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Sample records for clinical skills assessment

  1. Teaching and Assessing Clinical Reasoning Skills.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jyoti Nath; Anshu; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2015-09-01

    Clinical reasoning is a core competency expected to be acquired by all clinicians. It is the ability to integrate and apply different types of knowledge, weigh evidence critically and reflect upon the process used to arrive at a diagnosis. Problems with clinical reasoning often occur because of inadequate knowledge, flaws in data gathering and improper approach to information processing. Some of the educational strategies which can be used to encourage acquisition of clinical reasoning skills are: exposure to a wide variety of clinical cases, activation of previous knowledge, development of illness scripts, sharing expert strategies to arrive at a diagnosis, forcing students to prioritize differential diagnoses; and encouraging reflection, metacognition, deliberate practice and availability of formative feedback. Assessment of clinical reasoning abilities should be done throughout the training course in diverse settings. Use of scenario based multiple choice questions, key feature test and script concordance test are some ways of theoretically assessing clinical reasoning ability. In the clinical setting, these skills can be tested in most forms of workplace based assessment. We recommend that clinical reasoning must be taught at all levels of medical training as it improves clinician performance and reduces cognitive errors. PMID:26519715

  2. Assessing clinical communication skills in physicians: are the skills context specific or generalizable

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Lubna A; Violato, Claudio; Crutcher, Rodney A

    2009-01-01

    Background Communication skills are essential for physicians to practice Medicine. Evidence for the validity and domain specificity of communication skills in physicians is equivocal and requires further research. This research was conducted to adduce evidence for content and context specificity of communication skills and to assess the usefulness of a generic instrument for assessing communication skills in International Medical Graduates (IMGs). Methods A psychometric design was used for identifying the reliability and validity of the communication skills instruments used for high-stakes exams for IMG's. Data were collected from 39 IMGs (19 men – 48.7%; 20 women – 51.3%; Mean age = 41 years) assessed at 14 station OSCE and subsequently in supervised clinical practice with several instruments (patient surveys; ITERs; Mini-CEX). Results All the instruments had adequate reliability (Cronbach's alpha: .54 – .96). There were significant correlations (r range: 0.37 – 0.70, p < .05) of communication skills assessed by examiner with standardized patients, and of mini-CEX with patient surveys, and ITERs. The intra-item reliability across all cases for the 13 items was low (Cronbach's alpha: .20 – .56). The correlations of communication skills within method (e.g., OSCE or clinical practice) were significant but were non-significant between methods (e.g., OSCE and clinical practice). Conclusion The results provide evidence of context specificity of communication skills, as well as convergent and criterion-related validity of communication skills. Both in OSCEs and clinical practice, communication checklists need to be case specific, designed for content validity. PMID:19445685

  3. Promoting Assessment Efficacy through an Integrated System for Online Clinical Assessment of Practical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Peter J.; Engstrom, Craig; Green, Anita; Friis, Peter; Dickens, Sue; Macdonald, Doune

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evaluation outcomes from an externally funded research project involving the online clinical assessment of practical skills (eCAPS) using web-based video technologies within a university medical programme. eCAPS was implemented to trial this web-based approach for promoting the efficacy of "practical" skills assessment in knee…

  4. Using systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs) to assess medical students’ skills in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Bergus, George R; Woodhead, Jerold C; Kreiter, Clarence D

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is widely used to assess the clinical performance of medical students. However, concerns related to cost, availability, and validity, have led educators to investigate alternatives to the OSCE. Some alternatives involve assessing students while they provide care to patients – the mini-CEX (mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise) and the Long Case are examples. We investigated the psychometrics of systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs), in which physicians are supplemented by lay trained observers, as a means of assessing the clinical performances of medical students. Methods During the pediatrics clerkship at the University of Iowa, trained lay observers assessed the communication skills of third-year medical students using a communication checklist while the students interviewed and examined pediatric patients. Students then verbally presented their findings to faculty, who assessed students’ clinical skills using a standardized form. The reliability of the combined communication and clinical skills scores was calculated using generalizability theory. Results Fifty-one medical students completed 199 observed patient encounters. The mean combined clinical and communication skills score (out of a maximum 45 points) was 40.8 (standard deviation 3.3). The calculated reliability of the SOCE scores, using generalizability theory, from 10 observed patient encounters was 0.81. Students reported receiving helpful feedback from faculty after 97% of their observed clinical encounters. Conclusion The SOCE can reliably assess the clinical performances of third-year medical students on their pediatrics clerkship. The SOCE is an attractive addition to the other methods utilizing real patient encounters for assessing the skills of learners. PMID:23745065

  5. Assessing Nonverbal Communication Skills through Video Recording and Debriefing of Clinical Skill Simulation Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinerichs, Scott; Cattano, Nicole M.; Morrison, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Nonverbal communication (NVC) skills are a critical component to clinician interactions with patients, and no research exists on the investigation of athletic training students' nonverbal communication skills. Video recording and debriefing have been identified as methods to assess and educate students' NVC skills in other allied health…

  6. Preceptor doctors' assessment of the clinical skills of chiropractic externs

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Roger J.R.; Callender, Alana K.; Hynes, Rachelle A.; Gran, Donald F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study surveyed preceptor doctors' opinions of student competence before and after a chiropractic preceptorship. Methods: The qualitative and quantitative survey asked doctors about the competence of externs in various skills and asked opened-ended questions about the strengths and weaknesses of the externs. The survey was conducted using a common Web-based platform called SurveyMonkey. Results: A total of 125 doctors responded to the survey. The doctors tended to agree that they saw a positive change in the skills of the externs over time. Externs presented to the preceptors lacking in confidence and office management skills. The preceptors reported an increase from 2.7 to 3.9 on a 5.0 Likert scale in the students' confidence in adjusting skills during the preceptorship. The preceptor doctors were split on students' preparedness in chiropractic adjusting technique, reporting it as both the strongest and the weakest presenting skill. Conclusion: Preceptor doctors perceived that their student externs were academically qualified but were weaker in the clinical application of procedures. Results from this survey suggest that the preceptor program can improve the confidence levels and practice management knowledge of chiropractic externs. PMID:26600271

  7. Students’ performance in the different clinical skills assessed in OSCE: what does it reveal?

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Joong Hiong; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Mansor, Azura; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Foong, Chan Choong; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to compare students’ performance in the different clinical skills (CSs) assessed in the objective structured clinical examination. Methods Data for this study were obtained from final year medical students’ exit examination (n=185). Retrospective analysis of data was conducted using SPSS. Means for the six CSs assessed across the 16 stations were computed and compared. Results Means for history taking, physical examination, communication skills, clinical reasoning skills (CRSs), procedural skills (PSs), and professionalism were 6.25±1.29, 6.39±1.36, 6.34±0.98, 5.86±0.99, 6.59±1.08, and 6.28±1.02, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA showed there was a significant difference in the means of the six CSs assessed [F(2.980, 548.332)=20.253, p<0.001]. Pairwise multiple comparisons revealed significant differences between the means of the eight pairs of CSs assessed, at p<0.05. Conclusions CRSs appeared to be the weakest while PSs were the strongest, among the six CSs assessed. Students’ unsatisfactory performance in CRS needs to be addressed as CRS is one of the core competencies in medical education and a critical skill to be acquired by medical students before entering the workplace. Despite its challenges, students must learn the skills of clinical reasoning, while clinical teachers should facilitate the clinical reasoning process and guide students’ clinical reasoning development. PMID:25697602

  8. Assessing the Clinical Skills of Dental Students: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carly L.; Grey, Nick; Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    2013-01-01

    Education, from a student perspective, is largely driven by assessment. An effective assessment tool should be both valid and reliable, yet this is often not achieved. The aim of this literature review is to identify and appraise the evidence base for assessment tools used primarily in evaluating clinical skills of dental students. Methods:…

  9. Instructor and Dental Student Perceptions of Clinical Communication Skills via Structured Assessments.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Carly T

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use structured assessments to assess dental students' clinical communication skills exhibited during patient appointments. Fourth-year dental students (n=55) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham evaluated their own interpersonal skills in a clinical setting utilizing the Four Habits Coding Scheme. An instructor also assessed student-patient clinical communication. These assessments were used to identify perceived strengths and weaknesses in students' clinical communication. Both instructor assessments and student self-assessments pinpointed the following clinical communication skills as effective the most often: patient greeting, avoidance of jargon, and non-verbal behavior. There was also relative agreement between instructor assessments and student self-assessments regarding clinical communication skills that were rated as not effective most frequently: ensuring patient comprehension, identification of patient feelings, and exploration of barriers to treatment. These resulted pointed to strengths and weaknesses in the portion of the curriculum designed to prepare students for effective provider-patient communication. These results may suggest a need for the school's current behavioral science curriculum to better address discussion of potential treatment barriers and patient feelings as well as techniques to ensure patient comprehension. PMID:27139207

  10. Observational Skill-based Clinical Assessment tool for Resuscitation (OSCAR): Development and validation☆

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S.; Brett, S.; McKay, A.; Lambden, S.; Vincent, C.; Sevdalis, N.

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study reported here was to address the need to assess and train teamwork and non-technical skills in the context of Resuscitation. Specifically, we sought to develop a tool that is feasible to use and psychometrically sound to assess team behaviours during cardiac arrest resuscitation attempts. Methods To ensure validity, reliability, and feasibility, the Observational Skill based Clinical Assessment tool for Resuscitation (OSCAR) was developed in 3 phases. A review of the literature leading to initial tool development was followed by an assessment of face and content validity, and finally a thorough reliability assessment, using Cronbach's α to assess internal consistency and intraclass correlation to assess inter-rater reliability. Results OSCAR was developed methodically, and tested for face and content validity. Cronbach's α results ranged from 0.736 to 0.965 demonstrating high internal consistency, and intraclass correlation results ranged from 0.652 to 0.911, all of which are strongly significant and indicate good inter-rater reliability. Conclusion On the basis of our results, we conclude that OSCAR is psychometrically robust, scientifically sound, and clinically relevant. We have developed the Observational Skill-based Clinical Assessment tool for Resuscitation (OSCAR) for the assessment of non-technical skills in Resuscitation teams. We propose the use of this tool in simulation and real Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation attempts to assess, guide and train non-technical skills to team members, to improve patient safety and maximise the chances of successful resuscitation. PMID:21481519

  11. Clinical Sampling in the Assessment of Young Children with Handicaps: Shopping for Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeVan, Richard R.

    1990-01-01

    The article proposes a strategy for the assessment of young children with handicaps in which brief clinical sampling is used to document developmental skills. This information may then be used in designing intervention programs. Principles and techniques of brief clinical sampling are described and application examples are given. (Author/DB)

  12. How Good Are Our Raters? Rater Errors in Clinical Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iramaneerat, Cherdsak; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    A multi-faceted Rasch measurement (MFRM) model was used to analyze a clinical skills assessment of 173 fourth-year medical students in a Midwestern medical school to investigate four types of rater errors: leniency, inconsistency, halo, and restriction of range. Each student performed six clinical tasks with six standardized patients (SPs), who…

  13. Test of Integrated Professional Skills: Objective Structured Clinical Examination/Simulation Hybrid Assessment of Obstetrics-Gynecology Residents' Skill Integration

    PubMed Central

    Winkel, Abigail Ford; Gillespie, Colleen; Hiruma, Marissa T.; Goepfert, Alice R.; Zabar, Sondra; Szyld, Demian

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessment of obstetrics-gynecology residents' ability to integrate clinical judgment, interpersonal skills, and technical ability in a uniform fashion is required to document achievement of benchmarks of competency. An observed structured clinical examination that incorporates simulation and bench models uses direct observation of performance to generate formative feedback and standardized evaluation. Methods The Test of Integrated Professional Skills (TIPS) is a 5-station performance-based assessment that uses standardized patients and complex scenarios involving ultrasonography, procedural skills, and evidence-based medicine. Standardized patients and faculty rated residents by using behaviorally anchored checklists. Mean scores reflecting performance in TIPS were compared across competency domains and by developmental level (using analysis of variance) and then compared to standard faculty clinical evaluations (using Spearman ρ). Participating faculty and residents were also asked to evaluate the usefulness of the TIPS. Results Twenty-four residents participated in the TIPS. Checklist items used to assess competency were sufficiently reliable, with Cronbach α estimates from 0.69 to 0.82. Performance improved with level of training, with wide variation in performance. Standard faculty evaluations did not correlate with TIPS performance. Several residents who were rated as average or above average by faculty performed poorly on the TIPS (> 1 SD below the mean). Both faculty and residents found the TIPS format useful, providing meaningful evaluation and opportunity for feedback. Conclusions A simulation-based observed structured clinical examination facilitates observation of a range of skills, including competencies that are difficult to observe and measure in a standardized way. Debriefing with faculty provides an important interface for identification of performance gaps and individualization of learning plans. PMID:24701321

  14. Teaching and assessing clinical skills: a competency-based programme in China.

    PubMed

    Stillman, P L; Wang, Y; Ouyang, Q; Zhang, S; Yang, Y; Sawyer, W D

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a competency-based clinical skills teaching and assessment programme in China utilizing modern teaching techniques. Medical teachers from three schools agreed on items for inclusion in the complete physical examination of an asymptomatic adult, an outline for an adult and paediatric history, and important interviewing skills. Lesson plans, performance checklists, and written and videotape training materials were developed. Standardized patients were trained at one school to assist with the teaching at that school and with the assessment at all three schools. A national, a provincial, and a local medical school in China were used. Before beginning the new curriculum for students in their first year of clinical training, baseline data were collected on skills of students at various levels of training in the previous curriculum at all three schools. Although in the previous curriculum there was some improvement in clinical skills among advanced compared to more junior students, performance was lower than expected by staff. One year after implementation of the new curriculum, students were evaluated. These students significantly outperformed their counterparts as well as the more senior level students tested the previous year. This project has established a competency-based teaching and assessment programme in China that allows for rapid improvement in the clinical skills of students. Within a short time, a sophisticated group of medical educators has been formed, who now function as consultants to other educators in their own country. Many aspects of this programme are being adapted throughout China and are applicable to medical schools throughout the world. PMID:9231122

  15. Multisource feedback: 360-degree assessment of professional skills of clinical directors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Robert; Rayner, Hugh; Wall, David

    2007-08-01

    For measuring behaviour of National Health Service (NHS) staff, 360-degree assessment is a valuable tool. The important role of a clinical director as a medical leader is increasingly recognized, and attributes of a good clinical director can be defined. Set against these attributes, a 360-degree assessment tool has been designed. The job description for clinical directors has been used to develop a questionnaire sent to senior hospital staff. The views of staff within the hospital are similar irrespective of gender, post held or length of time in post. Analysis has shown that three independent factors can be distilled, namely operational management, interpersonal skills and creative/strategic thinking. A simple validated questionnaire has been developed and successfully introduced for the 360-degree assessment of clinical directors. PMID:17683657

  16. Using the script concordance test to assess clinical reasoning skills in undergraduate and postgraduate medicine.

    PubMed

    Wan, S H

    2015-10-01

    The script concordance test is a relatively new format of written assessment that is used to assess higher-order clinical reasoning and data interpretation skills in medicine. Candidates are presented with a clinical scenario, followed by the reveal of a new piece of information. The candidates are then asked to assess whether this additional information increases or decreases the probability or likelihood of a particular diagnostic, investigative, or management decision. To score these questions, the candidate's decision in each question is compared with that of a reference panel of expert clinicians. This review focuses on the development of quality script concordance questions, using expert panellists to score the items and set the passing score standard, and the challenges in the practical implementation (including pitfalls to avoid) of the written assessment. PMID:26314569

  17. Application of national testing standards to simulation-based assessments of clinical palpation skills.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Carla M

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of simulation technology, several types of data acquisition methods have been used to capture hands-on clinical performance. Motion sensors, pressure sensors, and tool-tip interaction software are a few of the broad categories of approaches that have been used in simulation-based assessments. The purpose of this article is to present a focused review of 3 sensor-enabled simulations that are currently being used for patient-centered assessments of clinical palpation skills. The first part of this article provides a review of technology components, capabilities, and metrics. The second part provides a detailed discussion regarding validity evidence and implications using the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing as an organizational and evaluative framework. Special considerations are given to content domain and creation of clinical scenarios from a developer's perspective. The broader relationship of this work to the science of touch is also considered. PMID:24084306

  18. Assessment of clinical psychiatric skills in final-year medical students: the use of videotape.

    PubMed

    Fenton, G W; O'Gorman, E C

    1984-09-01

    Sixty final-year medical students had their clinical performance in psychiatry assessed by the following three methods: a multiple choice questionnaire based on a series of short videotaped interviews with psychiatric patients; the examination of a traditional long 'case' with presentation of the history, mental state findings and formulation about diagnosis and management to a panel of three examiners; and a conventional oral examination about the principles and practice of psychiatry with a different trio of examiners. The total mark on the videotape session correlated significantly with the combined clinical and oral marks. There was also a significant positive correlation between the total video marks and the individual clinical marks, but none between the marks obtained during the video and oral components of the examination. However, the significant positive correlations between the video marks and those of the clinical examination were modest and only accounted for not more than 14% of the variance. Inspection of the distribution of correct answers to the videotape questions shows that students do best in identifying mental state symptoms and signs and in choosing the correct diagnosis. They do less well in the areas of aetiology and treatment. Indeed, optimal performance in the latter distinguishes those who do well in the clinical/oral examination from those whose performance is mediocre. The significance of these findings to the teaching and assessment of psychiatric skills in medical students is discussed. PMID:6472143

  19. An innovative method to assess clinical reasoning skills: Clinical reasoning tests in the second national medical science Olympiad in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    score were highest for KF and CIP. The correlation between scores for each test and grade point average was low to intermediate for all four of the tests. Conclusion The combination of these four clinical reasoning tests is a reliable evaluation tool that can be implemented to assess clinical reasoning skills in talented undergraduate medical students, however these data may not generalizable to whole medical students population. The CIP and KF tests showed the greatest potential to measure clinical reasoning skills. Grade point averages did not necessarily predict performance in the clinical domain of the national competitive examination for medical school students. PMID:22005350

  20. Developing an Evaluation Tool for Assessing Clinical Ethics Consultation Skills in Simulation Based Education: The ACES Project.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Katherine; Parsi, Kayhan; McCarthy, Michael; Siddall, Viva Jo; Kuczewski, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities has created a quality attestation (QA) process for clinical ethics consultants; the pilot phase of reviewing portfolios has begun. One aspect of the QA process which is particularly challenging is assessing the interpersonal skills of individual clinical ethics consultants. We propose that using case simulation to evaluate clinical ethics consultants is an approach that can meet this need provided clear standards for assessment are identified. To this end, we developed the Assessing Clinical Ethics Skills (ACES) tool, which identifies and specifies specific behaviors that a clinical ethics consultant should demonstrate in an ethics case simulation. The aim is for the clinical ethics consultant or student to use a videotaped case simulation, along with the ACES tool scored by a trained rater, to demonstrate their competence as part of their QA portfolio. The development and piloting of the tool is described. PMID:25794891

  1. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) - A Systematic Review of Rating Scales

    PubMed Central

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students’ communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Results Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Discussion Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed

  2. Assessing Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Most educators are familiar with instances of authentic assessment of "content" within the disciplines or of authentic assessment of "discipline-specific skills." In such authentic assessments, students apply the knowledge and skills of the discipline to situations or tasks that replicate real world challenges. The measurement of skills is…

  3. Implementation of an Electronic Objective Structured Clinical Exam for Assessing Practical Skills in Pre-Professional Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Programs: Examiner and Course Coordinator Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J.; Ashby, Samantha E.; Rivett, Darren A.; Russell, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of practical clinical skills is essential in the health fields. Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs), where examiners assess students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors), are central to the evaluation of practical skills. However, traditional OSCEs require considerable time-investment to administer, and…

  4. Assessment of percutaneous renal access skills during Urology Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE)

    PubMed Central

    Noureldin, Yasser A.; Elkoushy, Mohamed A.; Andonian, Sero

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The first objective was to assess percutaneous renal access (PCA) skills of urology postgraduate trainees (PGTs) during the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). The second objective was to determine whether previous experience with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) improved performance. Methods: After obtaining ethics approval, we recruited PGTs from two urology programs in Quebec between postgraduate years (PGY-3 to PGY-5). Each trainee was asked to answer a short questionnaire regarding previous experience in endourologic procedures. After a 3-minute orientation on the PERC Mentor simulator (Simbionix, Cleveland, OH), each trainee was asked to perform task 4, where they had to correctly access all of the renal calyces and pop the balloons in a normal left kidney model. We collected and analyzed data from the questionnaire and the performance report generated by the simulator. Results: In total, 13 PGTs participated in this study. PGTs had performed a median of 200 (range: 50–1000) cystoscopies, 50 (range: 10–125) TURBTs, 30 (range: 0–100) TURPs, 5 (range: 0–50) laser prostatectomies, and 50 (range: 2–125) ureteroscopies prior to this OSCE. PGTs with previous PCNL experience (8/13) had performed a mean of 18.6 ± 6.3 PCNLs. PGTs with previous PCNL experience performed significantly better in terms of shorter fluoroscopy time (10 ± 1.5 vs. 5.1 ± 0.7 min; p = 0.04), fewer attempts required for successful puncture of the pelvi-calyceal system (PCS) (21 ± 2.3 vs. 13 ± 1.8; p = 0.02), and had significantly lower complications in terms of fewer infundibular injury (7.4 ± 1.5 vs. 2 ± 0.4; p = 0.004) and fewer PCS perforations (11 ± 1.7 vs. 4.5 ± 1.2; p = 0.01). Conclusion: It is feasible to use the PERC Mentor simulator during OSCEs to assess PCA skills of urology PGTs. PGTs who had previous PCNL experience performed significantly better with fewer complications. PMID:25844094

  5. Clinical Skills Assessment: The Effects of Moving Certification Requirements Into Neurology, Child Neurology, and Psychiatry Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Dorthea; Brooks, Beth Ann; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Jibson, Michael; Faulkner, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Background A few years ago, when the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology decided to phase out the patient-based oral examinations in its 3 primary specialties, requirements for assessing clinical skills during residency training were instituted. Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the experiences of training program directors and graduates with these new credentialing requirements (labeled CSEs) as well as other effects on the specialties. Methods Surveys were administered electronically in 2012 to all current neurology, child neurology, and psychiatry program directors, and to a convenience sample of graduates who applied for the 2012 certification examinations. Results Response rates for graduates were similar across the 3 specialties but low (28%–33%). Response rates were higher for program directors (53%–62%) and were similar across the 3 specialties. The results indicated that the CSEs were usually administered early in training, were completed toward the end, were often passed on first attempt, generally took place during routine clinical assignments, were used to assess additional competencies, almost always included feedback to the residents, and did not often lead to remediation. Furthermore, the CSEs were perceived to be useful components in the assessment of clinical skills. Conclusions The results obtained from the early implementation of the CSEs suggest that they provide an opportunity to assess clinical skills with the additional benefit of feedback to trainees. Other effects included eventual incorporation into training program requirements, milestones, and related faculty development and research efforts. PMID:26217432

  6. Assessment of Genetics Knowledge and Skills in Medical Students: Insight for a Clinical Neurogenetics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Phillip L.; Pettiford, Jennifer M.; Combs, Susan E.; Heffron, Ari; Healton, Sean; Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Macri, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The pace of discovery in biochemistry and genetics and its effect on clinical medicine places new curricular challenges in medical school education. We sought to evaluate students' understanding of neurogenetics and its clinical applications to design a pilot curriculum into the clinical neurology clerkship. We utilized a needs assessment and a…

  7. Fostering Dental Students' Academic Achievements and Reflection Skills Through Clinical Peer Assessment and Feedback.

    PubMed

    Tricio, Jorge A; Woolford, Mark J; Escudier, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Peer assessment is increasingly being encouraged to enhance dental students' learning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the educational impact in terms of academic achievements and reflective thinking of a formative prospective peer assessment and feedback protocol. Volunteer final-year dental students at King's College London Dental Institute, UK, received training on peer assessment, peer feedback, and self-reflection. At the beginning (baseline) and end (resultant) of the 2012-13 academic year, 86 students (55% of the year group) completed a reflection questionnaire (RQ). Sixty-eight of those students used a modified Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) as a framework for peer assessment and peer feedback during a complete academic year. End-of-year, high-stakes examination grades and RQ scores from the participants and nonparticipants were statistically compared. The participants completed 576 peer DOPS. Those 22 students who peer assessed each other ≥10 times exhibited highly statistically significant differences and powerful positive effect sizes in their high-stakes exam grades (p=0.0001, d=0.74) and critical reflection skills (p=0.005, d=1.41) when compared to those who did not assess one another. Furthermore, only the same 22 students showed a statistically significant increase and positive effect size in their critical reflection skills from baseline to resultant (p=0.003, d=1.04). The results of this study suggest that the protocol used has the potential to impact dental students' academic and reflection skills, provided it is practiced in ten or more peer encounters and ensuring peer feedback is provided followed by self-reflection. PMID:27480702

  8. Assessment of first-year veterinary students' communication skills using an objective structured clinical examination: the importance of context.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Kent G; Adams, Cindy L; Coe, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Communication skills are considered to be a core clinical skill in veterinary medicine and essential for practice success, including outcomes of care for patients and clients. While veterinary schools include communication skills training in their programs, there is minimal knowledge on how best to assess communication competence throughout the undergraduate program. The purpose of this study was to further our understanding of the reliability, utility, and suitability of a communication skills Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Specifically we wanted to (1) identify the greatest source of variability (student, rater, station, and track) within a first-year, four station OSCE using exam scores and scores from videotape review by two trained raters, and (2) determine the effect of different stations on students' communication skills performance. Reliability of the scores from both the exam data and the two expert raters was 0.50 and 0.46 respectively, with the greatest amount of variance attributable to student by station. The percentage of variance due to raters in the exam data was 16.35%, whereas the percentage of variance for the two expert raters was 0%. These results have three important implications. First, the results reinforce the need for communication educators to emphasize that use of communication skills is moderated by the context of the clinical interaction. Second, by increasing rater training the amount of error in the scores due to raters can be reduced and inter-rater reliability increases. Third, the communication assessment method (in this case the OSCE checklist) should be built purposefully, taking into consideration the context of the case. PMID:22951466

  9. Practical clinical skills assessment for a cohort of 680 2nd year human medicine students. Is it feasible?

    PubMed

    Wagner-Menghin, Michaela; Preusche, Ingrid; Schmidts, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In clinical skills training objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are the method of choice to foster learning. Hence, implementing them is challenging and expensive. Thus it is investigated how an alternative procedure that keeps OSCE's essential elements, but assigns less stations to each student, works in terms of validity and justifiability.Data of n = 694 students, each taking five tasks drawn semi-randomized out of a pool of 26 tasks, strictly aligned with learning objectives, are analyzed. Despite unsurprisingly low overall reliability, a justifiable pass/fail decision is possible for 480 students (69 %). The remaining group (n = 210, 30 %) is indeed larger than with longer OSCEs, and would need ongoing assessment. The tasks' psychometric quality contributes to exams construct validity. Resource preserving short practical skills assessment is educationally valid and feasible with MedUniVienna's human medicine cohorts of n = 680. PMID:25724462

  10. A Competitive Objective Structured Clinical Examination Event to Generate an Objective Assessment of Anesthesiology Resident Skills Development.

    PubMed

    Rebel, Annette; DiLorenzo, Amy N; Fragneto, Regina Y; Dority, Jeremy S; Rose, Greg; Nguyen, Dung; Hassan, Zaki-Udin; Schell, Randall M

    2016-05-15

    Residency programs are charged with teaching, assessing, and documenting resident competency for a multitude of skills throughout the course of residency training. An innovative, competition-based objective structured clinical examination event was designed in our department to objectively assess the skill level of anesthesiology residents. After conducting the identical event for 2 years in postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) residents, we tested the hypothesis that the event can provide adequate standardization to appropriately document progression in technical and nontechnical skills. Twenty-one residents participated in both events during their PGY1 and PGY2 years: n = 10, 2012/2013, n = 11, 2013/2014. The PGY1 participants in 2012 were retested in 2013 (as PGY2 residents) during an identical event, and their performance was compared as a group and on an individual level. The PGY1 residents in 2013 did the same in 2014. Four workstations were analyzed to determine whether improvement in performance occurred between the PGY1 and the PGY2 years: (1) preoperative assessment, (2) operating room anesthesia station checkout, (3) peripheral IV and endotracheal tube placement, and (4) transfer of care in the postanesthesia care unit. The performances of PGY1 and PGY2 residents were compared. The assessments were performed by anesthesiology faculty using checklists, time to complete task, and Likert scale ratings. Data analysis showed improved technical anesthesia skills (operating room setup, peripheral IV, and endotracheal tube placement) and more complete anesthesia-related information management in the preoperative assessment and postoperative transition of care in the postanesthesia care unit in PGY2 residents compared with the PGY1 performance of the same residents. The described event is a valuable tool for objective assessment of multiple anesthesia skills and possible milestones during residency. PMID:26752179

  11. Assessment of photoselective vaporization of prostate skills during Urology Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE)

    PubMed Central

    Noureldin, Yasser A.; Elkoushy, Mohamed A.; Fahmy, Nader; Carrier, Serge; Elhilali, Mostafa M.; Andonian, Sero

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the use of the GreenLight Simulator (GL-SIM) (American Medical Systems, Guelph, ON) in the skill assessment of postgraduate trainees (PGTs) in photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP). We also sought to determine whether previous PVP experience or GL-SIM practice improved performance. Methods: PGTs in postgraduate years (PGY-3 to PGY-5) from all 4 Quebec urology training programs were recruited during 2 annual Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). During a 20-minute OSCE station, PGTs were asked to perform 2 exercises: (1) identification of endoscopic landmarks and (2) a PVP of a 30-g normal prostate. Grams vaporized, global scores, and number of correct anatomical landmarks were recorded and correlated with PGY level, practice on the GL-SIM, and previous PVP experience. Results: In total, 25 PGTs were recruited at each OSCE, with 13 PGTs participating in both OSCEs. When comparing scores from the first and second OSCEs, there was a significant improvement in the number of grams vaporized (2.9 vs. 4.3 g; p = 0.003) and global score (100 vs. 165; p = 0.03). There was good correlation between the number of previously performed PVPs and the global score (r = 0.4, p = 0.04). Similarly, PGTs with previous practice on the GL-SIM had significantly higher global score (100.6 vs. 162.6; p = 0.04) and grams vaporized (3.1 vs. 4.1 g; p = 0.04) when compared with those who did not practice on GL-SIM. Furthermore, there were significantly more competent PGTs among those who had previously practiced on the GL-SIM (32.7% vs. 10.2%; p = 0.009). PGY level did not significantly affect grams vaporized or global score (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Performance on the GL-SIM at OSCEs significantly correlated with previous practice on the GL-SIM and previous PVP experience rather than PGY level. Furthermore, there were significantly more competent PGTs among those who had previously practiced on the GL-SIM. PMID:25737763

  12. Assessing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on assessing employee skills. "Bridging the Training Gap: Identifying Work Place Transferable Skills Needs in Manufacturing Organizations in East Central Minnesota" (K. Peter Kuchinke, James M. Brown, Howie Anderson, Joe Hobson) reports a study of a workplace education program in rural Minnesota…

  13. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  14. A pilot test of WebOSCE: a system for assessing trainees' clinical skills via teleconference.

    PubMed

    Novack, Dennis H; Cohen, Diane; Peitzman, Steven J; Beadenkopf, Scott; Gracely, Ed; Morris, John

    2002-09-01

    WebOSCE is a computer-based system that allows a student at an affiliate site to participate in a 10-station standardized patient-based exam using a videoconference interface, while nine other students take the exam on-site. We pilot-tested this system during a required year-end objective structured clinical exam. We compared performance data between the 26 distance students taking the exam via WebOSCE with 221 on-site students. We also compared both student groups' responses on a post-exam questionnaire, and conducted a post-exam structured interview to elicit the Pittsburgh students' perspectives on the WebOSCE experience. Students taking the exam via WebOSCE scored significantly lower in most categories except for physical exam and information-giving skills, on which the groups did not differ. There were no differences between groups in students' overall evaluation of the exam experiences. In general, Pittsburgh students rated WebOSCE highly and offered many helpful comments to improve the technology and the experience. PMID:12474813

  15. Development and use of an instrument adapted to assess the clinical skills learning environment in the pre-clinical years

    PubMed Central

    Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Chappelle, Kathryn G.; Elliot, Diane L.; Litzelman, Debra K.; Palmer, Ryan; Biagioli, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Communication, Curriculum, and Culture (C3) instrument is a well-established survey for measuring the professional learning climate or hidden curriculum in the clinical years of medical school. However, few instruments exist for assessing professionalism in the pre-clinical years. We adapted the C3 instrument and assessed its utility during the pre-clinical years at two U.S. medical schools. Methods The ten-item Pre-Clinical C3 survey was adapted from the C3 instrument. Surveys were administered at the conclusion of the first and second years of medical school using a repeated cross-sectional design. Factor analysis was performed and Cronbach’s alphas were calculated for emerging dimensions. Results The authors collected 458 and 564 surveys at two medical schools during AY06-07 and AY07-09 years, respectively. Factor analysis of the survey data revealed nine items in three dimensions: “Patients as Objects”, “Talking Respectfully of Colleagues”, and “Patient-Centered Behaviors”. Reliability measures (Cronbach’s alpha) for the Pre-Clinical C3 survey data were similar to those of the C3 survey for comparable dimensions for each school. Gender analysis revealed significant differences in all three dimensions. Conclusions The Pre-Clinical C3 instrument’s performance was similar to the C3 instrument in measuring dimensions of professionalism. As medical education moves toward earlier and more frequent clinical and inter-professional educational experiences, the Pre-Clinical C3 instrument may be especially useful in evaluating the impact of curricular revisions. PMID:26509103

  16. Creativity in clinical communication: from communication skills to skilled communication.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Peter; Young, Bridget

    2011-03-01

    Medical Education 2011: 45: 217-226 Objectives  The view that training in communication skills produces skilled communication is sometimes criticised by those who argue that communication is individual and intuitive. We therefore examine the validity of the concept of communication as a skill and identify alternative principles to underpin future development of this field. Methods  We critically examine research evidence about the nature of clinical communication, and draw from theory and evidence concerning education and evaluation, particularly in creative disciplines. Results  Skilled communication cannot be fully described using the concept of communication skills. Attempts to do so risk constraining and distorting pedagogical development in communication. Current education practice often masks the difficulties with the concept by introducing subjectivity into the definition and assessment of skills. As all clinical situations differ to some extent, clinical communication is inherently creative. Because it is rarely possible to attribute specific effects to specific elements of communication, communication needs to be taught and evaluated holistically. Conclusions  For communication teaching to be pedagogically and clinically valid in supporting the inherent creativity of clinical communication, it will need to draw from education theory and practice that have been developed in explicitly creative disciplines. PMID:21299597

  17. Math Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartel, R. W.; Adem, M.

    2004-01-01

    A math review exam, written and administered in conjunction with the Quantitative Assessment Program at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, is used at the beginning of the 1st food engineering course to evaluate math skills needed for successful completion of the course. Students who do not score well on the math exam are targeted for individual…

  18. Student Attainment of Proficiency in a Clinical Skill: The Assessment of Individual Learning Curves

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Robert D.; Hecker, Kent G.; Biau, David J.; Pang, Daniel S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the learning curve cumulative summation test (LC-CUSUM) can differentiate proficiency in placing intravenous catheters by novice learners, and identify the cause of failure when it occurred. In a prospective, observational study design 6 undergraduate students with no previous experience of placing intravenous catheters received standardized training by a board certified veterinary anesthesiologist in intravenous catheter placement technique. Immediately following training, each student attempted 60 intravenous catheterizations in a dog mannequin thoracic limb model. Results were scored as a success or failure based upon completion of four specific criteria, and where catheter placement failure occurred, the cause was recorded according to pre-defined criteria. Initial acceptable and unacceptable failure rates were set by the study team and the LC-CUSUM was used to generate a learning curve for each student. Using 10% and 25% acceptable and unacceptable failure rates, 3 out of 6 students attained proficiency, requiring between 26 to 48 attempts. Applying 25% and 50% acceptable and unacceptable failure rates, 5 of 6 students obtained proficiency, requiring between 18 and 55 attempts. Wide inter-individual variability was observed and the majority of failed catheterisation attempts were limited to two of the four pre-defined criteria. These data indicate that the LC-CUSUM can be used to generate individual learning curves, inter-individual variability in catheter placement ability is wide, and that specific steps in catheter placement are responsible for the majority of failures. These findings may have profound implications for how we teach and assess technical skills. PMID:24586337

  19. Why patients take part in the Royal College of Physicians Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills (MRCP PACES).

    PubMed

    McFarland, Lorraine; Barlow, Julie; Nwokolo, Chuka

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patients' motivation to participate in the Royal College of Physicians Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills (PACES). An exploratory cross-sectional study was performed with data collected via telephone interviews. All patients aged 18+ who participated in PACES at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire in the last two years were invited to take part; 28 patients were interviewed. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Motivational factors identified included the opportunity to give something back for the care received, contributing to doctors' learning processes, altruism and being able to learn more about one's own condition. Patients believed that they offered real-life experiences that cannot be provided by actors. The social environment during PACES played a large part in volunteer retention. Recruitment of patient volunteers needs to emphasise the altruistic nature of the role in assisting the learning process for doctors and the subsequent benefit for future patients. PMID:22372221

  20. Employability Skills Assessment Tool Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Puvanasvaran, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Research nationally and internationally found that technical graduates are lacking in employability skills. As employability skills are crucial in outcome-based education, the main goal of this research is to develop an Employability Skill Assessment Tool to help students and lecturers produce competent graduates in employability skills needed by…

  1. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories.

    PubMed

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2007-05-01

    The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow's Doctors"(1) which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates.(2)The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review. PMID:23012147

  2. Web-Based Learning System for Developing and Assessing Clinical Diagnostic Skills for Dermatology Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Fan-Ray; Chin, Yi-Ying; Lee, Chao-Hsien; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Hong, Chien-Hu; Lee, Kuang-Lieh; Ho, Wen-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have explored the learning difficulties and misconceptions that students encounter when using information and communication technology for e-learning. To address this issue, this research developed a system for evaluating the learning efficiency of medical students by applying two-tier diagnosis assessment. The effectiveness of the…

  3. Do Workshops in Evidence-Based Practice Equip Participants to Identify and Answer Questions Requiring Consideration of Clinical Research? A Diagnostic Skill Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Peter C,; Naqvi, Zoon; Dayan, Peter S.; Celentano, James J.; Eskin, Barnet; Graham, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires practitioners to identify and formulate questions in response to patient encounters, and to seek, select, and appraise applicable clinical research. A standardized workshop format serves as the model for training of medical educators in these skills. We developed an evaluation exercise to assess the ability…

  4. Assessing Applied Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMartino, Joe; Castaneda, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A recent employer survey sponsored by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills found that the skills new job entrants most need for success in the workplace--oral and written communication, time management, critical thinking, problem solving, personal accountability, and the ability to work effectively with others--are the areas in which recent…

  5. Assessing Writing Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2013-12-01

    This is an encore presentation of what was presented at the 2012 AGU International Conference. It was entitled: 'ASSESSING CORE COMPETENCIES.' The poster presentation, however, has been redesigned and reorganized with new, revised perspectives. The importance of ASSESSMENT principles has been emphasized. Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marchese in 1987. Assessment is the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology itself. He further argues that students must demonstrate that they have the have the ability to think critically before they make an attempt to use technology in a chosen application-specific environment. The author further

  6. Two Thinking Skills Assessment Approaches: "Assessment of Pupils' Thinking Skills" and "Individual Thinking Skills Assessments"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lynsey A.; Williams, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is linked to a previous paper outlining an evaluation of a thinking skills intervention (Burke & Williams, 2008). Following extensive requests for the assessment tools used in the intervention, this short paper presents the development and potential uses of two thinking skills assessment tools. The aim of the paper is simply to make…

  7. Do Clinical Breast Examination Skills Improve During Medical School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Karen C.; Dunlop, Dorothy; Dolan, Nancy C.

