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Sample records for clinical status virologic

  1. Deep Sequencing: Becoming a Critical Tool in Clinical Virology

    PubMed Central

    QUIÑONES-MATEU, Miguel E.; AVILA, Santiago; REYES-TERAN, Gustavo; MARTINEZ, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Population (Sanger) sequencing has been the standard method in basic and clinical DNA sequencing for almost 40 years; however, next-generation (deep) sequencing methodologies are now revolutionizing the field of genomics, and clinical virology is no exception. Deep sequencing is highly efficient, producing an enormous amount of information at low cost in a relatively short period of time. High-throughput sequencing techniques have enabled significant contributions to multiples areas in virology, including virus discovery and metagenomics (viromes), molecular epidemiology, pathogenesis, and studies of how viruses to escape the host immune system and antiviral pressures. In addition, new and more affordable deep sequencing-based assays are now being implemented in clinical laboratories. Here we review the use of the current deep sequencing platforms in virology, focusing on three of the most studied viruses: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and influenza virus. PMID:24998424

  2. Clinical, virologic, histologic, and biochemical outcomes after successful HCV therapy

    PubMed Central

    George, Sarah L.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Mihindukulasuriya, Kusal L.; Hoffmann, Joyce; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and fifty patients with sustained virologic response (SVR) after treatment of chronic hepatitis C were enrolled in a long-term clinical follow-up study; patients were followed for 5 years for liver-related outcomes and evidence of biochemical or virologic relapse. Patients with stage two or greater fibrosis on pre-treatment biopsy were invited to undergo a long-term follow-up biopsy after their 4th year of follow-up. One hundred twenty-eight patients (85%) were followed through their 4th year and long-term follow-up biopsies were obtained from 60 patients (40%). Forty-nine patients had paired pre-treatment and long-term follow-up biopsies blindly rescored. Forty of these (82%) had a decrease in fibrosis score and forty-five (92%) had a decrease in combined inflammation score. Ten patients (20%) had normal or nearly normal livers on long-term follow-up biopsy. Two patients with pre-treatment cirrhosis developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and one died. All the other patients with pre-treatment cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis had improved fibrosis scores on long-term follow-up biopsy. No patient had conclusive evidence of virologic relapse. Three patients had persistently elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels; two of these had new liver disease. In conclusion, in this cohort of 150 patients with SVR followed for five years the majority of patients had good outcomes. Serum virologic relapse was not seen but two patients with pre-treatment cirrhosis developed HCC and one died. In blind rescoring of forty-nine paired pre-treatment and long-term follow-up biopsies 82% improved fibrosis scores and 92% improved at least one component of inflammation. A minority of patients had normal or nearly normal liver tissue on long-term follow-up biopsy. Patients with cirrhosis pre-treatment are at a low but real risk of HCC after SVR. PMID:19072828

  3. Virology, Immunology, and Clinical Course of HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutchan, J. Allen

    1990-01-01

    Presents overview of medical aspects of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) disease. Addresses structure and replication of virus, current methods for detecting HIV-1 in infected persons, effects of the virus on immune system, and clinical course of HIV-1 disease. Emphasizes variable causes of progression through HIV-1 infection stages;…

  4. Virological and clinical characterizations of respiratory infections in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and seasonal distribution of viral etiological agents and to compare their clinical manifestations and disease severity, including single and co infections. Methods Multiplex reverse-transcription PCR was performed for the detection of viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirat. Disease severity was grouped using a categorization index as very mild/mild, and moderate/severe. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of hospitalized children with viral respiratory tract infection were analyzed. Results Viral pathogens were detected in 103/155 (66.5%) of patients. In order of frequency, identified pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (32.0%), adenovirus (26.2%), parainfluenza viruses type 1–4 (19.4%), rhinovirus (18.4%), influenza A and B (12.6%), human metapneumovirus (12.6%), coronavirus (2.9%), and bocavirus (0.9%). Coinfections were present in 21 samples. Most of the children had very mild (38.8%) and mild disease (37.9%). Severity of illness was not worse with coinfections. The most common discharge diagnoses were "URTI" with or without LRTI/asthma (n=58). Most viruses exhibited strong seasonal patterns. Leukocytosis (22.2%) and neutrophilia (36.6%) were most commonly detected in patients with adenovirus and rhinovirus (p<0.05). Monocytosis was the most remarkable finding in the patients (n=48, 53.3%), especially in patients with adenovirus (p<0.05). Conclusions RSV and RhV were associated with higher severity of illness in hospitalized children. RSV found to account for half of LRTI hospitalizations. In AdV and FluA and B infections, fever lasted longer than in other viruses. Coinfections were detected in 21 of the patients. The presence of coinfections was not associated with increased disease severity. PMID:23536956

  5. Next-generation sequencing technology in clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Capobianchi, M R; Giombini, E; Rozera, G

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in nucleic acid sequencing technologies, referred to as 'next-generation' sequencing (NGS), have produced a true revolution and opened new perspectives for research and diagnostic applications, owing to the high speed and throughput of data generation. So far, NGS has been applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the discovery of novel viruses and the characterization of viral communities. Additional applications include whole viral genome sequencing, detection of viral genome variability, and the study of viral dynamics. These applications are particularly suitable for viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus, whose error-prone replication machinery, combined with the high replication rate, results, in each infected individual, in the formation of many genetically related viral variants referred to as quasi-species. The viral quasi-species, in turn, represents the substrate for the selective pressure exerted by the immune system or by antiviral drugs. With traditional approaches, it is difficult to detect and quantify minority genomes present in viral quasi-species that, in fact, may have biological and clinical relevance. NGS provides, for each patient, a dataset of clonal sequences that is some order of magnitude higher than those obtained with conventional approaches. Hence, NGS is an extremely powerful tool with which to investigate previously inaccessible aspects of viral dynamics, such as the contribution of different viral reservoirs to replicating virus in the course of the natural history of the infection, co-receptor usage in minority viral populations harboured by different cell lineages, the dynamics of development of drug resistance, and the re-emergence of hidden genomes after treatment interruptions. The diagnostic application of NGS is just around the corner. PMID:23279287

  6. [Bacteriological and virological status in upper respiratory tract infections of cats (cat common cold complex)].

    PubMed

    Adler, Kerstin; Radeloff, Isabel; Stephan, Bernd; Greife, Heinrich; Hellmann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Between October 2002 and January 2005,460 bacteriological samples from cats with an acute upper respiratory tract infection were analysed in clinical field studies in two accredited laboratories in Germany. Oropharyngeal swabs were taken from these cats and sent to the laboratories for routine diagnostics. In the swab samples of 460 cats 382 bacteria strains were isolated. The following bacteria were isolated most frequently: Pasteurella spp. (32.5 %), Staphylococcus spp. (18.5 %), Escherichia coli (17.0 %), Streptococcus spp. (9.1 %), Pseudomonas spp. (6.9 %) and Klebsiella spp. (3.0 %). Bordetella bronchiseptica was found in 0.4 % of the animals To evaluate possible regional and time influences, the animals were split into three populations: 1: Germany, laboratory A; 2: Germany, laboratory B; 3: France and Belgium, laboratory B. In population 1 an 2 Pasteurella spp. were found most frequently with 42.2 % and 36.5 %, respectively. The second most frequently isolated bacterial species were Staphylococcus spp. with 14.1 % and 21.4 % and E. coli with 13.6 % and 17.5 % respectively. In population 3 Staphylococcus spp., E. coli (20 % each) and Pasteurella spp. (18.5 %) were isolated at almost the same frequency. Virological parameter were additionally analysed in 328 cats (population 2 and 3). Serum samples were analysed for antibodies specific for Feline Calicivirus (FCV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and for Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) antigen. Oropharyngeal swabs were analysed for Feline Herpesvirus (FHV) by using PCR. Calicivirus-specific antibodies were found in 99.6 % of the cats of population 2 and in 100 % of the animals in population 3. Herpesvirus was detected in 15.3 % and 23.3 % of the cats, respectively. FeLV-Antigen was found in 0.4 % of the animals in population 2 and in 10.1 % of the cats in population 3, while FIV-antibodies were identified in 8.7 % of the animals of population 2 and in 6.1 % of the cats of population 3. In total FHV was

  7. Comparison of adherence monitoring tools and correlation to virologic failure in a pediatric HIV clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Intasan, Jintana; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Vonthanak, Saphonn; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Ngampiyaskul, Chaiwat; Wongsawat, Jurai; Luesomboon, Wicharn; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Puthanakit, Thanyawee

    2014-06-01

    There is no consensus on a gold standard for monitoring adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared different adherence monitoring tools in predicting virologic failure as part of a clinical trial. HIV-infected Thai and Cambodian children aged 1-12 years (N=207) were randomized to immediate-ART or deferred-ART until CD4% <15%. Virologic failure (VF) was defined as HIV-RNA >1000 copies/mL after ≥6 months of ART. Adherence monitoring tools were: (1) announced pill count, (2) PACTG adherence questionnaire (form completed by caregivers), and (3) child self-report (self-reporting from children or caregivers to direct questioning by investigators during the clinic visit) of any missed doses in the last 3 days and in the period since the last visit. The Kappa statistic was used to describe agreement between each tool. The median age at ART initiation was 7 years with median CD4% 17% and HIV-RNA 5.0 log(10)copies/mL and 92% received zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine. Over 144 weeks, 13% had VF. Mean adherence by announced pill count before VF in VF children was 92% compared to 98% in children without VF (p=0.03). Kappa statistics indicated slight to fair agreement between tools. In multivariate analysis adjusting for gender, treatment arm ethnicity and caregiver education, significant predictors of VF were poor adherence by announced pill count (OR 4.56; 95%CI 1.78-11.69), reporting any barrier to adherence in the PACTG adherence questionnaire (OR 7.08; 95%CI 2.42-20.73), and reporting a missed dose in the 24 weeks since the last HIV-RNA assessment (OR 8.64; 95%CI 1.96-38.04). In conclusion, we recommend the child self-report of any missed doses since last visit for use in HIV research and in routine care settings, because it is easy and quick to administer and a strong association with development of VF. PMID:24901463

  8. Comparison of Adherence Monitoring Tools and Correlation to Virologic Failure in a Pediatric HIV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Intasan, Jintana; Vonthanak, Saphonn; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Ngampiyaskul, Chaiwat; Wongsawat, Jurai; Luesomboon, Wicharn; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Puthanakit, Thanyawee

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is no consensus on a gold standard for monitoring adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared different adherence monitoring tools in predicting virologic failure as part of a clinical trial. HIV-infected Thai and Cambodian children aged 1–12 years (N=207) were randomized to immediate-ART or deferred-ART until CD4% <15%. Virologic failure (VF) was defined as HIV-RNA >1000 copies/mL after ≥6 months of ART. Adherence monitoring tools were: (1) announced pill count, (2) PACTG adherence questionnaire (form completed by caregivers), and (3) child self-report (self-reporting from children or caregivers to direct questioning by investigators during the clinic visit) of any missed doses in the last 3 days and in the period since the last visit. The Kappa statistic was used to describe agreement between each tool. The median age at ART initiation was 7 years with median CD4% 17% and HIV-RNA 5.0 log10copies/mL and 92% received zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine. Over 144 weeks, 13% had VF. Mean adherence by announced pill count before VF in VF children was 92% compared to 98% in children without VF (p=0.03). Kappa statistics indicated slight to fair agreement between tools. In multivariate analysis adjusting for gender, treatment arm ethnicity and caregiver education, significant predictors of VF were poor adherence by announced pill count (OR 4.56; 95%CI 1.78–11.69), reporting any barrier to adherence in the PACTG adherence questionnaire (OR 7.08; 95%CI 2.42–20.73), and reporting a missed dose in the 24 weeks since the last HIV-RNA assessment (OR 8.64; 95%CI 1.96–38.04). In conclusion, we recommend the child self-report of any missed doses since last visit for use in HIV research and in routine care settings, because it is easy and quick to administer and a strong association with development of VF. PMID:24901463

  9. Epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic characteristics of human rhinovirus infection among otherwise healthy children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ju; Arnold, John C.; Fairchok, Mary P.; Danaher, Patrick J.; McDonough, Erin A.; Blair, Patrick J.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Schofield, Christina; Ottolini, Martin; Mor, Deepika; Ridoré, Michelande; Burgess, Timothy H.; Millar, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a major cause of influenza-like illness (ILI) in adults and children. Differences in disease severity by HRV species have been described among hospitalized patients with underlying illness. Less is known about the clinical and virologic characteristics of HRV infection among otherwise healthy populations, particularly adults. Objectives To characterize molecular epidemiology of HRV and association between HRV species and clinical presentation and viral shedding. Study design Observational, prospective, facility-based study of ILI was conducted from February 2010 to April 2012. Collection of nasopharyngeal specimens, patient symptoms, and clinical information occurred on days 0, 3, 7, and 28. Patients recorded symptom severity daily for the first 7 days of illness in a symptom diary. HRV was identified by RT-PCR and genotyped for species determination. Cases who were co-infected with other viral respiratory pathogens were excluded from the analysis. We evaluated the associations between HRV species, clinical severity, and patterns of viral shedding. Results Eighty-four HRV cases were identified and their isolates genotyped. Of these, 62 (74%) were >18y. Fifty-four were HRV-A, 11 HRV-B, and 19 HRV-C. HRV-C infection was more common among children than adults (59% vs. 10%, P<0.001). Among adults, HRV-A was associated with higher severity of upper respiratory symptoms compared to HRV-B (P=0.02), but no such association was found in children. In addition, adults shed HRV-A significantly longer than HRV-C (Ptrend=0.01). Conclusions Among otherwise healthy adults with HRV infection, we observed species-specific differences in respiratory symptom severity and duration of viral shedding. PMID:25728083

  10. Hepatitis C virus genotype 6: Virology, epidemiology, genetic variation and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Vo Duy; Akkarathamrongsin, Srunthron; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Poovorawan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a serious public health problem affecting 170 million carriers worldwide. It is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer and is the primary cause for liver transplantation worldwide. HCV genotype 6 (HCV-6) is restricted to South China, South-East Asia, and it is also occasionally found in migrant patients from endemic countries. HCV-6 has considerable genetic diversity with 23 subtypes (a to w). Although direct sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis is the gold standard for HCV-6 genotyping and subtyping, there are also now rapid genotyping tests available such as the reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA II; Innogenetics, Zwijnaarde, Belgium). HCV-6 patients present with similar clinical manifestations as patients infected with other genotypes. Based on current evidence, the optimal treatment duration of HCV-6 with pegylated interferon/ribavirin should be 48 wk, although a shortened treatment duration of 24 wk could be sufficient in patients with low pretreatment viral load who achieve rapid virological response. In addition, the development of direct-acting antiviral agents is ongoing, and they give high response rate when combined with standard therapy. Herein, we review the epidemiology, classification, diagnosis and treatment as it pertain to HCV-6. PMID:24659883

  11. Clinical observations on virologically confirmed fatal dengue infections in Jakarta, Indonesia*

    PubMed Central

    Sumarmo; Wulur, H.; Jahja, E.; Gubler, D. J.; Suharyono, W.; Sorensen, K.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty virologically confirmed cases of dengue infection with a fatal outcome were studied clinically in Jakarta, Indonesia, from 1975 to 1978. All 4 dengue virus serotypes were isolated from fatal cases, but dengue type 3 was responsible for 21 (70%) of these isolates, compared to only 47% of isolates from all cases of dengue infection. The majority (60%) of these 30 cases were males in the 5-9-year age group. Nonspecific signs and symptoms in the fatal cases were no different from those in patients who survived dengue infection, but 70% of the patients with fatal outcome had one or more signs of encephalitis, primarily convulsions and somnolence; 3 of them developed spastic tetraparesis before death and 2 died of an illness clinically compatible with viral encephalitis. Other unexpected observations were that only 63% of the patients had classical dengue shock syndrome with haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia and shock. A high percentage (80%) had gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and in 9 patients (30%) this was severe enough to cause shock and death. In these 9 cases, the gastrointestinal haemorrhage and haematemesis began before the onset of shock and there was no evidence of haemoconcentration or pleural effusion at any time during hospitalization. According to certain widely accepted criteria, these patients would not be diagnosed as dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). But as they made up nearly one-third of the confirmed fatal dengue infections in this study and had massive gastrointestinal haemorrhages with thrombocytopenia, the definition of DHF should be changed to include this type of patient. It is proposed that the disease should be more realistically classified as dengue fever with or without haemorrhage and dengue shock syndrome. PMID:6605216

  12. Virologic response and haematologic toxicity of boceprevir- and telaprevir-containing regimens in actual clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Butt, A. A.; Yan, P.; Shaikh, O. S.; Freiberg, M. S.; Re, V. Lo; Justice, A. C.; Sherman, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of boceprevir (BOC) and telaprevir (TPV) in actual clinical settings remain unknown. We determined rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) and haematologic adverse effects among persons treated with BOC- or TPV-containing regimens, compared with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG/RBV). Using an established cohort of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons, Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES), we identified those treated with a BOC- or TPV-containing regimen and HCV genotype 1-infected controls treated with PEG/RBV. We excluded those with HIV co-infection and missing HCV RNA values to determine SVR. Primary endpoints were SVR (undetectable HCV RNA ≥12 weeks after treatment completion) and haematologic toxicity (grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia). We evaluated 2288 persons on BOC-, 409 on TPV-containing regimen and 6308 on PEG/RBV. Among these groups, respectively, 31%, 43% and 9% were treatment-experienced; 17%, 37% and 14% had baseline cirrhosis; 63%, 54% and 48% were genotype 1a. SVR rates among noncirrhotics were as follows: treatment naïve: 65% (BOC), 67% (TPV) and 31% (PEG/RBV); treatment experienced: 57% (BOC), 54% (TPV) and 13% (PEG/RBV); (P-value not significant for BOC vs TPV; P < 0.0001 for BOC or TPV vs PEG/RBV). Haematologic toxicities among BOC-, TPV- and PEG/RBV-treated groups were as follows: grade 3/4 anaemia 7%, 11% and 3%; grade 4 thrombocytopenia 2.2%, 5.4% and 1.7%; grade 4 neutropenia 8.2%, 5.6% and 3.4%. SVR rates are higher and closer to those reported in pivotal clinical trials among BOC- and TPV-treated persons compared with PEG/RBV-treated persons. Haematologic adverse events are frequent, but severe toxicity is uncommon. PMID:25524834

  13. The effect of efavirenz versus nevirapine-containing regimens on immunologic, virologic and clinical outcomes in a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare regimens consisting of either efavirenz or nevirapine and two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) among HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naive, and AIDS-free individuals with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Design Prospective studies of HIV-infected individuals in Europe and the US included in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration. Methods Antiretroviral therapy-naive and AIDS-free individuals were followed from the time they started an NRTI, efavirenz or nevirapine, classified as following one or both types of regimens at baseline, and censored when they started an ineligible drug or at 6 months if their regimen was not yet complete. We estimated the ‘intention-to-treat’ effect for nevirapine versus efavirenz regimens on clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Our models included baseline covariates and adjusted for potential bias introduced by censoring via inverse probability weighting. Results A total of 15 336 individuals initiated an efavirenz regimen (274 deaths, 774 AIDS-defining illnesses) and 8129 individuals initiated a nevirapine regimen (203 deaths, 441 AIDS-defining illnesses). The intention-to-treat hazard ratios [95% confidence interval (CI)] for nevirapine versus efavirenz regimens were 1.59 (1.27, 1.98) for death and 1.28 (1.09, 1.50) for AIDS-defining illness. Individuals on nevirapine regimens experienced a smaller 12-month increase in CD4 cell count by 11.49 cells/μl and were 52% more likely to have virologic failure at 12 months as those on efavirenz regimens. Conclusions Our intention-to-treat estimates are consistent with a lower mortality, a lower incidence of AIDS-defining illness, a larger 12-month increase in CD4 cell count, and a smaller risk of virologic failure at 12 months for efavirenz compared with nevirapine. PMID:22546987

  14. Clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes in hamsters experimentally infected with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae): a rodent model of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Elena; Mateo, Rosa I; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Popov, Vsevolod L; Newman, Patrick C; Tesh, Robert B

    2006-06-01

    The clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes occurring in hamsters after infection with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae) are described. Pirital virus infection in the hamsters was characterized by high titered viremia, leukocytosis, coagulopathy, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, hepatocellular and splenic necrosis, and marked elevation of serum transaminase levels. All of the animals died within 9 days. The clinical and histopathological findings in the Pirital virus-infected hamsters were very similar to those reported in severe human cases of Lassa fever, suggesting that this new animal model could serve as a low-cost and relatively safe alternative for studying the pathogenesis and therapy of Lassa fever. PMID:16760527

  15. Performance and Logistical Challenges of Alternative HIV-1 Virological Monitoring Options in a Clinical Setting of Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Bronze, Michelle; Wellington, Maureen; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Manting, Corry; Steegen, Kim; Luethy, Rudi; Rinke de Wit, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a low-cost virological failure assay (VFA) on plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) specimens from HIV-1 infected patients attending an HIV clinic in Harare. The results were compared to the performance of the ultrasensitive heat-denatured p24 assay (p24). The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, version 2.0, served as the gold standard. Using a cutoff of 5,000 copies/mL, the plasma VFA had a sensitivity of 94.5% and specificity of 92.7% and was largely superior to the VFA on DBS (sensitivity = 61.9%; specificity = 99.0%) or to the p24 (sensitivity = 54.3%; specificity = 82.3%) when tested on 302 HIV treated and untreated patients. However, among the 202 long-term ART-exposed patients, the sensitivity of the VFA decreased to 72.7% and to 35.7% using a threshold of 5,000 and 1,000 RNA copies/mL, respectively. We show that the VFA (either on plasma or on DBS) and the p24 are not reliable to monitor long-term treated, HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, achieving acceptable assay sensitivity using DBS proved technically difficult in a less-experienced laboratory. Importantly, the high level of virological suppression (93%) indicated that quality care focused on treatment adherence limits virological failure even when PCR-based viral load monitoring is not available. PMID:25025031

  16. Performance and logistical challenges of alternative HIV-1 virological monitoring options in a clinical setting of Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Ondoa, Pascale; Shamu, Tinei; Bronze, Michelle; Wellington, Maureen; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Manting, Corry; Steegen, Kim; Luethy, Rudi; Rinke de Wit, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a low-cost virological failure assay (VFA) on plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) specimens from HIV-1 infected patients attending an HIV clinic in Harare. The results were compared to the performance of the ultrasensitive heat-denatured p24 assay (p24). The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, version 2.0, served as the gold standard. Using a cutoff of 5,000 copies/mL, the plasma VFA had a sensitivity of 94.5% and specificity of 92.7% and was largely superior to the VFA on DBS (sensitivity = 61.9%; specificity = 99.0%) or to the p24 (sensitivity = 54.3%; specificity = 82.3%) when tested on 302 HIV treated and untreated patients. However, among the 202 long-term ART-exposed patients, the sensitivity of the VFA decreased to 72.7% and to 35.7% using a threshold of 5,000 and 1,000 RNA copies/mL, respectively. We show that the VFA (either on plasma or on DBS) and the p24 are not reliable to monitor long-term treated, HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, achieving acceptable assay sensitivity using DBS proved technically difficult in a less-experienced laboratory. Importantly, the high level of virological suppression (93%) indicated that quality care focused on treatment adherence limits virological failure even when PCR-based viral load monitoring is not available. PMID:25025031

  17. Updates and achievements in virology.

    PubMed

    Buonaguro, Franco M; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-07-01

    The 4th European Congress of Virology, hosted by the Italian Society for Virology, attracted approximately 1300 scientists from 46 countries worldwide. It also represented the first conference of the European Society for Virology, which was established in Campidoglio, Rome, Italy in 2009. The main goal of the meeting was to share research activities and results achieved in European virology units/institutes and to strengthen collaboration with colleagues from both western and developing countries. The worldwide representation of participants is a testament to the strength and attraction of European virology. The 5-day conference brought together the best of current virology; topics covered all three living domains (bacteria, archaea and eucarya), with special sessions on plant and veterinary virology as well as human virology, including two oral presentations on mimiviruses. The conference included five plenary sessions, 31 workshops, one hepatitis C virus roundtable, ten special workshops and three poster sessions, as well as 45 keynote lectures, 191 oral presentations and 845 abstracts. Furthermore, the Gesellschaft fur Virologie Loeffler-Frosch medal award was given to Peter Vogt for his long-standing career and achievements; the Gardner Lecture of the European Society for Clinical Virology was presented by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, and the Pioneer in Virology Lecture of the Italian Society for Virology was presented by Ulrich Koszinowski. PMID:20624042

  18. Clinical and virologic outcomes in patients with oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) infections: results from a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dharan, Nila J.; Fry, Alicia M.; Kieke, Burney A.; Coleman, Laura; Meece, Jennifer; Vandermause, Mary; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Klimov, Alexander I.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Dharan et al. (2011) Clinical and virologic outcomes in patients with oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) infections: results from a clinical trial. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), 153–158. Nineteen patients with oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) infections were randomized to receive oseltamivir or placebo. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained, and clinical and virologic outcomes were compared, stratified by early or late treatment. Neuraminidase inhibition assay and pyrosequencing for H275Y confirmed resistance. Twelve (63%) patients received oseltamivir; 8 (67%) received late treatment. Seven (37%) patients received placebo; 6 (86%) presented >48 hours after onset. Time to 50% decrease in symptom severity, complete symptom resolution, and first negative culture were shortest among the early treatment group. While sample size prohibits a strong conclusion, future studies should evaluate for similar trends. PMID:22118629

  19. Clinical, Virologic, Immunologic Outcomes and Emerging HIV Drug Resistance Patterns in Children and Adolescents in Public ART Care in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Makadzange, A. T.; Higgins-Biddle, M.; Chimukangara, B.; Birri, R.; Gordon, M.; Mahlanza, T.; McHugh, G.; van Dijk, J. H.; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, M.; Ndung’u, T.; Masimirembwa, C.; Phelps, B.; Amzel, A.; Ojikutu, B. O.; Walker, B. D.; Ndhlovu, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine immunologic, virologic outcomes and drug resistance among children and adolescents receiving care during routine programmatic implementation in a low-income country. Methods A cross-sectional evaluation with collection of clinical and laboratory data for children (0-<10 years) and adolescents (10–19 years) attending a public ART program in Harare providing care for pediatric patients since 2004, was conducted. Longitudinal data for each participant was obtained from the clinic based medical record. Results Data from 599 children and adolescents was evaluated. The participants presented to care with low CD4 cell count and CD4%, median baseline CD4% was lower in adolescents compared with children (11.0% vs. 15.0%, p<0.0001). The median age at ART initiation was 8.0 years (IQR 3.0, 12.0); median time on ART was 2.9 years (IQR 1.7, 4.5). On ART, median CD4% improved for all age groups but remained below 25%. Older age (≥ 5 years) at ART initiation was associated with severe stunting (HAZ <-2: 53.3% vs. 28.4%, p<0.0001). Virologic failure rate was 30.6% and associated with age at ART initiation. In children, nevirapine based ART regimen was associated with a 3-fold increased risk of failure (AOR: 3.5; 95% CI: 1.3, 9.1, p = 0.0180). Children (<10y) on ART for ≥4 years had higher failure rates than those on ART for <4 years (39.6% vs. 23.9%, p = 0.0239). In those initiating ART as adolescents, each additional year in age above 10 years at the time of ART initiation (AOR 0.4 95%CI: 0.1, 0.9, p = 0.0324), and each additional year on ART (AOR 0.4, 95%CI 0.2, 0.9, p = 0.0379) were associated with decreased risk of virologic failure. Drug resistance was evident in 67.6% of sequenced virus isolates. Conclusions During routine programmatic implementation of HIV care for children and adolescents, delayed age at ART initiation has long-term implications on immunologic recovery, growth and virologic outcomes. PMID:26658814

  20. Durability and Effectiveness of Maraviroc-Containing Regimens in HIV-1-Infected Individuals with Virological Failure in Routine Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Potard, Valérie; Reynes, Jacques; Ferry, Tristan; Aubin, Céline; Finkielsztejn, Laurent; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Costagliola, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data are available on the durability and effectiveness of maraviroc in routine clinical practice. We assessed the durability of maraviroc-containing regimens during a 30-month period, as well as their immunovirological and clinical efficacy, according to viral tropism in treatment-experienced individuals with viral load (VL) >50 copies/ml in the French Hospital Database on HIV. Methods Virological success was defined as VL<50 copies/ml, immunological success as a confirmed increase of at least 100 CD4 cells/mm3 measured twice at least one month apart, and clinical failure as hospitalization for a non-AIDS event, an AIDS event, or death. Multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders were used to assess the influence of viral tropism on durability, the immunovirological responses, and clinical outcome. Results 356 individuals started maraviroc with VL>50 copies/ml of whom 223 harbored R5 viruses, 44 non-R5 viruses and 89 viruses of unknown tropism. Individuals with non-R5 viruses were more likely than individuals with R5 viruses to discontinue maraviroc (75% vs 34%, p<0.0001). At 30 months, the estimated rates of virological and immunological success were respectively 89% and 51% in individuals with R5 viruses and 48% and 23% in individuals with non-R5 viruses. In multivariable analysis, non-R5 viruses were associated with a lower likelihood of both virological success (hazard ratio (HR): 0.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.25–0.70) and immunological success (HR: 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18–0.77). No difference in clinical outcome was found between individuals with R5 and non-R5 viruses. The effectiveness of maraviroc-containing regimens in individuals with unknown viral tropism was not significantly different from that in individuals with R5 viruses. A limitation of the study is the absence of genotypic susceptibility score. Conclusion In this observational study, maraviroc-containing regimens yielded high rates of viral

  1. Pediatric Virology

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Bernard

    1965-01-01

    Pediatric virology is not an isolàted discipline. Rather, the syndromes associated with viral infection are modified by the unique characteristics of infancy and childhood. Fortunately for the pediatrician, and certainly for children, viral infections in childhood are rarely fatal, and are almost never serious. Future efforts of the pediatrician and virologist should be directed toward increased fetal salvage as with rubella and the prevention of severe, viral lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:14298871

  2. Virological and Immunological Status of the People Living with HIV/AIDS Undergoing ART Treatment in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Dumre, Shyam Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased the life span of the people living with HIV (PLHIV), but their virological and immunological outcomes are not well documented in Nepal. The study was conducted at a tertiary care center including 826 HIV-1 seropositive individuals undergoing ART for at least six months. Plasma viral load (HIV-1 RNA) was detected by Real Time PCR and CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4+) counts were estimated by flow cytometry. The mean CD4+ count of patients was 501 (95% CI = 325–579) cells/cumm, but about 35% of patients had CD4+ T cell counts below 350 cells/cumm. With increasing age, average CD4+ count was found to be decreasing (p = 0.005). Of the total cases, 82 (9.92%) were found to have virological failure (viral load: >1000 copies/ml). Tenofovir/Lamivudine/Efavirenz (TDF/3TC/EFV), the frequently used ART regimen in Nepal, showed virological failure in 11.34% and immunological failure in 37.17% of patients. Virological failure rate was higher among children < 15 years (14.5%) (p = 0.03); however, no association was observed between ART outcomes and gender or route of transmission. The study suggests there are still some chances of virological and immunological failures despite the success of highly active ART (HAART). PMID:27547761

  3. Virological and Immunological Status of the People Living with HIV/AIDS Undergoing ART Treatment in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Chet Raj; Shakya, Geeta; Dumre, Shyam Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased the life span of the people living with HIV (PLHIV), but their virological and immunological outcomes are not well documented in Nepal. The study was conducted at a tertiary care center including 826 HIV-1 seropositive individuals undergoing ART for at least six months. Plasma viral load (HIV-1 RNA) was detected by Real Time PCR and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte (CD4(+)) counts were estimated by flow cytometry. The mean CD4(+) count of patients was 501 (95% CI = 325-579) cells/cumm, but about 35% of patients had CD4(+) T cell counts below 350 cells/cumm. With increasing age, average CD4(+) count was found to be decreasing (p = 0.005). Of the total cases, 82 (9.92%) were found to have virological failure (viral load: >1000 copies/ml). Tenofovir/Lamivudine/Efavirenz (TDF/3TC/EFV), the frequently used ART regimen in Nepal, showed virological failure in 11.34% and immunological failure in 37.17% of patients. Virological failure rate was higher among children < 15 years (14.5%) (p = 0.03); however, no association was observed between ART outcomes and gender or route of transmission. The study suggests there are still some chances of virological and immunological failures despite the success of highly active ART (HAART). PMID:27547761

  4. Early Warning Indicators for First-Line Virologic Failure Independent of Adherence Measures in a South African Urban Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baohua; Hampton, Jane; Ordóñez, Claudia E.; Johnson, Brent A.; Singh, Dinesh; John, Sally; Gordon, Michelle; Hare, Anna; Murphy, Richard; Nachega, Jean; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; del Rio, Carlos; Sunpath, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We sought to develop individual-level Early Warning Indicators (EWI) of virologic failure (VF) for clinicians to use during routine care complementing WHO population-level EWI. A case-control study was conducted at a Durban clinic. Patients after≥5 months of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) were defined as cases if they had VF [HIV-1 viral load (VL)>1000 copies/mL] and controls (2:1) if they had VL≤1000 copies/mL. Pharmacy refills and pill counts were used as adherence measures. Participants responded to a questionnaire including validated psychosocial and symptom scales. Data were also collected from the medical record. Multivariable logistic regression models of VF included factors associated with VF (p<0.05) in univariable analyses. We enrolled 158 cases and 300 controls. In the final multivariable model, male gender, not having an active religious faith, practicing unsafe sex, having a family member with HIV, not being pleased with the clinic experience, symptoms of depression, fatigue, or rash, low CD4 counts, family recommending HIV care, and using a TV/radio as ART reminders (compared to mobile phones) were associated with VF independent of adherence measures. In this setting, we identified several key individual-level EWI associated with VF including novel psychosocial factors independent of adherence measures. PMID:24320011

