was based on historical and clinical findings as well as the results of the synovial fluid analysis and/or positive synovial culture. Ultrasonographic findings recorded were degree of joint/sheath effusion, degree of synovial membrane thickening, echogenicity of the synovial fluid, and presence of hyperechogenic spots and fibrinous loculations. Ultrasonographic findings were tested for dependence on the cause of sepsis, time between admission and beginning of clinical signs, and the white blood cell counts in the synovial fluid. Thirty-eight horses with confirmed septic arthritis/tenosynovitis of 43 joints/sheaths were included. Degree of effusion was marked in 81.4% of cases, mild in 16.3%, and absent in 2.3%. Synovial thickening was mild in 30.9% of cases and moderate/severe in 69.1%. Synovial fluid was anechogenic in 45.2% of cases and echogenic in 54.8%. Hyperechogenic spots were identified in 32.5% of structures and fibrinous loculations in 64.3%. Relationships between the degree of synovial effusion, degree of the synovial thickening, presence of fibrinous loculations, and the time between admission and beginning of clinical signs were identified, as well as between the presence of fibrinous loculations and the cause of sepsis (P ≤ 0.05). Findings indicated that ultrasonographic findings of septic arthritis/tenosynovitis may vary in horses, and may be influenced by time between admission and beginning of clinical signs. PMID:25046562

  11. Gamma globulin, Evan's blue, aprotinin A PLA2 inhibitor, tetracycline and antioxidants protect epithelial cells against damage induced by synergism among streptococcal hemolysins, oxidants and proteinases: relation to the prevention of post-streptococcal sequelae and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Sadovnic, M

    1998-11-01

    An in vitro model was employed to study the potential role of streptococcal extra-cellular products, rich in streptolysin O, in cellular injury as related to streptococcal infections and post-streptococcal sequelae. Extra-cellular products (EXPA) rich in streptolysin O were isolated from type 4, group A hemolytic streptococci grown in a chemostat, in a synthetic medium. EXPA induced moderate cytopathogenic changes in monkey kidney epithelial cells and in rat heart cells pre-labeled with 3H-arachidonate. However very strong toxic effects were induced when EXP was combined with oxidants (glucose oxides generated H2O2, AAPH-induced peroxyl radical (ROO.), NO generated by sodium nitroprusside) and proteinases (plasmin, trypsin). Cell killing was distinctly synergistic in nature. Cell damage induced by the multi-component cocktails was strongly inhibited either by micromolar amounts of gamma globulin, and Evan's blue which neutralized SLO activity, by tetracycline, trasylol (aprotinin), epsilon amino caproic acid and by soybean trypsin inhibitor, all proteinase inhibitors as well as by a non-penetrating PLA2 inhibitor A. The results suggest that fasciitis, myositis and sepsis resulting from infections with hemolytic streptococci might be caused by a coordinated 'cross-talk' among microbial, leukocyte and additional host-derived pro-inflammatory agents. Since attempts to prolong lives of septic patients by the exclusive administration of single antagonists invariably failed, it is proposed that the administration of 'cocktails' of putative inhibitors against major pro-inflammatory agonizes generated in inflammation and infection might protect against the deleterious effects caused by the biochemical and pharmacological cascades which are known to be activated in sepsis. PMID:9848686

  12. Septic abortion caused by Campylobacter jejuni bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Skuhala, Tomislava; Škerk, Višnja; Markotić, Alemka; Bukovski, Suzana; Desnica, Boško

    2016-08-01

    A 20-year-old female patient, 14 weeks pregnant, was admitted to hospital with anamnestic and clinical features of acute pyelonephritis. Clinical signs of septic abortion developed and after obstetric examination the therapy was changed to ampicillin, gentamicin and clindamycin. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from blood cultures. Pathohistological findings confirmed diagnosis of purulent chorioamnionitis. After 2 weeks of ciprofloxacin administration the patient fully recovered. Campylobacter jejuni was not isolated from stool culture and no signs of acute enteritis were registered during the illness. Invasive forms of Campylobacter disease without enteritis are not unusual in immunocompromised hosts but they are restricted to C. fetus rather than C. jejuni isolates. PMID:25872616

  13. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Following Appendectomy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lardo, Soroy; Ariane, Anna; Chen, Khie

    2015-07-01

    Septic Pulmonary embolism is a rare condition where there were numerous pulmonary infarcts resulting from blood clot emboli that also contains microorganism. This disorder is insidious onset, Its clinical features usually unspecific and the diagnosis usually difficult to establish. A 43 old woman who underwent an appendicitis surgery, reentered the hospital at the sixth day after surgery presented with fever, pain at the surgical site, progressive severe dyspnea and chest tightness. From the physical examination finding there were tachycardia, tachypneu, wet rough basal rhonki on the right rear and tenderness at right lower region of the abdomen. The thorax-abdomen CT scan result was pleuropneumonial with minimal effusion in the right side. A CT angiography scan of the chest and abdomen showed intralumen emboli in medial lobe segmen of right pulmonary artery, right pleuropneumonia with segmental lession in segmen 10 right lobe and inflammation process along right lateral wall of the abdomen. Laboratory results that also supported diagnosis were D dimer 3442 ng/mL and culture result from surgical site pus showed E. Coli ESBL (+). Base on these findings, this case was established as a septic pulmonary embolism. PMID:26586389

  14. Association of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with clinical components of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, D F; Schwartz, B; Black, C M; Todd, J K; Elliott, J; Breiman, R F; Facklam, R R

    1993-01-01

    Sixty-two invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strains, including 32 strains isolated from patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), were analyzed for the following phenotypic and genotypic characteristics: M-protein type, serum opacity factor production, protease production, the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) genes A, B, and C, and in vitro production of SpeA and SpeB. These characteristics were analyzed for possible associations with each other as well as with clinical components of STSS. M-type 1, the most commonly isolated M-type, was significantly associated with protease production. Protease activity was significantly associated with the clinical sign of soft tissue necrosis. M-type 1 and 3 strains from STSS patients were significantly associated with the clinical signs of shock and organ involvement as well as with SpeA production in vitro. Finally, the production of SpeA was significantly associated with the clinical component of shock and organ involvement as well as with rash. These data suggest that STSS does not make up a single syndrome but, rather, that the multiple STSS clinical criteria probably reflect different phenotypic characteristics of individual S. pyogenes isolates. PMID:8335368

  15. Is It Time to Beta Block the Septic Patient?

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Philip; Veenith, Tonny; Snelson, Catherine; Whitehouse, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Beta blockers are some of the most studied drugs in the pharmacopoeia. They are already widely used in medicine for treating hypertension, chronic heart failure, tachyarrhythmias, and tremor. Whilst their use in the immediate perioperative patient has been questioned, the use of esmolol in the patients with established septic shock has been recently reported to have favourable outcomes. In this paper, we review the role of the adrenergic system in sepsis and the evidence for the use of beta stimulation and beta blockers from animal models to critically ill patients. PMID:26557668

  16. Impact of the Timing of Morphine Administration on Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Lethal Endotoxic Shock in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Tomoko; Kato, Hidehito; Ozaki, Makoto; Yagi, Junji

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis is a serious condition related to systemic inflammation, organ dysfunction, and organ failure. It is a subset of the cytokine storm caused by dysregulation of cytokine production. Morphine influences the severity of infection in vivo and in vitro because it regulates cytokine production. We investigated the immunological function of morphine using a mouse model of septic shock. We treated mice with α-galactosylceramide (2 μg/mouse) to induce lethal endotoxic shock following a challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.5 μg/mouse). This model represents acute lung injury and respiratory failure, and reflects the clinical features of severe septic shock. We evaluated the effect of the timing of morphine (0.8 mg/mouse) administration on the survival rate, cytokine production in vivo, and histological changes of mice with LPS-mediated lethal endotoxic shock. Morphine treatment before LPS challenge suppressed lethal endotoxic shock. In contrast, when we administered after LPS, morphine exacerbated lethal endotoxic shock; hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed a marked increase in the accumulation of infiltrates comprising polymorphonuclear leukocytes and mononuclear cells in the lung; and Elastica van Gieson staining revealed the destruction of alveoli. The plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, monocyte-chemotactic protein-1, and interleukin-12 in the group treated with morphine after LPS challenge were higher than those treated with morphine before LPS challenge. In conclusion, one of the factors that determine whether morphine exacerbates or inhibits infection is the timing of its administration. Morphine treatment before shock improved the survival rate, and morphine treatment after shock decreased the rate of survival. PMID:26682949

  17. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics, basic research, and clinical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorf, Joerg; Jansson, Volkmar; Maier, Markus; Delius, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The molecular events following shock wave treatment of bone are widely unknown. Nevertheless patients with osteonecrosis and non unions are already treated partly successful with shock waves. Concerning the first indication, the question of the permeation of the shock wave into the bone was addressed. Therefore shockwaves were applied to porcine femoral heads and the intraosseous pressure was measured. A linear correlation of the pressure to the intraosseous distance was found. Approximately 50% of the pressure are still measurable 10 mm inside the femoral head. These findings should encourage continued shock wave research on this indication. Concerning the second indication (non union), osteoblasts were subjected to 250 or 500 shock waves at 25 kV. After 24, 48, and 72 h the levels of the bone and vascular growth factors bFGF, TGFbeta1, and VEGF were examined. After 24 h there was a significant increase in bFGF levels (p<0.05) with significant correlation (p<0.05) to the number of impulses. TGFbeta1, and VEGF showed no significant changes. This may be one piece in the cascade of new bone formation following shock wave treatment and may lead to a more specific application of shock waves in orthopedic surgery.

  18. Diagnostic challenges in acromioclavicular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with Klinefelter's syndrome presented with a painful shoulder and staphylococcal sepsis. He received intravenous antibiotics while investigations were performed to locate the source of infection. MRI demonstrated infection in the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). The patient clinically improved and a further 5 weeks of oral antibiotics were given. He remained asymptomatic at 2-year follow-up. Although ACJ septic arthritis is rare, independent of immune-competent status, a high index of suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis. The condition presents additional diagnostic challenges due to unfamiliarity, the challenges of interpreting imaging, desire for radiological guided arthrocentesis and low volume aspirates. Overcoming these pitfalls is essential to avoid significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:27257000

  19. The Application of Clinical Lithotripter Shock Waves to RNA Nucleotide Delivery to Cells.

    PubMed

    Nwokeoha, Sandra; Carlisle, Robert; Cleveland, Robin O

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of genes into cells through the transfer of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) has been found to cause a change in the level of target protein expression. RNA-based transfection is conceptually more efficient than commonly delivered plasmid DNA because it does not require division or damage of the nuclear envelope, thereby increasing the chances of the cell remaining viable. Shock waves (SWs) have been found to induce cellular uptake by transiently altering the permeability of the plasma membrane, thereby overcoming a critical step in gene therapy. However, accompanying SW bio-effects include dose-dependent irreversible cell injury and cytotoxicity. Here, the effect of SWs generated by a clinical lithotripter on the viability and permeabilisation of three different cell lines in vitro was investigated. Comparison of RNA stability before and after SW exposure revealed no statistically significant difference. Optimal SW exposure parameters were identified to minimise cell death and maximise permeabilisation, and applied to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) messenger RNA (mRNA) or anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery. As a result, eGFP mRNA expression levels increased up to 52-fold in CT26 cells, whereas a 2-fold decrease in GFP expression was achieved after anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery to MCF-7/GFP cells. These results indicate that SW parameters can be employed to achieve effective nucleotide delivery, laying the foundation for non-invasive and high-tolerability RNA-based gene therapy. PMID:27444864

  20. Flavanones and Chromones from Salicornia herbacea Mitigate Septic Lethality via Restoration of Vascular Barrier Integrity.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Nguyen Quoc; Lee, Wonhwa; Oh, Joonseok; Kulkarni, Roshan Rajan; Gény, Charlotte; Jung, Byeongjin; Kang, Hyejin; Bae, Jong-Sup; Na, MinKyun

    2015-11-25

    Salicornia herbacea is an annual halophytic glasswort that has been employed as a culinary vegetable, salad, and traditional medicinal resource. Chemical investigation of the aerial parts of S. herbacea led to the isolation of two new (1, 2) and known (3) flavanones as well as a new nature-derived (4) and two known chromone derivatives (5, 6). These purified compounds were evaluated for their suppressive potentials against the release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), which has captured attention as a viable target for alleviating serious septic manifestations or septicemia. The phenolic compounds improved the survival rates of cecal ligation and puncture operation (CLP) in murine models, simulating severe septic shock and its related complications, to 40-60%. These results collectively validate that flavanone- and chromone-based secondary metabolites may serve as prospective prodrugs or food additives that may be commercialized for the control of septic complications and lethality. PMID:26522440

  1. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24567239

  2. A Homeowner's Guide to Septic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sponenberg, Torsten D.; And Others

    This booklet provides basic information on septic system use and maintenance. Written for current and prospective homeowners, it offers guidelines for proper operation of household septic systems. In addition, (1) components of individual systems are diagrammatically explained; (2) suggestions for maintenance are outlined; (3) problem areas and…

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Dengue Shock Syndrome in Vietnamese Children: A 10-Year Prospective Study in a Single Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Phung Khanh; Tam, Dong Thi Hoai; Diet, Tran Vinh; Tam, Cao Thi; Tien, Nguyen Thi Hanh; Kieu, Nguyen Tan Thanh; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy; Nga, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Qui, Phan Tu; Dung, Nguyen Minh; Wolbers, Marcel; Wills, Bridget

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is a severe manifestation of dengue virus infection that particularly affects children and young adults. Despite its increasing global importance, there are no prospective studies describing the clinical characteristics, management, or outcomes of DSS. Methods. We describe the findings at onset of shock and the clinical evolution until discharge or death, from a comprehensive prospective dataset of 1719 Vietnamese children with laboratory-confirmed DSS managed on a single intensive care unit between 1999 and 2009. Results. The median age of patients was 10 years. Most cases had secondary immune responses, with only 6 clear primary infections, and all 4 dengue virus serotypes were represented during the 10-year study. Shock occurred commonly between days 4 and 6 of illness. Clinical signs and symptoms were generally consistent with empirical descriptions of DSS, although at presentation 153 (9%) were still febrile and almost one-third had no bleeding. Overall, 31 (2%) patients developed severe bleeding, primarily from the gastrointestinal tract, 26 of whom required blood transfusion. Only 8 patients died, although 123 of 1719 (7%) patients had unrecordable blood pressure at presentation and 417 of the remaining 1596 (26%) were hypotensive for age. The majority recovered well with standard crystalloid resuscitation or following a single colloid infusion. All cases were classified as severe dengue, while only 70% eventually fulfilled all 4 criteria for the 1997 World Health Organization classification of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Conclusions. With prompt intervention and assiduous clinical care by experienced staff, the outcome of this potentially fatal condition can be excellent. PMID:24046311

  4. Clinical review: mechanical circulatory support for cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the 10 leading reasons for admission to adult critical care units. In-hospital mortality for this condition has remained static in recent years, and this is related primarily to the development of cardiogenic shock. Recent advances in reperfusion therapies have had little impact on the mortality of cardiogenic shock. This may be attributable to the underutilization of life support technology that may assist or completely supplant the patient's own cardiac output until adequate myocardial recovery is established or long-term therapy can be initiated. Clinicians working in the intensive care environment are increasingly likely to be exposed to these technologies. The purpose of this review is to outline the various techniques of mechanical circulatory support and discuss the latest evidence for their use in cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction. PMID:21067535

  5. Good's Syndrome Accompanied by Agranulocytosis Following a Rapid Clinical Course.

    PubMed

    Okusu, Takahiro; Sato, Taiki; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Nagata, Shinpei; Kozumi, Kazuhiro; Kim, Sung-Ho; Yamamoto, Suguru; Yamayoshi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Good's syndrome is an immunodeficiency disease involving thymoma accompanied by hypogammaglobulinemia. We encountered a case of Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis that followed a rapid clinical course. A 72-year-old man visited our hospital with a two-week history of a sore throat. Candida albicans was detected in the pharynx, and hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in addition to granulocytopenia. The patient subsequently developed septic shock and followed a rapid clinical course which ended in death. Good's syndrome with agranulocytosis was diagnosed at autopsy. Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis can follow a rapid clinical course and some cases remain asymptomatic until old age. Its prompt treatment is crucial. PMID:26935379

  6. Impact of Inappropriate Empiric Antimicrobial Therapy on Mortality of Septic Patients with Bacteremia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lueangarun, Saoraya; Leelarasamee, Amorn

    2012-01-01

    Background. Inappropriate empiric antimicrobials could be a major cause of unfavorable mortality rates in co-morbid patients. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and impact of first-dose and 24-hour inappropriate antimicrobials on mortality rates of bacteremic septic patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was employed. Case record forms of patients diagnosed as sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock with positive hemoculture during 2009 were retrieved from the medical wards, Siriraj Hospital. Demographic data, antimicrobial use, types of bacteria isolated from blood and susceptibilities, patients' comorbidities, 28-day and overall mortality rates were collected and analyzed. Results. There were 229 cases, mean age (SD) of 63.5 (17.2) years and mean (SD) APACHE II score of 24.7 (6.8). The prevalence of first-dose and 24-hour inappropriate antimicrobials was 29.7% and 25.3%, respectively. The 28-day and overall mortality rates between first-dose inappropriate and appropriate antimicrobial were 67.6% versus 60.2% (P = 0.301) and 75.0% versus 68.3% (P = 0.345), consequently. Patients with septic shock and inappropriate first-dose antimicrobials significantly had higher 28-day mortality rate (61.6% versus 41.9%; P = 0.017). Conclusion. Higher mortality rates in bacteremic septic patients were substantially associated with inappropriate first-dose antimicrobials and 3-hour delayed antimicrobial administration after sepsis diagnosis. PMID:22919379

  7. A Case of Acinetobacter Septic Pulmonary Embolism in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, Anitha; David, Jane; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Case Characteristics. An 11-month-old girl presented with fever and breathlessness for 5 days. Patient had respiratory distress with bilateral coarse crepitations. Chest radiograph revealed diffuse infiltrations in the right lung with thick walled cavities in mid and lower zone. Computed tomography showed multiple cystic spaces and emboli. Blood culture grew Acinetobacter species. Intervention. Patient was treated with Meropenem and Vancomycin. Outcome. Complete clinical and radiological recovery was seen in child. Message. Blood cultures and CT of the chest are invaluable in the evaluation of a patient with suspected septic pulmonary embolism. With early diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, complete recovery can be expected in patients with septic pulmonary embolism. PMID:27529040

  8. Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis as a Complication of Neonatal Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Noor J.; Bakathir, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Hashmi, Ahmed K.; Al-Ismaili, Mohammad I.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis as a complication of neonatal septic arthritis is rarely reported in the literature. We report two clinical cases of unilateral TMJ ankylosis occurring in paediatric patients subsequent to neonatal septic arthritis. The first case was a 15-month-old male infant who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in May 2010. According to the published English scientific literature, he is the youngest person yet to be diagnosed with this condition. The second case was a five-year-old female who presented to the Al-Nahda Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2011. Both cases presented with facial asymmetry and trismus. They subsequently underwent gap arthroplasty and interpositional temporalis muscle and fascia grafts which resulted in an immediate improvement in mouth opening. Postoperatively, the patients underwent active jaw physiotherapy which was initially successful. Both patients were followed up for a minimum of two years following their surgeries. PMID:26629387