    1998-01-01

    A study assessed the effect of training stage, gender, and specialty interest on 493 Northwestern University (Illinois) medical students' breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and clinical breast examination skills. Results suggest knowledge and attitudes are not related to clinical breast examination proficiency, which is a practiced tactile skill.…

  8. Assessing Pupils' Skills in Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammann, Marcus; Phan, Thi Thanh Hoi; Ehmer, Maike; Grimm, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    This study is concerned with different forms of assessment of pupils' skills in experimentation. The findings of three studies are reported. Study 1 investigates whether it is possible to develop reliable multiple-choice tests for the skills of forming hypotheses, designing experiments and analysing experimental data. Study 2 compares scores from…

  9. Phacoemulsification skills training and assessment.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Anthony; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Kersey, Tom; Benjamin, Larry; Darzi, Ara; Bloom, Philip

    2010-05-01

    BACKGROUND The quality of ophthalmic surgical training is increasingly challenged by an untimely convergence of several factors. This article reviews the tools currently available for training and assessment in phacoemulsification surgery. METHODS Medline searches were performed to identify articles with combinations of the following words: phacoemulsification, training, curriculum, virtual reality and assessment. Further articles were obtained by manually searching the reference lists of identified papers. RESULTS Thus far phacoemulsification training outside the operating room include wet labs and micro-surgical skills courses. These methods have been criticised for being unrealistic, inaccurate and inconsistent. Virtual reality simulators have the ability to teach phacoemulsification psychomotor skills, as well as to carry out objective assessment. Other ophthalmic surgical skill assessment tools such as Objective Assessment of Skills in Intraocular Surgery (OASIS) and Global Rating Assessment of Skills in Intraocular Surgery (GRASIS) are emerging. Assessor bias is minimised by using video-based assessments, which have been shown to reduce subjectivity. Dexterity analysis technology such as the Imperial College Surgical Assessment Device (ICSAD) and virtual reality simulators can be used as objective assessment devices. CONCLUSION Improvements in technology can be utilised in ophthalmology and will help to address the increasingly limited opportunities for training and assessment during training and throughout a subsequent career (re-training and re-validation). This will inevitably translate into enhanced patient care. PMID:19628497

  10. Assessing Business Student Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    The development of student thinking skills is a major goal of business education. As with other such goals, student outcomes assessment must be undertaken to measure goal achievement. Thinking is difficult to teach; it is also difficult to assess. The purpose of this article is to improve management educators' understanding of student…

  11. A Procedural Skills OSCE: Assessing Technical and Non-Technical Skills of Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Debra; Hamstra, Stanley J.; Wood, Timothy J.; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Touchie, Claire; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Bordage, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Internists are required to perform a number of procedures that require mastery of technical and non-technical skills, however, formal assessment of these skills is often lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop, implement, and gather validity evidence for a procedural skills objective structured clinical examination (PS-OSCE) for internal…

  12. The lasting value of clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Kern, D C; Parrino, T A; Korst, D R

    1985-07-01

    To assess the lasting value of clinical skills learned by residents in a subspecialty-oriented training program in internal medicine, we surveyed recent graduates. Graduates received a questionnaire contrasting separate ratings of the amount of training (preparation) they received during residency with the importance of this training in subsequent career activities. Topics included 12 traditional medical disciplines, 15 areas related to the practice of medicine, 15 allied medical disciplines, ten basic skill and knowledge areas, and 28 technical procedures. Response rate was 91.8% (56/61). Ninety-five percent of respondents had certification from the American Board of Internal Medicine, 80% had subspecialty training, and 89% rendered direct patient care. Fifty-six topics showed disparity between preparation and importance scores (45 with P less than .0001). For 14 categories, mainly technical procedures, disparate ratings suggested excessive programmatic emphasis, while for 42 categories, including history taking and physical examination, there may have been inadequate emphasis. These data suggest that basic clinical skills may require greater emphasis, even in traditional programs. The opinion of program graduates is an important resource in designing training programs in internal medicine. PMID:3999353

  13. Clinical Skills Verification, Formative Feedback, and Psychiatry Residency Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalack, Gregory W.; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the implementation of Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) in their program as an in-training assessment intended primarily to provide formative feedback to trainees, strengthen the supervisory experience, identify the need for remediation of interviewing skills, and secondarily to demonstrating resident competence…

  14. Learning Clinical Skills: An Interprofessional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeth, Della; Nicol, Maggie

    1998-01-01

    In a clinical skills center, nurses, doctors, and specialists helped nursing and medical students develop clinical and communication skills in the context of holistic patient care. Two aspects of the format received high ratings: realistic patient scenarios and interdisciplinary team teaching. (SK)

  15. Counselling on breastfeeding: assessing knowledge and skills.

    PubMed Central

    Rea, M. F.; Venancio, S. I.; Martines, J. C.; Savage, F.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the results of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of the WHO/UNICEF 40-hour course "Breastfeeding counselling: a training course". The course was conducted in a maternity hospital which provides care to a low-income population in a metropolitan area in São Paulo, Brazil. Health workers from 60 health units were randomly assigned to be either participants (20) or controls (40), and their breastfeeding knowledge and skills were assessed before and immediately after the course, as well as 3 months later. Immediately after the course the participants' knowledge of breastfeeding had increased significantly compared to controls. Both their clinical and counselling skills also improved significantly. When assessed 3 months later, the scores remained high with only a small decrease. The implementation of the course was also evaluated. The methods used were participatory observation, key interviews and focus group discussion. In the 33 sessions of the course, the average score was 8.43 out of 10. Scores were highest for content and methodology of the theory sessions, and lowest for "use of time", "clinical management of lactation", and "discussion of clinical practice". "Breastfeeding counselling: a training course" therefore effectively increases health workers' knowledge and their clinical and counselling skills for the support of breastfeeding. The course can be conducted adequately using the material and methodology proposed, but could be more satisfactory if the time allocated to exercises and clinical practice sessions were increased. PMID:10427934

  16. Assessing Students' Technical Skill Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Haley

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) is working to comply with the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins) to ensure that its graduates have mastered the technical skills needed by business and industry. The legislation requires that each state identify and approve program assessment strategies…

  17. Development of a Learning-Oriented Computer Assisted Instruction Designed to Improve Skills in the Clinical Assessment of the Nutritional Status: A Pilot Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    García de Diego, Laura; Cuervo, Marta; Martínez, J. Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Computer assisted instruction (CAI) is an effective tool for evaluating and training students and professionals. In this article we will present a learning-oriented CAI, which has been developed for students and health professionals to acquire and retain new knowledge through the practice. A two-phase pilot evaluation was conducted, involving 8 nutrition experts and 30 postgraduate students, respectively. In each training session, the software developed guides users in the integral evaluation of a patient’s nutritional status and helps them to implement actions. The program includes into the format clinical tools, which can be used to recognize possible patient’s needs, to improve the clinical reasoning and to develop professional skills. Among them are assessment questionnaires and evaluation criteria, cardiovascular risk charts, clinical guidelines and photographs of various diseases. This CAI is a complete software package easy to use and versatile, aimed at clinical specialists, medical staff, scientists, educators and clinical students, which can be used as a learning tool. This application constitutes an advanced method for students and health professionals to accomplish nutritional assessments combining theoretical and empirical issues, which can be implemented in their academic curriculum. PMID:25978456

  18. Assessment of social communication skills in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Landa, Rebecca J

    2005-01-01

    This paper orients the reader to social communication assessment and reviews methods for assessing social communication behavior in children from toddlerhood through the preschool years. Most standardized, normed tests of language in this age range focus on morpho-syntactic and semantic comprehension and production abilities. While social communication is perhaps one of the most important skills for peer acceptance, these skills are often overlooked in language evaluation with children. However, there are a number of caregiver questionnaires, interviews, or direct social-communication sampling methods that are available to assist clinicians or researchers in documenting social-communication skills or behaviors. Since assessment of social communication is essential in clinical work with children with an autism spectrum disorder, some of the tools described below are outgrowths of autism research or provide autism-related scores. While many children receiving social communication assessments do not have autism, the need to assess social communication skills in children with language impairment is highlighted by the growing literature documenting social and pragmatic difficulties in this population (Bishop 2000 Causes, Characteristics, Intervention, and Outcome. Hove, UK: Psychology press). Regardless of whether the measures presented herein were initially designed for children with autism or not, they will provide insights into the social communicative behaviors or tendencies in young children. PMID:16161095

  19. The Assessment of Interpersonal Skills Using Standardized Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnabl, Gail K.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A multistation clinical examination using standardized patients was used over 4 years to assess the interpersonal skills of 346 fourth year medical students, 51 internal medicine residents, and 71 foreign medical graduates seeking admission to graduate study. Results indicate that a reliable assessment of interpersonal skills can be achieved this…

  20. Assessing scrub practitioner non-technical skills: a literature review.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Guy

    2015-01-01

    A review by Catchpole et al (2009) into the causes and types of harm experienced by the surgical patient emphasised the high risk nature of the perioperative period. Investigations into recent failures at NHS organisations have emphasised the relevance of non-technical skills education in improving clinical performance and patient outcomes. However, scrub practitioner non-technical skills are often developed on a tacit basis, making assessment of performance difficult. This literature review identifies strategies that facilitate assessment of non-technical skills during surgery. Recommendations are made that will assist scrub practitioners in using a validated scrub practitioner non-technical skills assessment framework reliably. PMID:26016259

  1. Progress testing 2.0: clinical skills meets necessary science

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Jonathan; DeMuth, Robin; Mavis, Brian; Wagner, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Progress testing has been widely used in medical schools to test scientific knowledge but has not been reported for assessing clinical skills. Development We designed a novel progress examination that included assessments of both clinical performance and underlying basic and social science knowledge. This Progress Clinical Skills Examination (PCSE) was given to 21 early medical students at the beginning and end of a 6-week pilot test of a new medical school curriculum. Implementation This examination was feasible for early students, easy to map to curricular objectives, and easy to grade using a combination of assessment strategies. Future directions Use of a PCSE is feasible for early medical students. As medical schools integrate clinical experience with underlying knowledge, this type of examination holds promise. Further data are needed to validate this examination as an accurate measure of clinical performance and knowledge. PMID:25948045

  2. Peer Assessment of Elementary Science Teaching Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Gulsen Bagci; Cakan, Mehtap

    2007-01-01

    In this study, peer assessment was applied in assessing elementary science teaching skills. Preservice teachers taught a science topic as a team to their peers in an elementary science methods course. The peers participating in the science lesson assessed teacher-groups' elementary science teaching skills on an assessment form provided by the…

  3. Advances in Teaching and Assessing Nontechnical Skills.

    PubMed

    Hull, Louise; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-08-01

    The importance of surgeons' nontechnical skills is gaining widespread recognition as a critical element of high-quality and safe surgical care. This article reviews the knowledge base on training and assessing surgeons, and operating room (OR) teams, in nontechnical aspects of their performance. Nontechnical skills are defined in the context of the OR and key assessment instruments that have been developed to capture these skills are reviewed. Key developments that have taken place in the past decade on formal skills training are discussed, and recommendations to further advance nontechnical skills and team-based training and assessment in surgery are presented. PMID:26210977

  4. Clinical skill development for community pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Barnette, D J; Murphy, C M; Carter, B L

    1996-09-01

    The importance of establishing clinical pharmacy services in the community cannot be understated in light of current challenges to the traditional dispensing role as the primary service of the community pharmacist. Advancements in automated dispensing technology and declining prescription fee reimbursement are rapidly forcing pharmacists to seek alternative sources of revenue. Providing pharmaceutical care is a viable option to increase customer loyalty job satisfaction, and reimbursement. To support the development of clinical services, academic institutions are forming partnerships with individual community practitioners to overcome perceived educational and training barriers. The authors describe the design and development of two unique clinical skill development programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This paper also outlines the patient focused services that the participants have established upon completing the training. These programs successfully enhanced participants' therapeutic knowledge base and facilitated development of the clinical skills necessary for direct patient care. PMID:8824077

  5. Enhancing Professional Writing Skills of Veterinary Technology Students: Linking Assessment and Clinical Practice in a Communications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Patricia; Schull, Daniel; Coleman, Glen; Pitt, Rachael; Manathunga, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary technology is an emerging profession within the veterinary and allied animal health fields in Australia and affords graduates the opportunity to contribute to the small but growing body of literature within this discipline. This study describes the introduction of a contextualised assessment task to develop students' research…

  6. Assessments and skills improvement for endoscopists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John T

    2016-06-01

    Different countries employ a range of assessment methods to monitor trainees from novice to independent practice. The optimal method to monitor and assess individuals' training in endoscopy has not been formally determined. The UK has developed a competency based assessment training and certification (credentialing) programme. The tools developed to provide endoscopy work based assessments (DOPS) have been validated and are used for trainees and independent endoscopists, providing formative feedback for targeted training. Summative assessments are used for trainee certification and independent colonoscopists wishing to provide part of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. The UK was able to develop both clinical standards and an endoscopy training and certification process applied to all individuals and monitored by a single professional body. The supporting IT system enabled a structured and robust quality assurance process to be applied to all individuals and endoscopy units. Assessment of practising endoscopists relies on the development and measurement of surrogate measures, which represent key performance indicators for those individuals. These surrogates for performance are still evolving although they are now well established for colonoscopy practice. Monitoring of independent practice is dependent on clinical audit of these key performance indicators. Feedback of data to individuals helps benchmarking and identification of those with sub-optimal performance. Independent endoscopists now recognize the benefit of on-going training to help both skills development and to address sub-optimal performance. This chapter describes how the UK developed a web-based integrated training and certification system. PMID:27345651

  7. Teaching and Assessing Communication Skills in Medical Undergraduate Training.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jyoti Nath; Anshu, -; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-06-01

    Good communication skills are essential for an optimal doctor-patient relationship, and also contribute to improved health outcomes. Although the need for training in communication skills is stated as a requirement in the 1997 Graduate Medical Education Regulations of the Medical Council of India, formal training in these skills has been fragmentary and non-uniform in most Indian curricula. The Vision 2015 document of the Medical Council of India reaffirms the need to include training in communication skills in the MBBS curriculum. Training in communication skills needs approaches which are different from that of teaching other clinical subjects. It is also a challenge to ensure that students not only imbibe the nuances of communication and interpersonal skills, but adhere to them throughout their careers. This article addresses the possible ways of standardizing teaching and assessment of communication skills and integrating them into the existing curriculum. PMID:27376604

  8. Teaching and assessing procedural skills: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Graduating Internal Medicine residents must possess sufficient skills to perform a variety of medical procedures. Little is known about resident experiences of acquiring procedural skills proficiency, of practicing these techniques, or of being assessed on their proficiency. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively investigate resident 1) experiences of the acquisition of procedural skills and 2) perceptions of procedural skills assessment methods available to them. Methods Focus groups were conducted in the weeks following an assessment of procedural skills incorporated into an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Using fundamental qualitative description, emergent themes were identified and analyzed. Results Residents perceived procedural skills assessment on the OSCE as a useful formative tool for direct observation and immediate feedback. This positive reaction was regularly expressed in conjunction with a frustration with available assessment systems. Participants reported that proficiency was acquired through resident directed learning with no formal mechanism to ensure acquisition or maintenance of skills. Conclusions The acquisition and assessment of procedural skills in Internal Medicine programs should move toward a more structured system of teaching, deliberate practice and objective assessment. We propose that directed, self-guided learning might meet these needs. PMID:23672617

  9. Negotiation skills for clinical research professionals

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Sanjay; Shah, Tapankumar

    2011-01-01

    Negotiation as a skill is a key requirement for each and every job profile where dealing with multiple parties is involved. The important focus while negotiating should be on the interest then position. Key to every successful negotiation is advance planning, preparation, and patience as the objective is to create value and establish the terms on which parties with differing and often conflicting aims will co-operate. While preparing one should collect facts, know priorities, principles, identify common ground, decide on walk-away position, and try and identify the next best alternative. Negotiation is a set of skills that can be learned and practiced so that your ability to utilize relationship, knowledge, money, power, time, and personality to negotiate improves with each negotiation. In a successful negotiation, all parties win. Important thing to note is that not every negotiation involves money. Anytime you want something from someone else and anytime someone wants something from you, you are negotiating. Everything is negotiable and every day you negotiate with customers, suppliers, colleagues, your wife, and even your children. Negotiation is a game, and like any game it has its rules and tactics. Clinical Research professionals deal with various parties for different purposes at the same time; hence, they require excellent negotiation skills. Project Mangers and Clinical Research Associates are the two most important roles in clinical research industry who require negotiation skills as they deal with various internal and external customers and vendors. PMID:21897886

  10. The odontology victim identification skill assessment system.

    PubMed

    Zohn, Harry K; Dashkow, Sheila; Aschheim, Kenneth W; Dobrin, Lawrence A; Glazer, Howard S; Kirschbaum, Mitchell; Levitt, Daniel; Feldman, Cecile A

    2010-05-01

    Mass fatality identification efforts involving forensic odontology can involve hundreds of dental volunteers. A literature review was conducted and forensic odontologists and dental educators consulted to identify lessons learned from past mass fatality identification efforts. As a result, the authors propose a skill assessment system, the Odontology Victim Identification Skill Assessment System (OVID-SAS), which details qualifications required to participate on the Antemortem, Postmortem, Ante/Postmortem Comparison, Field, and Shift Leader/Initial Response Teams. For each qualification, specific skills have been identified along with suggested educational pedagogy and skill assessment methods. Courses and assessments can be developed by dental schools, professional associations, or forensic organizations to teach and test for the skills required for dental volunteers to participate on each team. By implementing a system, such as OVID-SAS, forensic odontologists responsible for organizing and managing a forensic odontology mass fatality identification effort will be able to optimally utilize individuals presenting with proven skills. PMID:20345802

  11. Teachers' Assessment of Students' Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokking, Karel; van der Schaaf, Marieke; Jaspers, Jos; Erkens, Gijsbert

    2004-01-01

    Today, teachers are expected to develop complex skills, such as research skills, in their students while implementing new views on learning and teaching and using authentic assessment strategies. About these new assessment strategies there is much debate and teachers are vulnerable in using them. We studied upper secondary education natural and…

  12. Clinical breast evaluation skills of house officers and students.

    PubMed

    Chalabian, J; Garman, K; Wallace, P; Dunnington, G

    1996-10-01

    Current health care reform is placing primary care physicians in an increasingly significant role as the front-line providers of women's health care. It is critical that primary care physicians as well as surgeons develop the knowledge base, physical examination skills, and interpersonal skills necessary to care for patients with breast cancer. This study uses a standardized patient breast case in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) format to objectively assess clinical breast evaluation skill performance by house officers and medical students. Performance of USC medical students, exposed to a uniform clinical breast evaluation curriculum, were compared with MSIVs from four other medical schools, and postgraduate year I and II categorical surgical residents. USC medical students were found to maintain performance between an initial surgical OSCE breast station and a delayed clinical practice exam (CPX) reexam as MSIVs (breast exam, P = 0.21; patient-physician interaction, P = 0.67). USC MSIVs had statistically significantly higher performance on the CPX breast station when compared with other MSIVs (T = 11.701, two-tailed test, P = 0.0001). House officers demonstrated significantly poorer skills than medical students (P = 0.03). An incoming housestaff group showed improvement with clinical breast evaluation checklists and orientation as part of their intern orientation program and ongoing curriculum. PMID:8813167

  13. Conception of Learning and Clinical Skill Acquisition in Undergraduate Exercise Science Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nathan; Chuter, Vivienne; Rooney, Kieron

    2013-01-01

    Learning clinical skills presents a novel experience for undergraduate students, particularly when it comes to preparing for skill assessment. Compared with the thousands of hours of practice believed to be necessary for the development of motor skill expertise (1), these students have significantly limited exposure time. Furthermore, effective…

  14. The Relationship between Athletic Training Student Critical Thinking Skills and Clinical Instructor Supervision: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabay, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) assess the critical thinking skill level of the athletic training student at onset and end of the clinical education experience 2) to examine the influence of the students' critical thinking skills and the CIs' supervision responses to the changes in the students' critical thinking skills and 3) to compare the…

  15. Teamwork Skills Assessment for Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Teamwork skills are required at work, but teacher efforts in many countries to track achievement within this context have been hindered by lack of assessment tools and input from students. The Teamwork Skills Inventory relies on peer and self-evaluation to establish accountability, identify competencies, and detect learning needs. Twenty-five…

  16. Undesired Variance Due to Examiner Stringency/Leniency Effect in Communication Skill Scores Assessed in OSCEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harasym, Peter H.; Woloschuk, Wayne; Cunning, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Physician-patient communication is a clinical skill that can be learned and has a positive impact on patient satisfaction and health outcomes. A concerted effort at all medical schools is now directed at teaching and evaluating this core skill. Student communication skills are often assessed by an Objective Structure Clinical Examination (OSCE).…

  17. Estimating Reading Skill from ACT Assessment Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Julie

    1986-01-01

    A study correlating Nelson-Denny Reading Test scores with American College Testing Program Assessments (ACT) indicates that reading skill can be predicted accurately from the ACT social studies reading and English usage subtests. (MSE)

  18. Assessing a Political Skills Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Robert M.

    This paper describes and evaluates a political skills course for college students. Course objectives include teaching students to do the following: organize and run a meeting; bargain effectively; communicate within and between groups; manage a crisis; organize a political coalition; be aware of personal stress and some of the ways to reduce it;…

  19. Ecosystem Model Skill Assessment. Yes We Can!

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Erik; Fay, Gavin; Gaichas, Sarah; Gamble, Robert; Lucey, Sean; Link, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Need to Assess the Skill of Ecosystem Models Accelerated changes to global ecosystems call for holistic and integrated analyses of past, present and future states under various pressures to adequately understand current and projected future system states. Ecosystem models can inform management of human activities in a complex and changing environment, but are these models reliable? Ensuring that models are reliable for addressing management questions requires evaluating their skill in representing real-world processes and dynamics. Skill has been evaluated for just a limited set of some biophysical models. A range of skill assessment methods have been reviewed but skill assessment of full marine ecosystem models has not yet been attempted. Northeast US Atlantis Marine Ecosystem Model We assessed the skill of the Northeast U.S. (NEUS) Atlantis marine ecosystem model by comparing 10-year model forecasts with observed data. Model forecast performance was compared to that obtained from a 40-year hindcast. Multiple metrics (average absolute error, root mean squared error, modeling efficiency, and Spearman rank correlation), and a suite of time-series (species biomass, fisheries landings, and ecosystem indicators) were used to adequately measure model skill. Overall, the NEUS model performed above average and thus better than expected for the key species that had been the focus of the model tuning. Model forecast skill was comparable to the hindcast skill, showing that model performance does not degenerate in a 10-year forecast mode, an important characteristic for an end-to-end ecosystem model to be useful for strategic management purposes. Skill Assessment Is Both Possible and Advisable We identify best-practice approaches for end-to-end ecosystem model skill assessment that would improve both operational use of other ecosystem models and future model development. We show that it is possible to not only assess the skill of a complicated marine ecosystem model, but that

  20. Enabling performance skills: Assessment in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrone, Jenny Kristina

    Current reform in engineering education is part of a national trend emphasizing student learning as well as accountability in instruction. Assessing student performance to demonstrate accountability has become a necessity in academia. In newly adopted criterion proposed by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), undergraduates are expected to demonstrate proficiency in outcomes considered essential for graduating engineers. The case study was designed as a formative evaluation of freshman engineering students to assess the perceived effectiveness of performance skills in a design laboratory environment. The mixed methodology used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to assess students' performance skills and congruency among the respondents, based on individual, team, and faculty perceptions of team effectiveness in three ABET areas: Communications Skills. Design Skills, and Teamwork. The findings of the research were used to address future use of the assessment tool and process. The results of the study found statistically significant differences in perceptions of Teamwork Skills (p < .05). When groups composed of students and professors were compared, professors were less likely to perceive student's teaming skills as effective. The study indicated the need to: (1) improve non-technical performance skills, such as teamwork, among freshman engineering students; (2) incorporate feedback into the learning process; (3) strengthen the assessment process with a follow-up plan that specifically targets performance skill deficiencies, and (4) integrate the assessment instrument and practice with ongoing curriculum development. The findings generated by this study provides engineering departments engaged in assessment activity, opportunity to reflect, refine, and develop their programs as it continues. It also extends research on ABET competencies of engineering students in an under-investigated topic of factors correlated with team

  1. Using a simulated environment to support students learning clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Doody, O; Condon, M

    2013-11-01

    Within intellectual disability nursing students are prepared within a biopsychosocialeducational model and curriculum address these challenges. Using a simulated learning environment has great potential for promoting competence and in-depth knowledge of substantive topics relevant to practice. This article presents an assignment designed to more closely resemble real-world activities to allow students develop and exercise skills that translate to practice activities and incorporates a student's reflective comments on the process. The assignment was designed to foster intellectual disability student nurses ability to facilitate family/client education. The aim of the assignment was fulfilled through the students designing a clinical skill teaching session that could be used with families/clients. The sessions were recorded and the student reviewed their recording to reflect on their performance and to self assess. To facilitate student learning the modules academic lecturer also reviewed the recording and both lecturer and student meet to discuss the reflection and self assessment. PMID:23602694

  2. Teaching clinical interviewing skills using role-playing: conveying empathy to performing a suicide assessment: a primer for individual role-playing and scripted group role-playing.

    PubMed

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Barney, Christine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a useful introduction to the art of role-playing in both the individual format and the group format using scripted group role-playing (SGRP). Role-playing can provide powerful learning opportunities, but to do so it must be done well. This article imparts guidance toward this goal. SGRP may greatly enhance the acquisition of critical complex interviewing skills, such as suicide assessment and uncovering domestic violence, in health care providers across all disciplines, an educational goal that has not been achievable to date. Although research is at an early stage of development, the hope represented by SGRP is tangible. PMID:25725575

  3. Educational Assessment Knowledge and Skills for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The 1990 Standards for Teacher Competence in Educational Assessment of Students (AFT, NCME, & NEA, 1990) made a documentable contribution to the field. However, the Standards have become a bit dated, most notably in two ways: (1) the Standards do not consider current conceptions of formative assessment knowledge and skills, and (2) the Standards…

  4. Key Skills Portfolio Assessment: Good Practice Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Martin; Wilson, Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    This guide offers advice and guidance to key skills managers, coordinators and other practitioners who are responsible for ensuring that the standards of portfolio assessment in their center are consistent across the center and with national standards. It describes and offers advice and guidance on the stages of assessment and internal moderation…

  5. Assessing Higher Thinking Skills through Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braungart-Bloom, Diane S.

    This paper reports on the New Jersey State Department of Education's research process for developing a scoring rubric that assesses test objectives and higher order thinking skills through writing. New Jersey's statewide assessment program includes a written essay portion to test students' ability to write on a given topic and communicate an…

  6. Case History Skill Assessment: Breadth versus Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haine, Charles L.; Gross, Leon J.

    1999-01-01

    Study investigated whether poor performance on the case history portion of the National Board of Examiners in Optometry clinical skills examination was due to candidates' failure to inquire about major issues or explore issues thoroughly. Data from tests administered to 1,266 candidates were analyzed. Results indicate candidates generally…

  7. Sibling Conflict Resolution Skills: Assessment and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Brett W.; Roberts, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Sibling conflict can rise to the level of a clinical problem. In Phase 1 a lengthy behavioral role-play analog sampling child reactions to normal sibling conflicts was successfully shortened. In Phase 2 normal children who lacked sibling conflict resolution skills were randomly assigned to a Training or Measurement Only condition. Training…

  8. Skill Assessment in Ocean Biological Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Robinson, Allan R.; Rose, Kenneth A.; Schlitzer, Reiner; Thompson, Keith R.; Doney, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing recognition that rigorous skill assessment is required to understand the ability of ocean biological models to represent ocean processes and distributions. Statistical analysis of model results with observations represents the most quantitative form of skill assessment, and this principle serves as well for data assimilation models. However, skill assessment for data assimilation requires special consideration. This is because there are three sets of information in the free-run model, data, and the assimilation model, which uses Data assimilation information from both the flee-run model and the data. Intercom parison of results among the three sets of information is important and useful for assessment, but is not conclusive since the three information sets are intertwined. An independent data set is necessary for an objective determination. Other useful measures of ocean biological data assimilation assessment include responses of unassimilated variables to the data assimilation, performance outside the prescribed region/time of interest, forecasting, and trend analysis. Examples of each approach from the literature are provided. A comprehensive list of ocean biological data assimilation and their applications of skill assessment, in both ecosystem/biogeochemical and fisheries efforts, is summarized.

  9. Assessment of dental students’ communication skills with patients

    PubMed Central

    MEMARPOUR, MAHTAB; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; ZAREI, ZAHRA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Establishment of effective communication between the clinician and patient is essential in order to increase the effectiveness of treatment. These skills have been less investigated among dental students. This study aimed to evaluate communication skills of dental students in Shiraz with patients through direct observation, patients' perspectives and students' self-assessments. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled the fifth and sixth year dental students and one of each student’s patients who was chosen using simple random sampling method. We used a checklist for data collection. Students’ communication skills were assessed at three steps of the student-patient interview – at the beginning of the interview, during the interview, and at the end of the interview. The checklist was completed by three groups: 1) an observer, 2) the patient and 3) the student, as self-assessment. The validity of the checklist was confirmed by clinical professors and the reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Student’s t test. A repeated measure MANOVA was used to compare the mean communication skills in the researcher, patients, and students at each step of the patient interviews. Results There were 110 students (mean age: 22.3±8.4 years) and 110 patients (mean age: 32±8.8 years) who completed the checklists. Overall, the communication skills of dental students were rated as good according to the patients. However, the observer and student participants rated the skills at the moderate level. We observed significant differences between communication skills in all three groups and in the three steps of the patient interviews (p<0.001). According to patients' beliefs and students' self assessments, there were no differences between male and female students in communication skills in the three steps of the patient interviews (all p>0.05). However from the observer’s viewpoint, female students

  10. An Alumni Assessment of MIS Related Job Skill Importance and Skill Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Jerod W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a job skill survey of Management Information Systems (MIS) alumni from a Northeastern U.S. university. The study assesses job skill importance and skill gaps associated with 104 technical and non-technical skill items. Survey items were grouped into 6 categories based on prior research. Skill importance and skill…

  11. Shortcomings in the Evaluation of Students' Clinical Skills and Behaviors in Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Donald G.; Eaglen, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the extent to which current medical-student evaluation assesses noncognitive clinical skills and behaviors needed by graduates, including small-group conferences, case-based discussion, library research, lifelong learning, reasoned thinking, interpersonal skills, and logical/sequenced history taking and physical examinations.…

  12. Assessing Writing Skill. Research Monograph No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breland, Hunter M.; And Others

    Six university English departments collaborated in this examination of the differences between multiple-choice and essay tests in evaluating writing skills. The study also investigated ways the two tools can complement one another, ways to improve cost effectiveness of essay testing, and ways to integrate assessment and the educational process.…

  13. Multi-Skilled Healthcare Worker Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Cindy

    This assessment instrument is designed for use in evaluating the workplace literacy skills of individuals applying for employment in various hospital departments, including food service, housekeeping, environmental services, occupations, including food service occupations. The instrument is divided into two parts. Part 1 is designed to be…

  14. Non-technical skills assessment in surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharat; Mishra, Amit; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2011-09-01

    Adverse events in surgery have highlighted the importance of non-technical skills, such as communication, decision-making, teamwork, situational awareness and leadership, to effective organizational performance. These skills carry particular importance to surgical oncology, as members of a multidisciplinary team must work cohesively to formulate effective patient care plans. Several non-technical skills evaluation tools have been developed for use in surgery, without adequate comparison and consensus on which should be standard for training. Eleven articles describing the use of three non-technical evaluation tools related to surgery: NOTSS (Non Technical Skills for Surgeons), NOTECHS (Non Technical Skills) and OTAS (Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery) were analyzed with respect to scale formulation, validity, reliability and feasibility. Furthermore, their use in training thus far and the future of non-technical rating scales in surgical curricula was discussed. Future work should focus on incorporating these assessment tools into training and into a real operating room setting to provide formative evaluations for surgical residents. PMID:21129950

  15. Guide for an Assessment of Basic Life Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    Basic life skill items developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) to measure the achievement of 17-year-olds in the following areas are presented: (1) personal finance and consumer protection skills; (2) health maintenance skills; (3) interpersonal skills; (4) family responsibility skills; and (5) career development…

  16. Pairing as an instructional strategy to promote soft skills amongst clinical dental students.

    PubMed

    Abu Kasim, N H; Abu Kassim, N L; Razak, A A A; Abdullah, H; Bindal, P; Che' Abdul Aziz, Z A; Sulaiman, E; Farook, M S; Gonzalez, M A G; Thong, Y L; Ahmad, N A; Naimie, Z; Abdullah, M; Lui, J L; Abdul Aziz, A

    2014-02-01

    Training dentists today is challenging as they are expected to provide a wide range of dental care. In the provision of good dental care, soft skills are equally important as clinical skills. Therefore in dental education the development of soft skills are of prime concern. This study sought to identify the development of soft skills when dental students are paired in their clinical training. In this perception study, four open-ended items were used to elicit students' feedback on the appropriateness of using clinical pairing as an instructional strategy to promote soft skills. The most frequently cited soft skills were teamwork (70%) and communication (25%) skills. However, both negative and positive behaviours were reported. As for critical thinking and problem solving skills, more positive behaviours were reported for abilities such as to explain, analyze, find ideas and alternative solutions, and make decisions. Leadership among peers was not evident as leading without legitimate authority could be a hindrance to its development. If clinical pairing is to be used as an effective instructional strategy to promote soft skills amongst students, clear guidelines need to be developed to prepare students to work in a dental team and the use of appropriate assessment tools can facilitate the development of these soft skills. PMID:24423176

  17. Construction and Validation of the Clinical Judgment Skill Inventory: Clinical Judgment Skill Competencies That Measure Counselor Debiasing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bryan S.; Leahy, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To construct and validate a new self-report instrument, the Clinical Judgment Skill Inventory (CJSI), inclusive of clinical judgment skill competencies that address counselor biases and evidence-based strategies. Method: An Internet-based survey design was used and an exploratory factor analysis was performed on a sample of rehabilitation…

  18. Evaluation of Clinical and Communication Skills of Pharmacy Students and Pharmacists with an Objective Structured Clinical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Rebecca L.; Tovar, John M.; Witte, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate how effectively pharmacy students and practicing pharmacists communicate and apply knowledge to simulations of commonly encountered patient scenarios using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Design. Second-, third-, and fourth-year pharmacy students completed an OSCE as part of their required courses in 2012 and 2013. All students in both years completed identical OSCE cases. Licensed pharmacists were recruited to complete the OSCE and serve as controls in 2012. A survey assessed student perception and acceptance of the OSCE as well as student confidence in performance. Assessment. Licensed pharmacists had significantly higher clinical and communication skills scores than did pharmacy students. Student progression in communication and clinical skills improved significantly over time. Survey results indicated that students felt the OSCE was well-structured and assessed clinical skills taught in pharmacy school; 86% of students felt confident they could provide these skills. Conclusion. Objective structured clinical examinations can evaluate clinical competence and communication skills among professional students. Implementation of OSCEs may be an effective tool for assessment of the Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education domains. PMID:26690286

  19. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  20. Multicultural Life Skills Assessment of Individuals with Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Levan H. F.; Browder, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the need for a multicultural perspective on life skills assessment for students with severe disabilities. Guidelines for making a life skills assessment process more multicultural are offered. (Author/DB)

  1. Construct Validity of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Psychiatry: Associations with the Clinical Skills Examination and Other Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Robin S.; Chibnall, John T.; Blaskiewicz, Robert J.; Furman, Gail E.; Powell, Jill K.; Mohr, Clinton J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The construct validity of checklist and global process scores for an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in psychiatry was assessed. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict psychiatry OSCE scores from the clinical skills examination, an obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) OSCE, and the National Board of Medical…

  2. Gynecologic endoscopy skills training and assessment: review.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, Rasiah; Setchell, Thomas; Miskry, Tariq; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Training in and assessment of endoscopic skills is currently undergoing a period of evolution. Several recognized factors driving this evolution include working pattern, training opportunities, cost, and patient safety. In addition, the need to continuously monitor competence is punctuated by the rapid technologic changes and rising consumer expectation. These challenges present an opportunity to positively enhance the learning and performance of surgical practice. PMID:23933352

  3. A pilot project in distance education: nurse practitioner students' experience of personal video capture technology as an assessment method of clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Strand, Haakan; Fox-Young, Stephanie; Long, Phil; Bogossian, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a pilot project aimed at exploring postgraduate distance students' experiences using personal video capture technology to complete competency assessments in physical examination. A pre-intervention survey gathered demographic data from nurse practitioner students (n=31) and measured their information communication technology fluency. Subsequently, thirteen (13) students were allocated a hand held video camera to use in their clinical setting. Those participating in the trial completed a post-intervention survey and further data were gathered using semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and deductive content analysis, and the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (Venkatesh et al., 2003) were used to guide the project. Uptake of the intervention was high (93%) as students recognised the potential benefit. Students were video recorded while performing physical examinations. They described high level of stress and some anxiety, which decreased rapidly while assessment was underway. Barriers experienced were in the areas of facilitating conditions (technical character e.g. upload of files) and social influence (e.g. local ethical approval). Students valued the opportunity to reflect on their recorded performance with their clinical mentors and by themselves. This project highlights the demands and difficulties of introducing technology to support work-based learning. PMID:22154874

  4. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for clinical laboratory occupations programs. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process used to develop the…

  5. Clinical skills: bed making and patient positioning.

    PubMed

    Pellatt, Glynis Collis

    Providing a clean, comfortable bed and positioning a patient in the optimum posture for prevention of complications and to enable maximum independence are fundamental nursing skills. Bed-making is a daily routine that requires practical and technical skills. Selecting the correct posture for a patient in bed or in a chair is essential for physiological functioning and recovery. In this article bed-making is described, as are positioning and re-positioning in relation to patients in bed, armchairs and wheelchairs. Infection control and moving and handling issues are also considered. PMID:17505378

  6. Getting Skills Right: Assessing and Anticipating Changing Skill Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Digitalisation, globalisation, demographic shifts and other changes in work organisation are constantly reshaping skill needs. This can lead to persistent skill shortages and mismatch which are costly for individuals, firms and society in terms of lost wages and lower productivity and growth. These costs can be reduced through better assessment…

  7. Peer Assessment of Soft Skills and Hard Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Aimao

    2012-01-01

    Both the information technology (IT) industry and the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) demand soft-skill training in higher education and require IT graduates to demonstrate competence in interpersonal communication, teamwork, and conflict management. Group projects provide teamwork environment for soft-skill training, but…

  8. Defining and Assessing Team Skills of Business and Accountancy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghalith, Nabil; Blum, Michael; Medlock, Amanda; Weber, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the project are (1) to define the skills necessary for students to work effectively with others to achieve common goals, and (2) to develop an assessment instrument to measure student progress toward achieving these skills. The defined skill set will form a basis for common expectations related to team skills that will be shared…

  9. Computerized assessment of dental student writing skills.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Joseph M; Elliot, Norbert; Biber, Cheryl L; Sanders, R Michael

    2005-02-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using computer-based tools for the assessment of written materials produced by dental students. Written assignments produced by three consecutive incoming dental school classes (240 students) were assessed, and the performance among and between classes was analyzed. Computerized assessment of documents produced by students in the context of their regular coursework proved to be an efficient and effective mechanism for assessing performance. Student performance, assessed as a byproduct of this research, was disappointing. The performance of all classes fell below the eleventh grade level, with some students producing written material at a level of sophistication generally expected from middle school children. Existing technology shows promise as a vehicle for enhancing the assessment of dental students' written communication skills. The ease of use and minimal training necessary to apply this technology can help mitigate the time-intensive nature of writing assessment. If this assessment information is then used to enhance instruction--a process inherently available through software such as WebCT--the distance between assessment and instruction may be more readily bridged through an increase in the use of technology. PMID:15689614

  10. How well do final year undergraduate medical students master practical clinical skills?

    PubMed Central

    Störmann, Sylvère; Stankiewicz, Melanie; Raes, Patricia; Berchtold, Christina; Kosanke, Yvonne; Illes, Gabrielle; Loose, Peter; Angstwurm, Matthias W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical examination and other practical clinical skills are fundamental to guide diagnosis and therapy. The teaching of such practical skills has gained significance through legislative changes and adjustments of the curricula of medical schools in Germany. We sought to find out how well final year undergraduate medical students master practical clinical skills. Methods: We conducted a formative 4-station objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) focused on practical clinical skills during the final year of undergraduate medical education. Participation was voluntary. Besides the examination of heart, lungs, abdomen, vascular system, lymphatic system as well as the neurological, endocrinological or orthopaedic examination we assessed other basic clinical skills (e.g. interpretation of an ECG, reading a chest X-ray). Participants filled-out a questionnaire prior to the exam, inter alia to give an estimate of their performance. Results: 214 final year students participated in our study and achieved a mean score of 72.8% of the total score obtainable. 9.3% of participants (n=20) scored insufficiently (<60%). We found no influence of sex, prior training in healthcare or place of study on performance. Only one third of the students correctly estimated their performance (35.3%), whereas 30.0% and 18.8% over-estimated their performance by 10% and 20% respectively. Discussion: Final year undergraduate medical students demonstrate considerable deficits performing practical clinical skills in the context of a formative assessment. Half of the students over-estimate their own performance. We recommend an institutionalised and frequent assessment of practical clinical skills during undergraduate medical education, especially in the final year. PMID:27579358

  11. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education. PMID:22449990

  12. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  13. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, T J; Nikendei, C

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or "skills labs", i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method's effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  14. Peer Coaching in Clinical Teaching: Formative Assessment of a Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hekelman, Francine P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Peer coaching as an approach to faculty development is introduced. A 1.5-year formative assessment of one family physician's teaching practices and beliefs describes the process as a mechanism for improving clinical teaching skills. (SLD)

  15. Assessments of "Learning-Related Skills" and "Interpersonal Skills" Constructs within Early Childhood Environments in Singapore"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Sok Mui; Rodger, Sylvia; Brown, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Social skills are necessary for developing successful relationships and promoting learning. "Interpersonal skills" (IPS) are needed for maintaining friendships while "learning-related skills" (LRS) are required for positive classroom behaviours. In this study, we investigated the construct validity of LRS and IPS within two existing assessments:…

  16. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking. PMID:25892366

  17. Teaching students in the classroom and clinical skills environment.

    PubMed

    Dix, Greg; Hughes, Suzanne

    This article demonstrates that careful planning and management can help to ensure effective learning for pre-registration students during theory and practical skills teaching. It highlights two lesson plans with intended learning outcomes, one for a didactic teaching session and the other for a psychomotor clinical skills session. The article identifies a variety of teaching and learning strategies that could be adopted. PMID:15915956

  18. Clinical skills training in undergraduate medical education using a student-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk

    2013-08-01

    This thesis focuses on how to engage students in self-directed learning and in peer-learning activities to improve clinical skills training in undergraduate medical education. The first study examined the clinical skills teaching provided by student teachers compared to that provided by associate professors. This study showed that student teachers performed as good as or even better than associate professors when teaching simple clinical skills. The second study of this thesis examined how complex clinical skills--such as patient management skills--develop with increasing levels of competence. The Reporter-Interpreter-Manager-Educator framework was used to reflect this change and construct validity was explored for RIME-based evaluations of single-patient encounters. In the third study the effects of training in pairs--also known as dyad practice--examined. This study showed that the students practicing in pairs significantly out-performed those training alone using RIME-based assessments and that dyad training significantly improved students' confidence in managing future patient encounters. The final study examined students' use of self-directed clinical encounter cards (CECs) based on the RIME framework. Results from this study showed that self-directed CECs can have positive effects on participatory practice and clinical reasoning when implemented in a supporting environment but the chance of success depends on the context of use. Self-directed CECs can be successful but major faculty development initiatives are required before implementation in large and dispersed settings. In conclusion, this thesis demonstrated different aspects of student-centered approaches to clinical skills learning. Whereas self-directed learning is difficult in clinical clerkship, the experimental studies demonstrated remarkable advantages to peer-learning in skills-lab. Thus, peer-learning activities could be essential to providing high-quality medical training in the face of limited

  19. Assessing topographical orientation skills in cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Liana; Bianchini, Filippo; Iaria, Giuseppe; Tanzilli, Antonio; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The long-term effects of cannabis on human cognition are still unclear, but, considering that cannabis is a widely used substance and, overall, its potential use in therapeutic interventions, it is important to evaluate them. We hypothesize that the discrepancies among studies could be attributed to the specific cognitive function investigated and that skills subserved by the hippocampus, such as the spatial orientation abilities and, specifically, the ability to form and use cognitive maps, should be more compromised than others. Indeed it has been showed that cannabis users have a reduced hippocampus and that the hippocampus is the brain region in which cannabis has the greatest effect since it contains the highest concentration of cannabinoid receptors. To test this hypothesis we asked 15 heavy cannabis users and 19 nonusers to perform a virtual navigational test, the CMT, that assesses the ability to form and use cognitive maps. We found that using cannabis has no effect on these hippocampus-dependent orientation skills. We discuss the implications of our findings and how they relate to evidence reported in the literature that the intervention of functional reorganization mechanisms in cannabis user allows them to cope with the cognitive demands of navigational tasks. PMID:22272167

  20. Assessing Topographical Orientation Skills in Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Liana; Bianchini, Filippo; Iaria, Giuseppe; Tanzilli, Antonio; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The long-term effects of cannabis on human cognition are still unclear, but, considering that cannabis is a widely used substance and, overall, its potential use in therapeutic interventions, it is important to evaluate them. We hypothesize that the discrepancies among studies could be attributed to the specific cognitive function investigated and that skills subserved by the hippocampus, such as the spatial orientation abilities and, specifically, the ability to form and use cognitive maps, should be more compromised than others. Indeed it has been showed that cannabis users have a reduced hippocampus and that the hippocampus is the brain region in which cannabis has the greatest effect since it contains the highest concentration of cannabinoid receptors. To test this hypothesis we asked 15 heavy cannabis users and 19 nonusers to perform a virtual navigational test, the CMT, that assesses the ability to form and use cognitive maps. We found that using cannabis has no effect on these hippocampus-dependent orientation skills. We discuss the implications of our findings and how they relate to evidence reported in the literature that the intervention of functional reorganization mechanisms in cannabis user allows them to cope with the cognitive demands of navigational tasks. PMID:22272167

  1. Soft Skills Assessment: Theory Development and the Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Soft skills have become a subject of increasing interest in lifelong learning. Soft skills development is intended to enable and enhance personal development, participation in learning and success in employment. The assessment of soft skill is therefore widely practised, but there is little in the way of research or evidence on how well this…

  2. Using the Academic Skills Inventory to Assess the Biology Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Kyle; Hurney, Carol A.; Wigtil, Clifton J.; Sundre, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    The Academic Skills Inventory (Kruger and Zechmeister, 2001) was developed at Loyola University of Chicago and originally designed for use with psychology majors. It was later extended for use in a variety of academic programs. The Academic Skills Inventory (ASI) assesses student self-reports of behaviors in 10 skill areas: (1) written and oral…

  3. Comparing Self and Expert Assessments of Counseling Skills before and after Skills Training, and upon Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepkowski, William J.; Packman, Jill; Smaby, Marlowe H.; Maddux, Cleborne

    2009-01-01

    Counselor ability to accurately self-assess their competence is important to ethical practice. However, research indicates that people in general are not reliable in judging their own competence. This study compared the self-assessments of skills of 69 counselors-in-training to the skill ratings of trained expert-raters at three points during…

  4. Feedback on students' clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Marianne; Mårtensson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim Feedback on clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education is regarded as vital in occupational therapy students' professional development. The nature of supervisors' feedback however, could be confirmative and/or corrective and corrective feedback could be with or without suggestions on how to improve. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of supervisors' feedback on final-year occupational therapy students' clinical reasoning skills through comparing the nature of feedback with the students' subsequent clinical reasoning ability. Method A mixed-method approach with a convergent parallel design was used combining the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. From focus groups and interviews with students, data were collected and analysed qualitatively to determine how the students experienced the feedback they received from their supervisors. By quantitatively comparing the final practical exam grades with the nature of the feedback, their fieldwork End-of-Term grades and average academic performance it became possible to merge the results for comparison and interpretation. Results Students' clinical reasoning skills seem to be improved through corrective feedback if accompanied by suggestions on how to improve, irrespective of their average academic performance. Supervisors were inclined to underrate high performing students and overrate lower performing students. Conclusions Students who obtained higher grades in the final practical examinations received more corrective feedback with suggestions on how to improve from their supervisors. Confirmative feedback alone may not be sufficient for improving the clinical reasoning skills of students. PMID:26256854

  5. The who and where of clinical skills teaching: a review from the UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Borneuf, Anne-Marie; Haigh, Carol

    2010-02-01

    Over the years, the debate on clinical skill acquisition in Nursing is one that has been subject to constant scrutiny within educational settings, locally and globally. Indeed, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) have endeavoured to provide some clarity with the publication of the Essential Skills Cluster statements [NMC, 2006. Advance Information Regarding Essential Skill Clusters for Preregistration Nursing Programmes (NMC Circular 35/2006). NMC, London] and the recently updated Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice [NMC, 2008. Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice: NMC Standards for Mentors, Practice Teachers and Teachers, second ed. NMC, London]. In this paper, we seek to provide a review of the evidence and debate produced thus far surrounding skills acquisition in general and the role of the nurse lecturer in particular from a UK perspective. PMID:19692151

  6. Queering know-how: clinical skill acquisition as ethical practice.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cressida J; Thachuk, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers' theoretical knowledge of "cultural competency" and patients' experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner's Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronormative principles expressed in interviews and the relative absence of skilled anti-heteronormative clinical practice can be understood as a failure to grasp the field of practice as a whole. Moving from "knowing-that" to "knowing-how" in terms of anti-heteronormative clinical skills is not only a desirable epistemological trajectory, we argue, but also a way of understanding better and worse ethical practice. PMID:25037245

  7. Yes, you can teach clinical skills in the classroom!

    PubMed

    Burton, J E; Bride, M

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the use of videotaped interviews with volunteer patients as a method of teaching interviewing skills to first and second year occupational therapy students. It is hoped that this experience will enable students to conduct interviews in clinical or community settings with greater confidence and effectiveness. PMID:10315064

  8. Augmented Reality M-Learning to Enhance Nursing Skills Acquisition in the Clinical Skills Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Bernard M.; Jackson, Cathryn; Wilson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on a pilot research project designed to explore if new mobile augmented reality (AR) technologies have the potential to enhance the learning of clinical skills in the lab. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory action-research-based pilot study was undertaken to explore an initial proof-of-concept design in…

  9. A Pharmacotherapy Capstone Course to Advance Pharmacy Students’ Clinical Documentation Skills

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ghada F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To implement and assess the effectiveness of a capstone pharmacotherapy course designed to integrate in-class curriculum using patient cases and drug-information questions. The course was intended to improve third-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students' clinical documentation skills in preparation for beginning advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. This 2-credit, semester-long course consisted of 6 patient cases and 12 drug-information questions posted electronically on an Internet-based medical chart, a public health presentation, a knowledge examination, and an objective standardized performance assessment. In class, students engaged in active-learning exercises and clinical problem-solving. Students worked outside of class in small groups to retrieve and discuss assigned articles and review medication information in preparation for in-class discussions. Assessment. A rubric was used to assess the patient cases and questions that students completed and submitted individually. Data for 4 consecutive course offerings (n=622) were then analyzed. A significant improvement was found in the “misplaced” but not the “missing” documentation ratings for both assessment and plan notes in the final assessment compared with baseline. In course evaluations, the majority of students agreed that the course integrated material across the curriculum (97%) and improved their clinical writing skills (80.5%). Conclusion. A capstone pharmacy course was successful in integrating and reviewing much of the material covered across the PharmD curriculum and in improving students’ clinical documentation skills. PMID:23049106

  10. A Perkins Challenge: Assessing Technical Skills in CTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James R., III

    2009-01-01

    Federal law requires state to develop performance measures and data-collection systems for secondary and postsecondary technical-skill attainment. This poses many challenges, such as defining a technical skills, measurement and when to assess students. In this article, the author outlines various assessment models and looks at the challenges…

  11. Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

  12. Assessing Students' Communication Skills: Validation of a Global Rating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffer, Simone; Muehlinghaus, Isabel; Froehmel, Annette; Ortwein, Heiderose

    2008-01-01

    Communication skills training is an accepted part of undergraduate medical programs nowadays. In addition to learning experiences its importance should be emphasised by performance-based assessment. As detailed checklists have been shown to be not well suited for the assessment of communication skills for different reasons, this study aimed to…

  13. Assessing clinical pragmatism.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn A

    1998-03-01

    "Clinical pragmatism" is an important new method of moral problem-solving in clinical practice. This method draws on the pragmatic philosophy of John Dewey and recommends an experimental approach to solving moral problems in clinical practice. Although the method may shed some light on how clinicians and their patients ought to interact when moral problems are at hand, it nonetheless is deficient in a number of respects. Clinical pragmatism fails to explain adequately how moral poblems can be solved experimentally, it underestimates the relevance and importance of judgment in clinical ethics, and it presents a questionable account of the role that moral principles should play in moral problem solving. PMID:11656751

  14. Developing a Measurement Strategy for Assessing Family Caregiver Skills: Conceptual Issues

    PubMed Central

    Farran, Carol J.; McCann, Judith J.; Fogg, Louis G.; Etkin, Caryn D.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a conceptual approach to assessing skills of family caregivers for persons with Alzheimer’s disease and recommends next steps for development of this science. Researchers used multiple methods to develop a conceptual strategy for assessing family caregiver skills. Study participants included clinical/outreach staff from an Alzheimer’s Disease Center, nursing faculty with expertise in dementia care, and family caregivers. Mixed methods contributed to the conceptual clarification of caregiving skill and to the development of three approaches to assessing caregiver skill: caregiver self report, clinician assessment, and direct observational assessment. Caregiver effectiveness has the potential to affect the process of caregiving and outcomes for the person with dementia and caregiver. PMID:20179779

  15. A rapid assessment of skills in young children with autism.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Dorothea C; Vorndran, Christina; Addison, Laura; Kuhn, Stephanie A

    2004-01-01

    Educational interventions based on the principles of behavior analysis are highly effective for establishing skills in young children with autism. As a first step in program development, the child's current skill level is determined by evaluating performance on tasks drawn from a preestablished curriculum. However, few specific guidelines have been delineated for conducting these skills assessments or interpreting the results. In this study, we evaluated an efficient methodology for conducting skills assessments. Six children who had been diagnosed with autism participated. The relative efficacy of two assessment packages--one containing several reinforcement procedures and one containing several potentially effective prompts--was evaluated across two to three skills for each child using multiple baseline and reversal designs. Results suggested that the methodology was useful for matching targeted skills to appropriate interventions. PMID:15154212

  16. Empirically Assessing the Importance of Computer Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This research determines which computer skills are important for entry-level accountants, and whether some skills are more important than others. Students participated before and after internships in public accounting. Longitudinal analysis is also provided; responses from 2001 are compared to those from 2008-2009. Responses are also compared to…

  17. Objective Assessment of Pharmacy Students' Interviewing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marie E.; Burpeau-Di Greggrio, Michele Y.

    1985-01-01

    The use of simulation of pharmacy student interviews with patients to teach and evaluate interviewing skills was found to be effective for both purposes and was felt by the students to be more objective than other methods for evaluating their own skills. The content checklists and interview rating instrument are appended. (MSE)

  18. Chart Review Skills: A Dimension of Clinical Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Axel A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A study of undergraduate medical students' abilities to identify salient information in reviewing patient charts was conducted at Southern Illinois University. Specific goals were to develop and test a method for assessing chart skills and to test several hypotheses that examine the effect of certain factors on chart review performance.…

  19. Medical simulation: the new tool for training and skill assessment.

    PubMed

    Carroll, John D; Messenger, John C

    2008-01-01

    Medical simulation is a new method to facilitate skill training and assessment. Simulation has achieved a high degree of sophistication in aviation and other fields. However, the complexity of health care, the numerous stakeholders, and the lack of central control of medical education have been barriers to the development and broad implementation of medical simulation. Acceptance by the medical community is growing, with the publication of scientific validation studies, the development of economic models and funding, and the integration of simulation into existing curricula and training programs. The major forces for implementing simulation will most likely come from the medical device industry and from institutions with mandates to improve the quality of health care and enhance patient safety. Certification boards are expected to increase their utilization of simulation technology to objectively assess proficiency of skills relevant to physicians and the health care system. Medical simulation has made the transition from an experimental technology to the clinical world, and the next five to 10 years may be viewed as the golden age of medical simulation. PMID:18192765

  20. Towards an Integrated Model for Developing Sustainable Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastre, Greet M. J.; van der Klink, Marcel R.; Sluijsmans, Dominique; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of current education is to ensure that graduates can act as independent lifelong learners. Graduates need to be able to assess their own learning and interpret assessment results. The central question in this article is how to acquire sustainable assessment skills, enabling students to assess their performance and learning…

  1. Developing Employability Skills: Peer Assessment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Reports examining graduate employment issues suggest that employers are concerned by the lack of employability skills exhibited by entry-level job applications. It is also suggested that employers consider it the responsibility of educational institutions to develop such skills. The current study seeks to identify peer assessment as a…

  2. Social Skills Assessment of Indian Children with Visual Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Sushama; Sigafoos, Jeff; Carroll, Annemaree

    2000-01-01

    A study used the Matson Evaluation of Social Skills with Youngsters (MESSY) to assess social skills in 200 Indian children with visual impairments. The factor structure for the resulting 50-item Hindi MESSY was highly comparable to four of the five original factors of the English version of the MESSY. (Contains references.) (CR)

  3. Constructing Items for Assessing English Writing Skills. Technical Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Ann

    Specifying and writing appropriate items for student writing assessments is an exacting task. All too frequently, however, teachers approach this task by reading a skill statement and hurriedly writing a few items with correct answers combined with several distractors. This approach disregards the essentials of isolating a single skill for…

  4. Assessment of Anger Coping Skills in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, P.; Brace, N.; Phillips, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent controlled studies have supported the effectiveness of anger management training for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This report describes an evaluation instrument designed to assess their usage of specific anger coping skills. The Profile of Anger Coping Skills (PACS) is designed for completion by a staff member or carer.…

  5. Assessing Transition Skills in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Dawn A.; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Hirano, Kara; Alverson, Charlotte Y.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the demanding 21st-century workforce, local education agencies are beginning to refocus and retool to ensure students with disabilities have the knowledge and skills to be productive adults and attain positive postschool outcomes. The skills 21st-century transition assessments address are relevant to teachers and students given the…

  6. Clinical scenarios: enhancing the skill set of the nurse as a vigilant guardian.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese; Belcher, Erin; Sarr, Barbara; Riutta, Emily; Ferrier, Jennifer Douglas; Botten, Mary A

    2010-08-01

    Patient safety is enhanced when nursing staff recognize and respond to subtle changes in a patient's condition. In this quality improvement project, simulated clinical scenarios were conducted with staff nurses on a multi-specialty surgical unit. Scenarios were developed from actual patient situations as well as from calls to the rapid response team. Nurses were given the opportunity to practice assessment, critical thinking, and communication skills. Pre- and post-project surveys were used to assess nurses' perceived level of confidence and skill in handling emergency situations. Post-project survey data showed that nurses perceived that the scenario exercises improved their confidence and skill in managing critical patient situations. In addition, the findings supported the continued use of the scenarios as a teaching strategy. The scenarios have increased nurses' awareness of early signs of patients' conditions deteriorating and have the potential to decrease the number of patient situations that escalate to emergencies. PMID:20666355

  7. Students' experiences of learning manual clinical skills through simulation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Eva; Silén, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Håkan

    2013-03-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and thoughts about their learning through simulation skills training. The study was designed for an educational setting at a clinical skills centre. Ten third-year undergraduate nursing students performed urethral catheterisation, using the virtual reality simulator UrecathVision™, which has haptic properties. The students practised in pairs. Each session was videotaped and the video was used to stimulate recall in subsequent interviews. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis from interviews resulted in three themes: what the students learn, how the students learn, and the simulator's contribution to the students' learning. Students learned manual skills, how to perform the procedure, and professional behaviour. They learned by preparing, watching, practising and reflecting. The simulator contributed by providing opportunities for students to prepare for the skills training, to see anatomical structures, to feel resistance, and to become aware of their own performance ability. The findings show that the students related the task to previous experiences, used sensory information, tested themselves and practised techniques in a hands-on fashion, and reflected in and on action. The simulator was seen as a facilitator to learning the manual skills. The study design, with students working in pairs combined with video recording, was found to enhance opportunities for reflection. PMID:22395307

  8. EQClinic: a platform for learning communication skills in clinical consultations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunfeng; Scott, Karen M.; Lim, Renee L.; Taylor, Silas; Calvo, Rafael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Doctors’ verbal and non-verbal communication skills have an impact on patients’ health outcomes, so it is important for medical students to develop these skills. Traditional, non-verbal communication skills training can involve a tutor manually annotating a student's non-verbal behaviour during patient–doctor consultations, but this is very time-consuming. Tele-conference systems have been used in verbal communication skills training. Methods We describe EQClinic, a system that enables verbal and non-verbal communication skills training during tele-consultations with simulated patients (SPs), with evaluation exercises promoting reflection. Students and SPs can have tele-consultations through the tele-consultation component. In this component, SPs can provide feedback to students through a thumbs-up/ thumbs-down tool and a comments box. EQClinic automatically analyses communication features in the recorded consultations, such as facial expressions, and provides graphical representations. Our 2015 pilot study investigated whether EQClinic helped students be aware of their non-verbal behaviour and improve their communication skills, and evaluated the usability of the platform. Students received automated feedback, and SP and tutor evaluations, and then completed self-assessment and reflection questionnaires. Results Eight medical students and three SPs conducted 13 tele-consultations using EQClinic. More students paid attention to their non-verbal communication and students who were engaged in two consultations felt more confident in their second consultation. Students rated the system positively, felt comfortable using it (5.9/7), and reported that the structure (5.4/7) and information (5.8/7) were clear. This pilot provides evidence that EQClinic helps, and positively influences, medical students practise their communication skills with SPs using a tele-conference platform. Discussion It is not easy to improve non-verbal communication skills in a

  9. Discussion of skill improvement in marine ecosystem dynamic models based on parameter optimization and skill assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcheng; Shi, Honghua; Liu, Yongzhi; Li, Fen; Ding, Dewen

    2015-12-01

    Marine ecosystem dynamic models (MEDMs) are important tools for the simulation and prediction of marine ecosystems. This article summarizes the methods and strategies used for the improvement and assessment of MEDM skill, and it attempts to establish a technical framework to inspire further ideas concerning MEDM skill improvement. The skill of MEDMs can be improved by parameter optimization (PO), which is an important step in model calibration. An efficient approach to solve the problem of PO constrained by MEDMs is the global treatment of both sensitivity analysis and PO. Model validation is an essential step following PO, which validates the efficiency of model calibration by analyzing and estimating the goodness-of-fit of the optimized model. Additionally, by focusing on the degree of impact of various factors on model skill, model uncertainty analysis can supply model users with a quantitative assessment of model confidence. Research on MEDMs is ongoing; however, improvement in model skill still lacks global treatments and its assessment is not integrated. Thus, the predictive performance of MEDMs is not strong and model uncertainties lack quantitative descriptions, limiting their application. Therefore, a large number of case studies concerning model skill should be performed to promote the development of a scientific and normative technical framework for the improvement of MEDM skill.

  10. Discussion of skill improvement in marine ecosystem dynamic models based on parameter optimization and skill assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcheng; Shi, Honghua; Liu, Yongzhi; Li, Fen; Ding, Dewen

    2016-07-01

    Marine ecosystem dynamic models (MEDMs) are important tools for the simulation and prediction of marine ecosystems. This article summarizes the methods and strategies used for the improvement and assessment of MEDM skill, and it attempts to establish a technical framework to inspire further ideas concerning MEDM skill improvement. The skill of MEDMs can be improved by parameter optimization (PO), which is an important step in model calibration. An efficient approach to solve the problem of PO constrained by MEDMs is the global treatment of both sensitivity analysis and PO. Model validation is an essential step following PO, which validates the efficiency of model calibration by analyzing and estimating the goodness-of-fit of the optimized model. Additionally, by focusing on the degree of impact of various factors on model skill, model uncertainty analysis can supply model users with a quantitative assessment of model confidence. Research on MEDMs is ongoing; however, improvement in model skill still lacks global treatments and its assessment is not integrated. Thus, the predictive performance of MEDMs is not strong and model uncertainties lack quantitative descriptions, limiting their application. Therefore, a large number of case studies concerning model skill should be performed to promote the development of a scientific and normative technical framework for the improvement of MEDM skill.

  11. Research Currents: Assessing Sub-Rosa Skills in Children's Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Perry

    1984-01-01

    Discusses examples of peer social interaction and language play among fourth through sixth graders. Suggests that these sub-rosa skills be taken into consideration during classroom assessment of language competence and development. (HTH)

  12. Assessing system operation skills in robotic surgery trainees

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jog, Amod; Malpani, Anand; Vagvolgyi, Balazs; Yuh, David; Nguyen, Hiep; Hager, Gregory; Grace Chen, Chi Chiung

    2012-01-01

    Background With increased use of robotic surgery in specialties including urology, development of training methods has also intensified. However, current approaches lack the ability of discriminating operational and surgical skills. Methods An automated recording system was used to longitudinally (monthly) acquire instrument motion/telemetry and video and for 4 basic surgical skills -- suturing, manipulation, transection, and dissection. Statistical models were then developed to discriminate the human-machine skill differences between practicing expert surgeons and trainees. Results Data from 6 trainee and 2 experts was analyzed to validate the first ever statistical models of operational skills, and demonstrate classification with very high accuracy (91.7% for masters, and 88.2% for camera motion) and sensitivity. Conclusions We report on our longitudinal study aimed at tracking robotic surgery trainees to proficiency, and methods capable of objectively assessing operational and technical skills that would be used in assessing trainee progress at the participating institutions. PMID:22114003

  13. Core Skills Assessment to Improve Mathematical Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat

    2013-01-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these…

  14. Results of the Student Skills Assessment Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamberts, Julie; Ellison, Jim

    Surveys of 150 full-time faculty and a stratified sample of 1,111 full- and part-time students at Lane Community College were conducted in order to obtain information on the skill levels of students, as perceived by faculty, and on educational needs and availability of information on student services, as perceived by students. A majority of both…

  15. Developing and Assessing College Student Teamwork Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Richard L.; Jones, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    Some form of team-oriented work is employed in most, if not all, organizations today. It would seem, then, that an important role for higher education should involve developing critical teamwork skills among students so as to prepare them for success in life. This very point was highlighted in a 2009 poll conducted on behalf of the Association of…

  16. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: II clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mason, T; Coyle, D; Lovell, A

    2008-03-01

    This study reports on research undertaken to identify the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses working in secure psychiatric services in the UK. The rationale for this research is the lack of clarity in the role definition of nurses working in these environments and the specific content that may underscore the curriculum for training forensic nurses. Over 3300 questionnaires were distributed to forensic psychiatric nurses, non-forensic psychiatric nurses and other disciplines and information obtained on (1) the perceived clinical problems that give forensic nurses the most difficulty; (2) the skills best suited to overcome those problems; and (3) the priority aspects of clinical nursing care that needs to be developed. A 35% response rate was obtained with 1019 forensic psychiatric nurses, 110 non-forensic psychiatric nurses and 43 other disciplines. The results highlighted a 'top ten' list of main problems with possible solutions and main areas for development. The conclusions drawn include a focus on skills and competencies regarding the management of personality disorders and the management of violence and aggression. PMID:18211560

  17. Summative clinical competency assessment: A survey of ultrasound practitioners’ views

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical competency and the assessment of core skills is a crucial element of any programme leading to an award with a clinical skills component. This has become a more prominent feature of current reports on quality health care provision. This project aimed to determine ultrasound practitioners’ opinions about how best to assess clinical competency. An on-line questionnaire was sent to contacts from the Consortium for the Accreditation of Sonographic Education and details distributed at the British Medical Ultrasound Society conference in 2011. One hundred and sixteen responses were received from a range of clinical staff with an interest in ultrasound assessment. The majority of respondents suggested that competency assessments should take place in the clinical departments with or without an element of assessment at the education centre. Moderation was an important area highlighted by respondents, with 84% of respondents suggesting that two assessors were required and 66% of those stating some element of external moderation should be included. The findings suggest that respondents’ preference is for some clinical competency assessments to take place on routine lists within the clinical department, assessed by two people one of which would be an external assessor. In view of recent reports relating to training and assessment of health care professionals, the ultrasound profession needs to begin the debate about how best to assess clinical competence and ensure appropriate first post-competency of anyone undertaking ultrasound examinations.

  18. Using Peer Assessment To Develop Skills and Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juwah, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Presents the use of a seven-stage peer assessment process and peer learning in an online, constructivist, higher education distance learning context to develop desired skills and capabilities. Authentic assessments included case studies, projects, critique and portfolio of evidence. Discusses assessment in a system of constructive alignment…

  19. Skill Learning Through Early Clinical Exposure: An Experience of Indian Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Jagzape, Arunita; Srivastava, Tripti; Gotarkar, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Indian Medical curriculum being discipline based, there is a line of demarcation between preclinical and clinical subjects. The challenges in medical education include the methods that would enhance the clinical education quality; one such method been Early Clinical Exposure (ECE). ECE can help to instill the skill component of medical education in the first year students helping to minimize the line of demarcation. Hence this study was undertaken to assess the skill learning of students through early clinical exposure and to collate the perception of them. Materials and Methods: In the present study, students of 1st MBBS were exposed to ECE as an adjunct teaching method with preset modules. They were evaluated by Objectively Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Feedback was obtained from 1st MBBS and also from the same students after passing the 1st MBBS in 4th semester. Results Significant differences in pre and post OSCE scores were noted (p<0.0001). Seventy six percent students rated ECE as an excellent tool. Second year students also perceived ECE held in 1st year was helpful to correlate topics and increasing confidence. Conclusion ECE had an effective influence on learning as manifested in skills gained by the students and their perceptions of ECE being helpful prospectively in their routine clinical posting. PMID:26894088

  20. How Effective Are Self- and Peer Assessment of Oral Presentation Skills Compared with Teachers' Assessments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Grez, Luc; Valcke, Martin; Roozen, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of oral presentation skills is an underexplored area. The study described here focuses on the agreement between professional assessment and self- and peer assessment of oral presentation skills and explores student perceptions about peer assessment. The study has the merit of paying attention to the inter-rater reliability of the…

  1. Clinical program leadership: skill requirements for contemporary leaders.

    PubMed

    Spallina, Joseph M

    2002-01-01

    With knowledge of these leadership requirements and a shrinking base of experienced managers, healthcare organizations and professional societies have little choice in their approach to prepare for the leadership development challenges of the future. Organizations will focus leadership development, training, and continuing management education on integrating business tools and skills into clinical program management. The management requirements for clinical programs will continue to grow in complexity and the number of qualified managers will continue to diminish, New approaches to solving this shortage will evolve. Professional, forprofit companies, healthcare provider organizations, and academic programs will develop clinical program management training tracks. Organizations that create solutions to this management imperative will maintain their competitive edge in the challenging times that will greet the industry in the future. PMID:12068993

  2. Assessing Patients’ Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Daniel R.; Hollars, Shannon N.; Adler, Abby D.; Goldstein, Lizabeth A.; Braun, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients’ skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions. PMID:25408560

  3. Assessing Patients' Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniel R; Hollars, Shannon N; Adler, Abby D; Goldstein, Lizabeth A; Braun, Justin D

    2014-10-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients' skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions. PMID:25408560

  4. Cross-platform digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A variety of structured assessment tools for use in surgical training have been reported, but extant assessment tools often employ paper-based rating forms. Digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills could potentially offer advantages over paper-based forms, especially in complex assessment situations. In this paper, we report on the development of cross-platform digital assessment forms for use with multiple raters in order to facilitate the automatic processing of surgical skills assessments that include structured ratings. The FileMaker 13 platform was used to create a database containing the digital assessment forms, because this software has cross-platform functionality on both desktop computers and handheld devices. The database is hosted online, and the rating forms can therefore also be accessed through most modern web browsers. Cross-platform digital assessment forms were developed for the rating of surgical skills. The database platform used in this study was reasonably priced, intuitive for the user, and flexible. The forms have been provided online as free downloads that may serve as the basis for further development or as inspiration for future efforts. In conclusion, digital assessment forms can be used for the structured rating of surgical skills and have the potential to be especially useful in complex assessment situations with multiple raters, repeated assessments in various times and locations, and situations requiring substantial subsequent data processing or complex score calculations. PMID:25959653

  5. Core skills assessment to improve mathematical competency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Fhloinn, Eabhnat Ní

    2013-12-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these problems; instead, they struggle through their degree, carrying a serious handicap of poor core mathematical skills, as confirmed by exploratory testing of final year students. In order to improve these skills, a pilot project was set up in which a 'module' in core mathematics was developed. The course material was basic, but 90% or higher was required to pass. Students were allowed to repeat this module throughout the year by completing an automated examination on WebCT populated by a question bank. Subsequent to the success of this pilot with third-year mechanical engineering students, the project was extended to five different engineering programmes, across three different year-groups. Full results and analysis of this project are presented, including responses to interviews carried out with a selection of the students involved.

  6. Transfer of Communication Skills to the Workplace during Clinical Rounds: Impact of a Program for Residents

    PubMed Central

    Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Bragard, Isabelle; Delvaux, Nicole; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Marchal, Serge; Meunier, Julie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. Methods Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm). Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. Results Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median = 92) compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median = 88) (p = .046). Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR)  = 1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI)  = 1.02–1.34; p = .023). Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR = 1.01; 95%CI = 1.01–1.02; p = .018) and supportive utterances (RR = 0.99; 95%CI = 0.98–1.00; p = .042) (respectively 1.15 (RR), 1.08–1.23 (95%CI), p<.001 for empathy and 0.95 (RR), 0.92–0.99 (95%CI), p = .012 for reassurance) was proportional to the number of hours of training attendance. Conclusion The training program improved patients' satisfaction and allowed the transfer of residents' communication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to

  7. Model of practical skill performance as an instrument for supervision and formative assessment.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Carsten; Sommer, Irene; Larsen, Karin; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2013-05-01

    There are still weaknesses in the practical skills of newly graduated nurses. There is also an escalating pressure on existing clinical placements due to increasing student numbers and structural changes in health services. Innovative educational practices and the use of tools that might support learning are sparsely researched in the field of clinical education for nursing students. This paper reports on an action research study that promoted and investigated use of The Model of Practical Skill Performance as a learning tool during nursing students' clinical placement. Clinical supervisors and two cohorts of nursing students placed in a hospital setting shared their experiences on the use of the model in six focus group interviews. Data was also generated through the supervisors' reflective logs. The model was viewed as highly applicable in the planning of learning situations as well as during practice, performance and formative assessment of practical skills learning. It provided a common language about practical skills and enhanced the participants' understanding of professionalism in practical nursing skill. In conclusion, the model helped to highlight the complexity in mastering practical skills, afforded help in sequencing a learning process that supported the novice, and contributed to a more nuanced feedback by supervisors. PMID:23021010

  8. The Use of Structured Imagery and Dispositional Measurement to Assess Situational Use of Mindfulness Skills

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan C.; Bach, Patricia A.; Cassisi, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent proliferation of studies on mindfulness produced varying theoretical models, each based in part on how mindfulness is assessed. These models agree, however, that mindfulness encompasses moment-to-moment or situational experiences. Incongruence between dispositional and situational assessment would be problematic for theory and empirical research. In particular, it remains to be established whether situational measurement is an accurate method for mindfulness assessment and whether dispositional measures are able to accurately detect mindfulness skills in various situations. The association between dispositional and situational mindfulness processes (i.e., situational attention awareness and emotion acceptance) was examined in two studies. In Study 1 (N = 148), independent groups who reported high and low levels of dispositional mindfulness skills were compared on a continuous measure of situational mindfulness skills. In Study 2 (N = 317), dispositional mindfulness questionnaires were used to predict situational use of mindfulness skills. Results suggest not only that situational measures accurately detect use of mindfulness skills, but also that dispositional measures can predict one’s use of situational mindfulness skills. Findings from both studies were consistent across both positive and negative situations. Moreover, neither neuroticism nor extraversion was shown to have a moderating effect on the relationship between dispositional and situational use of mindfulness skills. The implications of these findings for clinical practice and future investigations pertaining to measurement validity in this area are discussed. PMID:23936175

  9. Development of a Virtual Reality Assessment of Everyday Living Skills

    PubMed Central

    Ruse, Stacy A.; Davis, Vicki G.; Atkins, Alexandra S.; Krishnan, K. Ranga R.; Fox, Kolleen H.; Harvey, Philip D.; Keefe, Richard S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairments affect the majority of patients with schizophrenia and these impairments predict poor long term psychosocial outcomes.  Treatment studies aimed at cognitive impairment in patients with schizophrenia not only require demonstration of improvements on cognitive tests, but also evidence that any cognitive changes lead to clinically meaningful improvements.  Measures of “functional capacity” index the extent to which individuals have the potential to perform skills required for real world functioning.  Current data do not support the recommendation of any single instrument for measurement of functional capacity.  The Virtual Reality Functional Capacity Assessment Tool (VRFCAT) is a novel, interactive gaming based measure of functional capacity that uses a realistic simulated environment to recreate routine activities of daily living. Studies are currently underway to evaluate and establish the VRFCAT’s sensitivity, reliability, validity, and practicality. This new measure of functional capacity is practical, relevant, easy to use, and has several features that improve validity and sensitivity of measurement of function in clinical trials of patients with CNS disorders. PMID:24798174

  10. Development of a virtual reality assessment of everyday living skills.

    PubMed

    Ruse, Stacy A; Davis, Vicki G; Atkins, Alexandra S; Krishnan, K Ranga R; Fox, Kolleen H; Harvey, Philip D; Keefe, Richard S E

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairments affect the majority of patients with schizophrenia and these impairments predict poor long term psychosocial outcomes.  Treatment studies aimed at cognitive impairment in patients with schizophrenia not only require demonstration of improvements on cognitive tests, but also evidence that any cognitive changes lead to clinically meaningful improvements.  Measures of "functional capacity" index the extent to which individuals have the potential to perform skills required for real world functioning.  Current data do not support the recommendation of any single instrument for measurement of functional capacity.  The Virtual Reality Functional Capacity Assessment Tool (VRFCAT) is a novel, interactive gaming based measure of functional capacity that uses a realistic simulated environment to recreate routine activities of daily living. Studies are currently underway to evaluate and establish the VRFCAT's sensitivity, reliability, validity, and practicality. This new measure of functional capacity is practical, relevant, easy to use, and has several features that improve validity and sensitivity of measurement of function in clinical trials of patients with CNS disorders. PMID:24798174

  11. Skill Assessment in the Interpretation of 3D Fracture Patterns from Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Murillo, Salvador; Hanley, Jessica M; Kreiter, Clarence D; Karam, Matthew D; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Interpreting two-dimensional radiographs to ascertain the three-dimensional (3D) position and orientation of fracture planes and bone fragments is an important component of orthopedic diagnosis and clinical management. This skill, however, has not been thoroughly explored and measured. Our primary research question is to determine if 3D radiographic image interpretation can be reliably assessed, and whether this assessment varies by level of training. A test designed to measure this skill among orthopedic surgeons would provide a quantitative benchmark for skill assessment and training research. Methods Two tests consisting of a series of online exercises were developed to measure this skill. Each exercise displayed a pair of musculoskeletal radiographs. Participants selected one of three CT slices of the same or similar fracture patterns that best matched the radiographs. In experiment 1, 10 orthopedic residents and staff responded to nine questions. In experiment 2, 52 residents from both orthopedics and radiology responded to 12 questions. Results Experiment 1 yielded a Cronbach alpha of 0.47. Performance correlated with experience; r(8) = 0.87, p<0.01, suggesting that the test could be both valid and reliable with a slight increase in test length. In experiment 2, after removing three non-discriminating items, the Cronbach coefficient alpha was 0.28 and performance correlated with experience; r(50) = 0.25, p<0.10. Conclusions Although evidence for reliability and validity was more compelling with the first experiment, the analyses suggest motivation and test duration are important determinants of test efficacy. The interpretation of radiographs to discern 3D information is a promising and a relatively unexplored area for surgical skill education and assessment. The online test was useful and reliable. Further test development is likely to increase test effectiveness. Clinical Relevance Accurately interpreting radiographic images is an

  12. Clinical Research Careers: Reports from a NHLBI Pediatric Heart Network Clinical Research Skills Development Conference

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wyman W.; Richmond, Marc; Li, Jennifer S.; Saul, J. Philip; Mital, Seema; Colan, Steven D.; Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; McCrindle, Brain W.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Marino, Bradley S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Pearson, Gail D.; Evans, Frank; Scott, Jane D.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Wyman W. Lai, MD, MPH, and Victoria L. Vetter, MD, MPH. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), funded under the U.S. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH–NHLBI), includes two Clinical Research Skills Development (CRSD) Cores, which were awarded to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and to the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York–Presbyterian. To provide information on how to develop a clinical research career to a larger number of potential young investigators in pediatric cardiology, the directors of these two CRSD Cores jointly organized a one-day seminar for fellows and junior faculty from all of the PHN Core sites. The participants included faculty members from the PHN and the NHLBI. The day-long seminar was held on April 29, 2009, at the NHLBI site, immediately preceding the PHN Steering Committee meeting in Bethesda, MD. Methods The goals of the seminar were 1) to provide fellows and early investigators with basic skills in clinical research 2) to provide a forum for discussion of important research career choices 3) to introduce attendees to each other and to established clinical researchers in pediatric cardiology, and 4) to publish a commentary on the future of clinical research in pediatric cardiology. Results The following chapters are compilations of the talks given at the 2009 PHN Clinical Research Skills Development Seminar, published to share the information provided with a broader audience of those interested in learning how to develop a clinical research career in pediatric cardiology. The discussions of types of clinical research, research skills, career development strategies, funding, and career management are applicable to research careers in other areas of clinical medicine as well. Conclusions The aim of this compilation is to stimulate those who might be interested in the research career options available to investigators. PMID:21167335

  13. Does Computer-Based Motor Skill Assessment Training Transfer to Live Assessing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.; Taliaferro, Andrea; Krause, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Developing competency in motor skill assessment has been identified as a critical need in physical educator preparation. We conducted this study to evaluate (a) the effectiveness of a web-based instructional program--Motor Skill Assessment Program (MSAP)--for developing assessment competency, and specifically (b) whether competency developed by…

  14. Assessing Job Knowledge and Generally Useful Skills of Young Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmann, J. Stanley

    1977-01-01

    Discusses data collection and presents data analysis of NAEP's (National Assessment of Educational Progress) career and occupational development (COD) assessment, designed to determine how knowledgeable young Americans are about the work of the world and how well developed their basic skills (needed to obtain almost any job) are. (SH) Aspect of…

  15. Assessing Gross Motor Skills of Kosovar Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shala, Merita

    2009-01-01

    In the light of the new developments in preschool education in Kosovo, this study attempts to carry out an assessment of the development of gross motor skills of preschool children attending institutional education. The emphasis is on creating a set of tests to measure the motor attainments of these children by conducting assessments of the…

  16. Assessment of Inquiry Skills in the SAILS Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Inquiry provides both the impetus and experience that helps students acquire problem solving and lifelong learning skills. Teachers on the Strategies for Assessment of Inquiry Learning in Science Project (SAILS) strengthened their inquiry pedagogy, through focusing on seeking assessment evidence for formative action. This paper reports on both the…

  17. Investigating Secondary School Students' Unmediated Peer Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsivitanidou, Olia E.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Hovardas, Tasos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate secondary school students' unmediated peer assessment skills. Specifically, 36 seventh graders, without receiving any kind of support, were anonymously assigned to reciprocally assess their peers' science web-portfolios. Additionally, students' attitudes towards and intentions about the use of…

  18. Developing Enterprise Skills through Peer-Assessed Pitch Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of using summative peer assessment to develop enterprise skills within higher education. Design/methodology/approach: An empirical investigation analysing students own perceptions of the peer assessment process to evaluate its impact. Findings: Participating students indicate that…

  19. Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills. The Classroom Strategies Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano, Robert J.; Heflebower, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As the 21st century unfolds, the pace of change in the world is accelerating. Teachers and administrators must lead the cultural shift required to ensure their students can survive and thrive in the changing world. In Teaching & Assessing 21st Century Skills the authors present a model of instruction and assessment based on a combination of…

  20. Competency Assessment in Senior Emergency Medicine Residents for Core Ultrasound Skills

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jessica N.; Kendall, John; Smalley, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Quality resident education in point-of-care ultrasound (POC US) is becoming increasingly important in emergency medicine (EM); however, the best methods to evaluate competency in graduating residents has not been established. We sought to design and implement a rigorous assessment of image acquisition and interpretation in POC US in a cohort of graduating residents at our institution. Methods We evaluated nine senior residents in both image acquisition and image interpretation for five core US skills (focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST), aorta, echocardiogram (ECHO), pelvic, central line placement). Image acquisition, using an observed clinical skills exam (OSCE) directed assessment with a standardized patient model. Image interpretation was measured with a multiple-choice exam including normal and pathologic images. Results Residents performed well on image acquisition for core skills with an average score of 85.7% for core skills and 74% including advanced skills (ovaries, advanced ECHO, advanced aorta). Residents scored well but slightly lower on image interpretation with an average score of 76%. Conclusion Senior residents performed well on core POC US skills as evaluated with a rigorous assessment tool. This tool may be developed further for other EM programs to use for graduating resident evaluation. PMID:26594291

  1. Assessment of Social Communication Skills in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landa, Rebecca J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper orients the reader to social communication assessment and reviews methods for assessing social communication behavior in children from toddlerhood through the preschool years. Most standardized, normed tests of language in this age range focus on morpho-syntactic and semantic comprehension and production abilities. While social…

  2. Notes from the Field: Residents' Perceptions of Simulation-Based Skills Assessment in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Abigail Ford; Niles, Paulomi; Lerner, Veronica; Zabar, Sondra; Szyld, Demian; Squires, Allison

    2016-03-01

    Simulation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN) training captures a range of interpersonal, cognitive, and technical skills. However, trainee perspectives on simulation-based assessment remain unexplored. After an observed structured clinical examination (OSCE) simulation hybrid exam, two focus groups of residents were conducted. Analysis grounded in a thematic coding guided the qualitative research process. Responses suggest a valuation of cognitive and technical skills over interpersonal skills. Realism was seen as critical and residents perceived the assessment as more valuable for the educator than the learner. Feedback was highly valued. Resident perspectives on this exam give insight into their perceptions of simulation-based assessment as well as their conceptions of their own learning through simulations. PMID:25511557

  3. Assessing family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Farran, Carol J.; Fogg, Louis G.; McCann, Judith J.; Etkin, Caryn; Dong, Xinqi; Barnes, Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This measurement study operationalized family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by testing a Caregiver Assessment of Behavioral Skill-Self Report measure (CAB-SR). Method A cross-sectional design was used. Caregivers had a family member with possible/probable AD, resided at home with the care recipient and provided the majority of care (N=82). The mail-administered assessment included the CAB-SR and other care recipient and caregiver measures. Results Preliminary CAB-SR reliability and validity were determined, using reliability, factor analytic and correlational procedures. Conclusion This measure provides a preliminary assessment of caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of AD and shows promise for use in research and clinical intervention settings. PMID:21500018

  4. Educational assessment of mathematics skills and abilities.

    PubMed

    Bryant, B R; Rivera, D P

    1997-01-01

    Mathematics assessments play a valuable role in identifying students' strengths and weaknesses and in developing and monitoring instructional practice. Over the last century, mathematics assessment has been refined as math content has changed as a result of curriculum reform. Today, researchers and practitioners use various assessment techniques to (a) identify students who have mathematics learning disabilities (LD), (b) target individual strengths and weaknesses across mathematics areas, (c) document the effects of mathematics instruction in a remedial or special program, (d) identify strategies that students employ during math activities, (e) conduct research about the characteristics of students with math LD, and (f) examine the technical characteristics of mathematics tests. This article provides an historical overview of the development of mathematics assessment and a description of specific strategies for conducting math evaluations. PMID:9009875

  5. Clinical competence in pain assessment.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, B; Jakobsson, E; Haljamäe, H

    2000-10-01

    Our knowledge about the content of the clinical knowledge used by nurses in a surgical recovery unit for assessment of postoperative pain is fairly limited. The aim of the present study was to analyse and describe the variations of nurses' conceptions of the impact of clinical experience on competence in post-operative pain assessment. The informants consist of critical care nurses. A phenomenographical approach has been applied to tape-recorded interview data. The results reveal that clinical competence in pain assessment was described in three categories: (a) to be able to see; (b) to be able to differentiate; (c) to be able to give. The observations articulate what nurses perceive that they have learnt from experience in performing many clinical pain assessments and point to some difficulties in using a single-data source for the development of valid and truthful professional knowledge. In the development of professional experience, it is of the utmost importance to be able to change perspective from what is most frequent and general to what is special and unique, to base one's standpoint on the individual patient's experience and integrate this with previous professional experience. PMID:11000601

  6. Clinical Vignettes Improve Performance in Anatomy Practical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikah, December S. K.; Finn, Gabrielle M.; Swamy, Meenakshi; White, Pamela M.; McLachlan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Although medical curricula now adopt an integrated teaching approach, this is not adequately reflected in assessment of anatomy knowledge and skills. In this study, we aimed to explore the impact of the addition of clinical vignette to item stems on students' performance in anatomy practical examinations. In this study, 129 undergraduate medical…

  7. Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos. Results 411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (p < 0.05). One-thirds of those surveyed accessed the video clips using mobile devices; they agreed more with the statement that it was convenient to access the video clips than their peers who accessed the videos using computers (p < 0.05). Still, students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos. Conclusions The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources. PMID:24650290

  8. Assessing Teaching Skills with a Mobile Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David

    2013-01-01

    Because mobile technologies are overtaking personal computers as the primary tools of Internet access, and cloud-based resources are fundamentally transforming the world's knowledge, new forms of teaching and assessment are required to foster 21st century literacies, including those needed by K-12 teachers. A key feature of mobile technology…

  9. Assessing Teacher Skills: Necessary Component of Individualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laval S.