  5. Clinical and Virological Factors Associated with Viremia in Pandemic Influenza A/H1N1/2009 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Herman; To, Kelvin K. W.; Wen, Xi; Chen, Honglin; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Tsoi, Hoi-Wah; Li, Iris W. S.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Background Positive detection of viral RNA in blood and other non-respiratory specimens occurs in severe human influenza A/H5N1 viral infection but is not known to occur commonly in seasonal human influenza infection. Recently, viral RNA was detected in the blood of patients suffering from severe pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 viral infection, although the significance of viremia had not been previously studied. Our study aims to explore the clinical and virological factors associated with pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 viremia and to determine its clinical significance. Methodology/Principal Findings Clinical data of patients admitted to hospitals in Hong Kong between May 2009 and April 2010 and tested positive for pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 was collected. Viral RNA was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) targeting the matrix (M) and HA genes of pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus from the following specimens: nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), endotracheal aspirate (ETA), blood, stool and rectal swab. Stool and/ or rectal swab was obtained only if the patient complained of any gastrointestinal symptoms. A total of 139 patients were included in the study, with viral RNA being detected in the blood of 14 patients by RT-PCR. The occurrence of viremia was strongly associated with a severe clinical presentation and a higher mortality rate, although the latter association was not statistically significant. D222G/N quasispecies were observed in 90% of the blood samples. Conclusion Presence of pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 viremia is an indicator of disease severity and strongly associated with D222G/N mutation in the viral hemagglutinin protein. PMID:21980333

  6. Zika Virus Outbreak in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Clinical Characterization, Epidemiological and Virological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, Guilherme Amaral; Siqueira, André Machado; Wakimoto, Mayumi; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Nobre, Aline; Quintana, Marcel de Souza Borges; de Mendonça, Marco Cesar Lima; Lupi, Otilia; de Souza, Rogerio Valls; Romero, Carolina; Zogbi, Heruza; Bressan, Clarisse da Silveira; Alves, Simone Sampaio; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Carvalho, Marilia Sá

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2015, Brazil was faced with the cocirculation of three arboviruses of major public health importance. The emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) presents new challenges to both clinicians and public health authorities. Overlapping clinical features between diseases caused by ZIKV, Dengue (DENV) and Chikungunya (CHIKV) and the lack of validated serological assays for ZIKV make accurate diagnosis difficult. Methodology / Principal Findings The outpatient service for acute febrile illnesses in Fiocruz initiated a syndromic clinical observational study in 2007 to capture unusual presentations of DENV infections. In January 2015, an increase of cases with exanthematic disease was observed. Trained physicians evaluated the patients using a detailed case report form that included clinical assessment and laboratory investigations. The laboratory diagnostic algorithm included assays for detection of ZIKV, CHIKV and DENV. 364 suspected cases of Zika virus disease were identified based on clinical criteria between January and July 2015. Of these, 262 (71.9%) were tested and 119 (45.4%) were confirmed by the detection of ZIKV RNA. All of the samples with sequence information available clustered within the Asian genotype. Conclusions / Significance This is the first report of a ZIKV outbreak in the state of Rio de Janeiro, based on a large number of suspected (n = 364) and laboratory confirmed cases (n = 119). We were able to demonstrate that ZIKV was circulating in Rio de Janeiro as early as January 2015. The peak of the outbreak was documented in May/June 2015. More than half of the patients reported headache, arthralgia, myalgia, non-purulent conjunctivitis, and lower back pain, consistent with the case definition of suspected ZIKV disease issued by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). However, fever, when present, was low-intensity and short-termed. In our opinion, pruritus, the second most common clinical sign presented by the confirmed cases, should be added

  7. Human rhinovirus infections in hospitalized children: clinical, epidemiological and virological features.

    PubMed

    Tran, D N; Trinh, Q D; Pham, N T K; Pham, T M H; Ha, M T; Nguyen, T Q N; Okitsu, S; Shimizu, H; Hayakawa, S; Mizuguchi, M; Ushijima, H

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology and clinical impact of human rhinovirus (HRV) are not well documented in tropical regions. This study compared the clinical characteristics of HRV to other common viral infections and investigated the molecular epidemiology of HRV in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in Vietnam. From April 2010 to May 2011, 1082 nasopharyngeal swabs were screened for respiratory viruses by PCR. VP4/VP2 sequences of HRV were further characterized. HRV was the most commonly detected virus (30%), in which 70% were diagnosed as either pneumonia or bronchiolitis. Children with single HRV infections presented with significantly higher rate of hypoxia than those infected with respiratory syncytial virus or parainfluenza virus (PIV)-3 (12·4% vs. 3·8% and 0%, respectively, P < 0·05), higher rate of chest retraction than PIV-1 (57·3% vs. 34·5%, P = 0·028), higher rate of wheezing than influenza A (63·2% vs. 42·3%, P = 0·038). HRV-C did not differ to HRV-A clinically. The genetic diversity and changes of types over time were observed and may explain the year-round circulation of HRV. One novel HRV-A type was discovered which circulated locally for several years. In conclusion, HRV showed high genetic diversity and was associated with significant morbidity and severe ARIs in hospitalized children. PMID:26112743

  8. Virologic and Clinical Outcomes of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in HIV-HBV Coinfected Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, C.S.; Stock, P.G.; Dove, L.M.; Berg, C.L.; Nissen, N.N.; Curry, M.P.; Ragni, M.; Regenstein, F.G.; Sherman, K.E.; Roland, M.E.; Terrault, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the treatment of choice for endstage liver disease, but is controversial in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Using a prospective cohort of HIV-HBV coinfected patients transplanted between 2001–2007; outcomes including survival and HBV clinical recurrence were determined. Twenty-two coinfected patients underwent LT; 45% had detectable HBV DNA pre-LT and 72% were receiving anti-HBV drugs with efficacy against lamivudine-resistant HBV. Post-LT, all patients received hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) plus nucleos(t)ide analogues and remained HBsAg negative without clinical evidence of HBV recurrence, with a median follow-up 3.5 years. Low-level HBV viremia (median 108 IU/ml, range 9–789) was intermittently detected in 7/13 but not associated with HBsAg detection or ALT elevation. Compared with 20 HBV monoinfected patients on similar HBV prophylaxis and median follow-up of 4.0 years, patient and graft survival were similar: 100% vs. 85% in HBV mono- vs coinfected patients (p=0.08, log rank test). LT is effective for HIV-HBV coinfected patients with complications of cirrhosis, including those who are HBV DNA positive at the time of LT. Combination HBIG and antivirals is effective as prophylaxis with no clinical evidence of HBV recurrence but low level HBV DNA is detectable in ~50% of recipients. PMID:20346065

  9. Physical virology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, W. H.; Bruinsma, R.; Wuite, G. J. L.

    2010-10-01

    Viruses are nanosized, genome-filled protein containers with remarkable thermodynamic and mechanical properties. They form by spontaneous self-assembly inside the crowded, heterogeneous cytoplasm of infected cells. Self-assembly of viruses seems to obey the principles of thermodynamically reversible self-assembly but assembled shells (`capsids') strongly resist disassembly. Following assembly, some viral shells pass through a sequence of coordinated maturation steps that progressively strengthen the capsid. Nanoindentation measurements by atomic force microscopy enable tests of the strength of individual viral capsids. They show that concepts borrowed from macroscopic materials science are surprisingly relevant to viral shells. For example, viral shells exhibit `materials fatigue' and the theory of thin-shell elasticity can account - in part - for atomic-force-microscopy-measured force-deformation curves. Viral shells have effective Young's moduli ranging from that of polyethylene to that of plexiglas. Some of them can withstand internal osmotic pressures that are tens of atmospheres. Comparisons with thin-shell theory also shed light on nonlinear irreversible processes such as plastic deformation and failure. Finally, atomic force microscopy experiments can quantify the mechanical effects of genome encapsidation and capsid protein mutations on viral shells, providing virological insight and suggesting new biotechnological applications.

  10. Next-generation sequencing in clinical virology: Discovery of new viruses

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Budhauliya, Raghvendra; Das, Bidisha; Chatterjee, Soumya; Vanlalhmuaka; Veer, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are a cause of significant health problem worldwide, especially in the developing nations. Due to different anthropological activities, human populations are exposed to different viral pathogens, many of which emerge as outbreaks. In such situations, discovery of novel viruses is utmost important for deciding prevention and treatment strategies. Since last century, a number of different virus discovery methods, based on cell culture inoculation, sequence-independent PCR have been used for identification of a variety of viruses. However, the recent emergence and commercial availability of next-generation sequencers (NGS) has entirely changed the field of virus discovery. These massively parallel sequencing platforms can sequence a mixture of genetic materials from a very heterogeneous mix, with high sensitivity. Moreover, these platforms work in a sequence-independent manner, making them ideal tools for virus discovery. However, for their application in clinics, sample preparation or enrichment is necessary to detect low abundance virus populations. A number of techniques have also been developed for enrichment or viral nucleic acids. In this manuscript, we review the evolution of sequencing; NGS technologies available today as well as widely used virus enrichment technologies. We also discuss the challenges associated with their applications in the clinical virus discovery. PMID:26279987

  11. Tropical spastic paraparesis and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy: clinical, epidemiological, virological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Mahieux, R

    2012-03-01

    In 1980, Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus to be discovered. HTLV-1 belongs to the Retroviridae family, the Orthoretrovirinae subfamily and to the deltaretrovirus genus. HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4(+) lymphoid cells in vivo. Three molecules have been identified for binding and/or entry of HTLV-1: heparan sulfate proteoglycans, neuropilin-1, and glucose transporter 1. An efficient transfer of the virus from an infected cell to a target cell can occur through the formation of a viral synapse and/or by virofilm structure. As for all retroviruses, HTLV-1 genome possesses three major ORFs (gag, pol and env) encoding the structural and enzymatic proteins. HTLV-1 encodes also some regulatory and auxillary proteins including the tax protein with transforming activities and the HBZ protein which plays a role in the proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic cells. HTLV-1 is present throughout the world with clusters of high endemicity including mainly Southern Japan, the Caribbean region, areas in South America and in intertropical Africa. The worldwide HTLV-1 infected population is estimated to be around 10-20 million. HTLV-1 has three modes of transmission: (1): mother to child, mainly linked to prolonged breast-feeding; (2): sexual, mainly occurring from male to female and (3): contaminated blood products. HTLV-1 possesses a remarkable genetic stability. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of mainly two severe diseases: a malignant T CD4(+) cell lymphoproliferation, of very poor prognosis, named Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), and a chronic neuro-myelopathy named Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The lifetime risk among HTLV-1 carriers is estimated to be around 0.25 to 3%. TSP/HAM mainly occurs in adults, with a mean age at onset of 40-50 years and it is more common in women than in men. Blood transfusion is a major risk factor for TSP/HAM development. Clinically

  12. Boosted Lopinavir– Versus Boosted Atazanavir–Containing Regimens and Immunologic, Virologic, and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Study of HIV-Infected Individuals in High-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background. Current clinical guidelines consider regimens consisting of either ritonavir-boosted atazanavir or ritonavir-boosted lopinavir and a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbone among their recommended and alternative first-line antiretroviral regimens. However, these guidelines are based on limited evidence from randomized clinical trials and clinical experience. Methods. We compared these regimens with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes using data from prospective studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in Europe and the United States in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration, 2004–2013. Antiretroviral therapy–naive and AIDS-free individuals were followed from the time they started a lopinavir or an atazanavir regimen. We estimated the ‘intention-to-treat’ effect for atazanavir vs lopinavir regimens on each of the outcomes. Results. A total of 6668 individuals started a lopinavir regimen (213 deaths, 457 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths), and 4301 individuals started an atazanavir regimen (83 deaths, 157 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths). The adjusted intention-to-treat hazard ratios for atazanavir vs lopinavir regimens were 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI], .53–.91) for death, 0.67 (95% CI, .55–.82) for AIDS-defining illness or death, and 0.91 (95% CI, .84–.99) for virologic failure at 12 months. The mean 12-month increase in CD4 count was 8.15 (95% CI, −.13 to 16.43) cells/µL higher in the atazanavir group. Estimates differed by NRTI backbone. Conclusions. Our estimates are consistent with a lower mortality, a lower incidence of AIDS-defining illness, a greater 12-month increase in CD4 cell count, and a smaller risk of virologic failure at 12 months for atazanavir compared with lopinavir regimens. PMID:25567330

  13. Effect of double dose oseltamivir on clinical and virological outcomes in children and adults admitted to hospital with severe influenza: double blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    . No important differences in tolerability were found. Conclusions There were no virological or clinical advantages with double dose oseltamivir compared with standard dose in patients with severe influenza admitted to hospital. Registration Clinical Trials NCT00298233 PMID:23723457

  14. Pretreatment HIV Drug Resistance and HIV-1 Subtype C Are Independently Associated With Virologic Failure: Results From the Multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Smeaton, Laura; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Wallis, Carol L.; Tripathy, Srikanth; Morgado, Mariza G.; Saravanan, Shanmugham; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Reitsma, Marissa; Hart, Stephen; Mellors, John W.; Halvas, Elias; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; La Rosa, Alberto; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Lama, Javier R.; Rassool, Mohammed; Santos, Breno R.; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Hakim, James; Flanigan, Timothy; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Campbell, Thomas B.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Evaluation of pretreatment HIV genotyping is needed globally to guide treatment programs. We examined the association of pretreatment (baseline) drug resistance and subtype with virologic failure in a multinational, randomized clinical trial that evaluated 3 antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens and included resource-limited setting sites. Methods. Pol genotyping was performed in a nested case-cohort study including 270 randomly sampled participants (subcohort), and 218 additional participants failing ART (case group). Failure was defined as confirmed viral load (VL) >1000 copies/mL. Cox proportional hazards models estimated resistance–failure association. Results. In the representative subcohort (261/270 participants with genotypes; 44% women; median age, 35 years; median CD4 cell count, 151 cells/µL; median VL, 5.0 log10 copies/mL; 58% non-B subtypes), baseline resistance occurred in 4.2%, evenly distributed among treatment arms and subtypes. In the subcohort and case groups combined (466/488 participants with genotypes), used to examine the association between resistance and treatment failure, baseline resistance occurred in 7.1% (9.4% with failure, 4.3% without). Baseline resistance was significantly associated with shorter time to virologic failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; P = .035), and after adjusting for sex, treatment arm, sex–treatment arm interaction, pretreatment CD4 cell count, baseline VL, and subtype, was still independently associated (HR, 2.1; P = .05). Compared with subtype B, subtype C infection was associated with higher failure risk (HR, 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–2.35), whereas non-B/C subtype infection was associated with longer time to failure (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, .22–.98). Conclusions. In this global clinical trial, pretreatment resistance and HIV-1 subtype were independently associated with virologic failure. Pretreatment genotyping should be considered whenever feasible. Clinical Trials

  15. Absence of Effect of Menopause Status at Initiation of First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy on Immunologic or Virologic Responses: A Cohort Study from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, Guilherme Amaral; Velasque, Luciane; Luz, Paula Mendes; Cardoso, Sandra Wagner; Derrico, Monica; Moreira, Ronaldo Ismério; de Andrade, Angela Cristina Vasconcelos; Cytryn, Andrea; Pires, Elaine; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Friedman, Ruth Khalili

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) between premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Methods ART-naïve women initiating cART between January 2000/June 2010 at the Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas Cohort were studied. Women were defined as postmenopausal after 12 consecutive months of amenorrhea. CD4 cell counts and HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) measurements were compared between pre- and postmenopausal at 6, 12 and 24 months after cART initiation. Women who modified/discontinued a drug class or died due to an AIDS defining illness were classified as ART-failures. Variables were compared using Wilcoxon test, χ2 or Fisher’s exact test. The odds of cART effectiveness (VL<400 copies/mL and/or no need to change cART) were compared using logistic regression. Linear model was used to access relationship between CD4 change and menopause. Results Among 383 women, 328 (85%) were premenopausal and 55 (15%) postmenopausal. Median pre cART CD4 counts were 231 and 208 cells/mm3 (p = 0.14) in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. No difference in the median pre cART VL was found (both 4.8 copies/mL). Median CD4 changes were similar at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months after cART initiation, CD4 changes among postmenopausal women were significantly lower among premenopausal women (p = 0.01). When the analysis was restricted to women with VL<400 copies/mL, no statistical difference was observed. Overall, 63.7% achieved cART effectiveness at 24 months without differences between groups at 6, 12 and 24 months. Conclusion Menopause status at the time of first-line cART initiation does not impact CD4 cell changes at 24 months among women with a virologic response. No relationship between menopause status and virologic response was observed. PMID:24586673

  16. Classical swine fever virus: clinical, virological, serological and hematological findings after infection of domestic pigs and wild boars with the field isolate "Spante" originating from wild boar.

    PubMed

    Kaden, V; Ziegler, U; Lange, E; Dedek, J

    2000-01-01

    A classical swine fever virus (CSFV) field isolate originating from wild boar was investigated on its virulence in domestic pigs and wild boar. Three weaner pigs and two wild boars (yearlings) were intranasally inoculated with the isolate "Spante" and tested for clinical, virological, hematological and serological findings until day 31 after infection (p. i.). One day p. i. the piglets were put in contact to three sentinel pigs. During a period of 31 d neither the domestic pigs nor the wild boars showed clinical signs specific for CSF. Two infected weaner pigs became transiently viraemic, transmitted CSFV in nasal secretions, showed a slight leukopenia and reacted serologically positive. The contact infection resulted in a viraemia in two sentinel piglets on day 30. Only one contact animal developed antibodies. None of the wild boars became viraemic, excreted CSFV in nasal secretions or developed antibodies. The CSFV isolate "Spante" represents a low virulent virus. Referring to a significant higher percentage of virologically positive tissue samples after nested PCR compared with the virus isolation, persistence of CSFV is discussed. PMID:11153219

  17. Clinical and Virological Efficacy of Etravirine Plus Two Active Nucleos(t)ide Analogs in an Heterogeneous HIV-Infected Population

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Viciana, Pompeyo; Girón-González, José A.; Romero-Palacios, Alberto; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Martinez-Perez, Maria A.; López-Ruz, Miguel A.; de la Torre-Lima, Javier; Téllez-Pérez, Francisco; Delgado-Fernández, Marcial; Garcia-Lázaro, Milagros; Lozano, Fernando; Mohamed-Balghata, Mohamed O.

    2014-01-01

    Etravirine (ETV) is recommended in combination with a boosted protease inhibitor plus an optimized background regimen for salvage therapy, but there is limited experience with its use in combination with two nucleos(t)ide reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). This multicenter study aimed to assess the efficacy of this combination in two scenarios: group A) subjects without virologic failure on or no experience with non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) switched due to adverse events and group B) subjects switched after a virologic failure on an efavirenz- or nevirapine-based regimen. The primary endpoint was efficacy at 52 weeks analysed by intention-to-treat. Virologic failure was defined as the inability to suppress plasma HIV-RNA to <50 copies/mL after 24 weeks on treatment, or a confirmed viral load >200 copies/mL in patients who had previously achieved a viral suppression or had an undetectable viral load at inclusion. Two hundred eighty seven patients were included. Treatment efficacy rates in group A and B were 88.0% (CI95, 83.9–92.1%) and 77.4% (CI95, 65.0–89.7%), respectively; the rates reached 97.2% (CI95, 95.1–99.3%) and 90.5% (CI95, 81.7–99.3), by on-treatment analysis. The once-a-day ETV treatment was as effective as the twice daily dosing regimen. Grade 1–2 adverse events were observed motivating a treatment switch in 4.2% of the subjects. In conclusion, ETV (once- or twice daily) plus two analogs is a suitable, well-tolerated combination both as a switching strategy and after failure with first generation NNRTIs, ensuring full drug activity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01437241 PMID:24836963

  18. Effectiveness of Ritonavir-Boosted Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy in Clinical Practice Even with Previous Virological Failures to Protease Inhibitor-Based Regimens

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Castaño, Manuel A.; López-Ruz, Miguel A.; Rios-Villegas, María J.; Hernández-Quero, José; Merino, Dolores; Jiménez-Aguilar, Patricia; Marquez-Solero, Manuel; Terrón-Pernía, Alberto; Tellez-Pérez, Francisco; Viciana, Pompeyo; Orihuela-Cañadas, Francisco; Palacios-Baena, Zaira; Vinuesa-Garcia, David; Fajardo-Pico, Jose M.; Romero-Palacios, Alberto; Ojeda-Burgos, Guillermo; Pasquau-Liaño, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Significant controversy still exists about ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy (mtPI/rtv) as a simplification strategy that is used up to now to treat patients that have not experienced previous virological failure (VF) while on protease inhibitor (PI) -based regimens. We have evaluated the effectiveness of two mtPI/rtv regimens in an actual clinical practice setting, including patients that had experienced previous VF with PI-based regimens. Methods This retrospective study analyzed 1060 HIV-infected patients with undetectable viremia that were switched to lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy. In cases in which the patient had previously experienced VF while on a PI-based regimen, the lack of major HIV protease resistance mutations to lopinavir or darunavir, respectively, was mandatory. The primary endpoint of this study was the percentage of participants with virological suppression after 96 weeks according to intention-to-treat analysis (non-complete/missing = failure). Results A total of 1060 patients were analyzed, including 205 with previous VF while on PI-based regimens, 90 of whom were on complex therapies due to extensive resistance. The rates of treatment effectiveness (intention-to-treat analysis) and virological efficacy (on-treatment analysis) at week 96 were 79.3% (CI95, 76.8−81.8) and 91.5% (CI95, 89.6–93.4), respectively. No relationships were found between VF and earlier VF while on PI-based regimens, the presence of major or minor protease resistance mutations, the previous time on viral suppression, CD4+ T-cell nadir, and HCV-coinfection. Genotypic resistance tests were available in 49 out of the 74 patients with VFs and only four patients presented new major protease resistance mutations. Conclusion Switching to mtPI/rtv achieves sustained virological control in most patients, even in those with previous VF on PI-based regimens as long as no major resistance mutations are present for

  19. Clinical Outcome of HIV-Infected Patients with Sustained Virologic Response to Antiretroviral Therapy: Long-Term Follow-Up of a Multicenter Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Félix; Padilla, Sergio; Masiá, Mar; Iribarren, José A.; Moreno, Santiago; Viciana, Pompeyo; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Sirvent, José L. Gómez; Vidal, Francesc; López-Aldeguer, José; Blanco, José R.; Leal, Manuel; Rodríguez-Arenas, María Angeles; Hoyos, Santiago Perez

    2006-01-01

    Background Limited information exists on long-term prognosis of patients with sustained virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. We aimed to assess predictors of unfavorable clinical outcome in patients who maintain viral suppression with HAART. Methods Using data collected from ten clinic-based cohorts in Spain, we selected all antiretroviral-naive adults who initiated HAART and maintained plasma HIV-1 RNA levels <500 copies/mL throughout follow-up. Factors associated with disease progression were determined by Cox proportional-hazards models. Results Of 2,613 patients who started HAART, 757 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. 61% of them initiated a protease inhibitor-based HAART regimen, 29.7% a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen, and 7.8% a triple-nucleoside regimen. During 2,556 person-years of follow-up, 22 (2.9%) patients died (mortality rate 0.86 per 100 person-years), and 40 (5.3%) died or developed a new AIDS-defining event. The most common causes of death were neoplasias and liver failure. Mortality was independently associated with a CD4-T cell response <50 cells/L after 12 months of HAART (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 4.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.68–10.83]; P = .002), and age at initiation of HAART (AHR, 1.06 per year; 95% CI, 1.02–1.09; P = .001). Initial antiretroviral regimen chosen was not associated with different risk of clinical progression. Conclusions Patients with sustained virologic response on HAART have a low mortality rate over time. Long-term outcome of these patients is driven by immunologic response at the end of the first year of therapy and age at the time of HAART initiation, but not by the initial antiretroviral regimen selected. PMID:17183720

  20. The Clinical Impact of Continuing to Prescribe Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients with Advanced AIDS Who Manifest No Virologic or Immunologic Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, David A.; Kendall, Michelle A.; Feinberg, Judith; Alston-Smith, Beverly; Owens, Susan; Chafey, Suzette; Marco, Michael; Maxwell, Sharon; Benson, Constance; Keiser, Philip; van der Horst, Charles; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite the efficacy and tolerability of modern antiretroviral therapy (ART), many patients with advanced AIDS prescribed these regimens do not achieve viral suppression or immune reconstitution as a result of poor adherence, drug resistance, or both. The clinical outcomes of continued ART prescription for such patients have not been well characterized. Methods We examined the causes and predictors of all-cause mortality, AIDS-defining conditions, and serious non-AIDS-defining events among a cohort of participants in a clinical trial of pre-emptive therapy for CMV disease. We focused on participants who, despite ART had failed to achieve virologic suppression and substantive immune reconstitution. Results 233 ART-receiving participants entered with a median baseline CD4+ T cell count of 30/mm3 and plasma HIV RNA of 5 log10 copies/mL. During a median 96 weeks of follow-up, 24.0% died (a mortality rate of 10.7/100 patient-years); 27.5% reported a new AIDS-defining condition, and 22.3% a new serious non-AIDS event. Of the deaths, 42.8% were due to an AIDS-defining condition, 44.6% were due to a non-AIDS-defining condition, and 12.5% were of unknown etiology. Decreased risk of mortality was associated with baseline CD4+ T cell count ≥25/mm3 and lower baseline HIV RNA. Conclusions Among patients with advanced AIDS prescribed modern ART who achieve neither virologic suppression nor immune reconstitution, crude mortality percentages appear to be lower than reported in cohorts of patients studied a decade earlier. Also, in contrast to the era before modern ART became available, nearly half of the deaths in our modern-era study were caused by serious non-AIDS-defining events. Even among the most advanced AIDS patients who were not obtaining apparent immunologic and virologic benefit from ART, continued prescription of these medications appears to alter the natural history of AIDS—improving survival and shifting the causes of death from AIDS- to non

  1. Serologically silent hepatitis B virus coinfection in patients with hepatitis C virus-associated chronic liver disease: clinical and virological significance.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, R; Ishimura, N; Niigaki, M; Hamamoto, S; Satoh, S; Tanaka, S; Kushiyama, Y; Uchida, Y; Ihihara, S; Akagi, S; Watanabe, M; Kinoshita, Y

    1999-07-01

    Frequent coinfection of surface antigen-negative hepatitis B virus (silent HBV) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated chronic liver disease (CLD) has been reported. The clinical and virological significance of silent HBV infection was investigated in 65 patients with HCV-associated CLD who subsequently received interferon (IFN) therapy. HBV DNA was detected in 34 (52.3%) patients by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Virologically, all of the 34 patients were found to have HBV with an eight-nucleotide deletion in the core promoter. Coinfection of silent HBV was more frequent with HCV genotype 1b than in 2a (64.3% vs. 28.6%, P<.01). With HCV genotype 1b, the serum RNA level was significantly higher (> or =10(6) copies per milliliter vs. < or =10(5) copies per milliliter) in patients with silent HBV than those without coinfection (P<.01). Clinically, silent HBV was associated with a higher level of serum alanine aminotransferase (158.5+/-104.8 vs. 121.8+/-78.6 IU/I; mean +/- SD) and a greater histological activity of hepatitis as evaluated by histological activity index score (9.4+/-3.8 vs. 8.6+/-4.5; mean +/- SD), although it was not statistically significant. Silent HBV was also associated with poor efficacy of IFN therapy (P<.01). The results suggest that silent HBV has some promoting effect for HCV replication, at least for HCV genotype 1b, and may affect the histological activity of hepatitis and IFN response in HCV-associated CLD. PMID:10447413

  2. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    their current ART regimen. Conclusions Our study provided important information on virological outcome on lifelong ART in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents who were still on ART and continued to attend antiretroviral (ARV) clinics for follow-up visits. Actual conditions for scaling up and monitoring lifelong ART in children in resource-limited countries can have dramatic long-term outcomes and illustrate that paediatric ART receives inadequate attention. PMID:27125320

  3. Clinical status of benzoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Julia G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Strong, H. Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) is currently in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of cutaneous malignancies (basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous metastases) and psoriasis. Results to date suggest that this photosensitizer has potential in both of these areas. Recently, a clinical trial with BPD was initiated for the treatment of age related macular degeneration, a neovascular condition in the eye which leads to blindness. BPD is a lipophilic photosensitizer which is rapidly taken up by activated cells and the vascular endothelium of neovasculature. The PDT effects seen with BPD appear to be a combination of vascular occlusion and direct killing of target cells. Since many diseases involve either activated cells and/or neovasculature, PDT with photosensitizer with characteristics like those of BPD, has applications far wider than oncology. A new area of interest involving photosensitizers is that of immune modulation. A number of photosensitizers have been shown to effect immune modulation in animal models of immune dysfunction including autoimmunity (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus), cutaneous hypersensitivity and allografts. BPD and PHOTOFRINR have both been shown to be effective in ameliorating arthritic symptoms in a number of animal models. The mechanisms by which immune modulation is affected in these studies still remains to be resolved.