  9. How to monitor the brain in septic patients?

    PubMed

    Oddo, M; Taccone, F S

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury is frequently observed after sepsis and may be primarily related to the direct effects of the septic insult on the brain (e.g., brain edema, ischemia, seizures) or to secondary/indirect injuries (e.g., hypotension, hypoxemia, hypocapnia, hyperglycemia). Management of brain injury in septic patients is first focused to exclude structural intracranial complications (e.g., ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke) and possible confounders (e.g., electrolyte alterations or metabolic disorders, such as dysglycemia). Sepsis-associated brain dysfunction is frequently a heterogeneous syndrome. Despite increasing understanding of main pathophysiologic determinants, therapy is essentially limited to protect the brain against further cerebral damage, by way of "simple" therapeutic manipulations of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation and by avoiding over-sedation. Non-invasive monitoring of cerebral perfusion and oxygenation with transcranial Doppler (TCD) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is feasible in septic patients. Electroencephalography (EEG) allows detection of sepsis-related seizures and holds promise also as sedation monitoring. Brain CT-scan detects intra-cerebral structural lesions, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides important insights into primary mechanisms of sepsis-related direct brain injury, (e.g., cytotoxic vs. vasogenic edema) and the development of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Together with EEG and evoked potentials (EP), MRI is also important for coma prognostication. Emerging clinical evidence suggests monitoring of the brain in septic patients can be implemented in the ICU. The objective of this review was to summarize recent clinical data about the role of brain monitoring - including TCD, NIRS, EEG, EP, CT, and MRI - in patients with sepsis and to illustrate its potential utility for the diagnosis, management and prognostication. PMID:25812488

  10. Clinical application of shock wave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders: part II related to myofascial and nerve apparatus.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves have been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; accordingly we carried out a review on the effect of shock waves on the mesenchymal cells in their various expressions: bone, muscle, ligament and tendon tissue. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown the positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to present the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of myofascial and nerve disorders. With the help of the relevant literature, in this paper we outline the indications and success rates of SWT, as well as the adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density) defined according to the present state of knowledge. PMID:26753637

  11. Septic acute kidney injury: molecular mechanisms and the importance of stratification and targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Eric D; Kellum, John A; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients is sepsis. However, the molecular pathways and mechanisms that mediate septic AKI are not well defined. Experiments performed over the past 20 years suggest that there are profound differences in the pathogenesis between septic and ischemic AKI. Septic AKI often occurs independently of hypoperfusion, and is mediated by a concomitant pro- and anti-inflammatory state that is activated in response to various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as endotoxin, as well as damage-associated molecular patterns. These molecular patterns are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) found in the kidney, and effectuate downstream inflammatory pathways. Additionally, apoptosis has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic AKI. However, targeted therapies designed to mitigate the above aspects of the inflammatory state, TLR-related pathways, and apoptosis have failed to show significant clinical benefit. This failure is likely due to the protean nature of septic AKI, whereby different patients present at different points along the immunologic spectrum. While one patient may benefit from targeted therapy at one end of the spectrum, another patient at the other end may be harmed by the same therapy. We propose that a next important step in septic AKI research will be to identify where patients lie on the immunologic spectrum in order to appropriately target therapies at the inflammatory cascade, TLRs, and possibly apoptosis. PMID:25575158

  12. Circulating cell-free DNA indicates M1/M2 responses during septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yi; Gao, Xingjuan; Wang, Wenxiao; Xu, Xiaojuan; Yu, Lijuan; Ju, Xiuli; Li, Aimin

    2016-09-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has been widely suggested as clinical indicator in diseases, including sepsis. It was thought that the cfDNA was coming from the cell lysis, necrosis and apoptosis caused by tissue damages during sepsis. M1 or M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo, which is highly relevant with the tissue damages in sepsis. The correlation between cfDNA and M1/M2 responses during sepsis was never investigated. Here, we used bacteria injection induced septic peritonitis mouse model in both M1-dominant C57bl/6 and M2-dominant Balb/c mouse strains. We found that M2-dominant Balb/c mice showed better prognosis of septic peritonitis than C57bl/6 mice, which is corresponded with lower level of cfDNA in septic Balb/c mice compared to septic C57bl/6 mice. By assessing the M1 and M2 related cytokines in both septic Balb/c and C57bl/6 mice, we found out that Balb/c mice has lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and higher interleukin 10 (IL-10) productions than C57bl/6 mice during septic peritonitis. Especially, when monitoring the monocyte subtypes in peripheral blood of these septic mice, we found out that C57bl/6 showed higher inflammatory (Ly6C(high)) monocyte (corresponding to M1 macrophage) proportion than Balb/c mice. Interestingly, we find out that cfDNA is highly correlated with the ratio of Ly6C(high) monocytes versus Ly6C(low) monocytes, which represents M1/M2 (killing/healing) responses. Our study suggested that the cfDNA is a good indicator for evaluating M1/M2 responses in septic peritonitis. PMID:27335257

  13. STARD-compliant article: The utility of red cell distribution width to predict mortality for septic patients visiting the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kuei; Lin, Shen-Che; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Chen, Li-Min; Tzeng, I-Shiang; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common condition in the emergency department that is associated with high mortality. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) has been used as a simple prognosis predictor for patients with community-acquired pneumonia, gram-negative bacteremia, and severe sepsis or septic shock. To evaluate the performance of RDW to predict in-hospital mortality among septic patients, we conducted a hospital-based retrospective cohort study in an emergency department of a tertiary teaching hospital. RDW was compared with other commonly used clinical prediction scores (Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS) and the Confusion, Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, 65 years of age and older (CURB65)). Of 6973 consecutive adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of sepsis and 2 sets of blood culture ordered by physicians, 477 (6.8%) died. The mortality group had higher RDW levels than the survival group (15.7% vs 13.8%). After dividing RDW into quartiles, the patients in the highest RDW quartile (RDW >15.6%; mortality, 16.7%) had more than twice the risk of in-hospital mortality compared with patients in the second highest quartile (RDW >14% and <15.6%; mortality, 7.3%), whereas the mortality rate in the lowest RDW quartile (<13.1%) was only 1.6%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of RDW to predict mortality was 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.77), which is significantly higher than the areas under the curve of clinical prediction rules (SIRS, MEDS, and CURB65). After integrating RDW into these scores, all scores performed better in predicting mortality (0.73, 0.72, and 0.77, for SIRS, MEDS, and CURB65, respectively). RDW could be an independent predictor of mortality among septic patients. Clinicians could classify the septic patients into different risk groups according to RDW quartiles. For more accurate mortality prediction, RDW could be a potential parameter to be

  14. Septic Mice Are Susceptible to Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Benjamim, Claudia F.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical data underscores the fact that subsequent high mortality rates occur in patients who survive acute septic episodes. Herein, we described a clinically relevant model of experimental sepsis that we believe will allow further investigation of the manner in which the pulmonary innate immune response is modulated after sepsis. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model, whereby the cecum was partially ligated and punctured nine times with a 21-gauge needle. This procedure was associated with 100% mortality at 3 days after surgery. In contrast, when mice subjected to CLP were treated with antibiotic beginning at 8 hours after surgery, and every 12 hours thereafter until 3 days, ∼60% of the mice survived. Interestingly, CLP survivors quickly succumbed (100% mortality) to pulmonary infection when intratracheally challenged, at day 3 after CLP, with viable Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. No mortality was observed in conidia-challenged sham-operated mice. The defective innate immune response against A. fumigatus in CLP mice could not be explained by a failure of neutrophils to infiltrate the lungs. Instead, gene array analysis revealed that several components of the innate immune response, including the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway, were down-regulated. Thus, we describe a system of sepsis-induced innate immune failure in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. PMID:14633632

  15. Clinical experience with shock-wave lithotripsy using the Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, Mohamed E.; Oraby, Samir; Sameh, Wael; El-Abbady, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effectiveness of a lithotripter (Modularis Vario; Siemens, AG Healthcare, Munich, Germany) in the management of renal and ureteric stones. Patients and methods In all, 1146 adult patients with renal or ureteric stones were treated at one urological centre using the latest model of the Modularis Vario lithotripter. The effectiveness of lithotripsy and re-treatment rate were assessed. Data were obtained on stone location, stone size, shock wave usage, success rate, and complications. Results Between May 2007 and November 2009, 698 patients with renal stones and 448 with ureteric stones underwent extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The mean (SD) renal stone size was 12.8 (3.8) mm; a mean of 1.36 sessions was required, with a mean (SD) number of 3744 (1961) shocks delivered per renal stone. After 3 months, the success rate defined as the patient being stone-free or with residual fragments of <4 mm; for renal stones the rate was 91.1%, with a 6.9% complication rate in the form of steinstrasse and severe renal colic. The mean (SD) ureteric stone size was 10.4 (2.7) mm. A mean of 1.37 sessions was required, with a mean (SD) of 4551 (2467) shocks delivered for each ureteric stone. The success rate for ureteric stones was 89.5%, with a 5.6% complication rate. The overall efficiency quotient was 0.66. Conclusion The Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter is a safe and effective machine for treating renal and ureteric stones. PMID:26579276

  16. Septic complications of hemorrhoidal banding.

    PubMed

    Quevedo-Bonilla, G; Farkas, A M; Abcarian, H; Hambrick, E; Orsay, C P

    1988-05-01

    Rubber band ligation is an efficacious and cost-effective alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy for symptomatic internal hemorrhoids. Even though the well-recognized complications of bleeding and thrombosis occur infrequently, far more serious septic complications have only recently been described, as evidenced in five of our patients: four cases were serious enough to necessitate surgical intervention, and one patient died. Pain followed by urinary dysfunction with or without toxic symptoms should alert the physician to the probability of localized perianal or systemic sepsis. Acute awareness of these rare but potentially life-threatening complications and immediate aggressive treatment is mandatory if death is to be prevented. Rubber band ligation of internal hemorrhoids need not be abandoned; however, the indications should be clear, the technique mastered, and a close patient follow-up maintained. PMID:3358691

  17. Radical surgery in septic abortion.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, P; Ghosh, M; Ghosh, S

    1979-08-01

    At R.G. Kar Medical College Hospital, Calcutta, 10 cases of septic abortion from 1975-1977 were studied. Hysterectomies were preformed on 4 cases due to emergency situations including traumatised uterine fundus and perforated cervix, and on 6 cases after conservative treatment. Upon performing laparotomy in 9 cases, a uterine rent was detected; in 1 case there was a perforation in the posterior wall of the cervix, and in 5 cases mechanical obstructions due to internal adhesions to the uterine rent were found. 4 patients died primarily because of the patients seeking help too late. It is suggested that under high risk circumstances, laparotomy is advantageous to conservative medical management since bowel injuries and mechanical obstructions can only be detected by laparotomy. Radical surgery, however, should be undertaken before the patients general condition deteriorates to the point that the patient cannot tolerate surgical intervention. PMID:12336028

  18. Optoacoustic measurement of central venous oxygenation for assessment of circulatory shock: clinical study in cardiac surgery patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock is a dangerous medical condition, in which blood flow cannot provide the necessary amount of oxygen to organs and tissues. Currently, its diagnosis and therapy decisions are based on hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases) and mental status of a patient, which all have low specificity. Measurement of mixed or central venous blood oxygenation via catheters is more reliable, but highly invasive and associated with complications. Our previous studies in healthy volunteers demonstrated that optoacoustic systems provide non-invasive measurement of blood oxygenation in specific vessels, including central veins. Here we report our first results of a clinical study in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients. We used a medical-grade OPO-based optoacoustic system developed in our laboratory to measure in real time blood oxygenation in the internal jugular vein (IJV) of these patients. A clinical ultrasound imaging system (GE Vivid e) was used for IJV localization. Catheters were placed in the IJV as part of routine care and blood samples taken via the catheters were processed with a CO-oximeter. The optoacoustic oxygenation data were compared to the CO-oximeter readings. Good correlation between the noninvasive and invasive measurements was obtained. The results of these studies suggest that the optoacoustic system can provide accurate, noninvasive measurements of central venous oxygenation that can be used for patients with circulatory shock.

  19. FALLS-protocol: lung ultrasound in hemodynamic assessment of shock.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, D

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of acute circulatory failure is a challenge in absence of solid gold standard. It is suggested that artifacts generated by lung ultrasound can be of help. The FALLS-protocol (Fluid Administration Limited by Lung Sonography) follows Weil's classification of shocks. Firstly, it searches for pericardial fluid, then right heart enlargment, lastly abolished lung sliding. In this setting, the diagnoses of pericardial tamponade, pulmonary embolism and tension pneumothorax, i.e. obstructive shock, can be schematically ruled out. Moreover, the search of diffuse lung rockets (i.e. multiple B-lines, a comet-tail artifact) is performed. Its absence excludes pulmonary edema, that in clinical practice is left cardiogenic shock (most cases). At this step, the patient (defined FALLS-responder) receives fluid therapy. He/she has usually a normal sonographic lung surface, an A-profile. Any clinical improvement suggests hypovolemic shock. The absence of improvement generates continuation of fluid therapy, eventually yielding fluid overload. This condition results in the change from A-profile to B-profile. Lung ultrasound has the advantage to demonstrate this interstitial syndrome at an early and infraclinical stage (FALLS-endpoint). The change from horizontal A-lines to vertical B-lines can be considered as a direct marker of volemia in this use. By elimination, this change indicates schematically distributive shock, while in current practice septic shock. The major limitation is the B-profile on admission generated by an initial lung disorder. FALLS-protocol, which can be associated with no drawback with traditional hemodynamic tools, uses a simple machine (without Doppler) and a suitable microconvex probe allowing for heart, lung and vein assessment. PMID:24364005

  20. Postpartum septic sacroiliitis misdiagnosed as sciatic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Qing; Li, Fang-Cai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Shuang

    2010-03-01

    Early diagnosis of septic sacroiliitis is difficult because symptoms are nonspecific, especially during pregnancy and the postpartum period. We describe a female patient with left buttock pain radiating down the thigh after an uncomplicated induction delivery. She was afebrile and had no apparent abnormality on pelvic x-ray or computed tomography scan. A sensory deficit in the lateral portion of her left lower limb was found, and electromyography showed neurogenic abnormalities in the left lower limb. She was initially misdiagnosed as sciatic neuropathy. As her symptoms worsened, septic sacroiliitis is considered. Bone scintigraphy showed increased Tc-methylene diphosphonate uptake in the left sacroiliac joint, and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a signal abnormality in the left sacroiliac joint. The diagnosis of septic sacroiliitis was then confirmed by the rapid efficacy of antibiotic therapy. This report suggests that irritation and injury of spinal nerves can be the presenting signs in septic sacroiliitis. PMID:20090512

  1. Septic arthritis of the hip - current concepts.

    PubMed

    Rutz, E; Brunner, R

    2009-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip is the commonest septic condition during growth, reaching a distinct peak in frequency during infancy. The aetiology is a haematogenous joint infection. Indicative signs are severe pain when moving the joint, septic appearance and a poor general condition of these small and young patients. The diagnosis often can be difficult in infants since septic temperatures are not always present. An ultrasound scan shows the hip joint effusion and the capsular distension. X-ray investigation helps to exclude defective situations. Therapeutic options are: in patients with short history without radiologically visible complications we recommend repeated arthroscopic irrigation and in patients with long history and a radiologically visible defect of the femoral head or dislocation we recommend arthrotomy and open revision or reduction of the hip joint. PMID:19306242

  2. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock. PMID:27543137

  3. Septic arthritis due to Aerococcus viridans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P W; Trueblood, M C

    1985-10-01

    A 20-year-old woman was found to have septic arthritis of the hip due to Aerococcus viridans. This organism closely resembles Streptococcus viridans, but forms gram positive tetrads rather than chains in broth media. The organism has been reported rarely to cause endocarditis and one case of osteomyelitis has been observed. To our knowledge septic arthritis due to Aerococcus viridans has not been previously reported. PMID:4087248

  4. Modeling Blood Filtration in the Treatment of Septic Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Glenn; Hubler, Alfred

    2007-03-01

    Sepsis, the overreaction of the inflammation and coagulation responses to infection, is the leading cause of death in non-coronary intensive care unit patients in the US. Anti-mediator drugs have been generally ineffective, but by considering the network of cytokine interactions, we illustrate how filtering the cytokines in the blood leads to a reduced response. We further illustrate by applying an appropriate filter to existing immune response models as well as discuss both practical and optimal filter parameters.

  5. Optimization of Preload in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shujaat, Adil; Bajwa, Abubakr A.

    2012-01-01

    In sepsis both under- and overresuscitation are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Moreover, sepsis can be complicated by myocardial dysfunction, and only half of the critically ill patients exhibit preload responsiveness. It is of paramount importance to accurately, safely, and rapidly determine and optimize preload during resuscitation. Traditional methods of determining preload based on measurement of pressure in a heart chamber or volume of a heart chamber (“static” parameters) are inaccurate and should be abandoned in favor of determining preload responsiveness by using one of the “dynamic parameters” based on respiratory variation in the venous or arterial circulation or based on change in stroke volume in response to an endogenous or exogenous volume challenge. The recent development and validation of a number of noninvasive technologies now allow us to optimize preload in an accurate, safe, rapid and, cost-effective manner. PMID:22919473

  6. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  7. Multifaceted interventions to decrease mortality in patients with severe sepsis/septic shock—a quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Siontis, Brittany; Elmer, Jennifer; Dannielson, Richard; Brown, Catherine; Park, John; Surani, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that EGDT improves outcomes in septic patients, staff education on EGDT and compliance with the CPOE order set has been variable. Based on results of a resident survey to identify barriers to decrease severe sepsis/septic shock mortality in the medical intensive care unit (MICU), multifaceted interventions such as educational interventions to improve awareness to the importance of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT), and the use of the Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) order set, were implemented in July 2013. CPOE order set was established to improve compliance with the EGDT resuscitation bundle elements. Orders were reviewed and compared for patients admitted to the MICU with severe sepsis/septic shock in July and August 2013 (controls) and 2014 (following the intervention). Similarly, educational slide sets were used as interventions for residents before the start of their ICU rotations in July and August 2013. While CPOE order set compliance did not significantly improve (78% vs. 76%, p = 0.74), overall EGDT adherence improved from 43% to 68% (p = 0.0295). Although there was a trend toward improved mortality, this did not reach statistical significance. This study shows that education interventions can be used to increase awareness of severe sepsis/septic shock and improve overall EGDT adherence. PMID:26500811

  8. The pulmonary air-blood barrier of human shock lungs (a clinical, ultrastructural and morphometric study).

    PubMed

    Riede, U N; Joachim, H; Hassenstein, J; Costabel, U; Sandritter, W; Augustin, P; Mittermayer, C

    1978-05-01

    Interstitial edema in the alveolar septa is the first morphologically recognisable change to be observed in cases of shock. It is brought about by the altered function of the membranes of the damaged epithelium and endothelium in the alveolar wall. At the same time there is an impairment of gaseous exchange, which is rendered more difficult by the exudative process in the interstitium. Pari passu with these events there is injury to the cells of both the alveolar epithelium and the alveolar capillary endothelium. Both these processes are still reversible. The point of irreversibility appears to be reached--so far as time is concerned--at the end of the first week, after which the injurious effects on the cell are established, since the thin alveolar wall necessary for the exchange of gases becomes overgrown with bulky alveocytes (Tpye II), and the fibroblasts in thealveolar interstitium push the capillaries away from the surface of the alveolus. In most of the advanced cases of shock this process of thickening of the alveolar wall exceeds the critical value, and respiratory exchange is so impaired that satisfactory functioning of the lungs is no longer possible. PMID:683896

  9. [Shock-induced respiratory insufficiency (clinical aspects, pathology ultrastructure and morphometry)].