    1974-01-01

    The Hempstead schools on Long Island are among the nation's most progressive. The district has been cited by the USOE for its exemplary compensatory program. The system was individualized, but the quality of instruction could not be determined until each teacher was assessed. To do this, the district used a teaching survey instrument called the…

  10. Measuring children's social skills using microcomputer-based videodisc assessment.

    PubMed

    Irvin, L K; Walker, H M; Noell, J; Singer, G H; Irvine, A B; Marquez, K; Britz, B

    1992-10-01

    This article describes the development of a microcomputer-based videodisc assessment prototype for measuring children's social skills. The theoretical and empirical foundations for the content are described, and the contributions of interactive microcomputer-based video technology to assessment of children with handicaps are detailed. An application of Goldfried and D'Zurilla's "behavior-analytic" approach to development of the content of assessments is presented, and the related video and computer technology development is detailed. The article describes the conceptual foundations of the psychometrics of the assessment prototype as well as the psychometric methodology that was employed throughout the development process. Finally, a discussion of the potential applications and implications of the social skills assessment prototype is included. PMID:1417710

  11. Assessing clinical competency in the health sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarella, Karen Joanne

    To test the success of integrated curricula in schools of health sciences, meaningful measurements of student performance are required to assess clinical competency. This research project analyzed a new performance assessment tool, the Integrated Standardized Patient Examination (ISPE), for assessing clinical competency: specifically, to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' clinical competence as the ability to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical communication skills. Thirty-four DPT students performed two ISPE cases, one of a patient who sustained a stroke and the other a patient with a herniated lumbar disc. Cases were portrayed by standardized patients (SPs) in a simulated clinical setting. Each case was scored by an expert evaluator in the exam room and then by one investigator and the students themselves via videotape. The SPs scored each student on an overall encounter rubric. Written feedback was obtained from all participants in the study. Acceptable reliability was demonstrated via inter-rater agreement as well as inter-rater correlations on items that used a dichotomous scale, whereas the items requiring the use of the 4-point rubric were somewhat less reliable. For the entire scale both cases had a significant correlation between the Expert-Investigator pair of raters, for the CVA case r = .547, p < .05 and for the HD case r = .700, p < .01. The SPs scored students higher than the other raters. Students' self-assessments were most closely aligned with the investigator. Effects were apparent due to case. Content validity was gathered in the process of developing cases and patient scenarios that were used in this study. Construct validity was obtained from the survey results analyzed from the experts and students. Future studies should examine the effect of rater training upon the reliability. Criterion or predictive validity could be further studied by comparing students' performances on the ISPE with other independent estimates

  12. Assessing the Writing Skill of Prospective English Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, Ramon; Hulme, Gale

    The basic communication skills of prospective teachers at the University of Georgia were assessed with knowledge and performance instruments. The knowledge instrument was a criterion referenced test in communicative arts (logical reasoning, library research, composition, language, communications media and careers, literature, reading, and oral…

  13. Internal Construct Validity of the Career Skills Assessment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Donald A.

    The primary purpose of this study was to provide evidence for or against the construct validity of the Career Skills Assessment Program (CSAP) instrument. A secondary purpose was to present a systematic procedure for carrying out internal construct validity studies in any testing instrument. Construct validation using confirmatory factor analysis…

  14. Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Measurement Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Ludlow, Larry H.; Casey, Beth M.; Onge, Caroline St.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the Measurement Skills Assessment (MeSA), which was designed to evaluate the mastery of measurement in elementary school students. The primary objectives for the MeSA include covering a broad range of measurement concepts, distinguishing between major subtypes of measurement, and constructing a continuum of items varying in…

  15. Smoking Assessment and Cessation Skills in the Inpatient Medicine Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Alan L.; Kleinhenz, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of 61 inpatient medical writeups by 23 third year medicine clerks found smoking history notations in 74 percent but quantification of exposure much less commonly. None detailed patient addiction or willingness to quit, or included smoking cessation in the patient plan. Students' smoking assessment and cessation skills are seen as poorly…

  16. Holistic Assessment of a High School Writing Skills Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ronald W.; And Others

    A study investigated a holistic approach to the assessment of students' writing skills in a high school that is part of a residential treatment program for adolescents. High school students were asked to produce spontaneous writing samples in the fall and spring of the 1990-91 school year. The students were asked to write about someone they…

  17. Assessment of Cognitive Social Skills in Learning Disabled Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Joan M.; Bellack, Alan S.

    Cognitive social skills were assessed in 22 learning disabled (LD), 18 behavior problem, and 20 control boys in grades 7-9. Measures included an interview tapping social knowledge, self-reported behavior, generation of alternative solutions to social problems, and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised Vocabulary Scale. Sociometric…

  18. Assessing the Influence of Portfolios on Higher Order Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiter, David M.

    How the use of portfolios in the classroom will influence the higher order thinking skills is the main focus of this project. The introduction of portfolios as assessment tools is rather new to educational research, but does offer a legitimate area for serious study. Portfolios when used by students can offer them not only a way to showcase their…

  19. Using Oral Exams to Assess Communication Skills in Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke-Smalley, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Business, like many other fields in higher education, continues to rely largely on conventional testing methods for assessing student learning. In the current article, another evaluation approach--the oral exam--is examined as a means for building and evaluating the professional communication and oral dialogue skills needed and utilized by…

  20. Assessment of Macular Function Using the SKILL Card in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dhamdhere, Kavita P.; Schneck, Marilyn E.; Bearse, Marcus A.; Lam, Wendy; Barez, Shirin; Adams, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the impact of reduced contrast and reduced luminance on visual acuity (VA) using the Smith–Kettlewell Institute Low Luminance (SKILL) Card in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. We studied adults aged 27 to 65 years, 32 with T2DM and no retinopathy (NoRet group), 22 with T2DM and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR group), and 38 healthy control subjects. Monocular high-contrast (SKILL light) and low-contrast, low-luminance (SKILL dark) near visual acuities were tested. The SKILL score was calculated as the difference between dark chart and light chart acuities and was corrected for age. Contrast sensitivity (CS) was also measured. Subject group differences were examined using ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference test. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the ability of the SKILL Card and CS to discriminate the subject groups. Results. The SKILL score and CS were significantly worse in both diabetes groups compared with the controls (P < 0.01). SKILL scores in the NPDR group were poorest (highest) and significantly worse than those in the NoRet group (P < 0.05). SKILL scores discriminated NPDR and NoRet patients from the controls with high accuracy (99% and 88%, respectively), which was significantly (P < 0.03) better than CS (78% and 74%, respectively). Conclusions. The SKILL Card demonstrated vision function changes in diabetes even in the absence of clinically evident retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy led to a further increase in the SKILL score, while high-contrast VA remained unchanged. PMID:24825104

  1. The assessment and development of drug calculation skills in nurse education--a critical debate.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2009-07-01

    The drug calculation skill of nurses continues to be a national concern. The continued concern has led to the introduction of mandatory drug calculation skills tests which students must pass in order to go on to the nursing register. However, there is little evidence to demonstrate that nurses are poor at solving drug calculation in practice. This paper argues that nurse educationalists have inadvertently created a problem that arguably does not exist in practice through use of invalid written drug assessment tests and have introduced their own pedagogical practice of solving written drug calculations. This paper will draw on literature across mathematics, philosophy, psychology and nurse education to demonstrate why written drug assessments are invalid, why learning must take place predominantly in the clinical area and why the key focus on numeracy and formal mathematical skills as essential knowledge for nurses is potentially unnecessary. PMID:19324475

  2. Innovative integrative bedside teaching model improves tutors’ self-assessments of teaching skills and attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Itai; Pessach-Gelblum, Liat; Givati, Gili; Haim, Nadav; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Unterman, Avraham; Bar-Shavit, Yochay; Grabler, Galit; Sagi, Doron; Achiron, Anat; Ziv, Amitai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient bedside is the ideal setting for teaching physical examination, medical interviewing, and interpersonal skills. Herein we describe a novel model for bedside teaching (BST) practiced during tutor training workshop and its resulting effect on practitioners’ self assessment of teaching skills and perceptions. Methods One-day tutor training workshop included theoretical knowledge supplementation regarding tutors’ roles as well as implementing practical tools for clinical education, mainly BST model. The model, which emphasizes simultaneous clinical and communication teaching in a stepwise approach, was practiced by consecutive simulations with a gradual escalation of difficulty and adjusted instruction approaches. Pre- and post-workshop-adjusted questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 to 4 were completed by participants and compared. Results Analysis was based on 25 out of 48 participants who completed both questionnaires. Significantly improved teaching skills were demonstrated upon workshop completion (mean 3.3, SD 0.5) compared with pre-training (mean 2.6, SD 0.6; p<0.001) with significant increase in most examined parameters. Significantly improved tutor's roles internalization was demonstrated after training completion (mean 3.7, SD 0.3) compared with pre-workshop (mean 3.5 SD 0.5; p=0.002). Discussion Successful BST involves combination of clinical and communication skills. BST model practiced during the workshop may contribute to improved teaching skills in this challenging environment. PMID:26894587

  3. Promoting Clinical Knowledge, Skills, and Empathy via a Creative Self-Suicide Assignment: Rationale, Purpose, and Student Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Katrina; Juhnke, Gerald A.; Peters, Scott W.; Marbach, Christina R.; Day, Sally; Choucroun, Pierre; Baker, Ria E.

    2007-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of American deaths. Given suicide's overall frequency and negative effects, specialized suicide training is warranted. This article describes a creative self-suicide assignment designed to enhance doctoral students' suicide assessment and intervention knowledge and clinical skills, and promote greater counselor empathy…

  4. Can disclosure of scoring rubric for basic clinical skills improve objective structured clinical examination?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether disclosure of scoring rubric for objective basic clinical skills can improve the scores on the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in medical students. Methods: Clinical performance score results of one university medical students (study group, n=345) were compared to those of another university (control group, n=1,847). Both groups took identical OSCE exam. OSCE rubric was not revealed to the study group until they were in the last 2 years of medical school. Results: There was no significant difference between before and after disclosure of rubric. However, history taking and physical examination scores of the study group were lower than those of the control group before the disclosure of rubric. After disclosure of rubric, the scores were either unchanged or slightly increased in the control group. Trend analysis of scores demonstrated that history taking and physical examination scores after the disclosure were significantly increased in the study group for 2 years. Conclusion: This study revealed that disclosure of basic clinical skills rubric to medical students could enhance their clinical performance, particularly in history taking and physical examination scores. PMID:27240891

  5. The Differential Effects of Task Complexity on Domain-Specific and Peer Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zundert, Marjo J.; Sluijsmans, Dominique M. A.; Konings, Karen D.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study the relationship between domain-specific skills and peer assessment skills as a function of task complexity is investigated. We hypothesised that peer assessment skills were superposed on domain-specific skills and will therefore suffer more when higher cognitive load is induced by increased task complexity. In a mixed factorial…

  6. Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

    2010-01-01

    Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching…

  7. Teaching Clinical Reasoning and Problem-solving Skills Using Human Patient Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Deepti; Ottis, Erica J.; Caligiuri, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses using human patient simulation (HPS) to expose students to complex dynamic patient cases that require clinical judgment, problem-solving skills, and teamwork skills for success. An example of an HPS exercise used to teach multifaceted clinical concepts in a therapeutics course also is provided. PMID:22171117

  8. Wiki Activities in Blended Learning for Health Professional Students: Enhancing Critical Thinking and Clinical Reasoning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Health professionals use critical thinking, a key problem solving skill, for clinical reasoning which is defined as the use of knowledge and reflective inquiry to diagnose a clinical problem. Teaching these skills in traditional settings with growing class sizes is challenging, and students increasingly expect learning that is flexible and…

  9. Peer Mentoring as a Strategy to Improve Paramedic Students' Clinical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Gill; Hajzler, Darko; Ivanov, Tina; Limon, Jodie

    2008-01-01

    The development of clinical skills and judgment is a key area of learning for undergraduate paramedic students but they typically find translating theory to practice a daunting prospect not least because they practice their developing clinical skills in front of others. This paper documents the rationale and outcomes of a peer mentoring program in…

  10. Impact of Facilitated Asynchronous Distance Education on Clinical Skills Development of International Pharmacy Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Zubin; Dean, Marie Rocchi

    2006-01-01

    The use of distance education for clinical skills development in the health professions has not been extensively described, due in part to the intensive nature of the relationship between the patient and practitioner. In the context of pharmacy practice, there are specific needs to develop new vehicles for clinical skills education due to growing…

  11. Getting Started on Assessment: Developing a Voluntary System of Assessment and Certification Based on Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Skill Standards Board (DOL/ETA), Washington, DC.

    This manual provides practical advice for voluntary partnerships that, since 1994, are part of the effort to build a voluntary national system of skill standards, assessment, and certification. Intended to be used with guidance from the National Skill Standards Board, it is designed for the voluntary partnerships that have completed the standards…

  12. Does Composition Medium Affect the Psychometric Properties of Scores on an Exercise Designed to Assess Written Medical Communication Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulet, John R.; McKinley, Danette W.; Rebbecchi, Thomas; Whelan, Gerald P.

    2007-01-01

    The ECFMG[R] Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA[R]) was developed to evaluate whether graduates of international medical schools are ready to enter graduate training programs in the United States. The performance-based patient note exercise is specifically used to assess an examinee's ability to summarize, synthesize and interpret the data collected…

  13. Rapid application design of an electronic clinical skills portfolio for undergraduate medical students.

    PubMed

    Dornan, Tim; Lee, Catherine; Stopford, Adam; Hosie, Liam; Maredia, Neil; Rector, Alan

    2005-04-01

    The aim was to find how to use information and communication technology to present the clinical skills content of an undergraduate medical curriculum. Rapid application design was used to develop the product, and technical action research was used to evaluate the development process. A clinician-educator, two medical students, two computing science masters students, two other project workers, and a hospital education informatics lead, formed a design team. A sample of stakeholders took part in requirements planning workshops and continued to advise the team throughout the project. A university hospital had many features that favoured fast, inexpensive, and successful system development: a clearly defined and readily accessible user group; location of the development process close to end-users; fast, informal communication; leadership by highly motivated and senior end-users; devolved authority and lack of any rigidly imposed management structure; cooperation of clinicians because the project drew on their clinical expertise to achieve scholastic goals; a culture of learning and involvement of highly motivated students. A detailed specification was developed through storyboarding, use case diagramming, and evolutionary prototyping. A very usable working product was developed within weeks. "SkillsBase" is a database web application using Microsoft Active Server Pages, served from a Microsoft Windows 2000 Server operating system running Internet Information Server 5.0. Graphing functionality is provided by the KavaChart applet. It presents the skills curriculum, provides a password-protected portfolio function, and offers training materials. The curriculum can be presented in several different ways to help students reflect on their objectives and progress towards achieving them. The reflective portfolio function is entirely private to each student user and allows them to document their progress in attaining skills, as judged by self, peer and tutor assessment, and

  14. Extended score interval in the assessment of basic surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Stefan; Sevonius, Dan; Beckman, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Basic Surgical Skills course uses an assessment score interval of 0–3. An extended score interval, 1–6, was proposed by the Swedish steering committee of the course. The aim of this study was to analyze the trainee scores in the current 0–3 scored version compared to a proposed 1–6 scored version. Methods Sixteen participants, seven females and nine males, were evaluated in the current and proposed assessment forms by instructors, observers, and learners themselves during the first and second day. In each assessment form, 17 tasks were assessed. The inter-rater reliability between the current and the proposed score sheets were evaluated with intraclass correlation (ICC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The distribution of scores for ‘knot tying’ at the last time point and ‘bowel anastomosis side to side’ given by the instructors in the current assessment form showed that the highest score was given in 31 and 62%, respectively. No ceiling effects were found in the proposed assessment form. The overall ICC between the current and proposed score sheets after assessment by the instructors increased from 0.38 (95% CI 0.77–0.78) on Day 1 to 0.83 (95% CI 0.51–0.94) on Day 2. Discussion A clear ceiling effect of scores was demonstrated in the current assessment form, questioning its validity. The proposed score sheet provides more accurate scores and seems to be a better feedback instrument for learning technical surgical skills in the Basic Surgical Skills course. PMID:25636607

  15. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists. PMID:25993451

  16. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  17. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  18. Using a Structured Assessment Tool to Evaluate Nontechnical Skills of Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Lyk-Jensen, Helle Teglgaard; Dieckmann, Peter; Konge, Lars; Jepsen, Rikke Malene H G; Spanager, Lene; Østergaard, Doris

    2016-04-01

    Nontechnical skills are critical for good anesthetic practice but are seldom addressed explicitly in clinical training. The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the reliability and validity of the observation-based assessment tool Nurse Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills system (N-ANTS) and (2) to evaluate the effect of training nurse anesthetist supervisors in the use of N-ANTS. This system comprises a global rating score, 4 categories, and 15 elements to rate nurse anesthetists' nontechnical skills. A 1-day workshop was conducted for 22 nurse anesthetist supervisors to rate nurse anesthetists' nontechnical skills in 9 scripted video scenarios. Data were gathered from 2 rating sessions separated by a 2-hour training session. The interrater reliability was high before and after the training. It remained stable for the global rating score in N-ANTS and its category ratings, but improved at the elements level. When the raters' ratings were compared with ratings by an expert reference group, there was no statistically significant effect on training. We conclude that Danish nurse anesthetist supervisors without further rater training besides their work experience can use N-ANTS to assess nontechnical skills of nurse anesthetists. PMID:27311153

  19. Assessing competence in communication and interpersonal skills: the Kalamazoo II report.

    PubMed

    Duffy, F Daniel; Gordon, Geoffrey H; Whelan, Gerald; Cole-Kelly, Kathy; Frankel, Richard; Buffone, Natalie; Lofton, Stephanie; Wallace, MaryAnne; Goode, Leslie; Langdon, Lynn

    2004-06-01

    Accreditation of residency programs and certification of physicians requires assessment of competence in communication and interpersonal skills. Residency and continuing medical education program directors seek ways to teach and evaluate these competencies. This report summarizes the methods and tools used by educators, evaluators, and researchers in the field of physician-patient communication as determined by the participants in the "Kalamazoo II" conference held in April 2002. Communication and interpersonal skills form an integrated competence with two distinct parts. Communication skills are the performance of specific tasks and behaviors such as obtaining a medical history, explaining a diagnosis and prognosis, giving therapeutic instructions, and counseling. Interpersonal skills are inherently relational and process oriented; they are the effect communication has on another person such as relieving anxiety or establishing a trusting relationship. This report reviews three methods for assessment of communication and interpersonal skills: (1) checklists of observed behaviors during interactions with real or simulated patients; (2) surveys of patients' experience in clinical interactions; and (3) examinations using oral, essay, or multiple-choice response questions. These methods are incorporated into educational programs to assess learning needs, create learning opportunities, or guide feedback for learning. The same assessment tools, when administered in a standardized way, rated by an evaluator other than the teacher, and using a predetermined passing score, become a summative evaluation. The report summarizes the experience of using these methods in a variety of educational and evaluation programs and presents an extensive bibliography of literature on the topic. Professional conversation between patients and doctors shapes diagnosis, initiates therapy, and establishes a caring relationship. The degree to which these activities are successful depends, in

  20. The Effects of Performance-Based Assessment Criteria on Student Performance and Self-Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastre, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based…

  1. A randomized controlled pilot trial comparing the impact of access to clinical endocrinology video demonstrations with access to usual revision resources on medical student performance of clinical endocrinology skills

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Demonstrating competence in clinical skills is key to course completion for medical students. Methods of providing clinical instruction that foster immediate learning and potentially serve as longer-term repositories for on-demand revision, such as online videos demonstrating competent performance of clinical skills, are increasingly being used. However, their impact on learning has been little studied. The aim of this study was to determine the value of adjunctive on-demand video-based training for clinical skills acquisition by medical students in endocrinology. Methods Following an endocrinology clinical tutorial program, 2nd year medical students in the pre-assessment revision period were recruited and randomized to either a set of bespoke on-line clinical skills training videos (TV), or to revision as usual (RAU). The skills demonstrated on video were history taking in diabetes mellitus (DMH), examination for diabetes lower limb complications (LLE), and examination for signs of thyroid disease (TE). Students were assessed on these clinical skills in an observed structured clinical examination two weeks after randomization. Assessors were blinded to student randomization status. Results For both diabetes related clinical skills assessment tasks, students in the TV group performed significantly better than those in the RAU group. There were no between group differences in thyroid examination performance. For the LLE, 91.7% (n = 11/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 40% (n = 4/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.024). For the DMH, 83.3% (n = 10/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 20% (n = 2/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.007). Conclusion Exposure to high quality videos demonstrating clinical skills can significantly improve medical student skill performance in an

  2. Goodness of Fit of Skills Assessment Approaches: Insights from Patterns of Real vs. Synthetic Data Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beheshti, Behzad; Desmarais, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the issue of the goodness of fit of different skills assessment models using both synthetic and real data. Synthetic data is generated from the different skills assessment models. The results show wide differences of performances between the skills assessment models over synthetic data sets. The set of relative performances…

  3. Assessment Training Effects on Student Assessment Skills and Task Performance in a Technology-Facilitated Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiongyi; Li, Lan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an assessment training module on student assessment skills and task performance in a technology-facilitated peer assessment. Seventy-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The participants completed an assessment training exercise, prior to engaging in peer-assessment activities. During the…

  4. Assessment of email communication skills of rheumatology fellows: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dhuper, Sonal; Siva, Chokkalingam; Fresen, John L; Petruc, Marius; Velázquez, Celso R

    2010-01-01

    Physician–patient email communication is gaining popularity. However, a formal assessment of physicians' email communication skills has not been described. We hypothesized that the email communication skills of rheumatology fellows can be measured in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) setting using a novel email content analysis instrument which has 18 items. During an OSCE, we asked 50 rheumatology fellows to respond to a simulated patient email. The content of the responses was assessed using our instrument. The majority of rheumatology fellows wrote appropriate responses scoring a mean (±SD) of 10.6 (±2.6) points (maximum score 18), with high inter-rater reliability (0.86). Most fellows were concise (74%) and courteous (68%) but not formal (22%). Ninety-two percent of fellows acknowledged that the patient's condition required urgent medical attention, but only 30% took active measures to contact the patient. No one encrypted their messages. The objective assessment of email communication skills is possible using simulated emails in an OSCE setting. The variable email communication scores and incidental patient safety gaps identified, suggest a need for further training and defined proficiency standards for physicians' email communication skills. PMID:20962134

  5. Lagrangian Predictive Skill Assessment for the Deepwater Horizon Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipphardt, B. L.; Huntley, H. S.; Sulman, M.; Kirwan, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    The explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform produced enormous human, ecological, and economic impacts. At the same time this disaster provided an unprecedented amount of Lagrangian information on ocean processes, including a large number of surface and near-surface drifters deployed in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico as well as remotely sensed images of the surface oil slick. In addition several global and regional ocean model predictions were used to forecast the spill movements. These models generally exhibited large variations in the mesoscale flow near the Deepwater Horizon site, even though they all assimilated similar sets of ocean observations. This provides a unique opportunity to thoroughly assess model Lagrangian predictive skill. Here, the predictive skill of one model, a regional implementation of the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), is evaluated using data from more than 80 drifter trajectories in the northern Gulf of Mexico. These trajectories are compared with maps of Lagrangian coherent structures, computed from near-surface model velocities, to determine whether the observations are consistent with the larger scale transport structure predicted by the model. We also discuss new metrics to assess model Lagrangian predictive skill of the plume movement.

  6. The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of clinical skills

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of deliberate practice in medical students' development from novice to expert was examined for preclinical skill training. Methods Students in years 1-3 completed 34 Likert type items, adapted from a questionnaire about the use of deliberate practice in cognitive learning. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability analysis were used to validate the questionnaire. Analysis of variance examined differences between years and regression analysis the relationship between deliberate practice and skill test results. Results 875 students participated (90%). Factor analysis yielded four factors: planning, concentration/dedication, repetition/revision, study style/self reflection. Student scores on 'Planning' increased over time, score on sub-scale 'repetition/revision' decreased. Student results on the clinical skill test correlated positively with scores on subscales 'planning' and 'concentration/dedication' in years 1 and 3, and with scores on subscale 'repetition/revision' in year 1. Conclusions The positive effects on test results suggest that the role of deliberate practice in medical education merits further study. The cross-sectional design is a limitation, the large representative sample a strength of the study. The vanishing effect of repetition/revision may be attributable to inadequate feedback. Deliberate practice advocates sustained practice to address weaknesses, identified by (self-)assessment and stimulated by feedback. Further studies should use a longitudinal prospective design and extend the scope to expertise development during residency and beyond. PMID:22141427

  7. Mining Sector. Basic Skills Needs Assessment. INCO (Manitoba Division) & Local 6166 United Steelworkers of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Lee Thomas

    A project examined the skills gap within the mining industry, identified and prioritized skills common to all jobs and occupations, and provided insight into skills that workers are likely to need in the future. The research for the basic skills needs assessment was conducted from June-October 1993 at INCO's Manitoba Division Operations in…

  8. Clinical competency assessment in intravenous therapy and vascular access: part 2.

    PubMed

    Louise Hulse, Anna

    This article explores and critically evaluates clinical practice competencies as a form of assessment within post-registration nurse education, specifically relating to competence assessment of intravenous (IV) therapy. In the first article in this two-part series, 'Competency assessment in intravenous therapy and vascular access: part 1' (BJN, 22(16)), an in-depth literature review was carried out and applied to current competency assessment design. Clinical staff opinion was sought to evaluate users' opinions of this assessment method against recommended literature. The aim of both articles is to describe critically and analyse existing practice using this form of assessment, and relate other forms of assessment to IV therapy and vascular access clinical competence. A small-scale study was performed to evaluate whether clinical competency assessment is the most appropriate form of assessment of IV therapy and vascular access skills. A questionnaire was designed to assess nurse opinion in relation to advantages (positives) and disadvantages (negatives) of clinical practice competency assessment; 35 randomly selected post-registered nurses were included in the sample. Findings illustrated that clinical competency assessment is the most appropriate form for the assessment of clinical skills in IV therapy. However, recommendations were made for the possible use of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) assessment. Furthermore, this report recommends the assessment of theory and knowledge through written exams or multiple-choice questions (MCQs) as an addition to clinical practice competence assessment for IV therapy. PMID:24067310

  9. Assessing Social Skills in Early Elementary-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Social Skills Q-Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Jill; Kasari, Connie; Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    This study employed a newly developed measure, the Social Skills Q-Sort (SSQ), to assess paraprofessionals' and teachers' reports of social skills for children with and without ASD. Paraprofessionals and teachers showed good rater-agreement on the SSQ. ROC curve analyses yielded an excellent profile of sensitivity and specificity for…

  10. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution. PMID:26906246

  11. Assessing the skills of home care workers in helping older people take their prescribed medications.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Elizabeth E J

    2015-08-01

    The Southern Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland applied a modified version of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the skills of home care workers in assisting older people taking prescribed medications. In Northern Ireland, home care workers are care workers employed by health and social care trusts or private agencies. The application of the model has developed the skills of this staff group, improved the relationship between the commissioner and provider, significantly reduced the time spent by community nurses in individual training and assessment, and enhanced the patient experience for those taking medication. Overall, the application of this model has provided assurances to the Trust board, the executive director of nursing, and operational directors that home care workers are competent in assisting older people in this high-risk activity. PMID:26252238

  12. An assessment of CPR skills using simulation: Are first responders prepared to save lives?

    PubMed

    Everett-Thomas, Ruth; Yero-Aguayo, Mercedes; Valdes, Beatriz; Valdes, Guillermo; Shekhter, Ilya; Rosen, Lisa F; Birnbach, David J

    2016-07-01

    The American Heart Association's (AHA) recommendation for biyearly recertification and annual mandatory CPR training may be suboptimal for first responders (nurses and technicians) working in outpatient clinics (American Heart Association, 2013). To determine the efficacy of the AHA guidelines, 40 simulated sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) encounters were conducted followed by debriefing and a subsequent SCA to determine a basic level of CPR proficiency. First responders' CPR skills were evaluated using a 19-item assessment form to quantify the event. A comparison of scores using two different viewing modalities was performed to provide an assessment of the training program. Of the 40 sessions, group mean performance scores for the first encounter were just above the organization's minimum required score of 24. Performance scores increased slightly (27-28) after the second encounter. Proficiency of skills was poor and frequent basic life support training may be indicated to help first responders provide high-quality CPR. PMID:27428694

  13. Dynamic assessment of word learning skills of pre-school children with primary language impairment.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Bernard; Law, James

    2014-10-01

    Dynamic assessment has been shown to have considerable theoretical and clinical significance in the assessment of socially disadvantaged and culturally and linguistically diverse children. In this study it is used to enhance assessment of pre-school children with primary language impairment. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a dynamic assessment (DA) has the potential to enhance the predictive capacity of a static measure of receptive vocabulary in pre-school children. Forty pre-school children were assessed using the static British Picture Vocabulary Scale (BPVS), a DA of word learning potential and an assessment of non-verbal cognitive ability. Thirty-seven children were followed up 6 months later and re-assessed using the BPVS. Although the predictive capacity of the static measure was found to be substantial, the DA increased this significantly especially for children with static scores below the 25th centile. The DA of children's word learning has the potential to add value to the static assessment of the child with low language skills, to predict subsequent receptive vocabulary skills and to increase the chance of correctly identifying children in need of ongoing support. PMID:24160256

  14. Assessing Motor Skill Competency in Elementary School Students: A Three-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyun; Mason, Steve; Hypnar, Andrew; Bennett, Austin

    2016-03-01

    This study was to examine how well fourth- and fifth-grade students demonstrated motor skill competency assessed with selected PE Metrics assessment rubrics (2009). Fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 1,346-1,926) were assessed on their performance of three manipulative skills using the PE Metrics Assessment Rubrics during the pre-intervention year, the post-intervention year 1, and the post-intervention year 3. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, ANOVA, and follow-up comparisons were conducted for data analysis. The results indicated that the post-intervention year 2 cohort performed significantly more competent than the pre-intervention cohort and the post-intervention year 1 cohort on the three manipulative skill assessments. The post-intervention year 1 cohort significantly outperformed the pre-intervention cohort on the soccer dribbling, passing, and receiving and the striking skill assessments, but not on the throwing skill assessment. Although the boys in the three cohorts performed significantly better than the girls on all three skills, the girls showed substantial improvement on the overhand throwing and the soccer skills from baseline to the post-intervention year 1 and the post-intervention year 2. However, the girls, in particular, need to improve striking skill. The CTACH PE was conducive to improving fourth- and fifth-grade students' motor skill competency in the three manipulative skills. This study suggest that PE Metrics assessment rubrics are feasible tools for PE teachers to assess levels of students' demonstration of motor skill competency during a regular PE lesson. Key pointsCATCH PE is an empirically-evidenced quality PE curricular that is conducive to improving students' manipulative skill competency.Boys significantly outperformed than girls in all three manipulative skills.Girls need to improve motor skill competency in striking skill. PE Metrics are feasible assessment rubrics that can be easily used by trained physical

  15. Assessing Motor Skill Competency in Elementary School Students: A Three-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiyun; Mason, Steve; Hypnar, Andrew; Bennett, Austin

    2016-01-01

    This study was to examine how well fourth- and fifth-grade students demonstrated motor skill competency assessed with selected PE Metrics assessment rubrics (2009). Fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 1,346-1,926) were assessed on their performance of three manipulative skills using the PE Metrics Assessment Rubrics during the pre-intervention year, the post-intervention year 1, and the post-intervention year 3. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, ANOVA, and follow-up comparisons were conducted for data analysis. The results indicated that the post-intervention year 2 cohort performed significantly more competent than the pre-intervention cohort and the post-intervention year 1 cohort on the three manipulative skill assessments. The post-intervention year 1 cohort significantly outperformed the pre-intervention cohort on the soccer dribbling, passing, and receiving and the striking skill assessments, but not on the throwing skill assessment. Although the boys in the three cohorts performed significantly better than the girls on all three skills, the girls showed substantial improvement on the overhand throwing and the soccer skills from baseline to the post-intervention year 1 and the post-intervention year 2. However, the girls, in particular, need to improve striking skill. The CTACH PE was conducive to improving fourth- and fifth-grade students’ motor skill competency in the three manipulative skills. This study suggest that PE Metrics assessment rubrics are feasible tools for PE teachers to assess levels of students’ demonstration of motor skill competency during a regular PE lesson. Key points CATCH PE is an empirically-evidenced quality PE curricular that is conducive to improving students’ manipulative skill competency. Boys significantly outperformed than girls in all three manipulative skills. Girls need to improve motor skill competency in striking skill. PE Metrics are feasible assessment rubrics that can be easily used by trained

  16. Importance of Building Confidence in Patient Communication and Clinical Skills Among Chiropractic Students

    PubMed Central

    Hecimovich, Mark D.; Volet, Simone E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: One important objective of chiropractic education is to foster student professional confidence and competence in patient communication and clinical skills. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the extant literature on this topic, stressing the significance of building students' confidence for effective practice and the need for more research in this area. Methods: The authors reviewed MEDLINE and ERIC from 1980 through 2008 using several key words pertinent to confidence and health care. Three distinct, but interrelated, bodies of literature were assessed, including professional confidence in health care research, the nature and development of confidence in educational psychology research, and fostering professional confidence in chiropractic education. Results: It was apparent through the review that chiropractic education has developed educational methods and opportunities that may help develop and build student confidence in patient communication and clinical skills. However, there has not been sufficient research to provide empirical evidence of the impact. Conclusion: Fostering chiropractic students' development of confidence in what they say and do is of paramount importance not only to them as new practitioners but more importantly to the patient. There is no doubt that a better understanding of how confidence can be developed and consolidated during tertiary study should be a major goal of chiropractic education PMID:19826543

  17. Relationship Skills in a Clinical Performance Examination: Reliability and Validity of the Relationship Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Cynthia; And Others

    Among the repertoire of clinical skills necessary for the professional development of medical students is the ability to create a positive doctor-patient relationship through effective communication skills. The purpose of this study was to create an instrument that reliably measures the relationship between physician and patient. The Relationship…

  18. Integrating Academic and Clinical Learning Using a Clinical Swallowing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an experiential learning activity designed to integrate classroom knowledge and a clinical swallowing assessment. Twenty master's-level graduate students in a dysphagia course conducted a clinical swallowing assessment with a resident of an independent retirement community. The exercise was designed to allow students an…

  19. Assessing suturing skills in a self-guided learning setting: absolute symmetry error.

    PubMed

    Brydges, Ryan; Carnahan, Heather; Dubrowski, Adam

    2009-12-01

    Directed self-guidance, whereby trainees independently practice a skill-set in a structured setting, may be an effective technique for novice training. Currently, however, most evaluation methods require an expert to be present during practice. The study aim was to determine if absolute symmetry error, a clinically important measure that can be assessed by the trainee, is a feasible assessment tool for self-guided learning of suturing skill. Forty-eight undergraduate medical trainees independently practiced suturing and knot tying skills using a benchtop model. Performance on a pretest, posttest, retention test and a transfer test was assessed using (1) the validated final product analysis (FPA), (2) the surgical efficiency score (SES), a combination of the FPA and hand motion analysis and (3) absolute symmetry error, a new measure that assesses the symmetry of the final product. Absolute symmetry error, along with the other objective assessment tools, detected improvements in performance from pretest to posttest (P < 0.05). A battery of correlation analyses indicated that absolute symmetry error correlates moderately with the FPA and SES. The development of valid, reliable and feasible technical skill assessments is needed to ensure all training centers evaluate trainee performance in a standardized fashion. Measures that do not require the use of experts or computers have potential for widespread use. We suggest that absolute symmetry error is a useful approximation of novices' suturing and knot tying performance. Future research should evaluate whether absolute symmetry error can enhance learning when used as a source of feedback during self-guided practice. PMID:19132540

  20. An innovative method to assess negotiation skills necessary for quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Varkey, Prathibha; Gupta, Priyanka; Bennet, Kevin E

    2008-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) initiatives require leaders who can facilitate change through negotiation. Although a few education programs teach these skills, there is no published literature on methods to assess competency in negotiation. This study's purpose was to determine the psychometric properties of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess negotiation skills. The OSCE uses an actor trained to respond to the learner in a standardized fashion. The negotiation station was part of an 8-station QI OSCE piloted in the Mayo Clinic Endocrinology and Preventive Medicine fellowship programs. External experts judged the content validity to be excellent. Interrater reliability was outstanding for the global competency assessment (0.80) and moderate for checklist scores (0.53). All participating faculty strongly agreed (33.3%) or agreed (66.7%) that the OSCE station was an authentic assessment tool. Further research is needed to study the predictive validity of such an OSCE and its application to assessing other quality improvement competencies. PMID:18820139

  1. Assessing Change in High School Student Information Literacy Using the Tool for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Yutzey, Susan D.; Piazza, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Change in high school student information literacy (IL) knowledge and skills, from freshman year to senior year in high school was the focus of this quasi-experimental research project. Researchers used a free information literacy skills assessment tool entitled TRAILS (Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) to measure…

  2. KCTCS Kentucky Manufacturing Skill Standards Assessment Center/Assessment Provider Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Community and Technical Coll. System, Lexington.