  4. Low rate of virological failure and maintenance of susceptibility to HIV-1 protease inhibitors with first-line lopinavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral treatment in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; Zazzi, Maurizio; Punzi, Grazia; Monno, Laura; Colao, Grazia; Corsi, Paola; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Meini, Genny; Ghisetti, Valeria; Bonora, Stefano; Pecorari, Monica; Gismondo, Maria Rita; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Carli, Tiziana; De Luca, Andrea

    2010-12-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant HIV-1 has hardly ever been detected at failed boosted PI-based first-line antiretroviral regimens in clinical trials. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in clinical practice. To address this gap, data from patients starting a first-line lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/rtv)-based therapy with available baseline HIV-1 RNA load, a viral genotype and follow-up viral load after 3 and 6 months of treatment were extracted from the Italian Antiretroviral Resistance Cohort Analysis (ARCA) observational database. Based on survival analysis, 39 (7.1%) and 43 (7.8%) of the 548 examined patient cases had an HIV-1 RNA >500 and >50 copies/ml, respectively, after 6 months of treatment. Cox proportional hazard models detected baseline HIV-1 RNA (RH 1.79, 95%CI 1.10-2.92 per 1-log(10) increase, P=0.02) and resistance to the nucleoside backbone (RH 1.04, 95%CI 1.02-1.06 per 10-point increase using the Stanford HIVdb algorithm, P<0.001) as independent predictors of HIV-1 RNA at >500 copies/ml, but not at the >50 copies/ml cutoff criteria. Higher baseline viral load, older patient age, heterosexual route of infection and use of tenofovir/emtricitabine were predictors of failure at month 3 using the 50-copy and/or 500-copy threshold. Resistance to LPV/rtv did not occur or increase in any of the available 36 follow-up HIV-1 genotypes. Resistance to the nucleoside backbone (M184V) developed in four cases. Despite the likely differences in patient population and adherence, both the low rate of virological failure and the lack of development of LPV/rtv resistance documented in clinical trials are thus confirmed in clinical practice. PMID:20981785

  5. Characterization of dengue virus infections in a sample of patients suggests unique clinical, immunological, and virological profiles that impact on the diagnosis of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Senaratne, Thamarasi; Wimalaratne, Harith; Alahakoon, D G S; Gunawardane, Nirmali; Carr, Jillian; Noordeen, Faseeha

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are increasing with respect to incidence and severity in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. The objective of this study was to define the clinical, immunological, and virological profiles of patients admitted to the General Hospital, Kandy with clinically apparent dengue. Demographic, clinical, hematological parameters, liver enzymes (ALT and AST), and blood samples were collected from 292 patients with fever <5 days post onset and fulfilling the WHO criteria for the diagnosis of dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF). Samples were analyzed for, anti-DENV IgM, IgG, and DENV nucleic acid. Myalgia was the commonest complaint by 65% of the patients. Packed cell volume was >45% in 27% of the patients while 42.12% had reduced platelets and 62.67% had reduced white blood cell counts. In contrast to other studies, positive tourniquet test (PTT) and petechiae were not major indicators of DENV infection or severity of the disease. Clinical profiles were significantly different between DF and DHF/DSS and showed many similarities to that reported elsewhere. Altogether, 43 patients (14.73%) were viremic as detected by RT-PCR; 181 patients (62%) were positive for anti-DENV IgM, and 245 (84%) patients were positive for anti-DENV IgG. In combination, anti-DENV IgM and RT-PCR assays detected 224 (77.5%) of DENV infected cases, thus improving the DENV diagnosis rate. Hence, the diagnostic utility of PTT, anti-DENV IgM/IgG serology, or RT-PCR used alone in the early phase of illness is low in Sri Lanka but the diagnostic value can be improved by a combination of serology and RT-PCR. J. Med. Virol. 88:1703-1710, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990973

  6. Epidemiological, Clinical and Virological Characteristics of Influenza B Virus from Patients at the Hospital Tertiary Care Units in Bangkok during 2011-2014

    PubMed Central

    Horthongkham, Navin; Athipanyasilp, Niracha; Pattama, Archiraya; Kaewnapan, Bualan; Sornprasert, Suthatta; Srisurapanont, Surangrat; Kantakamalakul, Wannee; Amaranond, Palanee; Sutthent, Ruengpung

    2016-01-01

    Influenza B virus, which causes acute respiratory infections, has increased in prevalence in recent years. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene, influenza B virus can be divided into two lineages, Victoria and Yamagata, that co-circulate during the influenza season. However, analysis of the potential association between the clinical and virological characteristic and the lineage of influenza B viruses isolated in Thailand was lacking. To investigate influenza B virus genetically and determine its neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor susceptibility phenotype, a total of 6920 nasopharyngeal-wash samples were collected from patients with influenza-like illness between the years 2011 and 2014 and were screened for influenza B virus by real-time PCR. Of these samples, 3.1% (216/6920) were confirmed to contain influenza B viruses, and 110 of these influenza viruses were randomly selected for nucleotide sequence analysis of the HA and NA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA sequences showed clustering into various clades: Yamagata clade 3 (11/110, 10%), Yamagata clade 2 (71/110, 64.5%), and Victoria clade 1 (28/110, 25.5%). The analysis of clinical characteristic demonstrated that the Victoria lineage was significantly associated with the duration of hospitalization, number of deceased cases, pneumonia, secondary bacterial infection and underlying disease. When combined with phylogenetic analysis of the NA sequences, four samples showed viruses with reassortant sequences between the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. Statistical analysis of the clinical outcomes and demographic data for the reassortant strains did not differ from those of the other strains in circulation. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza B viruses were not detected. Our findings indicated the co-circulation of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages over the past four cold seasons in Bangkok. We also demonstrated differences in the clinical symptoms between these lineages. PMID:27387488

  7. [Nonconvulsive status epilepticus: clinical practice and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Masao

    2013-05-01

    The clinical spectrum of nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is rapidly expanding from classical manifestations, such as staring, repetitive blinking, chewing, swallowing, and automatism to novel manifestations, such as acute and protracted coma, apnea, cognitive impairment, higher brain dysfunction, and cardiac arrest. It is only in the last decade that these novel NCSE manifestations have been revealed, which is certainly reflective of modern advances in critical care neurology, such as the introduction and spread of continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) monitoring. Although NCSE is a relatively frequent, treatable condition but with a high mortality rate, physicians are still unfamiliar with its clinical manifestations, thus leading to underdiagnosis. In this review, the clinical manifestations, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of NCSE are critically described using the best available evidence and perspectives, including my hypothesis on epileptic organ dysfunction; in particular, the possible causal relationship between NCSE and cardiac arrhythmia, such as atrial fibrillation is also discussed. PMID:23667121

  8. The Epidemiology, Virology and Clinical Findings of Dengue Virus Infections in a Cohort of Indonesian Adults in Western Java

    PubMed Central

    Kosasih, Herman; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Nurhayati; de Mast, Quirijn; Rudiman, Irani F.; Widjaja, Susana; Antonjaya, Ungke; Novriani, Harli; Susanto, Nugroho H.; Jusuf, Hadi; van der Ven, Andre; Beckett, Charmagne G.; Blair, Patrick J.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Williams, Maya; Porter, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue has emerged as one of the most important infectious diseases in the last five decades. Evidence indicates the expansion of dengue virus endemic areas and consequently the exponential increase of dengue virus infections across the subtropics. The clinical manifestations of dengue virus infection include sudden fever, rash, headache, myalgia and in more serious cases, spontaneous bleeding. These manifestations occur in children as well as in adults. Defining the epidemiology of dengue in a given area is critical to understanding the disease and devising effective public health strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report the results from a prospective cohort study of 4380 adults in West Java, Indonesia, from 2000–2004 and 2006–2009. A total of 2167 febrile episodes were documented and dengue virus infections were confirmed by RT-PCR or serology in 268 cases (12.4%). The proportion ranged from 7.6 to 41.8% each year. The overall incidence rate of symptomatic dengue virus infections was 17.3 cases/1,000 person years and between September 2006 and April 2008 asymptomatic infections were 2.6 times more frequent than symptomatic infections. According to the 1997 WHO classification guidelines, there were 210 dengue fever cases, 53 dengue hemorrhagic fever cases (including one dengue shock syndrome case) and five unclassified cases. Evidence for sequential dengue virus infections was seen in six subjects. All four dengue virus serotypes circulated most years. Inapparent dengue virus infections were predominantly associated with DENV-4 infections. Conclusions/Significance Dengue virus was responsible for a significant percentage of febrile illnesses in an adult population in West Java, Indonesia, and this percentage varied from year to year. The observed incidence rate during the study period was 43 times higher than the reported national or provincial rates during the same time period. A wide range of clinical severity was observed with

  9. Clinical, epidemiological and virological characteristics of the first detected human case of avian influenza A(H5N6) virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rusheng; Chen, Tianmu; Ou, Xinhua; Liu, Ruchun; Yang, Yang; Ye, Wen; Chen, Jingfang; Yao, Dong; Sun, Biancheng; Zhang, Xixing; Zhou, Jianxiang; Sun, Yan; Chen, Faming; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A human infection with novel avian influenza A H5N6 virus emerged in Changsha city, China in February, 2014. This is the first detected human case among all human cases identified from 2014 to early 2016. We obtained and summarized clinical, epidemiological, and virological data from this patient. Complete genome of the virus was determined and compared to other avian influenza viruses via the construction of phylogenetic trees using the neighbor-joining approach. A girl aged five and half years developed fever and mild respiratory symptoms on Feb. 16, 2014 and visited hospital on Feb. 17. Throat swab specimens were obtained from the patient and a novel reassortant avian influenza A H5N6 virus was detected. All eight viral gene segments were of avian origin. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene segments were closely related to A/duck/Sichuan/NCXN11/2014(H5N1) and A/chicken/Jiangxi/12782/2014(H10N6) viruses, respectively. The six internal genes were homologous to avian influenza A (H5N2) viruses isolated in duck from Jiangxi in China. This H5N6 virus has not gained genetic mutations necessary for human infection and was suggested to be sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors, but resistant to adamantanes. Epidemiological investigation of the exposure history of the patient found that a live poultry market could be the source place of infection and the incubation period was 2–5 days. This novel reassortant Avian influenza A(H5N6) virus could be low pathogenic in humans. The prevalence and genetic evolution of this virus should be closely monitored. PMID:26973295

  10. Clinical, epidemiological and virological characteristics of the first detected human case of avian influenza A(H5N6) virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rusheng; Chen, Tianmu; Ou, Xinhua; Liu, Ruchun; Yang, Yang; Ye, Wen; Chen, Jingfang; Yao, Dong; Sun, Biancheng; Zhang, Xixing; Zhou, Jianxiang; Sun, Yan; Chen, Faming; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2016-06-01

    A human infection with novel avian influenza A H5N6 virus emerged in Changsha city, China in February, 2014. This is the first detected human case among all human cases identified from 2014 to early 2016. We obtained and summarized clinical, epidemiological, and virological data from this patient. Complete genome of the virus was determined and compared to other avian influenza viruses via the construction of phylogenetic trees using the neighbor-joining approach. A girl aged five and half years developed fever and mild respiratory symptoms on Feb. 16, 2014 and visited hospital on Feb. 17. Throat swab specimens were obtained from the patient and a novel reassortant avian influenza A H5N6 virus was detected. All eight viral gene segments were of avian origin. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene segments were closely related to A/duck/Sichuan/NCXN11/2014(H5N1) and A/chicken/Jiangxi/12782/2014(H10N6) viruses, respectively. The six internal genes were homologous to avian influenza A (H5N2) viruses isolated in duck from Jiangxi in China. This H5N6 virus has not gained genetic mutations necessary for human infection and was suggested to be sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors, but resistant to adamantanes. Epidemiological investigation of the exposure history of the patient found that a live poultry market could be the source place of infection and the incubation period was 2-5days. This novel reassortant Avian influenza A(H5N6) virus could be low pathogenic in humans. The prevalence and genetic evolution of this virus should be closely monitored. PMID:26973295

  11. Status of Clinical Supervision among School Counselors in Southeast Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Anna Lila; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Bergin, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the role of clinical supervision in school counseling practice. This research explored the status and meaning of clinical supervision to school counselors employed in two southeastern Georgia counties. Results indicate that participants value clinical supervision even though their employers did not necessarily…

  12. Maintaining Life-saving Testing for Patients With Infectious Diseases: Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Society for Microbiology, and Pan American Society for Clinical Virology Recommendations on the Regulation of Laboratory-developed Tests.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Angela M; Couturier, Marc R; Ginocchio, Christine C; Hanson, Kimberly E; Miller, Melissa B; Walker, Kimberly E; Frank, Gregory M

    2016-07-15

    In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed to regulate laboratory-developed tests (LDTs)-diagnostics designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory. The Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society for Microbiology, and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology recognize that the FDA is committed to protecting patients. However, our societies are concerned that the proposed regulations will limit access to testing and negatively impact infectious diseases (ID) LDTs. In this joint commentary, our societies discuss why LDTs are critical for ID patient care, hospital infection control, and public health responses. We also highlight how the FDA's proposed regulation of LDTs could impair patient access to life-saving tests and stifle innovation in ID diagnostics. Finally, our societies make specific recommendations for the FDA's consideration to reduce the burden of the proposed new rules on clinical laboratories and protect patients' access to state-of-the art, quality LDTs. PMID:27118790

  13. Clinical status of ten dentin adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Verschueren, M; Gladys, S; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1994-11-01

    Laboratory testing of dentin adhesive systems still requires corroboration by long-term clinical trials for their ultimate clinical effectiveness to be validated. The objective of this clinical investigation was to evaluate, retrospectively, the clinical effectiveness of earlier-investigated dentin adhesive systems (Scotchbond, Gluma, Clearfil New Bond, Scotchbond 2, Tenure, and Tripton), and to compare their clinical results with those obtained with four modern total-etch adhesive systems (Bayer exp. 1 and 2, Clearfil Liner Bond System, and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose). In total, 1177 Class V cervical lesions in the teeth of 346 patients were restored following two cavity designs: In Group A, enamel was neither beveled nor intentionally etched, as per ADA guidelines; in Group B, adjacent enamel was beveled and conditioned. Clinical retention rates definitely indicated the improved clinical efficacy of the newest dentin adhesives over the earlier systems. With regard to adhesion strategy, adhesive systems that removed the smear layer and concurrently demineralized the dentin surface layer performed clinically better than systems that modified the disorderly layer of smear debris without complete removal. Hybridization by resin interdiffusion into the exposed dentinal collagen layer, combined with attachment of resin tags into the opened dentin tubules, appeared to be essential for reliable dentin bonding but might be insufficient by itself. The additional formation of an elastic bonding area as a polymerization shrinkage absorber and the use of a microfine restorative composite apparently guaranteed an efficient clinical result. The perfect one-year retention recorded for Clearfil Liner Bond System and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose must be confirmed at later recalls. PMID:7983255

  14. Virological Efficacy in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neurocognitive Status in Patients with Long-Term Monotherapy Based on Lopinavir/Ritonavir: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José R.; Muñoz-Moreno, José A.; Moltó, José; Prats, Anna; Curran, Adrià; Domingo, Pere; Llibre, Josep M.; McClernon, Daniel R.; Bravo, Isabel; Canet, Jaume; Watson, Victoria; Back, David; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2013-01-01

    Background Data on suppression of HIV replication in the CNS and on the subsequent risk of neurocognitive impairment using monotherapy with boosted protease inhibitors are limited. Methods Ours was an exploratory cross-sectional study in patients on lopinavir/ritonavir-based monotherapy (LPV/r-MT) or standard triple therapy (LPV/r-ART) for at least 96 weeks who maintained a plasma viral load <50 copies/mL. HIV-1 RNA in CSF was determined by HIV-1 SuperLow assay (lower limit of detection, 1 copy/mL). Neurocognitive functioning was assessed using a recommended battery of neuropsychological tests covering 7 areas. Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) was determined and also a global deficit score (GDS) for study comparisons. Results Seventeen patients on LPV/r-MT and 17 on LPV/r-ART were included. Fourteen (82.4%) patients on LPV/r-MT and 16 (94.1%) on LPV/r-ART had HIV-1 RNA <1 copy/mL in CSF (p = 0.601). NCI was observed in 7 patients on LPV/r-MT and in 10 on LPV/r-ART (41% vs 59%; p = 0.494). Mean (SD) GDS was 0.22 (0.20) in patients on LPV/r-MT and 0.47 (0.34) in those on LPV/r-ART (p = 0.012). Conclusions Suppression of HIV in CSF is similar in individuals with durable plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression who are receiving LPV/r-MT or LPV/r-ART for at least 96 weeks. Findings for HIV-1 replication in CSF and neurocognitive status indicate that this strategy seems to be safe for CNS functioning. PMID:23922957

  15. Integrated Clinical, Pathologic, Virologic, and Transcriptomic Analysis of H5N1 Influenza Virus-Induced Viral Pneumonia in the Rhesus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Kyoko; Gao, Yuwei; Cilloniz, Cristian; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Fujie, Masahiro; Deng, Guohua; Zhu, Qiyun; Fan, Shufang; Makino, Akiko; Muramoto, Yukiko; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Tamura, Daisuke; Noda, Takeshi; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Katze, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Viral pneumonia has been frequently reported during early stages of influenza virus pandemics and in many human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus infection. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease, we produced nonlethal viral pneumonia in rhesus macaques by using an HPAI H5N1 virus (A/Anhui/2/2005; referred to as Anhui/2). Infected macaques were monitored for 14 days, and tissue samples were collected at 6 time points for virologic, histopathologic, and transcriptomic analyses. Anhui/2 efficiently replicated in the lung from 12 h to 3 days postinfection (p.i.) and caused temporal but severe pneumonia that began to resolve by day 14. Lung transcriptional changes were first observed at 6 h, and increased expression of vascular permeability regulators and neutrophil chemoattractants correlated with increased serum leakage and neutrophil infiltration in situ. Additional inflammatory, antiviral, and apoptotic genes were upregulated from 12 h, concurrent with viral antigen detection and increasing immune cell populations. A shift toward upregulation of acquired immunity was apparent after day 6. Expression levels of established immune cell molecular markers revealed remarkable similarity with pathological findings, indicating early and robust neutrophil infiltration, a slight delay in macrophage accumulation, and abundant late populations of T lymphocytes. We also characterized the putative mechanisms regulating a unique, pneumonia-associated biphasic fever pattern. Thus, this study is the first to use a comprehensive and integrative approach to delineate specific molecular mechanisms regulating influenza virus-induced pneumonia in nonhuman primates, an important first step toward better management of human influenza virus disease. PMID:22491448

  16. Individualized treatment strategies and predictors of virological response for chronic hepatitis C: a multicenter prospective study from China

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yue-Min; Zhang, Yu-Guo; Zheng, Huan-Wei; An, Chun-Mian; Li, You-Sheng; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Dian-Xing; Li, Cang-You; Li, Qiang; Tong, Li-Xin; Kong, Ling-Bo; Zhao, Su-Xian; Wang, Rong-Qi; Meng, Ping; Su, Shan-Shan; He, Huan; Niu, Xue-Min

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy comprising pegylated interferon-alpha (PegIFNα) and ribavirin (RBV) has been the standard of care for the chronic hepatitis C patients for more than a decade. Recently, direct antiviral agents show better efficacy, tolerance, and shorter treatment duration. However, the prohibitive costs of the regimens limit their use in developing countries where most of the HCV infection exists. Optimizing the treatment and understanding the host- and virus-factors associated with viral clearance were necessary for individualizing therapy to maximize sustained virologic response. To explore individualized antiviral strategies with PegIFNα-2a/IFNα-2b plus ribavirin for CHC patients, and to clarify predictive factors for virological response. A cohort of 314 patients were included in this open-label, prospective clinical trial, which received individualized doses of PegIFNα-2a or IFNα-2b combined with RBV according to body weight, disease status and complications, with the duration of 44 weeks after HCV RNA undetectable. All the IL-28B (rs8099917), IL-17A (rs8193036), IL-17B (rs2275913) and PD-1.1 SNPs were genotyped using the TaqMan system. The sustained virological response (SVR) in PegIFNα-2a group was significantly higher than that in IFNα-2b (85.8% vs 75.0%, P = 0.034), especially in HCV genotype 1 (84.0% vs 64.3%, P = 0.022). However, no significant differences were found in rapid virological response (RVR), complete early virological response (cEVR) and SVR between PegIFNα-2a and IFNα-2b according to different doses, respectively. The genotype frequency of IL-28B TT in patients with cEVR, SVR was higher than that in non-responsed patients (93.8% vs 78.1%, χ2 = 7.827, P = 0.005; 95.9% vs 80.4%, χ2 = 9.394, P = 0.002). No significant correlation between the genotype distribution of IL-17A, IL-17B and PD-1.1 with virological response. Individualized regimens of PegIFNα-2a/RBV and IFNα-2b/RBV could achieve satisfied virological response in

  17. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting. PMID:25902572

  18. [Virological diagnosis of HIV infection in children].

    PubMed

    Muñoz Fernández, M A

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in newborns should be carried out using virological methods, viral isolation or molecular methods for the detection of proviral DNA by PCR. Serological methods have poor sensitivity in the first months of life because the IgG of the seropositive mother crosses the placenta. Once HIV-1 infection is diagnosed, other assays are available which indicate the clinical progression of the infection, the genetic variability of the virus, its biological behavior and sensitivity to different antiretroviral medications. These studies can be used independently of the clinical manifestations in order to assess disease progression. Different immunological markers and virological markers of disease progression have been described, but the CD4+ T lymphocyte count is used routinely as an immunological marker and as a virological marker of the virus load. In HIV-1 newborns and children, the largest decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes is due to the combined effect of infection progression and a natural decrease in CD4+ T lymphocytes with age. In newborns, low viral load levels suggest that the infection was acquired shortly before birth or that maternal and/or placental factors inhibited viral replication before birth, or that the child was infected at birth. In children, viral loads are greater than in adult patients during the primary infection and throughout their evolution. Because of advances in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, the study of resistance to antiretroviral agents by phenotypical and genotypical methods is important. Increased viral load suggests the loss of effectiveness of a treatment and should be monitored. PMID:9675394

  19. Therapeutic nucleic acids: current clinical status.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kannan; Gogtay, Nithya Jaideep

    2016-09-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are simple linear polymers that have been the subject of considerable research in the last two decades and have now moved into the realm of being stand-alone therapeutic agents. Much of this has stemmed from the appreciation that they carry out myriad functions that go beyond mere storage of genetic information and protein synthesis. Therapy with nucleic acids either uses unmodified DNA or RNA or closely related compounds. From both a development and regulatory perspective, they fall somewhere between small molecules and biologics. Several of these compounds are in clinical development and many have received regulatory approval for human use. This review addresses therapeutic uses of DNA based on antisense oligonucleotides, DNA aptamers and gene therapy; and therapeutic uses of RNA including micro RNAs, short interfering RNAs, ribozymes, RNA decoys and circular RNAs. With their specificity, functional diversity and limited toxicity, therapeutic nucleic acids hold enormous promise. However, challenges that need to be addressed include targeted delivery, mass production at low cost, sustaining efficacy and minimizing off-target toxicity. Technological developments will hold the key to this and help accelerate drug approvals in the years to come. PMID:27111518

  20. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  1. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.919 Virology. (a) Types of services offered by laboratories. In virology, there are two types of laboratories for proficiency testing...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  5. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.919 Virology. (a) Types of services offered by laboratories. In virology, there are two types of laboratories for proficiency testing...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  7. Clinical and virological dynamics of a serotype O 2010 South East Asia lineage foot-and-mouth disease virus in sheep using natural and simulated natural inoculation and exposure systems.

    PubMed

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Pacheco, Juan M; Singanallur, Nagendrakumar B; Ferreira, Helena C de Carvalho; Vosloo, Wilna; Rodriguez, Luis L; Arzt, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Within-host infection dynamics of a recent field isolate of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), serotype O, topotype South East Asia, lineage Myamar'98 were evaluated in sheep using four different systems for virus exposure. Two novel, simulated natural, inoculation systems consisting of intra-nasopharyngeal (INP) deposition and aerosol inoculation were evaluated in comparison with two conventional systems: coronary band inoculation and direct contact exposure. All four exposure systems were efficient in generating consistently severe, generalized FMD with synchronous clinical characteristics within exposure groups, indicating that this Myanmar98 strain is highly virulent in sheep. Clinical and virological dynamics were similarly rapid following INP- and coronary band inoculation, with both systems leading to significantly earlier detection of virus shedding when compared to aerosol inoculation and contact exposure. The data presented herein support application of the two optimized simulated natural inoculation systems as valid alternatives to conventionally used exposure systems for studies of FMDV pathogenesis and vaccinology in sheep. Furthermore, the data suggest that targeted exposure of the ovine pharynx is highly efficient for generating consistent FMDV infection, which supports critical involvement of this anatomic region as a site of primary virus replication in sheep. PMID:25937316

  8. Updates in immunoassays: virology.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Virus identification is a challenge to the clinical microbiologist since growing viruses in traditional cell culture is labor intensive, time consuming, and subject to contamination. The advent of rapid and automated immunoassays has eliminated this problem by generating positive results in minutes to hours. For example, testing for infectious mononucleosis can yield a positive result in 3-8 minutes as seen with the Beckman Coulter, Inc. ICON Mono test or in 5-15 minutes with the MONO Mononucleosis Rapid Test Device marketed by ACON Laboratories, Inc. Fully automated immunoassay analyzers provide fast, accurate, sensitive results that aid in a prompt and accurate diagnosis for the patient. Turnaround times are shortened, allowing for timely medical intervention and treatment. The priority in any hospital or medical facility is to treat the patient as quickly and appropriately as possible. By using immunoassays, clinical laboratory professionals are able to report out correct results in a timely manner, ensuring overall positive patient outcomes and improved quality of healthcare. PMID:22953519

  9. Treatment Extension of Pegylated Interferon Alpha and Ribavirin Does Not Improve SVR in Patients with Genotypes 2/3 without Rapid Virological Response (OPTEX Trial): A Prospective, Randomized, Two-Arm, Multicentre Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Heidrich, Benjamin; Cordes, Hans-Jörg; Klinker, Hartwig; Möller, Bernd; Naumann, Uwe; Rössle, Martin; Kraus, Michael R.; Böker, Klaus H.; Roggel, Christoph; Schuchmann, Marcus; Stoehr, Albrecht; Trein, Andreas; Hardtke, Svenja; Gonnermann, Andrea; Koch, Armin; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P.; Cornberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Although sofosbuvir has been approved for patients with genotypes 2/3 (G2/3), many parts of the world still consider pegylated Interferon alpha (P) and ribavirin (R) as standard of care for G2/3. Patients with rapid virological response (RVR) show response rates >80%. However, SVR (sustained virological response) in non-RVR patients is not satisfactory. Longer treatment duration may be required but evidence from prospective trials are lacking. A total of 1006 chronic HCV genotype 2/3 patients treated with P/R were recruited into a German HepNet multicenter screening registry. Of those, only 226 patients were still HCV RNA positive at week 4 (non-RVR). Non-RVR patients with ongoing response after 24 weeks P-2b/R qualified for OPTEX, a randomized trial investigating treatment extension of additional 24 weeks (total 48 weeks, Group A) or additional 12 weeks (total 36 weeks, group B) of 1.5 μg/kg P-2b and 800-1400 mg R. Due to the low number of patients without RVR, the number of 150 anticipated study patients was not met and only 99 non-RVR patients (n=50 Group A, n=49 Group B) could be enrolled into the OPTEX trial. Baseline factors did not differ between groups. Sixteen patients had G2 and 83 patients G3. Based on the ITT (intention-to-treat) analysis, 68% [55%; 81%] in Group A and 57% [43%; 71%] in Group B achieved SVR (p= 0.31). The primary endpoint of better SVR rates in Group A compared to a historical control group (SVR 70%) was not met. In conclusion, approximately 23% of G2/3 patients did not achieve RVR in a real world setting. However, subsequent recruitment in a treatment-extension study was difficult. Prolonged therapy beyond 24 weeks did not result in higher SVR compared to a historical control group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803309 PMID:26057627

  10. Relationship between clinical and BK virological response in patients with late hemorrhagic cystitis treated with cidofovir: a retrospective study from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, S; Pillon, M; Tridello, G; Aljurf, M; Martino, R; Schroyens, W; Nozzoli, C; Barba, P; Faraci, M; Fagioli, F; Cappelli, B; Cordonnier, C; Al-Mohareb, F; Floisand, Y; Greil, J; Panizzolo, I S; Santarone, S

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between clinical response and modification of BK viremia, we assessed retrospectively 32 cases of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT that were treated with i.v. cidofovir (CDV). They were 22 men (69%) and 10 women (31%) with a median age of 24 years, range 3-62. The median number of CDV doses was 3, range 1-8, and the treatment lasted for a median of 3 weeks, range 1-10. Clinical improvement of HC was observed in 27 patients (84%). In 12 of 32 episodes (37.5%), BK viremia was determined before every CDV administration and a complete clinical response was observed in 10 of 12 patients (83%), the reduction of BK viremia load being 1 log by 2 weeks after starting CDV. Nephrotoxicity related to CDV was observed in nine patients. Among 26 patients with 100-day follow-up, 4 of 4 patients who had a complete clinical response by 30 days were alive vs 16 of 22 (73%) who did not have the resolution of HC in this time frame. We conclude that in patients with HC, the response to CDV treatment is usually associated with a significant reduction of BK viremia load. PMID:23222380

  11. Changes in Cognitive Status in COPD Patients Across Clinical Stages.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Isabel; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Rodriguez-Torres, Jeanette; Moreno-Ramírez, M Paz

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease, its prevalence increases with age. COPD is frequently associated with co-morbidities such as cognitive impairment, and their clinical relevance has risen in the recent past. Cognitive function may fluctuate with the variable components of COPD like hypoxaemia, hypercapnia, lung function, exacerbations or severity of the disease. The objectives of this study were to examine whether the cognitive status of COPD patients is different across clinical stages (exacerbation, at discharge and stable COPD) and also if there are cognitive areas that have more potential to change than others. Prospective observational clinical study: 62 patients admitted to hospital due to acute exacerbation of COPD were evaluated at hospital admission; 61 at discharge; and finally, 48 patients with stable COPD completed the study and were included in the analysis. Cognitive status was assessed with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Our results show that all clinical variables improved from exacerbation to discharge COPD. MoCA total score, visuoconstructional, attention, language, abstraction, delayed recall and orientation subscores improved significantly from exacerbation to discharge COPD (p < 0.05). MoCA total score, visuoconstructional and naming subscores worsened significantly from discharge to stable COPD (p < 0.05). Finally, from exacerbation to stable COPD all the clinical variables improved; MoCA total score and naming, attention, language, abstraction and delayed recall subscores have shown significant differences (p < 0.05). Cognitive status of COPD patients is different across clinical stages, and there are cognitive areas with more potential to change than others. PMID:26667660

  12. Summary of the 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology (SIV) comprised seven plenary sessions focused on: General virology and viral genetics; Virus-Host interaction and pathogenesis; Viral oncology; Emerging viruses and zoonotic, foodborne, and environmental pathways of transmission; Viral immunology and vaccines; Medical virology and antiviral therapy; Viral biotechnologies and gene therapy. Moreover, four hot topics were discussed in special lectures: the Pioneer in human virology lecture regarding the control of viral epidemics with particular emphasis on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the Pioneer in plant virology lecture focused on cell responses to plant virus infection, a Keynote lecture on the epidemiology and genetic diversity of Crimea-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus, and the G.B. Rossi lecture on the molecular basis and clinical implications of human cytomegalovirus tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells. The meeting had an attendance of about 160 virologists. A summary of the plenary lectures and oral selected presentations is reported. PMID:20799282

  13. CD4:CD8 ratio as a frontier marker for clinical outcome, immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absolute CD4 T cell count and plasma viral load have been established as predictors of HIV disease progression, and CD4 T cell count is used as an indicator for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Following long-term therapy, patients generally present with significant CD4 T cell recovery contrasting with persistently elevated CD8 T cell counts, which leads to a partial restoration of CD4:CD8 ratio. This review focuses on the relevance of the CD4:CD8 ratio on clinical outcomes, immune dysfunction and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated patients. Method We conducted a comprehensive literature review of publications in English language using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD4:CD8 T cell ratio and clinical outcome in adult HIV-positive patients in the context of treated infection. Discussion Low CD4:CD8 ratio has been linked to ageing and acts as a predictor of mortality in the general population. This ratio may represent the combined effects of inflammation and immunological changes called “inflammaging.” Although the mechanisms underlying partial correction of the CD4:CD8 ratio and persistently elevated CD8 T cell count in long-term treated patients remain poorly understood, it has been recently indicated that patients with optimal CD4 T cell recovery and low CD4:CD8 ratio still harbour increased immune activation, an immune senescent phenotype and have a higher risk of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality. This review reconsiders CD4:CD8 ratio in the light of advances in the understanding of immune dysfunction and examines its pathophysiological features and implications on clinical outcome and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated HIV-positive adults. Conclusion The CD4:CD8 ratio can contribute to the immunological evaluation of treated patients in a long-term follow-up and may be applied for monitoring both immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in immune-based clinical trials. PMID:26130226

  14. Aptamers in Virology: Recent Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Binning, Jennifer M.; Leung, Daisy W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers generated from randomized libraries of nucleic acids have found utility in a wide variety of fields and in the clinic. Aptamers can be used to target both intracellular and extracellular components, including small molecules, proteins, cells, and viruses. With recent technological developments in stringent selection and rapid isolation strategies, it is likely that aptamers will continue to make an impact as useful tools and reagents. Although many recently developed aptamers are intended for use as therapeutic and diagnostic agents, use of aptamers for basic research, including target validation, remains an active area with high potential to impact our understanding of molecular mechanisms and for drug discovery. In this brief review, we will discuss recent aptamer discoveries, their potential role in structural virology, as well as challenges and future prospects. PMID:22347221

  15. The History of Tumor Virology

    PubMed Central

    Javier, Ronald T.; Butel, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    In the century since its inception, the field of tumor virology has provided groundbreaking insights into the causes of human cancer. Peyton Rous founded this scientific field in 1911 by discovering an avian virus that induced tumors in chickens; however, it took 40 years for the scientific community to comprehend the effect of this seminal finding. Later identification of mammalian tumor viruses in the 1930s by Richard Shope and John Bittner, and in the 1950s by Ludwik Gross, sparked the first intense interest in tumor virology by suggesting the possibility of a similar causal role for viruses in human cancers. This change in attitude opened the door in the 1960s and 1970s for the discovery of the first human tumor viruses—EBV, hepatitis B virus, and the papillomaviruses. Such knowledge proved instrumental to the development of the first cancer vaccines against cancers having an infectious etiology. Tumor virologists additionally recognized that viruses could serve as powerful discovery tools, leading to revolutionary breakthroughs in the 1970s and 1980s that included the concept of the oncogene, the identification of the p53 tumor suppressor, and the function of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. The subsequent availability of more advanced molecular technologies paved the way in the 1980s and 1990s for the identification of additional human tumor viruses—human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, and Kaposi’s sarcoma virus. In fact, current estimates suggest that viruses are involved in 15% to 20% of human cancers worldwide. Thus, viruses not only have been shown to represent etiologic agents for many human cancers but have also served as tools to reveal mechanisms that are involved in all human malignancies. This rich history promises that tumor virology will continue to contribute to our understanding of cancer and to the development of new therapeutic and preventive measures for this disease in the 21st century. PMID:18829521

  16. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  17. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  20. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  1. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  2. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  3. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  4. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  5. USE OF BIOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE TO INFORM THE ANALYSIS OF GENE-GENE INTERACTIONS INVOLVED IN MODULATING VIROLOGIC FAILURE WITH EFAVIRENZ-CONTAINING TREATMENT REGIMENS IN ART-NAÏVE ACTG CLINICAL TRIALS PARTICIPANTS

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Benjamin J.; Torstenson, Eric S.; Mclaren, Paul J.; De Bakker, Paul I.W.; Haas, David W.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Gulick, Roy M.; Haubrich, Richard; Ribaudo, Heather; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a high priority for the future of health care. The idea of tailoring an individual’s wellness plan to their unique genetic code is one which we hope to realize through the use of pharmacogenomics. There have been examples of tremendous success in pharmacogenomic associations however there are many such examples in which only a small proportion of trait variance has been explained by the genetic variation. Although the increased use of GWAS could help explain more of this variation, it is likely that a significant proportion of the genetic architecture of these pharmacogenomic traits are due to complex genetic effects such as epistasis, also known as gene-gene interactions, as well as gene-drug interactions. In this study, we utilize the Biofilter software package to look for candidate epistasis contributing to risk for virologic failure with efavirenz-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in treatment-naïve participants of AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) randomized clinical trials. A total of 904 individuals from three ACTG trials with data on efavirenz treatment are analyzed after race-stratification into white, black, and Hispanic ethnic groups. Biofilter was run considering 245 candidate ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) genes and using database knowledge of gene and protein interaction networks to produce approximately 2 million SNP-SNP interaction models within each ethnic group. These models were evaluated within the PLATO software package using pair wise logistic regression models. Although no interaction model remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, an interaction between SNPs in the TAP1 and ABCC9 genes was one of the top models before correction. The TAP1 protein is responsible for intracellular transport of antigen to MHC class I molecules, while ABCC9 codes for a transporter which is part of the subfamily of ABC transporters associated with multi-drug resistance

  6. Clinical significance of treatment delay in status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency that requires immediate action. The clinical and demographic features of SE are known to be highly variable. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of treatment delays on patient recovery and different clinical factors that are important in the determination of the acute prognosis in SE. Methods This population-based study included 109 consecutive visits of patients with the diagnosis of SE in the emergency department (ED) of Tampere University Hospital. The clinical features of SE were compared with the discharge condition. Results The treatment delays were long; in half of the patients, the delay for paramedic arrival was over 30 min, and in one-third of the cases, the delay was over 24 h. ED patients who had less than 1 h of delay before the administration of an antiepileptic drug (AED) had better outcomes compared to patients with a greater than 1 h delay (p < 0.05). The two major etiologies for the SE were cerebrovascular disease and alcohol misuse. A good immediate outcome was found in 46% of the patients. Epileptiform activity on the EEG, a history of epilepsy or SE, presence of cardiovascular disease, and alcohol misuse were associated with a poor outcome. Conclusions The results of this study emphasize the importance of an urgent response by emergency services and proper recognition of atypical phenotypes of SE. PMID:23445821

  7. Finding our roots and celebrating our shoots: Plant virology in Virology, 1955-1964.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2015-05-01

    To celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of Virology a survey is made of the plant viruses, virologists and their institutions, and tools and technology described in the first decade of plant virus publications in Virology. This was a period when plant viruses increasingly became tools of discovery as epistemic objects and plant virology became a discipline discrete from plant pathology and other life sciences. PMID:25842010

  8. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic.