    PubMed

    Riede, U N; Horn, R; Mittermayer, C

    1980-01-01

    Interstitial oedema in the alveolar septa is the first morphologically recognisable change to be observed in cases of shock. It is brought about by the altered function of the membranes of the damaged epithelium and endothelium in the alveolar wall. At the same time there is an impairment of gaseous exchange, which is rendered more difficult by the exudative process in the interstitium. Pari passu with these events there is injury to the cells of both the alveolar epithelium and the alveolar capillary endothelium. Both these processes are still reversible. The point of irreversibility appears to be reached - so far as time is concerned - at the end of the 1st week, after which the injurious effects on the cell are established, since the thin alveolar wall, necessary for the exchange of gases, becomes overgrown with bulky alveocytes (Type II) and the fibroblasts in the alveolar interstitium crowd the capillaries away from the surface of the alveolus. In most of the advanced cases of shock this process of thickening of the alveolar wall exceeds the critical value, and respiratory exchange is so impaired that satisfactory functioning of the lungs is no longer possible. PMID:7450479

  10. [Neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury. PMID:25199226

  11. Suppressive effects of three diketopiperazines from marine-derived bacteria on polyphosphate-mediated septic responses.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seongdo; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Min, Gahee; Choi, Hyukjae; Park, Dong Ho; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-09-25

    Diketopiperazine is a natural products found from bacteria, fungi, marine sponges, gorgonian and red algae. They are cyclic dipeptides possessing relatively simple and rigid structures with chiral nature and various side chains. The compounds in this structure class have been known to possess diverse bioactivities including antibiotic activity, anti-cancer activity, neuroprotective activity, and anti-inflammatory activity. Previous studies have reported proinflammatory responses of endothelial cells to the release of polyphosphate (PolyP). In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory responses and mechanisms of diketopiperazine and its effects on PolyP-induced septic activities in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The survival rates, septic biomarker levels, behavior of human neutrophils, and vascular permeability were determined in PolyP-activated HUVECs and mice. Diketopiperazine suppressed the PolyP-mediated vascular barrier permeability, upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers, adhesion/migration of leukocytes, and activation and/or production of nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, diketopiperazine demonstrated protective effects on PolyP-mediated lethal death and the levels of the related septic biomarkers. Therefore, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of diketopiperazine on various systemic inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis or septic shock. PMID:27481191

  12. From Space to the Septic Patient: Assessment of Cellular Immunity in Severely Immune Compromised Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudhoff, Lars; Kaufmann, Ines; Feuerecker, Matthias; Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence; Mehta, Satish; Pierson, Duane; Schelling, Gustav; Chouker, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Immune dysfunctions and sepsis as a most severe condition immune dysfunction constitute the leading cause for death in critically ill patients and accounts for about as many annual deaths as acute myocardial infarction, making it an eminent health care issue. In progressed phases of sepsis, the cellular immune response is typically markedly dysfunctional. Space and Antarctic analogues of space have revealed states of major immune dysfunction. Due to various contributing stressors, such as physical stress and hypoxia, spaceflight can exerts strong modulatory and even depressive effects on the immune system, entailing a broad panel of studies on the topic. The aim of this study was to analyze the cellular immunity of septic patients in comparison to healthy controls, hereby translating the question from space to the patient and applying the newly developed and evolved DLR/ESA-NASA immune assays to the clinic accordingly. Methods: 76 patients were enrolled for blood withdrawal within 24 hours after the onset of severe sepsis or septic shock, as opposed to eleven healthy controls. Whole blood was stimulated with bacterial antigen mixture (containing diphteria-, tetanus- and pertussis-toxoid), fungal antigen mixture (containing candida-lysate and trichophyton-lysate), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol-myristate-acetate and anti-CD3/CD28, respectively. Subsequent to a 48-hour incubation period, supernatant cytokine concentrations were measured using Luminex xMAP technology (Bioplex). Non-normally distributed data is given as median [interquartile range (IQR)]. Results: In almost all of the multiple read-outs analyzed, marked immune dysfunction was present in the critically ill patient collective (median SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score): 67). As an exception, IL-10 release was scarcely impaired. Exemplarily, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was severely suppressed in the patient group in whole blood stimulated with

  13. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  14. [Generalized septic infections in rheumatoid arthritis. Study of autopsy material].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1994-11-01

    In the randomized autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a letal, generalized septic infection (GSI) was observed in 22 cases (13.66%). The GSI was accompanied by a pyarthros in 12 (7.45%) and no pyarthros in 10 (6.21%) cases. The clinical parameters of 22 septic RA patients were compared with 139 age and sex matched RA patients without GSI. The average age of septic patients decreased (p < 0.02), with low serum electrophoretic b-globulin level (p < 0.04), and high Waaler-Rose (p < 0.02) and Latex level (p < 0.004). The clinical parameters of 22 septic patients were compared with 76 age and sex matched RA patients without sepsis, vasculitis, or generalized secondary amyloidosis (GSA), and/or miliary epitheloid granulomas of tuberculous type (mT). The differences between the two groups of patients were the same, with a statistically more pronounced age difference (p < 0.005). 29 out of 161 patients (18.01 %) suffered from a clinically manifest diabetes mellitus (in 6 patients accompanied by sepsis), and 11 (6.83 %) from a clinically latent diabetes mellitus (in 2 patients accompanied by sepsis). There was no significant relationship between sepsis and manifest diabetes mellitus. The controlled and treated diabetes mellitus does not influence the frequency of lethal sepsis. Significant correlations were found between sepsis and latent diabetes mellitus (based on the histological detection of amyloid deposition localized to the islets of Langerhans (p < 0.02). 34 out of 161 patients (21.12%) suffered from a generalized secondary amyloidosis (in 3 patients accompanied by sepsis). There was no significant relationship between sepsis and generalized secondary amyloidosis. The thickness of adrenal cortex represents the effect of steroid therapy. Critical random check, using the Mann-Whitney tests, supports significance relationship between the adrenal cortex atrophy and fatal sepsis (p < 0.010). The follicular lymphoid depletion in the spleen

  15. Nontyphoidal Salmonella Septic arthritis of the elbow in a healthy infant

    PubMed Central

    Nafeesah, Abdullah Saleh Al

    2015-01-01

    A case of rarely encountered nontyphoidal Salmonella septic arthritis of the elbow in an infant with no preexisting disease is reported. Salmonella etiology was not suspected in this case, and the diagnosis was made only after bacterial isolation. Aspiration of the infected joint with radiological guidance initially failed to give a good clinical response. Arthrotomy was done with intravenous cefotaxime for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks oral ciprofloxacin therapy to which the child responded favorably. Up to our knowledge this is the first case of nontyphoidal salmonella elbow septic arthritis in an infant in Saudi Arabia to be reported in the English literature. PMID:26985275

  16. Differentiation of psoas muscle abscess from septic arthritis of the hip in children.

    PubMed

    Song, J; Letts, M; Monson, R

    2001-10-01

    A 20-year review was conducted of children presenting with psoas abscess at two major pediatric hospitals. Eleven children with psoas abscesses were identified. The extreme variability in the clinical presentation of this condition is shown. Psoas abscess was most difficult to differentiate from septic arthritis of the hip in pediatric patients. This study also shows the often circuitous investigative route traversed before arriving at the diagnosis of psoas abscess. Atypical features, such as femoral nerve neurapraxia or bladder irritability in association with hip pain, should alert the clinician to consider psoas abscess. Based on this study, a diagnostic algorithm to differentiate between psoas abscess and septic hip was formulated. PMID:11603678

  17. Septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to Sneathia sanguinegens.

    PubMed

    Bachy, B; Bémer, P; Tortellier, L; Giraudeau, C; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2011-11-01

    Sneathia sanguinegens is an infrequent bacterium in clinical specimens. We describe a case of right elbow septic arthritis due to a Sneathia species most closely related to S. sanguinegens in a young immunocompetent woman. S. sanguinegens has never been implicated in osteoarticular infections. PMID:21737545

  18. [Characteristics of various parameters of homeostasis in suppurative-septic complications of severe trauma].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, I I; Nasonkin, O S; Mukhamed, D

    1985-07-01

    In pyo-septic complications of a severe mechanical isolated trauma there are regular changes in homeostasis. The direction and degree of the changes of biochemical and immunological parameters within the first 3 days may be a prognostic criterion of the clinical course of the postshock period whether complicated or noncomplicated. PMID:4060486

  19. Psoas abscess with associated septic arthritis of the hip in infants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Enbo; Ma, Lili; Edmonds, Eric W; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Lijun; Ji, Shijun

    2010-12-01

    We describe psoas abscess with concomitant septic hip arthritis in 2 infants, 3 and 7 months old. The common clinical features were a palpable mass in the inguinal region, irritable hip, and delayed treatment. The diagnosis of septic hip was delayed in one child, and they both had residual hip deformity at follow-up. It is possible that initial delay in diagnoses resulted in the concurrent pathologic condition because of spread of infection. These 2 cases demonstrate the first known reports of concurrent psoas abscess and septic hip arthritis in infancy. Magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable method to identify these concurrent pathologic conditions. A proposed etiologic mechanism is also discussed in the article. PMID:21129563

  20. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  1. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  2. Clinical Features and outcomes in adults with cardiogenic shock supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Brett J; Shah, Ravi V; Murthy, Venkatesh; McCullough, Stephen A; Reza, Nosheen; Thomas, Sunu S; Song, Tae H; Newton-Cheh, Christopher H; Camuso, Janice M; MacGillivray, Thomas; Sundt, Thoralf M; Semigran, Marc J; Lewis, Gregory D; Baker, Joshua N; Garcia, José P

    2015-11-15

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an increasingly used supportive measure for patients with refractory cardiogenic shock (CS). Despite its increasing use, there remain minimal data regarding which patients with refractory CS are most likely to benefit from ECMO. We retrospectively studied all patients (n = 123) who underwent initiation of ECMO for CS from February 2009 to September 2014 at a single center. Baseline patient characteristics, including demographics, co-morbid illness, cause of CS, available laboratory values, and patient outcomes were analyzed. Overall, 69 patients (56%) were weaned from ECMO, with 48 patients (39%) surviving to discharge. Survivors were younger (50 vs 60 years; p ≤0.0001), had a lower rate of previous smoking (27 vs 56%; p = 0.01) and chronic kidney disease (2% vs 13%; p = 0.03), and had lower lactate measured soon after ECMO initiation (3.1 vs 10.2 mmol/l; p = 0.01). Patients with pulmonary embolism (odds ratio 8.0, 95% confidence interval 2.00 to 31.99; p = 0.01) and acute cardiomyopathy (odds ratio 7.5, 95% confidence interval 1.69 to 33.27; p = 0.01) had a higher rate of survival than acute myocardial infarction, chronic cardiomyopathy, and miscellaneous etiologies compared to postcardiotomy CS as a referent. In conclusion, survival after ECMO initiation differs based on underlying cause of CS. Survival may be lower in older patients and those with early evidence of persistent hypoperfusion after initiation of ECMO for CS. PMID:26443560

  3. The protective effects of the traditional Chinese herbs against renal damage induced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Binwu; He, Dalin; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Xingfa; Nan, Xunyi

    2011-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)-induced renal damage can occur as a result of multiple mechanisms. We have reported previously that Astragalus membranaceus, Salvia miltiorrhiza, a decoction of six drugs containing rhizoma Rehmanniae preparata and supplements of a few traditional Chinese medicinal herbs for invigorating the kidney and excreting calculus, have a protective effect on renal injury induced by high-energy shock waves (HESW) in rabbits. In this clinical study we further investigate the protective effects of these traditional Chinese herbs against renal damage induced by ESWL. Sixty consenting patients with renal calculus who underwent ESWL treatment were included and randomly assigned to the medication group or control group. Post-ESWL plasma nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1), malondialdehyde (MDA), and serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increased significantly in the controls (P < 0.05), while in the medication group, slightly but not significantly elevated levels of plasma ET-1, NO, and serum TNF-α were found. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased gradually in the controls, reaching a trough 72 h after ESWL (P < 0.05), while in the treated group it was unchanged, and remained at a level higher versus the controls (P < 0.05). Plasma NO peaked twice by 72 h and at 1 week in the controls (P < 0.05). Urinary enzymes and β(2)-microglobulin increased significantly and peaked by 24 h and immediately after ESWL (P < 0.05). These values were greater in the controls, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the preparations of traditional Chinese medicines for invigorating the kidney and excreting calculus can reduce renal tubular damage induced by ESWL, and can shorten the recovery time of renal tubules in human subjects. PMID:20607528

  4. Point-of-care optical tool to detect early stage of hemorrhage and shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurjar, Rajan S.; Riccardi, Suzannah L.; Johnson, Blair D.; Johnson, Christopher P.; Paradis, Norman A.; Joyner, Michael J.; Wolf, David E.

    2014-02-01

    There is a critical unmet clinical need for a device that can monitor and predict the onset of shock: hemorrhagic shock or bleeding to death, septic shock or systemic infection, and cardiogenic shock or blood flow and tissue oxygenation impairment due to heart attack. Together these represent 141 M patients per year. We have developed a monitor for shock based on measuring blood flow in peripheral (skin) capillary beds using diffuse correlation spectroscopy, a form of dynamic light scattering, and have demonstrated proof-of-principle both in pigs and humans. Our results show that skin blood flow measurement, either alone or in conjunction with other hemodynamic properties such as heart rate variability, pulse pressure variability, and tissue oxygenation, can meet this unmet need in a small self-contained patch-like device in conjunction with a hand-held processing unit. In this paper we describe and discuss the experimental work and the multivariate statistical analysis performed to demonstrate proof-of-principle of the concept.

  5. New Antiseptic Peptides To Protect against Endotoxin-Mediated Shock

    PubMed Central

    Gutsmann, Thomas; Razquin-Olazarán, Iosu; Kowalski, Ina; Kaconis, Yani; Howe, Jörg; Bartels, Rainer; Hornef, Mathias; Schürholz, Tobias; Rössle, Manfred; Sanchez-Gómez, Susana; Moriyon, Ignacio; Martinez de Tejada, Guillermo; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Systemic bacterial infections are associated with high mortality. The access of bacteria or constituents thereof to systemic circulation induces the massive release of immunomodulatory mediators, ultimately causing tissue hypoperfusion and multiple-organ failure despite adequate antibiotic treatment. Lipid A, the “endotoxic principle” of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is one of the major bacterial immunostimuli. Here we demonstrate the biological efficacy of rationally designed new synthetic antilipopolysaccharide peptides (SALPs) based on the Limulus anti-LPS factor for systemic application. We show efficient inhibition of LPS-induced cytokine release and protection from lethal septic shock in vivo, whereas cytotoxicity was not observed under physiologically relevant conditions and concentrations. The molecular mechanism of LPS neutralization was elucidated by biophysical techniques. The lipid A part of LPS is converted from its “endotoxic conformation,” the cubic aggregate structure, into an inactive multilamellar structure, and the binding affinity of the peptide to LPS exceeds those of known LPS-binding proteins, such as LPS-binding protein (LBP). Our results thus delineate a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of patients with septic shock. PMID:20606063

  6. The Therapeutic Role of Vasopressin on Improving Lactate Clearance During and After Vasogenic Shock: Microcirculation, Is It The Black Box?

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Elchin; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Mousavi, Sarah; Nouri, Masoumeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin as a supplementary vasopressor in septic shock restores vascular tone and mean arterial pressure, meanwhile decreases dose and exposure time to catecholamines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vasopressin on lactate and lactate clearance as markers of tissue perfusion during septic shock. In this prospective, randomized, controlled trial, 30 patients with septic shock were enrolled in two groups. One group received norepinephrine infusion (titrated to reach the target MAP of ≥65 mm Hg) and the other group in addition to norepinephrine, received vasopressin at a constant rate of 0.03 u/min. Serum lactate levels were assessed at baseline, 24 and 48 hours after randomization. Lactate clearance was estimated for each patient at 24 and 48 hours. Venous lactate was measured in both groups. Despite a tendency toward higher venous lactate at 24 and 48 hours in the norepinephrine group (3.1 vs. 2.5, P=0.67 and 1.7 vs. 1.1, P=0.47), the conflict was not statistically significant among them. While lactate clearance after 24 hours was significantly higher in vasopressin treatment group (46% vs. 20%, respectively; P=0.048), the 48-hour lactate clearance did not differ from statistic viewpoints despite their clinical values (66% vs. 40%, P=0.17). Although lactate levels did not significantly differ between treatment groups, lactate clearance at 24 hours was significantly higher in vasopressin group. This may be the effect of vasopressin effect on microcirculation and tissue hypoperfusion or its catecholamine sparing effect. PMID:26853286

  7. Cardiogenic shock in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Viveiros, Eulália; Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Costa, Edite; Nunes, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a healthy male full-term neonate, 21 days old, admitted to the emergency room, presenting a severe cardiovascular collapse with an initial sinus rhythm. The first diagnostic hypothesis was of septic shock, having antibiotics, fluid resuscitation, inotropic drugs and ventilatory support started immediately. After achieving haemodynamic stability, a new cardiovascular collapse occurred with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). The latter was successfully treated and the neonate did not suffer any organ damage. Cardiogenic shock should be considered despite being a much rarer cause of shock in neonates. SVT is promptly diagnosed when a cardiorespiratory monitor is available; however, the intermittent occurrence of the tachycardia episodes makes this diagnosis more difficult to recognise and manage. PMID:23737567

  8. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  9. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2012-08-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30% of households are served by a septic (onsite) wastewater treatment system, and many property owners also operate their own domestic well nearby. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. In areas with small lots (thus high spatial septic system densities), shallow domestic wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Mass balance approaches have been used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of groundwater resources. In this study, a source area model based on detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling is applied for a stochastic analysis of domestic well contamination by septic leachate. Specifically, we determine the probability that a source area overlaps with a septic system drainfield as a function of aquifer properties, septic system density and drainfield size. We show that high spatial septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We find that mass balance calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances that experience limited attenuation, and those that are harmful even at low concentrations (e.g., pathogens).

  10. Domestic wells have high probability of pumping septic tank leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, J. E.; Harter, T.

    2011-06-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems such as septic systems are common in rural and semi-rural areas around the world; in the US, about 25-30 % of households are served by a septic system and a private drinking water well. Site-specific conditions and local groundwater flow are often ignored when installing septic systems and wells. Particularly in areas with small lots, thus a high septic system density, these typically shallow wells are prone to contamination by septic system leachate. Typically, mass balance approaches are used to determine a maximum septic system density that would prevent contamination of the aquifer. In this study, we estimate the probability of a well pumping partially septic system leachate. A detailed groundwater and transport model is used to calculate the capture zone of a typical drinking water well. A spatial probability analysis is performed to assess the probability that a capture zone overlaps with a septic system drainfield depending on aquifer properties, lot and drainfield size. We show that a high septic system density poses a high probability of pumping septic system leachate. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer has a strong influence on the intersection probability. We conclude that mass balances calculations applied on a regional scale underestimate the contamination risk of individual drinking water wells by septic systems. This is particularly relevant for contaminants released at high concentrations, for substances which experience limited attenuation, and those being harmful even in low concentrations.

  11. Radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Haynie, T.P.; Podoloff, D.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Harle, T.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Despite controversy over its exact role, radionuclide imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of patients suspected of having osteomyelitis. The differentiation between osteomyelitis and cellulitis is best accomplished by using a three-phase technique using Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Frequently, it is necessary to obtain multiple projections and magnification views to adequately assess suspected areas. It is recommended that a Ga-67 or In-111 leukocyte scan be performed in those cases where osteomyelitis is strongly suspected clinically and the routine bone scan is equivocal or normal. Repeated bone scan after 48 to 72 h may demonstrate increased radioactivity in the case of early osteomyelitis with the initial photon-deficient lesion. In-111 leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating recent fracture or operation, but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation. The recognition of certain imaging patterns appears helpful to separate osteomyelitis from septic arthritis or cellulitis. 83 references.