    This document describes the Kentucky Manufacturing Skill Standards (KMSS) development process. The Manufacturing Standards project is divided into three phases: standards, assessment, and curriculum. The vision of this project is to identify a standards-driven assessment process and determine the level of competency and understanding. This data…

  3. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  4. Skills Needs Assessment Process To Support Economic Development. HRD & ALL Research Series. Paper 90-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.; Kaman, Vickie

    The purpose of skills-training needs-assessment is to identify what type of skills and knowledge are needed to support economic strategies and, as a result, improve organizational decisionmaking related to training investments and general work force development. This paper presents findings of 11 skills-retraining, needs-assessment,…

  5. Teaching Early Childhood Teacher Candidates How to Assess Children's Inquiry Skills in Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joohi; Yoon, Ji Yoon

    2008-01-01

    This article presents pragmatic information on teaching early childhood teacher candidates how to assess children's inquiry process skills. The authors list three important steps in choosing inquiry skills. They generated behavioral indicators for each inquiry skill, and designed an assessment rubric using number grading or a…

  6. Setting Standards on the Core and Advanced iSkills[TM] Assessments. Research Memorandum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Richard J.; Katz, Irvin R.

    2008-01-01

    This report documents a standard-setting study to determine recommended minimum scores (cut scores) needed on the Core and Advanced iSkills[TM] assessments for examinees to be considered at a foundational level of ICT literacy skill. Two foundational levels--one for each iSkills assessment--had been specified previously by the National ICT…

  7. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  8. A Clinical Skills Instruction Program: The Acute Abdomen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laube, Douglas W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An effective evaluation of the acutely ill female implies a thorough examination that integrates skills representing three learning domains. This process should include: a thorough medical history, a physical examination, good patient-physician rapport, and development of an efficacious management plan. A University of Iowa simulation approach is…

  9. Providing specialist clinical skills in soft tissue and intra-articular injection through a postgraduate masters module.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Kay; Waterfield, Jackie

    2005-01-01

    Current philosophy and policy changes in the National Health Service are encouraging healthcare practitioners to extend their clinical skills to create a more patient-centred approach thus allowing patients to be seen in a timely and more appropriate manner. This often requires further development of the practitioners' skills and knowledge. One approach to achieve this is through collaboration between employers and educational providers to ensure that educational experience is not only evidence based but also responsive to the needs of the current and future workforce. A postgraduate module was developed to raise critical and evaluative skills, as well as the technical skills of practitioners using injections in the management of joint and soft tissue pathology, while developing a professional responsibility towards injection practice. The module emphasized learning though experience by contextualizing the theoretical aspects of the module and by its student centred assessments. Further strengths of this module are that it has utilized academic and clinical expertise and knowledge to enable clinicians to gain additional skills and the multidisciplinary approach engendered good working practice Overall the module was evaluated positively by both tutors and students and not only met its aims but also addressed the current professional and policy issues around continuing professional development. PMID:17042005

  10. Questioning Skills Demonstrated by Approved Clinical Instructors During Clinical Field Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Mary G

    2008-01-01

    Context: The current trend in athletic training clinical education places greater emphasis on the quality of interactions occurring between Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) and athletic training students (ATSs). Among other attributes, the ability of ACIs to facilitate and direct quality clinical learning experiences may be influenced by the skill with which the ACI is able to use selected teaching strategies. Objective: To gain insight into ACIs' use of questioning as a specific teaching strategy during the clinical education experiences of undergraduate ATSs. Design: Qualitative case study design involving initial and stimulated-recall interviews, prolonged field observations, and audio recording of ACI-ATS interactions. Setting: The primary athletic training facility at one athletic training education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: The 8 ACI participants included 3 full-time athletic training education program faculty members and 5 graduate-level assistants. The 24 ATS participants included 1 senior, 17 juniors, and 6 sophomores. Data Collection and Analysis: Transcribed data collected from 8 initial interviews, 23 field observations, 23 audio-recorded ACI-ATS interactions and 54 stimulated-recall interviews were analyzed through microscopic, open, and axial coding, as well as coding for process. The cognition level of questions posed by ACIs was analyzed according to Sellappah and colleagues' Question Classification Framework. Results: The ACI participants posed 712 questions during the 23 observation periods. Of the total questions, 70.37% were classified as low-level cognitive questions and 17.00% as high-level cognitive questions. The remaining 12.64% were classified as other. Conclusions: Although all ACIs used questioning during clinical instruction, 2 distinct questioning patterns were identified: strategic questioning and nonstrategic questioning. The way ACIs

  11. Reliability and validity of a tool to assess airway management skills in anesthesia trainees

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aliya; Khan, Fauzia Anis; Ismail, Samina

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Gaining expertise in procedural skills is essential for achieving clinical competence during anesthesia training. Supervisors have the important responsibility of deciding when the trainee can be allowed to perform various procedures without direct supervision while ensuring patient safety. This requires robust and reliable assessment techniques. Airway management with bag-mask ventilation and tracheal intubation are routinely performed by anesthesia trainees at induction of anesthesia and to save lives during a cardiorespiratory arrest. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the construct validity, and inter-rater and test-retest reliability of a tool designed to assess competence in bag-mask ventilation followed by tracheal intubation in anesthesia trainees. Material and Methods: Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Tracheal intubation and bag-mask ventilation skills in 10 junior and 10 senior anesthesia trainees were assessed by two investigators on two occasions at a 3-4 weeks interval, using a procedure-specific assessment tool. Results: Average kappa value for inter-rater reliability was 0.91 and 0.99 for the first and second assessments, respectively, with an average agreement of 95%. The average agreement for test-retest reliability was 82% with a kappa value of 0.39. Senior trainees obtained higher scores compared to junior trainees in all areas of assessment, with a significant difference for patient positioning, preoxygenation, and laryngoscopy technique, depicting good construct validity. Conclusion: The tool designed to assess bag-mask ventilation and tracheal intubation skills in anesthesia trainees demonstrated excellent inter-rater reliability, fair test-retest reliability, and good construct validity. The authors recommend its use for formative and summative assessment of junior anesthesia trainees.

  12. The Dreyfus model of clinical problem-solving skills acquisition: a critical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Context The Dreyfus model describes how individuals progress through various levels in their acquisition of skills and subsumes ideas with regard to how individuals learn. Such a model is being accepted almost without debate from physicians to explain the ‘acquisition’ of clinical skills. Objectives This paper reviews such a model, discusses several controversial points, clarifies what kind of knowledge the model is about, and examines its coherence in terms of problem-solving skills. Dreyfus' main idea that intuition is a major aspect of expertise is also discussed in some detail. Relevant scientific evidence from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience is reviewed to accomplish these aims. Conclusions Although the Dreyfus model may partially explain the ‘acquisition’ of some skills, it is debatable if it can explain the acquisition of clinical skills. The complex nature of clinical problem-solving skills and the rich interplay between the implicit and explicit forms of knowledge must be taken into consideration when we want to explain ‘acquisition’ of clinical skills. The idea that experts work from intuition, not from reason, should be evaluated carefully. PMID:20563279

  13. Social Skills: Adolf Meyer’s Revision of Clinical Skill for the New Psychiatry of the Twentieth Century

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Adolf Meyer (1866–1950) exercised considerable influence over the development of Anglo-American psychiatry during the first half of the twentieth century. The concepts and techniques he implemented at his prominent Phipps Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins remain important to psychiatric practice and neuro-scientific research today. In the 1890s, Meyer revised scientific medicine’s traditional notion of clinical skill to serve what he called the ‘New Psychiatry’, a clinical discipline that embodied social and scientific ideals shared with other ‘new’ progressive reform movements in the United States. This revision conformed to his concept of psychobiology – his biological theory of mind and mental disorders – and accorded with his definition of scientific medicine as a unity of clinical–pathological methods and therapeutics. Combining insights from evolutionary biology, neuron theory and American pragmatist philosophy, Meyer concluded that subjective experience and social behaviour were functions of human biology. In addition to the time-honoured techniques devised to exploit the material data of the diseased body – observing and recording in the clinic, dissecting in the morgue and conducting histological experiments in the laboratory – he insisted that psychiatrists must also be skilled at wielding social interaction and interpersonal relationships as investigative and therapeutic tools in order to conceptualise, collect, analyse and apply the ephemeral data of ‘social adaptation’. An examination of his clinical practices and teaching at Johns Hopkins between 1913 and 1917 shows how particular historical and intellectual contexts shaped Meyer’s conceptualisation of social behaviour as a biological function and, subsequently, his new vision of clinical skill for twentieth-century psychiatry. PMID:26090738

  14. Assessing clinical reasoning abilities of medical students using clinical performance examination

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sunju; Kim, Do-Kyong; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Roh, Hye-Rin; Oh, Young-Rim; Seo, Ji-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of new clinical performance examination (CPX) for assessing clinical reasoning skills and evaluating clinical reasoning ability of the students. Methods: Third-year medical school students (n=313) in Busan-Gyeongnam consortium in 2014 were included in the study. One of 12 stations was developed to assess clinical reasoning abilities. The scenario and checklists of the station were revised by six experts. Chief complaint of the case was rhinorrhea, accompanied by fever, headache, and vomiting. Checklists focused on identifying of the main problem and systematic approach to the problem. Students interviewed the patient and recorded subjective and objective findings, assessments, plans (SOAP) note for 15 minutes. Two professors assessed students simultaneously. We performed statistical analysis on their scores and survey. Results: The Cronbach α of subject station was 0.878 and Cohen κ coefficient between graders was 0.785. Students agreed on CPX as an adequate tool to evaluate students’ performance, but some graders argued that the CPX failed to secure its validity due to their lack of understanding the case. One hundred eight students (34.5%) identified essential problem early and only 58 (18.5%) performed systematic history taking and physical examination. One hundred seventy-three of them (55.3%) communicated correct diagnosis with the patient. Most of them had trouble in writing SOAP notes. Conclusion: To gain reliability and validity, interrater agreement should be secured. Students' clinical reasoning skills were not enough. Students need to be trained on problem identification, reasoning skills and accurate record-keeping. PMID:26838567

  15. Skill assessment of spatial maps for oceanographic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Kenneth A.; Roth, Brian M.; Smith, Eric P.

    2009-02-01

    Comparing data-derived and model-generated spatial maps of key variables is a critical part of oceanographic model skill assessment. Yet, many comparisons resort to presenting the maps side-by-side and saying that the two maps look similar. We describe a suite of techniques for comparing 2-dimensional spatial maps that allow for fuzziness in the comparison and that are included in the Map Comparison Kit software package. These techniques included Kappa, Fuzzy Kappa, Moving Window, and Aggregated Cells. We also introduce a new measure that we call "slip-and-slide." The slip-and-slide technique is based on determining what has to be done (shift, rotate, re-scale axes) to the model map to get the model map to agree as close as possible to the data map. We simulated two commonly encountered spatial patterns on a 100 by 100 grid of cells (hotspot and gradient), and used the generated maps in two simulation experiments. The first experiment was designed to confirm that the new slip-and-slide method could recover known differences between the data and model maps (identical twin experiment), while the second experiment included all of the map comparison techniques applied to data and model maps that were generated from different response surfaces. The slip-and-slide method successfully recovered the known distortion parameters under ideal conditions and when the response variable differed in magnitude between the model and data maps. Slip-and-slide started to show some difficulty in recovering known distortion parameters when noise was added to the fit of the response surface used in the parameter searching. The second simulation experiment demonstrated the fuzzy techniques, and how the similarity between data and model maps can be quantified and evaluated using increasing degrees of fuzziness in the various techniques. The second simulation experiment also showed the success of the slip-and-slide method, as the various techniques all showed greater similarity between the

  16. The Skilled Counselor Training Model: Skills Acquisition, Self-Assessment, and Cognitive Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Cassandra; Packman, Jill; Smaby, Marlowe H.; Maddux, Cleborne D.

    2005-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effectiveness of the Skilled Counselor Training Model (SCTM; M. H. Smaby, C. D. Maddux, E. Torres-Rivera, & R. Zimmick, 1999) in teaching counseling skills and in fostering counselor cognitive complexity. Counselor trainees who completed the SCTM had better counseling skills and higher levels of cognitive complexity than…

  17. A Condom Skill Scale: Assessing Condom Skills among Female Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Coreen A.; Fenaughty, Andrea M.; Lindemann, Dana F.

    2003-01-01

    Describe the development and properties of a scale measuring demonstrated condom use skill using a sample of 261 drug-using women. Analysis of scale scores revealed high levels of condom skill among the population. Preliminary analysis suggests that the Condom Skill Scale is a potentially valid and reliable instrument, and may have application as…

  18. The challenge of racial difference: skills for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Proctor, E K; Davis, L E

    1994-05-01

    Just as racial injustice negatively affects the plight of minorities in society, racial tensions impede professional helping. Often, the racially dissimilar social worker and client approach each other with little understanding of each other's social realities and with unfounded assumptions. Unfortunately, professionals find it difficult to acknowledge such differences or their effect on their relationships. Yet the fruitfulness of the helping encounter often depends on the ability to develop and invest in a trusting relationship. This article identifies the societal roots of the stresses associated with cross-racial relationships. Three concerns commonly experienced by clients whose workers are racially different are identified: (1) Is the helper a person of goodwill? (2) Is the helper trained and skilled? (3) Is the help offered valid and meaningful for me and my social reality? Case vignettes are used to illustrate how each concern is typically mishandled. The importance of successfully managing each concern is stressed, and skills for successful management are illustrated. PMID:8209290

  19. Using clinical video excerpts to prompt music therapy majors' recall of related experiences and self-attributions of comfort and skill.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a method for collecting music therapy majors' hypothesized self-attributions of comfort and skill in diverse clinical scenarios and relating their attributions to recall and perceptions of similar personal and clinical experience. Fifty eight music therapy majors, from freshmen to graduate (board-certified) students, watched 10 brief video excerpts. After each excerpt participants moved 2 Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI) dials, one labeled "comfort" and the other labeled "skill," to indicate their feelings about themselves as therapist with the client(s) in the excerpt. At the end of viewing all excerpts, participants completed an open-ended total recall paper/pencil form requesting estimation of personal and clinical experience with any population represented in the excerpts. Participants recalled more personal experience compared to clinical experience. A strong positive correlation was found between personal and clinical experience estimates. A strong positive correlation was also found between comfort and skill scores. Personal experience estimates were not related to self-attributions of comfort or skill. Clinical excerpts prompted neutral self-attributions of comfort and skill with comfort being slightly higher than skill self-attributions. Clinical experience estimates, although not related to self-attributions of comfort; were positively related to self-attributions of skill. Exploratory comparisons with small groups within the total sample suggest a highly positive impact of specific music therapy clinical experience, particularly the post-coursework internship, on skill self-attributions. Results are discussed within the context of using the assessment to investigate the predictive value of self-attributes as clinical indicators of persistence for recruitment and retention of potentially successful music therapy students and young professionals. PMID:20394131

  20. Front-crawl stroke descriptors variability assessment for skill characterisation.

    PubMed

    Dadashi, F; Millet, G P; Aminian, K

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this article is to characterise front-crawl swimming skill based on variability pattern of technique descriptors. Nine national level and nine recreational swimmers performed three 300 m trials in a 50 m outdoor pool, at 70%, 80% and 90% of their front-crawl 400 m personal best time. Using wearable inertial measurement units (IMUs) and validated algorithms we assessed the variability of technique descriptors at each arm cycle (139 ± 17 per trial). We calculated the duration of pull, push and non-propulsive phases, index of coordination (IdC), stroke length, stroke rate and intra-cyclic velocity variation. To track intra-trial technique variability, we calculated the Cauchy index to quantify the stability of multidimensional technique descriptors in space-time. Skilled swimmers, having access to divers motor solutions, achieved significantly higher velocities at similar intensities and similar IdC (P < 0.01) with more stable motor pattern (smaller Cauchy index). Besides, the similarity of intra-cyclic velocity variation at different intensities denotes that skilled swimmers used a wider dynamic range of velocity. We also introduced cycle velocity variation as a new metric of propulsive pattern repeatability and showed cycle velocity variation changes is correlated to the Cauchy index (rx,y = 0.72, P < 0.01). These findings indicate that IdC can be used as a predictor of performance only when swimmers of homogeneous expertise level are studied and suggest the scrutiny of both intra-cyclic velocity variation and cycle velocity variation as a requisite to study the motor adaptations of the swimmer in facing new constraints. PMID:26595663

  1. Assessment of student competency in a simulated speech-language pathology clinical placement.

    PubMed

    Hill, Anne E; Davidson, Bronwyn J; McAllister, Sue; Wright, Judith; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2014-10-01

    Clinical education programs in speech-language pathology enable the transition of students' knowledge and skills from the classroom to the workplace. Simulated clinical learning experiences provide an opportunity to address the competency development of novice students. This study reports on the validation of an assessment tool designed to evaluate speech-language pathology students' performance in a simulated clinical placement. The Assessment of Foundation Clinical Skills (AFCS) was designed to link to concepts and content of COMPASS(®): Competency Assessment in Speech Pathology, a validated assessment of performance in the workplace. It incorporates units and elements of competency relevant to the placement. The validity of the AFCS was statistically investigated using Rasch analysis. Participants were 18 clinical educators and 130 speech-language pathology students undertaking the placement. Preliminary results support the validity of the AFCS as an assessment of foundation clinical skills of students in this simulated clinical placement. All units of competency and the majority of elements were relevant and representative of these skills. The use of a visual analogue scale which included a pre-Novice level to rate students' performance on units of competency was supported. This research provides guidance for development of quality assessments of performance in simulated placements. PMID:23992225

  2. The music therapy clinical intern: performance skills, academic knowledge, personal qualities, and interpersonal skills necessary for a student seeking clinical training.

    PubMed

    Brookins, L M

    1984-01-01

    The music therapy curriculum consists of two distinct parts: the academic phase and the internship. The music therapy student must apply for a clinical internship during the last year of the academic phase, and the student is expected to evolve from student to professional music therapist during the internship phase. The present study sought to determine the skills, knowledge, and qualities clinical training directors considered most important for a prospective intern to possess. The sample population of the survey consisted of 25 clinical training directors from the Great Lakes Region. Results of the survey indicated that piano skills, knowledge of psychology, emotional maturity, and the ability to express needs and feelings were considered most important for the prospective intern to possess. PMID:10269791

  3. A Methodology for Assessing Skill-Based Educational Outcomes in a Pharmacy Course.

    PubMed

    Alston, Gregory L; Griffiths, Carrie L

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To develop a methodology for assessing skill development in a course while providing objective evidence of success and actionable data to improve instructional effectiveness. Design. Course objectives were recast as skills to be demonstrated. Confidence in these skills was surveyed before and after the course. Student skills were demonstrated using 4 work products and a multiple-choice examination. Assessment. The change from precourse survey to postcourse survey was analyzed with a paired t test. Quality of the student work product was assessed using scoring guides. All students demonstrated skill mastery by scoring 70% or above on the work product, and 87/88 demonstrated individual progress on the surveyed skills during the 15-week course. Conclusion. This assessment strategy is based on sound design principles and provides robust multi-modal evidence of student achievement in skill development, which is not currently available using traditional student course evaluation surveys. PMID:27168618

  4. A Methodology for Assessing Skill-Based Educational Outcomes in a Pharmacy Course

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop a methodology for assessing skill development in a course while providing objective evidence of success and actionable data to improve instructional effectiveness. Design. Course objectives were recast as skills to be demonstrated. Confidence in these skills was surveyed before and after the course. Student skills were demonstrated using 4 work products and a multiple-choice examination. Assessment. The change from precourse survey to postcourse survey was analyzed with a paired t test. Quality of the student work product was assessed using scoring guides. All students demonstrated skill mastery by scoring 70% or above on the work product, and 87/88 demonstrated individual progress on the surveyed skills during the 15-week course. Conclusion. This assessment strategy is based on sound design principles and provides robust multi-modal evidence of student achievement in skill development, which is not currently available using traditional student course evaluation surveys. PMID:27168618

  5. The Intra-Rater Reliability of Nine Content-Validated Technical Skill Assessment Instruments (TSAI) for Athletic Taping Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagumen, Niko G.; Butterwick, Dale J.; Paskevich, David M.; Fung, Tak S.; Donnon, Tyrone L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish the intra-rater reliability of nine content-validated Technical Skill Assessment Instruments (TSAI) for the skills of athletic taping. Setting: University of Calgary. Subjects: Canadian Certified Athletic Therapists, CAT(C), with a mean ± SD of 9.6 ± 10.8 years as a CAT(C), 7.8 ± 10.9 years as a Supervisory Athletic…

  6. Hand-Held Video for Clinical Skills Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Mark; Jones, Steve; Murphy, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    In health care education a balance needs to be struck between theoretical and practical teaching. Undergraduates typically split their time between clinical placement and university-based teaching blocks. A proportion of the time spent in preparation for clinical practice placements will be spent in the classroom or in simulation suites. The…

  7. Identifying Academic Skill and Performance Deficits: The Experimental Analysis of Brief Assessments of Academic Skills. General Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhon, Gary J.; Noell, George H.; Witt, Joseph C.; Freeland, Jennifer T.; Dufrene, Brad A.; Gilbertson, Donna N.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined an approach for assessing and intervening with academic concerns that is conceptually derived from the distinction between skill deficits and performance deficits. A class-wide assessment was used to describe the students' functioning in the context of their peers and to help select a target concern for intervention. An…

  8. Clinical Skills Verification in General Psychiatry: Recommendations of the ABPN Task Force on Rater Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibson, Michael D.; Broquet, Karen E.; Anzia, Joan Meyer; Beresin, Eugene V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Kaye, David; Rao, Nyapati Raghu; Rostain, Anthony Leon; Sexson, Sandra B.; Summers, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) announced in 2007 that general psychiatry training programs must conduct Clinical Skills Verification (CSV), consisting of observed clinical interviews and case presentations during residency, as one requirement to establish graduates' eligibility to sit for the written certification…

  9. The Weak Relationship between Anatomy Competence and Clinical Skills in Junior Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeman, Scarpa; Chandratilake, Madawa

    2012-01-01

    In modern curricula, the early integration of anatomy and clinical skills education at undergraduate level is seen as important. However, the direct relationship between medical students' competence in anatomy, and their clinical proficiency during early undergraduate years, has scarcely been studied. In this study, the marks for anatomy and…

  10. Clinically Oriented Physiology Teaching: Strategy for Developing Critical-Thinking Skills in Undergraduate Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Upadhya, Subramanya; Torke, Sharmila; Ramnarayan, K.

    2004-01-01

    Medicine is an applied science, interpreting evidence and applying it to real life by using clinical reasoning skills and experience. COPT (clinically oriented physiology teaching) was incorporated in physiology instruction aiming to relate the study of physiology to real-life problems, to generate enthusiasm and motivation for learning, and to…

  11. Decadal predictive skill assessment - ensemble and hindcast sample size impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienz, Frank; Müller, Wolfgang; Pohlmann, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Hindcast, respectively retrospective prediction experiments have to be performed to validate decadal prediction systems. These are necessarily restricted in the number due to the computational constrains. From weather and seasonal prediction it is known that, the ensemble size is crucial. A similar dependency is likely for decadal predictions but, differences are expected due to the differing time-scales of the involved processes and the longer prediction horizon. It is shown here, that the ensemble and hindcast sample size have a large impact on the uncertainty assessment of the ensemble mean, as well as for the detection of prediction skill. For that purpose a conceptual model is developed, which enables the systematic analysis of statistical properties and its dependencies in a framework close to that of real decadal predictions. In addition, a set of extended range hindcast experiments have been undertaken, covering the entire 20th century.

  12. The Validity and Clinical Uses of the Pepper Visual Skills for Reading Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Pepper Visual Skills for Reading Test was assessed as a measure of reading ability with meaningful text in 38 adults with macular degeneration; scores were compared with assessment made using the Gray Oral Reading Test, a previously standardized assessment. The test's validity was confirmed. (Author/JDD)

  13. Computerized Communication Assessment Management: A Multi-Method Approach to Skills and Field Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, Joan E.

    The Department of Communication Studies at the University of Missouri-Kansas City is developing a computer package designed to teach and assess aural, visual, and oral communication skills through a multi-media approach with classroom tests, portfolios, and performance measures. Before developing the multi-method approach, the department tried six…

  14. A Process Analysis of Engineering Problem Solving and Assessment of Problem Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigg, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    In the engineering profession, one of the most critical skills to possess is accurate and efficient problem solving. Thus, engineering educators should strive to help students develop skills needed to become competent problem solvers. In order to measure the development of skills, it is necessary to assess student performance, identify any…

  15. Concrete Steps for Assessing the "Soft Skills" in an MBA Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingols, Cynthia; Shapiro, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, our School of Management began the serious path of assessing both the "hard skills" (such as accounting, finance, and strategy) and the "soft skills" (such as leadership, team work, and ethics) of our MBA Program. The data generated from examining the "soft skills" that we want students to learn within our…

  16. Assessing 21st Century Skills: A Guide to Evaluating Mastery and Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards clearly define the skills students need for success in college and the 21st century workplace. The question is, how can you measure student mastery of skills like creativity, problem solving, and use of technology? Laura Greenstein demonstrates how teachers can teach and assess 21st century skills using authentic…

  17. Assessing Core Manipulative Skills in a Large, First-Year Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moni, Roger W.; Hryciw, Deanne H.; Poronnik, Philip; Lluka, Lesley J.; Moni, Karen B.

    2007-01-01

    Responding to the concern from our faculty that undergraduate students do not have robust laboratory skills, we designed and implemented a strategy to individually teach and assess the manipulative skills of students in first-year laboratories. Five core laboratory skills were selected for the course entitled Human Biology, a large, first-year…

  18. The Handy 5: Planning and Assessing Integrated Information Skills Instruction. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blume, Shelia; Fox, Carol; Lakin, Jacqueline McMahon; Losey, Betsy; Stover, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Information skills instruction is a fundamental and vital part of K-12 education in the 21st century. "The Handy 5", a proven effective model for planning, teaching, and assessing information skills instruction, was written to help library media specialists and teachers to collaborate more effectively in the teaching of information skills. This…

  19. Communication and Research Skills in the Information Systems Curriculum: A Method of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarony, Paul J.; Driscoll, Donna A.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of learning goals has become the norm in business programs in higher education across the country. This paper offers a methodology for the assessment of both communication skills and research skills within a curriculum of the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems Program. Program level learning goals assessed in this paper are: (1)…

  20. Clinical assessment of the scapula: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo; Mottram, Sarah; Roussel, Nathalie A; Cools, Ann M J; Meeusen, Romain

    2014-06-01

    Scientific evidence supporting a role for faulty scapular positioning in patients with various shoulder disorders is cumulating. Clinicians who manage patients with shoulder pain and athletes at risk of developing shoulder pain need to have the skills to assess static and dynamic scapular positioning and dynamic control. Several methods for the assessment of scapular positioning are described in scientific literature. However, the majority uses expensive and specialised equipment (laboratory methods), making their use in clinical practice nearly impossible. On the basis of biometric and kinematic studies, guidelines for interpreting the observation of static and dynamic scapular positioning pattern in patients with shoulder pain are provided. At this point, clinicians can use reliable clinical tests for the assessment of both static and dynamic scapular positioning in patients with shoulder pain. However, this review also provides clinicians several possible pitfalls when performing clinical scapular evaluation. On the basis of its clinical relevance, its proven reliability, its relation to body length and its applicability in a clinical setting, this review recommends to assess the scapula both static (visual observation and acromial distance or Baylor/double square method for shoulder protraction) and semidynamic (visual observation and inclinometry for scapular upward rotation). In addition, when the patient demonstrates with shoulder impingement symptoms, the scapular repositioning test and scapular assistant test are recommended for relating the patients' symptoms to the position or movement of the scapula. PMID:22821720

  1. New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills: the NEPTUNE-CS project at the Split University School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Šimunović, Vladimir J.; Hozo, Izet; Rakić, Mladen; Jukić, Marko; Tomić, Snježana; Kokić, Slaven; Ljutić, Dragan; Družijanić, Nikica; Grković, Ivica; Šimunović, Filip; Marasović, Dujomir

    2010-01-01

    Clinical skills’ training is arguably the weakest point in medical schools’ curriculum. This study briefly describes how we at the Split University School of Medicine cope with this problem. We consider that, over the last decades, a considerable advancement in teaching methodologies, tools, and assessment of students has been made. However, there are many unresolved issues, most notably: (i) the institutional value system, impeding the motivation of the teaching staff; (ii) lack of a strong mentoring system; (iii) organization, timing, and placement of training in the curriculum; (iv) lack of publications pertinent to training; and (v) unwillingness of patients to participate in student training. To improve the existing training models we suggest increased institutional awareness of obstacles, as well as willingness to develop mechanisms for increasing the motivation of faculty. It is necessary to introduce changes in the structure and timing of training and to complement it with a catalog, practicum, and portfolio of clinical skills. At Split University School of Medicine, we developed a new paradigm aimed to improve the teaching of clinical skills called “Neptune-CSS,” which stands for New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills in Split. PMID:20960586

  2. Effects of a rater training on rating accuracy in a physical examination skills assessment

    PubMed Central

    Weitz, Gunther; Vinzentius, Christian; Twesten, Christoph; Lehnert, Hendrik; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; König, Inke R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The accuracy and reproducibility of medical skills assessment is generally low. Rater training has little or no effect. Our knowledge in this field, however, relies on studies involving video ratings of overall clinical performances. We hypothesised that a rater training focussing on the frame of reference could improve accuracy in grading the curricular assessment of a highly standardised physical head-to-toe examination. Methods: Twenty-one raters assessed the performance of 242 third-year medical students. Eleven raters had been randomly assigned to undergo a brief frame-of-reference training a few days before the assessment. 218 encounters were successfully recorded on video and re-assessed independently by three additional observers. Accuracy was defined as the concordance between the raters' grade and the median of the observers' grade. After the assessment, both students and raters filled in a questionnaire about their views on the assessment. Results: Rater training did not have a measurable influence on accuracy. However, trained raters rated significantly more stringently than untrained raters, and their overall stringency was closer to the stringency of the observers. The questionnaire indicated a higher awareness of the halo effect in the trained raters group. Although the self-assessment of the students mirrored the assessment of the raters in both groups, the students assessed by trained raters felt more discontent with their grade. Conclusions: While training had some marginal effects, it failed to have an impact on the individual accuracy. These results in real-life encounters are consistent with previous studies on rater training using video assessments of clinical performances. The high degree of standardisation in this study was not suitable to harmonize the trained raters’ grading. The data support the notion that the process of appraising medical performance is highly individual. A frame-of-reference training as applied does not

  3. Teaching Medical Informatics Skills During a Clinical Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Codish, Shlomi; Leibowitz, Akiva; Weinreb, Baruch

    2005-01-01

    Medical students use many forms of medical electronic resources (MER) during clinical clerkships. Such resources may be inaccurate, irrelevant or inappropriate, yet most medical students do not receive guidance on the use of MER. During the earliest clinical clerkship we gave a series of seminars and assignments on the use of MER. These were well accepted and were followed by increased knowledge in the use of MER. PMID:16779216

  4. Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Social Skills Training for Schizophrenia: Improvement in Functioning and Experiential Negative Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Granholm, Eric; Holden, Jason; Link, Peter C.; McQuaid, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Identifying treatments to improve functioning and reduce negative symptoms in consumers with schizophrenia is of high public health significance. Method In this randomized clinical trial, participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (N=149) were randomly assigned to cognitive behavioral social skills training (CBSST) or an active goal-focused supportive contact (GFSC) control condition. CBSST combined cognitive behavior therapy with social skills training and problem solving training to improve functioning and negative symptoms. GFSC was weekly supportive group therapy focused on setting and achieving functioning goals. Blind raters assessed functioning (primary outcome: Independent Living Skills Survey (ILSS)), CBSST skill knowledge, positive and negative symptoms, depression, and defeatist performance attitudes. Results In mixed-effects regression models in intent-to-treat analyses, CBSST skill knowledge, functioning, amotivation/asociality negative symptoms and defeatist performance attitudes improved significantly more in CBSST relative to GFSC. In both treatment groups, comparable improvements were also found for positive symptoms and a performance-based measure of social competence. Conclusions The results suggest CBSST is an effective treatment to improve functioning and experiential negative symptoms in consumers with schizophrenia, and both CBSST and supportive group therapy that is actively focused on setting and achieving functioning goals can improve social competence and reduce positive symptoms. PMID:24911420

  5. Use of the nursing simulation laboratory in reentry programs: an innovative setting for updating clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Wood, R Y

    1994-01-01

    Nurses who have been inactive for five or more years are deficient in technical skills and have high levels of anxiety regarding these deficiencies. Collegiate school of nursing laboratories are ideal settings to provide skill practice, reduce fear regarding new technology, and restore confidence of returnees. This article describes the laboratory component of a clinical update course that uses principles of adult education and self-pacing through independent learning stations to teach contemporary nursing skills. A description of instructional resources and equipment used to facilitate the practice is included. PMID:8138599

  6. Developmental Trajectory of Information-Processing Skills in Children: Computer-Based Assessment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jacqueline; Crowe, Louise M; Dooley, Julian; Collie, Alex; Davis, Gavin; McCrory, Paul; Clausen, Helen; Maddocks, David; Anderson, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    There are significant merits to a comprehensive cognitive assessment, but they are also time-consuming, costly, and susceptible to practice effects and may not detect change in the context of medical interventions or minor brain disruptions. Brief computer-based assessments focused on "fluid" cognitive domains (e.g., information-processing skills), which are vulnerable to disruption as a result of a brain injury, may provide an alternative assessment option. This study sought to: (a) examine the utility of a well-established, adult-based computerized tool, CogSport for Kids (CogState), for evaluating information-processing skills in children and adolescents; and (b) to report normative data for healthy children and adolescents. The study was a cross-sectional, community-based observational study of typically developing children aged 9 to 17 years old (N = 832). Participants completed the CogSport for Kids test battery, which includes six brief computerized tasks that assess cognitive functions including processing speed, attention, and working memory. Results showed an improvement with age for response speed and accuracy. The greatest change occurred between 9 and 12 years with performance stabilizing at 15 years. This brief screening tool is appropriate for clinical and research use in children aged 9 years and older and may be used to track cognitive development from childhood into adulthood and to identify children who deviate from normal expectations. PMID:25551176

  7. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills. PMID:25402714

  8. A Generalizability Theory Study of Athletic Taping Using the Technical Skill Assessment Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Lafave, Mark R.; Butterwick, Dale J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletic taping skills are highly valued clinical competencies in the athletic therapy and training profession. The Technical Skill Assessment Instrument (TSAI) has been content validated and tested for intrarater reliability. Objective: To test the reliability of the TSAI using a more robust measure of reliability, generalizability theory, and to hypothetically and mathematically project the optimal number of raters and scenarios to reliably measure athletic taping skills in the future. Setting: Mount Royal University. Design: Observational study. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 29 university students (8 men, 21 women; age = 20.79 ± 1.59 years) from the Athletic Therapy Program at Mount Royal University. Intervention(s): Participants were allowed 10 minutes per scenario to complete prophylactic taping for a standardized patient presenting with (1) a 4-week-old second-degree ankle sprain and (2) a thumb that had been hyperextended. Two raters judged student performance using the TSAI. Main Outcome Measure(s): Generalizability coefficients were calculated using variance scores for raters, participants, and scenarios. A decision study was calculated to project the optimal number of raters and scenarios to achieve acceptable levels of reliability. Generalizability coefficients were interpreted the same as other reliability coefficients, with 0 indicating no reliability and 1.0 indicating perfect reliability. Results: The result of our study design (2 raters, 1 standardized patient, 2 scenarios) was a generalizability coefficient of 0.67. Decision study projects indicated that 4 scenarios were necessary to reliably measure athletic taping skills. Conclusions: We found moderate reliability coefficients. Researchers should include more scenarios to reliably measure athletic taping skills. They should also focus on the development of evidence-based practice guidelines and standards of athletic taping and should test those standards using a

  9. Norming a VALUE rubric to assess graduate information literacy skills

    PubMed Central

    Turbow, David J.; Evener, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study evaluated whether a modified version of the information literacy Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) rubric would be useful for assessing the information literacy skills of graduate health sciences students. Methods Through facilitated calibration workshops, an interdepartmental six-person team of librarians and faculty engaged in guided discussion about the meaning of the rubric criteria. They applied the rubric to score student work for a peer-review essay assignment in the “Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Practice” course. To determine inter-rater reliability, the raters participated in a follow-up exercise in which they independently applied the rubric to ten samples of work from a research project in the doctor of physical therapy program: the patient case report assignment. Results For the peer-review essay, a high level of consistency in scoring was achieved for the second workshop, with statistically significant intra-class correlation coefficients above 0.8 for 3 criteria: “Determine the extent of evidence needed,” “Use evidence effectively to accomplish a specific purpose,” and “Access the needed evidence.” Participants concurred that the essay prompt and rubric criteria adequately discriminated the quality of student work for the peer-review essay assignment. When raters independently scored the patient case report assignment, inter-rater agreement was low and statistically insignificant for all rubric criteria (kappa=−0.16, p>0.05–kappa=0.12, p>0.05). Conclusions While the peer-review essay assignment lent itself well to rubric calibration, scorers had a difficult time with the patient case report. Lack of familiarity among some raters with the specifics of the patient case report assignment and subject matter might have accounted for low inter-rater reliability. When norming, it is important to hold conversations about search strategies and expectations of performance. Overall

  10. Skill assessment for an operational algal bloom forecast system

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Richard P.; Tomlinson, Michelle C.; Calkins, Julie A.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fisher, Kathleen; Nierenberg, Kate; Currier, Robert; Wynne, Timothy T.

    2010-01-01

    An operational forecast system for harmful algal blooms (HABs) in southwest Florida is analyzed for forecasting skill. The HABs, caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, lead to shellfish toxicity and to respiratory irritation. In addition to predicting new blooms and their extent, HAB forecasts are made twice weekly during a bloom event, using a combination of satellite derived image products, wind predictions, and a rule-based model derived from previous observations and research. These forecasts include: identification, intensification, transport, extent, and impact; the latter being the most significant to the public. Identification involves identifying new blooms as HABs and is validated against an operational monitoring program involving water sampling. Intensification forecasts, which are much less frequently made, can only be evaluated with satellite data on mono-specific blooms. Extent and transport forecasts of HABs are also evaluated against the water samples. Due to the resolution of the forecasts and available validation data, skill cannot be resolved at scales finer than 30 km. Initially, respiratory irritation forecasts were analyzed using anecdotal information, the only available data, which had a bias toward major respiratory events leading to a forecast accuracy exceeding 90%. When a systematic program of twice-daily observations from lifeguards was implemented, the forecast could be meaningfully assessed. The results show that the forecasts identify the occurrence of respiratory events at all lifeguard beaches 70% of the time. However, a high rate (80%) of false positive forecasts occurred at any given beach. As the forecasts were made at half to whole county level, the resolution of the validation data was reduced to county level, reducing false positives to 22% (accuracy of 78%). The study indicates the importance of systematic sampling, even when using qualitative descriptors, the use of validation resolution to evaluate forecast

  11. Skill assessment for an operational algal bloom forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Richard P.; Tomlinson, Michelle C.; Calkins, Julie A.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fisher, Kathleen; Nierenberg, Kate; Currier, Robert; Wynne, Timothy T.