    PubMed

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sıtkı; Baspınar, Osman; Kocer, Derya; Dursun, Zehra Bestepe; Avcı, Deniz; Karakükcü, Cigdem; Çelik, İlhami; Gundogan, Kursat

    2016-03-01

    Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient's admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40), 46.6% (n = 29), 39.7% (n = 27), 35.3% (n = 24), 14.1% (n = 9), respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission. PMID:26938553

  9. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sıtkı; Baspınar, Osman; Kocer, Derya; Dursun, Zehra Bestepe; Avcı, Deniz; Karakükcü, Cigdem; Çelik, İlhami; Gundogan, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient’s admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40), 46.6% (n = 29), 39.7% (n = 27), 35.3% (n = 24), 14.1% (n = 9), respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission. PMID:26938553

  10. Introducing Virological Concepts Using an Insect Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Roger F.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented which utilizes wax moth larvae in a laboratory investigation of an insect virus. Describes how an insect virus can be used to introduce undergraduate biology students to laboratory work on viruses and several virological concepts. (SA)

  11. The status of platinum anticancer drugs in the clinic and in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wheate, Nial J; Walker, Shonagh; Craig, Gemma E; Oun, Rabbab

    2010-09-21

    Since its approval in 1979 cisplatin has become an important component in chemotherapy regimes for the treatment of ovarian, testicular, lung and bladder cancers, as well as lymphomas, myelomas and melanoma. Unfortunately its continued use is greatly limited by severe dose limiting side effects and intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Over the last 30 years, 23 other platinum-based drugs have entered clinical trials with only two (carboplatin and oxaliplatin) of these gaining international marketing approval, and another three (nedaplatin, lobaplatin and heptaplatin) gaining approval in individual nations. During this time there have been more failures than successes with the development of 14 drugs being halted during clinical trials. Currently there are four drugs in the various phases of clinical trial (satraplatin, picoplatin, Lipoplatin and ProLindac). No new small molecule platinum drug has entered clinical trials since 1999 which is representative of a shift in focus away from drug design and towards drug delivery in the last decade. In this perspective article we update the status of platinum anticancer drugs currently approved for use, those undergoing clinical trials and those discontinued during clinical trials, and discuss the results in the context of where we believe the field will develop over the next decade. PMID:20593091

  12. Clinical, virological and biochemical evidence supporting the association of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase polymorphism R284K and thymidine analogue resistance mutations M41L, L210W and T215Y in patients failing tenofovir/emtricitabine therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs) selected under treatment with nucleoside analogues generate two distinct genotypic profiles in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT): (i) TAM1: M41L, L210W and T215Y, and (ii) TAM2: D67N, K70R and K219E/Q, and sometimes T215F. Secondary mutations, including thumb subdomain polymorphisms (e.g. R284K) have been identified in association with TAMs. We have identified mutational clusters associated with virological failure during salvage therapy with tenofovir/emtricitabine-based regimens. In this context, we have studied the role of R284K as a secondary mutation associated with mutations of the TAM1 complex. Results The cross-sectional study carried out with >200 HIV-1 genotypes showed that virological failure to tenofovir/emtricitabine was strongly associated with the presence of M184V (P < 10-10) and TAMs (P < 10-3), while K65R was relatively uncommon in previously-treated patients failing antiretroviral therapy. Clusters of mutations were identified, and among them, the TAM1 complex showed the highest correlation coefficients. Covariation of TAM1 mutations and V118I, V179I, M184V and R284K was observed. Virological studies showed that the combination of R284K with TAM1 mutations confers a fitness advantage in the presence of zidovudine or tenofovir. Studies with recombinant HIV-1 RTs showed that when associated with TAM1 mutations, R284K had a minimal impact on zidovudine or tenofovir inhibition, and in their ability to excise the inhibitors from blocked DNA primers. However, the mutant RT M41L/L210W/T215Y/R284K showed an increased catalytic rate for nucleotide incorporation and a higher RNase H activity in comparison with WT and mutant M41L/L210W/T215Y RTs. These effects were consistent with its enhanced chain-terminated primer rescue on DNA/DNA template-primers, but not on RNA/DNA complexes, and can explain the higher fitness of HIV-1 having TAM1/R284K mutations. Conclusions Our study shows the association

  13. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Proficiency Testing Programs for Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty...

  14. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Proficiency Testing Programs for Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty...

  15. Estimates of global research productivity in virology.

    PubMed

    Falagas, Matthew E; Karavasiou, Antonia I; Bliziotis, Ioannis A

    2005-06-01

    The quantity and quality of published research in the field of Virology by different world regions was estimated in this study. Using the PubMed database, articles from journals included in the "Virology" category of the "Journal Citation Reports" database of the Institute for Scientific Information for the period 1995-2003 were retrieved. The world was divided into nine regions based on geographic, economic, and scientific criteria. Data on the country of origin of the research was available for 33,425 out of 33,712 articles (99.2% of all articles from the included journals). USA exceeds all other world regions in research production for the period studied (42% of total articles), with Western Europe ranking second (35.7%). The mean impact factor in articles published in Virology journals was highest for the USA (4.60), while it was 3.90 for Western Europe and 3.22 for the rest of the world (seven regions combined). USA and Canada ranked first in research productivity when both gross national income per capita (GNIPC) and population were taken into account. The results of this analysis show a distressing fact; the absolute and relative production of research in the field of Virology by the developing regions is very low, although viral diseases cause considerable morbidity and mortality in these areas. It is evident from this study that developing regions need more help from the developed regions to enhance research infrastructure. PMID:15834885

  16. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Proficiency Testing Programs for Nonwaived Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing...

  18. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  19. Oral Health Status and Behaviour of Mauritians Visiting Private Dental Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunsam, P. Pugo; Banka, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics. Design/methodology/approach: Oral health status was determined using the World Health Organization (Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index indicating the prevalence of caries, and factors associated…

  20. Clinical pharmacology training in India: Status and need.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Nilima A; Bachhav, Sagar S; Kulkarni, Laxmikant A; Vijaykumar

    2013-01-01

    Clinical pharmacologists undertake many tasks, and this makes defining a curriculum challenging. This is especially so under the changing circumstances in developing countries, where clinical pharmacology has an expanding role. The clinical pharmacologist may be responsible for conducting ethical clinical trials, supporting the needs of the generic drug industry, providing access to safe, effective and affordable medicines, guiding their rational use, achieving millennium development goals, and supervising medicines management standards for hospital accreditation. Clinical pharmacologists, including those in developing countries, have a great opportunity to contribute to public health and the growth of pharmaceutical industry, but at present, less clinical research is undertaken and fewer clinical trials are done than might be expected. Here we review clinical pharmacology training in India, consider the needs of different professionals contributing to clinical research and medicines utilization, and suggest ways in which current programs can be modified and new programs started. The conclusions are relevant to clinical pharmacology in both the developing and the developed world. PMID:24130374

  1. Clinical pharmacology training in India: Status and need

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Nilima A.; Bachhav, Sagar S.; Kulkarni, Laxmikant A.; Vijaykumar

    2013-01-01

    Clinical pharmacologists undertake many tasks, and this makes defining a curriculum challenging. This is especially so under the changing circumstances in developing countries, where clinical pharmacology has an expanding role. The clinical pharmacologist may be responsible for conducting ethical clinical trials, supporting the needs of the generic drug industry, providing access to safe, effective and affordable medicines, guiding their rational use, achieving millennium development goals, and supervising medicines management standards for hospital accreditation. Clinical pharmacologists, including those in developing countries, have a great opportunity to contribute to public health and the growth of pharmaceutical industry, but at present, less clinical research is undertaken and fewer clinical trials are done than might be expected. Here we review clinical pharmacology training in India, consider the needs of different professionals contributing to clinical research and medicines utilization, and suggest ways in which current programs can be modified and new programs started. The conclusions are relevant to clinical pharmacology in both the developing and the developed world. PMID:24130374

  2. Outpatient diabetes clinical decision support: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P J; Sperl-Hillen, J M; Fazio, C J; Averbeck, B M; Rank, B H; Margolis, K L

    2016-06-01

    Outpatient clinical decision support systems have had an inconsistent impact on key aspects of diabetes care. A principal barrier to success has been low use rates in many settings. Here, we identify key aspects of clinical decision support system design, content and implementation that are related to sustained high use rates and positive impacts on glucose, blood pressure and lipid management. Current diabetes clinical decision support systems may be improved by prioritizing care recommendations, improving communication of treatment-relevant information to patients, using such systems for care coordination and case management and integrating patient-reported information and data from remote devices into clinical decision algorithms and interfaces. PMID:27194173

  3. Feasibility of Automatic Extraction of Electronic Health Data to Evaluate a Status Epilepticus Clinical Protocol.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Baria; Paolicchi, Juliann; Pon, Steven; Howell, Joy D; Grinspan, Zachary M

    2016-05-01

    Status epilepticus is a common neurologic emergency in children. Pediatric medical centers often develop protocols to standardize care. Widespread adoption of electronic health records by hospitals affords the opportunity for clinicians to rapidly, and electronically evaluate protocol adherence. We reviewed the clinical data of a small sample of 7 children with status epilepticus, in order to (1) qualitatively determine the feasibility of automated data extraction and (2) demonstrate a timeline-style visualization of each patient's first 24 hours of care. Qualitatively, our observations indicate that most clinical data are well labeled in structured fields within the electronic health record, though some important information, particularly electroencephalography (EEG) data, may require manual abstraction. We conclude that a visualization that clarifies a patient's clinical course can be automatically created using the patient's electronic clinical data, supplemented with some manually abstracted data. Future work could use this timeline to evaluate adherence to status epilepticus clinical protocols. PMID:26518205

  4. Representation of Functional Status Concepts from Clinical Documents and Social Media Sources by Standard Terminologies

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jinqiu; Mohanty, April F.; Rashmi, V.H.; Weir, Charlene R.; Bray, Bruce E.; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported functional status is widely recognized as an important patient-centered outcome that adds value to medical care, research, and quality improvement. Functional status outcomes are, however, not routinely or uniformly collected in the medical record, except in certain small patient populations (e.g. geriatrics, nursing home residents). To utilize patient reported functional status for clinical research and practice, we manually collected 2,763 terms from clinical records and social media sites and modeled them on the widely used Short Form-36 Health Survey. We then examined the coverage of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) for these functional status terms through automated mapping. Most terms (85.9%) did not have exact matches in the UMLS. The partial matches were prevalent, however, they typically did not capture the terms’ exact semantics. Our study suggests that there is a need to extend existing standard terminologies to incorporate functional status terms used by patients and clinicians. PMID:26958215

  5. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology.

    PubMed

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  6. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  7. Current Status and Future Prospects of Clinical Psycholog

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Timothy B.; McFall, Richard M.; Shoham, Varda

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The escalating costs of health care and other recent trends have made health care decisions of great societal import, with decision-making responsibility often being transferred from practitioners to health economists, health plans, and insurers. Health care decision making increasingly is guided by evidence that a treatment is efficacious, effective–disseminable, cost-effective, and scientifically plausible. Under these conditions of heightened cost concerns and institutional–economic decision making, psychologists are losing the opportunity to play a leadership role in mental and behavioral health care: Other types of practitioners are providing an increasing proportion of delivered treatment, and the use of psychiatric medication has increased dramatically relative to the provision of psychological interventions. Research has shown that numerous psychological interventions are efficacious, effective, and cost-effective. However, these interventions are used infrequently with patients who would benefit from them, in part because clinical psychologists have not made a convincing case for the use of these interventions (e.g., by supplying the data that decision makers need to support implementation of such interventions) and because clinical psychologists do not themselves use these interventions even when given the opportunity to do so. Clinical psychologists’ failure to achieve a more significant impact on clinical and public health may be traced to their deep ambivalence about the role of science and their lack of adequate science training, which leads them to value personal clinical experience over research evidence, use assessment practices that have dubious psychometric support, and not use the interventions for which there is the strongest evidence of efficacy. Clinical psychology resembles medicine at a point in its history when practitioners were operating in a largely prescientific manner. Prior to the scientific reform of medicine in the

  8. Virological diagnosis of Ebolavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, D W; Rawlinson, W D; Kok, J; Dwyer, D E; Catton, M

    2015-08-01

    Ebolaviruses, and the other viral causes of haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) have always posed special problems for diagnostic laboratories. These arise from the rarity of human infections, minimal documented experience with test delivery and interpretation, the paucity of established commercial or in-house assays, the lack of clinical material for test development and validation, the high level containment required for handling live virus, the ongoing evolution of the viruses, and the high personal and public health requirements for accurate diagnosis. This article addresses the current situation and the ongoing challenges associated with delivering timely, high quality and safe testing within Australia for people exposed as part of the current major outbreak of Ebolavirus disease (EVD) in Western Africa. The members of the Public Health Laboratory Network have developed deliverable and reliable nucleic acid detection tests, and also have the laboratory capacity to handle the live viruses if necessary. However delivering and maintaining these services necessitates high levels of experience in developing and applying tests for exotic and emerging infections, strong national and international links and collaborations, ongoing monitoring and reassessment of test design and performance, innovative approaches to generation of positive control material, and a regular quality assurance program. PMID:26126050

  9. Computerized clinical guidelines: current status & principles for future research.

    PubMed

    Kondylakis, Haridimos; Tsiknakis, Manolis

    2012-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that the adoption of computerized clinical guidelines would improve the quality of the provided health care, their influence in the daily practice is limited. In this paper we provide insights on the core topics related to computer interpretable clinical guidelines and we present shortly the main approaches in the area. Then we discuss the current limitations, and we present three simple principles that according to our view should be adopted to enhance the penetration of computerized clinical guidelines in the health care organizations. The overall goal of this paper is not only to give readers a quick overview of the works in the area, but also to provide necessary insights for the practical understanding of the issues involved and draw directions for future research and development activities. PMID:22874227

  10. Current status and future of clinical islet xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinichi; Tomiya, Masayuki; Sawamoto, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    β-Cell replacement therapy, including allogeneic pancreas and islet transplantation, can normalize HbA1c levels in unstable type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, but a donor shortage is a serious issue. To overcome this problem, xenotransplantation is an attractive option. In fact, islet transplantation from porcine pancreata was performed in the 1990s, which opened the door for islet xenotransplantation, but the possibility of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) infection was raised, which has restricted progress in this field. The International Xenotransplantation Association published a consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in T1D to restart islet xenotransplantation safely. Clinical porcine islet xenotransplantation was restarted under comprehensive regulations in New Zealand. In addition, newly emerged gene-editing technologies have activated the xenotransplantation field. Islet xenotransplantation is becoming a clinical reality, with the results of recent studies showing promise to advance this field. PMID:26987992

  11. PHARMACOKINETIC EXPOSURE AND VIROLOGIC RESPONSE IN HIV-1 INFECTED PREGNANT WOMEN TREATED WITH LOPINAVIR/RITONAVIR: AIDS CLINICAL TRIALS GROUP PROTOCOL A5153S: A SUBSTUDY TO A5150

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Beverly E.; Tierney, Camlin; Sun, Xin; Stek, Alice; Cohn, Susan E.; Coombs, Robert W.; Bastow, Barbara; Aweeka, Francesca T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We studied the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of boosted soft-gel lopinavir/ritonavir to assess if the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) is altered in pregnancy and whether changes in AUC impacted HIV-1 control. Methods We enrolled pregnant women ≥13 years of age between 22 to 30 weeks gestation who expected to be on stable lopinavir/ritonavir for ≥8 weeks pre-delivery and ≥24 weeks post-delivery. Pharmacokinetic evaluations for lopinavir and ritonavir occurred at 36 weeks gestation and 6 and 24 weeks postpartum. Results Ten women underwent intensive pharmacokinetic evaluations for lopinavir and ritonavir at 36 weeks gestation and at 6 and 24 weeks postpartum. Estimated geometric mean (GM) AUC 0–6h (95% CI) for lopinavir were not significantly different at 26.5 (17.0, 41.4) and 41.9 (26.1, 67.5) mcg*hr/mL at 36 weeks gestation and 6 weeks postpartum, respectively (within-subject GM ratio 0.60 (0.25, 1.43); p=0.19). At 36 weeks gestation, 5 of 10 women had viral load <50 copies/mL and at 6 weeks postpartum 5 of 9 had viral load <50 copies/mL. Nine of ten infants for whom data were available were HIV negative. Conclusion Despite below target lopinavir levels (< 52 mcg*hr/mL except at 2 postpartum measurements), women maintained virologic control postpartum. Higher doses of lopinavir/ritonavir during pregnancy may not be necessary in all women. PMID:26878071

  12. Current status of quality in Japanese clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuyuki; Kodama, Yasuo; Ono, Shunsuke; Mutoh, Mizue; Kawashima, Susumu; Fujimura, Akio

    2005-08-01

    The changes in the quality of Japanese clinical trials were evaluated by comparing the results of Good Clinical Practice (GCP) audits conducted from April 1997 to March 2000 (fiscal year (FY) 1997-1999) with those from April 2001 to March 2002 (FY2001). During both of the periods inspections were undertaken by the Organization for Pharmaceutical Safety and Research (OPSR). The audit findings in the former period were based on the audits that covered 331 hospitals and 775 trials conducted under the old GCP guideline. The audits in the latter period targeted 147 hospitals and 238 trials conducted under the old or new GCP guideline. The total number of deficiencies detected by GCP audits in the former three-year period (FY 1997-1999) was 1529, and the corresponding number in the latter single year (FY 2001) was 912. Two remarkable changes in OPSR's findings were observed between FY 1997-1999 and FY 2001 as follows; the proportion of protocol deviations increased from 14.7% (225/1529) to 53.1% (484/912), while the proportion of errors in case report forms (CRFs) decreased from 43.6% (666/1529) to 15.4% (140/912). The new GCP guideline sets very high standards for a hospital's qualification: to have sufficient equipment and hospital resources, to have capacity for promptly responding to urgent trial-related problems, to have an IRB, and to have appropriate staff including clinical research coordinators (CRCs) assigned to the clinical trial. Our results suggest that the impact of the regulatory changes of applicable standard is large for a hospital's qualification for conducting clinical trials in Japan. PMID:16054582

  13. The Clinical Status of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianyun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jing; Li, Yaqi; Tan, Zirui; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising option for treatment of ICM. Several stem cell types including cardiac-derived stem cells (CSCs), bone marrow-derived stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), and CD34+ and CD 133+ stem cells have been applied in clinical researches. The clinical effect produced by stem cell administration in ICM mainly depends on the transdifferentiation and paracrine effect. One important issue is that low survival and residential rate of transferred stem cells in the infracted myocardium blocks the effective advances in cardiac improvement. Many other factors associated with the efficacy of cell replacement therapy for ICM mainly including the route of delivery, the type and number of stem cell infusion, the timing of injection, patient's physical condition, the particular microenvironment onto which the cells are delivered, and clinical condition remain to be addressed. Here we provide an overview of the pros and cons of these transferred cells and discuss the current state of their therapeutic potential. We believe that stem cell translation will be an ideal option for patients following ischemic heart disease in the future. PMID:26101528

  14. Self-Esteem, Oral Health Behaviours, and Clinical Oral Health Status in Chinese Adults: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Luzy Siu-Hei; Chan, Joanne Chung-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This is an exploratory study to examine the relations among self-esteem, oral health behaviours and clinical oral health status in Chinese adults. In addition, gender differences in clinical oral health status and oral health behaviours were explored. Methods: Participants were 192 patients from a private dental clinic in Hong Kong…

  15. Pathologic and virologic study of fatal Lassa fever in man.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D. H.; McCormick, J. B.; Johnson, K. M.; Webb, P. A.; Komba-Kono, G.; Elliott, L. H.; Gardner, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Postmortem examination of 21 virologically documented cases of Lassa fever, including 6 complete autopsies, was performed as part of a field study of community-acquired Lassa fever in Sierra Leone. The most consistently observed lesions were hepatocellular, adrenal, and splenic necrosis and adrenal cytoplasmic inclusions. Neither these lesions, nor other milder and less constantly observed lesions such as myocarditis, renal tubular injury, and interstitial pneumonia, appeared severe enough to explain the cause of death in Lassa fever. The central nervous system (CNS) contained no specific lesions. Viral titrations demonstrated high viral content in liver, lung, spleen, kidney, heart, placenta, and mammary gland. Clinical laboratory data included elevation of hepatic enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Because of the paucity of pathologic lesions in spite of widely disseminated viral infection, further investigation of humoral inflammatory mechanisms is indicated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7081389

  16. The legal status of clinical practice parameters: an annotated bibliography.

    PubMed

    Kapp, M B

    1993-01-01

    An important recent development in American medicine has been the strong push in the last few years toward the formal creation, dissemination, and enforcement of explicit clinical practice guidelines or parameters relating to the quality and efficacy of various medical interventions, parameters that would guide the decisions and actions of physicians and other health care providers (1-3). Medical societies (4), governmental agencies such as the federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, and insurers are utilizing a variety of approaches to the development of practice parameters for medical diagnosis and intervention, including informal consensus development, formal consensus development, evidence-based guideline development, and explicit guideline development (5). The number and variety of practice parameters has burgeoned in response to the wide national variations in medical practice patterns, without corresponding differences in clinical outcomes, that have been documented by health services researchers. Several commentators have expressed serious skepticism about the probable impact of practice parameters, surmising that they will be used extensively in a negative manner in medical malpractice litigation (6, 7). Many physicians in particular have asked "how they [practice parameters] can be implemented without courting the ruin of the individual practitioner" (8). In response to these anxieties, a new medicolegal literature has arisen to address the relationship between the development of clinical practice parameters and the physician's exposure to malpractice litigation and adverse judgments, as well as the implications for malpractice insurance premiums. This growing literature has now achieved a critical mass. The major contributions to this corpus at present are listed and annotated below. PMID:8334377

  17. Radionuclide liver cancer therapies: from concept to current clinical status.

    PubMed

    Vente, Maarten A D; Hobbelink, Monique G G; van Het Schip, Alfred D; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; Nijsen, Johannes F W

    2007-07-01

    Primary and secondary liver cancer have longtime been characterized by an overall poor prognosis since the majority of patients are not candidates for surgical resection with curative intent, systemic chemotherapy alone has rarely resulted in long-term survival, and the role of conventional external beam radiation therapy has traditionally been limited due to the relative sensitivity of the liver parenchyma to radiation. Therefore, a host of new treatment options have been developed and clinically introduced, including radioembolization techniques, which are the main topic of this paper. In these locoregional treatments liver malignancies are passively targeted because, unlike the normal liver, the blood supply of intrahepatic tumors is almost uniquely derived from the hepatic artery. These internal radiation techniques consist of injecting either yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres, or iodine-131 ((131)I) or rhenium-188 ((188)Re) labeled lipiodol into the hepatic artery. Radioactive lipiodol is used exclusively for treatment of primary liver cancer, whereas (90)Y microsphere therapy is applied for treatment of both primary and metastatic liver cancers. Favorable clinical results have been achieved, particularly when (90)Y microspheres were used in conjunction with systemic chemotherapy. The main advantages of radiolabeled lipiodol treatment are that it is relatively inexpensive (especially (188)Re-HDD-lipiodol) and that the administration procedure is somewhat less complex than that of the microspheres. Holmium-166 ((166)Ho) loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres have also been developed and are about to be clinically introduced. Since (166)Ho is a combined beta-gamma emitter and highly paramagnetic as well, it allows for both (quantitative) scintigraphic and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:17630919

  18. Current Status of Xenotransplantation and Prospects for Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Richard N.; Dorling, Anthony; Ayares, David; Rees, Michael A.; Seebach, Jörg D.; Fishman, Jay A.; Hering, Bernhard J.; Cooper, David K.C.

    2010-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is one promising approach to bridge the gap between available human cells, tissues, and organs and the needs of patients with diabetes or end-stage organ failure. Based on recent progress using genetically-modified source pigs, improving results with conventional and experimental immunosuppression, and expanded understanding of residual physiologic hurdles, xenotransplantation appears likely to be evaluated in clinical trials in the near future for some select applications. This review offers a comprehensive overview of known mechanisms of xenograft injury, a contemporary assessment of preclinical progress and residual barriers, and our opinions regarding where breakthroughs are likely to occur. PMID:19796067

  19. Clinical implications of altered thyroid status in male testicular function.

    PubMed

    Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Wagner, Márcia Santos; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2009-11-01

    Thyroid hormones are involved in the development and maintenance of virtually all tissues. Although for many years the testis was thought to be a thyroid-hormone unresponsive organ, studies of the last decades have demonstrated that thyroid dysfunction is associated not only with abnormalities in morphology and function of testes, but also with decreased fertility and alterations of sexual activity in men. Nowadays, the participation of triiodothyronine (T3) in the control of Sertoli and Leydig cell proliferation, testicular maturation, and steroidogenesis is widely accepted, as well as the presence of thyroid hormone transporters and receptors in testicular cells throughout the development process and in adulthood. But even with data suggesting that T3 may act directly on these cells to bring about its effects, there is still controversy regarding the impact of thyroid diseases on human spermatogenesis and fertility, which can be in part due to the lack of well-controlled clinical studies. The current review aims at presenting an updated picture of recent clinical data about the role of thyroid hormones in male gonadal function. PMID:20126850

  20. Clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging - current status

    SciTech Connect

    Cammoun, D.; Hendee, W.R.; Davis, K.A.

    1985-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has far-reaching real and possible clinical applications. Its usefulness has been best explored and realized in the central nervous system, especially the posterior fossa and brain stem, where most abnormalities are better identified than with computed tomography. Its lack of ionizing radiation and extreme sensitivity to normal and abnormal patterns of myelination make magnetic resonance imaging advantageous for diagnosing many neonatal and pediatric abnormalities. New, reliable cardiac gating techniques open the way for promising studies of cardiac anatomy and function. The ability to image directly in three orthogonal planes gives us new insight into staging and follow-up of pelvic tumors and other pelvic abnormalities. Exquisite soft tissue contrast, far above that attainable by other imaging modalities, has made possible the early diagnosis of traumatic ligamentous knee injury, avascular necrosis of the hip and diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of musculoskeletal neoplasms. 59 references, 9 figures.

  1. The current status and trend of clinical pharmacology in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several international forums for promoting clinical pharmacology in developing countries have been held since 1980, and several clinical pharmacology programmes targeting developing countries were instituted such that the status of clinical pharmacology in developing countries is not where it was 50 years ago. Therefore, a survey and an appraisal of the literature on the current status of clinical pharmacology in developing countries were undertaken with a hope that it would enable development of appropriate strategies for further promotion of clinical pharmacology in these countries. Methods First, nine determinants (or enabling factors) for running a successful clinical pharmacology programme were identified, i.e., disease burden, drug situation, economic growth, clinical pharmacology activities, recognition, human capital, government support, international collaboration, and support for traditional/alternative medicines. These factors were then evaluated with regard to their current status in the developing countries that responded to an electronic questionnaire, and their historical perspective, using the literature appraisal. From these, a projected trend was constructed with recommendations on the way forward. Results Clinical pharmacology services, research and teaching in developing countries have improved over the past 50 years with over 90% of countries having the appropriate policies for regulation and rational use of medicines in place. Unfortunately, policy implementation remains a challenge, owing to a worsening disease burden and drug situation, versus fewer clinical pharmacologists and other competing priorities for the national budgets. This has led to a preference for training ‘a physician clinical pharmacologist’ in programmes emphasizing local relevancy and for a shorter time, and the training of other professionals in therapeutics for endemic diseases (task shifting), as the most promising strategies of ensuring rational use of

  2. Present status of clinical deployment of glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2015-03-01

    Glucokinase is one of four members of the hexokinase family of enzymes. Its expression is limited to the major organs (such as the pancreas, liver, brain and the gastrointestinal tract) that are thought to have an integrated role in glucose sensing. In the liver, phosphorylation of glucose by glucokinase promotes glycogen synthesis, whereas in the β-cells, it results in insulin release. Studies of glucokinase-linked genetically-modified mice and mutations in humans have illustrated the important roles played by glucokinase in whole-body glucose homeostasis, and suggest that the use of pharmacological agents that augment glucokinase activity could represent a viable treatment strategy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Since 2003, many glucokinase activators (GKAs) have been developed, and their ability to lower the blood glucose has been shown in several animal models of type 2 diabetes. Also, we and others have shown in mouse models that GKAs also have the effect of stimulating the proliferation of β-cells. However, the results of recent phase II trials have shown that GKAs lose their efficacy within several months of use, and that their use is associated with a high incidence of hypoglycemia; furthermore, patients treated with GKAs frequently developed dyslipidemia. A better understanding of the role of glucokinase in metabolic effects is required to resolve several issues identified in clinical trials. PMID:25802718

  3. Clinical Applications of Magnetic Resonance Imaging—Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Cammoun, Driss; Davis, Kathleen A.; Hendee, William R.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has far-reaching real and possible clinical applications. Its usefulness has been best explored and realized in the central nervous system, especially the posterior fossa and brain stem, where most abnormalities are better identified than with computed tomography. Its lack of ionizing radiation and extreme sensitivity to normal and abnormal patterns of myelination make magnetic resonance imaging advantageous for diagnosing many neonatal and pediatric abnormalities. New, reliable cardiac gating techniques open the way for promising studies of cardiac anatomy and function. The ability to image directly in three orthogonal planes gives us new insight into staging and follow-up of pelvic tumors and other pelvic abnormalities. Exquisite soft tissue contrast, far above that attainable by other imaging modalities, has made possible the early diagnosis of traumatic ligamentous knee injury, avascular necrosis of the hip and diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of musculoskeletal neoplasms. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:3911592

  4. Clinical and hormonal status of infants with nonmosaic XXY karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Lahlou, Najiba; Fennoy, Ilene; Ross, Judith L; Bouvattier, Claire; Roger, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare our recent findings in a cohort of 77 nonmosaic XXY infants <2 years of age with clinical and biological features already reported. Results The majority of reported XXY neonates had normal external genitalia. Only undescended testes and/or micropenis were identified reasons for referral. Delayed ambulation and speech skills were also indications for postnatally karyotyping. All subjects from our cohort (73 prenatally detected subjects, five postnatal diagnoses) had height and weight within the normal range, and were not dysmorphic. Insulin-like-peptide-3 and testosterone secretion by Leydig cells appeared normally sensitive to luteinizing hormone. In reported studies, inhibin B levels were within normal range, anti-Mullerian hormone levels were normal or high and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were significantly higher than control values, data consistent with a relative resistance to FSH. Conclusion Early detection of Klinefelter syndrome is desirable for prospectively monitoring the apparition of developmental problems and the progressive decline in the tubular function of the testis, with the hope of designing future conservative interventions before germ cell degeneration is completed. PMID:21429009

  5. Synthetic Virology: Engineering Viruses for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Caitlin M.; Kuypers, Brianna E.; Lam, Michael T.; Robinson, Tawana M.; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or “bionic” viruses, feature engineered components, or “parts”, that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies – rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational – have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavours will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine. PMID:25195922

  6. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-01-01

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology. PMID:16805914

  7. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-01-01

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology. PMID:16805914

  8. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  9. Magnitude of Virologic Blips Is Associated With a Higher Risk for Virologic Rebound in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Recurrent Events Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grennan, J. Troy; Loutfy, Mona R.; Su, DeSheng; Harrigan, P. Richard; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rourke, Sean; Tsoukas, Christos; Hogg, Bob

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Taiwo and Bosch, on pages 1189–91.) Background. The importance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) blip magnitude on virologic rebound has been raised in clinical guidelines relating to viral load assays. Methods. Antiretroviral-naive individuals initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after 1 January 2000 and achieving virologic suppression were studied. Negative binomial models were used to identify blip correlates. Recurrent event models were used to determine the association between blips and rebound by incorporating multiple periods of virologic suppression per individual. Results. 3550 participants (82% male; median age, 40 years) were included. In a multivariable negative binomial regression model, the Amplicor assay was associated with a lower blip rate than branched DNA (rate ratio, 0.69; P < .01), controlling for age, sex, region, baseline HIV-1 RNA and CD4 count, AIDS-defining illnesses, year of cART initiation, cART type, and HIV-1 RNA testing frequency. In a multivariable recurrent event model controlling for age, sex, intravenous drug use, cART start year, cART type, assay type, and HIV-1 RNA testing frequency, blips of 500–999 copies/mL were associated with virologic rebound (hazard ratio, 2.70; P = .002), whereas blips of 50–499 were not. Conclusions. HIV-1 RNA assay was an important determinant of blip rates and should be considered in clinical guidelines. Blips ≥500 copies/mL were associated with increased rebound risk. PMID:22438396

  10. Quality of Adolescent Mother-Infant Interactions and Clinical Determinations of Risk Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy-Herb, Holly E.; Honig, Alice Sterling

    1999-01-01

    Observed 37 pairs of low-income adolescent mothers and infants over a 6-month period to determine efficacy of clinical determinations of risk. Found that maternal-risk status was significantly associated with more sensitive parenting behaviors including responsiveness to infant cues and to infant distress, and social, emotional, and cognitive…

  11. Levels of uninvolved immunoglobulins predict clinical status and progression-free survival for multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Harutyunyan, Nika M; Vardanyan, Suzie; Ghermezi, Michael; Gottlieb, Jillian; Berenson, Ariana; Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia; Berenson, James R

    2016-07-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the enhanced production of the same monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-Ig or M protein). Techniques such as serum protein electrophoresis and nephelometry are routinely used to quantify levels of this protein in the serum of MM patients. However, these methods are not without their shortcomings and problems accurately quantifying M proteins remain. Precise quantification of the types and levels of M-Ig present is critical to monitoring patient response to therapy. In this study, we investigated the ability of the HevyLite (HLC) immunoassay to correlate with clinical status based on levels of involved and uninvolved antibodies. In our cohort of MM patients, we observed that significantly higher ratios and greater differences of involved HLC levels compared to uninvolved HLC levels correlated with a worse clinical status. Similarly, higher absolute levels of involved HLC antibodies and lower levels of uninvolved HLC antibodies also correlated with a worse clinical status and a shorter progression-free survival. These findings suggest that the HLC assay is a useful and a promising tool for determining the clinical status and survival time for patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:27017948

  12. “Risk factors associated with virologic failure in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at a public hospital in Peru”

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Alave R; Jorge, Paz B; Elsa, Gonzalez L; Miguel, Campos S; Rodriguez, Martin; Willig, James; Juan, Echevarría Z

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe clinical and biological characteristics of subjects with virologic failure who participated in the sexually transmitted diseases HIV/AIDS National Program from a Peruvian public hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS An exploratory descriptive study was performed with data from subjects older than 18 who started high activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) between May 2004 and December 2009 and who had a viral load control after 24 weeks of HAART. Virologic failure was defined as a viral load value above 1000 copies/mL on follow up after 24 weeks on HAART. RESULTS Of 1 478 records of patients on HAART analized, the median age was 35 years [IQR, 29-41] and 69.6% were male. Also, virologic failure occurred in 24% and 3.7% died. Of subjects with virologic failure, 9.5% died. On multivariate analysis, age, history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, change of antiretroviral therapy due to toxicity, opportunistic infections during HAART, level of CD4 + lymphocytes below 100 cells/ml at start of HAART, adherence and clinical stage were independently associated with virologic failure. In the group of patient with no history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, age, opportunistic infections during HAART were associated with virologic failure. CONCLUSION This study identified factors associated with virologic failure. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the use of these factors can help to identify prospectively patients at high risk of failure, and to design interventions aimed to reduce this risk. PMID:23450408

  13. The role, responsibilities and status of the clinical medical physicist in AFOMP.

    PubMed

    Ng, K H; Cheung, K Y; Hu, Y M; Inamura, K; Kim, H J; Krisanachinda, A; Leung, J; Pradhan, A S; Round, H; van Doomo, T; Wong, T J; Yi, B Y

    2009-12-01

    This document is the first of a series of policy statements being issued by the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (AFOMP). The document was developed by the AFOMP Professional Development Committee (PDC) and was endorsed for official release by AFOMP Council in 2006. The main purpose of the document was to give guidance to AFOMP member organizations on the role and responsibilities of clinical medical physicists. A definition of clinical medical physicist has also been provided. This document discusses the following topics: professional aspects of education and training; responsibilities of the clinical medical physicist; status and organization of the clinical medical physics service and the need for clinical medical physics service. PMID:20169835

  14. Epidemiology of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever in Malaysia. III. A comparative study of clinical features seen in virologically confirmed cases for periods between 1963-1987--a review.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, K C; Senan, P

    1992-01-01

    Dengue fever, Dengue hemorrhagic fever and Dengue shock syndrome within the dengue complex is a sinister disease of great public health importance and continues to ravage children, young adults and the aged in Malaysia. The history of the disease is traced for over the years and the changing pattern of clinical presentation are noted. Various hospital based studies have been compared and the pathognomonic features of the disease in Malaysia are highlighted. PMID:1303471

  15. T cell virological synapses and HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is the cause of a modern global pandemic associated with progressive acquired immune deficiency. The infection is characterized by the loss of the primary target of viral infection, the CD4+ T cell. The measurement of plasma viremia in patients can predict the rate of CD4+ cell decline; however, it is not clear whether this cell-free plasma virus represents the engine that drives viral spread. Active viral replication is mainly observed within lymphoid tissues that are hotbeds of cell-cell interactions that initiate and organize immune responses. It is well established that cell-cell interactions enhance viral spread in vitro. Dendritic cell-T cell interactions, which lie at the heart of adaptive immune responses, enhance viral infection in vitro. Interactions between infected and uninfected CD4+ T cells are a dominant route of viral spread in vitro and are likely to play a central role in viral dissemination in vivo. Future studies will test existing paradigms of HIV-1 dissemination to determine whether virus-transmitting contacts between infected and uninfected T cells called virological synapses are the dominant mode of viral spread in vivo. Here, we review the status of our understanding of this mode of infection with a focus on T cell-T cell interactions and examine how it may explain resistance to neutralizing antibodies and or the generation of genetic diversity of HIV. PMID:22477441

  16. Clinical Informatics Board Certification: History, Current Status, and Predicted Impact on the Clinical Informatics Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E.; Munger, Benson S.; Lehmann, Christoph U.