  12. Enhanced sludge reduction in septic tanks by increasing temperature.

    PubMed

    Pussayanavin, Tatchai; Koottatep, Thammarat; Eamrat, Rawintra; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2015-01-01

    Septic tanks in most developing countries are constructed without drainage trenches or leaching fields to treat toilet wastewater and /or grey water. Due to the short hydraulic retention time, effluents of these septic tanks are still highly polluted, and there is usually high accumulation of septic tank sludge or septage containing high levels of organics and pathogens that requires frequent desludging and subsequent treatment. This study aimed to reduce sludge accumulation in septic tanks by increasing temperatures of the septic tank content. An experimental study employing two laboratory-scale septic tanks fed with diluted septage and operating at temperatures of 40 and 30°C was conducted. At steady-state conditions, there were more methanogenic activities occurring in the sludge layer of the septic tank operating at the temperature of 40°C, resulting in less total volatile solids (TVS) or sludge accumulation and more methane (CH4) production than in the unit operating at 30°C. Molecular analysis found more abundance and diversity of methanogenic microorganisms in the septic tank sludge operating at 40°C than at 30°C. The reduced TVS accumulation in the 40°C septic tank would lengthen the period of septage removal, resulting in a cost-saving in desluging and septage treatment. Cost-benefit analysis of increasing temperatures in septic tanks was discussed. PMID:25438134

  13. Arginine vasopressin vs. terlipressin in the treatment of shock states.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn

    2008-06-01

    The synthetic vasopressin analogue, terlipressin, is being increasingly used to treat catecholamine-resistant hypotension in septic shock and other conditions. While terlipressin holds some theoretical and anecdotal advantages over vasopressin, this has not been formally tested in prospective randomised trials. This review analyses the published literature and makes comparisons, where possible, between vasopressin and terlipressin. PMID:18683481

  14. Cardiogenic shock: A look at acute functional mitral incompetence.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F A; Vosloo, J; Naude, H; Steyn, A J

    2016-08-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with cardiogenic shock secondary to acute functional mitral incompetence as well as septic shock related to pneumonia. The patient deteriorated haemodynamically despite adequate medical therapy. An echocardiogram revealed a massive mitral incompetence and an ejection fraction of 32%. An intra-aortic balloon pump was placed and the patient improved dramatically. On day 6 after admission the echocardiogram was repeated, revealing a mild mitral incompetence and an ejection fraction of 58%. PMID:27499404

  15. Streptococcus constellatus Causing Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Right Ovarian Vein with Extension into the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Abdallah; Haddad, Amy; Naqvi, Amir; Onyesoh, Ngozi U.; Malik, Rushdah; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcus constellatus collectively with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius constitute the Streptococcus anginosus (formerly Streptococcus milleri) group. Though they are commonly associated with abscesses, bacteremia with subsequent septic thrombophlebitis is extremely rare, and resulting mortality is infrequent. Case Presentation. We report a case of a previously healthy 60-year-old African American female who presented with Streptococcus constellatus bacteremia associated with septic thrombophlebitis to the right ovarian vein extending into the inferior vena cava. She was urgently treated with antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusion. Septic thrombophlebitis has a clinical presentation that is often misleading. Therefore, a high clinical index of suspicion and the use of appropriate imaging modalities (computed tomography) are essential in recognizing and confirming this diagnosis. Prompt treatment is warranted. Surgical thrombectomies have been successfully replaced by a combination of antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26171262

  16. High Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Patients with Septic Arthritis Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Wu, Chung-Da; Cheng, Shun-Chien; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Tseng, Chi-Chou; Chan, Huan-Tee; Chen, Po-Yih; Chao, Chien-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background This study investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with septic arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus and tried to identify the risk factors for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) arthritis. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, patients with septic arthritis caused by S. aureus were identified from the computerized databases of a regional hospital and a medical center in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Results A total of 93 patients with S. aureus arthritis were identified, and MRSA arthritis was found in 38 (40.9%) cases. The mean age of the patients was 58 years, and 86 (92.5%) episodes were classified as community-acquired infections. Diabetes mellitus (n = 41, 44.1%) was the most common underlying disease, followed by chronic kidney disease and liver cirrhosis. Patients with MRSA arthritis were more frequently elderly and found in the setting of healthcare-associated infection than patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infections. No other significant differences in clinical manifestations and outcomes were noted between these two groups of patients. Overall, the in-hospital mortality rate was 5.4%, and diabetes mellitus was the only risk factor for mortality. Conclusions MRSA is emerging in the setting of community-acquired septic arthritis. MRSA septic arthritis is more likely to develop in the elderly and in healthcare-associated infections than MSSA septic arthritis. PMID:25996145

  17. [A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic pulmonary embolisms].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoichi; Takayanagi, Noboru; Sugita, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    A 41-year-old-man with sore throat and fever visited a nearby clinic. He was given antibiotics, but on disease day 11, the left side of his neck had swollen. Because chest CT on disease day 16 showed bilateral multiple pulmonary nodules, he was admitted to our hospital. He had septic pulmonary embolisms and thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein, and Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated from the blood and neck pus culture, and we diagnosed him as having Lemierre's syndrome. We administered piperacillin/ tazobactam and heparin, and his symptoms improved thereafter. Lemierre's syndrome is relatively rare but is increasing in recent years. We report herein this case and compare reported cases in Japan with those from overseas. PMID:25672140

  18. Sepsis: pathophysiology and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Gotts, Jeffrey E; Matthay, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock represent increasingly severe systemic inflammatory responses to infection. Sepsis is common in the aging population, and it disproportionately affects patients with cancer and underlying immunosuppression. In its most severe form, sepsis causes multiple organ dysfunction that can produce a state of chronic critical illness characterized by severe immune dysfunction and catabolism. Much has been learnt about the pathogenesis of sepsis at the molecular, cell, and intact organ level. Despite uncertainties in hemodynamic management and several treatments that have failed in clinical trials, investigational therapies increasingly target sepsis induced organ and immune dysfunction. Outcomes in sepsis have greatly improved overall, probably because of an enhanced focus on early diagnosis and fluid resuscitation, the rapid delivery of effective antibiotics, and other improvements in supportive care for critically ill patients. These improvements include lung protective ventilation, more judicious use of blood products, and strategies to reduce nosocomial infections. PMID:27217054

  19. Autodigestion: Proteolytic Degradation and Multiple Organ Failure in Shock.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Angelina E; Kistler, Erik B; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2016-05-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for multiorgan failure following shock other than supportive care. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of these sequelae to shock is required. The intestine plays a central role in multiorgan failure. It was previously suggested that bacteria and their toxins are responsible for the organ failure seen in circulatory shock, but clinical trials in septic patients have not confirmed this hypothesis. Instead, we review here evidence that the digestive enzymes, synthesized in the pancreas and discharged into the small intestine as requirement for normal digestion, may play a role in multiorgan failure. These powerful enzymes are nonspecific, highly concentrated, and fully activated in the lumen of the intestine. During normal digestion they are compartmentalized in the lumen of the intestine by the mucosal epithelial barrier. However, if this barrier becomes permeable, e.g. in an ischemic state, the digestive enzymes escape into the wall of the intestine. They digest tissues in the mucosa and generate small molecular weight cytotoxic fragments such as unbound free fatty acids. Digestive enzymes may also escape into the systemic circulation and activate other degrading proteases. These proteases have the ability to clip the ectodomain of surface receptors and compromise their function, for example cleaving the insulin receptor causing insulin resistance. The combination of digestive enzymes and cytotoxic fragments leaking into the central circulation causes cell and organ dysfunction, and ultimately may lead to complete organ failure and death. We summarize current evidence suggesting that enteral blockade of digestive enzymes inside the lumen of the intestine may serve to reduce acute cell and organ damage and improve survival in experimental shock. PMID:26717111

  20. [Bacteriophage therapy of septic complications of orthopaedic surgery (author's transl].

    PubMed

    Lang, G; Kehr, P; Mathevon, H; Clavert, J M; Séjourne, P; Pointu, J

    1979-01-01

    Seven septic cases have been treated by bacteriophage; two infections after insertion of a hip prosthesis, two septic arthritis of the knee, one osteomyelitis of the tibia, one septic non-union of the femur and one septic complication following Harrington rodding. Only specific phages were used in association with several types of surgical procedure. The technique of treatment is described. All cases were long-term infections with resistant organisms. Results were good in five, fair in one and one case was a failure. It is concluded that phage therapy may be helpful in the treatment of long-term infections. PMID:156386

  1. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  2. Primary septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint in a heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Longo, F.J.; Monteagudo, I.; Vaquero, F.J.; Martinez Moreno, J.L.; Carreno, L.

    1986-01-01

    A 20-year-old heroin user developed staphylococcus septic arthritis of the manubrium joint. The diagnosis was established by a culture of the infected tissue and blood culture. The clinical impression was aided by 99mTc radionuclide scintimetry. Early diagnosis localized the infection. Immediate antibiotic therapy solved a problem in the sternum that seems not to have been reported in the English literature.

  3. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus. PMID:26787717

  4. Valvular endocarditis and septic thrombosis associated with a radial fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Matthew J.; Pack, LeeAnn; Forzán, María J.

    2012-01-01

    A free-ranging adult female red-tailed hawk died suddenly after 3 weeks in rehabilitation for a radial fracture. Cause of death was septic thrombosis from a chronic bacterial valvular endocarditis, probably associated with injury at the fracture site. The challenge of clinical diagnosis of sepsis in wild birds is emphasized. PMID:22753969

  5. Valvular endocarditis and septic thrombosis associated with a radial fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Lemon, Matthew J; Pack, LeeAnn; Forzán, María J

    2012-01-01

    A free-ranging adult female red-tailed hawk died suddenly after 3 weeks in rehabilitation for a radial fracture. Cause of death was septic thrombosis from a chronic bacterial valvular endocarditis, probably associated with injury at the fracture site. The challenge of clinical diagnosis of sepsis in wild birds is emphasized. PMID:22753969

  6. Dichloroacetate administration in the treatment of endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Preiser, J C; Moulart, D; Vincent, J L

    1990-03-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), an activator of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, has been shown to reduce blood lactate levels effectively in various conditions. DCA administration has also sometimes resulted in beneficial cardiovascular effects. To assess its potential value in the routine management of septic shock, we studied the effects of DCA on a canine endotoxic shock model associated with moderate lactic acidosis. Eighteen dogs were pentobarbitone anesthetized, intubated, and mechanically ventilated. Thirty minutes after the administration of 3 mg/kg of Escherichia coli endotoxin, 10 dogs received 100 mg/kg followed by 100 mg/kg/hr of DCA, and eight dogs served as control. In all animals, fluid administration was titrated according to the left-sided filling pressures. In the DCA-treated animals, lactate levels rapidly fell from 3.1 +/- 1.2 to 1.3 +/- 0.8 mEq/liter after 30 min. The bolus of DCA was usually followed by a very transient increase in arterial pressure, but no sustained hemodynamic change was noted. Oxygen consumption (measured from the exhaled gases) was not affected. Four dogs in the DCA group and one dog in the control group survived the next morning (difference not significant). The present study confirms that DCA can effectively reduce blood lactate levels in endotoxic shock and might therefore be useful in severe lactic acidosis related to septic shock. However, the routine use of DCA in septic shock to improve hemodynamic status is not supported by the present findings. PMID:2178797

  7. The race against the "septic shark".

    PubMed

    Westphal, Martin; Kampmeier, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Great white sharks are responsible for about 10 cases of death annually worldwide, as compared with millions of deaths caused by sepsis. However, the basic principles of avoiding shark attacks and fighting sepsis seem to be similar: avoidance, attention, and speed, if necessary. The present review discusses the current status of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, which are actually content for discussion because of their low specificity. Current data suggest that one in eight patients with severe sepsis does not fulfill the SIRS criteria and is consequently missed, and therefore the calls for new definitions of sepsis are getting louder. Furthermore, the need for early treatment of sepsis and fast admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) with experienced stuff is reviewed as well as the early and appropriate initiation of therapy, namely antibiotic and volume therapy. A key feature is the analysis of the studies from the so-called "Sepsis Trilogy" (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMiSe studies), with a focus on the status of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). The authors of the "Sepsis Trilogy" concluded that there is no benefit regarding survival in septic patients by using EGDT as compared with standard therapy. However, the low mortality of the control groups within the "Sepsis Trilogy" studies as compared with the Rivers et al. study from 2001 leads to the conclusion that there has been an improvement in the therapy of septic patients, most probably due to the early initiation of therapy as a kind of "standard" in sepsis therapy. Finally, the phenomenon of a "large trial disease" is discussed, exemplary in a trial which investigated the maintenance of the "right" mean arterial pressure in sepsis patients. Even if the result of a large randomized trial might be that there is no difference between two study groups, the real exercise is to identify the patient collectives who might benefit or experience harm due to an intervention. In summary, as

  8. Septic Arthritis Due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans▿

    PubMed Central

    Magro-Checa, César; Chaves-Chaparro, Lara; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Rosales-Alexander, José Luis; Salvatierra, Juan; Raya, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans has been reported as a rare cause of human pathogenesis. Infections mainly occur in immunocompromised patients and very often are associated with a foreign body. We report the first case of septic arthritis caused by C. cellulans in an immunocompetent patient. Our patient suffered a penetrating palm tree thorn injury to his left knee 8 weeks before admission. Although no foreign objects were found, they were suspected because previous reports suggest a frequent association with this microorganism, and open debridament was performed. Removal of foreign bodies related to this organism must be considered a high-priority treatment in these patients to achieve a complete recovery. PMID:21998421

  9. Septic and aseptic arthritis: a continuum?

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Keat, A

    1999-03-01

    This chapter considers the likelihood that a wide spectrum of infection-provoked arthritis exists, ranging from overt sepsis to apparently aseptic chronic arthritis in which very small numbers of causal bacteria can be detected only by using highly sensitive techniques. It asks whether joints are, as conventionally held, normally devoid of micro-organisms and how to judge the significance of bacteria detected within apparently sterile joints. Through a consideration of known septic, probably infective and apparently aseptic forms of arthritis, a set of criteria for attributing causality to putative arthritogenic micro-organisms is proposed. PMID:10952856

  10. The race against the "septic shark"

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Great white sharks are responsible for about 10 cases of death annually worldwide, as compared with millions of deaths caused by sepsis. However, the basic principles of avoiding shark attacks and fighting sepsis seem to be similar: avoidance, attention, and speed, if necessary. The present review discusses the current status of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, which are actually content for discussion because of their low specificity. Current data suggest that one in eight patients with severe sepsis does not fulfill the SIRS criteria and is consequently missed, and therefore the calls for new definitions of sepsis are getting louder. Furthermore, the need for early treatment of sepsis and fast admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) with experienced stuff is reviewed as well as the early and appropriate initiation of therapy, namely antibiotic and volume therapy. A key feature is the analysis of the studies from the so-called "Sepsis Trilogy" (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMiSe studies), with a focus on the status of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). The authors of the "Sepsis Trilogy" concluded that there is no benefit regarding survival in septic patients by using EGDT as compared with standard therapy. However, the low mortality of the control groups within the "Sepsis Trilogy" studies as compared with the Rivers et al. study from 2001 leads to the conclusion that there has been an improvement in the therapy of septic patients, most probably due to the early initiation of therapy as a kind of "standard" in sepsis therapy. Finally, the phenomenon of a "large trial disease" is discussed, exemplary in a trial which investigated the maintenance of the "right" mean arterial pressure in sepsis patients. Even if the result of a large randomized trial might be that there is no difference between two study groups, the real exercise is to identify the patient collectives who might benefit or experience harm due to an intervention. In summary, as

  11. Streptococcus gordonii septic arthritis : two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite advances in antimicrobial and surgical therapy, septic arthritis remains a rheumatologic emergency that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. In adults, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microorganism isolated from native joints. Streptococcus gordonii is a prominent member of the viridans group of oral bacteria and is among the bacteria most frequently identified as being primary agent of subacute bacterial endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, Streptococcus gordonii has not yet been described as agent of septic arthritis. Case Presentation We describe here two cases of septic arthritis due to Streptococcus gordonii. It gives us an opportunity to review epidemiology, diagnosis criteria and management of septic arthritis. Conclusion Although implication of S. gordonii as aetiologic agent of subacute endocarditis is well known, this organism is a rare cause of septic arthritis. In this case, the exclusion of associated endocarditis is warranted. PMID:22974507

  12. Evaluating the effect of intraoperative peritoneal lavage on bacterial culture in dogs with suspected septic peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Swayne, Seanna L.; Brisson, Brigitte; Weese, J. Scott; Sears, William

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study describes the effect of intraoperative peritoneal lavage (IOPL) on bacterial counts and outcome in clinical cases of septic peritonitis. Intraoperative samples were cultured before and after IOPL. Thirty-three dogs with presumed septic peritonitis on the basis of cytology were managed surgically during the study period. Positive pre-lavage bacterial cultures were found in 14 cases, 13 of which were a result of intestinal leakage. The post-lavage cultures showed fewer isolates in 9 cases and in 1 case became negative. The number of dogs with a decrease in the concentration of bacteria cultured from pre-lavage to post-lavage samples was not statistically significant. There was no significant effect of the change in pre- to post-lavage culture, single versus multiple types of bacteria, selection of an appropriate empiric antimicrobial on survival or the need for subsequent surgery. PMID:23450861

  13. Bilateral sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis secondary to indwelling central venous catheter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Charita; Watson, Nicholas FS; Jagasia, Nitin; Chari, Ray; Patterson, Jane E

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare, comprising approximately 0.5% to 1% of all joint infections. Predisposing causes include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. Case presentation We report a rare case of bilateral sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis in an elderly patient secondary to an indwelling right subclavian vein catheter. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. We also review the literature regarding the epidemiology, investigation and methods of treatment of the condition. Conclusion SCJ infections are rare, and require a high degree of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of neck and shoulder pain may cloud the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Surgical intervention is often required; however, our patient avoided major intervention and settled with parenteral antibiotics and washout of the joint. PMID:18445257

  14. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000185.htm Cardiogenic shock To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cardiogenic shock is when the heart has been damaged so ...