    2009-02-01

    An operational forecast system for harmful algal blooms (HABs) in southwest Florida is analyzed for forecasting skill. The HABs, caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, lead to shellfish toxicity and to respiratory irritation. In addition to predicting new blooms and their extent, HAB forecasts are made twice weekly during a bloom event, using a combination of satellite derived image products, wind predictions, and a rule-based model derived from previous observations and research. These forecasts include: identification, intensification, transport, extent, and impact; the latter being the most significant to the public. Identification involves identifying new blooms as HABs and is validated against an operational monitoring program involving water sampling. Intensification forecasts, which are much less frequently made, can only be evaluated with satellite data on mono-specific blooms. Extent and transport forecasts of HABs are also evaluated against the water samples. Due to the resolution of the forecasts and available validation data, skill cannot be resolved at scales finer than 30 km. Initially, respiratory irritation forecasts were analyzed using anecdotal information, the only available data, which had a bias toward major respiratory events leading to a forecast accuracy exceeding 90%. When a systematic program of twice-daily observations from lifeguards was implemented, the forecast could be meaningfully assessed. The results show that the forecasts identify the occurrence of respiratory events at all lifeguard beaches 70% of the time. However, a high rate (80%) of false positive forecasts occurred at any given beach. As the forecasts were made at half to whole county level, the resolution of the validation data was reduced to county level, reducing false positives to 22% (accuracy of 78%). The study indicates the importance of systematic sampling, even when using qualitative descriptors, the use of validation resolution to evaluate forecast

  12. Cross-Linguistic Expression of Contrastive Accent: Clinical Assessment in Spanish and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Peppe, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Well-documented Romance-Germanic differences in the use of accent in speech to convey information-structure and focus cause problems for the assessment of prosodic skills in populations with clinical disorders. The strategies for assessing the ability to use lexical and contrastive accent in English and Spanish are reviewed, and studies in the…

  13. Use of videos to support teaching and learning of clinical skills in nursing education: A review.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Helen; Oprescu, Florin I; Downer, Terri; Phillips, Nicole M; McTier, Lauren; Lord, Bill; Barr, Nigel; Alla, Kristel; Bright, Peter; Dayton, Jeanne; Simbag, Vilma; Visser, Irene

    2016-07-01

    Information and communications technology is influencing the delivery of education in tertiary institutions. In particular, the increased use of videos for teaching and learning clinical skills in nursing may be a promising direction to pursue, yet we need to better document the current research in this area of inquiry. The aim of this paper was to explore and document the current areas of research into the use of videos to support teaching and learning of clinical skills in nursing education. The four main areas of current and future research are effectiveness, efficiency, usage, and quality of videos as teaching and learning materials. While there is a clear need for additional research in the area, the use of videos seems to be a promising, relevant, and increasingly used instructional strategy that could enhance the quality of clinical skills education. PMID:27237353

  14. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    PubMed

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. PMID:23611153

  15. Chairside Assisting Skill Evaluation (CASE). Clinical Setting. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innovative Programming Systems, Minneapolis, Minn.

    These checklists are designed for use during the dental assistant student's extramural clinical experience assignment. Checklists test students on their knowledge of terminology, equipment, procedures, and patient relations. Objectives are listed outline style with columns to check progress during a first and a second evaluation. Areas included…

  16. Facilitating Allied Health Students' Acquisition of Clinical Reasoning Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beissner, Katherine; And Others

    This paper discusses two methods used in training allied health students to clarify patients' problems and develop treatment plans to resolve them. The traditional problem solving approach is presented as a means to introduce students to patient evaluation and treatment planning, while clinical reasoning is seen as a more expert way to approach…

  17. Clinical Reasoning Skills of Speech and Language Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoben, Kirsty; Varley, Rosemary; Cox, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background: Difficulties experienced by novices in clinical reasoning have been well documented in many professions, especially medicine (Boshuizen and Schmidt 1992, 2000; Elstein, Shulman and Sprafka 1978; Patel and Groen 1986; Rikers, Loyens and Schmidt 2004). These studies have shown that novice clinicians have difficulties with both knowledge…

  18. Study of the self-confidence of midwifery graduates from Mashhad College of nursing and midwifery in fulfilling clinical skills

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakhani, Kobra; Shorab, Nahid Jahani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Self-confidence is one of the main components of clinical competence, and it is considered to be an important indicator of ability and competence. The aim of this study was to determine the confidence of midwifery graduates from Mashhad College of nursing and midwifery in fulfilling the required clinical skills. Methods: The study was in the form of a cross-sectional study, and it was performed in 2011 on 50 midwifery graduates who had been working in health centers in Mashhad for six months to three years providing midwifery services, as well as on their supervisors having a minimum of 6 months experiences of responsibility in these centers. The research tools included self-assessment tools of self-confidence in midwives and assessment tools of self-confidence in midwifery graduates in fulfilling clinical skills performed by the supervisors. The validity of the tools was confirmed by face validity and content validity, and the reliability of the test was confirmed by test-retest (r = 0.82). After the data were extracted and encoded, they were analyzed using SPSS software version 11.5, descriptive statistics, the t-test, and Pearson’s test. Results: Among the midwifery graduates, 84.57% of them had confidence in the area of management of low-risk situations, and 55.51% had confidence in their ability to manage high-risk situations. The self-confidence levels of graduates in fulfilling clinical skills in the management of low-risk and high-risk situations were significantly different (P < 0.05). Clinical skills had a positive correlation with self-confidence (P < 0.05, r = 0.85). Conclusion: Improvements were needed in the self-confidence of graduates in fulfilling clinical skills in the management of high-risk situations. In order to achieve such improvement, it is necessary to identify and use methods of increasing graduates’ self-confidence in the learning environment by developing an enhanced midwifery curriculum and improved teaching methods

  19. National Clinical Skills Competition: an effective simulation-based method to improve undergraduate medical education in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guanchao; Chen, Hong; Wang, Qiming; Chi, Baorong; He, Qingnan; Xiao, Haipeng; Zhou, Qinghuan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Clinical Skills Competition has been held in China for 5 consecutive years since 2010 to promote undergraduate education reform and improve the teaching quality. The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study. Methods Participation in the competitions and the compilation of the questions used in the competition finals are summarized, and the influence and guidance quality are further analyzed. Through the nationwide distribution of questionnaires in medical colleges, the effects of the simulation-based competition on promoting undergraduate medical education reform were evaluated. Results The results show that approximately 450 students from more than 110 colleges (accounting for 81% of colleges providing undergraduate clinical medical education in China) participated in the competition each year. The knowledge, skills, and attitudes were comprehensively evaluated by simulation-based assessment. Eight hundred and eighty copies of the questionnaires were distributed to 110 participating medical schools in 2015. In total, 752 valid responses were received across 95 schools. The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%), updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%), strengthened faculty development (84.0%), improved educational resources (82.1%), and benefited all students (53.4%). Conclusions The National Clinical Skills Competition is widely accepted in China. It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China. PMID:26894586

  20. Clinical Assessment in Mathematics: Learning the Craft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunting, Robert P.; Doig, Brian A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a professional development program called Clinical Approaches to Mathematics Assessment. Argues for the advanced training of mathematics teachers who understand knowledge construction processes of students; can use clinical tools for evaluating a student's unique mathematical "fingerprint"; and can create or adapt problems, tasks, or…

  1. Agreement Among Dental Students, Peer Assessors, and Tutor in Assessing Students' Competence in Preclinical Skills.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jennifer I; Richardson, Gillian L; Drummie, Joyce

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of agreement regarding assessments of competence among dental students, their student peers, and their clinical skills tutors in a preclinical skills program. In 2012-13 at the University of Edinburgh, second-year dental students learned to perform the following seven cavity preparations/restorations on primary and permanent Frasaco teeth: single-surface adhesive occlusal cavity; single-surface adhesive interproximal cavity; single-surface adhesive labial cavity; multi-surface adhesive cavity; multi-surface amalgam cavity; pre-formed metal crown preparation; and composite resin buildup of a fractured maxillary central incisor tooth. Each student, a randomly allocated student peer, and the clinical skills tutor used standardized descriptors to assign a competency grade to all the students' preparations/restorations. The grades were analyzed by chi-square analysis. Data were available for all 59 second-year students in the program. The results showed that both the students and their peers overestimated the students' competence compared to the tutor at the following levels: single-surface adhesive occlusal cavity (χ(2)=10.63, p=0.005); single-surface adhesive interproximal cavity (χ(2)=11.40, p=0.003); single-surface labial cavity (χ(2)=23.70, p=0.001); multi-surface adhesive cavity (χ(2)=12.56, p=0.002); multi-surface amalgam cavity (χ(2)=38.85, p=0.001); pre-formed metal crown preparation (χ(2)=40.41, p=0.001); and composite resin buildup (χ(2)=57.31, p=0.001). As expected, the lowest levels of agreement occurred on the most complicated procedures. These findings support the need for additional ways to help students better self-assess their work. PMID:26522637

  2. Assessment Work: Examining the Prevalence and Nature of Assessment Competencies and Skills in Student Affairs Job Postings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, John L.; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method study explored the assessment-related skills and job duties that student affairs administrators expect from new employees as reflected in 1,759 job openings posted in 2008, of which seven job postings were specialist positions in outcomes-based assessment. The skills and duties required of these seven positions were primarily…

  3. Unpacking Pandora's Box: Issues in the Assessment of English Learners' Literacy Skill Development in Multimodal Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Jessica Zacher

    2012-01-01

    In this commentary I unpack the Pandora's Box of issues related to the assessment of English language learners' literacy skill development in multimodal classrooms. I ask how we might quantify the benefits of multimodal composing, for k-12 as well as college students, given the existing complexity of assessing ELLs' traditional literacy skills. I…

  4. Teachers' Perceptions of a Fundamental Movement Skill (FMS) Assessment Battery in a School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Natalie; Morgan, Philip J.; Salmon, Jo; Barnett, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental movement skills (FMS) competence is low in adolescent girls. An assessment tool for teachers is needed to monitor FMS in this demographic. The present study explored whether the Canadian Agility and Movement Skill Assessment (CAMSA) is feasible for use by physical education (PE) teachers of Australian Year 7 girls in a school setting.…

  5. Competencies That Count: Strategies for Assessing High-Performance Skills. LAB Working Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lili

    This guide provides a "road map" to the various ways that schools and employers assess high-performance competencies, such as problem solving, information management, and communication and negotiation skills. The guide begins with a brief analysis of why it is important to assess these skills in light of the current standards environment in…

  6. Nurses' Evaluation of Their Use and Mastery in Health Assessment Skills: Selected Iran's Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Safa, Azade

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health assessment skills are of the most important skills which nurses require. The more precise assessment, the better results would be obtained and the quality of patient care would be improved. However, in Iran, few studies have investigated nurses’ assessment skills. Objectives: This study was aimed to assessnurses' evaluation of the learned skills of health assessment and their use. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 nurses in Isfahan province hospitals. Data was collected by a questionnaire including demographic data and 120 health assessment skills. Nurses scored their frequency of using and proficiency in skills. Statistical analysis was conducted by ANOVA, Tukey test and independent sample T-tests. Results: The highest level of using and proficiency in skills was related to taking history. Nurses received 87.25% of score in this field. The lowest level of application was in assessment of the urogenital system so that nurses received 16.37% of score in this area. Also the lowest proficiency was in assessment of the nervous system and nurses received 34.58% of score in this area. Conclusions: The level of nurses' proficiency in the health assessment skills was not satisfactory. Modifying the curriculum and cooperating of nurse managers and nursing schools can help to improve the situation. PMID:25414875

  7. Effective Student Assessment and Evaluation in the Classroom: Knowledge + Skills + Attributes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Todd; Swanson, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of "Effective Student Assessment and Evaluation in the Classroom: Knowledge + Skills + Attributes" is to more clearly articulate the student assessment knowledge, skills and attributes expected under the Teaching Quality Standard Ministerial Order of applicants for Alberta interim professional teacher certification. The document aims…

  8. Assessing Early Literacy Skills with the Mountain Shadows Phonemic Awareness Scale (MS-PAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Marley W.; Edwards, Vicki A.

    2004-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that phonemic awareness is associated with the development of skilled reading. Consequently, it is recommended that beginning readers be assessed to ensure adequate development of phonemic awareness skills. When choosing an assessment method, reliability and validity, ease of administration and scoring, and…

  9. Using Assessment to Improve Early Elementary Students' Knowledge and Skills for Comprehending Informational Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witmer, Sara E.; Duke, Nell K.; Billman, Alison K.; Betts, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Although assessment of student progress in word reading skills is common, students' knowledge and skills for comprehending informational text are rarely assessed. Despite research indicating the need for instruction in this area and a growing national understanding of its importance that is reflected in the Common Core State Standards, few…

  10. Using Model-Tracing to Conduct Performance Assessment of Students' Inquiry Skills within a Microworld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobert, Janice D.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    The National frameworks for science emphasize inquiry skills (NRC, 1996), however, in typical classroom practice, science learning often focuses on rote learning in part because science process skills are difficult to assess (Fadel, Honey, & Pasnick, 2007) and rote knowledge is prioritized on high-stakes tests. Short answer assessments of inquiry…

  11. Discrimination Skills Predict Effective Preference Assessment Methods for Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, May S. H.; Nguyen, Duong; Yu, C. T.; Thorsteinsson, Jennifer R.; Martin, Toby L.; Martin, Garry L.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between three discrimination skills (visual, visual matching-to-sample, and auditory-visual) and four stimulus modalities (object, picture, spoken, and video) in assessing preferences of leisure activities for 7 adults with developmental disabilities. Three discrimination skills were measured using the Assessment of…

  12. A Calculus of Occupational Skill Attainment: Building More Validity into a Valid Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munyofu, Paul; Kohr, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated several aspects of occupational skill assessment as implemented in one state: (1) What is the extent to which student achievement on the cognitive component was related to their achievement on the psychomotor component of the technical skill assessments? (2) How efficiently was their overall composite attainment calculated?…

  13. Teacher Compliance and Accuracy in State Assessment of Student Motor Skill Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Tina J.; Hicklin, Lori K.; French, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate teacher compliance with state mandated assessment protocols and teacher accuracy in assessing student motor skill performance. Method: Middle school teachers (N = 116) submitted eighth grade student motor skill performance data from 318 physical education classes to a trained monitoring…

  14. Aligning CASAS Competencies and Assessments to Basic Skills Content Standards. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception, the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) has focused on teaching and assessing basic skills in contexts that are relevant and important to adult learners. CASAS has developed and continues to refine a highly formalized hierarchy of competencies, the application of basic skills that adults need to be fully…

  15. ASK Standards: Assessment, Skills, and Knowledge Content Standards for Student Affairs Practitioners and Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Assessment Skills and Knowledge (ASK) standards seek to articulate the areas of content knowledge, skill and dispositions that student affairs professionals need in order to perform as practitioner-scholars to assess the degree to which students are mastering the learning and development outcomes the professionals intend. Consistent with…

  16. Validation of Modified Soft Skills Assessment Instrument (MOSSAI) for Use in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aworanti, O. A.; Taiwo, M. B.; Iluobe, O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, it has become an accepted norm nearly all over the globe to teach and assess soft skills. However, in Nigeria, it is an emerging area of interest that needs to be addressed squarely. In the light of the fore-going, this study validated a modified version of Measuring and Assessment Soft Skills (MASS) (an instrument developed and used by…

  17. The Development of the Manchester Motor Skills Assessment (MMSA): An Initial Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, C.; Cole, M.; Crook, H.; Fletcher, J.; Lucanz, J.; Noble, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article is an initial evaluation of a motor skills assessment for primary aged children. The Manchester Motor Skills Assessment (MMSA) is designed to be quick and easy for teaching assistants to complete, with the dual purposes of informing group programme planning and demonstrating an individual child's progress following a period of…

  18. Critical Emergency Medicine Procedural Skills: A Comparative Study of Methods for Teaching and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Dane M.; And Others

    Three critical procedural skills in emergency medicine were evaluated using three assessment modalities--written, computer, and animal model. The effects of computer practice and previous procedure experience on skill competence were also examined in an experimental sequential assessment design. Subjects were six medical students, six residents,…

  19. [Health assessment of local residents who made full use of symptomatology skills and test device].

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Shinichiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Ikeda, Kayo; Okazaki, Teruo; Takahashi, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    A strategy named "Japan is back" adopted in June 2013 specifies that pharmacies shall be regarded as community-based places where health-related information is provided, and the public shall be encouraged to use the services of pharmacies and pharmacists who can advise on health and appropriate use of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, and promote self medication. In Japan there are approximately 55000 pharmacies and 260000 pharmacists, and community residents are recommended to use these resources. As advisors on healthcare in the community, pharmacists are required to make judgments regarding drug use in individuals performing self medication and using OTC drugs in consideration of their symptoms and level of understanding of their health conditions, and recommend that they consult a medical center if necessary. To meet these requirements pharmacists need to have the skills to monitor each individual's lifestyle, behavior, and environment as well as trends in society, and assess their health status. However, education that allows pharmacists to practice such skills remains insufficiently developed. We consider that to be able to detect diseases early among community residents and appropriately support them using pharmacotherapy, it is very important to train pharmacists to do the following at pharmacies: 1) determine individuals who should be treated early using symptomatologic skills; 2) promote public awareness of disease; and 3) perform biochemical examination (blood is collected by fingerprick promptly to obtain biochemical data) in cooperation with the Department of Clinical Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hiroshima University. PMID:25747208

  20. The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills.

    PubMed

    Fastré, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based assessment criteria, describing what students should do, for the task at hand. The performance-based group is compared to a competence-based assessment group in which students receive a preset list of competence-based assessment criteria, describing what students should be able to do. The test phase revealed that the performance-based group outperformed the competence-based group on test task performance. In addition, higher performance of the performance-based group was reached with lower reported mental effort during training, indicating a higher instructional efficiency for novice students. PMID:20054648

  1. Using the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to Describe and Interpret Skill Acquisition and Clinical Judgment in Nursing Practice and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Three studies using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition were conducted over a period of 21 years. Nurses with a range of experience and reported skillfulness were interviewed. Each study used nurses' narrative accounts of actual clinical situations. A subsample of participants were observed and interviewed at work. These studies extend the…

  2. Assessing Information Literacy Skills Development in First Year Students: A Multi-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Assessment data from 5 years of a pretest/posttest with first-year students was analyzed using McNemar's test. The results show that revisiting previous assessment data can identify significant changes in information literacy skill development.

  3. Assessing students' English language proficiency during clinical placement: A qualitative evaluation of a language framework.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, Caroline; Rogan, Fran

    2015-06-01

    The increase in nursing students for whom English is an additional language requires clinical facilitators to assess students' performance regarding clinical skills, nursing communication and English language. However, assessing language proficiency is a complex process that is often conflated with cultural norms and clinical skills, and facilitators may lack confidence in assessing English language. This paper discusses an evaluation of a set of guidelines developed in a large metropolitan Australian university to help clinical facilitators make decisions about students' English language proficiency. The study found that the guidelines were useful in helping facilitators assess English language. However, strategies to address identified language problems needed to be incorporated to enable the guidelines to also be used as a teaching tool. The study concludes that to be effective, such guidelines need embedding within a systematic approach that identifies and responds to students who may be underperforming due to a low level of English language proficiency. PMID:25784501

  4. Preparing Pre-Service Primary School Teachers to Assess Fundamental Motor Skills: Two Skills and Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, John; Miller, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pre-service teacher education (PSTE) programmes for generalist primary school teachers have limited time allocated to Physical Education, Health and Personal Development. In practice, teachers in schools are required to assess motor skills despite the fact that their training provides minimal preparation. This necessitates creative…

  5. Assessing skill of operational forest fire emissions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Across the continental United States, the BlueSky Smoke Modeling Framework provides hourly forest fire emissions forecasts and calculates the concentrations of hazardous compounds 72 hours in advance. Though a traditional computational model itself, the BlueSky Framework pulls together the results from a number of different independent models for fire and fuel information, combustion of fuel, and speciated emissions calculations to produce its operational forecasts of fire-related emissions and smoke dispersals. One aspect of forest fire emissions that is of particular concern is small particulate matter, particularly microscopic particles with diameters less than 2.5 micrometers. These particles, known as PM2.5, are small enough to penetrate lung tissue and cause serious health problems in high concentrations. To assess the skill of the BlueSky Gateway, a system that uses the BlueSky Framework and the Community MultiScale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to forecast PM2.5 surface concentrations, Strand et al. compared the modeled estimates for two Californian forest wildfire events against observations.

  6. Self-Assessed Skill Needs and Job Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappelli, Peter; Rogovsky, Nikolai

    Since 1983, discussions focused increasingly on the contribution to economic performance associated with the skills of the work force. Government policy went further by specifying skills important to economic performance and advocating their introduction into schools and training programs. Surprisingly little empirical research examined the…

  7. Teaching, Learning and Assessment for Adults: Improving Foundation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Many adults in OECD countries have low language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) skills. The consequences of these low foundation skills span the economic, health and social well-being of individuals, families and communities. Investment in this sector of adult education is therefore crucial. This study looks specifically inside the programmes for…

  8. A Rapid Assessment of Skills in Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Vorndran, Christina; Addison, Laura; Kuhn, Stephanie A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Educational interventions based on the principles of behavior analysis are highly effective for establishing skills in young children with autism. As a first step in program development, the child's current skill level is determined by evaluating performance on tasks drawn from a preestablished curriculum. However, few specific guidelines have…

  9. Developing Critical Thinking Skills: Assessing the Effectiveness of Workbook Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Elise D.; Jefferson, Renee N.

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenge of developing critical thinking skills in college students, this empirical study examines the effectiveness of cognitive exercises in developing those skills. The study uses Critical Thinking: Building the Basics by Walter, Knudsvig, and Smith (2003). This workbook is specifically designed to exercise and develop critical…

  10. Self-assessment and goal-setting is associated with an improvement in interviewing skills

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Kathleen; Zabar, Sondra; Charap, Joseph; Nicholson, Joseph; Disney, Lindsey; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Describe the relationship between medical students’ self-assessment and goal-setting (SAGS) skills and development of interviewing skills during the first-year doctoring course. Method 157 first-year medical students completed three two-case standardized patient (SP) interviews. After each of the first two, students viewed videotapes of their interview, completed a SAGS worksheet, and reviewed a selected tape segment in a seminar. SAGS was categorized into good and poor quality and interviewing skills were rated by trained raters. Results SAGS improved over time (37% good week 1 vs. 61% good week 10). Baseline SAGS and interviewing skills were not associated. Initial SAGS quality was associated with change in interviewing skills – those with poor-quality SAGS demonstrated a decrease and those with good-quality SAGS demonstrated an increase in scores by 17 weeks (ANOVA F=4.16, p=0.024). For students whose SAGS skills were good at both week 1 and 10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 1–10 and then increased significantly at week 17. For those whose SAGS remained ‘poor’ in weeks 1–10, interviewing skills declined in weeks 10–17. Conclusions In general, the quality of students’ SAGS improved over time. Poor baseline SAGS skills and failure to improve were associated with a decrease in interviewing skills at 17 weeks. For students with better SAGS, interviewing skills increased at week 17. Improvement in SAGS skills was not associated with improved interviewing skills. Understanding structured self-assessment skills helps identify student characteristics that influence progressive mastery of communication skills and therefore may inform curriculum and remediation tailoring. PMID:25059835

  11. Identifying Culturally Competent Clinical Skills in Speech-Language Pathologists in the Central Valley of California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maul, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify specific clinical skills in speech-language pathologists (SLPs) that may constitute cultural competency, a term which currently lacks operational definition. Through qualitative interview methods, the following research questions were addressed: (1) What dominant themes, if any, can be found in SLPs'…

  12. The Psychometric Properties of the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills in Clinical Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Corinna; Kuyken, Willem; Bohus, Martin; Heidenreich, Thomas; Michalak, Johannes; Steil, Regina

    2010-01-01

    The Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills (KIMS) is a well-validated multidimensional questionnaire measuring dimensions of mindfulness on four scales: Observing, Describing, Act With Awareness, and Accept Without Judgment. Even though the KIMS has been used in several clinical studies no information is available about the psychometric…

  13. Generic Reflective Feedback: An Effective Approach to Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojcikowski, K.; Brownie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning can be an effective tool to develop clinical reasoning skills. However, it traditionally takes place in tutorial groups, giving students little flexibility in how and when they learn. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of generic reflective feedback (GRF) with tutorial-based reflective feedback on the development of…

  14. The Integration of Psychomotor Skills in a Hybrid-PBL Dental Curriculum: The Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joanne N.; MacNeil, M. A. J.; Harrison, Rosamund L.; Clark, D. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Describes the restructuring of clinical clerkships at the University of British Columbia (Canada) dental school as part of a new, hybrid, problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum, focusing on strategies for integrating development of psychomotor skills. Methods of achieving both horizontal and vertical integration of competencies through grouping…

  15. Development of the Objective, Structured Communication Assessment of Residents (OSCAR) Tool for Measuring Communication Skills With Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Aleece; Perzynski, Adam; Thomas, Charles; Saade, Jimmy Y.; McFarlane, Michael; Becker, Jeffery

    2013-01-01

    Background Although interpersonal and communication skills are essential to physician practice, there is a dearth of effective tools to meaningfully teach and assess communication skills. Objective The purpose of our study was to create a standardized tool for evaluation of communication skills for residents across specialties. Methods We designed an Objective, Structured Communication Assessment of Residents (OSCAR) tool, consisting of 4 clinical stations, to assess intern communication skills with relationship development, their establishment of case goals, and their organization and time management skills. Interns from 11 training programs completed the stations, with senior residents trained to function as standardized patients. The 4 stations' scenarios were a disruptive patient, handling a phone call for a narcotics refill, disclosing a medical mistake, and delivering bad news. Results Eighty-three interns completed OSCAR during orientation. The assessment took interns about 40 minutes to complete, and participants were given immediate feedback by the standardized patients. The total possible score for each station was 50. Resident performance was highest for disclosing a medical error (94%, 47 of 50), followed by handling a disruptive patient (90%, 45 of 50), disclosing bad news (86%, 43 of 50), and handling the phone call for the narcotics refill (62%, 31 of 50). Multivariate analysis of variance results indicated differences between residents from US and international medical schools, but there were no significant differences across specialties. Interrater reliability was excellent for each station (> 0.80). Conclusions OSCAR is a practical tool for assessing interns' communication skills to provide timely results to program directors. PMID:24455003

  16. Assessment of motor and process skills: assessing client work performance in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish whether the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) is an appropriate tool to evaluate the quality of work performance by comparing clients' results on the AMPS with the quality of the skills that they demonstrate on the shop floor. A convenience sample of chronically unemployed (vocationally disabled) participants (N=139) with no formal training who were seeking unskilled work through Jobcentrum West-Vlaanderen (West Flanders Job Centre, Belgium) was used. Results demonstrated that in 75.2% of cases the prediction of employment outcome was correct; it is suggested that an AMPS motor score < 2.5 and a process score < 1.2 is insufficient for regular employment, while a motor score > 3.1 and process score > 1.5 indicates that regular employment is a realistic goal. The quality of the motor skills measured by the AMPS and measured on the shop floor are comparable, but little similarity was found in the measurement of process skills. PMID:20164615

  17. Assessing Residents' Frozen Section Skills for Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Selove, William; Bradford, Leslie S; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-09-01

    Intraoperative frozen section (IFS) on endometrial cancer is an invaluable skill for pathologists-in-training to master. Within limited time constraints, pathologists are expected to determine tumor type, grade, and depth of myometrial invasion. During their training, pathology residents gradually gain experience in handling the majority of cases. However, significant errors can still be seen among senior level trainees. We aimed to improve training effectiveness by evaluating our trainees' performance, identifying common errors, and recommending focused curriculum. Twenty-two residents [postgraduate year (PGY)-1-PGY-4] performed 260 IFS during a 4-yr period. We compared their independent IFS diagnoses with final diagnoses. Overall resident IFS accuracy was 73%. Accuracy for tumor type and depth of myometrial invasion was 80% and 93%, respectively. Two thirds of errors were due to sampling with the rest because of interpretation. Major deficiencies lay in recognizing high-risk histologic types (serous, clear cell, sarcoma) and unconventional myometrial invasion patterns (MELF, adenoma malignum, and adenomyosis-like). Resident IFS errors would theoretically result in suboptimal staging for 32 (12%) patients and unnecessary staging for 1 (0.4%). Overall IFS performance improved as training level increased (76% accuracy for PGY-1 accompanied by PGY-5; 59% for PGY-2; 74% for PGY-3; and 86% for PGY-4). We recommend a dedicated curriculum targeting these difficult yet clinically important entities through review literature and a collection of classic cases demonstrating the diverse morphology variations. Implementing such focused training would greatly improve our trainees' competence on IFS, preparing them to handle a wide variety of cases and situations in future practice. PMID:26598984

  18. Communication Skills in Standardized-Patient Assessment of Final-Year Medical Students: A Psychometric Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiton, Gretchen; Hodgson, Carol S.; Delandshere, Ginett; Wilkerson, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the content-specificity of communication skills. It investigates the reliability and dimensionality of standardized patient (SP) ratings of communication skills in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination(OSCE) for final year medical students. An OSCE consisting of seven standardized patient(SP)…

  19. Creating clinical trial designs that incorporate clinical outcome assessments.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark R; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Lesser, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    Clinical outcome assessments (COAs) are increasingly being used in determining the efficacy of new treatment regimens. This was typified in the recent use of a symptom-based instrument combined with an organ-based measure of response for the approval of ruxolitinib in myelofibrosis. There are challenges in incorporating these COAs into clinical trials, including designating the level of priority, incorporating these measures into a combined or composite endpoint, and dealing with issues related to compliance and interpretation of results accounting for missing data. This article describes the results of a recent panel discussion that attempted to address these issues and provide guidance to the incorporation of COAs into clinical trials, including novel statistical designs, so that the testing of new treatments in patients with cancers of the central nervous system can incorporate these important clinical endpoints. PMID:26989129

  20. Veterinary students' attitudes toward the assessment of clinical reasoning using extended matching questions.

    PubMed

    Tomlin, Jane L; Pead, Matthew J; May, Stephen A

    2008-01-01

    For the purposes of assessment, clinical expertise has been broken down into three broad components: scientific and clinical knowledge, clinical reasoning, and practical or technical skills. This structure can be used to define the tools used for assessment of clinical students. Knowledge can be assessed through a variety of written formats, and skills through various practical assessments, including the objective structured clinical examination. The assessment of clinical reasoning is more of a challenge, and, partly in order to address this challenge, the Royal Veterinary College recently introduced veterinary clinical-scenario-based extended matching questions. A questionnaire was used to collect students' perceptions of the new format. Surprisingly, this questionnaire also delivered important insights into the students' understanding of the process of clinical reasoning itself that could be crucial in future curriculum design. Despite a theory course that introduced students to the nature of expertise and the importance of pattern recognition to experienced clinicians, some final-year students could not recognize this approach as relevant to them and objected to the way in which some of the questions were driving them to think. This may relate to the variety of methods of case management that students observe during their practical experience and the different attitudes of clinicians to the way students work up cases. Overall, the students perceived this question type as an appropriate way to test clinical reasoning and as relevant to the experience they had gained during their clinical rotations, both within the college and in veterinary practices outside it. PMID:19228917

  1. The Effect of Communication Skills Training by Video Feedback Method on Clinical Skills of Interns of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Compared to Didactic Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Managheb, S. E.; Zamani, A.; Shams, B.; Farajzadegan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective communication is essential to the practice of high-quality medicine. There are methodological challenges in communication skills training. This study was performed in order to assess the educational benefits of communication skills training by video feedback method versus traditional formats such as lectures on clinical…

  2. Skill assessment for coupled biological/physical models of marine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stow, Craig A.; Jolliff, Jason; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Doney, Scott C.; Allen, J. Icarus; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Rose, Kenneth A.; Wallhead, Philip

    2009-02-01

    Coupled biological/physical models of marine systems serve many purposes including the synthesis of information, hypothesis generation, and as a tool for numerical experimentation. However, marine system models are increasingly used for prediction to support high-stakes decision-making. In such applications it is imperative that a rigorous model skill assessment is conducted so that the model's capabilities are tested and understood. Herein, we review several metrics and approaches useful to evaluate model skill. The definition of skill and the determination of the skill level necessary for a given application is context specific and no single metric is likely to reveal all aspects of model skill. Thus, we recommend the use of several metrics, in concert, to provide a more thorough appraisal. The routine application and presentation of rigorous skill assessment metrics will also serve the broader interests of the modeling community, ultimately resulting in improved forecasting abilities as well as helping us recognize our limitations.

  3. The development and validation of a golf swing and putt skill assessment for children.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Lisa M; Hardy, Louise L; Brian, Ali S; Robertson, Sam

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument's discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p < 0.001). The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90) and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82), although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key pointsGolf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level

  4. The Development and Validation of a Golf Swing and Putt Skill Assessment for Children

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Lisa M.; Hardy, Louise L.; Brian, Ali S.; Robertson, Sam

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument’s discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p < 0.001). The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90) and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82), although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key points Golf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level

  5. Learning Clinical Skills during Bedside Teaching Encounters in General Practice: A Video-Observational Study with Insights from Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajjawi, Rola; Rees, Charlotte; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how opportunities for learning clinical skills are negotiated within bedside teaching encounters (BTEs). Bedside teaching, within the medical workplace, is considered essential for helping students develop their clinical skills. Design/methodology/approach: An audio and/or video observational study examining…

  6. The outcomes and acceptability of near-peer teaching among medical students in clinical skills

    PubMed Central

    Raw, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the outcomes and acceptability of final-year students tutoring in Clinical Skills to Years 1-2 students in a 4-week Medical Education elective. Methods A paper-based survey with 14 questions requiring responses on a Likert-like scale and 2 questions with free-text responses was used to investigate Year 6 student-tutor (n=45) and Years 1-2 tutee (n=348) perceptions of near-peer teaching in Clinical Skills. The independent t-test compared mean responses from student-tutors and tutees, and thematic analysis of free-text responses was conducted.  Results Tutee perceptions were significantly higher than student-tutor self-perceptions in small-group teaching and facilitation skills (p=0.000), teaching history-taking skills (p=0.046) and teaching physical examination skills (p=0.000). Perceptions in aspects of ‘Confidence in tutoring’ were not significantly different for student-tutors and tutees, with both having lowest perceptions for identifying and providing remediation for underperforming tutees. Student-tutors rated all areas of personal and professional development highly. Main themes emerging from analysis of student comments were the benefits to student-tutors, benefits to tutees and areas needing improvement, with outcomes of this near-peer teaching relating well to cognitive and social theories in the literature. Conclusions Both student tutors and their tutees perceived near-peer teaching in Clinical Skills to be acceptable and beneficial with particular implications for Medical Education. PMID:27295403

  7. Assessment of Interpersonal Communication Skills Among Sari Health Centers’ Staff

    PubMed Central

    Siamian, Hasan; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Nia, Roobabe Darvish; Nezhad, Fereshteh Reza; Akbari, Hadise; Balaghafari, Azita; Vahdei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Ability to communicate correctly has been one of the life's basic social skills and its significance in human life is to some extent that some of the experts attribute the human growth foundation owners of the leading personal injuries and progress to human relationship. Purpose of this study was to evaluate the interpersonal communication skills among the health care centers staff. Methods: This study was a descriptive–cross sectional study was done among 85 staff in 12 metropolitan and 9 urban health centers in 2013. According to Kerejsi and Morgan's table, 70 employees were determined as samples. Seventy questionnaires were distributed at the mentioned centers and 60 measurable health questionnaires were examined. Demographic data and measure of communication skills: is a 36-items consisting of seven domains: (general Communication, speaking, listening, interpretation and clarification, asking, feedback, and reward and punishment), obtained data were analyzed by inferential statistical tests (Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis and correlation coefficient). Results: Most respondents 38 (63.3%) were women, 57 (95%) married and 17 (28.1 %) age means of 43-47 years. In the study status of the communication skills status of employees employed in health centres, Sari, “Punish and encourage skills” with mean and total standard deviation of 4.11±37.0 assigned the highest score and “feedback” skill with mean and total standard deviation of 3.68±045 assigned the less score. Conclusion: Findings showed that public relation skill, listening, reward and punishment in good scope and other skills were in the average scope. No need for training skills of empowerment of staff and their mental health. These results could be used for developing similar instruments in other health workers. PMID:25568632

  8. Aging Q3: an initiative to improve internal medicine residents' geriatrics knowledge, skills, and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, William P; Zapka, Jane; Iverson, Patty J; Zhao, Yumin; Wiley, M Kathleen; Pride, Pamela; Davis, Kimberly S

    2012-05-01

    A growing number of older adults coupled with a limited number of physicians trained in geriatrics presents a major challenge to ensuring quality medical care for this population. Innovations to incorporate geriatrics education into internal medicine residency programs are needed. To meet this need, in 2009, faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina developed Aging Q(3)-Quality Education, Quality Care, and Quality of Life. This multicomponent initiative recognizes the need for improved geriatrics educational tools and faculty development as well as systems changes to improve the knowledge and clinical performance of residents. To achieve these goals, faculty employ multiple intervention strategies, including lectures, rounds, academic detailing, visual cues, and electronic medical record prompts and decision support. The authors present examples from specific projects, based on care areas including vision screening, fall prevention, and caring for patients with dementia, all of which are based on the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. The authors describe the principles driving the design, implementation, and evaluation of the Aging Q(3) program. They present data from multiple sources that illustrate the effectiveness of the interventions to meet the knowledge, skill level, and behavior goals. The authors also address major challenges, including the maintenance of the teaching and modeling interventions over time within the context of demanding primary care and inpatient settings. This organized, evidence-based approach to quality improvement in resident education, as well as faculty leadership development, holds promise for successfully incorporating geriatrics education into internal medicine residencies. PMID:22450181

  9. Trade and Technical. Volume II. Access Skills. Vocational Readiness Skills. Missouri LINC. Assessing Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Dept. of Practical Arts and Vocational-Technical Education.

    This document contains trade and industrial occupations-related materials to help teachers and parents teach access skills to Missouri junior high and high school special needs students who want to pursue a vocational program in auto body repair, auto mechanics, building maintenance and custodial work, diesel mechanics, machinist, small engine…

  10. Clinical assessment of social cognitive function in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Molenberghs, Pascal; Lee, Teresa; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition broadly refers to the processing of social information in the brain that underlies abilities such as the detection of others' emotions and responding appropriately to these emotions. Social cognitive skills are critical for successful communication and, consequently, mental health and wellbeing. Disturbances of social cognition are early and salient features of many neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and often occur after acute brain injury. Its assessment in the clinic is, therefore, of paramount importance. Indeed, the most recent edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduced social cognition as one of six core components of neurocognitive function, alongside memory and executive control. Failures of social cognition most often present as poor theory of mind, reduced affective empathy, impaired social perception or abnormal social behaviour. Standard neuropsychological assessments lack the precision and sensitivity needed to adequately inform treatment of these failures. In this Review, we present appropriate methods of assessment for each of the four domains, using an example disorder to illustrate the value of these approaches. We discuss the clinical applications of testing for social cognitive function, and finally suggest a five-step algorithm for the evaluation and treatment of impairments, providing quantitative evidence to guide the selection of social cognitive measures in clinical practice. PMID:26670297

  11. Uncertainty Analysis for Peer Assessment: Oral Presentation Skills for Final Year Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ho Sung

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment plays an important role in engineering education for an active involvement in the assessment process, developing autonomy, enhancing reflection, and understanding of how to achieve the learning outcomes. Peer assessment uncertainty for oral presentation skills as part of the FYP assessment is studied. Validity and reliability for…

  12. How to Assess Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Don't settle for assessing recall and comprehension only when you can use this guide to create assessments for higher-order thinking skills. Assessment expert Susan M. Brookhart brings you up to speed on how to develop and use test questions and other assessments that reveal how well your students can analyze, reason, solve problems, and think…

  13. Self-Assessment of Employability Skill Outcomes among Undergraduates and Alignment with Academic Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Despite acknowledgement of the benefits of self-assessment in higher education, disparity between student and academic assessments, with associated trends in overrating and underrating, plagues its meaningful use, particularly as a tool for formal assessment. This study examines self-assessment of capabilities in certain employability skills in…

  14. Enhancement of Medical Interns' Levels of Clinical Skills Competence and Self-Confidence Levels via Video iPods: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Designing and delivering evidence-based medical practice for students requires careful consideration from medical science educators. Social Web (Web 2.0) applications are a part of today’s educational technology milieu; however, empirical research is lacking to support the impact of interactive Web 2.0 mobile applications on medical educational outcomes. Objectives The aim of our study was to determine whether instructional videos provided by iPod regarding female and male urinary catheter insertion would increase students’ confidence levels and enhance skill competencies. Methods We conducted a prospective study with medical trainee intern (TI) participants: 10 control participants (no technological intervention) and 11 intervention participants (video iPods). Before taking part in a skills course, they completed a questionnaire regarding previous exposure to male and female urinary catheterization and their level of confidence in performing the skills. Directly following the questionnaire, medical faculty provided a 40-minute skills demonstration in the Advanced Clinical Skills Centre (ACSC) laboratory at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. All participants practiced the skills following the demonstrations and were immediately evaluated by the same faculty using an assessment rubric. Following the clinical skill evaluation, participants completed a postcourse questionnaire regarding skill confidence levels. At the end of the skills course, the intervention group were provided video iPods and viewed a male and a female urinary catheterization video during the next 3 consecutive months. The control group did not receive educational technology interventions during the 3-month period. At the end of 3 months, participants completed a follow-up questionnaire and a clinical assessment of urinary catheterization skills at the ACSC lab. Results The results indicate a decline in skill competency over time among the control group for both male and female

  15. A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

  16. Social Skills Assessment in Young Children with Autism: A Comparison Evaluation of the SSRS and PKBS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui-Ting; Sandall, Susan R.; Davis, Carol A.; Thomas, Carnot James

    2011-01-01

    Impairment in the development of reciprocal social interaction and other social skills is one of the defining characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). There is a need for assessment tools that will help guide social skills interventions and document outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential usefulness of two…

  17. Psychometric Characteristics of Role-Play Assessments of Social Skill in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellack, Alan S.; Brown, Clayton H.; Thomas-Lohrman, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    There is an extensive literature documenting that people with schizophrenia have marked impairments in social role functioning and social skill. One of the most widely employed strategies for assessing social skill has been role-play tests: simulated social interactions that are videotaped for subsequent behavioral coding. There has been…

  18. Prekindergarten Children's Executive Functioning Skills and Achievement Gains: The Utility of Direct Assessments and Teacher Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhs, Mary Wagner; Farran, Dale Clark; Nesbitt, Kimberly Turner

    2015-01-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that young children who exhibit greater executive functioning (EF) skills in early childhood also achieve more academically. The goal of the present study was to examine the unique contributions of direct assessments and teacher ratings of children's EF skills at the beginning of prekindergarten (pre-k) to…

  19. Information Literacy Follow-Through: Enhancing Preservice Teachers' Information Evaluation Skills through Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seely, Sara Robertson; Fry, Sara Winstead; Ruppel, Margie

    2011-01-01

    An investigation into preservice teachers' information evaluation skills at a large university suggests that formative assessment can improve student achievement. Preservice teachers were asked to apply information evaluation skills in the areas of currency, relevancy, authority, accuracy, and purpose. The study used quantitative methods to assess…

  20. The Gain-Loss Model: A Probabilistic Skill Multimap Model for Assessing Learning Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robusto, Egidio; Stefanutti, Luca; Anselmi, Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    Within the theoretical framework of knowledge space theory, a probabilistic skill multimap model for assessing learning processes is proposed. The learning process of a student is modeled as a function of the student's knowledge and of an educational intervention on the attainment of specific skills required to solve problems in a knowledge…

  1. Relationships between Self-Assessment Skills, Test Performance, and Demographic Variables in Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, David J.; Holzer, Charles; O'Neill, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Some researchers have seen the capacity for self-assessment in trainees as a special skill, and some reports have concluded that this skill is positively and crucially correlated with academic competence. Thus, it is believed that those trainees who are most deficient in knowledge are least likely to be aware of their limitations. Other…

  2. Assessment of Higher Order Thinking Skills. Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory, Ed.; Robinson, Daniel H., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This volume examines the assessment of higher order thinking skills from the perspectives of applied cognitive psychology and measurement theory. The volume considers a variety of higher order thinking skills, including problem solving, critical thinking, argumentation, decision making, creativity, metacognition, and self-regulation. Fourteen…

  3. A Summary of an Assessment of Fourth and Sixth Grade Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CTB / McGraw-Hill, Monterey, CA.