    2010-01-01

    Within health and health care, medical informatics and its subspecialties of biomedical, clinical, and public health informatics have emerged as a new discipline with increasing demands for its own work force. Knowledge and skills in medical informatics are widely acknowledged as crucial to future success in patient care, research relating to biomedicine, clinical care, and public health, as well as health policy design. The maturity of the domain and the demand on expertise necessitate standardized training and certification of professionals. The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) embarked on a major effort to create professional level education and certification for physicians of various professions and specialties in informatics. This article focuses on the AMIA effort in the professional structure of medical specialization, e.g., the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) and the related Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). This report summarizes the current progress to create a recognized sub-certificate of competence in Clinical Informatics and discusses likely near term (three to five year) implications on training, certification, and work force with an emphasis on clinical applied informatics. PMID:23616825

  17. Immunization Status of Young People Attending a Youth Clinic in Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Meynard, Anne; Genequand, Lydia Markham; Jeannot, Emilien; Wyler-Lazarevic, Claire-Anne; Cerutti, Bernard; Narring, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent vaccination coverage is very variable in European countries and data are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess immunization status and analyze potential variations according to sociodemographic variables in a youth clinic in Geneva, Switzerland. Immunization status was assessed retrospectively: Tetanus (number of doses or in absence of data tetanus antibodies) and measles as indicators of childhood coverage as well as hepatitis B and human papillomavirus. All new patients (N = 390) of Geneva University Hospital's youth clinic were included between January 2010 and June 2011. Vaccine coverage was low for all vaccines regardless of sex or origin. 89% of young people tested (mostly recent immigrants with no available data) had tetanus antibodies indicating adequate childhood immunization but hepatitis B and HPV coverage was low especially in recent immigrants. Systematic assessment allows better adolescent vaccine coverage and can improve safety by avoiding unnecessary dosis. PMID:25774037

  18. The clinical impact of HPV tumor status upon head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Eleni; Li, Ryan; Eisele, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human papillomavirus (HPV) is etiologically responsible for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs). HPV-positive HNSCCs (HPV-HNSCCs) most commonly arise from the oropharynx and are responsible for the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal SCC (OSCC) in the United States (US) and abroad. HPV-positive OSCC (HPV-OSCC) has a unique demographic and risk factor profile and tumor biology. HPV-OSCC patients tend to be white, younger, and have a higher cumulative exposure to sexual behaviors as compared with HPV-negative OSCC patients. HPV-positive tumor status also significantly improves survival, and is indeed the single strongest prognostic factor for OSCC. The mechanisms that underlie the improved prognosis conferred by HPV-positive disease are unknown. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical impact of HPV status in HNSCC, particularly in OSCC, both in terms of the unique clinic-demographic profile and prognostic implications. PMID:24134947

  19. The status of hypnosis as an empirically validated clinical intervention: a preamble to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Nash, M R

    2000-04-01

    In his introductory remarks to this Journal's special issue on the status of hypnosis as an empirically supported clinical intervention, the editor briefly describes the dawn of clinical hypnosis research, the logic of the natural science model, the importance of an inspired but tough-minded clinical science, and the auspicious confluence of practice and research purpose in this enterprise. The progenitor of this effort was indeed the Report of the Royal Commission coauthored by Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier, among others, more than 215 years ago--a report noted as one of the most important documents in the history of human reason. The ethos and logic of this special issue is grounded on the legacy of that document. Eschewing the conflicting mental health agendas of managed-care, government, patient rights, and professional guild interests, this special issue seeks to present a frank, evenhanded, informed, and dispassionate assessment of what science knows and does not know about clinical hypnosis. PMID:10769979

  20. The relationship between clinical periodontal status and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Results after 5 years.

    PubMed

    Firatli, E

    1997-02-01

    The clinical periodontal status of 44 insulin-dependent diabetic children and adolescents and 20 healthy control subjects was compared for a period of approximately 5 years. Fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1) values were determined at baseline and 5 years later. The differences in the clinical and laboratory parameters were compared during the study period. The differences between the two groups were also evaluated. The only statistically significant difference observed in the diabetic group was clinical attachment loss (CAL). The CAL was statistically significantly higher in the diabetic group compared to the controls, and a statistically significantly higher in the diabetic group compared to the controls, and a statistically significant positive correlation was observed between the duration of diabetes and CAL. Fructosamine was also correlated with the gingival index in the diabetic group while there was no correlation in the controls. It may be concluded that diabetes modifies the clinical status of the periodontal tissues and increases clinical attachment loss. PMID:9058330

  1. Current views and advances on Paediatric Virology: An update for paediatric trainees

    PubMed Central

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; GREENOUGH, ANNE; THEODORIDOU, MARIA; KRAMVIS, ANNA; CHRISTAKI, ILIANA; KOUTSAFTIKI, CHRYSSIE; KOUTSAKI, MARIA; PORTALIOU, DIMITRA M.; KOSTAGIANNI, GEORGIA; PANAGOPOULOU, PARASKEVI; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines Paediatrics with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new paediatric intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in Paediatric Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop. PMID:26889211

  2. Socioeconomic Status of Counties Where Dialysis Clinics Are Located Is an Important Factor in Comparing Dialysis Providers.

    PubMed

    Almachraki, Fadi; Tuffli, Michael; Lee, Paul; Desmarais, Mark; Shih, Huai-Che; Nissenson, Allen R; Krishnan, Mahesh

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the hypothesis that the clinic site of service socioeconomic status (SES) represents an unmeasured confounder for clinical outcome comparisons between dialysis clinics and provider types, using data from the federal pay-for-performance program for end-stage renal disease. A total of 6506 dialysis facilities were categorized by clinic SES status (rurality and poverty status). Clinics were then grouped by provider type (chain size and tax status). Lastly, performance penalties were determined by each of these classifications. Findings were that 7.4% of dialysis clinics could be classified as being in rural locations, and 20.6% could be classified as being in high-poverty locations. Large dialysis organizations served more rural (65%) and high-poverty areas (metropolitan, 69%; micropolitan, 75%; rural, 75%) compared to other providers (medium, small, hospital/university). For-profit providers accounted for a majority of dialysis clinics in rural areas (78%) and high poverty areas (metropolitan, 84%; micropolitan, 85%; rural, 90%). This study found that dialysis clinic performance penalties did vary by SES, with poorer outcomes observed for clinic locations with lower SES. This finding, along with the nonrandom distribution of provider types by SES status, suggests that clinic and provider location SES may need to be considered when comparing providers. PMID:26090696

  3. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old) enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409). After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. PMID:26316387

  4. Methods for enhancing the efficiency of dental/oral health clinical trials: current status, future possibilities.

    PubMed

    Barnett, M L; Pihlstrom, B L

    2004-10-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for clinical trials to study oral, dental, and craniofacial diseases and conditions. This has resulted from such factors as the increasing pace of discoveries requiring translational research to develop them for clinical use, FDA requirements for product approval, a need for additional data to support evidence-based dental practice, and the expansion of the NIDCR's clinical research programs. The complexity, size, and duration of clinical trials often make them quite costly to conduct, and may impede the development of novel diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods that could have a significant impact on clinical practice and inform public health policy. Recent advances in such areas as genomics and proteomics, coupled with the development of new technologies, have expanded our knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of disease and, from this, have provided new insights into the design and conduct of clinical trials. The workshop, "Methods for Enhancing the Efficiency of Dental/Oral Health Clinical Trials: Current Status, Future Possibilities", held on May 6-7, 2004, considered a variety of ways in which these insights are being, or have the potential to be, applied to clinical trials so as to enhance their efficiency and, hence, their cost-effectiveness, without diminishing the quality of information produced. The focus of this workshop was to assess the state of the science and identify research needs for the use of biomarkers, surrogate endpoints, and new technologies in oral disease clinical trials. Examples of ways in which clinical trials of other diseases have benefited from the use of new methods and technologies and FDA considerations were also discussed. PMID:15381712

  5. Investigating the genetic background of bovine digital dermatitis using improved definitions of clinical status.

    PubMed

    Schöpke, K; Gomez, A; Dunbar, K A; Swalve, H H; Döpfer, D

    2015-11-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis (DD) is an increasing claw health problem in all cattle production systems worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of an improved scoring of the clinical status for DD via M-scores accounting for the dynamics of the disease; that is, the transitions from one stage to another. The newly defined traits were then subjected to a genetic analysis to determine the genetic background for susceptibility to DD. Data consisted of 6,444 clinical observations from 729 Holstein heifers in a commercial dairy herd, collected applying the M-score system. The M-score system is a classification scheme for stages of DD that allows a macroscopic scoring based on clinical inspections of the bovine foot, thus it describes the stages of lesion development. The M-scores were used to define new DD trait definitions with different complexities. Linear mixed models and logistic models were used to identify fixed environmental effects and to estimate variance components. In total, 68% of all observations showed no DD status, whereas 11% were scored as infectious for and affected by DD, and 21% of all observations exhibited an affected but noninfectious status. For all traits, the probability of occurrence and clinical status were associated with age at observation and period of observation. Risk of becoming infected increased with age, and month of observation significantly affected all traits. Identification of the optimal month concerning DD herd status was consistent for all trait definitions; the last month of the trial was identified. In contrast, months exhibiting the highest least squares means of transformed scores differed depending on trait definition. In this respect, traits that can distinguish between healthy, infectious, and noninfectious stages of DD can account for the infectious potential of the herd and can serve as an alert tool. Estimates of heritabilities of traits studied ranged between 0.19 (±0.11) and 0.52 (±0

  6. Virology, Immunology and Pathology of Human Rabies During Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo, Yolanda; Paez, Andres; Kuzmin, Ivan; Niezgoda, Michael; Orciari, Lillian A.; Yager, Pamela A.; Recuenco, Sergio; Franka, Richard; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Willoughby, Rodney E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rabies is an acute fatal encephalitis caused by all members of the Lyssavirus genus. The first human rabies survivor without benefit of prior vaccination was reported from Milwaukee in 2005. We report a second unvaccinated patient who showed early recovery from rabies and then died accidentally during convalescence, providing an unparalleled opportunity to examine the histopathology as well as immune and virological correlates of early recovery from human rabies. Methods Case report, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indirect and direct fluorescent antibody assays, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, phylogenetic reconstruction, isolation in tissue culture, pathology and immunohistochemistry. Results The 9 year old died 76 days after presenting with rabies of vampire bat phylogeny transmitted by cat bite. Antibody response in serum and cerebrospinal fluid was robust and associated with severe cerebral edema. No rabies virus was cultured at autopsy. Rabies virus antigen was atypical in size and distribution. Rabies virus genome was present in neocortex but absent in brainstem. Conclusions Clinical recovery was associated with detection of neutralizing antibody and clearance of infectious rabies virus in the central nervous system by 76 days but not clearance of detectable viral subcomponents such as nucleoprotein antigen or RNA in brain. PMID:25405805

  7. Variation in serum biomarkers with sex and female hormonal status: implications for clinical tests

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Jordan M.; Cooper, Jason D.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Few serum biomarker tests are implemented in clinical practice and recent reports raise concerns about poor reproducibility of biomarker studies. Here, we investigated the potential role of sex and female hormonal status in this widespread irreproducibility. We examined 171 serum proteins and small molecules measured in 1,676 participants from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Concentrations of 96 molecules varied with sex and 66 molecules varied between oral contraceptive pill users, postmenopausal females, and females in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (FDR-adjusted p-value <0.05). Simulations of biomarker studies yielded up to 40% false discoveries when patient and control groups were not matched for sex and up to 41% false discoveries when premenopausal females were not matched for oral contraceptive pill use. High accuracy (over 90%) classification tools were developed to label samples with sex and female hormonal status where this information was not collected. PMID:27240929

  8. Impact of immune status on the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Sung, Heungsup; Jung, Jiwon; Yu, Shi Nae; Lee, Ju Young; Kim, Sung-Han; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang-Oh; Chong, Yong Pil

    2016-08-01

    Nocardiosis occurs in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. We aimed to assess how its characteristics differ depending on patients' immune status. Of a total of 54 patients with culture-proven nocardiosis diagnosed over 13 years, 18 (33%) were immunocompetent. Half of immunocompetent patients had chronic lung disease and were not receiving systemic corticosteroid. There were no significant differences in clinical, radiographic, and microbiologic characteristics, and treatment outcomes according to immune status, except that pulmonary cavitation (47% vs. 8%) and coexisting infections (17% vs. 0%) were more frequent in immunocompromised hosts. Nocardia farcinica, the most commonly identified isolates at the species level (51%), was highly susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (100%) and highly resistant to ceftriaxone (94%). Nocardiosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of pneumonia, brain abscess, or soft tissue infection that does not respond to conventional antibiotic therapy such as ceftriaxone, regardless of whether the patient is immunocompromised or not. PMID:27241370

  9. Variation in serum biomarkers with sex and female hormonal status: implications for clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Jordan M; Cooper, Jason D; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Few serum biomarker tests are implemented in clinical practice and recent reports raise concerns about poor reproducibility of biomarker studies. Here, we investigated the potential role of sex and female hormonal status in this widespread irreproducibility. We examined 171 serum proteins and small molecules measured in 1,676 participants from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Concentrations of 96 molecules varied with sex and 66 molecules varied between oral contraceptive pill users, postmenopausal females, and females in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (FDR-adjusted p-value <0.05). Simulations of biomarker studies yielded up to 40% false discoveries when patient and control groups were not matched for sex and up to 41% false discoveries when premenopausal females were not matched for oral contraceptive pill use. High accuracy (over 90%) classification tools were developed to label samples with sex and female hormonal status where this information was not collected. PMID:27240929

  10. Leukogram Profile and Clinical Status in vivax and falciparum Malaria Patients from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Tobón-Castaño, Alberto; Mesa-Echeverry, Esteban; Miranda-Arboleda, Andrés Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hematological alterations are frequent in malaria patients; the relationship between alterations in white blood cell counts and clinical status in malaria is not well understood. In Colombia, with low endemicity and unstable transmission for malaria, with malaria vivax predominance, the hematologic profile in malaria patients is not well characterized. The aim of this study was to characterize the leukogram in malaria patients and to analyze its alterations in relation to the clinical status. Methods. 888 leukogram profiles of malaria patients from different Colombian regions were studied: 556 with P. falciparum infection (62.6%), 313 with P. vivax infection (35.2%), and 19 with mixed infection by these species (2.1%). Results. Leukocyte counts at diagnosis were within normal range in 79% of patients and 18% had leucopenia; the most frequent alteration was lymphopenia (54%) followed by monocytosis (11%); the differential granulocyte count in 298 patients revealed eosinophilia (15%) and high basophil counts (8%). Leukocytosis, eosinopenia, and neutrophilia were associated with clinical complications. The utility of changes in leukocyte counts as markers of severity should be explored in depth. A better understanding of these hematological parameters will allow their use in prompt diagnosis of malaria complications and monitoring treatment response. PMID:26664413

  11. Clinical characteristics as a function of referral status among substance users in residential treatment.

    PubMed

    Banducci, Anne N; Dahne, Jennifer; Magidson, Jessica F; Chen, Kevin; Daughters, Stacey B; Lejuez, C W

    2013-04-01

    In the United States, substance users who voluntarily (VO) elect to receive treatment and substance users who are court-mandated (CM) to receive treatment typically obtain care within the same facilities. Little is known about the clinical characteristics that differentiate these individuals. The current study provides rates of specific DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II psychiatric and substance use disorders, comorbidities, childhood trauma, motivation, and other clinical and demographic characteristics as a function of referral status, among individuals in residential substance use treatment (463 participants, M age=43.3; 69.7% male; 88.4% African American). Participants were interviewed and diagnosed using the Structure Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the Diagnostic Interview for Personality Disorders. Within our sample, VO individuals, as compared to CM individuals had significantly higher rates of psychiatric disorders (68.7% versus 55.2%, respectively), including mood disorders, major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and borderline personality disorder. Additionally, they were significantly more likely to have alcohol dependence (43.0% versus 20.8%) and cocaine dependence (66.5% versus 48.9%). Elevated rates of comorbidities and childhood abuse were also observed among VO individuals, while motivation did not differ as a function of referral status. Overall, VO individuals appeared to have more severe problems than their CM counterparts which may suggest that they require more intensive or different types of treatment. PMID:23380487

  12. Clinical significance of surgical margin status in patients subjected to radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Dobruch, Jakub; Nyk, Lukasz; Skrzypczyk, Michał; Chłosta, Piotr; Dzik, Tomasz; Borówka, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical value of positive surgical margins (PSM) in patients subjected to radical prostatectomy (RP). The data of men who were subjected to RP from the 1st of January, 2001 to the 30th of May, 2010 were analyzed. Specimens with PSM were again evaluated to confirm the presence of positive margins. PSM were found in 64 (25%) out of 255 analyzed patients. Out of all clinical features, only biopsy Gleason score and clinical stage of the disease were found to be predictive of PSM. Biochemical recurrence (BR) was found in 42 (16.5%) men, among them 17 (26.6%) had PSM and 25 (13.1%) had negative margins. The risk of BR in those with "focal" PSM (<3 mm) did not differ from the risk of BR observed in patients without PSM. In contrast, the likelihood of BR was significantly greater in cases of PSM in which maximum longitude exceeded 3 mm. Reevaluation of the PSM specimens revealed equivocal margins status in six cases. PSM are not inevitably associated with BR. The risk of failure is influenced by their length. Reevaluation of the prostate specimen may lead to surgical margins status modification. PMID:24578961

  13. A text mining approach to the prediction of disease status from clinical discharge summaries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Spasic, Irena; Keane, John A; Nenadic, Goran

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors present a system developed for the Challenge in Natural Language Processing for Clinical Data-the i2b2 obesity challenge, whose aim was to automatically identify the status of obesity and 15 related co-morbidities in patients using their clinical discharge summaries. The challenge consisted of two tasks, textual and intuitive. The textual task was to identify explicit references to the diseases, whereas the intuitive task focused on the prediction of the disease status when the evidence was not explicitly asserted. DESIGN The authors assembled a set of resources to lexically and semantically profile the diseases and their associated symptoms, treatments, etc. These features were explored in a hybrid text mining approach, which combined dictionary look-up, rule-based, and machine-learning methods. MEASUREMENTS The methods were applied on a set of 507 previously unseen discharge summaries, and the predictions were evaluated against a manually prepared gold standard. The overall ranking of the participating teams was primarily based on the macro-averaged F-measure. RESULTS The implemented method achieved the macro-averaged F-measure of 81% for the textual task (which was the highest achieved in the challenge) and 63% for the intuitive task (ranked 7(th) out of 28 teams-the highest was 66%). The micro-averaged F-measure showed an average accuracy of 97% for textual and 96% for intuitive annotations. CONCLUSIONS The performance achieved was in line with the agreement between human annotators, indicating the potential of text mining for accurate and efficient prediction of disease statuses from clinical discharge summaries. PMID:19390098

  14. Clinical presentation and visual status of retinitis pigmentosa patients: a multicenter study in southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onakpoya, Oluwatoyin Helen; Adeoti, Caroline Olufunlayo; Oluleye, Tunji Sunday; Ajayi, Iyiade Adeseye; Majengbasan, Timothy; Olorundare, Olayemi Kolawole

    2016-01-01

    Background To review the visual status and clinical presentation of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methodology Multicenter, retrospective, and analytical review was conducted of the visual status and clinical characteristics of patients with RP at first presentation from January 2007 to December 2011. Main outcome measure was the World Health Organization’s visual status classification in relation to sex and age at presentation. Data analysis by SPSS (version 15) and statistical significance was assumed at P<0.05. Results One hundred and ninety-two eyes of 96 patients with mean age of 39.08±18.5 years and mode of 25 years constituted the study population; 55 (57.3%) were males and 41 (42.7%) females. Loss of vision 67 (69.8%) and night blindness 56 (58.3%) were the leading symptoms. Twenty-one (21.9%) patients had a positive family history, with RP present in their siblings 15 (71.4%), grandparents 11 (52.3%), and parents 4 (19.4%). Forty (41.7%) were blind at presentation and 23 (24%) were visually impaired. Blindness in six (15%) patients was secondary to glaucoma. Retinal vascular narrowing and retinal pigmentary changes of varying severity were present in all patients. Thirty-five (36.5%) had maculopathy, 36 (37.5%) refractive error, 19 (20%) lenticular opacities, and eleven (11.5%) had glaucoma. RP was typical in 85 patients (88.5%). Older patients had higher rates of blindness at presentation (P=0.005); blindness and visual impairment rate at presentation were higher in males than females (P=0.029). Conclusion Clinical presentation with advanced diseases, higher blindness rate in older patients, sex-related difference in blindness/visual impairment rates, as well as high glaucoma blindness in RP patients requires urgent attention in southwestern Nigeria. PMID:27601870

  15. Clinical Relevance of Telomere Status and Telomerase Activity in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Pascua, Irene; De Juan, Carmen; Head, Jacqueline; Torres-García, Antonio-José; Iniesta, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The role of telomeres and telomerase in colorectal cancer (CRC) is well established as the major driving force in generating chromosomal instability. However, their potential as prognostic markers remains unclear. We investigated the outcome implications of telomeres and telomerase in this tumour type. We considered telomere length (TL), ratio of telomere length in cancer to non-cancer tissue (T/N ratio), telomerase activity and TERT levels; their relation with clinical variables and their role as prognostic markers. We analyzed 132 CRCs and paired non-cancer tissues. Kaplan-Meier curves for disease-free survival were calculated for TL, T/N ratio, telomerase activity and TERT levels. Overall, tumours had shorter telomeres than non-tumour tissues (P < 0.001) and more than 80% of CRCs displayed telomerase activity. Telomere lengths of non-tumour tissues and CRCs were positively correlated (P < 0.001). Considering telomere status and clinical variables, the lowest degree of telomere shortening was shown by tumours located in the rectum (P = 0.021). Regarding prognosis studies, patients with tumours showing a mean TL < 6.35 Kb experienced a significantly better clinical evolution (P < 0.001) and none of them with the highest degree of tumour telomere shortening relapsed during the follow-up period (P = 0.043). The mean TL in CRCs emerged as an independent prognostic factor in the Cox analysis (P = 0.017). Telomerase-positive activity was identified as a marker that confers a trend toward a poor prognosis. In CRC, our results support the use of telomere status as an independent prognostic factor. Telomere status may contribute to explaining the different molecular identities of this tumour type. PMID:26913901

  16. Present status of PACS at Kyoto University Hospital: image workstation for clinical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kotaro; Komori, Masaru; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Okajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Ishu; Takahashi, Takashi; Konishi, Junji; Abe, Mituyuki; Gotoh, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    1990-08-01

    The PAC system: KIDS (Kyoto University Hospital Image Database and Communication System) has been expanded to include several major digital imaging modalities such as X-ray CT, MRI, DSA and CR. The fiber optic high-speed local area network and the workstation with quick image handling are newly designed. The system (new KIDS) is intended to achieve a film-less environment in the department of radiology and to evaluate the feasibility of a hospital-wide PAC system. The present status of the system at the end of 1989 including a image workstation installed in a lecture hall for clinical education is described.

  17. Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Status and Possible Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most complex behavioral disorders with a strong genetic influence. The objectives of this article are to review the current status of genetic research in ASD, and to provide information regarding the potential candidate genes, mutations, and genetic loci possibly related to pathogenesis in ASD. Investigations on monogenic causes of ASD, candidate genes among common variants, rare de novo mutations, and copy number variations are reviewed. The current possible clinical applications of the genetic knowledge and their future possibilities are highlighted. PMID:26713075

  18. Influence of Patients’ Socioeconomic Status on Clinical Management Decisions: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernheim, Susannah M.; Ross, Joseph S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about how patients’ socioeconomic status (SES) influences physicians’ clinical management decisions, although this information may have important implications for understanding inequities in health care quality. We investigated physician perspectives on how patients’ SES influences care. METHODS The study consisted of in-depth semistructured interviews with primary care physicians in Connecticut. Investigators coded interviews line by line and refined the coding structure and interview guide based on successive interviews. Recurrent themes emerged through iterative analysis of codes and tagged quotations. RESULTS We interviewed 18 physicians from varied practice settings, 6 female, 9 from minority racial backgrounds, and 3 of Hispanic ethnicity. Four themes emerged from our interviews: (1) physicians held conflicting views about the effect of patient SES on clinical management, (2) physicians believed that changes in clinical management based on the patient’s SES were made in the patient’s interest, (3) physicians varied in the degree to which they thought changes in clinical management influenced patient outcomes, and (4) physicians faced personal and financial strains when caring for patients of low SES. CONCLUSIONS Physicians indicated that patient SES did affect their clinical management decisions. As a result, physicians commonly undertook changes to their management plan in an effort to enhance patient outcomes, but they experienced numerous strains when trying to balance what they believed was feasible for the patient with what they perceived as established standards of care. PMID:18195315

  19. Serum DNA Motifs Predict Disease and Clinical Status in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Julia; Urnovitz, Howard B.; Saresella, Marina; Caputo, Domenico; Clerici, Mario; Mitchell, William M.; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    Using recently available mass sequencing and assembly technologies, we have been able to identify and quantify unique cell-free DNA motifs in the blood of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The most common MS clinical syndrome, relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), is accompanied by a unique fingerprint of both inter- and intragenic cell-free circulating nucleic acids as specific DNA sequences that provide significant clinical sensitivity and specificity. Coding genes that are differentially represented in MS serum encode cytoskeletal proteins, brain-expressed regulators of growth, and receptors involved in nervous system signal transduction. Although coding genes distinguish RRMS and its clinical activity, several repeat sequences, such as the L1M family of LINE elements, are consistently different in all MS patients and clinical status versus the normal database. These data demonstrate that DNA motifs observed in serum are characteristic of RRMS and disease activity and are promising as a clinical tool in monitoring patient responses to treatment modalities. PMID:20228264

  20. [Virological and clinical features of patients with sporadic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Tang, Z; Wang, Y; Yu, Z; Yang, D; Hao, L

    1997-06-01

    In this study, the transmission route in 16 sporadic hepatitis C (SHC) patients was investigated. Three of them were surgeons who had often had occupational needlestick accidents, another 3 had close household contact with their spouses who had been diagnosed as chronic posttransfusion viral hepatitis C (PTHC), and the remaining 5 had potential parenteral exposure such as tooth extraction, injection or inoculation and so on. Five patients with SHC didn't have such history, their transmission route was not determined. Our result showed a lower viremia level in patients with SHC when compared to PTHC patients (the serum dilutions for HCV RNA detection was 10-100 times in the former and 100-10000 times in the latter. P<0.01). Only 1 patient with SHC was anti-HCV positive. Comparing to PTHC, the patients with SHC in our study had milder liver demage and lower ALT levels, and most of them (10/16) were symptomless. PMID:15619815

  1. Update on hepatitis E virology: Implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Debing, Yannick; Moradpour, Darius; Neyts, Johan; Gouttenoire, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a positive-strand RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. The 7.2kb genome encodes three open reading frames (ORF) which are translated into (i) the ORF1 polyprotein, representing the viral replicase, (ii) the ORF2 protein, corresponding to the viral capsid, and (iii) the ORF3 protein, a small protein involved in particle secretion. Although HEV is a non-enveloped virus in bile and feces, it circulates in the bloodstream wrapped in cellular membranes. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 infect only humans and cause mainly waterborne outbreaks. HEV genotypes 3 and 4 are widely represented in the animal kingdom and are transmitted as a zoonosis mainly via contaminated meat. HEV infection is usually self-limited but may persist and cause chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. Reduction of immunosuppressive treatment or antiviral therapy with ribavirin have proven effective in most patients with chronic hepatitis E but therapy failures have been reported. Alternative treatment options are needed, therefore. Infection with HEV may also cause a number of extrahepatic manifestations, especially neurologic complications. Progress in the understanding of the biology of HEV should contribute to improved control and treatment of HEV infection. PMID:26966047

  2. Clinical and Virological Outcome of European Patients Infected With HIV

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-29

    HIV; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis C; AIDS; Coinfection; Cardiovascular Diseases; Diabetes Mellitus; Acidosis, Lactic; Renal Insufficiency; Fractures, Bone; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic; Proteinuria

  3. A case of Lassa fever: clinical and virological findings.

    PubMed Central

    Emond, R T; Bannister, B; Lloyd, G; Southee, T J; Bowen, E T

    1982-01-01

    Five days after arriving in London from Jos a young Nigerian women developed a severe and prolonged illness that proved to be Lassa fever. Virus was not detected in urine during the first three weeks but then appeared and reached a peak during the sixth week, with continuing excretion for 67 days after the onset of illness. Laboratory investigations showed evidence of extensive tissue damage and disturbance of clotting, but there was no serious bleeding and she eventually made a complete recovery despite a high sustained viraemia and severe liver damage. Convalescent serum was used in treatment but it was difficult to assess its contribution to the favourable outcome. PMID:6812716

  4. The Theory and Fundamentals of Bioimpedance Analysis in Clinical Status Monitoring and Diagnosis of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sami F.; Mohktar, Mas S.; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Bioimpedance analysis is a noninvasive, low cost and a commonly used approach for body composition measurements and assessment of clinical condition. There are a variety of methods applied for interpretation of measured bioimpedance data and a wide range of utilizations of bioimpedance in body composition estimation and evaluation of clinical status. This paper reviews the main concepts of bioimpedance measurement techniques including the frequency based, the allocation based, bioimpedance vector analysis and the real time bioimpedance analysis systems. Commonly used prediction equations for body composition assessment and influence of anthropometric measurements, gender, ethnic groups, postures, measurements protocols and electrode artifacts in estimated values are also discussed. In addition, this paper also contributes to the deliberations of bioimpedance analysis assessment of abnormal loss in lean body mass and unbalanced shift in body fluids and to the summary of diagnostic usage in different kinds of conditions such as cardiac, pulmonary, renal, and neural and infection diseases. PMID:24949644

  5. Current Status of Immunomodulatory and Cellular Therapies in Preclinical and Clinical Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Preeti; Brayman, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation is a β-cell replacement strategy that represents a possible definitive intervention for patients with type 1 diabetes, offering substantial benefits in terms of lowering daily insulin requirements and reducing incidences of debilitating hypoglycemic episodes and unawareness. Despite impressive advances in this field, a limiting supply of islets, inadequate means for preventing islet rejection, and the deleterious diabetogenic and nephrotoxic side effects associated with chronic immunosuppressive therapy preclude its wide-spread applicability. Islet transplantation however allows a window of opportunity for attempting various therapeutic manipulations of islets prior to transplantation aimed at achieving superior transplant outcomes. In this paper, we will focus on the current status of various immunosuppressive and cellular therapies that promote graft function and survival in preclinical and clinical islet transplantation with special emphasis on the tolerance-inducing capacity of regulatory T cells as well as the β-cells regenerative capacity of stem cells. PMID:22046502

  6. The Clinical Status of Radiation Therapy in Korea in 2009 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jang, Won-Il; Kim, Hee Jin; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Seo, Young Seok; Paik, Eun Kyung; Cha, Yu Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to estimate the clinical status of radiation therapy (RT) in Korea. Materials and Methods We analyzed open claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). The subjects were patients with malignant neoplasms who had procedure codes concerning RT in 2009 and 2013. Results The total numbers of patients who underwent RT in 2009 and 2013 were 42,483 and 56,850, respectively. The numbers of men and women were 20,012 and 22,471 in 2009 and 26,936 and 29,914 in 2013, respectively. The five most frequent RT sites were metastatic, breast, gastrointestinal, thoracic, and gynecologic cancers in 2009, and metastatic, breast, gastrointestinal, thoracic and head and neck cancers in 2013. The three leading types of cancer among men were metastatic, gastrointestinal, and thoracic, and breast, metastatic, and gynecologic among women. According to age, the most common treatment site was the central nervous system for those aged 20 years or less, the breast for those in their 30s to 50s, and metastatic sites for those in their 60s or older. Conclusion Data from this study provide an overview of the clinical status of RT in Korea. PMID:26693912

  7. [Detection of the viral load and its use as a virological marker in the follow-up of HIV-1-positive patients].