  15. The lack of consistent diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin infusion blood pressure effects in the US and EU traumatic hemorrhagic shock clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Edward P; Philbin, Nora B; Koenigsberg, Max D; Gao, Weihua

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin solutions have demonstrated a pressor effect that could adversely affect hemorrhagic shock patient resuscitation through accelerated hemorrhage, diminished perfusion, or inadequate resuscitation. Data from two parallel, multicenter traumatic hemorrhagic shock clinical trials in 17 US emergency departments and in 27 EU prehospital systems using diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin (DCLHb), a hemoglobin-based resuscitation fluid. In the 219 patients, patients were 37 years old, 64% sustained blunt injury, 48% received DCLHb, and 36% expired. Although mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure values differed at 2 of the 10 measured time points, blood pressure (BP) curve analysis showed no SBP, diastolic blood pressure, or MAP differences based on treatment. Although SBP values 160 and 120 mmHg or greater were 2.2x and 2.6x more frequently noted in survivors, they were not more common with DCLHb use or in DCLHb patients who expired in US study nonsurvivors or in any EU study patients. Systolic blood pressure values 160 and 120 mmHg or greater were 2.8x and 1.3x more frequently noted in DCLHb survivors as compared with normal saline survivors. Only 3% of the BP variation noted could be attributed to DCLHb use, and as expected, injury severity and baseline physiologic status were stronger predictors. In the United States alone, treatment group was not correlated by regression with BP at any time point. Neither mean BP readings nor elevated BP readings were correlated with DCLHb treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients. As such, no clinically demonstrable DCLHb pressor effect could be directly related to the adverse mortality outcome observed in the US study. PMID:20092028

  16. n-Butanol extract from Folium isatidis inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Lu, Yili; Jin, Jiahui; Dong, Lili; Xu, Fengli; Chen, Shuangshuang; Wang, Zhanyue; Liang, Guang; Shan, Xiaoou

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, which is caused by severe infection, is an important cause of mortality, but effective clinical treatment against sepsis is extremely limited. As the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a major role in inflammatory responses. Studies have shown beneficial pharmacological effects for Folium isatidis. The present study further illuminated the effects of n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced septic shock and identified the main active chemical components. Our study showed that pretreatment with n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis not only significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production but also markedly and dose dependently enhanced the recruitment of MyD88, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and the degradation of IκB-α. Additionally, the extract exhibited dramatic protective effects against lung injury and death in mice with septic shock. Eight main active compounds were identified, including organic acids, glycoside, indolinones, and flavonoids. These findings provide a perspective on the respiratory protection offered by n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced sepsis and outline a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:26491261

  17. Risk factors for mortality in patients with septic pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hong Geun; Cha, Seung-Ick; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-08-01

    Data regarding prognostic factors for patients with septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) are lacking. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of SPE and to ascertain the risk factors for mortality in patients with this condition. Patients with SPE, whose data were retrospectively collected from a tertiary referral center in Korea, were categorized by the presence or absence of in-hospital death into two groups: death and survival groups. The two groups were compared for clinical and radiologic parameters. SPE was community-acquired in most patients (78%). The most common focus of primary infection was that of bone, joint, or soft tissue (33%), followed by liver abscess (17%). The in-hospital mortality was 12%. Multivariate analysis showed that tachypnea (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-20.53, p = 0.038) and segmental or lobar consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scan (OR 10.79, 95% CI 2.51-46.43, p = 0.001) were independent predictors of in-hospital death in SPE patients. Taken together, the primary infectious foci of SPE in Korea are different from those reported in Western countries. Tachypnea and segmental or lobar consolidation on CT scan may be independent risk factors for in-hospital death in these patients. PMID:27346380

  18. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    El Mezouar, Imane; Abourazzak, Fatema Zahra; Mansouri, Samia; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis, so called osteomyelitis pubis is the infection which involves pubic symphysis and its joint. It is a rare condition, representing less than one percent of all cases of osteomyelitis. It affects most frequently young athletes and women undergoing gynecologic or urologic surgery. It presents itself with fever and pubic pain which irradiates to the genitals and increases when hip is mobilized, and this fact produces gait claudication. Diagnosis is based on clinic supported by microbiologic culture results, image methods, and proteins augment during acute phase. The etiologic agents most commonly found are Staphylococcus aureus, followed by gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infection in recent pelvis surgery. The antibiotic treatment is adjusted depending on the microbiological diagnosis, adding NSAIDs, and bed rest. We report a 16 year-old male presenting with pubic pain and fever. Magnetic resonance imagery showed arthritis of the pubic symphysis. The patient was treated with antibiotics with a good clinical response. PMID:25419287

  19. Septic peritonitis secondary to unilateral pyometra and ovarian bursal abscessation in a dog.

    PubMed

    Van Israel, N; Kirby, B M; Munro, E A C

    2002-10-01

    A seven-year-old, female entire Labrador retriever was presented for acute-onset vomiting and lethargy, associated with weakness and generalised tremors. The clinical, radiographic, ultrasonographic and histopathological findings revealed septic peritonitis which occurred secondarily to unilateral pyometra and ovarian bursal abscessation. However, in this case, the initial clinical findings, blood parameters, radiographic and ultrasonographic findings did not allow a specific diagnosis. Repeat monitoring was required, and abdominocentesis proved to be the most useful diagnostic test, allowing a definitive diagnosis and the decision to be made as to whether or not to carry out exploratory surgery. PMID:12400643

  20. Neurological Complications after Neonatal Bacteremia: The Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonates with bacteremia are at risk of neurologic complications. Relevant information warrants further elucidation. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications (BNCs) in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A systemic chart review was performed conducted to identify clinical characteristics and outcomes. A cohort of related conditions was constructed as the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for BNC. Results Of 1037 bacteremia episodes, 36 (3.5%) had BNCs. Twenty-four cases of BNCs were related to meningitis, five were presumed meningitis, and seven occurred after septic shock. The most common causative pathogens were Group B streptococcus (41.7%) and E. coli (16.7%). The major BNCs consisted of seizures (28), hydrocephalus (20), encephalomalacia (11), cerebral infarction (7), subdural empyema (6), ventriculitis (8), and abscess (4). Eight (22.8%) neonates died and six (16.7%) were discharged in critical condition when the family withdrew life-sustaining treatment. Among the 22 survivors, eight had neurologic sequelae upon discharge. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, neonates with meningitis caused by Group B streptococcus (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 8.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.20–36.08; p = 0.002) and combined meningitis and septic shock (OR, 5.94; 95% CI: 1.53–23.15; p = 0.010) were independently associated with BNCs. Conclusions Neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications are associated with adverse outcomes or sequelae. Better strategies aimed at early detection and reducing the emergence of neurologic complications and aggressive treatment of Group B streptococcus sepsis are needed in neonates with meningitis and septic shock. PMID:25364821

  1. Acute Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Cardiogenic Shock: An Algorithm-Based Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program Can Improve Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Unai, Shinya; Tanaka, Daizo; Ruggiero, Nicholas; Hirose, Hitoshi; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in our institution resulted in near total mortality prior to the establishment of an algorithm-based program in July 2010. We hypothesized that an algorithm-based ECMO program improves the outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated with cardiogenic shock. Between March 2003 and July 2013, 29 patients underwent emergent catheterization for acute myocardial infarction due to left main or proximal left anterior descending artery occlusion complicated with cardiogenic shock (defined as systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg despite multiple inotropes, with or without intra-aortic balloon pump, lactic acidosis). Of 29 patients, 15 patients were treated before July 2010 (Group 1, old program), and 14 patients were treated after July 2010 (Group 2, new program). There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics, including age, sex, coronary risk factors, and left ventricular ejection fraction between the two groups. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to ECMO was performed in two cases (13%) in Group 1 and four cases (29%) in Group 2. ECMO support was performed in one case (6.7%) in Group 1 and six cases (43%) in Group 2. The 30-day survival of Group 1 versus Group 2 was 40 versus 79% (P = 0.03), and 1-year survival rate was 20 versus 56% (P = 0.01). The survival rate for patients who underwent ECMO was 0% in Group 1 versus 83% in Group 2 (P = 0.09). In Group 2, the mean duration on ECMO was 9.8 ± 5.9 days. Of the six patients who required ECMO in Group 2, 100% were successfully weaned off ECMO or were bridged to ventricular assist device implantation. Initiation of an algorithm-based ECMO program improved the outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock. PMID:26148217

  2. Pelvic osteomyelitis mimicking septic hip arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Richelle C; Strongwater, Allan M

    2009-09-01

    Peripelvic infections are rare, compared with the incidence of septic hip arthritis, but are serious, requiring emergent treatment. They often are not included in differential diagnoses for patients presenting with fever, pain, inability to bear weight, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Most patients are treated initially as a septic hip arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to outcome in peripelvic abscess. Use of MRI may help to elucidate the correct diagnosis. Previously reported peripelvic infections included obturator internus and externus, and psoas, but to the best of our knowledge, this is first case report of infection of the ischiopubic ramus synchondrosis presenting as septic arthritis. PMID:19491707

  3. Human beta-defensin-3 producing cells in septic implant loosening.

    PubMed

    Levón, Jaakko; Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Mackiewicz, Zygmunt; Coer, Andrej; Trebse, Rihard; Waris, Eero; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2015-02-01

    Human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) has been found in synovial fluid and later in periprosthetic tissues in septic joint implant loosening. The aim of the present study was to identify its cellular sources. Tissue samples from 12 patients were analyzed. A fully automatic Leica BOND MAX staining robot was used. Affinity-purified rabbit anti-human hBD-3 IgG was applied in a two-layer horse radish peroxidase/anti-rabbit-labeled polymer method. Double immunofluorescence of hBD3 together with CD68, CD31, heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) and mast cell tryptase (MCT) staining was done. Human BD-3 was found in monocyte/macrophage-like cells, vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts-like cells, but was weakly expressed in foreign body giant cells and negative in neutrophils. Human BD-3 was found in CD68 and CD31 immunoreactive cells, whereas HSP47 and MCT positive cells were hBD-3 negative. Immunostaining of hBD-3 was strong in some tissue areas but weak or absent in others. Monocyte/macrophages and endothelial cells were established in this study as the major cellular sources of hBD-3 in septic loosening, but fibroblasts and foreign body giant cells can also contribute to its production. The heterogeneous topological staining of hBD-3 suggests local regulation, possibly by bacterial products, damage-associated molecular patterns and cytokines. The results explain the increased synovial fluid/tissue concentrations of hBD-3 in septic loosening. PMID:25655501

  4. Septic arthritis caused by chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, J. L.; Watson, P. A.; Crouch, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    We have treated four cases of previously quiescent osteomyelitis which presented as septic arthritis in an adjacent joint. The osteomyelitic focus was in the bone proximal to the involved joints (zero to ten centimeters above the joint line). Based on the presenting history, physical findings, laboratory tests and cultures of joint fluids, the joint sepsis was low grade in all patients which led to delays in diagnosis and treatment. Aggressive surgical debridement of both bone and joint, followed by a prolonged course of antibiotics led to resolution in all patients. A high index of suspicion combined with adequate radiographs of the surrounding bones should lead to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 1A-B Figure 1C Figure 1D Figure 2 PMID:9234979

  5. Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder Complicating Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Raiser, Sara; Davidson, Kathryn; Walsh, Ashley; Egerman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthropathy leads to rapid joint destruction, impairment, and disability. Staphylococcus can be particularly virulent to bone and joints leading to adverse obstetric events. At 28 of weeks gestation, a patient presented with pyelonephritis and progressive left shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated early clavicular destruction and acromial involvement. Glenohumeral joint aspiration produced Staphylococcus aureus. The patient then had premature rupture of membranes and progressed rapidly to preterm delivery. Placental pathology revealed chorioamnionitis and microabscesses. Treatment of the infected joint required further surgical drainage and bone resection as well as extended antibiotics. It is important to remember that joint pain in pregnancy may indicate infective arthritis, and pyelonephritis can be a source of such an infection. Evaluation includes magnetic resonance imaging and consultation for joint aspiration. Prompt recognition and treatment are necessary to prevent joint destruction. PMID:24959364

  6. IMPACT OF CONTINUOUS RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY INTENSITY ON SEPTIC ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Mayumi, Kengo; Yamashita, Tetsushi; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Noiri, Eisei; Nangaku, Masaomi; Yahagi, Naoki; Doi, Kent

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been evaluated, but recent randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a beneficial impact of high intensity on the outcomes. High intensity might cause some detrimental results recognized recently as CRRT trauma. This study was undertaken to evaluate the association of CRRT intensity with mortality in a population of AKI patients treated with lower-intensity CRRT in Japan. A retrospective single-center cohort study enrolled 125 AKI patients treated with CRRT in mixed intensive care units of a university hospital in Japan. Subanalysis was conducted for septic and postsurgical AKI. The median value of the prescribed total effluent rate was 20.1 (interquartile range 15.3–27.1) mL/kg/h. Overall, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated no association of the CRRT intensity with the 60-day in-hospital mortality rate (hazard ratio 1.006, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.991–1.018, P = 0.343). In subanalysis with the septic AKI patients, multivariate analysis revealed two factors associated independently with the 60-day mortality rate: the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at initiation of CRRT (hazard ratio 1.152, 95% CI 1.025–1.301, P = 0.0171) and the CRRT intensity (hazard ratio 1.024, 95% CI 1.004–1.042, P = 0.0195). The CRRT intensity was associated significantly with higher 60-day in-hospital mortality in septic AKI, suggesting that unknown detrimental effects of CRRT with high-intensity CRRT might worsen the outcomes in septic AKI patients. PMID:26771934

  7. [Pancreatitis and nutrition. Significance of the gastrointestinal tract and nutrition for septic complications].

    PubMed

    Foitzik, T

    2001-01-01

    Septic complications are an important factor for the morbidity and mortality of acute pancreatitis. The gut has been identified as a source of infection early in the course of the disease allowing intestinal bacteria to translocate into pancreatic necrosis and other organs. Bacterial translocation is promoted by an impaired intestinal mucosal barrier which can be attributed to the reduced oxygen and substrate supply of the intestine during the early systemic response to the pancreatic injury. A rat model of severe acute pancreatitis has been used to confirm the hypothesis that an impaired mucosal barrier can be stabilized by supplying certain nutritients, vitamins and trace elements. Following a discussion of the many aspects of bacterial translocation and gut derived sepsis, the role of the gut and nutrition for the development of septic complications in acute pancreatitis is summarized as follows: Early in the course of acute pancreatitis the gut is a target organ of the primary systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) to pancreatic injury. SIRS-induced gut barrier dysfunction promoting bacterial translocation makes the gut the motor for secondary (septic) complications. As a septic focus the gut becomes a target for therapeutic measures aimed at stabilizing the impaired gut barrier. Nutritive factors demonstrated to improve impaired gut barrier function include early enteral feeding and specific factors like glutamine which are essential for enterocytes and colonocytes in stress. Experimental data are presented to underline the significance of these nutritive factors and subsequent randomized multicenter trials performed to verify the positive experimental results are introduced. The effect of other nutritive factors (e.g. omega-3-fatty acids) has not yet been systemically investigated. Thus, experimental and clinical studies need to be performed for evaluating their effect on bacterial translocation and the disease course in acute pancreatitis. PMID:11227293

  8. IMPACT OF CONTINUOUS RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY INTENSITY ON SEPTIC ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, Kengo; Yamashita, Tetsushi; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Noiri, Eisei; Nangaku, Masaomi; Yahagi, Naoki; Doi, Kent

    2016-02-01

    The intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been evaluated, but recent randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a beneficial impact of high intensity on the outcomes. High intensity might cause some detrimental results recognized recently as CRRT trauma. This study was undertaken to evaluate the association of CRRT intensity with mortality in a population of AKI patients treated with lower-intensity CRRT in Japan. A retrospective single-center cohort study enrolled 125 AKI patients treated with CRRT in mixed intensive care units of a university hospital in Japan. Subanalysis was conducted for septic and postsurgical AKI. The median value of the prescribed total effluent rate was 20.1 (interquartile range 15.3-27.1) mL/kg/h. Overall, univariate Cox regression analysis indicated no association of the CRRT intensity with the 60-day in-hospital mortality rate (hazard ratio 1.006, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.991-1.018, P = 0.343). In subanalysis with the septic AKI patients, multivariate analysis revealed two factors associated independently with the 60-day mortality rate: the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at initiation of CRRT (hazard ratio 1.152, 95% CI 1.025-1.301, P = 0.0171) and the CRRT intensity (hazard ratio 1.024, 95% CI 1.004-1.042, P = 0.0195). The CRRT intensity was associated significantly with higher 60-day in-hospital mortality in septic AKI, suggesting that unknown detrimental effects of CRRT with high-intensity CRRT might worsen the outcomes in septic AKI patients. PMID:26771934

  9. Expression of Heat Shock Protein 27 in Melanoma Metastases Is Associated with Overall Response to Bevacizumab Monotherapy: Analyses of Predictive Markers in a Clinical Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Cornelia; Akslen, Lars A.; Straume, Oddbjørn

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential predictive biomarkers in 35 patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-angiogenic bevacizumab monotherapy in a clinical phase II study. The immunohistochemical expression of various angiogenic factors in tissues from primary melanomas and metastases as well as their concentration in blood samples were examined. Strong expression of Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSP27) in metastases correlated significantly with complete or partial response to bevacizumab (p = 0.044). Furthermore, clinical benefit, i.e., complete or partial response or stable disease for at least 6 months, was more frequent in patients with strong expression of HSP27 in primary tumors (p = 0.046). Tissue expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), its splicing variant VEGF165b or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) did not correlate with response, and the concentration of HSP27, VEGF-A or bFGF measured in blood samples before treatment did not show predictive value. Further, microvessel density, proliferating microvessel density and presence of glomeruloid microvascular proliferations were assessed in sections of primary tumors and metastases. Microvessel density in primary melanomas was significantly higher in patients with clinical benefit than in non-responders (p = 0.042). In conclusion, our findings suggest that strong HSP27 expression in melanoma metastases predicts response to bevacizumab treatment. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00139360 PMID:27166673

  10. Prognostic value of gasometric parameters of carbon dioxide in resuscitation of septic patients. A bibliography review.

    PubMed

    Lamsfus-Prieto, J Á; de Castro-Fernández, R; Hernández-García, A M; Marcano-Rodriguez, G

    2016-04-01

    The anaerobic metabolism is the cornerstone in physiopathology of septic shock. Nowadays we have both the central or mixed venous oxygen saturation and lactate levels to monitoring the metabolism in septic patients. Some studies have shown that normalization of systemic hemodynamic and oxygen metabolism variables not prevent progression to multiorgan damage and death. Recently has been proposed the venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (ΔpvaCO2) as an alternative marker of tissue hypoperfusion, like Cardiac Index. High ΔpvaCO2 predicts adverse outcomes. Also has been proposed both, the ratio between the ΔpvaCO2 and arterial-to-venous oxygen content difference (ΔCavO2): ΔpvaCO2/ΔCavO2; and, the ratio between venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (ΔCvaCO2) and ΔCavO2: ΔCvaCO2/ΔCavO2, as markers of anaerobic metabolism. Both of high ratios are related to high levels of lactate and worse prognosis. Therefore in patients with sepsis the combination of markers of resuscitation could be important to improve the outcomes. PMID:26775123

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Heart-Lung Transplantation: Review of 10 Single-Center Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae Kwang; Choi, Se Hoon; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart-lung transplantation (HLT) has provided hope to patients with end-stage lung disease and irreversible heart dysfunction. We reviewed the clinical outcomes of 10 patients who underwent heart-lung transplantation at Asan Medical Center. Methods Between July 2010 and August 2014, a total of 11 patients underwent HLT at Asan Medical Center. After excluding one patient who underwent concomitant liver transplantation, 10 patients were enrolled in our study. We reviewed the demographics of the donors and the recipients’ baseline information, survival rate, cause of death, and postoperative complications. All patients underwent follow-up, with a mean duration of 26.1±16.7 months. Results Early death occurred in two patients (20%) due to septic shock. Late death occurred in three patients (38%) due to bronchiolitis obliterans (n=2) and septic shock (n=1), although these patients survived for 22, 28, and 42 months, respectively. The actuarial survival rates at one year, two years, and three years after HLT were 80%, 67%, and 53%, respectively. Conclusion HLT is a procedure that is rarely performed in Korea, even in medical centers with large heart and lung transplant programs. In order to achieve acceptable clinical outcomes, it is critical to carefully choose the donor and the recipient and to be certain that all aspects of the transplant procedure are planned in advance with the greatest care. PMID:27298792

  12. Preliminary characterization of abandoned septic tank systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report documents the activities and findings of the Phase I Preliminary Characterization of Abandoned Septic Tank Systems. The purpose of the preliminary characterization activity was to investigate the Tiger Team abandoned septic systems (tanks and associated leachfields) for the purpose of identifying waste streams for closure at a later date. The work performed was not to fully characterize or remediate the sites. The abandoned systems potentially received wastes or effluent from buildings which could have discharged non-domestic, petroleum hydrocarbons, hazardous, radioactive and/or mixed wastes. A total of 20 sites were investigated for the preliminary characterization of identified abandoned septic systems. Of the 20 sites, 19 were located and characterized through samples collected from each tank(s) and, where applicable, associated leachfields. The abandoned septic tank systems are located in Areas 5, 12, 15, 25, and 26 on the Nevada Test Site.

  13. TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF WASTES PUMPED FROM SEPTIC TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study identified methods of treating and disposing of septic tank sludge (septage). Biological, chemical, and physical properties of septage were determined and curves were developed for designing septage treatment facilities. Two processes were tested for treating and dispos...