    A comprehensive assessment was made of the status of elementary education in Missouri in reading, mathematics, language, and study skills. The Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills (CTBS) and the Short Form Test of Academic Aptitude (SFTAA) were administered to a sample of Missouri fourth and sixth graders. For each curricular area, Missouri…

  4. Creating Trails: Tool for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloman, Barbara F.; Gedeon, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (TRAILS), a freely available, online tool designed to measure the information literacy skills of high school students. It is based on information literacy competencies for ninth-graders found in the "Ohio Academic Content Standards" (Ohio Department of Education…

  5. Teachers' Perceptions of Their RTI Skills as They Relate to Assessment, Instruction, and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Karyn Spann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' perceptions of their Response to Intervention (RTI) skills as they relate to assessment, instruction, and intervention. "The Perceptions of RTI Skills Survey" was distributed to 138 elementary general education teachers in ten elementary schools in six rural school districts, and…

  6. An Occupational Therapy Work Skills Assessment for Individuals with Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Irene; Higham, Julie; McLean, Alison M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an occupational therapy skills assessment protocol developed and used to evaluate physical, cognitive, and behavioral abilities for persons seeking to return to work following head injuries. It measures them within the framework of productivity, interpersonal skills, and safety. (Contains 48 references.) (Author/JOW)

  7. Development of a Process To Assess Higher Order Thinking Skills for College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Donald A.

    Issues in the development of assessments of higher order thinking skills for college graduates are discussed in the order in which they were presented when this series of papers was commissioned. With regard to Issue 1, it is generally agreed that the development of these skills is a desirable goal, but there is little consensus on how they should…

  8. Measuring beyond Content: A Rubric Bank for Assessing Skills in Authentic Research Assignments in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishbaugh, Tara L. S.; Cessna, Stephen; Horst, S. Jeanne; Leaman, Lori; Flanagan, Toni; Neufeld, Doug Graber; Siderhurst, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the development of an analytic rubric bank to assess non-content learning, namely higher order cognitive skills, the understanding of the nature of science, and effective scientific communication skills in student research projects. Preliminary findings indicate that use of this tool enhances our students' learning in these areas,…

  9. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Rating Instruments for a Communication Skills Assessment of Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iramaneerat, Cherdsak; Myford, Carol M.; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Lowenstein, Tali

    2009-01-01

    The investigators used evidence based on response processes to evaluate and improve the validity of scores on the Patient-Centered Communication and Interpersonal Skills (CIS) Scale for the assessment of residents' communication competence. The investigators retrospectively analyzed the communication skills ratings of 68 residents at the…

  10. Investigating the Baseline Skills of Research Students Using a Competency-Based Self-Assessment Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Anthony P.; Boran, James R.; Myddelton, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent government-led initiatives are changing the nature of the UK PhD to support the greater development of transferable skills. There are similar initiatives internationally. A key requirement and challenge is to effectively assess the "baseline" skills of a cohort on entry to a research programme and then monitor their progress in personal…

  11. An Assessment of the Computer Skills of Incoming Freshmen at Two University of Wisconsin Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marian A.; Furst-Bowe, Julie A.

    A study was conducted at the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Eau Claire and UW-Stout in 1992 to assess the computer skills of incoming college freshmen. Information about the students' computer skills was obtained through the use of a questionnaire. The questionnaire was distributed to 92 students at UW-Eau Claire and 86 students at UW-Stout.…

  12. A Study of the Basic Skills Assessment Direct and Indirect Measures of Writing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson, Eleanor

    The Basic Skills Assessment (BSA) is a national secondary level testing program which provides secure tests in reading, writing, and mathematics. It is designed to identify students who need additional instruction in the basic skills so they may be helped to reach the school district's secondary school graduation requirements. One of the BSA's…

  13. Assessment and Teaching of Science Skills: Whole of Programme Perceptions of Graduating Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Varsavsky, Cristina; Matthews, Kelly E.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on science student perceptions of their skills (scientific knowledge, oral communication, scientific writing, quantitative skills, teamwork and ethical thinking) as they approach graduation. The focus is on which teaching activities and assessment tasks over the whole programme of study students thought utilised each of the six…

  14. Essential Communication and Documentation Skills. Module: Final Assessment and Action Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Muriel; And Others

    This module is the 10th of 10 in the Essential Communication and Documentation Skills curriculum. It develops final assessment and action planning, workplace literacy skills identified as being directly related to the job of the direct care worker. The curriculum is designed to improve the competence of New York State Division for Youth direct…

  15. Information Literacy and Adult Learners: Using Authentic Assessment to Determine Skill Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapchak, Marcia E.; Lewis, Leslie A.; Motyka, Julie K.; Balmert, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy (IL) skills are essential for adult learners in higher education, especially those unfamiliar with information systems. Citing a lack of literature assessing such skills in adult learners, this article examines the IL abilities of adult learners in an IL course. Using a rubric and annotated bibliographies from study…

  16. Assessing the Quality of Clinical Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Sanneke; Grol, Richard; Laan, Roland; Wensing, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Background Learning in a clinical environment differs from formal educational settings and provides specific challenges for clinicians who are teachers. Instruments that reflect these challenges are needed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of clinical teachers. Objective To systematically review the content, validity, and aims of questionnaires used to assess clinical teachers. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and ERIC from 1976 up to March 2010. Review Methods The searches revealed 54 papers on 32 instruments. Data from these papers were documented by independent researchers, using a structured format that included content of the instrument, validation methods, aims of the instrument, and its setting. Results Aspects covered by the instruments predominantly concerned the use of teaching strategies (included in 30 instruments), supporter role (29), role modeling (27), and feedback (26). Providing opportunities for clinical learning activities was included in 13 instruments. Most studies referred to literature on good clinical teaching, although they failed to provide a clear description of what constitutes a good clinical teacher. Instrument length varied from 1 to 58 items. Except for two instruments, all had to be completed by clerks/residents. Instruments served to provide formative feedback ( instruments) but were also used for resource allocation, promotion, and annual performance review (14 instruments). All but two studies reported on internal consistency and/or reliability; other aspects of validity were examined less frequently. Conclusions No instrument covered all relevant aspects of clinical teaching comprehensively. Validation of the instruments was often limited to assessment of internal consistency and reliability. Available instruments for assessing clinical teachers should be used carefully, especially for consequential decisions. There is a need for more valid comprehensive instruments. Electronic supplementary material The online

  17. Clinical and laboratory assessment of thyroid abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.M.

    1985-09-01

    Clinical assessment of the patient with suspected thyroid disease remains an important part of the workup. Available laboratory tests of thyroid function include measurements of serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone, titers of autoantibodies involved with Graves' disease and thyroiditis, and thyroid imaging and uptake techniques. The usefulness and limitations of each of these tests are reviewed.

  18. Personality Assessment Use by Clinical Neuropsychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven R.; Gorske, Tad T.; Wiggins, Chauntel; Little, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study is an exploration of the personality assessment practices of clinical neuropsychologists. Professional members of the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the International Neuropsychological Society (N = 404) were surveyed to examine use of several forms of personality, behavior, and emotional function measures. Results…

  19. A Comprehensive, Simulation-Based Approach to Teaching Clinical Skills: The Medical Students’ Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Leigh V.; Crimmins, Ashley C.; Bonz, James W.; Gusberg, Richard J.; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D.; Dodge, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p < 0.001), communication (p = 0.02), teamwork (p = 0.01), confidence in management (p < 0.001), and translation to clinical experience (p < 0.001). Regarding the team leader role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p < 0.001) and awareness of team building (p = <0.001). Ratings demonstrate a positive impact of simulation on both clinical management skills and team leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

  20. Exploring the use of mobile technologies for the acquisition of clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Clay, Collette A

    2011-08-01

    Mobile learning has the potential to supplement information communication technology (ICT), online learning and the traditional teaching and learning methods to educate practitioners in the clinical practice area. Following the development of several Post Graduate modules of learning for the theory and clinical skills required to undertake the Newborn Infant Physical Examination (NIPE), a small research study was undertaken to combine mobile learning and NIPE. The research study explored the hypothesis that mobile devices could be used in pedagogically effective ways to support and enhance the learning and acquisition of clinical skills in the clinical arena. Participants in the study each received a handheld mobile device (iPod) that had been loaded with several Reusable Learning Objects (RLO) outlining each aspect of the physical examination to be performed. At the end of the module (12 weeks in duration), each participant completed an evaluation questionnaire. Participants confirmed that mobile learning afforded flexibility in time and place of learning and captured their interest in the learning material. This study reports that the use of mobile technology for skill acquisition is creative and innovative, placing learning firmly in the hands of the learner. PMID:21112132

  1. Assessing musical skills in autistic children who are not savants.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Pamela

    2009-05-27

    Descriptions of autistic musical savants suggest that they possess extraordinary skills within the domain. However, until recently little was known about the musical skills and potential of individuals with autism who are not savants. The results from these more recent studies investigating music perception, cognition and learning in musically untrained children with autism have revealed a pattern of abilities that are either enhanced or spared. For example, increased sensitivity to musical pitch and timbre is frequently observed, and studies investigating perception of musical structure and emotions have consistently failed to reveal deficits in autism. While the phenomenon of the savant syndrome is of considerable theoretical interest, it may have led to an under-consideration of the potential talents and skills of that vast majority of autistic individuals, who do not meet savant criteria. Data from empirical studies show that many autistic children possess musical potential that can and should be developed. PMID:19528029

  2. Assessing musical skills in autistic children who are not savants

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Descriptions of autistic musical savants suggest that they possess extraordinary skills within the domain. However, until recently little was known about the musical skills and potential of individuals with autism who are not savants. The results from these more recent studies investigating music perception, cognition and learning in musically untrained children with autism have revealed a pattern of abilities that are either enhanced or spared. For example, increased sensitivity to musical pitch and timbre is frequently observed, and studies investigating perception of musical structure and emotions have consistently failed to reveal deficits in autism. While the phenomenon of the savant syndrome is of considerable theoretical interest, it may have led to an under-consideration of the potential talents and skills of that vast majority of autistic individuals, who do not meet savant criteria. Data from empirical studies show that many autistic children possess musical potential that can and should be developed. PMID:19528029

  3. Developing assessment: involving the sessional clinical teacher.

    PubMed

    Bateman, H; Thomason, J M; McCracken, G; Ellis, J

    2016-02-12

    Assessment development is a fundamental element of curriculum management and a requirement for providers of education to consistently demonstrate attainment of educational standards. Development of authentic, valid and reliable assessment is, however, both challenging and resource intensive. In the UK, dental education standards are regulated by the General Dental Council (GDC). The 'safe beginner' is the threshold determined by the GDC for the passing student - but how do we apply this? This article describes an approach the School of Dental Sciences at Newcastle University has adopted to address the challenges associated with developing assessments. Sessional clinical teachers contribute a significant proportion of the clinical supervision within the BDS programme and also have a good appreciation of both the standard and concept of the 'safe beginner'. By implementing a process of active timetable management, we have identified time where this group could contribute to assessment development. We believe that aspects, which could be enhanced by their involvement, include writing, validation, standard-setting and utilisation of assessment. To achieve this, we recognise a requirement for investment in careful manpower planning and training, but consider that it is realistic and beneficial to include sessional clinical teachers in this essential part of learning and teaching. PMID:26868802

  4. The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo, Javier; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques have allowed physicians to obtain robust measurements of intracardiac flows in the clinical setting. Consequently, the physiological implications of intraventricular fluid dynamics are beginning to be understood. Initial data show that these flows involve complex fluid-structure interactions and mixing phenomena that are modified by disease. Here we critically review the most important aspects of intraventricular fluid mechanics relevant for clinical applications. We discuss current image and numerical methods for assessing intraventricular flows, as well as implemented approaches to analyze their impact on cardiac function. The physiological and clinical insights provided by such techniques are discussed both in health and in disease. The final goal is to encourage research in the application of fluid dynamic foundations to patient-based clinical data. A huge potential is anticipated not only in terms of the basic science of large-scale biological systems, but also in practical terms of improving patient care.

  5. Assessing Information Literacy Skills in the California State University: A Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Describes an information literacy skills assessment project by California State University as part of an accountability process. Highlights include information competence; a qualitative study using information scenarios; capturing what students do when they search for information; and ethnographic data. (LRW)

  6. Assessment Methodology, Context, and Empowerment: The ACE Model of Skill Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Sharon L.; Moffett, Richard G. III

    2000-01-01

    The Assessment, Context, and Empowerment Model provides students with opportunities to practice communication, interpersonal, and problem-solving skills in relevant contexts related to the workplace. They receive developmental feedback from themselves, their peers, and their instructor. (SK)

  7. Teaching and Assessing Manipulative Motor Skills in High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bert, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article provides new ways to teach and assess motor skills in various lifetime sports such as tennis, golf, badminton, and other sports that students are likely to play as adults by focusing on five basic biomechanical principles.

  8. The effect of short-term workshop on improving clinical reasoning skill of medical students

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Jafari, Farshad; Kahbazi, Manijeh; Rafiei, Mohammad; Pakniyat, AbdolGhader

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning process leads clinician to get purposeful steps from signs and symptoms toward diagnosis and treatment. This research intends to investigate the effect of teaching clinical reasoning on problem-solving skills of medical students. Methods: This research is a semi-experimental study. Nineteen Medical student of the pediatric ward as case group participated in a two-day workshop for training clinical reasoning. Before the workshop, they filled out Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) questionnaires. Fifteen days after the workshop the DTI questionnaire completed and "key feature" (KF) test and "clinical reasoning problem" (CRP) test was held. 23 Medical student as the control group, without passing the clinical reasoning workshop DTI questionnaire completed, and KF test and CRP test was held. Results: The average score of the DTI questionnaire in the control group was 162.04 and in the case group before the workshop was 153.26 and after the workshop was 181.68. Compare the average score of the DTI questionnaire before and after the workshop there is a significant difference. The difference between average KF test scores in the control and the case group was not significant but between average CRP test scores was significant. Conclusion: Clinical reasoning workshop is effectiveness in promoting problem-solving skills of students. PMID:27579286

  9. Social Work Practice with LGBT Elders at End of Life: Developing Practice Evaluation and Clinical Skills Through a Cultural Perspective.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Darren P

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on culturally sensitive clinical issues related to best practices with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) elder patients at end-of-life (EOL) at key points in the therapeutic relationship. Vital concepts, including practice evaluation and clinical skills, are presented through a cultural and oncology lens. There is a paucity of LGBT research and literature as well as a shortfall of MSW graduate school education specific to social work palliative and end-of-life care (PELC) practice with LGBT elders. The content of this article is designed to be adapted and used as an educational tool for institutions, agencies, graduate programs, medical professions, social work, and students. Learning the unique elements of LGBT cultural history and their implications on EOL care can improve social work practice. This article provides an examination from assessment and engagement basics to advance care planning incorporating specific LGBT EOL issues. PMID:26380926

  10. Assessing Reading Skills in an F.E. College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Judy

    This guide outlines a model that adult educators can use to construct a test for their adult students, regardless of subject area, that is written at the students' reading level. The problems that written tests pose for trade and technical students in further education (FE) who have poor reading skills and the drawbacks of using commercially…

  11. Assessing Library Skills: A First Step to Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhardt, Joanna M.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the University of Rhode Island Libraries' "Comprehensive Plan for Information Literacy," a three-credit class in the skills and concepts of information literacy was first offered in the fall of 1999. More than 1,000 undergraduate students have taken the class since that time. A pre-test was given at the beginning of each semester,…

  12. Assessing Aptitude and Attitude Development in a Translation Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mekheimer, Mohamed Amin A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects on EFL students of using Blackboard technology and online dictionaries in developing translating skills and building positive attitudes towards translation in male Saudi college students. The study compares two groups of students in a translation course; one in a traditional, face-to-face setting (control) and…

  13. Skill and Will: Test-Taking Motivation and Assessment Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eklof, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    An achievement test score can be viewed as a joint function of skill and will, of knowledge and motivation. However, when interpreting and using test scores, the "will" part is not always acknowledged and scores are mostly interpreted and used as pure measures of student knowledge. This paper argues that students' motivation to do their best on…

  14. The Use of Rubrics in Benchmarking and Assessing Employability Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riebe, Linda; Jackson, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Calls for employability skill development in undergraduates now extend across many culturally similar developed economies. Government initiatives, industry professional accreditation criteria, and the development of academic teaching and learning standards increasingly drive the employability agenda, further cementing the need for skill…

  15. Assessing 21st Century Skills: Summary of a Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Judith Anderson

    2011-01-01

    The routine jobs of yesterday are being replaced by technology and/or shipped off-shore. In their place, job categories that require knowledge management, abstract reasoning, and personal services seem to be growing. The modern workplace requires workers to have broad cognitive and affective skills. Often referred to as "21st century…

  16. A New Method of Assessing the Interpersonal Skills of Surgeons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchard, Kenneth W.; Rowland-Morin, Pamela A.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a behavioral test of surgeons' interpersonal skills involved applying a rating scale to videotape recordings of physician interactions with a gall bladder patient, at three intervals. Quality of communication was found to vary over the intervals. The instrument used was more sensitive to variation than a comparison scale.…

  17. Interrater Objectivity for Field-Based Fundamental Motor Skill Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Lisa; van Beurden, Eric; Morgan, Philip J.; Lincoln, Doug; Zask, Avigdor; Beard, John

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect in studies concerning fundamental motor skills (FMS) proficiency is interrater objectivity (or interrater reliability), defined as the consistency or agreement in scores obtained from two or more raters. In a training setting, interrater objectivity is commonly determined as the relative number of times raters agree with an…

  18. Evaluation of preceptors and skills achievement by clinical pharmacy clerkship students during their clinical rotations at University of Gondar, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Belachew, Sewunet Admasu; Abegaz, Tadesse Melaku; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Getachew, Henok; Tefera, Yonas Getaye

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the overall experiences of clinical pharmacy students during their clinical attachments and to understand the breadth and depth of clinical skills provided by their preceptors. Methods A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire containing 34 items to obtain feedback from the clerkship students from June to July 2015. Data analysis was performed to calculate mean, standard deviation, percentages, and multiple logistic regression using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software Version 22. Statistical significance was set at P<0.01. Results All 58 clerkship students actively participated in the study, yielding a response rate of 100%. While students ranked their clerkship experience as moderate, >15% remarked that they did not receive enough opportunities to hone their pharmaceutical care documentation skills. A relatively high percentage of students (32.8%) strongly agreed that their preceptors had provided ample opportunity to discuss the patient problems at the bedside and encouraged them to express their opinions regarding patients’ drug therapeutic issues. This study also revealed that students’ continuity in developing their therapeutic and disease process knowledge was significantly associated with the preceptor’s ability to provide adequate training and orientation (P =0.01), engagement in clinical pharmacy activities (P =0.01), regular review of students’ work (P =0.01), and instruction to students before entering clinical sites (P =0.00). Conclusion The findings of this study reveal that a majority of the students were moderately satisfied with the clinical training program and preceptors need to demonstrate effective pharmaceutical care processes in their clinical sites. PMID:27099540

  19. Virtual humans and formative assessment to train diagnostic skills in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Ferrer-Garcia, Marta; Pla, Joana; Andrés-Pueyo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Carrying out a diagnostic interview requires skills that need to be taught in a controlled environment. Virtual Reality (VR) environments are increasingly used in the training of professionals, as they offer the most realistic alternative while not requiring students to face situations for which they are yet unprepared. The results of the training of diagnostic skills can also be generalized to any other situation in which effective communication skills play a major role. Our aim with this study has been to develop a procedure of formative assessment in order to increment the effectiveness of virtual learning simulation systems and then to assess their efficacy. PMID:24875685

  20. Using Portfolio to Assess Rural Young Learners' Writing Skills in English Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Muhammad Noor Abdul; Yusoff, Nurahimah Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at discussing the benefits of portfolio assessment in assessing students' writing skills. The study explores the use of authentic assessment in the classroom. Eleven primary school children from Year 4 in a rural school in Sabah participated in this study. Data were collected by observing them during the English Language lessons…

  1. Project RAILS: Lessons Learned about Rubric Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Jackie; Zou, Ning; Mills, Jenny Rushing; Holmes, Claire; Oakleaf, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Rubric assessment of information literacy is an important tool for librarians seeking to show evidence of student learning. The authors, who collaborated on the Rubric Assessment of Informational Literacy Skills (RAILS) research project, draw from their shared experience to present practical recommendations for implementing rubric assessment in a…

  2. The Development of a Multirater Instrument for Assessing Employee Problem-Solving Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, Margaret C.

    2004-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of the development of a multirater instrument to measure employee problem-solving skill. The instrument consisted of two parallel forms: an employee self-assessment and a supervisory assessment. For the self-assessment, twenty employees rated the degree to which they engage in activities commonly…

  3. Early Childhood Reading Skills and Proficiency in NAEP Eighth-Grade Reading Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Enis; Ogut, Burhan; Kim, Young Yee

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between reading skills in earlier grades and achieving "Proficiency" on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) grade 8 reading assessment was examined by establishing a statistical link between NAEP and the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) grade 8 reading assessments using data from a common…

  4. Physical Education Teacher Training in Fundamental Movement Skills Makes a Difference to Instruction and Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Natalie Jayne; Barnett, Lisa M.; Brown, Helen; Telford, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate instruction and assessment of fundamental movement skills (FMSs) by Physical Education (PE) teachers of Year 7 girls. Of 168 secondary school PE teachers, many had received little FMSs professional development, and although most assessed student FMSs proficiency, the quality of assessment was variable.…

  5. Approaches to the Assessment of Science Process Skills: A Reconceptualist View and Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oloruntegbe, K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment means many things to many people. There is a plethora of terms and definitions. To measure science-learning outcomes at skills level, assessment was modified and restructured not only in form and context, but in vocabularies and nomenclatures. Thus, there emerged different forms, like alternative, authentic and performance assessments,…

  6. Promoting the Self-Regulation of Clinical Reasoning Skills in Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, R; Pesut, D; Kautz, D

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this paper is to describe the research surrounding the theories and models the authors united to describe the essential components of clinical reasoning in nursing practice education. The research was conducted with nursing students in health care settings through the application of teaching and learning strategies with the Self-Regulated Learning Model (SRL) and the Outcome-Present-State-Test (OPT) Model of Reflective Clinical Reasoning. Standardized nursing languages provided the content and clinical vocabulary for the clinical reasoning task. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study described the application of the OPT model of clinical reasoning, use of nursing language content, and reflective journals based on the SRL model with 66 undergraduate nursing students over an 8 month period of time. The study tested the idea that self-regulation of clinical reasoning skills can be developed using self-regulation theory and the OPT model. Results: This research supports a framework for effective teaching and learning methods to promote and document learner progress in mastering clinical reasoning skills. Self-regulated Learning strategies coupled with the OPT model suggest benefits of self-observation and self-monitoring during clinical reasoning activities, and pinpoints where guidance is needed for the development of cognitive and metacognitive awareness. Recommendations and Conclusions: Thinking and reasoning about the complexities of patient care needs requires attention to the content, processes and outcomes that make a nursing care difference. These principles and concepts are valuable to clinical decision making for nurses globally as they deal with local, regional, national and international health care issues. PMID:19888432

  7. Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach (CARMINA).

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Pierfrancesco; Tardivo, Stefano; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Moretti, Francesca; Poletti, Piera; Fiore, Alberto; Monturano, Massimo; Mura, Ida; Privitera, Gaetano; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The European Union recommendations for patient safety calls for shared clinical risk management (CRM) safety standards able to guide organizations in CRM implementation. The purpose of this paper is to develop a self-evaluation tool to measure healthcare organization performance on CRM and guide improvements over time. Design/methodology/approach - A multi-step approach was implemented including: a systematic literature review; consensus meetings with an expert panel from eight Italian leader organizations to get to an agreement on the first version; field testing to test instrument feasibility and flexibility; Delphi strategy with a second expert panel for content validation and balanced scoring system development. Findings - The self-assessment tool - Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach includes seven areas (governance, communication, knowledge and skills, safe environment, care processes, adverse event management, learning from experience) and 52 standards. Each standard is evaluated according to four performance levels: minimum; monitoring; outcomes; and improvement actions, which resulted in a feasible, flexible and valid instrument to be used throughout different organizations. Practical implications - This tool allows practitioners to assess their CRM activities compared to minimum levels, monitor performance, benchmarking with other institutions and spreading results to different stakeholders. Originality/value - The multi-step approach allowed us to identify core minimum CRM levels in a field where no consensus has been reached. Most standards may be easily adopted in other countries. PMID:27477931

  8. Use of the human patient simulator to teach clinical judgment skills in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Mattie L; Curran, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Nurse educators are finding it increasingly more challenging to prepare undergraduate students for the ever-changing and more acute clinical environment. As an answer to this dilemma, the human patient simulator can provide students with the opportunity to enhance knowledge, to facilitate skill acquisition, to decrease anxiety, and to promote clinical judgment in a safe environment. These experiences assist the novice nursing student to progress to the advanced beginner stage of practice. This article describes how faculty used the human patient simulator in creating a case scenario that enhanced critical thinking in senior nursing students. PMID:16166827

  9. An Assessment of the Skill of GEOS-5 Seasonal Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Rienecker, Michele M.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal forecast skill of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office coupled global climate model (CGCM) is evaluated based on an ensemble of 9-month lead forecasts for the period 1993 to 2010. The results from the current version (V2) of the CGCM consisting of the GEOS-5 AGM coupled to the MOM4 ocean model are compared with those from an earlier version (V1) in which the AGCM (the NSIPP model) was coupled to the Poseidon Ocean Model. It was found that the correlation skill of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forecasts is generally better in V2, especially over the sub-tropical and tropical central and eastern Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean. Furthermore, the improvement in skill in V2 mainly comes from better forecasts of the developing phase of ENSO from boreal spring to summer. The skill of ENSO forecasts initiated during the boreal winter season, however, shows no improvement in terms of correlation skill, and is in fact slightly worse in terms of root mean square error (RMSE). The degradation of skill is found to be due to an excessive ENSO amplitude. For V1, the ENSO amplitude is too strong in forecasts starting in boreal spring and summer, which causes large RMSE in the forecast. For V2, the ENSO amplitude is slightly stronger than that in observations and V1 for forecasts starting in boreal winter season. An analysis of the terms in the SST tendency equation, shows that this is mainly due to an excessive zonal advective feedback. In addition, V2 forecasts that are initiated during boreal winter season, exhibit a slower phase transition of El Nino, which is consistent with larger amplitude of ENSO after the ENSO peak season. It is found that this is due to weak discharge of equatorial Warm Water Volume (WWV). In both observations and V1, the discharge of equatorial WWV leads the equatorial geostrophic easterly current so as to damp the El Nino starting in January. This process is delayed by about 2 months in V2 due to the slower phase

  10. Assessing study skills among a sample of university students: an Iranian survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Numerous studies have revealed that study skills have a constructive role on the academic performance of students, in addition to educational quality, students’ intelligence, and their affective characteristics. This study aims to examine study skills and the factors influencing them among the health sciences students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out from May to November 2013. A total of 340 Urmia health sciences students were selected using a simple sampling method. Data were collected using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire of Counseling Center of Houston University and analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The mean and standard deviation of the students’ study skills were 172.5±23.2, out of a total score of 240. Around 1.2% of the study skills were weak; 86.8%, moderate; and 12%, good. Among the study skills, the scores of time management, and memory and concentration were better than the others. Also, there was a significant positive correlation between study skills scores and the students’ family housing status and academic level (P<0.05). Conclusion: Although the majority of the participants had moderate study skills, these were not sufficient and far from good. Improving and promoting the study skills of university students require the designing and implementing of education programs for study strategies. Therefore, decision makers and planners in the educational areas of universities should consider the topic described above. PMID:24798427

  11. Clinical manual assessment of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Porretto-Loehrke, Ann; Schuh, Cassandra; Szekeres, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Although hand therapists often evaluate patients with wrist pain, novice and experienced clinicians alike would benefit from a systematic assessment to efficiently identify the source of dysfunction and initiate an appropriate treatment plan. This article proposes a systematic approach for clinical evaluation of the wrist by describing the basic clinical examination (BCE) process and interpreting the findings in terms of common pathology. The BCE will enable the hand therapist to identify conditions that are contraindicated for conservative care and require further physician intervention, determine a working diagnosis for most musculoskeletal problems, and determine the appropriate extra tests to confirm the working diagnosis and/or rule out differential diagnoses. By combining findings from the patient's history, BCE, and special testing, hand therapists can efficiently determine the underlying pathology and provide appropriate treatment that can optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27112270

  12. Clinical tools for assessing balance disorders.

    PubMed

    Yelnik, A; Bonan, I

    2008-12-01

    Three main issues have to be addressed by the examination of a patient complaining from balance disorders: physiopathology and aetiology, severity and consequences, and evolution. A precise clinical analysis must be then conducted, including close anamnesis and clinical examination, with scale measurements depending on the objectives. Daily consequences can be assessed by the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, which considers a large field of daily activities. The International Classification of Functioning evaluates activities and participation, influence of environmental factors, and quality of life. Then, patient's examination aims at objectifying and measuring the balance disorder. Quantified measurement is possible even in a simple doctor's office. Clinical scales for balance assessment should be used for a standardized assessment and to allow comparison of different subjects. Although the Tinetti test is the most-widely used in older people, it is quite approximate. The Berg Balance Scale has also been first validated in older people, it is rather easy to use, but uncertainty between two close scores is frequent. The Timed Up-and-Go Test is the simplest one and probably the most reliable. The Unipodal Stance Testing is also a simple test and a good predictor of fall. The Functional Ambulation Classification focuses attention on the physical support needed by the patient during walking. The Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS) is easy to use after a recent stroke. Instrumental analysis by means of static and dynamic platforms, often coupled together with accelerometers or video, can be used to complete the clinical examination. Its main interest is to contribute to give insight into physiologic and pathologic mechanisms underlying the postural trouble. PMID:19026963

  13. Incorporating Standardized Colleague Simulations in a Clinical Assessment Course and Evaluating the Impact on Interprofessional Communication

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Brianne; Blake, Elizabeth; Phillips, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of incorporating standardized colleague simulations on pharmacy students’ confidence and interprofessional communication skills. Design. Four simulations using standardized colleagues portraying attending physicians in inpatient and outpatient settings were integrated into a required course. Pharmacy students interacted with the standardized colleagues using the Situation, Background, Assessment, Request/Recommendation (SBAR) communication technique and were evaluated on providing recommendations while on simulated inpatient rounds and in an outpatient clinic. Additionally, changes in student attitudes and confidence toward interprofessional communication were assessed with a survey before and after the standardized colleague simulations. Assessment. One hundred seventy-one pharmacy students participated in the simulations. Student interprofessional communication skills improved after each simulation. Student confidence with interprofessional communication in both inpatient and outpatient settings significantly improved. Conclusion. Incorporation of simulations using standardized colleagues improves interprofessional communication skills and self-confidence of pharmacy students. PMID:26089566

  14. Just enough, but not too much interactivity leads to better clinical skills performance after a computer assisted learning module

    PubMed Central

    Kalet, A.; Song, H.S.; Sarpel, U.S.; Schwartz, R.; Brenner, J.; Ark, T.K; Plass, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Well-designed computer-assisted instruction (CAI) can potentially transform medical education. Yet little is known about whether specific design features such as direct manipulation of the content yield meaningful gains in clinical learning. We designed three versions of a multimedia module on the abdominal exam incorporating different types of interactivity. Methods As part of their physical diagnosis course, 162 second-year medical students were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to Watch, Click or Drag versions of the abdominal exam module. First, students’ prior knowledge, spatial ability, and prior experience with abdominal exams were assessed. After using the module, students took a posttest; demonstrated the abdominal exam on a standardized patient; and wrote structured notes of their findings. Results Data from143 students were analyzed. Baseline measures showed no differences among groups regarding prior knowledge, experience, or spatial ability. Overall there was no difference in knowledge across groups. However, physical exam scores were significantly higher for students in the Click group. Conclusions A mid-range level of behavioral interactivity was associated with small to moderate improvements in performance of clinical skills. These improvements were likely mediated by enhanced engagement with the material, within the bounds of learners’ cognitive capacity. These findings have implications for the design of CAI materials to teach procedural skills. PMID:22917265

  15. The Effect of Student Self-Video of Performance on Clinical Skill Competency: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Stephen; Storr, Michael; Morgan, Prue; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies and student information technology literacy are enabling new methods of teaching and learning for clinical skill performance. Facilitating experiential practice and reflection on performance through student self-video, and exposure to peer benchmarks, may promote greater levels of skill competency. This study examines the…

  16. Decoding Skills Acquired by Low Readers Taught in Regular Classrooms Using Clinical Techniques. Research Report No. 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallistel, Elizabeth; Fischer, Phyllis

    This study evaluated the decoding skills acquired by low readers in an experimental project that taught low readers in regular class through the use of clinical procedures based on a synthetic phonic, multisensory approach. An evaluation instrument which permitted the tabulation of specific decoding skills was administered as a pretest and…

  17. A new approach to assessing skill needs of senior managers.

    PubMed

    Griffith, John R; Warden, Gail L; Neighbors, Kamilah; Shim, Beth

    2002-01-01

    Management of health care organizations must improve to meet the well-documented challenges of quality improvement and cost control. Other industries have developed the tools--entry education, mentoring, planned mid-career formal education and experience, and special programs for senior management. The purpose of this paper is to pilot test an alternative method to identify competencies and performance of health care executives. We propose using formal lists of technical, interpersonal, and strategic competencies and specific real events chosen by the respondent to identify and prioritize competencies. Results of a trial with 30 large health care system CEOs and 15 early careerists demonstrate that the method reveals useful depth and detail about managers' educational needs. The results suggest that current thinking about managerial education and learning patterns may be seriously inadequate in several respects. The continued improvement of U.S. health care is a pressing national concern. Quality of care is highly variable and substantially deficient in many institutions (Chassin and Galvin 1998; Committee on Quality of Health Care in America 2001). "Quality improvement should be the essential business strategy for healthcare in the 21st century (Kizer 2001)." Productivity improvements will be essential to balance cost pressures from an aging population and growing technology (Heffler, et al. 2002). Skillful management is necessary to improve quality and productivity. Teams of dozens of caregivers are often required to improve a patient's health. The organizations that provide care have grown larger in response to the greater cost, complexity of operation and finance, and evidence of the success of scale in other industries. While many small professional practices, hospitals, and nursing homes remain, consolidation has created a few dozen provider and intermediary organizations exceeding a billion dollars a year in expenditures. These large health care

  18. Assessing Thinking Skills in Astro 101: Do We Make an Impact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, D.

    2005-12-01

    Most instructors agree that a major goal of "Astronomy 101" is to develop thinking skills in our students (Partridge and Greenstein, AER 2, 46, 2003). Much educational research in astronomy has initially concentrated on "best practices" for improving student learning (development of "think-pair-share", lecture tutorials, peer tutoring, etc.). Little has been done to date to assess our efforts to improve student thinking skills and students' desire to think more deeply about the cognitively rich ideas offered in the typical astronomy class. This study surveys several astronomy and physics courses to determine whether general analytical thinking skills increase because of the science course and whether students' attitudes toward cognition improve. Cacioppo, Petty and Kao's "Need for Cognition" scale is used for the latter assessment (J. Personality Assessment 48, 306, 1984). A shortened version of Whimbey and Lochhead's ASI skills instrument is used to assess analytical skills ("Problem Solving and Comprehension," 1986). Preliminary results suggest that students need for cognition does not change in general, although there may be a correlation between increasing need for cognition and improvement in grades through the semester. There is a suggestion that need for cognition is slightly predictive of course performance, but a greater correlation exists between the post-course survey and grades. Gains in general analytical skills have been seen in initial surveys, but correlations with course performance appear elusive.

  19. Skill assessment of a global hydrological model in reproducing extreme flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candogan Yossef, Naze; van Beek, L. P. H.; Kwadijk, J. C. J.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the skill of the Macro-scale Hydrological Model (MHM) PCR-GLOBWB in reproducing past extremes in the discharges of 20 large rivers of the world, as an initial step in assessing the prospect of using the model for hydrological forecasting. The assessment provides a benchmark verification procedure with the best possible meteorological forcing. Global terrestrial hydrology is simulated for a historical period from 1958 until 2001 by forcing PCR-GLOBWB with daily meteorological data obtained by downscaling the CRU dataset to daily fields using the ERA-40 reanalysis, which can be considered to be the best representation of past weather. Simulated discharge values are compared with observed monthly streamflow records for a selection of 20 large river basins that represent all the continents, a wide range of climatic zones and latitudes as well as a variety of precipitation regimes. Model skill is assessed in three ways. At first, the general performance of the model in simulations is evaluated. MSE skill scores that provide a quality measure relative to the mean climatology are calculated for each river basin, prior to and after bias correction. The coefficient of determination (R2) and Nash and Sutcliffe's coefficient of efficiency (E) are also calculated. Secondly, model skill in reproducing significantly higher and lower flows than the monthly normals is assessed in terms of skill scores used for forecasts of categorical events. For each month, discharge is classified into low, normal and high flow; where normal flow is defined as the central 50% of the cumulative distribution. The skill in simulating these classes is assessed by constructing categorical contingency tables and applying Gerrity scores used in meteorology for ordinal categorical events. Thirdly, model skill in reproducing flood and drought events is assessed. Floods and droughts are regarded as simple binary events defined in terms of exceedences of threshold discharges

  20. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The CHAMPS Motor Skills Protocol (CMSP)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field based settings. The development of the CHAMPS (Children’s Activity and Movement in Preschool Study) Motor Skills Protocol (CMSP) included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large epidemiological studies. Following pilot work, 297 children (3-5 years old) from 22 preschools were tested using the final version of the CMSP and the TGMD-2. Reliability of the CMSP and interobserver reliability were determined using intraclass correlation procedures (ICC; ANOVA). Concurrent validity was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients to compare the CMSP to the original Test of Gross Motor Development (2nd Edition) (TGMD-2). Results indicated that test reliability, interobserver reliability and validity coefficients were all high, generally above R/r = 0.90. Significant age differences were found. Outcomes indicate that the CMSP is an appropriate tool for assessing motor development of 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children in field-based settings that are consistent with large-scale trials. PMID:21532999

  1. Teaching first-year medical students in basic clinical and procedural skills − A novel course concept at a medical school in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Mileder, Lukas; Wegscheider, Thomas; Dimai, Hans Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Clerkships are still the main source for undergraduate medical students to acquire necessary skills. However, these educational experiences may not be sufficient, as there are significant deficiencies in the clinical experience and practical expertise of medical students. Project description: An innovative course teaching basic clinical and procedural skills to first-year medical students has been implemented at the Medical University of Graz, aiming at preparing students for clerkships and clinical electives. The course is based on several didactic elements: standardized and clinically relevant contents, dual (theoretical and virtual) pre-course preparation, student peer-teaching, small teaching groups, hands-on training, and the use of medical simulation. This is the first course of its kind at a medical school in Austria, and its conceptual design as well as the implementation process into the curriculum shall be described. Evaluation: Between November 2011 and January 2013, 418 students have successfully completed the course. Four online surveys among participating students have been performed, with 132 returned questionnaires. Students’ satisfaction with all four practical course parts was high, as well as the assessment of clinical relevance of contents. Most students (88.6%) strongly agreed/agreed that they had learned a lot throughout the course. Two thirds of the students were motivated by the course to train the acquired skills regularly at our skills laboratory. Narrative feedbacks revealed elements contributing most to course success. Conclusions: First-year medical students highly appreciate practical skills training. Hands-on practice, peer-teaching, clinically relevant contents, and the use of medical simulation are valued most. PMID:24575157

  2. [Objective surgery -- advanced robotic devices and simulators used for surgical skill assessment].