    PubMed

    Hodara, V L; Monticelli, A; Benetucci, J; Lasala, M; Jauregui Rueda, H; Libonatti, O; García Messina, O; Reboredo, G; Bogdanowicz, E; Bases, O; Pampuro, S; Salomón, H

    1998-01-01

    The evaluation of viral load as virological marker and its clinical and immunological correlation are presented. The first viral load studies were performed during 1996 at the National Reference Center for AIDS in Argentina in HIV-1 positive patients derived from different Hospitals in Buenos Aires. The study included 216 HIV-1 positive patients, 49 females and 167 males. Plasma was used for evaluating viral load and a second sample was obtained in 25 of the 216 patients for their monitoring. Viral load was performed using bDNA technique (Quantiplex HIV RNA assay 2.0, Chiron Corporation, USA). Other parameters such as CD4 count determined by flow cytometry and clinical stages according to CDC classification were obtained in order to correlate clinical and immunological status of the patients. When CD4 count was compared with viral load, the results showed a trend of viral RNA increase in plasma along with a decrease in CD4+ lymphocytes. This trend was also observed to correlate with the progression to AIDS disease. In all groups of patients, considering either CD4 counts or clinical status, ranges of viral load values were broad. Thus, as shown by percentiles 25 and 75, patients with CD4 counts < 200/ml, presented viral load values between 18,395 c/ml to 215,425 c/ml and patients with > 200/ml viral RNA showed values from < 10,000 to 35,180 c/ml. Patients with CDC's A and B stages presented values from < 10,000 to 45,160 c/ml and 87,000 c/ml respectively, while patients classified as C had 10,582 to 215,000 c/ml. Results of two consecutive samples in the 25 patients showed the usefulness of this technique for monitoring antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless, despite the tendency of viral load to increase along with the progression of the disease, the broad range of values suggested the importance of using both virological and immunological parameters for the management of HIV infected patients. PMID:9629601

  8. Gender-specific risk factors for virologic failure in KwaZulu-Natal: Automobile ownership and financial insecurity

    PubMed Central

    HARE, Anna Q.; ORDÓÑEZ, Claudia E.; JOHNSON, Brent A.; RIO, Carlos DEL; KEARNS, Rachel A.; WU, Baohua; HAMPTON, Jane; WU, Peng; SUNPATH, Henry; MARCONI, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to examine which socioeconomic indicators are risk factors for virologic failure among HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A case-control study of virologic failure was conducted among patients recruited from the outpatient clinic at McCord Hospital in Durban, South Africa between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2012. Cases were those failing first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART), defined as viral load > 1000 copies/mL. Univariate logistic regression was performed on sociodemographic data for the outcome of virologic failure. Variables found significant (p<.05) were used in multivariate models and all models were stratified by gender. Of 158 cases and 300 controls, 35% were male and median age was 40 years. Gender stratification of models revealed automobile ownership was a risk factor among males, while variables of financial insecurity (unemployment, non-spouse family paying for care, staying with family) were risk factors for women. In this cohort, financial insecurity among women and automobile ownership among men were risk factors for virologic failure. Risk factor differences between genders demonstrate limitations of generalized risk factor analysis. PMID:25037488

  9. Thank you to Virology Journal's peer reviewers in 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Virology Journal would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 10 (2013). The success of any scientific journal depends on an effective and strict peer review process and Virology Journal could not operate without your contribution. We are grateful to the large number of reviewers (1026 to be exact!), who have done a great job in not only lifting the quality of the journal’s scientific peer reviewing process, but also helped us to achieve our goal of a median time to first decision of just 35 days. Our record time from submission to online, open access, publication in 2013 was 22 days for a Research Article [1] and 28 days for a Review [2]. This is a great achievement by any standard. We look forward to your continuous support of Virology Journal either as an invited reviewer or a contributing author in the years to come.

  10. A Serious Game for Clinical Assessment of Cognitive Status: Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Chignell, Mark; Tierney, Mary C.; Lee, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background We propose the use of serious games to screen for abnormal cognitive status in situations where it may be too costly or impractical to use standard cognitive assessments (eg, emergency departments). If validated, serious games in health care could enable broader availability of efficient and engaging cognitive screening. Objective The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of a game-based cognitive assessment delivered on tablet technology to a clinical sample and to conduct preliminary validation against standard mental status tools commonly used in elderly populations. Methods We carried out a feasibility study in a hospital emergency department to evaluate the use of a serious game by elderly adults (N=146; age: mean 80.59, SD 6.00, range 70-94 years). We correlated game performance against a number of standard assessments, including the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Results After a series of modifications, the game could be used by a wide range of elderly patients in the emergency department demonstrating its feasibility for use with these users. Of 146 patients, 141 (96.6%) consented to participate and played our serious game. Refusals to play the game were typically due to concerns of family members rather than unwillingness of the patient to play the game. Performance on the serious game correlated significantly with the MoCA (r=–.339, P <.001) and MMSE (r=–.558, P <.001), and correlated (point-biserial correlation) with the CAM (r=.565, P <.001) and with other cognitive assessments. Conclusions This research demonstrates the feasibility of using serious games in a clinical setting. Further research is required to demonstrate the validity and reliability of game-based assessments for clinical decision making. PMID:27234145

  11. Epidemiology, molecular virology and diagnostics of Schmallenberg virus, an emerging orthobunyavirus in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    After the unexpected emergence of Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) in northern Europe in 2006, another arbovirus, Schmallenberg virus (SBV), emerged in Europe in 2011 causing a new economically important disease in ruminants. The virus, belonging to the Orthobunyavirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, was first detected in Germany, in The Netherlands and in Belgium in 2011 and soon after in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Denmark and Switzerland. This review describes the current knowledge on the emergence, epidemiology, clinical signs, molecular virology and diagnosis of SBV infection. PMID:23675914

  12. Clinical research in the treatment of tuberculosis: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Chang, K-C; Yew, W-W; Sotgiu, G

    2015-12-01

    To supplement previous state-of-art reviews on anti-tuberculosis treatment and to pave the way forward with reference to the current status, we systematically reviewed published literature on clinical research on tuberculosis (TB) over the past decade in the treatment of drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), with a focus on drugs, dosing factors and regimens. Our review was restricted to Phase II/III clinical trials, cohort and case-control studies, and systematic reviews of clinical studies. TB programmatic and patient behavioural factors, non-TB drugs, adjunctive surgery, new vaccines, immunotherapy, antiretroviral therapy and management of latent tuberculous infection are outside the scope of this review. An algorithm was used to systematically search PubMed for relevant articles published in English from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2014. Articles without evaluated factors (drugs, dosing factors and regimens) or comparative analysis of specified anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes were excluded. Of the 399 articles initially identified, 294 were excluded. The main findings of the remaining 105 articles are described under two categories: presumed drug-susceptible TB and MDR-TB. Fifty-nine articles included under drug-susceptible TB were divided into 12 subcategories: isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, fluoroquinolones, fixed-dose combination drugs, dosing frequency, treatment phases, treatment duration, experimental regimens for pulmonary (surrogate markers vs. clinical outcomes) and extra-pulmonary TB. Forty-nine articles included under MDR-TB were divided into seven subcategories: fluoroquinolones, pyrazinamide, second-line injectable drugs, World Health Organization Group 4 and Group 5 drugs, MDR-TB regimens and novel drugs. Clinical research in the last decade and ongoing trials might furnish new paradigms for improving the treatment of this recalcitrant ancient disease. PMID:26614181

  13. Teaching medical students a clinical approach to altered mental status: simulation enhances traditional curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Jeremy D.; Clark, Sunday; Kang, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Simulation-based medical education (SBME) is increasingly being utilized for teaching clinical skills in undergraduate medical education. Studies have evaluated the impact of adding SBME to third- and fourth-year curriculum; however, very little research has assessed its efficacy for teaching clinical skills in pre-clerkship coursework. To measure the impact of a simulation exercise during a pre-clinical curriculum, a simulation session was added to a pre-clerkship course at our medical school where the clinical approach to altered mental status (AMS) is traditionally taught using a lecture and an interactive case-based session in a small group format. The objective was to measure simulation's impact on students’ knowledge acquisition, comfort, and perceived competence with regards to the AMS patient. Methods AMS simulation exercises were added to the lecture and small group case sessions in June 2010 and 2011. Simulation sessions consisted of two clinical cases using a high-fidelity full-body simulator followed by a faculty debriefing after each case. Student participation in a simulation session was voluntary. Students who did and did not participate in a simulation session completed a post-test to assess knowledge and a survey to understand comfort and perceived competence in their approach to AMS. Results A total of 154 students completed the post-test and survey and 65 (42%) attended a simulation session. Post-test scores were higher in students who attended a simulation session compared to those who did not (p<0.001). Students who participated in a simulation session were more comfortable in their overall approach to treating AMS patients (p=0.05). They were also more likely to state that they could articulate a differential diagnosis (p=0.03), know what initial diagnostic tests are needed (p=0.01), and understand what interventions are useful in the first few minutes (p=0.003). Students who participated in a simulation session were more likely

  14. Factors Associated With Smoking Status among HIV-Positive Patients in Routine Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Zyambo, Cosmas M; Willig, James H; Cropsey, Karen L; Carson, April P; Wilson, Craig; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Westfall, Andrew O; Burkholder, Greer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment-related reductions in morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have been attenuated by cigarette smoking, which increases risk of cardiovascular, respiratory, and neoplastic diseases. This study investigated factors associated with smoking status among HIV-positive patients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 2,464 HIV-positive patients attending the HIV Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham between April 2008 and December 2013. Smoking status (current, former, never), psychosocial factors, and clinical characteristics were assessed. Multinomial logistic regression was used to obtain unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of the various factors with smoking status. Results Among HIV-positive patients (mean age 45 years, 75% male, 55% African-American), the majority reported a history of smoking (39% current and 22% former smokers). In adjusted models, patient characteristics associated with increased odds of current smoking were male gender (OR for heterosexual men, 1.8 [95% CI: 1.3–2.6]; for men who have sex with men, 1.5 [1.1–1.9]), history of respiratory diseases (1.5 [1.2–1.9]), unsuppressed HIV viral load (>50 copies/mL) (1.5 [1.1–1.9]), depression (1.6 [1.3–2.0]), anxiety (1.6 [1.2–2.1]), and prior and current substance abuse (4.7 [3.6–6.1] and 8.3 [5.3–13.3] respectively). Male gender, anxiety, and substance abuse were also associated with being a former smoker. Conclusions Smoking was common among HIV-positive patients, with several psychosocial factors associated with current and former smoking. This suggests smoking cessation programs in HIV clinic settings may achieve greater impact by integrating interventions that also address illicit substance abuse and mental health. PMID:26767146

  15. A clinical evaluation of the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination in a general psychiatric inpatient population.

    PubMed Central

    Lamarre, C J; Patten, S B

    1994-01-01

    The Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination (NCSE) is a structured test of cognitive functioning. The NCSE assesses a broader range of cognitive functioning than the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), but remains brief enough to be administered at the bedside in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to assess the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and reliability of the NCSE as a clinical case-finding instrument for DSM-III-R defined organic mental disorders in psychiatric inpatients. Validity was assessed by comparing the results of the test (interpreted as "pass" or "fail") to a blind clinical assessment by an experienced psychiatrist. The NCSE was found to have superior sensitivity to the MMSE (83% versus 43%), but inferior specificity (47% versus 97%). The low specificity resulted in a positive predictive value of only 24%. The NCSE had good test-retest reliability (Kappa = .69), but the inter-rater reliability was not as good (Kappa = 0.57). The NCSE was too non-specific to be used as a case-finding instrument for organic mental disorders. In conclusion, although clinicians may find the NCSE to be a valuable instrument for the assessment of cognitive function, it cannot be used as a screening or case-finding instrument for organic disorders among psychiatric inpatients. PMID:8204561

  16. Clinical and taxonomic status of pathogenic nonpigmented or late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    The history, taxonomy, geographic distribution, clinical disease, and therapy of the pathogenic nonpigmented or late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are reviewed. Community-acquired disease and health care-associated disease are highlighted for each species. The latter grouping includes health care-associated outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks as well as sporadic disease cases. Treatment recommendations for each species and type of disease are also described. Special emphasis is on the Mycobacterium fortuitum group, including M. fortuitum, M. peregrinum, and the unnamed third biovariant complex with its recent taxonomic changes and newly recognized species (including M. septicum, M. mageritense, and proposed species M. houstonense and M. bonickei). The clinical and taxonomic status of M. chelonae, M. abscessus, and M. mucogenicum is also detailed, along with that of the closely related new species, M. immunogenum. Additionally, newly recognized species, M. wolinskyi and M. goodii, as well as M. smegmatis sensu stricto, are included in a discussion of the M. smegmatis group. Laboratory diagnosis of RGM using phenotypic methods such as biochemical testing and high-performance liquid chromatography and molecular methods of diagnosis are also discussed. The latter includes PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, hybridization, ribotyping, and sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the RGM are also annotated, along with the current recommendations from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) for mycobacterial susceptibility testing. PMID:12364376

  17. Current Clinical Status of Telehealth in Korea: Categories, Scientific Basis, and Obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Kim, Hyunah; Lee, Suehyun; Lee, Kye Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Through telehealth, medical services have expanded beyond spatial boundaries and are now available in living spaces outside of hospitals. It can also contribute to patient medical knowledge improvement because patients can access their hospital records and data from home. However, concepts of telehealth are rather vague in Korea. Methods We refer to several clinical reports to determine the current clinical status of and obstacles to telehealth in Korea. Results Patients' health conditions are now reported regularly to doctors remotely, and patients can receive varied assistance. Self-improvement based on minute details that are beyond medical staff's reach is another possible benefit that may be realized with the help of a variety of medical equipment (sensors). The feasibility, clinical effect, and cost-benefit of telehealth have been verified by scientific evidence. Conclusions Patients will be able to improve their treatment adherence by receiving help from various professionals, such as doctors, nurses, nutritionists, and sports therapists. This means that the actual treatment time per patient will increase as well. Ultimately, this will increase the quality of patients' self-administration of care to impede disease progression and prevent complications. PMID:26618030

  18. [ISO 15189 accreditation in clinical microbiology laboratory: general concepts and the status in our laboratory].

    PubMed

    Akyar, Işin

    2009-10-01

    One important trend in the laboratory profession and quality management is the global convergence of laboratory operations. The goal of an accredited medical laboratory is to continue "offering useful laboratory service for diagnosis and treatment of the patients and also aid to the health of the nation". An accredited clinical laboratory is managed by a quality control system, it is competent technically and the laboratory service meets the needs of all its patients and physicians by taking the responsibility of all the medical tests and therapies. For this purpose, ISO 15189 international standard has been prepared by 2003. ISO 15189 standard is originated from the arrangement of ISO 17025 and ISO 9001:2000 standards. Many countries such as England, Germany, France, Canada and Australia have preferred ISO 15189 as their own laboratory accreditation programme, meeting all the requirements of their medical laboratories. The accreditation performance of a clinical microbiology laboratory is mainly based on five essential points; preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, quality control programmes (internal, external, interlaboratory) and audits (internal, external). In this review article, general concepts on ISO 15189 accreditation standards for the clinical microbiology laboratories have been summarized and the status of a private laboratory (Acibadem LabMed, Istanbul) in Turkey has been discussed. PMID:20084925

  19. Clinical and Taxonomic Status of Pathogenic Nonpigmented or Late-Pigmenting Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The history, taxonomy, geographic distribution, clinical disease, and therapy of the pathogenic nonpigmented or late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are reviewed. Community-acquired disease and health care-associated disease are highlighted for each species. The latter grouping includes health care-associated outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks as well as sporadic disease cases. Treatment recommendations for each species and type of disease are also described. Special emphasis is on the Mycobacterium fortuitum group, including M. fortuitum, M. peregrinum, and the unnamed third biovariant complex with its recent taxonomic changes and newly recognized species (including M. septicum, M. mageritense, and proposed species M. houstonense and M. bonickei). The clinical and taxonomic status of M. chelonae, M. abscessus, and M. mucogenicum is also detailed, along with that of the closely related new species, M. immunogenum. Additionally, newly recognized species, M. wolinskyi and M. goodii, as well as M. smegmatis sensu stricto, are included in a discussion of the M. smegmatis group. Laboratory diagnosis of RGM using phenotypic methods such as biochemical testing and high-performance liquid chromatography and molecular methods of diagnosis are also discussed. The latter includes PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, hybridization, ribotyping, and sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the RGM are also annotated, along with the current recommendations from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) for mycobacterial susceptibility testing. PMID:12364376

  20. Clinical status of anti-cancer agents derived from marine sources.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram; Sharma, Mukul; Joshi, Penny; Rawat, Diwan S

    2008-08-01

    The chemical, biological and ecological diversity of the marine ecosystem has contributed immensely in the discovery of extremely potent compounds that have shown potent activities in antitumor, analgesia, antiinflammatory, immunomodulation, allergy, anti-viral etc. The compounds of marine origin are diverse in structural class from simple linear peptides to complex macrocyclic polyethers. The recent advances in the sophisticated instruments for the isolation and characterization of marine natural products and development of high-throughput screening, have substantially increased the rate of discovery of various compounds of biomedical application. Didemnin was the first marine peptide that entered in human clinical trials in US for the treatment of cancer and other compounds such as dolastatin-10, soblidotin, didemnin B, ecteinascidin 743, girolline, aplidine, cryptophycins (also arenastatin A), bryostatin 1, ILX 651, kahalalide F, E7389, discodermolide, ES-285 (spisulosine), HTI-286 (hemiasterlin derivative), squalamine, KRN-7000, vitilevuamide, Laulimalide, Curacin A, diazonamide, peloruside A, eleutherobin, sarcodictyin, thiocoraline, salicylihalimides A, ascididemnin, CGX-1160, CGX-1007dictyodendrins, GTS-21 (aka DMBX), manoalide, IPL-576,092 (aka HMR-4011A) have entered in the clinical trials. This article summarize clinical status and synthetic advances of some of these compounds. PMID:18690825

  1. Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photosensitization: current clinical status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Stuart L.; Golub, Allyn L.; Shulman, D. Geoffrey

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photosensitization (ALA PDT) via endogenous protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) synthesis has been reported as efficacious, using topical formulations, in the treatment of a variety of dermatologic diseases including superficial basal cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and actinic (solar) keratoses. Application of ALA PDT to the detection and treatment of both malignant and non-malignant diseases of internal organs has recently been reported. Local internal application of ALA has been used for the detection, via PpIX fluorescence, of pathological conditions of the human urinary bladder and for selective endometrial ablation in animal model systems. Systemic, oral administration of ALA has been used for ALA PDT of superficial head and neck cancer and of colorectal cancer. This paper reviews the current clinical status of ALA PDT.

  2. Current Status and Clinical Studies of Oriental Herbs in Sexual Medicine in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yu Seob; Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Li Tao

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common diseases among aging men. Although previous studies have shown that type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE5-Is) are very effective for the treatment of ED, many researchers are currently attempting to identify therapeutic agents from natural sources with comparable or better effects than PDE5-Is. Herbal medicine is thought to be advantageous because it is natural; moreover, it not only treats isolated symptoms, but also maintains general well-being. Furthermore, since newly created chemical compound libraries have limited structural diversity with regard to pharmaceutical agents, more attention has recently been paid to the ability of oriental herbs to enhance physical health, including sexual function. Herein, we review the current status of Korean preclinical or clinical studies of the application of oriental herbs to sexual medicine. PMID:26331122

  3. Low internal radiation alters innate immune status in children with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Reza; Kuznetsova, L V; Bojenko, V B

    2010-09-01

    Adverse health effect of low radiation is clear. The aim of this study was to determine effect of internal low radiation on innate immune status in Ukrainian children with spastic colitis as a result of Chernobyl disaster. The test population consisted of 95 participants: 75 rural participants with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome, aged 4 to 18, who lived in a contaminated area exposed to radio nucleotide due to the disaster in reactor in Chernobyl nuclear power plant (categorized in three groups) and 20 healthy urban participants from Kiev, aged 5 to 15, as the control group. Internal radiation activity has been measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed for CD16(+) subset, serum concentration of circulation immune complex was measured by the polyethylene glycol method. Phagocytic activity function was assessed by using latex article and phagocytic index were calculated. p < 0.05 was considered significant. Percent of CD16(+) cell in groups II and III increased significantly in comparison to control group (p < 0.05). Concentration of circulating immune complexes increased significantly in all study groups compared to control group (p < 0.001). Phagocytes activity and phagocyte index decreased significantly in all study groups in comparison to control group (p < 0.001). The innate immune status of study groups has changed. Our data have demonstrated that this change may be related to radioactivity from technogenic pollution due to the disaster in reactor in Chernobyl nuclear power plant. PMID:20538707

  4. Clinical significance of accurate identification of lymph node status in distant metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwen; Wang, Hongqiang; Su, Yuqi; Huang, Na; Shi, Min; Bin, Jianping; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The clinical consequences of accurately identifying lymph node (LN) status in distant metastatic gastric cancer (DMGC) are unclear. We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of N stage, positive LN (PLN) count, and the positive LN ratio (LNR). We also retrospectively compared survival outcomes of DMGC patients stratified by LN dissection (LND). RESULTS LND was performed in 1593 patients. The CSS was significantly different between groups divided according to N stage, PLN, and LNR in DMGC patients who underwent LND. Lower LNR was an independent predictor of longer survival in all kinds of patients cohorts, whereas PLN was not such a predictor. PLN count correlated with LND number and LNR. No correlation existed between LNR and LND number. Undergoing LND and having a higher number of dissected LNs were associated with superior CSS. MATERIALS AND METHODS Data from 1889 DMGC patients treated between 2004 and 2009, and documented in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry, were reviewed. Pearson's correlation coefficient and the Chi-square test were used to study the relationships between LND number, PLN count, N stage, and the LNR. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis, with the log-rank test performed for univariate analysis (UVA) and the Cox proportional hazards model employed for multivariate analysis (MVA). CONCLUSION LN metastatic variables play important roles in the prognostic evaluation and treatment decisions of DMGC patients. Accurate identification of LN status in DMGC patients is critical. LND performance is associated with increased survival and has clinical practicability. PMID:26556854

  5. A survey on clinical presentation and nutritional status of infants with suspected cow' milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cow's milk is the most common food allergen in infants and the diagnosis of cow's milk allergy is difficult, even with the use of several diagnostic tests. Therefore, elimination diets and challenge tests are essential for the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder. The aim of this study is to report the clinical presentation and nutritional status of children evaluated by pediatric gastroenterologists for the assessment of symptoms suggestive of cow's milk allergy. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was performed among 9,478 patients evaluated by 30 pediatric gastroenterologists for 40 days in 5 different geographical regions in Brazil. Clinical data were collected from patients with symptoms suggestive of cow's milk allergy. The nutritional status of infants (age ≤ 24 months) seen for the first time was evaluated according to z-scores for weight-for-age, weight-for-height, and height-for-age. Epi-Info (CDC-NCHS, 2000) software was used to calculate z-scores. Results The prevalence of suspected cow's milk allergy in the study population was 5.4% (513/9,478), and the incidence was 2.2% (211/9,478). Among 159 infants seen at first evaluation, 15.1% presented with a low weight-for-age z score (< -2.0 standard deviation - SD), 8.7% with a low weight-for-height z score (< -2.0 SD), and 23.9% with a low height-for-age z score (< -2.0 SD). Conclusion The high prevalence of nutritional deficits among infants with symptoms suggestive of cow's milk allergy indicates that effective elimination diets should be prescribed to control allergy symptoms and to prevent or treat malnutrition. PMID:20416046

  6. Pemetrexed clinical studies in performance status 2 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZINNER, RALPH; GRUL, CARLA VISSEREN; SPIGEL, DAVID R.; OBASAJU, COLEMAN

    2016-01-01

    Because poor performance status (PS) is an independent prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), PS scores are widely used by oncologists to make treatment decisions. Advanced NSCLC patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS of 2 have poor prognoses and are frequently excluded from clinical trials. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed in this patient group. We identified English-language literature (through March 2015) involving completed and ongoing studies through searches of PubMed, meeting abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov and the European Clinical Trials Register; search terms included ‘pemetrexed,’ ‘NSCLC’ and ‘PS2’. Only studies reporting ≥1 subset analysis of PS2 patients receiving pemetrexed were chosen. Our search identified a total of ten pemetrexed studies in PS2 patients. Eight studies included only chemonaive patients, one study included both chemonaive patients and patients with one prior chemotherapy regimen and one study included only patients with one prior regimen. In subset analyses in these studies, PS2 patients had worse outcomes than PS0-1 patients regardless of treatment. In a phase 3 study, chemonaive advanced NSCLC patients with PS2 receiving pemetrexed-carboplatin versus pemetrexed experienced improved overall survival [hazard ratio (HR)=0.62; P=0.001], progression-free survival (HR=0.46; P<0.001) and response (P=0.032). This review confirms the poorer outcomes in PS2 vs. PS0-1 patients. Although it is not an approved combination therapy, in clinical studies, PS2 patients treated with pemetrexed plus carboplatin as first-line therapy had improved response rates and survival. Additional research on PS2 patients is needed. PMID:26530033

  7. Integrated Design of a Virology Course Develops Lifelong Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mester, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the author's first attempt at integrated course design. Students in the author's virology course helped set the learning goals, and the design and content of the exams, and developed rubrics for individual and group projects. The result was that they learned how to direct their own learning. Integrated course design and…

  8. Virologic Tools for HCV Drug Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the development of new antiviral drugs that target specific steps of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) lifecycle. These drugs, collectively termed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), include non-structural (NS) HCV protein inhibitors, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors (nucleotide analogues and non-nucleoside inhibitors), and NS5A inhibitors. Due to the high genetic variability of HCV, the outcome of DAA-based therapies may be altered by the selection of amino-acid substitutions located within the targeted proteins, which affect viral susceptibility to the administered compounds. At the drug developmental stage, preclinical and clinical characterization of HCV resistance to new drugs in development is mandatory. In the clinical setting, accurate diagnostic tools have become available to monitor drug resistance in patients who receive treatment with DAAs. In this review, we describe tools available to investigate drug resistance in preclinical studies, clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26690198

  9. Comparison of Diffusion Tensor Tractography and Motor Evoked Potentials for the Estimation of Clinical Status in Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Yong-Taek; Park, Jong-Wan; Lee, Joon-Youn; Park, Chul-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) for estimation of clinical status in patients in the subacute stage of stroke. Methods Patients with hemiplegia due to stroke who were evaluated using both DTT and MEPs between May 2012 and April 2015 were recruited. Clinical assessments investigated upper extremity motor and functional status. Motor status was evaluated using Medical Research Council grading and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of upper limb and hand (FMA-U and FMA-H). Functional status was measured using the Modified Barthel Index (MBI). Patients were classified into subgroups according to DTT findings, MEP presence, fractional anisotropy (FA) value, FA ratio (rFA), and central motor conduction time (CMCT). Correlations of clinical assessments with DTT parameters and MEPs were estimated. Results Fifty-five patients with hemiplegia were recruited. In motor assessments (FMA-U), MEPs had the highest sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) as well as the second highest specificity and positive predictive value (PPV). CMCT showed the highest specificity and PPV. Regarding functional status (MBI), FA showed the highest sensitivity and NPV, whereas CMCT had the highest specificity and PPV. Correlation analysis showed that the resting motor threshold (RMT) ratio was strongly associated with motor status of the upper limb, and MEP parameters were not associated with MBI. Conclusion DTT and MEPs could be suitable complementary modalities for analyzing the motor and functional status of patients in the subacute stage of stroke. The RMT ratio was strongly correlated with motor status. PMID:26949679

  10. Degree of Glutathione Deficiency and Redox Imbalance Depend on Subtype of Mitochondrial Disease and Clinical Status

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, Tereza; Le, Anthony; Atkuri, Kondala; Shah, Monisha K.; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Cowan, Tina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are associated with decreased energy production and redox imbalance. Glutathione plays a central role in redox signaling and protecting cells from oxidative damage. In order to understand the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction on in vivo redox status, and to determine how this varies by mitochondrial disease subtype and clinical severity, we used a sensitive tandem mass spectrometry assay to precisely quantify whole blood reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione levels in a large cohort of mitochondrial disorder patients. Glutathione redox potential was calculated using the Nernst equation. Compared to healthy controls (n = 59), mitochondrial disease patients (n = 58) as a group showed significant redox imbalance (redox potential −251 mV±9.7, p<0.0001) with an increased level of oxidation by ∼9 mV compared to controls (−260 mV±6.4). Underlying this abnormality were significantly lower whole blood GSH levels (p = 0.0008) and GSH/GSSG ratio (p = 0.0002), and significantly higher GSSG levels (p<0.0001) in mitochondrial disease patients compared to controls. Redox potential was significantly more oxidized in all mitochondrial disease subgroups including Leigh syndrome (n = 15), electron transport chain abnormalities (n = 10), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (n = 8), mtDNA deletion syndrome (n = 7), mtDNA depletion syndrome (n = 7), and miscellaneous other mitochondrial disorders (n = 11). Patients hospitalized in metabolic crisis (n = 7) showed the greatest degree of redox imbalance at −242 mV±7. Peripheral whole blood GSH and GSSG levels are promising biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction, and may give insights into the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathophysiology of the various mitochondrial disorders. In particular, evaluation of redox potential may be useful in monitoring of clinical status or response to redox

  11. Tenofovir-based alternate therapies for chronic hepatitis B patients with partial virological response to entecavir.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Yip, B; Trinh, H; Pan, C Q; Han, S-H B; Wong, C C; Li, J; Chan, S; Krishnan, G; Wong, C C; Nguyen, M H

    2015-08-01

    Entecavir (ETV) is a first-line antiviral therapy for treating chronic hepatitis B (CHB); however, some patients have suboptimal response to ETV. Currently, there are limited data on how to approach these patients. Therefore, our aim was to compare the effectiveness of two alternate therapies--tenofovir (TDF) monotherapy and combination therapy of ETV+TDF--in CHB patients with ETV partial virological response. We conducted a retrospective study of 68 patients who had partial virological response to ETV, defined as having detectable HBV DNA following at least 12 months of ETV, and were switched to TDF monotherapy (n = 25) or ETV+TDF (n = 43). Patients were seen in seven US liver/community-based clinics and started on ETV between 2005 and 2009. The majority of patients were male; the vast majority were Asian and had positive hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg). Patients in both groups had similar pretreatment characteristics. Complete viral suppression (CVS) rates with TDF monotherapy and ETV+TDF were similar after 6 months (71% vs 83%, P = 0.23) and 12 months (86% vs 84%, P = 0.85), and there was no statistically significant difference in CVS rates even when only patients with higher HBV DNA levels at switch (>1000 IU/mL) were evaluated. Multivariate analysis indicated that ETV+TDF was not an independent predictor of CVS compared to TDF monotherapy (OR = 1.19, P = 0.63). In conclusion, TDF monotherapy and ETV+TDF are comparable in achieving CVS in CHB patients with partial virological response to ETV. Long-term alternate therapy with one pill (TDF monotherapy) vs two pills (ETV+TDF) could lead to lower nonadherence rates and better treatment outcomes. PMID:25417914

  12. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gare, Janet; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Ryan, Claire E; David, Matthew; Kaima, Petronia; Imara, Ulato; Lote, Namarola; Crowe, Suzanne M; Hearps, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12) of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91), pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84) with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01) and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037) were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033). Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance. PMID:26244516

  13. A prospective evaluation of leak point pressure, bladder compliance and clinical status in myelodysplasia patients with tethered spinal cords.