  14. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis caused by Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hofer, M; Steinrücken, J; Trampuz, A; Borens, O

    2014-12-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphisis is distinguished from osteitis pubis by positive cultures. The symptoms, physical examination and laboratory findings of these two conditions are comparable. We present a case of 57-year-old woman with septic arthritis of pubic symphisis caused by Streptococcus mitis, a commensal oral flora that belongs to viridans group streptococci, which normally reside in the oral cavity, the gastrointestinal and the urogenital tract. PMID:25109348

  15. Could Biomarkers Direct Therapy for the Septic Patient?

    PubMed

    Sims, Clark R; Nguyen, Trung C; Mayeux, Philip R

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis is a serious medical condition caused by a severe systemic inflammatory response to a bacterial, fungal, or viral infection that most commonly affects neonates and the elderly. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of sepsis have resulted in guidelines for care that have helped reduce the risk of dying from sepsis for both children and older adults. Still, over the past three decades, a large number of clinical trials have been undertaken to evaluate pharmacological agents for sepsis. Unfortunately, all of these trials have failed, with the use of some agents even shown to be harmful. One key issue in these trials was the heterogeneity of the patient population that participated. What has emerged is the need to target therapeutic interventions to the specific patient's underlying pathophysiological processes, rather than looking for a universal therapy that would be effective in a "typical" septic patient, who does not exist. This review supports the concept that identification of the right biomarkers that can direct therapy and provide timely feedback on its effectiveness will enable critical care physicians to decrease mortality of patients with sepsis and improve the quality of life of survivors. PMID:26857961

  16. Post-arthroscopy septic arthritis: Current data and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T; Boisrenoult, P; Jenny, J Y

    2015-12-01

    Septic arthritis develops after less than 1% of all arthroscopy procedures. The clinical symptoms may resemble those seen after uncomplicated arthroscopy, raising diagnostic challenges. The diagnosis rests on emergent joint aspiration with microscopic smear examination and prolonged culturing on specific media. Urgent therapeutic measures must be taken, including abundant arthroscopic lavage, synovectomy, and the concomitant administration of two effective antibiotics for at least 6 weeks. Preservation of implants or transplants is increasingly accepted, and repeated joint lavage is a component of the treatment strategy. After knee arthroscopy, infection is the most common complication; most cases occur after cruciate ligament reconstruction, and staphylococci are the predominant causative organisms. Emergent synovectomy with transplant preservation and appropriate antibiotic therapy ensures eradication of the infection in 85% of cases, with no adverse effect on final functional outcomes. After shoulder arthroscopy, infection is 10 times less common than neurological complications and occurs mainly after rotator cuff repair procedures; the diagnosis may be difficult and delayed if Propionibacterium acnes is the causative organism. The update presented here is based on both a literature review and a practice survey. The findings have been used to develop practical recommendations aimed at improving the management of post-arthroscopy infections, which are exceedingly rare but can induce devastating functional impairments. PMID:26412207

  17. The role of beta-blockers in septic patients.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, O; Teboul, J L

    2015-03-01

    β-blockers are widely used to treat cardiovascular diseases and in the peri-operative period in selected patients. The main benefit in terms of morbidity and/or mortality of their use is believed to be linked to specific effects on myocardial oxygen supply/demand balance, to anti-arrhythmic effects and anti-inflammatory effects. Use of β-blockers in severe sepsis is still under debate and if any, their appropriate indications remain unclear. In this article, we analyze the recent literature addressing the metabolic, immuno-modulatory and hemodynamic effects of non cardio-selective and of cardio-selective β-blockers in experimental and human sepsis in order to help clarifying the potential place of these drugs in patients with severe sepsis. From this analysis, it appears that β-adrenoceptor blocking agents may represent a therapeutic approach in patients with severe sepsis, in whom catecholaminergic hyperactivity including excessive tachycardia is supposed to play an aggravating role. However, many questions about effectiveness, safety and cardio-selectivity of the drugs and about the appropriate target population remain partially unanswered. Recently, esmolol, a short-time acting β1-adrenoceptor blocker titrated to decrease heart rate below 95 beats/min was shown to exert beneficial effects in a monocentric randomized clinical trial including selected septic patients. Further large multicenter randomized trials are required to confirm the potential benefit of such a therapy in patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24941896

  18. [Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis in two athletes].

    PubMed

    Andrews, José A; Rizzato Lede, Daniel; Senderovsky, Melisa; Finn, Bárbara C; Emery, Nicholas; Bottaro, Federico; Bruetman, Julio E; Young, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis, so called osteomyelitis pubis is the infection which involves pubic symphysis and its joint. It is a rare condition, representing less than one percent of all cases of osteomyelitis. It affects most frequently young athletes and women undergoing gynecologic or urologic surgery. It presents itself with fever and pubic pain which irradiates to the genitals and increases when hip is mobilized, and this fact produces gait claudication. Differential diagnosis should be made with pubic osteitis, which is a sterile inflammatory condition. Diagnosis is based on clinic supported by microbiologic culture results, image methods, and proteins augment during acute phase. Image guided puncture is often necessary for the differential diagnosis with pubic osteitis. The etiologic agents most commonly found are Staphylococcus aureus, followed by gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infection in recent pelvis surgery. The antibiotic treatment is adjusted depending on the microbiological diagnosis, adding NSAIDs, and bed rest. Surgical debridement is required up to 55% of the cases. Two cases of osteomyelitis of the pubis by S. aureus, with good outcome to treatment with antibiotics, NSAIDs and rest are here described. Both patients were healthy relevant athletes. PMID:22763164

  19. Genetic diversity of Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates determined by EcoRI restriction fragment length polymorphism of heat-shock protein 70 genes.

    PubMed

    Meade, John C; de Mestral, Jacqueline; Stiles, Jonathan K; Secor, W Evan; Finley, Richard W; Cleary, John D; Lushbaugh, William B

    2009-02-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis using a multilocus heat-inducible cytoplasmic heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) hybridization probe with EcoRI-digested genomic DNA was used in molecular typing of 129 Trichomonas vaginalis isolates. Results indicate that Trichomonas organisms exhibit considerable polymorphism in their Hsp70 RFLP patterns. Analysis of seven American Type Culture Collection reference strains and 122 clinical isolates, including 84 isolates from Jackson, Mississippi, 18 isolates from Atlanta, Georgia, and 20 isolates from throughout the United States, showed 105 distinct Hsp70 RFLP pattern subtypes for Trichomonas. Phylogenetic analysis of the Hsp70 RFLP data showed that the T. vaginalis isolates were organized into two clonal lineages. These results illustrate the substantial genomic diversity present in T. vaginalis and indicate that a large number of genetically distinct Trichomonas isolates may be responsible for human trichomoniasis in the United States. PMID:19190222

  20. Fibronectin and other DIC-related variables in septic ICU patients receiving cryoprecipitate.

    PubMed

    Hesselvik, F; Brodin, B; Blombäck, M; Cedergren, B; Lieden, G; Maller, R

    1985-01-01

    In a controlled study of fibronectin supplementation in sepsis, 11 ICU patients in septic shock were scheduled to receive either cryoprecipitate from 20-40 donors (n = 6) or 250-300 ml of stored plasma (n = 5) (two infusions over 24 h). We wanted to: compare some "conventional" DIC variables in the ICU (platelet count, prothrombin complex = NT, FDP) to additional variables: Fibronectin (Fn), fibrinogen (Fg), F V, FVIII R:Ag, F VIII:C activity, F XII, plasminogen (Plg), antiplasmin (AP), antithrombin (AT), kallikrein inhibiting activity (KI) and spontaneous proteolytic activity (SPA): study the effects of cryoprecipitate or plasma infusion on three variables. Samples were taken before the first infusion, and 24 and 48 h after. At onset, high levels (p less than .001 when compared to blood donors) of Fg, VIIIR:Ag and VIII:C were seen. KI levels were within the normal range. F V was low (p less than .05). Fn, NT, XII, Plg, AP and AT were markedly low (p less than .001). SPA showed great variation. When compared to 28 patients with severe infections, but not in septic shock, the ICU group had higher VIIIR:Ag (p less than .05) and VIII:C (p less than .01), and lower XII, Plg, AP and AT (p less than .001). FDP was elevated in all ICU patients. Five patients were thrombocytopenic, and in these a pattern with low levels of Plg and AT was observed. Fn did not correlate well to the other variables measured. These results indicate a marked activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in these severely ill patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3937220

  1. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  2. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26999192

  3. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS, OUTCOMES AND RISK FACTORS FOR DEATH AMONG CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH HIV-RELATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    PubMed Central

    LUNA, Leonardo Duarte Sobreira; SOARES, Douglas de Sousa; JUNIOR, Geraldo Bezerra da SILVA; CAVALCANTE, Malena Gadelha; MALVEIRA, Lara Raissa Cavalcante; MENESES, Gdayllon Cavalcante; PEREIRA, Eanes Delgado Barros; DAHER, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: The aim of this study is to describe clinical characteristics, outcomes and risk factors for death among patients with HIV-related acute kidney injury (AKI) admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with HIV-infected AKI patients admitted to the ICU of an infectious diseases hospital in Fortaleza, Brazil. All the patients with confirmed diagnosis of HIV and AKI admitted from January 2004 to December 2011 were included. A comparison between survivors and non-survivors was performed. Risk factors for death were investigated. Results: Among 256 AKI patients admitted to the ICU in the study period, 73 were identified as HIV-infected, with a predominance of male patients (83.6%), and the mean age was 41.2 ± 10.4 years. Non-survivor patients presented higher APACHE II scores (61.4 ± 19 vs. 38.6 ± 18, p = 0.004), used more vasoconstrictors (70.9 vs. 37.5%, p = 0.02) and needed more mechanical ventilation - MV (81.1 vs. 35.3%, p = 0.001). There were 55 deaths (75.3%), most of them (53.4%) due to septic shock. Independent risk factors for mortality were septic shock (OR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.0-96.9, p = 0.007) and respiratory insufficiency with need of MV (OR = 27.6, 95% CI = 5.0-153.0, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Non-survivor HIV-infected patients with AKI admitted to the ICU presented higher severity APACHE II scores, more respiratory damage and hemodynamic impairment than survivors. Septic shock and respiratory insufficiency were independently associated to death. PMID:27410912

  4. 13CO2 recovery fraction in expired air of septic patients under mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Auxiliadora-Martins, M; Martins, M A; Coletto, F A; Martins-Filho, O A; Marchini, J S; Basile-Filho, A

    2008-07-01

    The continuous intravenous administration of isotopic bicarbonate (NaH13CO2) has been used for the determination of the retention of the 13CO2 fraction or the 13CO2 recovered in expired air. This determination is important for the calculation of substrate oxidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in critically ill patients with sepsis under mechanical ventilation, the 13CO2 recovery fraction in expired air after continuous intravenous infusion of NaH13CO2 (3.8 micromol/kg diluted in 0.9% saline in ddH2O). A prospective study was conducted on 10 patients with septic shock between the second and fifth day of sepsis evolution (APACHE II, 25.9 +/- 7.4). Initially, baseline CO2 was collected and indirect calorimetry was also performed. A primer of 5 mL NaH13CO2 was administered followed by continuous infusion of 5 mL/h for 6 h. Six CO2 production (VCO2) measurements (30 min each) were made with a portable metabolic cart connected to a respirator and hourly samples of expired air were obtained using a 750-mL gas collecting bag attached to the outlet of the respirator. 13CO2 enrichment in expired air was determined with a mass spectrometer. The patients presented a mean value of VCO2 of 182 +/- 52 mL/min during the steady-state phase. The mean recovery fraction was 0.68 +/- 0.06%, which is less than that reported in the literature (0.82 +/- 0.03%). This suggests that the 13CO2 recovery fraction in septic patients following enteral feeding is incomplete, indicating retention of 13CO2 in the organism. The severity of septic shock in terms of the prognostic index APACHE II and the sepsis score was not associated with the 13CO2 recovery fraction in expired air. PMID:18719737

  5. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements.

  6. Gallium scintigraphy for diagnosis of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, T.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Sherman, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-four children with presumptive acute osteomyelitis or septic arthritis underwent early gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy and have been retrospectively reviewed. Diagnostic accuracy using this technique was 91%. Gallium-67 citrate is a more reliable radiopharmaceutical agent for the detection of selected acute musculoskeletal infections than either technetium methylene diphosphonate or indium-111. However, the radiation dosage from gallium is higher than from other radiopharmaceutical agents, and the authors would recommend its use only in cases where the diagnosis cannot be made on the basis of clinical, laboratory, or plain roentgenographic criteria.

  7. Bilateral iliopsoas abscess associated with right hip septic arthritis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaiem, Maher M; Bajuifer, Salem J; Fattani, Mohammed O; Al-Zaiem, Feras M

    2014-07-01

    Iliopsoas abscess is a very rare pathology in the neonatal period. There is a lack of reports in the literature on bilateral psoas abscess with hip joint arthritis. We report a case of bilateral iliopsoas abscess with concomitant right hip septic arthritis, caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 28-day-old male infant. The baby presented with bilateral diffuse swelling of the groins and upper thighs. He was treated successfully by ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage along with systemic antibiotic therapy. Clinical improvement was observed within 24-48 hours of drainage. PMID:25028234

  8. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Septic Systems in New York State.

    PubMed

    Truhlar, Allison M; Rahm, Brian G; Brooks, Rachael A; Nadeau, Sarah A; Makarsky, Erin T; Walter, M Todd

    2016-07-01

    Onsite septic systems use microbial processes to eliminate organic wastes and nutrients such as nitrogen; these processes can contribute to air pollution through the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Current USEPA estimates for septic system GHG emissions are based on one study conducted in north-central California and are limited to methane; therefore, the contribution of these systems to the overall GHG emission budget is unclear. This study quantified and compared septic system GHG emissions from the soil over leach fields and the roof vent, which are the most likely locations for gas emissions during normal septic system operation. At each of eight septic systems, we measured fluxes of CH, CO, and NO using a static chamber method. The roof vent released the majority of septic system gas emissions. In addition, the leach field was a significant source of NO fluxes. Comparisons between leach field and vent emissions suggest that biological processes in the leach field soil may influence the type and quantity of gas released. Overall, our results suggest that (i) revisions are needed in USEPA guidance (e.g., septic systems are not currently listed as a source of NO emissions) and (ii) similar studies representing a wider range of climatic and geographic settings are needed. The total vent, sand filter, and leach field GHG emissions were 0.17, 0.045, and 0.050 t CO-equivalents capita yr, respectively. In total, this represents about 1.5% of the annual carbon footprint of an individual living in the United States. PMID:27380062

  9. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3−/−), complement factor B (fB−/−), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR−/−) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3−/− mice than in WT controls, whereas fB−/− mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3−/− sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB−/− sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus. PMID:26787717

  10. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: Human heat shock protein 70 improves the manufacturing process without affecting clinical safety.

    PubMed

    Maas Enriquez, Monika; Thrift, John; Garger, Stephen; Katterle, Yvonne

    2016-11-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) approved for the treatment of hemophilia A. BAY 81-8973 has the same amino acid sequence as the currently marketed sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) product and is produced using additional advanced manufacturing technologies. One of the key manufacturing advances for BAY 81-8973 is introduction of the gene for human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the rFVIII-FS cell line. HSP70 facilitates proper folding of proteins, enhances cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis, and potentially impacts rFVIII glycosylation. HSP70 expression in the BAY 81-8973 cell line along with other manufacturing advances resulted in a higher-producing cell line and improvements in the pharmacokinetics of the final product as determined in clinical studies. HSP70 protein is not detected in the harvest or in the final BAY 81-8973 product. However, because this is a new process, clinical trial safety assessments included monitoring for anti-HSP70 antibodies. Most patients, across all age groups, had low levels of anti-HSP70 antibodies before exposure to the investigational product. During BAY 81-8973 treatment, 5% of patients had sporadic increases in anti-HSP70 antibody levels above a predefined threshold (cutoff value, 239 ng/mL). No clinical symptoms related to anti-HSP70 antibody development occurred. In conclusion, addition of HSP70 to the BAY 81-8973 cell line is an innovative technology for manufacturing rFVIII aimed at improving protein folding and expression. Improved pharmacokinetics and no effect on safety of BAY 81-8973 were observed in clinical trials in patients with hemophilia A. PMID:27436242

  11. Clinical Nomograms to Predict Stone-Free Rates after Shock-Wave Lithotripsy: Development and Internal-Validation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Kwon; Ha, Seung Beom; Jeon, Chan Hoo; Oh, Jong Jin; Cho, Sung Yong; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Jeong, Chang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) is accepted as the first line treatment modality for uncomplicated upper urinary tract stones; however, validated prediction models with regards to stone-free rates (SFRs) are still needed. We aimed to develop nomograms predicting SFRs after the first and within the third session of SWL. Computed tomography (CT) information was also modeled for constructing nomograms. Materials and Methods From March 2006 to December 2013, 3028 patients were treated with SWL for ureter and renal stones at our three tertiary institutions. Four cohorts were constructed: Total-development, Total-validation, CT-development, and CT-validation cohorts. The nomograms were developed using multivariate logistic regression models with selected significant variables in a univariate logistic regression model. A C-index was used to assess the discrimination accuracy of nomograms and calibration plots were used to analyze the consistency of prediction. Results The SFR, after the first and within the third session, was 48.3% and 68.8%, respectively. Significant variables were sex, stone location, stone number, and maximal stone diameter in the Total-development cohort, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) and grade of hydronephrosis (HN) were additional parameters in the CT-development cohort. The C-indices were 0.712 and 0.723 for after the first and within the third session of SWL in the Total-development cohort, and 0.755 and 0.756, in the CT-development cohort, respectively. The calibration plots showed good correspondences. Conclusions We constructed and validated nomograms to predict SFR after SWL. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first graphical nomograms to be modeled with CT information. These may be useful for patient counseling and treatment decision-making. PMID:26890006

  12. One-year clinical outcomes in invasive treatment strategies for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon Pyo; Kang, Ki-Woon; Yoon, Hyeon Soo; Myung, Jin Cheol; Choi, Yu Jeong; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kyung Tae; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical outcomes of an invasive strategy for elderly (aged ≥ 75 years) patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) complicated by cardiogenic shock (CS). Methods Data on 366 of 409 elderly CS patients from a total of 6,132 acute STEMI cases enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry between January 2008 and June 2011, were collected and analyzed. In-hospital deaths and the 1-month and 1-year survival rates free from major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as all cause death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization) were reported for the patients who had undergone invasive (n = 310) and conservative (n = 56) treatment strategies. Results The baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. There were fewer in-hospital deaths in the invasive treatment strategy group (23.5% vs. 46.4%, P < 0.001). In addition, the 1-year MACE-free survival rate after invasive treatment was significantly lower compared with the conservative treatment (51% vs. 66%, P = 0.001). Conclusions In elderly patients with acute STEMI complicated by CS, the outcomes of invasive strategy are similar to those in younger patients at the 1-year follow-up. PMID:24133510

  13. Septic hematogenous lumbar spondylodiscitis in elderly patients with multiple risk factors: efficacy of posterior stabilization and interbody fusion with iliac crest bone graft

    PubMed Central

    Mater, Eckhardt; Schön, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The conservative and operative treatment strategies of hematogenous spondylodiscitis in septic patients with multiple risk factors are controversial. The present series demonstrates the outcome of 18 elderly patients (median age, 72 years) with septic hematogenous spondylodiscitis and intraspinal abscess treated with microsurgical decompression and debridement of the infective tissue, followed by posterior stabilization and interbody fusion with iliac crest bone graft in one or two lumbar segments. The majority of the patients were unsuccessfully treated with intravenous antibiotics prior to the operation. Antibiotic therapy was continued for more than 6 weeks postoperatively. Morbidity and early mortality amounted to 50 and 17%, respectively. Three patients died in the hospital from internal complications after an initial postoperative improvement of the inflammatory clinical signs and laboratory parameters. Fifteen patients recovered from the spinal infection. Three of them died several months after discharge (cerebral hemorrhage, malignancy and unknown cause). Twelve patients had excellent or good outcomes during the follow-up period of at least 1 year. The series shows that operative decompression and eradication of the intraspinal and intervertebral infective tissue with fusion and stabilization via a posterior approach is possible in septic patients with multiple risk factors and leads to good results in those patients, who survive the initial severe stage of the septic disease. However, the morbidity and mortality suggest that this surgical treatment is not the therapy of first choice in high-risk septic patients, but may be considered in patients when conservative management has failed. PMID:20495933

  14. Role of activated neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Perl, Mario; Hohmann, Christoph; Denk, Stephanie; Kellermann, Philipp; Lu, Dapeng; Braumüller, Sonja; Bachem, Max G; Thomas, Jörg; Knöferl, Markus W; Ayala, Alfred; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus S

    2012-07-01

    More than 50% of severely injured patients have chest trauma. Second insults frequently result in acute lung injury (ALI), with sepsis being the main underlying condition. We aimed to develop a standardized, reproducible, and clinically relevant double-hit mouse model of ALI induced by chest trauma and polymicrobial sepsis and to investigate the pathophysiologic role of activated neutrophils. Lung contusion was applied to C57Bl/6 mice via a focused blast wave. Twenty-four hours later, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. For polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) depletion, animals received intravenous injections of PMN-depleting antibody. In response to blunt chest trauma followed by sepsis as well as after sepsis alone, a significant local and systemic inflammatory response with increased cytokine/chemokine levels in lung and plasma was observed. In contrast, lung apoptosis was markedly elevated only after a double hit. Intra-alveolar neutrophils and total bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations were markedly increased following isolated chest trauma or the combined insult, but not after sepsis alone. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was enhanced only in response to the double hit accompanied by histological disruption of the alveolar architecture, lung congestion, and marked cellular infiltrates. Neutrophil depletion significantly diminished lung interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 concentrations and reduced the degree of septic ALI. Here we have established a novel and highly reproducible mouse model of chest trauma-induced septic ALI characterizing a clinical relevant double-hit scenario. In particular, the depletion of neutrophils substantially mitigated the extent of lung injury, indicating a pathomechanistic role for neutrophils in chest trauma-induced septic ALI. PMID:22552016

  15. Greenhouse gas emissions from septic systems in New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlar, A. M.; Rahm, B. G.; Brooks, R. A.; Nadeau, S. A.; Walter, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Onsite septic systems are a practical way to treat wastewater in rural or less-densely populated areas. Septic systems utilize microbial processes to eliminate organic wastes and nutrients such as nitrogen; these processes can contribute to air pollution through the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). At each of nine septic systems, we measured fluxes of CH4, CO2, and N2O from the soil over the leach field and sand filter, and from the roof outlet vent. These are the most likely locations for gas emissions during normal operation of the septic system. The majority of all septic system gas emissions were released from the roof vent. However, our comparisons of the gas fluxes from these locations suggest that biological processes in the soil, especially the soil over the leach field, can influence the type and quantity of gas that is released from the system. The total vent, sand filter, and leach field GHG emissions were 0.12, 0.045, and 0.046 tonne CO2e capita-1 year-1, respectively. In total, this represents about 1.5% of the annual carbon footprint of an individual living in the US.