    PubMed

    Suhánszki, Norbert; Haidegger, Tamás

    2014-12-01

    Robotic assistance became a leading trend in minimally invasive surgery, which is based on the global success of laparoscopic surgery. Manual laparoscopy requires advanced skills and capabilities, which is acquired through tedious learning procedure, while da Vinci type surgical systems offer intuitive control and advanced ergonomics. Nevertheless, in either case, the key issue is to be able to assess objectively the surgeons' skills and capabilities. Robotic devices offer radically new way to collect data during surgical procedures, opening the space for new ways of skill parameterization. This may be revolutionary in MIS training, given the new and objective surgical curriculum and examination methods. The article reviews currently developed skill assessment techniques for robotic surgery and simulators, thoroughly inspecting their validation procedure and utility. In the coming years, these methods will become the mainstream of Western surgical education. PMID:25500641

  3. Clinical Risk Assessment in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Asefzadeh, Saeed; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Nikpey, Ahmad; Atighechian, Golrokh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin's Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital) through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG) performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN) was in respiratory care “Ventilator's alarm malfunction (no alarm)” with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal “not washing the NG-Tube” with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care. PMID:23930171

  4. Adapting the Helpful Responses Questionnaire to assess communication skills involved in delivering contingency management: Preliminary psychometrics

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    A paper/pencil instrument, adapted from Miller and colleagues’ (1991) Helpful Responses Questionnaire (HRQ), was developed to assess clinician skill with core communicative aspects involved in delivering contingency management (CM). The instrument presents a single vignette consisting of six points of client dialogue to which respondents write ‘what they would say next.’ In the context of an implementation/effectiveness hybrid trial, 19 staff clinicians at an opiate treatment program completed serial training outcome assessments before, following, and three months after CM training. Assessments included this adaptation of the HRQ, a multiple-choice CM knowledge test, and a recorded standardized patient encounter scored for CM skillfulness. Study results reveal promising psychometric properties for the instrument, including strong scoring reliability, internal consistency, concurrent and predictive validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to training effects. These preliminary findings suggest the instrument is a viable, practical method to assess clinician skill in communicative aspects of CM delivery. PMID:25770870

  5. Promoting Learning Skills through Teamwork Assessment and Self/Peer Evaluation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issa, Tomayess

    2012-01-01

    In the education sector, teamwork assessment and self/peer evaluation are widely applied in higher education nationally and internationally. This assessment is designed to encourage students to promote and improve their skills in teamwork, communication (writing, interpersonal interaction and cultural awareness, and presenting), critical and…

  6. Assessing Scientific and Technological Enquiry Skills at Age 11 Using the E-Scape System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Dan; Collier, Chris; Howe, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the outcomes from the "e-scape Primary Scientific and Technological Understanding Assessment Project" (2009-2010), which aimed to support primary teachers in developing valid portfolio-based tasks to assess pupils' scientific and technological enquiry skills at age 11. This was part of the wider "e-scape" project…

  7. Assessment of Social Skills for Students with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winner, Michelle Garcia

    2002-01-01

    This article introduces a framework to summarize areas of social cognition that affect the ability of students with Asperger syndrome to relate to others. A five-step approach to assessment is reviewed to provide information regarding the nature of students' social cognition and related skills. Informal assessment tools are then described.…

  8. Teenage Consumers: A Profile. Results of the 1978 National Assessment of Consumer Skills and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This document reports some of the findings of a national assessment of seventeen-year-olds on consumer knowledge, skills, and attitudes. An introduction describes the development of the survey, the probability sample, the administration of the assessment, and the format for reporting the results. Chapter 1 of five chapters summarizes the responses…

  9. Assessing and Certifying Generic Skills: What Is Happening in Vocational Education and Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn; Blom, Kaaren; Meyers, David; Bateman, Andrea

    Trends in assessment and certification of generic skills in vocational education and training (VET) across Australia were examined. Data were collected through the following activities: a literature review; semi-structured interviews with managers of assessment and teachers and learners in six registered training organizations across Australia;…

  10. Documenting Student Competence through Effective Performance Assessment: Employability Skills. Workshop Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Curriculum Materials Service.

    This report contains 26 performance assessments for documenting student employability skills. Each performance assessment consists of the following: a competency; a terminal performance objective (outcome); competency builders and pupil performance objectives (criteria for documenting mastery of the objective); applied academic competencies;…

  11. Got Game? A Choice-Based Learning Assessment of Data Literacy and Visualization Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Doris B.; Blair, Kristen P.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    In partnership with both formal and informal learning institutions, researchers have been building a suite of online games, called choicelets, to serve as interactive assessments of learning skills, e.g. critical thinking or seeking feedback. Unlike more traditional assessments, which take a retrospective, knowledge-based view of learning,…

  12. Validity of Teacher Report for Assessing the Emergent Literacy Skills of At-Risk Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Justice, Laura M.; Zucker, Tricia A.; Kilday, Carolyn R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive validity of teacher report for assessing the emergent literacy skills of preschool-age children. The aims were twofold: (a) to examine predictive relationships between teacher report and direct behavioral assessment, and (b) to examine the extent to which teacher report accurately…

  13. Moving towards the Assessment of Collaborative Problem Solving Skills with a Tangible User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ras, Eric; Krkovic, Katarina; Greiff, Samuel; Tobias, Eric; Maquil, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The research on the assessment of collaborative problem solving (ColPS), as one crucial 21st Century Skill, is still in its beginnings. Using Tangible User Interfaces (TUI) for this purpose has only been marginally investigated in technology-based assessment. Our first empirical studies focused on light-weight performance measurements, usability,…

  14. Analysis and Validation of a Rubric to Assess Oral Presentation Skills in University Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Ros, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of this study was to analyze users' perceptions and convergent validity of peer- and teacher summative assessment using a rubric for students' oral presentation skills in a university context. Method: Peer- and teacher-assessment convergence was analyzed from an analytical and holistic perspective. Students'…

  15. The Effectiveness of a Web-Based Motor Skill Assessment Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.; Moran, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based, intereactive video assessment program on teaching preservice physical education majors to assess the motor skill of kicking. The program provided component specific feedback through tutorial, guided practice, and competency training options. The 72 participants were…

  16. Use of Digital Video to Assess Orientation and Mobility Observational Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.; Zimmerman, George J.; Fox, Lynn A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the observational skills in orientation and mobility (O&M) of nine university students and nine certified O&M specialists using a digital video assessment. The students differed from the O&M specialists in their stylistic observations and the details of their responses. Implications for the improvement of video assessments are…

  17. Reactions to Skill Assessment: The Forgotten Factor in Explaining Motivation to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Bradford S.; Ford, J. Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The study presented here examined the effects of trainees' reactions to skill assessment on their motivation to learn. A model was developed that suggests that two dimensions of trainees' assessment reactions, distributive justice and utility, influence training motivation and overall training effectiveness. The model was tested using a sample of…

  18. Guidelines for Assessing Job-Related Social Skills of Mildly Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullis, Michael; Foss, Gilbert

    1986-01-01

    Effective assessment of job-related social skills of mildly handicapped workers should consider three components of social competence: context, cognition, and performance. A comprehensive profile of social competence is best obtained through use of several assessment tools, such as: rating scales; role play; problem-solving tests; applied…

  19. An Early Mathematical Patterning Assessment: Identifying Young Australian Indigenous Children's Patterning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papic, Marina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an Early Mathematical Patterning Assessment (EMPA) tool that provides early childhood educators with a valuable opportunity to identify young children's mathematical thinking and patterning skills through a series of hands-on and drawing tasks. EMPA was administered through one-to-one assessment interviews to children aged 4 to…

  20. Interventional pain management skills competency in pain medicine fellows: a method for development and assessment.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Kevin; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Perret-Karimi, Danielle; Hata, Justin; Ferrer, Steven M; Demesmin, Didier; Petagna, Ann Marie

    2014-08-01

    The purposes of this project were to propose an educational module to instruct pain medicine fellows in the appropriate performance of interventional pain management techniques and to verify procedural competency through objective evaluation methodology. Eight board-certified pain medicine physicians spanning two fellowship programs trained seven fellows using a standardized competency-based module. Assessment tools address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (American Board of Anesthesiology Pain Medicine Content Outline). The seven fellows demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation module. Objective measures compared the fellows' performance on standardized procedure checklists administered 9 mos into training; fellows in the 2012-2013 academic year also received testing at the 3-mo mark. Support for the assessment module is demonstrated by appropriate performance of interventional procedures, with improvement noted from 3-mo to 9-mo testing, successful completion of chart-stimulated oral examinations, proper performance of relevant physical examination maneuvers, and completion of program-specific medical knowledge written tests. The fellows were evaluated via patient surveys and 360-degree global rating scales, maintained procedure logs, and completed two patient-care reports; these were reviewed by program directors to ensure adequate completion. The standardized educational module and evaluation methodology presented provide a potential framework for the definition of baseline competency in the clinical skill area of interventional pain management. PMID:25033098

  1. Clinical assessment of the glenoid labrum

    PubMed Central

    Arnander, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background The glenoid labrum is integral to shoulder stability and can be difficult to assess clinically. Whilst it is a single anatomical structure, damage to different regions results in very different clinical manifestations. A large number of provocative tests have been described, all of which initially purport to have excellent diagnostic accuracy. Clinical experience suggests that this is not the case and decision making can be difficult for the non-expert. The purpose of this study is to review the current evidence for the most commonly used tests and to provide suggestions for tests which have the most evidence for efficacy. Methods The glenoid labrum was divided into anterior, superior and posterior regions. The English language literature describing labral tests was reviewed. The evidence provided by the authors and any subsequent studies was analysed. Results Whilst a large number if tests have been described with the primary authors reporting excellent results the evidence for most is poor when later tested critically. Discussion No single test will accurately diagnose labral pathology. The clinician must use evidence from the clinical history combined with selective use and interpretation of tests with which they are familiar.

  2. A Field-Based Testing Protocol for Assessing Gross Motor Skills in Preschool Children: The Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Harriet G.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Jeter, Chevy; Jones, Shaverra; Pate, Russell R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable tool for use in assessing motor skills in preschool children in field-based settings. The development of the Children's Activity and Movement in Preschool Study Motor Skills Protocol included evidence of its reliability and validity for use in field-based environments as part of large…

  3. Clinical Supervision Skills: Managing the Clinical Environment. Health Occupations Clinical Teacher Education Series for Secondary and Post-Secondary Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary Lou; And Others

    This learning module, which is part of a staff development program for health occupations clinical instructors, discusses the process of managing the physical clinical environment and students' experiences within the clinical environment. It includes learning activities dealing with various aspects of managing the physical environment and student…

  4. Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Simon; Endacott, Ruth; Cant, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Aim To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care. Background Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures. Methods Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance. Results A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills. Conclusion A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care. PMID:27147832

  5. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Methods Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. Results We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. Conclusion We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model. PMID:20433720

  6. Tailored skills training for practitioners to enhance assessment of prognostic factors for persistent and disabling back pain: four quasi-experimental single-subject studies.

    PubMed

    Demmelmaier, Ingrid; Denison, Eva; Lindberg, Per; Åsenlöf, Pernilla

    2012-07-01

    The well-known gap between guidelines and behaviour in clinical practice calls for effective behaviour change interventions. One example showing this gap is physiotherapists' insufficient assessment of psychosocial prognostic factors in back pain (i.e., yellow flags). The present study aimed to evaluate an educational model by performing a tailored skills training intervention for caregivers and studying changes over time in physiotherapists' assessment of prognostic factors in telephone consultations. A quasi-experimental single-subject design over 36 weeks was used, with repeated measurements during baseline, intervention, and postintervention phases. Four physiotherapists in primary health care audiorecorded a total of 63 consultations with patients. The tailored intervention included individual goal setting, skills training, and feedback on performance. The primary outcome was the number of assessed prognostic factors (0-10). Changes were seen in all four participants. The amount of assessed prognostic factors increased from between 0 and 2 at baseline to between 6 and 10 at postintervention. Time spent on assessment of psychosocial factors increased, and time spent on discussions about biomedical pain symptoms decreased. Knowledge and biopsychosocial attitudes toward back pain were congruent with guidelines at inclusion and did not change markedly during the intervention. Self-efficacy for assessment of cognitive and emotional prognostic factors increased during the study phases. The results suggest that a tailored skills training intervention using behaviour change techniques, such as individual goal setting, skills training, and feedback on performance, is effective in producing change in specific clinical behaviours in physiotherapists. PMID:22145578

  7. Learning Strategies Used while Developing Motor Skill Assessment Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.; Bishop, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based assessment training program and whether explicitly guiding the participants toward the recommended learning sequence would improve their performance on assessing the underhand roll compared to participants that were given free choice of their learning sequence. Participants were 48 volunteer…

  8. Clinical assessment of adolescents involved in Satanism.

    PubMed

    Clark, C M

    1994-01-01

    Satanism is a destructive religion that promises power, dominance, and gratification to its practitioners. Unfortunately, some adolescents are seduced by these promises, often because they feel alienated, alone, angry, and desperate. This article explores the psychosocial needs of adolescents that are often met by participation in Satanic worship. Gratification of these needs, when met, may make leaving the cult a difficult and lengthy process. Included is a method for determining the adolescents' level of involvement and an assessment strategy for the therapeutic evaluation process. A brief overview of clinical intervention is also discussed. PMID:8085495

  9. Knowledge and skills retention following Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission course for final year medical students in Rwanda: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kyamanya, Patrick; Van Steirteghem, Samuel; Becker, Martin; English, Mike; Lissauer, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine whether, after the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission (ETAT+) course, a comprehensive paediatric life support course, final year medical undergraduates in Rwanda would achieve a high level of knowledge and practical skills and if these were retained. To guide further course development, student feedback was obtained. Methods Longitudinal cohort study of knowledge and skills of all final year medical undergraduates at the University of Rwanda in academic year 2011–2012 who attended a 5-day ETAT+ course. Students completed a precourse knowledge test. Knowledge and clinical skills assessments, using standardised marking, were performed immediately postcourse and 3–9 months later. Feedback was obtained using printed questionnaires. Results 84 students attended the course and re-evaluation. Knowledge test showed a significant improvement, from median 47% to 71% correct answers (p<0.001). For two clinical skills scenarios, 98% passed both scenarios, 37% after a retake, 2% failed both scenarios. Three to nine months later, students were re-evaluated, median score for knowledge test 67%, not significantly different from postcourse (p>0.1). For clinical skills, 74% passed, with 32% requiring a retake, 8% failed after retake, 18% failed both scenarios, a significant deterioration (p<0.0001). Conclusions Students performed well on knowledge and skills immediately after a comprehensive ETAT+ course. Knowledge was maintained 3–9 months later. Clinical skills, which require detailed sequential steps, declined, but most were able to perform them satisfactorily after feedback. The course was highly valued, but several short courses and more practical teaching were advocated. PMID:24925893

  10. A discrete system simulation study in scheduling and resource allocation for the John A. Burns School of Medicine Clinical Skills Center.

    PubMed

    Glaspie, Henry W; Oshiro Wong, Celeste M

    2015-03-01

    The Center for Clinical Skills (CCS) at the University of Hawai'i's John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) trains medical students in a variety of medical practice education experiences aimed at improving patient care skills of history taking, physical examination, communication, and counseling. Increasing class sizes accentuate the need for efficient scheduling of faculty and students for clinical skills examinations. This research reports an application of a discrete simulation methodology, using a computerized commercial business simulation optimization software package Arena® by Rockwell Automation Inc, to model the flow of students through an objective structure clinical exam (OSCE) using the basic physical examination sequence (BPSE). The goal was to identify the most efficient scheduling of limited volunteer faculty resources to enable all student teams to complete the OSCE within the allocated 4 hours. The simulation models 11 two-person student teams, using resources of 10 examination rooms where physical examination skills are demonstrated on fellow student subjects and assessed by volunteer faculty. Multiple faculty availability models with constrained time parameters and other resources were evaluated. The results of the discrete event simulation suggest that there is no statistical difference in the baseline model and the alternative models with respect to faculty utilization, but statistically significant changes in student wait times. Two models significantly reduced student wait times without compromising faculty utilization. PMID:25821650

  11. NPEC Sourcebook on Assessment: Definitions and Assessment Methods for Communication, Leadership, Information Literacy, Quantitative Reasoning, and Quantitative Skills. NPEC 2005-0832

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; RiCharde, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Faculty, instructional staff, and assessment professionals are interested in student outcomes assessment processes and tools that can be used to improve learning experiences and academic programs. How can students' skills be assessed effectively? What assessments measure skills in communication? Leadership? Information literacy? Quantitative…

  12. A Tool for Assessing Sign Language Skills of Rehabilitation Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krafcik, Nancy H.; Gibson-Harman, Kim

    1987-01-01

    The article describes development in Illinois of the Department of Rehabilitation Services Sign Language Assessment Tool. The instrument is designed to evaluate the level of receptive and expressive sign language proficiency of rehabilitation personnel serving the deaf. (DB)

  13. Benefits of a programme taking advantage of patient‐instructors to teach and assess musculoskeletal skills in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Bideau, M; Guerne, P‐A; Bianchi, M‐P; Huber, P

    2006-01-01

    Aim To evaluate a rheumatoid arthritis patient‐instructor‐based formation–assessment programme for its ability to improve and assess musculoskeletal knowledge and skills in third‐year medical students. Methods (1) The quality of our musculoskeletal teaching was assessed before patient‐instructor intervention through an open‐questions test (pre‐test) and performance record forms (PRFs) filled in by the patient‐instructors. (2) The improvement afforded by patient‐instructors was evaluated through a second (identical) open‐questions test (post‐test). (3) The resulting skills in the students were further assessed by an individual patient‐instructors physical status record form (PSRF), filled in by the students. Results Pre‐tests and post‐tests showed an improvement in correct answers from a mean score of 39% to 47%. The history‐taking questions that obtained <50% scores in the pre‐test mostly dealt with the consequences of a chronic illness. Intervention of patient‐instructors especially improved knowledge of the psychosocial aspects and side effects of drugs. With regard to physical examination, patient‐instructors makedly improved the identification of assessment of signs of active and chronic inflammation. PRF analysis showed that 10 of 28 questions answered by <50% of the students were related to disease characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis, extra‐articular signs, side effects of drugs and psychosocial aspects. Analysis of the PSRF indicated that the weakness of our students' physical examination abilities in particular is related to recognising the types of swelling and differentiating tenderness from pain on motion. Conclusion This study proves the considerable benefits of the involvement of patient‐instructors in the teaching and assessment of clinical skills in students. PMID:16707537

  14. Assessing Suturing Skills in a Self-Guided Learning Setting: Absolute Symmetry Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brydges, Ryan; Carnahan, Heather; Dubrowski, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Directed self-guidance, whereby trainees independently practice a skill-set in a structured setting, may be an effective technique for novice training. Currently, however, most evaluation methods require an expert to be present during practice. The study aim was to determine if absolute symmetry error, a clinically important measure that can be…

  15. Does self-reflection and peer-assessment improve Saudi pharmacy students’ academic performance and metacognitive skills?

    PubMed Central

    Yusuff, Kazeem B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The patient-centered focus of clinical pharmacy practice which demands nuanced application of specialized knowledge and skills targeted to meeting patient-specific therapeutic needs warrant that the training strategy used for PharmD graduates must empower with the ability to use the higher level cognitive processes and critical thinking effectively in service delivery. However, the historical disposition to learning in the Middle East and among Saudi students appeared heavily focused on rote memorization and recall of memorized facts. Objectives: To assess the impact of active pedagogic strategies such as self-reflection and peer assessment on pharmacy students’ academic performance and metacognitive skills, and evaluate students’ feedback on the impact of these active pedagogic strategies on their overall learning experience. Method: An exploratory prospective cohort study was conducted among 4th year students at the College of Clinical Pharmacy, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia to assess the impact of self-reflection and peer-assessment in a semester-wide assessment tasks in two compulsory first semester 4th year courses (Therapeutics-3 and Pharmacoeconomics). An end-of-course evaluation survey with a pre-tested 5-item open-ended questionnaire was also conducted to evaluate students’ feedback on the impact of active pedagogic strategies on their overall learning experience. Result: Male students (study group) constituted 40.7% of the cohort while 59.3% were females (control group) with mean ± SD age of 23.2 ± 5.6 and 22.1 ± 4.9 years respectively. The mean ± SD scores for quizzes, mid-term and final exams, and the overall percentage pass were significantly higher in the study group for both courses (P < 0.001). The majority of the students in the study group opined that the exposure to active pedagogic strategies enabled them to improve their use of critical thinking, facilitated deeper engagement with their learning and

  16. A Teacher's Perception and Practice of Assessing the Reading Skills of Young Learners--A Study from Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalani, Shaheena Sulaiman; Rodrigues, Sherwin

    2012-01-01

    This collaborative action research aimed to explore some classroom-based assessment strategies to assess the reading skills of young children. This article presents the findings of the pre-intervention stage as part of an action research study where a teacher's perception and practice of assessing the reading skills of young learners were…

  17. Early Assessment of High School Juniors' College Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordner, Marsha S.

    In response to low college-going rates and low persistence rates of college students, Clark Technical College (CTC) initiated the High School Liaison Project to improve articulation between the college and local schools. The project served as an umbrella for several related activities, including a program for assessing the potential college skills…

  18. Developing Students' Skills in Reflective Practice: Design and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlovich, Kathryn; Collins, Eva; Jones, Glyndwr

    2009-01-01

    This article examines learning journals as a method for developing self-awareness within a business education context, exploring "how can effective design and assessment of reflective journals assist the development of students' self-knowledge?" The authors describe three different approaches to learning journals, with each case study outlining…

  19. Skill assessment of the existing capacity for extended-range weather forecasting in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adejuwon, James O.; Odekunle, Theophilus O.

    2004-08-01

    The need for skilful weather forecasting as a strategy for adapting food production to a variable and changing climate is recognized. Frequent assessment of the existing tools provides the needed feedback to encourage the growth of a more reliable weather forecasting capacity. A scheme designed for the assessment of the skill demonstrated by published weather forecasts is presented. The existing products of four weather forecasting organizations with interests in West Africa are assessed using the observed weather during the period from 1996 to 2000. The weather forecasting organizations concerned are NOAA (USA), Met Office (UK), CNRS (France) and the Nigerian Central Forecasting Office. The forecast skills of the various organizations appear not to have witnessed any significant improvement between 1996 and 2000. Overall, the low proportion of the forecasts falling into the low skill category is encouraging. However, the relatively high percentage of the moderate skill and low percentage of the high skill categories suggest that there is considerable room for improvement. One may have to give the various organizations more time to perfect the existing tools. However, this review has not come too early, because it is the type of feedback needed to hasten the emergence of more skilful forecasts. It has been established in this study that better rainfall forecasts could be achieved with higher resolution sea-surface temperature anomaly data and the inclusion of more predictor variables, especially those of a synoptic nature.

  20. The design and implementation of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) as a strategy to improve nursing students' clinical reasoning skills.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kerry; Dempsey, Jennifer; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Noble, Danielle; Hickey, Noelene; Jeong, Sarah; Hunter, Sharyn; Norton, Carol

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design and testing of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) which was constructed to enable student nurses to "think like a nurse." The ICDSF was based on a model of clinical reasoning. Teaching student nurses to reason clinically is important as poor clinical reasoning skills can lead to "failure-to rescue" of deteriorating patients. The framework of the ICDSF was based on nursing concepts to encourage deep learning and transferability of knowledge. The principles of active student participation, situated cognition to solve problems, authenticity, and cognitive rehearsal were used to develop the ICDSF. The ICDSF was designed in such a way that students moved through it in a step-wise fashion and were required to achieve competency at each step before proceeding to the next. The quality of the ICDSF was evaluated using a questionairre survey, students' written comments and student assessment measures on a pilot and the ICDSF. Overall students were highly satisfied with the clinical scenarios of the ICDSF and believed they were an interesting and useful way to engage in authentic clinical learning. They also believed the ICDSF was useful in developing cognitive skills such as clinical reasoning, problem-solving and decision-making. Some reported issues were the need for good technical support and the lack of face to face contact when using e-learning. Some students also believed the ICDSF was less useful than actual clinical placements. PMID:21074299

  1. Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill in assessing technical competence to carry out caesarean section with increasing seniority.

    PubMed

    Landau, Alex; Reid, Wendy; Watson, Andrew; McKenzie, Clare

    2013-04-01

    Since the incorporation of workplace-based assessment within the specialty training programme in obstetrics and gynaecology, the assessment of technical competence to carry out caesarean section has been undertaken by the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill tool. This requirement has been formalised in the Matrix of Educational Progression, ensuring that the tool must assess trainees' technical competence in caesarean section procedures of varying levels of complexity throughout training. Trainee feedback suggests that the effectiveness of the tool diminishes as the seniority of the trainee increases, with technical competence assessed less effectively in more complex procedures. This seems to be a result of the generic design of the tool and insufficient training on the part of assessors. Both of these are due to be addressed within a division of the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill tool into explicitly formative and summative assessments of technical skill, following a General Medical Council-led consultation on the future of workplace-based assessment. PMID:23062591

  2. Brief FASD prevention intervention: physicians’ skills demonstrated in a clinical trial in Russia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can result in a range of adverse pregnancy outcomes including Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Risky drinking among Russian women constitutes a significant risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEP). Russian women report that obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) physicians are the most important source of information about alcohol consumption during pregnancy and developing effective prevention interventions by OB/GYNs is indicated. This is the first study focused on implementation of an AEP prevention intervention at women’s clinics in Russia. Method The paper describes the intervention protocol and addresses questions about the feasibility of a brief FASD prevention intervention delivered by OB/GYNs at women’s clinics in Russia. Brief physician intervention guidelines and two evidence-based FASD prevention interventions were utilized to design a brief dual-focused physician intervention (DFBPI) appropriate to Russian OB/GYN care. The questions answered were whether trained OB/GYN physicians could deliver DFBPI during women’s routine clinic visits, whether they maintained skills over time in clinical settings, and which specific intervention components were better maintained. Data were collected as part of a larger study aimed at evaluating effectiveness of DFBPI in reducing AEP risk in non-pregnant women. Methods of monitoring the intervention delivery included fidelity check lists (FCL) with the key components of the intervention completed by physicians and patients and live and audio taped observations of intervention sessions. Physicians (N = 23) and women (N = 372) independently completed FCL, and 78 audiotapes were coded. Results The differences between women’s and physicians’ reports on individual items were not significant. Although the majority of physician and patient reports were consistent (N = 305), a discrepancy existed between the reports in 57 cases. Women reported more intervention

  3. Quality assessment of clinical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Dorothea; Luckow, Marlen; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional images are vital for the diagnosis in dentistry and cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Artifacts caused by highly absorbing components such as metallic implants, however, limit the value of the tomograms. The dominant artifacts observed are blowout and streaks. Investigating the artifacts generated by metallic implants in a pig jaw, the data acquisition for the patients in dentistry should be optimized in a quantitative manner. A freshly explanted pig jaw including related soft-tissues served as a model system. Images were recorded varying the accelerating voltage and the beam current. The comparison with multi-slice and micro computed tomography (CT) helps to validate the approach with the dental CT system (3D-Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). The data are rigidly registered to comparatively quantify their quality. The micro CT data provide a reasonable standard for quantitative data assessment of clinical CT.

  4. Can we teach core clinical obstetrics and gynaecology skills using low fidelity simulation in an interprofessional setting?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arunaz; Gilmour, Carole; Nestel, Debra; Aldridge, Robyn; McLelland, Gayle; Wallace, Euan

    2014-12-01

    Core clinical skills acquisition is an essential component of undergraduate medical and midwifery education. Although interprofessional education is an increasingly common format for learning efficient teamwork in clinical medicine, its value in undergraduate education is less clear. We present a collaborative effort from the medical and midwifery schools of Monash University, Melbourne, towards the development of an educational package centred around a core skills-based workshop using low fidelity simulation models in an interprofessional setting. Detailed feedback on the package was positive with respect to the relevance of the teaching content, whether the topic was well taught by task trainers and simulation models used, pitch of level of teaching and perception of confidence gained in performing the skill on a real patient after attending the workshop. Overall, interprofessional core skills training using low fidelity simulation models introduced at an undergraduate level in medicine and midwifery had a good acceptance. PMID:25308468

  5. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory biology courses. Modules are designed to improve skills in quantitative numeracy, interpreting data sets using visual tools, and making inferences about biological phenomena using mathematical/statistical models. We also examine demographic/background data that predict student improvement in these skills through exposure to these modules. We carried out pre/postassessment tests across four semesters and used student interviews in one semester to examine how students at different levels approached quantitative problems. We found that students improved in all skills in most semesters, although there was variation in the degree of improvement among skills from semester to semester. One demographic variable, transfer status, stood out as a major predictor of the degree to which students improved (transfer students achieved much lower gains every semester, despite the fact that pretest scores in each focus area were similar between transfer and nontransfer students). We propose that increased exposure to quantitative skill development in biology courses is effective at building competency in quantitative reasoning. PMID:27146161

  6. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory biology courses. Modules are designed to improve skills in quantitative numeracy, interpreting data sets using visual tools, and making inferences about biological phenomena using mathematical/statistical models. We also examine demographic/background data that predict student improvement in these skills through exposure to these modules. We carried out pre/postassessment tests across four semesters and used student interviews in one semester to examine how students at different levels approached quantitative problems. We found that students improved in all skills in most semesters, although there was variation in the degree of improvement among skills from semester to semester. One demographic variable, transfer status, stood out as a major predictor of the degree to which students improved (transfer students achieved much lower gains every semester, despite the fact that pretest scores in each focus area were similar between transfer and nontransfer students). We propose that increased exposure to quantitative skill development in biology courses is effective at building competency in quantitative reasoning. PMID:27146161

  7. A Two-Stage Multi-Agent Based Assessment Approach to Enhance Students' Learning Motivation through Negotiated Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadli, Abdelhafid; Bendella, Fatima; Tranvouez, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an Agent-based evaluation approach in a context of Multi-agent simulation learning systems. Our evaluation model is based on a two stage assessment approach: (1) a Distributed skill evaluation combining agents and fuzzy sets theory; and (2) a Negotiation based evaluation of students' performance during a training…

  8. Assessment of Mindfulness by Self-Report: The Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Ruth A.; Smith, Gregory T.; Allen, Kristin B.

    2004-01-01

    A self-report inventory for the assessment of mindfulness skills was developed, and its psychometric characteristics and relationships with other constructs were examined. Participants included three samples of undergraduate students and a sample of outpatients with borderline personality disorder. Based on discussions of mindfulness in the…

  9. Using the Communication Matrix to Assess Expressive Skills in Early Communicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Charity

    2011-01-01

    Many children born with severe and multiple disabilities have complex communication needs and may use no speech or only minimal speech to communicate. Meaningful assessment of their expressive skills to identify communication strengths along a developmental trajectory is an essential first step toward appropriate intervention. This article…

  10. Dynamic Assessment of Word Learning Skills: Identifying Language Impairment in Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapantzoglou, Maria; Restrepo, M. Adelaida; Thompson, Marilyn S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Bilingual children are often diagnosed with language impairment, although they may simply have fewer opportunities to learn English than English-speaking monolingual children. This study examined whether dynamic assessment (DA) of word learning skills is an effective method for identifying bilingual children with primary language…

  11. Assessment of Academic Literacy Skills: Preparing Minority and LEP (Limited English Proficient) Students for Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Phyllis

    Addressing the problem of the language-related barriers to successful postsecondary education for underprepared college students, an assessment of academic language proficiency and a curriculum to help students improve their academic language skills were developed. The nature of the language tasks required in the undergraduate curriculum was…

  12. Developing Teachers' Knowledge and Skills at the Intersection of English Language Learners and Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Téllez, Kip; Mosqueda, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The growth of teachers' professional knowledge and skills has been the topic of policy, research, and even philosophy for many decades. The assessment of English Learners (ELs), a more specific concern, has become an interest of the educational community in just the past 40 years (e.g., Harris, 1969). The authors' task in this chapter is to…

  13. Assessment of Job Application and Employment Interview Skills for Job Seekers with Disabilities: Assessor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Suki; And Others

    The job application form and interview skills assessment procedures presented in this manual were developed to serve as one component of the Diagnostic Employability Profile, designed to serve disabled clients of vocational rehabilitation services. Since the overall objective of the job application is to secure a job interview, assessment…

  14. Teaching Thinking Skills in Context-Based Learning: Teachers' Challenges and Assessment Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avargil, Shirly; Herscovitz, Orit; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2012-01-01

    For an educational reform to succeed, teachers need to adjust their perceptions to the reform's new curricula and strategies and cope with new content, as well as new teaching and assessment strategies. Developing students' scientific literacy through context-based chemistry and higher order thinking skills was the framework for establishing a new…

  15. Challenging Behavior and Early Academic Skill Development: An Integrated Approach to Assessment and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojnoski, Robin L.; Wood, Brenna K.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an approach to assessment and intervention of challenging behavior in early education settings that integrates a focus on instructional conditions and early academic skill development. The authors suggest this approach allows for a better understanding of the relationship between social behavior and child performance with…

  16. Impact of a Peer-Tutoring Course on Skill Performance, Assessment, and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulling, Andy R.; Allen, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the completion of a peer-teaching course impacted pre-service teachers ability to perform, teach, and assess motor skills. Central Michigan University (CMU) implemented a required course for physical education teacher education majors in which enrollees were evaluated on how well they performed…

  17. Texas Assessment of Academic Skills 1997-98 Report. Publication Number 97.12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Program Evaluation.

    The Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) is a state-mandated, criterion-referenced or mastery test that has been administered since the 1990-91 school year. The TAAS measures student mastery of the statewide curriculum in reading and mathematics at grades 3 through 8 and at the exit level, and in writing at grades 4 and 8 and at the exit…

  18. Connected Mathematics and the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills. What Works Clearinghouse Brief Study Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Schneider found no statistically significant differences between the intervention and comparison groups on the school-level Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) analyzed in the study. The findings may have been affected by only three schools implementing more than one-third of the total math problems in each year and grade. In addition, the…

  19. Connected Mathematics and the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills. What Works Clearinghouse Detailed Study Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Schneider found no statistically significant differences between the intervention and comparison groups on the school-level Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) analyzed in the study. The findings may have been affected by only three schools implementing more than one-third of the total math problems in each year and grade. In addition, the…

  20. Texas Trends in Education: Texas Assessment of Academic Skills, 1994-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy J.

    The Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) study describes either 3- or 4-year trends in average campus-level passing rates on TAAS at all grade levels. It discusses student, teacher, campus, and district characteristics as they may relate to student success on TAAS by looking at data for students in grades 4, 8, and 10 for four consecutive…

  1. Using Reflection to Assess Students Ability to Learn and Develop Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Heather M.; Burk, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Leadership skill development has been identified as an important element of future leisure service professionals academic preparation. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to utilize in-depth course reflection and service-learning to assess whether undergraduate students enrolled in a leadership course were meeting the leadership objectives set…

  2. EFL Primary School Teachers' Attitudes, Knowledge and Skills in Alternative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.; Taqi, Hanan A.; Abdul-Kareem, Muneera M.

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated female EFL primary school teachers' attitudes as well as teachers' knowledge and skills in alternative assessment. Data was collected via a questionnaire from 335 EFL primary school teachers randomly selected from six educational zones. An interview with principals and head teachers and a focus group interview with EFL…

  3. Assessment of Communication Skills of Physical Education and Sport Students in Turkish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Ali Dursun

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the communication skills of the students studying in physical education and sports schools in various universities in Turkey. A total of 1,854 Physical Education and Sports students in five Turkish universities participated in the study. The instrument used to gather information for this study comprised the demographic…

  4. Developing Team Skills with Self- and Peer Assessment: Are Benefits Inversely Related to Team Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Keith; Gardner, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Self- and peer assessment has proved effective in promoting the development of teamwork and other professional skills in undergraduate students. However, in previous research approximately 30 percent of students reported that its use produced no perceived improvement in their teamwork experience. It was hypothesised that a significant…

  5. Faculty Mentors', Graduate Students', and Performance-Based Assessments of Students' Research Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldon, David F.; Maher, Michelle A.; Hurst, Melissa; Timmerman, Briana

    2015-01-01

    Faculty mentorship is thought to be a linchpin of graduate education in STEM disciplines. This mixed-method study investigates agreement between student mentees' and their faculty mentors' perceptions of the students' developing research knowledge and skills in STEM. We also compare both assessments against independent ratings of the students'…

  6. Teaching and Assessing Science Process Skills in Physics: The "Bubbles" Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo

    2000-01-01

    Describes a bubble activity related to the concepts of force and motion. Uses soap solutions for the task and evaluates students according to their performance in the problem solving process and garnering investigation results, which are conceptually based. Promotes and assesses science process skills. (Contains 20 references.) (YDS)

  7. Teachers' and Mothers' Assessment of Social Skills of Students with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cifci Tekinarslan, Ilknur; Sazak Pinar, Elif; Sucuoglu, Bulbin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the assessment results of social skills of students with mental retardation by their teachers and mothers through relational model by using descriptive statistics. The research group in this study consisted of mothers and teachers of 562 children with mental retardation aged between 6 and 12 who enrolled in…

  8. Puerto Rican Participation in Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) Programs. A Preliminary Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Jose E.

    This report presents the findings of a preliminary assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) programs, the welfare-to-work centerpiece of the Family Support Act, for moving Puerto Rican welfare recipients closer to self-sufficiency. Programs in Newark (New Jersey), New York City, and Philadelphia…

  9. The Effect of Classroom Performance Assessment on EFL Students' Basic and Inferential Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Koumy, Abdel Salam Abdel Khalek

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of classroom performance assessment on the EFL students' basic and inferential reading skills. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was employed in the study. The subjects of the study consisted of 64 first-year secondary school students in Menouf Secondary School for Boys at Menoufya…

  10. Video Review in Self-Assessment of Pharmacy Students' Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volino, Lucio R.; Das, Rolee Pathak

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a student self-assessment activity of a video-recorded counseling session and evaluate its impact on student self-perceptions of specific communication skills. This activity was incorporated into a core-communications course within the third professional year of a Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. Student…

  11. Assessing Early Communication Skills at 12 Months: A Retrospective Study of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Nathaniel Robert; Eadie, Patricia Ann; Prior, Margot Ruth; Reilly, Sheena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early identification of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is currently limited by the absence of reliable biological markers for the disorder, as well as the reliability of screening and assessment tools for children aged between 6 and 18 months. Ongoing research has demonstrated the importance of early social communication skills in…

  12. Integrating Soft Skills Assessment through University, College, and Programmatic Efforts at an AACSB Accredited Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Debbie; Schwieger, Dana; Surendran, Ken

    2008-01-01

    The growing demand for verification that students are, indeed, learning what they need to learn is driving institutions and programs to develop tools for assessing the level of knowledge and skills of their graduating students. One such tool, the Information Systems Analyst (ISA) certification, is a recently developed instrument for measuring…

  13. Performance-Based Assessment of Software Skills Proficiency: A Demonstration of the "Judd Tests."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David C.

    The differences between multiple-choice, simulated, and concurrent tests of software-skills proficiency are discussed. For three basic human-resource functions, the advantages of concurrent tests (i.e., those that use the actual application software) include true performance-based assessment, unconstrained response alternatives, and increased job…

  14. The Carter Neurocognitive Assessment for Children with Severely Compromised Expressive Language and Motor Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leevers, Hilary J.; Roesler, Cynthia P.; Flax, Judy; Benasich, April A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, different means of assessing cognitive development in children with severe impairments in "both" their expressive language and their motor skills are reviewed. A range of techniques are considered, including traditional cognitive tests and behavioral and physiological measures, but these techniques are generally impractical and…

  15. The Validation of Parallel Test Forms: "Mountain" and "Beach" Picture Series for Assessment of Language Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Jungok; Lee, Yae-Sheik

    2011-01-01

    Pictures are widely used to elicit expressive language skills, and pictures must be established as parallel before changes in ability can be demonstrated by assessment using pictures prompts. Why parallel prompts are required and what it is necessary to do to ensure that prompts are in fact parallel is not widely known. To date, evidence of…

  16. Assessing and Certifying Occupational Skills and Competencies in Vocational Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Olivier

    This document contains the analytical reports and case studies presented at a 1992 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development policy seminar that focused on assessment, certification, and recognition of skills and qualifications in vocational education and training. The following papers are included: "The Issues" (Hilary Steedman);…

  17. Measuring Primary Students' Graph Interpretation Skills via a Performance Assessment: A Case Study in Instrument Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Karen; Cranston, Kayla A.; Pryor, Marie; Kermish-Allen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This case study was conducted within the context of a place-based education project that was implemented with primary school students in the USA. The authors and participating teachers created a performance assessment of standards-aligned tasks to examine 6-10-year-old students' graph interpretation skills as part of an exploratory research…

  18. Organizational Assessment of Basic Skills Needs at the University Division of Residence Operations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Muriel P.

    An organizational needs assessment (ONA) process was developed to gather information about the basic skills upgrading needs and issues in the Division of Residence Operations of a state university. Forty-four participants from management, union leadership, and all job levels in the university's custodial and maintenance departments participated in…

  19. Developing a Process-Oriented Translation Test for Assessing English-Arabic Basic Translation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdellah, Antar Solhy

    2007-01-01

    The study reviews translation validated tests and proposes a process-oriented translation test for assessing basic translation skills for freshmen English majors at the faculty of Education. The proposed test is developed based on the process approach to translating and translation teaching, and is confined to translation from English to Arabic.…

  20. An Assessment of Post-Professional Athletic Training Students' Critical Thinking Skills and Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Jessica Marie

    2013-01-01

    The need for outcome measures in critical thinking skills and dispositions for post-professional athletic training programs (PPATPs) is significant. It has been suggested that athletic trainers who are competent and disposed towards thinking critically will be successful in the profession. The purpose of this study is to assess critical thinking…