    PubMed

    Houser, E E; Bartholomew, T H; Cookson, M S; Marlin, A E; Little, N A

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated prospectively 26 patients with myelodysplasia and a tethered spinal cord to determine whether surgical release of the tethered cord positively influenced leak point pressure, bladder compliance, upper tract status and/or clinical management. Urodynamics were performed immediately before and after the neurosurgical procedure, and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Mean patient age was 7.8 years (range 2 days to 34 years) and median interval from onset of symptoms to surgery was 60 days (range 2 days to 4 years). Patient presentation included a combination of orthopedic, neurological and urological symptoms. Of 26 patients 9 (35%) had new hydronephrosis, urinary tract infections or urinary incontinence. Leak point pressure and bladder compliance did not change significantly by 6 months postoperatively. Of the 4 patients who presented with hydronephrosis 1 worsened in status, 2 stabilized and 1 improved. Clinical status was unchanged in 16 patients, improved in 4 and worsened in 6. There was no significant relationship between patient age and urodynamic or clinical outcome. Among patients followed for at least 6 months radiographic and clinical improvement occurred in 25% and 15%, respectively. Urodynamic improvements were transient. Surgical release of a tethered cord improved the urological status in less than a quarter of the patients in this series. PMID:8254809

  14. On the front line of HIV virological monitoring: barriers and facilitators from a provider perspective in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Rutstein, S E; Golin, C E; Wheeler, S B; Kamwendo, D; Hosseinipour, M C; Weinberger, M; Miller, W C; Biddle, A K; Soko, A; Mkandawire, M; Mwenda, R; Sarr, A; Gupta, S; Mataya, R

    2016-01-01

    Scale-up of viral load (VL) monitoring for HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a priority in many resource-limited settings, and ART providers are critical to effective program implementation. We explored provider-perceived barriers and facilitators of VL monitoring. We interviewed all providers (n = 17) engaged in a public health evaluation of dried blood spots for VL monitoring at five ART clinics in Malawi. All ART clinics were housed within district hospitals. We grouped themes at patient, provider, facility, system, and policy levels. Providers emphasized their desire for improved ART monitoring strategies, and frustration in response to restrictive policies for determining which patients were eligible to receive VL monitoring. Although many providers pled for expansion of monitoring to include all persons on ART, regardless of time on ART, the most salient provider-perceived barrier to VL monitoring implementation was the pressure of work associated with monitoring activities. The work burden was exacerbated by inefficient data management systems, highlighting a critical interaction between provider-, facility-, and system-level factors. Lack of integration between laboratory and clinical systems complicated the process for alerting providers when results were available, and these communication gaps were intensified by poor facility connectivity. Centralized second-line ART distribution was also noted as a barrier: providers reported that the time and expenses required for patients to collect second-line ART frequently obstructed referral. However, provider empowerment emerged as an unexpected facilitator of VL monitoring. For many providers, this was the first time they used an objective marker of ART response to guide clinical management. Providers' knowledge of a patient's virological status increased confidence in adherence counseling and clinical decision-making. Results from our study provide unique insight into provider

  15. Is long-term virological response related to CCR5 Δ32 deletion in HIV-1-infected patients started on highly active antiretroviral therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Laurichesse, Jean-Jacques; Taieb, Audrey; Capoulade-Metay, Corinne; Katlama, Christine; Villes, Virginie; Drobacheff-Thiebaud, Marie-Christine; Raffi, François; Chêne, Genevieve; Theodorou, Ioannis; Leport, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine whether CCR5 Δ32 deletion is associated with long-term response to combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in HIV-1 infected patients. Methods The genetic sub-study of ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE cohort included 609 patients who started a protease inhibitor-containing cART in 1997–99. Patients were considered to have a sustained virological response if all plasma HIV-RNA measurements between month 4 and years 3–5 were <500 copies/ml, allowing for a single blip. Virological response was compared between patients heterozygous for CCR5 Δ32 (Δ32/wt) and wild-type patients (wt/wt) from month 4 to year 3 and month 4 to year 5. Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for baseline demographical data, HIV-RNA, CD4 cell counts, antiretroviral naive status, time spent on antiretroviral therapy at year 3 and 5 and adherence to treatment (month 4 to year 3 and 5). Results Sustained virological response was better in Δ32/wt than in wt/wt patients: 66% versus 52% up to year 3 (p=0.02), nearly significant after adjustment to potential cofounders (p=0.07). Δ32/wt patients had a better virological response, up to year 5, 48% versus 35% (p=0.01), and remained significantly better, after adjustment, associated with a better virological response up to 5 years post initiation of cART (p=0.04). There was no association with CD4 response. Conclusion Δ32/wt deletion is associated with a beneficial virological response to cART on the long-term. Whether this association can be a direct effect of Δ32/wt deletion remains questionable and needs confirmation in other observational studies. PMID:20050936

  16. Health status instruments for patients with COPD in pulmonary rehabilitation: defining a minimal clinically important difference.

    PubMed

    Alma, Harma; de Jong, Corina; Jelusic, Danijel; Wittmann, Michael; Schuler, Michael; Blok, Bertine Flokstra-de; Kocks, Janwillem; Schultz, Konrad; Molen, Thys van der

    2016-01-01

    The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) defines to what extent change on a health status instrument is clinically relevant, which aids scientists and physicians in measuring therapy effects. This is the first study that aimed to establish the MCID of the Clinical chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Questionnaire (CCQ), the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) in the same pulmonary rehabilitation population using multiple approaches. In total, 451 COPD patients participated in a 3-week Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) programme (58 years, 65% male, 43 pack-years, GOLD stage II/III/IV 50/39/11%). Techniques used to assess the MCID were anchor-based approaches, including patient-referencing, criterion-referencing and questionnaire-referencing, and the distribution-based methods standard error of measurement (SEM), 1.96SEM and half standard deviation (0.5s.d.). Patient- and criterion-referencing led to MCID estimates of 0.56 and 0.62 (CCQ); 3.12 and 2.96 (CAT); and 8.40 and 9.28 (SGRQ). Questionnaire-referencing suggested MCID ranges of 0.28-0.61 (CCQ), 1.46-3.08 (CAT) and 6.86-9.47 (SGRQ). The SEM, 1.96SEM and 0.5s.d. were 0.29, 0.56 and 0.46 (CCQ); 3.28, 6.43 and 2.80 (CAT); 5.20, 10.19 and 6.06 (SGRQ). Pooled estimates were 0.52 (CCQ), 3.29 (CAT) and 7.91 (SGRQ) for improvement. MCID estimates differed depending on the method used. Pooled estimates suggest clinically relevant improvements needing to exceed 0.40 on the CCQ, 3.00 on the CAT and 7.00 on the SGRQ for moderate to very severe COPD patients. The MCIDs of the CAT and SGRQ in the literature might be too low, leading to overestimation of treatment effects for patients with COPD. PMID:27597571

  17. Health status instruments for patients with COPD in pulmonary rehabilitation: defining a minimal clinically important difference

    PubMed Central

    Alma, Harma; de Jong, Corina; Jelusic, Danijel; Wittmann, Michael; Schuler, Michael; Blok, Bertine Flokstra-de; Kocks, Janwillem; Schultz, Konrad; Molen, Thys van der

    2016-01-01

    The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) defines to what extent change on a health status instrument is clinically relevant, which aids scientists and physicians in measuring therapy effects. This is the first study that aimed to establish the MCID of the Clinical chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Questionnaire (CCQ), the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) in the same pulmonary rehabilitation population using multiple approaches. In total, 451 COPD patients participated in a 3-week Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) programme (58 years, 65% male, 43 pack-years, GOLD stage II/III/IV 50/39/11%). Techniques used to assess the MCID were anchor-based approaches, including patient-referencing, criterion-referencing and questionnaire-referencing, and the distribution-based methods standard error of measurement (SEM), 1.96SEM and half standard deviation (0.5s.d.). Patient- and criterion-referencing led to MCID estimates of 0.56 and 0.62 (CCQ); 3.12 and 2.96 (CAT); and 8.40 and 9.28 (SGRQ). Questionnaire-referencing suggested MCID ranges of 0.28–0.61 (CCQ), 1.46–3.08 (CAT) and 6.86–9.47 (SGRQ). The SEM, 1.96SEM and 0.5s.d. were 0.29, 0.56 and 0.46 (CCQ); 3.28, 6.43 and 2.80 (CAT); 5.20, 10.19 and 6.06 (SGRQ). Pooled estimates were 0.52 (CCQ), 3.29 (CAT) and 7.91 (SGRQ) for improvement. MCID estimates differed depending on the method used. Pooled estimates suggest clinically relevant improvements needing to exceed 0.40 on the CCQ, 3.00 on the CAT and 7.00 on the SGRQ for moderate to very severe COPD patients. The MCIDs of the CAT and SGRQ in the literature might be too low, leading to overestimation of treatment effects for patients with COPD. PMID:27597571

  18. Viral vectors: from virology to transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouard, D; Alazard-Dany, N; Cosset, F-L

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1970s, it was predicted that gene therapy would be applied to humans within a decade. However, despite some success, gene therapy has still not become a routine practise in medicine. In this review, we will examine the problems, both experimental and clinical, associated with the use of viral material for transgenic insertion. We shall also discuss the development of viral vectors involving the most important vector types derived from retroviruses, adenoviruses, herpes simplex viruses and adeno-associated viruses. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:18776913

  19. The relationship between religious involvement and clinical status of patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Mario; Pincus, Harold Alan; Welsh, Deborah E; Greenwald, Devra; Lasky, Elaine; Kilbourne, Amy M

    2009-01-01

    Objective Religion and spirituality are important coping strategies in depression but have been rarely studied within the context of bipolar disorder. The present study assessed the association between different forms of religious involvement and the clinical status of individuals treated for bipolar disorder. Methods A cross-sectional observation study of follow-up data from a large cohort study of patients receiving care for bipolar disorder (n = 334) at an urban Veterans Affairs mental health clinic was conducted. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the association between public (frequency of church attendance), private (frequency of prayer/meditation), as well as subjective forms (influence of beliefs on life) of religious involvement and mixed, manic, depressed, and euthymic states when demographic, anxiety, alcohol abuse, and health indicators were controlled. Results Multivariate analyses found significant associations between higher rates of prayer/meditation and participants in a mixed state [odds ratio (OR) = 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.52, chi square = 9.42, df = 14, p < 0.05], as well as lower rates of prayer/meditation and participants who were euthymic (OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.72-0.99, chi square = 4.60, df = 14, p < 0.05). Depression and mania were not associated with religious involvement. Conclusions Compared to patients with bipolar disorder in depressed, manic, or euthymic states, patients in mixed states have more active private religious lives. Providers should assess the religious activities of individuals with bipolar disorder in mixed states and how they may complement/deter ongoing treatment. Future longitudinal studies linking bipolar states, religious activities, and treatment-seeking behaviors are needed. PMID:20148868

  20. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control.

    PubMed

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Koelsch, Kersten K; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. PMID:25217531

  1. Evaluation of a clinical tool for early etiology identification in status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Vincent; Westover, M. Brandon; Drislane, Frank W.; Dworetzky, Barbara A.; Curley, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Because early etiologic identification is critical to select appropriate specific status epilepticus (SE) management, we aim to validate a clinical tool we developed that uses history and readily available investigations to guide prompt etiologic assessment. Methods This prospective multicenter study included all adult patients treated for SE of all but anoxic causes from four academic centers. The proposed tool is designed as a checklist covering frequent precipitating factors for SE. The study team completed the checklist at the time the patient was identified by electroencephalography (EEG) request. Only information available in the emergency department or at the time of in-hospital SE identification was used. Concordance between the etiology indicated by the tool and the determined etiology at hospital discharge was analyzed, together with interrater agreement. Results Two hundred twelve patients were included. Concordance between the etiology hypothesis generated using the tool and the finally determined etiology was 88.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 86.4–89.8) (κ = 0.88). Interrater agreement was 83.3% (95% CI 80.4–96) (κ = 0.81). Significance This tool is valid and reliable for identification early the etiology of an SE. Physicians managing patients in SE may benefit from using it to identify promptly the underlying etiology, thus facilitating selection of the appropriate treatment. PMID:25385281

  2. Heart Failure Medications Detection and Prescription Status Classification in Clinical Narrative Documents.

    PubMed

    Meystre, Stéphane M; Kim, Youngjun; Heavirland, Julia; Williams, Jenifer; Bray, Bruce E; Garvin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEI) and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARB) are two common medication classes used for heart failure treatment. The ADAHF (Automated Data Acquisition for Heart Failure) project aimed at automatically extracting heart failure treatment performance metrics from clinical narrative documents, and these medications are an important component of the performance metrics. We developed two different systems to detect these medications, rule-based and machine learning-based. The rule-based system used dictionary lookups with fuzzy string searching and showed successful performance even if our corpus contains various misspelled medications. The machine learning-based system uses lexical and morphological features and produced similar results. The best performance was achieved when combining the two methods, reaching 99.3% recall and 98.8% precision. To determine the prescription status of each medication (i.e., active, discontinued, or negative), we implemented a SVM classifier with lexical features and achieved good performance, reaching 95.49% accuracy, in a five-fold cross-validation evaluation. PMID:26262123

  3. Superior virologic and treatment outcomes when viral load is measured at 3 months compared to 6 months on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kerschberger, Bernhard; Boulle, Andrew M; Kranzer, Katharina; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Schomaker, Michael; Coetzee, David; Goemaere, Eric; Van Cutsem, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Routine viral load (VL) monitoring is utilized to assess antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virologic failure, and it is currently scaled-up in many resource-constrained settings. The first routine VL is recommended as late as six months after ART initiation for early detection of sub-optimal adherence. We aimed to assess the optimal timing of first VL measurement after initiation of ART. Methods This was a retrospective, cohort analysis of routine monitoring data of adults enrolled at three primary care clinics in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, between January 2002 and March 2009. Primary outcomes were virologic failure and switch to second-line ART comparing patients in whom first VL done was at three months (VL3M) and six months (VL6M) after ART initiation. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. Results In total, 6264 patients were included for the time to virologic failure and 6269 for the time to switch to second-line ART analysis. Patients in the VL3M group had a 22% risk reduction of virologic failure (aHR 0.78, 95% CI 0.64–0.95; p=0.016) and a 27% risk reduction of switch to second-line ART (aHR 0.73, 95% CI 0.58–0.92; p=0.008) when compared to patients in the VL6M group. For each additional month of delay of the first VL measurement (up to nine months), the risk of virologic failure increased by 9% (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02–1.15; p=0.008) and switch to second-line ART by 13% (aHR 1.13, 95% CI 1.05–1.21; p<0.001). Conclusions A first VL at three months rather than six months with targeted adherence interventions for patients with high VL may improve long-term virologic suppression and reduce switches to costly second-line ART. ART programmes should consider the first VL measurement at three months after ART initiation. PMID:26403636

  4. [Detection of local influenza outbreaks and role of virological diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Schweiger, B; Buda, S

    2013-01-01

    For many years, the Working Group on Influenza (AGI) has been the most important influenza surveillance system in Germany. An average sample of the population is covered by both syndromic and virological surveillance, which provides timely data regarding the onset and course of the influenza wave as well as its burden of disease. However, smaller influenza outbreaks cannot be detected by the AGI sentinel system. This is achieved by the information reported by the mandatory notification system (Protection Against Infection Act, IfSG), which serves as the second pillar of the national influenza surveillance. Approaches to recognize such outbreaks are based either on reported influenza virus detection and subsequent investigations by local health authorities or by notification of an accumulation of respiratory diseases or nosocomial infections and subsequent laboratory investigations. In this context, virological diagnostics plays an essential role. This has been true particularly for the early phase of the 2009 pandemic, but generally timely diagnostics is essential for the identification of outbreaks. Regarding potential future outbreaks, it is also important to keep an eye on animal influenza viruses that have repeatedly infected humans. This mainly concerns avian influenza viruses of the subtypes H5, H7, and H9 as well as porcine influenza viruses for which a specific PCR has been established at the National Influenza Reference Centre. An increased incidence of respiratory infections, both during and outside the season, should always encourage virological laboratory diagnostics to be performed as a prerequisite of further extensive investigations and an optimal outbreak management. PMID:23275953

  5. The usefulness of holotranscobalamin in predicting vitamin B12 status in different clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima; Schorr, Heike; Geisel, Jürgen

    2005-02-01

    Serum concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) become increased in B12-deficient subjects and are therefore, considered specific markers of B12 deficiency. Serum level of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) becomes decreased before the development of the metabolic dysfunction. We investigated the usefulness of holoTC in diagnosing B12 deficiency in some clinical settings. We measured serum concentrations of holoTC, MMA, Hcy and total B12 in omnivores, vegetarians, elderly people and haemodialysis patients. Our results indicated that the incidence of holoTC <35 pmol/L was highest in the vegans (76%). Low holoTC and elevated MMA were detected in 64% of the vegans and 43% of the lacto- and lacto-ovovegetarians. An elevated MMA and a low holoTC were found in subjects with total serum B12 as high as 300 pmol/L. The distribution of holoTC in elderly people was similar to that in younger adults (median holoTC 55 pmol/L in both groups). A low holoTC and an elevated MMA were found in 16% of the elderly group. An elevated MMA and a normal holoTC were found in 20% of the elderly group who had a relatively high median serum concentration of creatinine (106.1 micromol/L). Serum concentrations of holoTC in dialysis patients were considerably higher than all other groups (median 100 pmol/L). This was also associated with severely increased serum levels of MMA (median 987 nmol/L). From these results it can be concluded that serum concentration of holoTC is a much better predictor of B12 status than total B12. This was particularly evident in case of dietary B12 deficiency. Serum concentrations of holoTC as well as MMA can be affected by renal dysfunction. Elevated MMA and normal holoTC in patients with renal insufficiency may not exclude vitamin B12 deficiency. HoloTC seems not to be a promising marker in predicting B12 status in renal patients. PMID:15720207

  6. Impact of Lymph Node Status on Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Shaitelman, Simona; Grills, Inga S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Dekhne, Nayana; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina K.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) between node-negative and node-positive patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 534 patients with early-stage breast cancer received APBI including 39 node-positive (N+) cases. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors were compared between node-negative (N-) and N+ cohorts. Local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), axillary failure (AF), distant metastases (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: N+ patients were younger (p = 0.04), had larger tumors (p < 0.001), and were more likely to receive chemotherapy (p < 0.001). Mean follow-up was 7.8 years for N+ patients and 6.3 years for N- patients (p = 0.06). No differences were seen in 5-year actuarial rates of LR (2.2% vs. 2.6%, p = 0.86), AF (0% vs. 0%, p = 0.69), DFS (90.0% vs. 88.0%, p = 0.79), or OS (91.0 vs. 84.0%, p = 0.65) between the two groups, whereas higher rates of RR (0% vs. 6.1%, p < 0.001) and DM (2.2% vs. 8.9%, p = 0.005) were noted in N+ patients. A trend for improved CSS (p = 0.06), was seen in N- patients. Age, tumor size, receptor status, T-stage, chemotherapy, APBI technique, and nodal status (p = 0.86) were not associated with LR, while a trend for an association with LR was noted with close/positive margins, (p = 0.07), and failure to receive adjuvant hormonal therapy (p = 0.06). Conclusions: No differences were seen in the rates of LR or AF between N- and N+ patients after APBI. These results support the continued enrollment of node-positive patients in Phase III trials evaluating the efficacy of APBI including the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project-B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413.

  7. Clinical Neuropathology practice news 1-2014: Pyrosequencing meets clinical and analytical performance criteria for routine testing of MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S.; Manzl, Claudia; Filipits, Martin; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Pulverer, Walter; Dieckmann, Karin; Widhalm, Georg; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Knosp, Engelbert; Marosi, Christine; Hainfellner, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Testing of the MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma is relevant for clinical decision making and research applications. Two recent and independent phase III therapy trials confirmed a prognostic and predictive value of the MGMT promoter methylation status in elderly glioblastoma patients. Several methods for MGMT promoter methylation testing have been proposed, but seem to be of limited test reliability. Therefore, and also due to feasibility reasons, translation of MGMT methylation testing into routine use has been protracted so far. Pyrosequencing after prior DNA bisulfite modification has emerged as a reliable, accurate, fast and easy-to-use method for MGMT promoter methylation testing in tumor tissues (including formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples). We performed an intra- and inter-laboratory ring trial which demonstrates a high analytical performance of this technique. Thus, pyrosequencing-based assessment of MGMT promoter methylation status in glioblastoma meets the criteria of high analytical test performance and can be recommended for clinical application, provided that strict quality control is performed. Our article summarizes clinical indications, practical instructions and open issues for MGMT promoter methylation testing in glioblastoma using pyrosequencing. PMID:24359605

  8. Nutritional status of older persons presenting in a primary care clinic in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adebusoye, L A; Ajayi, I O; Dairo, M D; Ogunniyi, A O

    2012-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the nutritional status and its association with sociodemographic characteristics and health complaints of older persons presenting at the General Outpatients Department (GOPD) Clinic of University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to select 500 consecutively presenting participants aged 60 years and older between September and December, 2009. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) tool and body mass index were used to assess undernutrition and overweight, respectively. The prevalence of nutritional problems was 61.9% (undernutrition = 7.8% and overweight = 54.1%). Being unmarried (P < 0.001), engagement in a job after the age of 60 years (P < 0.001), constipation (P = 0.009), rectal bleeding (P = 0.008), and oral problems (mouth, teeth, and tongue) were significantly (P < 0.001) associated with undernutrition. Younger age (P = 0.050) and female gender (P = 0.011) were significantly associated with being overweight. Logistic regression analysis showed being unmarried OR = 1.355 (95%CI 1.075-1.708) to be the most important factor for the development of undernutrition. The high prevalence of nutritional problems in this study underscores the need for intervention in this population. Correlation analysis (Pearson's) showed a positive association between BMI and MNA scores (r = 0.152, P = 0.001). PMID:22335441

  9. [Comparative study of homeopathic remedies clinical efficacy in comprehensive treatment of inflammatory periodontal diseases in patients with burdened allergic status].

    PubMed

    Grudianov, A I; Bezrukova, I V; Aleksandrovskaia, I Iu

    2006-01-01

    Comparative analysis of clinical efficacy of 3 antihomotoxic homeopathic preparations (Traumeel S, Engistol and Echinacea compositum S) with non-specific immunostimulating and anti-inflammatory effects was performed. The study showed that Traumeel S had maximal anti-inflammatory effect. In proportion as destructive process weighting the efficacy of homeopathic preparations was decreased. The preparations are indicated for comprehensive treatment of inflammatory periodontal diseases in patients with burdened allergic status or heavy concomitant pathology. PMID:16710274

  10. Xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes in patients with adenocarcinoma of the breast: correlation with clinical stage and menopausal status.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, Ramasamy; Chandra Mohan, Kurapathy Venkata Poorna; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2006-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the breast is the most common cancer in women worldwide and its incidence is increasing in most countries. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between different clinical stages and menopausal status using the activity of phase I and II carcinogen-metabolising enzymes in breast cancer patients. Fifty breast cancer patients clinically categorized as stage I, II and III, and as pre- and postmenopausal were chosen for the study. The levels of cytochrome P450 and b(5) and the activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and NADPH diaphorase in tumour tissues and adjacent normal tissues were estimated. Enhanced levels of cytochrome P450 and b(5) and phase II enzyme activity were observed in breast tumour tissues compared with the corresponding uninvolved adjacent tissues irrespective of clinical stage and menopausal status of the patients. The magnitude of the changes in phase I and II enzyme status was, however, more pronounced in stage I and in premenopausal patients than in stage II and III and postmenopausal patients respectively. Our results suggest that the balance between phase I carcinogen activation and phase II detoxification systems may play an important role in the development of breast tumours. PMID:16002293

  11. Evaluation of Humoral Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Antigens for Correlation with Clinical Status and Effective Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Mamiko; Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Ohta, Ken; Inoue, Manabu; Niki, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Kozo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kitada, Seigo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Suzuki, Koichi; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine. However, BCG has limited applications, and a more effective vaccine is needed. Cellular mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be the most important immune response for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the recent failure of a clinical trial for a booster BCG vaccine and increasing evidence of antibody-mediated immunity prompted us to evaluate humoral immunity to Mtb-specific antigens. Using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays, we observed less correlation of both CMI and IgG titers with patient clinical status, including serum concentration of C reactive protein. However, IgA titers against Mtb were significantly correlated with clinical status, suggesting that specific IgA antibodies protect against Mtb proliferation. In addition, in some cases, IgA antibody titers were significantly associated with the serum concentration of total albumin, which supports the idea that humoral immunity can be influenced by the nutritional status. Based on these observations, we propose that the induction of humoral immunity should be included as an option in TB vaccine development strategies. PMID:26568961

  12. Evaluation of Humoral Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Antigens for Correlation with Clinical Status and Effective Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Niki, Mamiko; Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Ohta, Ken; Inoue, Manabu; Niki, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Kozo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kitada, Seigo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Suzuki, Koichi; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine. However, BCG has limited applications, and a more effective vaccine is needed. Cellular mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be the most important immune response for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the recent failure of a clinical trial for a booster BCG vaccine and increasing evidence of antibody-mediated immunity prompted us to evaluate humoral immunity to Mtb-specific antigens. Using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays, we observed less correlation of both CMI and IgG titers with patient clinical status, including serum concentration of C reactive protein. However, IgA titers against Mtb were significantly correlated with clinical status, suggesting that specific IgA antibodies protect against Mtb proliferation. In addition, in some cases, IgA antibody titers were significantly associated with the serum concentration of total albumin, which supports the idea that humoral immunity can be influenced by the nutritional status. Based on these observations, we propose that the induction of humoral immunity should be included as an option in TB vaccine development strategies. PMID:26568961

  13. The Effects of Socioeconomic Status, Clinical Factors, and Genetic Ancestry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis Disease in Northeastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Young, Bonnie N.; Rendón, Adrian; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian; Baker, Jack; Healy, Meghan; Gross, Jessica M.; Long, Jeffrey; Burgos, Marcos; Hunley, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse socioeconomic and clinical factors influence susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) disease in Mexico. The role of genetic factors, particularly those that differ between the parental groups that admixed in Mexico, is unclear. The objectives of this study are to identify the socioeconomic and clinical predictors of the transition from latent TB infection (LTBI) to pulmonary TB disease in an urban population in northeastern Mexico, and to examine whether genetic ancestry plays an independent role in this transition. We recruited 97 pulmonary TB disease patients and 97 LTBI individuals from a public hospital in Monterrey, Nuevo León. Socioeconomic and clinical variables were collected from interviews and medical records, and genetic ancestry was estimated for a subset of 142 study participants from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We examined crude associations between the variables and TB disease status. Significant predictors from crude association tests were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We also compared genetic ancestry between LTBI individuals and TB disease patients at 1,314 SNPs in 273 genes from the TB biosystem in the NCBI BioSystems database. In crude association tests, 12 socioeconomic and clinical variables were associated with TB disease. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that marital status, diabetes, and smoking were independently associated with TB status. Genetic ancestry was not associated with TB disease in either crude or multivariable analyses. Separate analyses showed that LTBI individuals recruited from hospital staff had significantly higher European genetic ancestry than LTBI individuals recruited from the clinics and waiting rooms. Genetic ancestry differed between individuals with LTBI and TB disease at SNPs located in two genes in the TB biosystem. These results indicate that Monterrey may be structured with respect to genetic ancestry, and that genetic differences in TB

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae) by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus); beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus); and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus). The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus) and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae) by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology. PMID:27617007

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    PubMed Central

    Hadidi, Ahmed; Flores, Ricardo; Candresse, Thierry; Barba, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA, or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21–24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae) by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus); beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus); and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus). The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus) and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae) by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology. PMID:27617007

  16. [Environmental virology and sanitation in Brazil: a narrative review].

    PubMed

    Prado, Tatiana; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Sanitation services play a critical role in controlling transmission of numerous waterborne pathogens, especially viruses that cause acute gastroenteritis and hepatitis. The viral agents with the greatest public health impact are hepatitis A virus, rotaviruses and noroviruses, adenoviruses, and enteroviruses, contaminating many Brazilian aquatic ecosystems. Heavy circulation of viruses in the environment has been related to inadequate local sanitary conditions, including incomplete coverage of services or inefficacy of conventional technologies in eliminating or reducing the viral load in water or sewage. This study reviews the relations between virology, health, and sanitation, emphasizing the epidemiology of waterborne viral infections and their public health impact. PMID:25166934

  17. Correlation of clinical features and methylation status of MGMT gene promoter in glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Blanc, J L; Wager, M; Guilhot, J; Kusy, S; Bataille, B; Chantereau, T; Lapierre, F; Larsen, C J; Karayan-Tapon, L

    2004-07-01

    In an effort to extend the potential relationship between the methylation status of MGMT promoter and response to CENU therapy, we examined the methylation status of MGMT promoter in 44 patients with glioblastomas. Tumor specimens were obtained during surgery before adjuvant treatment, frozen and stored at -80 degrees C until for DNA extraction process. DNA methylation patterns in the CpG island of the MGMT gene were determined in every tumor by methylation specific PCR (MSP). These results were then related to overall survival and response to alkylating agents using statistical analysis. Methylation of the MGMT promoter was detected in 68% of tumors, and 96.7% of methylated tumors exhibited also an unmethylated status. There was no relationship between the methylation status of the MGMT promoter and overall survival and response to alkylating agents. Our observations do not lead us to consider promoter methylation of MGMT gene as a prognostic factor of responsiveness to alkylating agents in glioblastomas. PMID:15332332

  18. Current status of ex vivo gene therapy for hematological disorders: a review of clinical trials in Japan around the world.

    PubMed

    Tani, Kenzaburo

    2016-07-01

    Gene therapies are classified into two major categories, namely, in vivo and ex vivo. Clinical trials of human gene therapy began with the ex vivo techniques. Based on the initial successes of gene-therapy clinical trials, these approaches have spread worldwide. The number of gene therapy trials approved worldwide increased gradually starting in 1989, reaching 116 protocols per year in 1999, and a total of 2210 protocols had been approved by 2015. Accumulating clinical evidence has demonstrated the safety and benefits of several types of gene therapy, with the exception of serious adverse events in several clinical trials. These painful experiences were translated backward to basic science, resulting in the development of several new technologies that have influenced the recent development of ex vivo gene therapy in this field. To date, six gene therapies have been approved in a limited number of countries worldwide. In Japan, clinical trials of gene therapy have developed under the strong influence of trials in the US and Europe. Since the initial stages, 50 clinical trials have been approved by the Japanese government. In this review, the history and current status of clinical trials of ex vivo gene therapy for hematological disorders are introduced and discussed. PMID:27289360

  19. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Service and Research--Present Status and Future Goals at SUNY-Buffalo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koup, Jeffrey R.

    1976-01-01

    Two Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratories at Buffalo are described: one at the Millard Fillmore Hospital and the other at the Buffalo Children's Hospital. Their research efforts are reviewed and their scientific contributions to clinical therapeutics and pharmaceutical research are noted. (LBH)

  20. Primary Relationships, HIV Treatment Adherence, and Virologic Control

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, Samantha E.; Taylor, Jonelle M.; Darbes, Lynae A.; Comfort, Megan L.; Neilands, Torsten B.

    2013-01-01

    To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virologic control among HIV-positive men on ART in primary relationships, data were collected from 210 male couples (420 men). Dyadic actor–partner analyses investigated associations with three levels of adherence-related dependent variables: self-efficacy (ASE), self-reported adherence, and virologic control. Results indicated that higher patient ASE was related to his own positive beliefs about medications, higher relationship autonomy and intimacy, and fewer depressive symptoms. Fewer depressive symptoms and less relationship satisfaction in the partner were linked to higher ASE in the patient. Better self-reported adherence was related to the patient’s positive appraisal of the relationship and the partner’s positive treatment efficacy beliefs. Greater medication concerns of both patient and partner were associated with less adherence. The partner’s higher relationship commitment was associated with lower viral load in the patient. Findings suggest that depressive symptoms, treatment beliefs, and relationship quality factors of both partners may influence adherence-related outcomes. PMID:21811842

  1. Vitamin D Status in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Serbia: Correlation with Disease Activity and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Miskovic, Rada; Plavsic, Aleksandra; Raskovic, Sanvila; Jovicic, Zikica; Bolpacic, Jasna

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies indicate potential role of vitamin D as an important factor in the development of many autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with SLE are especially prone to the development of vitamin D deficiency due to the nature of their illness. AIM: The aims of our study were to determine the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in patients with SLE in Serbia, to identify clinical variables associated with vitamin D status and to examine the impact of vitamin D status on disease activity and presence of specific lupus autoantibodies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 46 patients with SLE. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was measured by electrohemiluminiscent immunoassay. RESULTS: The mean serum concentration of 25(OH)D was 11.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml. The prevalence of insufficiency was 32.6%, while the prevalence of deficiency was 67.4%. There was no association between vitamin D status and photosensitivity, skin lesions, arthritis and lupus nephritis. Vitamin D status was not associated with the presence of specific autoantibodies. There was no correlation between disease activity assessed by SLEDAI scale with the concentration of 25(OH)D. Patients who used vitamin D supplements and calcium did not have a significantly higher concentration of 25(OH)D. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with SLE.