  16. Methods of Monitoring Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ednan K.; Malhotra, Atul; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Intensive monitoring is a crucial component of the management of shock. However, there is little consensus about optimal strategies for monitoring. Although the pulmonary artery catheter has been widely used, conflicting data exist about the utility of this device. A variety of other techniques have been developed in hopes of providing clinically useful information about myocardial function, intravascular volume, and indices of organ function. In addition, there is evolving evidence that targeting and monitoring certain physiological goals may be most important early in the course of shock. In this chapter, we examine many of the available monitoring techniques and the evidence supporting their use. PMID:16088506

  17. [Potentials of infusion therapy in enhancing the detoxification effect of hemosorption in patients suffering from suppurative-septic complications of mechanical injury].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, I I; Trusov, A A; Rozhkov, A S; Shashkov, B V; Gard, I S

    1987-01-01

    Under study was the application of microvasoplegia as a method of preoperative management in fulfilling hemosorption in patients with pyo-septic complications of a severe mechanical trauma. The method of infusion and medicamentous therapy used before hemosorption is described. Laboratory examinations of the enzyme toxemia level have shown pathogenetic grounds of the complex method of treatment. Positive clinical results were obtained. PMID:3590549

  18. Combat: Initial Experience with a Randomized Clinical Trial of Plasma-Based Resuscitation in the Field for Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Michael P; Moore, Ernest E; Chin, Theresa L; Ghasabyan, Arsen; Chandler, James; Stringham, John; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Moore, Hunter B; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C; Sauaia, Angela

    2015-08-01

    The existing evidence shows great promise for plasma as the first resuscitation fluid in both civilian and military trauma. We embarked on the Control of Major Bleeding After Trauma (COMBAT) trial with the support of the Department of Defense to determine if plasma-first resuscitation yields hemostatic and survival benefits. The methodology of the COMBAT study represents not only 3 years of development work but also the integration of nearly two decades of technical experience with the design and implementation of other clinical trials and studies. Herein, we describe the key features of the study design, critical personnel and infrastructural elements, and key innovations. We will also briefly outline the systems engineering challenges entailed by this study. The COMBAT trial is a randomized, placebo-controlled, semiblinded, prospective, phase IIB clinical trial conducted in a ground ambulance fleet based at a level I trauma center and part of a multicenter collaboration. The primary objective of the COMBAT trial is to determine the efficacy of field resuscitation with plasma first compared with standard of care (normal saline). To date, we have enrolled 30 subjects in the COMBAT study. The ability to achieve intervention with a hemostatic resuscitation agent in the closest possible temporal proximity to injury is critical and represents an opportunity to forestall the evolution of the "bloody vicious cycle." Thus, the COMBAT model for deploying plasma in first-response units should serve as a model for randomized clinical trials of other hemostatic resuscitative agents. PMID:25784527

  19. Management of Large Proximal Ureteral Stones: A Comparative Clinical Trial Between Transureteral Lithotripsy (TUL) and Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    PubMed Central

    Rabani, Seyed Mohammadreza; Moosavizadeh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background A review of the related medical journals indicates that there is no definite evidence-based option for managing large proximal ureteral stones, although many procedures such as transureteral lithotripsy (TUL), shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotripsy, laparoscopic ureterolithotomy, and open ureterolithotomy are currently used to treat this urological problem. Objectives In this study, we tried to determine the most appropriate treatment plan for proximal ureteral stones larger than 12 mm by comparing the two most commonly used procedures. Patients and Methods Between February 2005 and April 2011, 62 patients including 40 males and 22 females (mean age 39.5 years, range 19 to 64) with proximal ureteral stones larger than 12 mm (12–26 mm) with a mean size of 17.64 mm were prospectively divided into two groups consisting of 32 patients who underwent TUL (group A) and 30 who underwent SWL (group B). In unsuccessful cases, repeat SWL or TUL was planned. Patients who could not tolerate the lithotomy position, younger than 18 years, had undergone coagulopathy, had concurrent renal and ureteral stones, were pregnant, or had sepsis were excluded from this study. Results Stone access was successful in 28 patients and the treatment was efficient in 18 patients (56.25%) in group A. For the patients with successful stone access but unsuccessful TUL, a DJ was inserted and a second ureteroscopic intervention was performed. The second intervention was successful in 7 patients (21.87). SWL was successful in 14 patients (46.66%) in the first attempt and in 7 additional patients in the second intervention (23.33%). Conclusions In this study, we showed different success rates for SWL and TUL because of the larger size of the stones. We achieved a success rate of 56.25% in the first attempt in the TUL group, and the overall success rate (after the second TUL) was 78.12%. In comparison, the SWL group had a success rate of 46.66% in the first attempt, and

  20. Hypovolemic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... clammy skin Confusion Decreased or no urine output General weakness Pale skin color (pallor) Rapid breathing Sweating , moist skin Unconsciousness The greater and more rapid the blood loss, the more severe the symptoms of shock.

  1. Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head Treated with Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: Analysis of Short-term Clinical Outcomes of Treatment with Radiologic Staging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Kwon, Jae-Woo; Park, Jung-Seob; Han, Kyeol; Shin, Woo-jin; Lee, Jeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate clinical results of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) with radiographic staging on patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH). Materials and Methods We evaluated 24 patients diagnosed with AVNFH (32 hip joints) who were treated with ESWT from 1993 to 2012. Average follow-up period was 27 months, and the average age of patients was 47.8 years. The Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) system was used to grade radiographic stage prior to treatment. For this study patients were divided into two groups based on their ARCO stage, group 1 (ARCO stages I and II) and group 2 (ARCO stage III). Comparative analyses were done between the two groups using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Harris hip score (HHS) at pre-treatment and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. Failure was defined when radiographic stage progressed or arthroplasty surgery was needed due to clinical exacerbation. Results Both groups showed clinical improvements with VAS scoring at final follow-up (group 1: median 7 to 1.5, P<0.001; group 2: mean 7 to 4, P=0.056). Using HHS, group 1 showed a significant improvement (from 65.5 to 95 [P<0.001]), while no significance was observed for group 2 (P=0.280). At final follow-up, 3 hips from group 1 and one hip from group 2 showed radiographic improvement; however, two patients underwent total hip arthroplasty due to persistent pain and dysfunction. Conclusion ESWT can be considered as an interventional option before surgical treatment in patients with not only early stage AVNFH but also with mid stage. PMID:27536633

  2. Vasopressin for the management of catecholamine-resistant anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A M; Yousuf, B; Khan, M A; Khan, F H; Khan, F A

    2008-09-01

    Severe anaesthetic anaphylaxis is relatively uncommon. Oxygen, fluids and epinephrine are considered to be the mainstay for treatment of cardiovascular collapse and current guidelines for the management of anaphylaxis list only epinephrine as a vasopressor to use in the event of a cardiovascular collapse. Recently, evidence has emerged in the support of the use of vasopressin in cardiopulmonary resuscitation; it is also recommended for the treatment of ventricular fibrillation, septic shock and post-cardiopulmonary bypass distribution shock. Currently, there is no algorithm or guideline for the management of anaphylaxis that include the use of vasopressin. We report a 24-year-old woman who developed severe anaphylactic shock at induction of anaesthesia while undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Circulation shock was refractory to epinephrine and high doses of pure alpha-agonist phenylephrine and norepinephrine. Single intravenous dose of two units of vasopressin re-established normal circulation and blood pressure. PMID:18830525

  3. Enhanced Innate Inflammation Induced by Anti-BTLA Antibody in Dual Insult Model of Hemorrhagic Shock/Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tingting; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Biron, Bethany M; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis following hemorrhagic shock is a common clinical condition, in which innate immune system suffers from severe suppression. B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) is an immune-regulatory coinhibitory receptor expressed not only on adaptive, but also on innate immune cells. Our previous data showed that BTLA gene deficient mice were protected from septic mortality when compared with wild-type control C57BL/6 mice. Here, we extended our study by treating C57BL/6 mice with an anti-BTLA monoclonal antibody (clone 6A6; reported to have the ability to neutralize or agonize/potentiate BTLA signaling) in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock (Hem) followed by sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); positing initially that if BTLA engagement was neutralized, like gene deficiency, an anti-BTLA mAb would have the similar effects on the inflammatory response/morbidity in these mice after such insults. Here, we report that BTLA expression is elevated on innate immune cells after Hem/CLP. However, anti-BTLA antibody treatment increased cytokine (TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10)/chemokine (KC, MIP-2, MCP-1) levels and inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells) recruitment in the peritoneal cavity, which in turn aggravated organ injury and elevated these animals' mortality in Hem/CLP. When compared with the protective effects of our previous study using BTLA gene deficient mice in a model of lethal septic challenge, we further confirmed BTLA's contribution to enhanced innate cell recruitment, elevated IL-10 levels, and reduced survival, and that engagement of antibody with BTLA potentiates/exacerbates the pathophysiology in Hem/sepsis. PMID:26674453

  4. Septic systems as hot-spots of pollutants in the environment: Fate and mass balance of micropollutants in septic drainfields.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Wilson, P Chris; Williams, Clinton F

    2016-10-01

    Septic systems, a common type of onsite wastewater treatment systems, can be an important source of micropollutants in the environment. We investigated the fate and mass balance of 17 micropollutants, including wastewater markers, hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the drainfield of a septic system. Drainfields were replicated in lysimeters (1.5m length, 0.9m width, 0.9m height) and managed similar to the field practice. In each lysimeter, a drip line dispersed 9L of septic tank effluent (STE) per day (equivalent to 32.29L/m(2) per day). Fourteen micropollutants in the STE and 12 in the leachate from drainfields were detected over eight months. Concentrations of most micropollutants in the leachate were low (<200ng/L) when compared to STE because >85% of the added micropollutants except for sucralose were attenuated in the drainfield. We discovered that sorption was the key mechanism for retention of carbamazepine and partially for sulfamethoxazole, whereas microbial degradation likely attenuated acetaminophen in the drainfield. This data suggests that sorption and microbial degradation limited transport of micropollutants from the drainfields. However, the leaching of small amounts of micropollutants indicate that septic systems are hot-spots of micropollutants in the environment and a better understanding of micropollutants in septic systems is needed to protect groundwater quality. PMID:27312276

  5. Lake phosphorus loading form septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, R.J.; Patmont, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    The movement of effluent phosphorus (P) from old septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater was investigated. A previous study indicated a correlation between P loadings and the presence of old homes. Water samples were taken from shallow wells installed 10 to 50 m downgradient from seven septic systems 20 to 40 years old. The equivalent volumetric fraction of each sample consisting of undiluted effluent was estimated from chloride concentration. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to account for the various sources of uncertainty. Movement of diluted septic effluent to the lake was common, but transport of more than 1% of effluent P through the soil was probable for only 4 of 26 samples. The greatest apparent P movement was associated with persistently saturated conditions.

  6. Preventive strategies for septic complications of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Oláh, A; Pardavi, G; Belágyi, T; Romics, L

    2007-01-01

    The diagram of the mortality of acute pancreatitis is characterized by two distinct peaks, in a similar manner to other generalized acute inflammatory responses. In the first phase, which is characterized by "hyper-inflammatory" mechanisms, death occurs due to overwhelming SIRS and subsequent multi-organ failure. The second peak of death is usually detected much later, at least two weeks after the onset of acute pancreatitis. Infection in necrotising pancreatitis is frequently observed in this so-called "compensatory antiinflammatory" phase. Since there has been no effective therapy evolved to prevent the activation of inflammatory and proteolytic cascades, the treatment of acute pancreatitis is merely symptomatic. Adequate fluid resuscitation and analgesia are the mainstays of treatment. In case of development of multi-organ failure, extensive medical and ventilatory supportive therapy is usually necessary. However, recent studies suggested certain methods might decrease the incidence of infection in pancreatic necrosis, which is usually due to bacterial translocation from the gut. Numerous attempts have been published in the literature to decrease the frequency of septic complications. Furthermore, the outcome of studies favouring antibiotic prophylaxis in acute pancreatitis were debatable. The development of multi-resistant strains of Gram-positive bacteria and Candida, due to long-term antibiotic use, is a strong argument against the indication of prophylactic antibiotic use. Recently, various clinical studies aimed to decrease bacterial translocation, including probiotic use and enteral feeding as part of the treatment. This paper provides a systematic review on data available in the evidence based literature on the use of antibiotics and the role of alternative and supportive therapy in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:17966933

  7. COMBAT: Initial experience with a randomized clinical trial of plasma-based resuscitation in the field for traumatic hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Michael P.; Moore, Ernest E.; Chin, Theresa L; Ghasabyan, Arsen; Chandler, James; Stringham, John; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Moore, Hunter B.; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C; Sauaia, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The existing evidence shows great promise for plasma as the first resuscitation fluid in both civilian and military trauma. We embarked on the Control of Major Bleeding After Trauma (COMBAT) trial with the support of the Department of Defense, in order to determine if plasma-first resuscitation yields hemostatic and survival benefits. The methodology of the COMBAT study represents not only three years of development work, but the integration of nearly two-decades of technical experience with the design and implementation of other clinical trials and studies. Herein, we describe the key features of the study design, critical personnel and infrastructural elements, and key innovations. We will also briefly outline the systems engineering challenges entailed by this study. COMBAT is a randomized, placebo controlled, semi-blinded prospective Phase IIB clinical trial, conducted in a ground ambulance fleet based at a Level I trauma center, and part of a multicenter collaboration. The primary objective of COMBAT is to determine the efficacy of field resuscitation with plasma first, compared to standard of care (normal saline). To date we have enrolled 30 subjects in the COMBAT study. The ability to achieve intervention with a hemostatic resuscitation agent in the closest possible temporal proximity to injury is critical and represents an opportunity to forestall the evolution of the “bloody vicious cycle”. Thus, the COMBAT model for deploying plasma in first response units should serve as a model for RCTs of other hemostatic resuscitative agents. PMID:25784527

  8. Bilateral Acromioclavicular Septic Arthritis as an Initial Presentation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Sadraei, Neda; Gupta, Rohan; Machicado, Jorge D.; Govindu, Rukma

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is infrequently associated with septic arthritis. Moreover, septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae IE in a patient who presented with bilateral AC joint septic arthritis and we review the literature on the topic. PMID:24987538

  9. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  10. First-trimester Septic Abortion Due to Salmonella enteritidis Oranienburg

    PubMed Central

    Jelsema, Russel D.; Isada, Nelson B.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Septic abortion caused by transplacental salmonella infection is extremely rare; there are no reported cases of serotype oranienburg as an etiology. Case: We describe a patient with non-typhoidal Salmonella enteritidis serotype oranienburg as a cause of first-trimester pregnancy loss. The rapid progression of this patient's septicemia and adverse outcome is described. The epidemiology and natural history of salmonella infections are also discussed. Conclusion: Non-typhoidal salmonella is still a cause of morbidity in Western countries. This infection can result in rapid-onset fetal demise and septic abortion. PMID:18475401

  11. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  12. Assessment of Septic System Performance Using Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, A.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Harvey, C.

    2005-12-01

    Failing and improperly managed septic systems can affect water quality and cause health problems for individuals, community residents, and wildlife. Early detection of septic system leakage and failure can limit the extent off-site contamination. State and county health agencies are typically responsible for permitting and regulating septic systems, and they rely on onsite inspection to identify malfunctioning systems. External symptoms which occur over an improperly functioning septic system can include lush or greener growth of vegetation, distress of vegetation, excessive soil moisture levels, or pooling of surface effluent. The use of remote sensing technologies coupled with attainable permit records to identify these features will enable the appropriate agencies to target problem areas without extensive field inspection. High-resolution thermal and color-infrared imagery were acquired in May 2005 for a study area in Jackson County, Mississippi, adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. Within this coastal neighborhood known to have significant septic system failures, volunteers supplied information regarding the function of their systems by completing a survey and allowing access to their property. For each of 36 data locations, a septic system score was calculated to indicate the level of system performance. Potential predictors of system performance were derived from data obtained from installation records and data extracted from imagery. Linear regression analyses of the dataset identified the significant predictors of septic system performance, and two models have been developed and proposed for the prioritization of problem septic systems by regulatory agencies. The Drain Field Model was developed using linear regression. Vegetative Index and Normalized Differential Vegetative Index were identified as the best predictors of system performance. The model considers the maximum values of the VI and NDVI within each drain field and calculates a score for each system

  13. Effect of the PA-MSHA vaccine on septic serum-induced inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Li; Qu, Yi; Zhong, De-Wu; Miao, Xiong-Ying; Yao, Hong-Liang

    2013-04-01

    Sepsis is defined as a complex clinical syndrome caused by a serious infection followed by an amplified and deregulated inflammatory response. The complex syndrome is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality, despite substantial clinical advances. A vaccine derived from the outer membrane proteins of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has been demonstrated to exhibit immune modulatory properties. In the present study, the effect of the PA-MSHA vaccine on the inflammatory response induced by serum from septic patients in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was determined. It was observed that PA-MSHA pretreatment inhibits the production of septic serum-induced tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, PA-MSHA treatment increases interleukin-10 levels and promotes the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the results of the current study provide mechanistic insight relevant to the potential application of PA-MSHA in the treatment of sepsis. PMID:23440442

  14. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  15. A case of toxic shock due to clandestine abortion by misoprostol self-administration.