  2. Establishment of the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP) and the current status of veterinary clinical pathology in Europe.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P J; Fournel-Fleury, C; Bolliger, A P; Freeman, K P; Braun, J-P; Archer, J; Paltrinieri, S; Tvedten, H; Polizopoulou, Z S; Jensen, A L; Pastor, J; Lanevschi-Pietersma, A; Thoren-Tolling, K; Schwendenwien, I; Thoresen, S I; Bauer, N B; Ledieu, D; Cerón, J J; Palm, M; Papasouliotis, K; Gaál, T; Vajdovich, P

    2007-12-01

    After 5 years of development, the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP) was formally recognized and approved on July 4, 2007 by the European Board of Veterinary Specialisation (EBVS), the European regulatory body that oversees specialization in veterinary medicine and which has approved 23 colleges. The objectives, committees, basis for membership, constitution, bylaws, information brochure and certifying examination of the ECVCP have remained unchanged during this time except as directed by EBVS. The ECVCP declared full functionality based on the following criteria: 1) a critical mass of 65 members: 15 original diplomates approved by the EBVS to establish the ECVCP, 37 de facto diplomates, 7 diplomates certified by examination, and 5 elected honorary members; 2) the development and certification of training programs, laboratories, and qualified supervisors for residents; currently there are 18 resident training programs in Europe; 3) administration of 3 annual board-certifying examinations thus far, with an overall pass rate of 70%; 4) European consensus criteria for assessing the continuing education of specialists every 5 years; 5) organization of 8 annual scientific congresses and a joint journal (with the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology) for communication of scientific research and information; the College also maintains a website, a joint listserv, and a newsletter; 6) collaboration in training and continuing education with relevant colleges in medicine and pathology; 7) development and strict adherence to a constitution and bylaws compliant with the EBVS; and 8) demonstration of compelling rationale, supporting data, and the support of members and other colleges for independence as a specialty college. Formal EBVS recognition of ECVCP as the regulatory body for the science and practice of veterinary clinical pathology in Europe will facilitate growth and development of the discipline and compliance of academic

  3. Alternative methods to analyse the impact of HIV mutations on virological response to antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wittkop, Linda; Commenges, Daniel; Pellegrin, Isabelle; Breilh, Dominique; Neau, Didier; Lacoste, Denis; Pellegrin, Jean-Luc; Chêne, Geneviève; Dabis, François; Thiébaut, Rodolphe

    2008-01-01

    Background Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS) regression may be useful to summarize the HIV genotypic information. Without pre-selection each mutation presented in at least one patient is considered with a different weight. We compared these two strategies with the construction of a usual genotypic score. Methods We used data from the ANRS-CO3 Aquitaine Cohort Zephir sub-study. We used a subset of 87 patients with a complete baseline genotype and plasma HIV-1 RNA available at baseline and at week 12. PCA and PLS components were determined with all mutations that had prevalences >0. For the genotypic score, mutations were selected in two steps: 1) p-value < 0.01 in univariable analysis and prevalences between 10% and 90% and 2) backwards selection procedure based on the Cochran-Armitage Test. The predictive performances were compared by means of the cross-validated area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Results Virological failure was observed in 46 (53%) patients at week 12. Principal components and PLS components showed a good performance for the prediction of virological response in HIV infected patients. The cross-validated AUCs for the PCA, PLS and genotypic score were 0.880, 0.868 and 0.863, respectively. The strength of the effect of each mutation could be considered through PCA and PLS components. In contrast, each selected mutation contributes with the same weight for the calculation of the genotypic score. Furthermore, PCA and PLS regression helped to describe mutation clusters (e.g. 10, 46, 90). Conclusion In this dataset, PCA and PLS showed a good performance but their predictive ability was not clinically superior to that of the genotypic score. PMID:18945369

  4. Influence of Clinical Status and Parasite Load on Erythropoiesis and Leucopoiesis in Dogs Naturally Infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi

    PubMed Central

    Trópia de Abreu, Raquel; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Background The bone marrow is considered to be an important storage of parasites in Leishmania-infected dogs, although little is known about cellular genesis in this organ during canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in erythropoiesis and leucopoiesis in bone marrow aspirates from dogs naturally infected with Leishmania chagasi and presenting different clinical statuses and bone marrow parasite densities. The evolution of CVL from asymptomatic to symptomatic status was accompanied by increasing parasite density in the bone marrow. The impact of bone marrow parasite density on cellularity was similar in dogs at different clinical stages, with animals in the high parasite density group. Erythroid and eosinophilic hypoplasia, proliferation of neutrophilic precursor cells and significant increases in lymphocytes and plasma cell numbers were the major alterations observed. Differential bone marrow cell counts revealed increases in the myeloid:erythroid ratio associated to increased numbers of granulopoietic cells in the different clinical groups compared with non-infected dogs. Conclusions Analysis of the data obtained indicated that the assessment of bone marrow constitutes an additional and useful tool by which to elaborate a prognosis for CVL. PMID:21572995

  5. Current status and future prospects of the development of clinical Pharmacy in China: A SWOT analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zhao, Qingwei; Zhang, Xiangyi; Yang, Hongyu; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Xingguo

    2016-03-01

    In many industrialized countries, clinical pharmacy has developed into a separate discipline and become a vital part of inpatient care in hospitals. However, as compared to many established branches of medicine, clinical pharmacy is still in its infancy, with much room for growth, improvement, and recognition by both the medical community and patients. In this study, a widely-recognized development strategy analysis tool, Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat (SWOT), was used to systematically address several key issues to the development of clinical pharmacy in China. This analysis aims to provide feasible recommendations for the development of clinical pharmacy in China by identifying current problems and growth opportunities. Full development of clinical pharmacy as a mature clinical discipline will help promote the rational use of drugs by both clinicians and patients and lead to enhanced drug efficacy and safety. PMID:27087089

  6. Effect of Habits and Nutritional Status on Clinical Grading and Histopathological Staging in Patients with Oral Sub Mucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lanke, Rama Brahmam; Shetty, Rakhith; Akifuddin, Syed; Sahu, Manish; Singh, Navneet; Kaur, Gagandeep; Goyal, Garish

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic progressive debilitating disease affecting the oral, oropharyngeal and sometimes the oesophageal mucosa resulting in inability to eat due to burning, ulcers and stiffness. Aim The study was undertaken, to evaluate the correlation of clinical staging, histological grading and nutritional status using body mass index (BMI) with gutkha (habit) index in OSMF patients. Materials and Methods The study group comprised of 50 patients clinically diagnosed and histopathologically confirmed cases of OSMF. Habit (gutkha) index was calculated by multiplying duration and frequency. Body mass index was calculated by dividing weight in kilograms and height in centimetres of the patient. Results Male to female ratio was 2.8:1. Clinical grading increased with increase in gutkha index, patients with gutkha index 1-50, maximum were in mild stage; with gutkha index 51-100, maximum in moderate and patients with gutkha index 101-150, all were in severe stage. Histological staging showed direct correlation with gutkha index, it increased with increase in gutkha index with p <0.05. Site analysis showed that buccal mucosa and retromolar area were involved in all the patient and floor of mouth in 46% of patients Body mass index analysis revealed that out of 27 patients with moderate clinical staging 3 was underweight; out of 3 with severe clinical staging, 2 was underweight. Conclusion The duration and frequency of areca nut product use effects on the incidence and severity of OSMF and the patient becomes unable to eat due to burning, ulcers and inability to open mouth which affect the health of the individual. Thus it is important to access the nutritional status to improve the survival rate of patients. PMID:26557616

  7. Maternal representations, infant psychiatric status, and mother-child relationship in clinic-referred and non-referred infants.

    PubMed

    Dollberg, Daphna; Feldman, Ruth; Keren, Miri

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relations between maternal representations, infant socio-emotional difficulties, and mother-child relational behavior, 49 clinic-referred infants and their mothers were compared to 30 non-referred controls. Clinic-referred infants' psychiatric status was determined with the DC 0-3-R classification of Zeanah and Benoit (Child Adolesc Psychiatry Clin N Am 4:539-554, 1995) and controls were screened for socio-emotional difficulties. Mothers were interviewed with the parent development interview (Aber et al. in The parent development interview. Unpublished manuscript, 1985) and dyads were observed in free play and problem-solving interactions. Group differences emerged for maternal representations and relational behaviors. Representations of clinic-referred mothers were characterized by lower joy, coherence, and richness, and higher anger experienced in the mother-infant relationship compared to controls. During free play, clinic-referred mothers showed lower sensitivity and higher intrusiveness and provided less adequate instrumental and emotional assistance and support during problem solving. Referred children showed lower social engagement during free play. Associations were found among maternal representations, maternal interactive behavior, child social engagement, and the child's ability to self-regulate during a challenging task. These findings provide empirical support for theoretical and clinical perspectives suggesting a reciprocal link between maternal negative representations and mother and child's maladaptive behaviors in the context of early socio-emotional difficulties and mental health referrals. PMID:19543936

  8. Update from the 7th annual meeting of the Italian Society of Virology.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Palù, Giorgio

    2008-07-01

    The Italian Society of Virology (SIV) held a meeting in Orvieto (June 24-26, 2007) aimed at promoting interactions and collaborations between scientists in the field of Virology. The meeting had an attendance of about 170 virologists from Italy. In accordance with the normal format of the SIV National Meeting the conference transcended all areas of Virology. Sessions included invited speakers together with selected oral presentation. Covered topics included: General Virology and Viral Genetics, Medical Virology and Antiviral Therapy, Viral Biotechnologies and Gene Therapy, Viral Oncogenesis and Vaccines, Virus-Host Interactions and Pathogenesis, Emerging and Zoonotic Viral Infections. In this edition, a special effort was addressed to the HPV infection and prevention and to the guidelines for the preemptive (presymptomatic) therapy of human cytomegalovirus infections in transplant recipients. A summary of the main topics are reported. PMID:18247363

  9. Trends and Disparities in Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Virologic Suppression Among Newly Treatment-Eligible HIV-Infected Individuals in North America, 2001–2009

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, David B.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Hessol, Nancy A.; Horberg, Michael A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Napravnik, Sonia; Patel, Pragna; Silverberg, Michael J.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Crane, Heidi M.; Collier, Ann C.; Samji, Hasina; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Gill, M. John; Klein, Marina B.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Gange, Stephen J.; Benson, A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Platt, Aaron; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2013-01-01

    Background. Since the mid-1990s, effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens have improved in potency, tolerability, ease of use, and class diversity. We sought to examine trends in treatment initiation and resulting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virologic suppression in North America between 2001 and 2009, and demographic and geographic disparities in these outcomes. Methods. We analyzed data on HIV-infected individuals newly clinically eligible for ART (ie, first reported CD4+ count <350 cells/µL or AIDS-defining illness, based on treatment guidelines during the study period) from 17 North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design cohorts. Outcomes included timely ART initiation (within 6 months of eligibility) and virologic suppression (≤500 copies/mL, within 1 year). We examined time trends and considered differences by geographic location, age, sex, transmission risk, race/ethnicity, CD4+ count, and viral load, and documented psychosocial barriers to ART initiation, including non–injection drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and mental illness. Results. Among 10 692 HIV-infected individuals, the cumulative incidence of 6-month ART initiation increased from 51% in 2001 to 72% in 2009 (Ptrend < .001). The cumulative incidence of 1-year virologic suppression increased from 55% to 81%, and among ART initiators, from 84% to 93% (both Ptrend < .001). A greater number of psychosocial barriers were associated with decreased ART initiation, but not virologic suppression once ART was initiated. We found significant heterogeneity by state or province of residence (P < .001). Conclusions. In the last decade, timely ART initiation and virologic suppression have greatly improved in North America concurrent with the development of better-tolerated and more potent regimens, but significant barriers to treatment uptake remain, both at the individual level and systemwide. PMID:23315317

  10. CD4+ and viral load outcomes of antiretroviral therapy switch strategies after virologic failure of combination antiretroviral therapy in perinatally HIV-infected youth in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, Lee; Karalius, Brad; Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Hazra, Rohan; Hernán, Miguel A.; Siberry, George K.; Seage, George R.; Agwu, Allison; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared 12-month CD4+ and viral load outcomes in HIV-infected children and adolescents with virological failure, managed with four treatment switch strategies. Design: This observational study included perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials (PACTG) Protocol 219C. Methods: Treatment strategies among children with virologic failure were compared: continue failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); switch to new cART; switch to drug-sparing regimen; and discontinue all ART. Mean changes in CD4+% and viral load from baseline (time of virologic failure) to 12 months follow-up in each group were evaluated using weighted linear regression models. Results: Virologic failure occurred in 939 out of 2373 (40%) children. At 12 months, children switching to new cART (16%) had a nonsignificant increase in CD4+% from baseline, 0.59 percentage points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) −1.01 to 2.19], not different than those who continued failing cART (71%) (−0.64 percentage points, P = 0.15) or switched to a drug-sparing regimen (5%) (1.40 percentage points, P = 0.64). Children discontinuing all ART (7%) experienced significant CD4+% decline −3.18 percentage points (95% CI −5.25 to −1.11) compared with those initiating new cART (P = 0.04). All treatment strategies except discontinuing ART yielded significant mean decreases in log10VL by 12 months, the new cART group having the largest drop (−1.15 log10VL). Conclusion: In PHIV children with virologic failure, switching to new cART was associated with the best virological response, while stopping all ART resulted in the worst immunologic and virologic outcomes and should be avoided. Drug-sparing regimens and continuing failing regimens may be considered with careful monitoring. PMID:26182197

  11. The Serological and Virological Investigation of Canine Adenovirus Infection on the Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Oya; Yapici, Orhan; Avci, Oguzhan; Simsek, Atilla; Atli, Kamil; Dik, Irmak; Yavru, Sibel; Hasircioglu, Sibel; Kale, Mehmet; Mamak, Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Two types of Canine Adenovirus (CAVs), Canine Adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), the virus which causes infectious canine hepatitis, and Canine Adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), which causes canine infectious laryngotracheitis, have been found in dogs. In this study, blood samples taken from 111 dogs, which were admitted to the Internal Medicine Clinic of Selcuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, with clinical symptoms. Seventy-seven dogs were sampled from Isparta and Burdur dog shelters by random sampling, regardless of the clinical findings. Dogs showed a systemic disease, characterized by fever, diarrhea, vomiting, oculonasal discharge, conjunctivitis, severe moist cough, signs of pulmonary disease and dehydration. Two dogs had corneal opacity and photophobia. In serological studies, 188 serum samples were investigated on the presence of CAV antibodies by ELISA. Total 103 (103/188–54.7%) blood samples were detected to be positive for CAV antibodies by ELISA. However, 85 (85/188–45.2%) blood samples were negative. Blood leukocyte samples from dogs were processed and inoculated onto confluent monolayers of MDCK cells using standard virological techniques. After third passage, cells were examined by direct immunoflourescence test for virus isolation. But positive result was not detected. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the high prevalence of CAV infection in dogs. PMID:24223508

  12. The serological and virological investigation of canine adenovirus infection on the dogs.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Oya; Yapici, Orhan; Avci, Oguzhan; Simsek, Atilla; Atli, Kamil; Dik, Irmak; Yavru, Sibel; Hasircioglu, Sibel; Kale, Mehmet; Mamak, Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Two types of Canine Adenovirus (CAVs), Canine Adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), the virus which causes infectious canine hepatitis, and Canine Adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), which causes canine infectious laryngotracheitis, have been found in dogs. In this study, blood samples taken from 111 dogs, which were admitted to the Internal Medicine Clinic of Selcuk University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, with clinical symptoms. Seventy-seven dogs were sampled from Isparta and Burdur dog shelters by random sampling, regardless of the clinical findings. Dogs showed a systemic disease, characterized by fever, diarrhea, vomiting, oculonasal discharge, conjunctivitis, severe moist cough, signs of pulmonary disease and dehydration. Two dogs had corneal opacity and photophobia. In serological studies, 188 serum samples were investigated on the presence of CAV antibodies by ELISA. Total 103 (103/188-54.7%) blood samples were detected to be positive for CAV antibodies by ELISA. However, 85 (85/188-45.2%) blood samples were negative. Blood leukocyte samples from dogs were processed and inoculated onto confluent monolayers of MDCK cells using standard virological techniques. After third passage, cells were examined by direct immunoflourescence test for virus isolation. But positive result was not detected. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the high prevalence of CAV infection in dogs. PMID:24223508

  13. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  14. Bite Injuries to the Hand: Microbiology, Virology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, M.; Jordan, D.; Hughes, O.; Khan, Wasim S.; Hindocha, S.

    2014-01-01

    Bites to the human hand, be it from a pet, a stray animal or even a fellow human, may often have dire consequences for the person suffering the insult. Bites by mammals are a common problem and they account for up to 1% of all visits to hospital emergency rooms, in the UK. Clenched fist injuries to the mouth (‘fight bite’) are notorious for being the worst human bites. Bite injuries of the hand and their related infections must be monitored vigilantly and managed proactively, by experts in this field of surgery. In this review article we discuss the associated microbiology and virology of these injuries as well as their management. PMID:25067969

  15. Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies to Diagnostic Virology

    PubMed Central

    Barzon, Luisa; Lavezzo, Enrico; Militello, Valentina; Toppo, Stefano; Palù, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Novel DNA sequencing techniques, referred to as “next-generation” sequencing (NGS), provide high speed and throughput that can produce an enormous volume of sequences with many possible applications in research and diagnostic settings. In this article, we provide an overview of the many applications of NGS in diagnostic virology. NGS techniques have been used for high-throughput whole viral genome sequencing, such as sequencing of new influenza viruses, for detection of viral genome variability and evolution within the host, such as investigation of human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis C virus quasispecies, and monitoring of low-abundance antiviral drug-resistance mutations. NGS techniques have been applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the detection of unexpected disease-associated viruses and for the discovery of novel human viruses, including cancer-related viruses. Finally, the human virome in healthy and disease conditions has been described by NGS-based metagenomics. PMID:22174638

  16. Clinical relevance of optimizing vitamin D status in soldiers to enhance physical and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Wentz, Laurel M; Eldred, Jerad D; Henry, Michael D; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency initiates a loss of combat effectiveness by impairing physical and cognitive functioning of combat Operators. Synthesized in response to sunlight and consumed in the diet, vitamin D functions as a hormone and regulates gene expression for nearly 300 genes throughout the human body. These target genes are involved processes essential to combat operations, such as immune function, response to stress, inflammation, and regulation of calcium movement. Since widespread vitamin D deficiency is observed across the U.S. population, poor vitamin D status is expected in Servicemembers. Physical conditions linked to vitamin D deficiency include increased risk for muscle or bone injury, muscle weakness, and reduced neuromuscular function. Hormonally, vitamin D levels have been positively correlated with testosterone levels. Vitamin D deficiency is also associated with cognitive decline, depression, and may prolong recovery following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Since vitamin D deficiency elevates systemic inflammation, poor vitamin D status at the time of brain injury may prolong the inflammatory response and exacerbate postconcussive symptoms. Furthermore, veterans with mTBI experience chronic endocrine dysfunction. While vitamin D status has not been assessed post-mTBI, it is plausible that vitamin D levels are altered along with testosterone and growth hormone, raising the question of whether vitamin D deficiency results from trauma-related hormonal abnormalities or whether vitamin D deficiency increases the risk for endocrine dysfunction. Through its association with testosterone production, vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) since testosterone levels are altered in veterans with PTSD. Therefore, vitamin D status has a significant impact on Operator health and performance. Supplementing vita-min D to deficient Operators provides a noninvasive and low-cost intervention to maintain combat force

  17. Incorporating microarray assessment of HER2 status in clinical practice supports individualised therapy in early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kathleen A; Pienaar, Fredrieka M; Brundyn, Karen; Swart, Gillaume; Gericke, George S; Myburgh, Ettienne J; Wright, Colleen A; Apffelstaedt, Justus P; Kotze, Maritha J

    2015-04-01

    Accurate determination of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status is essential for optimal selection of breast cancer patients for gene targeted therapy. The analytical performance of microarray analysis using TargetPrint for assessment of HER2 status was evaluated in 138 breast tumours, including 41 fresh and 97 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens. Reflex testing using immunohistochemistry/in situ hybridization (IHC/ISH) in four discordant cases confirmed the TargetPrint results, achieving 100% agreement regardless of whether fresh tissue or FFPE specimens were used. One equivocal IHC/ISH case was classified as HER2-positive based on the microarray result. The proven clinical utility in resolving equivocal and borderline cases justifies modification of the testing algorithm under these circumstances, to obtain a definitive positive or negative test result with the use of microarrays. Determination of HER2 status across three assay platforms facilitated improved quality assurance and led to a higher level of confidence on which to base treatment decisions. PMID:25586984

  18. L-Carnitine supplementation improved clinical status without changing oxidative stress and lipid profile in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek Mahdavi, Aida; Mahdavi, Reza; Kolahi, Sousan; Zemestani, Maryam; Vatankhah, Amir-Mansour

    2015-08-01

    Considering the pathologic importance of oxidative stress and altered lipid metabolism in osteoarthritis (OA), this study aimed to investigate the effect of l-carnitine supplementation on oxidative stress, lipid profile, and clinical status in women with knee OA. We hypothesized that l-carnitine would improve clinical status by modulating serum oxidative stress and lipid profile. In this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 72 overweight or obese women with mild to moderate knee OA were randomly allocated into 2 groups to receive 750 mg/d l-carnitine or placebo for 8 weeks. Dietary intake was evaluated using 24-hour recall for 3 days. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and lipid profile, visual analog scale for pain intensity, and patient global assessment of severity of disease were assessed before and after supplementation. Only 69 patients (33 in the l-carnitine group and 36 in the placebo group) completed the study. l-Carnitine supplementation resulted in significant reductions in serum MDA (2.46 ± 1.13 vs 2.16 ± 0.94 nmol/mL), total cholesterol (216.09 ± 34.54 vs 206.12 ± 39.74 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (129.45 ± 28.69 vs 122.05 ± 32.76 mg/dL) levels compared with baseline (P < .05), whereas these parameters increased in the placebo group. Serum triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TAC levels did not change significantly in both groups (P > .05). No significant differences were observed in dietary intake, serum lipid profile, MDA, and TAC levels between groups after adjusting for baseline values and covariates (P > .05). There were significant intragroup and intergroup differences in pain intensity and patient global assessment of disease status after supplementation (P < .05). Collectively, l-carnitine improved clinical status without changing oxidative stress and lipid profile significantly in women with knee OA. PMID:26149189

  19. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abati, Paulo Afonso Martins; Segurado, Aluisio Cotrim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002), P2 (2003-2006), and P3 (2007-2010) – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country. PMID:25741647

  20. Nutritional status and clinical outcome of children on continuous renal replacement therapy: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background No studies on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) have analyzed nutritional status in children. The objective of this study was to assess the association between mortality and nutritional status of children receiving CRRT. Methods Prospective observational study to analyze the nutritional status of children receiving CRRT and its association with mortality. The variables recorded were age, weight, sex, diagnosis, albumin, creatinine, urea, uric acid, severity of illness scores, CRRT-related complications, duration of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit, and mortality. Results The sample comprised 174 critically ill children on CRRT. The median weight of the patients was 10 kg, 35% were under percentile (P) 3, and 56% had a weight/P50 ratio of less than 0.85. Only two patients were above P95. The mean age for patients under P3 was significantly lower than that of the other patients (p = 0.03). The incidence of weight under P3 was greater in younger children (p = 0.007) and in cardiac patients and in those who had previous chronic renal insufficiency (p = 0.047). The mortality analysis did not include patients with pre-existing renal disease. Mortality was 38.9%. Mortality for patients with weight < P3 was greater than that of children with weight > P3 (51% vs 33%; p = 0.037). In the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, the only factor associated with mortality was protein-energy wasting (malnutrition) (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.067-4.173; p = 0.032). Conclusions The frequency of protein-energy wasting in children who require CRRT is high, and the frequency of obesity is low. Protein-energy wasting is more frequent in children with previous end-stage renal disease and heart disease. Underweight children present a higher mortality rate than patients with normal body weight. PMID:23016957

  1. VE1 immunohistochemistry predicts BRAF V600E mutation status and clinical outcome in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schafroth, Christian; Galván, José A.; Centeno, Irene; Koelzer, Viktor H.; Dawson, Heather E.; Sokol, Lena; Rieger, Gregor; Berger, Martin D.; Hädrich, Marion; Rosenberg, Robert; Nitsche, Ulrich; Schnüriger, Beat; Langer, Rupert; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-01-01

    Aim VE1 is a monoclonal antibody detecting mutant BRAFV600E protein by immunohistochemistry. Here we aim to determine the inter-observer agreement and concordance of VE1 with mutational status, investigate heterogeneity in colorectal cancers and metastases and determine the prognostic effect of VE1 in colorectal cancer patients. Methods Concordance of VE1 with mutational status and inter-observer agreement were tested on a pilot cohort of colorectal cancers (n = 34), melanomas (n = 23) and thyroid cancers (n = 8). Two prognostic cohorts were evaluated (n = 259, Cohort 1 and n = 226, Cohort 2) by multiple-punch tissue microarrays. VE1 staining on preoperative biopsies (n = 118 patients) was compared to expression in resections. Primary tumors and metastases from 13 patients were tested for VE1 heterogeneity using a tissue microarray generated from all available blocks (n = 100 blocks). Results Inter-observer agreement was 100% (kappa = 1.0). Concordance between VE1 and V600E mutation was 98.5%. Cohort 1: VE1 positivity (seen in 13.5%) was associated with older age (p = 0.0175) and MLH1 deficiency (p < 0.0001). Cohort 2: VE1 positivity (seen in 12.8%) was associated with female gender (p = 0.0016), right-sided tumor location (p < 0.0001), higher tumor grade (p < 0.0001) and mismatch repair (MMR)-deficiency (p < 0.0001). In survival analysis, MMR status and postoperative therapy were identified as possible confounding factors. Adjusting for these features, VE1 was an unfavorable prognostic factor. Preoperative biopsy staining matched resections in all cases except one. No heterogeneity was found across any primary/metastatic tumor blocks. Conclusion VE1 is highly concordant for V600E and homogeneously expressed suggesting staining can be analysed on resection specimens, preoperative biopsies, metastatic lesions and tissue microarrays. PMID:26496026

  2. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Kartolo, Wiwi Andralia; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP), have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA. PMID:26881220

  3. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Kartolo, Wiwi Andralia; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP), have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA. PMID:26881220

  4. Oral Health Status of Children Attending a Mobile Dental Clinic--A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Enciso, Reyes; Sundaresan, Santosh; Yekikian, Matthew; Mulligan, Roseann

    2015-11-01

    Periodicity of dental visits for children is based on age and disease susceptibility. Frequently mobile dental clinics are unable to provide follow-up care at recommended intervals. This study compared the oral health of children attending the mobile clinic (MC) twice with matched children by age, gender, race, and ZIP code attending for the first time. Dental charts (n=888) were reviewed and scored for decayed and filled surfaces. Seventy-eight children (mean age 9.6 years; 98.7% Hispanic) attended the clinic twice over a mean interval between visits of 1.5 years. These children had statistically significant lower rates of decay in deciduous and permanent tooth surfaces than matched children visiting the clinic for the first time (p<.05; p<.001), and significantly less decay in their deciduous and permanent teeth than at the first visit (p<.001; p<.05). Mobile clinics can be effective in decreasing the decay in teeth, even when the interval between visits is longer than current recommendations. PMID:26548689

  5. G1896A Precore Mutation and Association With HBeAg Status, Genotype and Clinical Status in Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Suppiah, Jeyanthi; Mohd Zain, Rozainanee; Bahari, Norazlah; Haji Nawi, Salbiah; Saat, Zainah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Precore stop codon (G1896A) mutation is one of the commonest mutations found in patients with chronic hepatitis B. However, over the years, this mutation was not reported much in Malaysia. Objectives: We therefore investigated the presence of G1896A mutation in Malaysian population and its association with HBeAg status, clinical stage, hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype and e-seroconversion rate. Patients and Methods: Serum samples from 93 patients confirmed as hepatitis B carriers were collected for molecular assay. The whole genome of HBV was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. The precore and basal core promoter regions were analyzed for presence of mutations. Results: The most commonly observed mutation in the precore region was C1858T with 64.5% prevalence. The precore mutation of interest (G1896A) was identified in 25.8% of isolates. The basal core promoter mutations detected were A1762T-G1764A (26.9%), C1653T (8.6%), A1752G (10.8%) and C1766T (2.2%). No significant association was observed between G1896A mutation and HBeAg-negativity. Nonetheless, G1896A was highly prevalent among HBV genotype B. Clinical association revealed that subjects with G1896A mutations were mainly detected in asymptomatic chronic hepatitis B (58.3%) and liver cirrhosis (41.7%). One subject was diagnosed with fulminant hepatitis (4.2%) and 8.3% had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Conclusions: Our data suggested an intermediate prevalence of G1896A mutation among Malaysian hepatitis B carriers. The stop codon mutation has a significant association with genotype B and patients with chronic hepatitis B and liver cirrhosis. PMID:26587040

  6. Early virological failure and the development of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in HIV-infected Ugandan children

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Theodore D.; Kamya, Moses R.; Li, Pelin; Pasutti, William; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Liegler, Teri; Dorsey, Grant; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Havlir, Diane V.; Wong, Joseph K.; Achan, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background Without virologic testing, HIV-infected African children starting antiretroviral (ARV)-therapy are at risk for undetected virological failure and the development of ARV-resistance. We sought to determine the prevalence of early virologic failure (EVF), to characterize the evolution of ARV-resistance mutations, and to predict the impact on second-line therapy. Methods The prevalence of EVF (HIV-RNA >400 copies/mL on sequential visits after 6 months of therapy) was identified among 120 HIV-infected Ugandan children starting ARV-therapy. ARV-mutations were identified by population sequencing of HIV-1 pol in sequential archived specimens. Composite discrete genotypic susceptibility scores (dGSS) were determined for second-line ARV-regimens. Results EVF occurred in 16 (13%) children and persisted throughout a median (IQR) 938 (760-1066) days of follow-up. M184V and non-nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase-inhibitor-associated mutations emerged within 6 months of EVF; thymidine-analog-mutations arose after 12 months. Worse dGSS scores correlated with increasing duration of failure (Spearman R = −0.47, p=0.001). Only 1 child met World Health Organization CD4 criteria for ARV-failure at the time of EVF or during the follow-up period. Conclusions A significant portion of HIV-infected African children experience EVF that would be undetected using CD4/clinical monitoring and resulted in the accumulation of ARV-mutations that could compromise second line therapy options. PMID:21099693

  7. [The Clinical Application Status and Development Trends of Hydrogen Peroxide Low Temperature Plasma Sterilizers].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Min; Zheng, Yunxin; Chen, Ying; Hou, Bin; Xu, Zitian

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilization technology solved the problems of thermo-sensitive materials' disinfection and sterilization based on its development and unique characteristics. This paper introduced the researches of clinical application quality control, and showed the hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers were being widely used in hospitals and highly recognized. According to the clinical data and the literatures of the domestic equipment in preliminary application, it could be concluded that the technology maturity of domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers was in a high level. The advantages of using domestic hydrogen peroxide low temperature plasma sterilizers to do disinfection and sterilization included lower cost, safer, faster and non-toxic, etc. Also the management system should be improved and the clinical staff should master the technical essentials, obey the procedures strictly, verify periodically and offer full monitoring to upgrade the quality of sterilization. PMID:27197500

  8. 18F-Fluoroestradiol PET: Current Status and Potential Future Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Liao, Geraldine J; Clark, Amy S; Schubert, Erin K; Mankoff, David A

    2016-08-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) expression in breast cancer is associated with a more favorable prognosis and is necessary for a response to endocrine therapies. Traditionally, ER expression is assessed by in vitro assays on biopsied tumor tissue. However, recent advances have allowed in vivo evaluation of ER expression with (18)F-fluoroestradiol ((18)F-FES) PET. Clinical studies have demonstrated the use of (18)F-FES PET as a method for quantifying in vivo ER expression and have explored its potential as a predictive assay and method of assessing in vivo pharmacodynamic response to endocrine therapy. This review outlines the biology and pharmacokinetics of (18)F-FES, highlights the current experience with (18)F-FES in patient studies on breast cancer and other diseases, and discusses potential clinical applications and the possible future clinical use of (18)F-FES PET. PMID:27307345

  9. Stem Cell Therapies for Knee Cartilage Repair: The Current Status of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John A.; Little, Dianne; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Tucker, Bradford S.; Ciccotti, Michael G.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage damage of the knee is common, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Many adult tissues contain cells that are able to differentiate into multiple cell types, including chondrocytes. These stem cells have gained significant attention over the past decade and may become frontline management for cartilage defects in the very near future. Purpose The role of stem cells in the treatment of knee osteochondral defects was reviewed. Recent animal and clinical studies were reviewed to determine the benefits and potential outcomes of using stem cells for cartilage defects. Study Design Literature review. Methods A PubMed search was undertaken. The key phrase “stem cells and knee” was used. The search included reviews and original articles over an unlimited time period. From this search, articles outlining animal and clinical trials were selected. A search of current clinical trials in progress was performed on the clinicaltrials.gov website, and “stem cells and knee” was used as the search phrase. Results Stem cells have been used in many recent in vitro and animal studies. A number of cell-based approaches for cartilage repair have progressed from preclinical animal studies into clinical trials. Conclusion The use of stem cells for the treatment of cartilage defects is increasing in animal and clinical studies. Methods of delivery of stem cells to the knee’s cartilage vary from direct injection to implantation with scaffolds. While these approaches are highly promising, there is currently limited evidence of a direct clinical benefit, and further research is required to assess the overall outcome of stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair. PMID:24220016

  10. Clinical Utility of Microarrays: Current Status, Existing Challenges and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinmin; Quigg, Richard J; Zhou, Jian; Gu, Weikuan; Nagesh Rao, P; Reed, Elaine F

    2008-01-01

    Microarray-based clinical tests have become powerful tools in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In contrast to traditional DNA-based tests that largely focus on single genes associated with rare conditions, microarray-based tests are ideal for the study of diseases with underlying complex genetic causes. Several microarray based tests have been translated into clinical practice such as MammaPrint and AmpliChip CYP450. Additional cancer-related microarray-based tests are either in the process of FDA review or under active development, including Tissue of Tumor Origin and AmpliChip p53. All diagnostic microarray testing is ordered by physicians and tested by a Clinical Laboratories Improvement Amendment-certified (CLIA) reference laboratory. Recently, companies offering consumer based microarray testing have emerged. Individuals can order tests online and service providers deliver the results directly to the clients via a password-protected secure website. Navigenics, 23andMe and deCODE Genetics represent pioneering companies in this field. Although the progress of these microarray-based tests is extremely encouraging with the potential to revolutionize the recognition and treatment of common diseases, these tests are still in their infancy and face technical, clinical and marketing challenges. In this article, we review microarray-based tests which are currently approved or under review by the FDA, as well as the consumer-based testing. We also provide a summary of the challenges and strategic solutions in the development and clinical use of the microarray-based tests. Finally, we present a brief outlook for the future of microarray-based clinical applications. PMID:19506735