    PubMed

    Cittadini, Francesca; Loyola, Giovanni; Caradonna, Letizia; Minelli, Natalia; Rossi, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    Maternal mortality and morbidity are the leading causes of death and illness, respectively, among women of reproductive age in many countries throughout the world. Of all maternal deaths, those related to unsafe abortions are the most widely underestimated, but they are also the most largely preventable. Medical abortion is a safe and reliable method for termination of a pregnancy in early gestation, although it is important to be aware of signs and symptoms of severe infection and toxic shock syndrome after the medical termination of pregnancy; case studies in literature are rarely fatal events. We report the first case of septic shock syndrome following a clandestine pregnancy termination with a misoprostol-only regimen (12 tablets 200 μg each). Autopsy findings and histopathological examination proved that the woman died from septic shock. This case suggests to improve the forensic investigations in case of unsafe, often clandestine, abortion is suspected. PMID:25041279

  16. Clinical Year in Review 2014: Critical Care Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Moon

    2014-01-01

    Severe sepsis is the most common cause of death among critically ill patients in non-coronary intensive care units. In 2002, the guideline titled "Surviving Sepsis Campaign" was published by American and European Critical Care Medicine to decrease the mortality of severe sepsis and septic shock patients, which has been the basis of the treatment for those patients. After the first revised guidelines were published on 2008, the most current version was published in 2013 based on the updated literature of until fall 2012. Other important revised guidelines in critical care field such as 'Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Pain, Agitation, and Delirium in Adult Patients in the Intensive Care Unit' were revised in 2013. This article will review the revised guidelines and several additional interesting published papers of until March 2014, including the part of ventilator-induced lung injury and the preventive strategies. PMID:25114697

  17. In vitro Stability of Heat Shock Protein 27 in Serum and Plasma Under Different Pre-analytical Conditions: Implications for Large-Scale Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Matthias; Traxler, Denise; Simader, Elisabeth; Bekos, Christine; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Lainscak, Mitja; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The effects of storage temperatures, repeated freeze-thaw cycles, or delays in separating plasma or serum from blood samples are largely unknown for heat shock protein 27 (HSP27). We evaluated (1) the imprecision of the HSP27 assay used in this study; (2) the in vitro stability of HSP27 in blood samples stored at 4°C for up to 6 hr with immediate and delayed serum/plasma separation from cells; and (3) the in vitro stability of HSP27 in blood samples stored at -80°C after repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The ELISA to detect HSP27 in this study showed a within-run CV of <9% and a total CV of <15%. After 4-6 hr of storage at 4°C, HSP27 concentrations remained stable when using serum tubes irrespective of sample handling, but HSP27 concentrations decreased by 25-45% when using EDTA plasma tubes. Compared with baseline HSP27, one freeze-thaw cycle had no effect on serum concentrations. However, plasma concentrations increased by 3.1-fold after one freeze-thaw cycle and by 7.3-fold after five freeze-thaw cycles. In conclusion, serum is an appropriate biological sample type for use in epidemiological and large-scale clinical studies. PMID:27139608

  18. Stromal Expression of Heat-Shock Protein 27 Is Associated with Worse Clinical Outcome in Patients with Colorectal Cancer Lung Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Thomas; Nikolowsky, Christoph; Starlinger, Patrick; Traxler, Denise; Zimmermann, Matthias; Birner, Peter; Hegedüs, Balazs; Dome, Balazs; Bergmann, Michael; Mildner, Michael; Klepetko, Walter; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC). Heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is upregulated in activated fibroblasts during wound healing and systemically elevated in various diseases. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are also thought to play a role as prognostic and predictive markers in various malignancies including CRC. Surprisingly, the expression of Hsp27 has never been assessed in CAFs. Therefore we aimed to investigate the expression level of Hsp27 in CAFs and its clinical implications in patients with CRC lung metastases. Methods FFPE tissue samples from 51 pulmonary metastases (PMs) and 33 paired primary tumors were evaluated for alpha-SMA, CD31, Hsp27 and vimentin expression by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinicopathological variables. 25 liver metastases served as control group. Moreover, serum samples (n=10) before and after pulmonary metastasectomy were assessed for circulating phospho-Hsp27 and total Hsp27 by ELISA. Results Stromal expression of Hsp27 was observed in all PM and showed strong correlation with alpha-SMA (P<0.001) and vimentin (P<0.001). Strong stromal Hsp27 was associated with higher microvessel density in primary CRC and PM. Moreover, high stromal Hsp27 and αSMA expression were associated with decreased recurrence-free survival after pulmonary metastasectomy (P=0.018 and P=0.008, respectively) and overall survival (P=0.031 and P=0.017, respectively). Serum levels of phospho- and total Hsp27 dropped after metastasectomy to levels comparable to healthy controls. Conclusions Herein we describe for the first time that Hsp27 is highly expressed in tumor stroma of CRC. Stromal α-SMA and Hsp27 expressions correlate with the clinical outcome after pulmonary metastasectomy. Moreover, serum Hsp27 might pose a future marker for metastatic disease in CRC. PMID:25793600

  19. Inhibition of IRAK-4 activity for rescuing endotoxin LPS-induced septic mortality in mice by lonicerae flos extract

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun Hong; Roh, Eunmiri; Kim, Hyun Soo; Baek, Seung-Il; Choi, Nam Song; Kim, Narae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate, Phase I for sepsis treatment. •Here, HS-23 or its major constituents rescued LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. •As a mechanism, they directly inhibited IRAK-4-catalyzed kinase activity. •Thus, they suppressed LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes. -- Abstract: Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate currently undergoing Phase I trial in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected healthy human volunteers, but its molecular basis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated protective effects of HS-23 or its major constituents on Escherichia coli LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. Intravenous treatment with HS-23 rescued LPS-intoxicated C57BL/6J mice under septic conditions, and decreased the levels of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) in the blood. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) and its isomers were assigned as major constituents of HS-23 in the protection against endotoxemia. As a molecular mechanism, HS-23 or CGA isomers inhibited endotoxin LPS-induced autophosphorylation of the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) in mouse peritoneal macrophages as well as the kinase activity of IRAK-4 in cell-free reactions. HS-23 consequently suppressed downstream pathways critical for LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB or activating protein 1 (AP-1) in the peritoneal macrophages. HS-23 also inhibited various toll-like receptor agonists-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, and down-regulated LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes in the cells. Taken together, HS-23 or CGA isomers exhibited anti-inflammatory therapy against LPS-induced septic mortality in mice, at least in part, mediated through the inhibition of IRAK-4.

  20. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Due to Bordetella petrii

    PubMed Central

    Bankowski, Matthew J.; Pien, Francis D.

    2014-01-01

    A case of Bordetella petrii septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in an elbow resulted from a dirt bike accident in Hawaii. Two months of intravenous antibiotics and repeated surgeries were required to cure this infection. Our case, and literature review, suggests that extended-spectrum penicillins, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are good treatment options. PMID:25540393

  1. Septic Arthritis of the Pediatric Shoulder: From Infancy to Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis of the glenohumeral joint in the pediatric population (<18 yo) is not commonly described in the literature. There is a corresponding paucity of information regarding its presentation and treatment. Methods. An IRB approved review of patients treated with irrigation and debridement by the Orthopaedic Department was completed. This retrospective study includes four patients, presenting from 2005 to 2015, with septic arthritis of the shoulder. Results. The mean age (Mage) at presentation was 5 years, with a range of 1 month to 15 years. Patients presented on average after 7 days with pain and a mean temperature of 39°C, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 66 mm/hr, a C-reactive protein level of 11.17 g/dL, and a white blood cell count of 20.2 × 103/mcL. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured from the wounds. All cases were treated operatively with irrigation and debridement and with antimicrobial therapy. Patients received antibiotics for an average of 6 weeks. Conclusion. Septic arthritis of the shoulder occurs in all pediatric ages. Successful treatment of septic arthritis of the shoulder was accomplished in four cases without division of the biceps sheath, with an average follow-up of 8 months.

  2. Caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.; Martin, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient was determined by measuring body composition, by multiple isotope dilution, before and at 2-wk intervals while receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in 86 septic and 57 nonseptic malnourished patients. All patients received a TPN solution containing 25% dextrose and 2.75% crystalline amino acids. The body composition of the nonseptic patients, who received 51.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/kg.day, improved significantly, while that of the septic patients, receiving 46.8 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg.day was only maintained. The relationship between caloric intake and the restoration of a malnourished body cell mass (BCM) was determined for each group by correlating, using multiple linear regression, the mean daily change in the BCM with the caloric intake and the nutritional state, as determined by body composition. According to the resultant regressions, an intake of 35.1 and 50.7 kcal/kg.day was required to maintain the BCM of the septic and nonseptic patients, respectively. To restore a depleted BCM, caloric intakes in excess of this amount are required.

  3. Percolation Tests for Septic Systems: A Laboratory Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, John R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how the procedures by which a certificate soil tester evaluates a parcel of land for its suitability as a site for a private sewage system or septic tank can be used by college students as a laboratory exercise in environmental geology. (HM)

  4. FEASIBILITY OF TREATING SEPTIC TANK WASTE BY ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study reported herein was to evaluate the impact of household septic tank wastes on municipal activated sludge treatment plants. Septage addition was evaluated on a continuous basis over a four-month period in a 7500 l/day (1980 gpd) pilot plant. The septage ...

  5. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  6. DETERMINATION OF TOXIC CHEMICALS IN EFFLUENT FROM HOUSEHOLD SEPTIC TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report study evaluated the presence of volatile organics in raw domestic sewage generated in a subdivision and treated by a large 5-year-old community septic tank that had recently been cleaned by having the solids removed by pumping just prior to this study. Analysis showed ...

  7. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  8. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  9. Molecular signature of organic nitrogen in septic-impacted groundwater.

    PubMed

    Arnold, William A; Longnecker, Krista; Kroeger, Kevin D; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen levels are elevated in aquatic systems due to anthropogenic activities. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) arises from various sources, and its impact could be more clearly constrained if specific sources were identified and if the molecular-level composition of DON were better understood. In this work, the pharmaceutical carbamazepine was used to identify septic-impacted groundwater in a coastal watershed. Using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry data, the nitrogen-containing features of the dissolved organic matter in septic-impacted and non-impacted samples were compared. The septic-impacted groundwater samples have a larger abundance of nitrogen-containing formulas. Impacted samples have additional DON features in the regions ascribed as 'protein-like' and 'lipid-like' in van Krevelen space and have more intense nitrogen-containing features in a specific region of a carbon versus mass plot. These features are potential indicators of dissolved organic nitrogen arising from septic effluents, and this work suggests that ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry is a valuable tool to identify and characterize sources of DON. PMID:25142948

  10. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint--Unusual Presentations.

    PubMed

    Lohiya, Sapna; Dillon, Jasjit

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 patients whose septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (SATMJ) presented atypically, resulting in treatment delay and complications. A 49-year-old man developed left-side facial allodynia, which was first treated unsuccessfully as trigeminal neuralgia. On day 21, the patient sustained facial trauma from a fall and presented to the emergency department (ED). Maxillofacial contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan was suggestive of parotiditis, SATMJ, or hemarthrosis. His condition did not improve with empiric antibiotic treatment. On day 30, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 6 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was treated with amoxicillin plus clavulanate and sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim for 30 days. On day 59, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and CT-proved TMJ osteoarthritic changes. A 56-year-old woman developed right-side facial pain after a crown procedure on her right mandibular second molar. Oral prednisone (and clindamycin) produced partial relief. Her primary physician suspected temporal arteritis, but its biopsy result on day 11 was normal. Gradually, the patient developed trismus and malocclusion refractory to various medicines. On day 49, she presented to the ED. A contrast-enhanced maxillofacial CT scan suggested SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 30 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. During days 50 to 57, the patient received intravenous ampicillin plus sulbactam and metronidazole. However, preauricular tenderness and drainage from the surgical incision persisted. On day 55, CT scan showed a residual abscess. Secondary debridement yielded 5 mL of pus. Culture grew coagulase-negative S aureus. On day 141, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and TMJ osteoarthritic changes on MRI. In these cases, the SATMJ diagnosis was delayed owing

  11. Cardiogenic shock and nutrition: safe?

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Pichard, Claude; Wernerman, Jan; Bendjelid, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a common diagnosis in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is characterized by a decreased cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume associated with an inadequate tissue perfusion including a physiological reduction in the splanchnic territory. It may occur in isolation as a reflection of cardiac pathology, or it may be part of a shock syndrome involving other pathogenic mechanisms. As the use of enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with an increase in mesenteric arterial output, EN could be deleterious by overwhelming the mechanisms of mesenteric adaptation. Accordingly, EN has been suspected to increase the risk of mesenteric ischaemia, bacterial translocation and sepsis in ICU patients with cardiogenic shock. International guidelines recommend a cautious use of EN within 72 h following cardiogenic shock. Recent evidence indicates that mesenteric arterial output may decrease during parenteral nutrition administration, suggesting that parenteral nutrition could have a protective effect on splanchnic organs in ICU patients with cardiogenic shock. Contrary to former beliefs, several meta-analyses have shown that parenteral nutrition is not associated with increased mortality. Exclusive EN is associated with negative energy balance and the combination of EN with supplemental parenteral nutrition during the first days following ICU admission has been proposed to prevent negative energy balance. Such a nutritional strategy could also be beneficial for the mesenteric circulation in cardiogenic shock, and consequently may improve the clinical outcome of patients with cardiogenic shock. Clinical trials are warranted to verify these hypotheses. PMID:21086113

  12. Interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of interstellar shocks driven by supernova remnants and by expanding H II regions around early-type stars is discussed. Jump conditions are examined, along with shock fronts, post-shock relaxation layers, collisional shocks, collisionless shocks, nonradiative shocks, radiative atomic shocks, and shock models of observed nebulae. Effects of shock waves on interstellar molecules are examined, with reference to the chemistry behind shock fronts, infrared and vibrational-rotational cooling by molecules, and observations of shocked molecules. Some current problems and applications of the study of interstellar shocks are summarized, including the initiation of star formation by radiative shock waves, interstellar masers, the stability of shocks, particle acceleration in shocks, and shocks in galactic nuclei.

  13. Alpha-Toxin and Gamma-Toxin Jointly Promote Staphylococcus aureus Virulence in Murine Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ing-Marie; Hartford, Orla; Foster, Timothy; Tarkowski, Andrzej

    1999-01-01

    Septic arthritis is a common and feared complication of staphylococcal infections. Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of potential virulence factors including certain adhesins and enterotoxins. In this study we have assessed the roles of cytolytic toxins in the development of septic arthritis by inoculating mice with S. aureus wild-type strain 8325-4 or isogenic mutants differing in the expression of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin production patterns. Mice inoculated with either an alpha- or beta-toxin mutant showed degrees of inflammation, joint damage, and weight decrease similar to wild-type-inoculated mice. In contrast, mice inoculated with either double (alpha- and gamma-toxin-deficient)- or triple (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin-deficient)-mutant S. aureus strains showed lower frequency and severity of arthritis, measured both clinically and histologically, than mice inoculated with the wild-type strain. We conclude that simultaneous production of alpha- and gamma-toxin is a virulence factor in S. aureus arthritis. PMID:10024541

  14. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26010188

  15. Septic systems as hot-spots of pollutants in the environment: Fate and mass balance of micropollutants in septic drainfields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effluent discharged from septic systems, also known as onsite wastewater treatment systems, can be an important source of micropollutants in the environment. We investigated the fate and transport of 17 micropollutants, including human excretion markers, hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care p...

  16. The value of suction drainage fluid culture during aseptic and septic orthopedic surgery: a prospective study of 901 patients.

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Pron, B; Vuagnat, A; Gleizes, V; Signoret, F; Denormandie, P; Si-Ali, A; Perrone, C; Feron, J M; Gaillard, J L

    2002-01-01

    There are no guidelines on the value of suction drainage fluid culture (SDC), and it is difficult to determine whether the organisms cultured from suction drainage fluid samples are pathogenic or simply contaminants. We performed 2989 cultures of suction drainage fluid samples obtained, during a 1-year period, from 901 patients who underwent aseptic or septic orthopedic surgery (946 operations). The culture results were analyzed to evaluate their ability to detect postoperative infection after aseptic operations or to detect either a persistent or new episode of sepsis in patients known to have infection. For aseptic operations, the sensitivity of SDC was 25%, the specificity was 99%, the positive predictive value was 25%, and the negative predictive value was 99%. For septic operations, the sensitivity of SDC was 81%, the specificity was 96%, the positive predictive value was 87%, and the negative predictive value was 94%. We conclude that, for aseptic orthopedic surgery, SDC is not useful in detecting postoperative infection. However, for septic orthopedic surgery, it is of clinical importance. PMID:11731944

  17. [Maternal-fetal staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome with chorioamniotitis].

    PubMed

    Lacoste, A; Torregrosa, A; Dubois, S; Apéré, H; Oyharçabal, V; Carré, M; Cayla-Embarek, C; Hernandoréna, X; Jouvencel, P

    2006-08-01

    We report a rare case of mother-infant pair with Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS). A term neonate was born by caesarean section for maternal septic syndrome during per-partum. He presented with respiratory distress complicated by pulmonary hypertension, skin rash, and multiple organ system involvement. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from placenta, surface swabs and gastric aspirate. He received adapted antibiotics, respiratory support by high frequency ventilation and NO. The mother had shock, skin rash and inflammatory syndrome. Outcome was good in both cases. The isolate produced enterotoxin C and L. Shock, exanthematous disease and multi-organ involvement complicating a staphylococcal infection in neonate must lead to suspect a TSS. PMID:16797947

  18. Evaluation of a broad range real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the diagnosis of septic synovitis in horses

    PubMed Central

    Elmas, Colette R.; Koenig, Judith B.; Bienzle, Dorothee; Cribb, Nicola C.; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Coté, Nathalie M.; Weese, J. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Septic synovitis is a potentially debilitating and life-threatening disorder in horses. We hypothesized that a universal bacterial real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay would have improved sensitivity and decreased turn-around time for detection of bacteria in synovial fluid (SF) samples. Forty-eight SF samples were collected from 36 horses that presented to two referral institutions with suspected septic synovitis. Universal RT-PCR, bacterial culture and SF analysis were performed on all samples, and an interpretation on the sample being septic or not was derived by three board certified specialists from the history, clinical assessment and SF characteristics. RT-PCR results were compared to a composite standard comprised of positive culture and interpretation by all three specialists of samples as “septic”. For 41 of 48 samples (85%), culture and RT-PCR results were concordant. Compared to the composite standard, 83% of samples were correctly classified by RT-PCR (turn-around time of approximately 4 hours). Relative sensitivity and specificity of RT-PCR were 87% and 72% respectively, and 56% and 86% for culture. Hence, universal RT-PCR was a rapid and highly sensitive test, which may accelerate diagnosis and improve outcome for horses with septic synovitis. PMID:24101798

  19. Septic arthritis in the era of immunosuppressive treatments.

    PubMed

    Salar, O; Baker, B; Kurien, T; Taylor, A; Moran, C

    2014-03-01

    Immunosuppressants have been the mainstay of treatment for certain inflammatory joint conditions for many years. Developments in this field, namely biological treatments, have led to a change in the classical presentation of acute bone, joint and soft tissue infections. The normal findings of severe pain and tenderness on examination may be absent or simply mimic a typical exacerbation of the chronic joint condition. A minimally raised white cell count and elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of systemic signs of infection may be interpreted as further evidence for the diagnosis of an exacerbation of inflammatory arthritis. We present a unique case of recurrent polyarticular septic arthritis in a patient treated with immunosuppression for refractory rheumatoid arthritis. We hope this article will enable doctors to appreciate and recognise the changing face of septic arthritis in the modern era of immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:24780657

  20. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 400 Area Septic System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affects groundwater or has the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 400 Area Septic System. The influent to the system is domestic waste water. Although the 400 Area Septic System is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. Therefore, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used.

  1. Aquatic Plant/microbial Filters for Treating Septic Tank Effluent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    The use of natural biological processes for treating many types of wastewater have been developed by NASA at the John C. Stennis Space Center, NSTL, Mississippi, during the past 15 years. The simplest form of this technology involves the use of aquatic plant/marsh filters for treatment of septic tank effluent. Septic tank effluent from single home units can be treated to advanced secondary levels and beyond by using a 37.2 sq m (400 sq ft) surface area washed gravel filter. This filter is generally 0.3 m (1 ft) deep with a surface cover of approximately 0.15 m (6 in.) of gravel. The plants in this filter are usually aesthetic or ornamental such as calla lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), canna lily (Canna flaccida), elephant ear (Colocasia esculenta), and water iris (Iris pseudacorus).

  2. Arthroscopy of septic carpitis in donkeys (Equus asinus)

    PubMed Central

    El