Science.gov

Sample records for clinical variables blood

  1. [Clinical significance of nocturnal blood pressure and blood pressure variability: analysis of 522 cases].

    PubMed

    Palatini, P; Mormino, P; Martina, S; Businaro, R; Penzo, M; Racioppa, A; Guzzardi, G; Anaclerio, M; Pessina, A C

    1990-03-01

    Purpose of the study was to investigate whether and to what extent blood pressure variability and average night-time blood pressure are related to cardiovascular complications in hypertension. To this aim 60 normotensive and 462 hypertensive subjects were studied by means of non-invasive 24 hour blood pressure monitoring, using either the Avionics, or the ICR Spacelabs, or the Takeda system. Each subject was attributed a target organ damage score on the basis of 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and fundoscopy, starting from 0 (no damage) up to 5 (maximum degree of damage). The 522 subjects were subsequently subdivided into 5 classes of increasing average daytime diastolic blood pressure. In each class a higher degree of cardiovascular complications was present in the subjects with the higher blood pressure variability and the higher average night-time blood pressure. From these results it may be inferred that both blood pressure variability and night-time blood pressure are related to the degree of target organ damage in hypertension. This stresses the importance of recording blood pressure throughout the 24 hours. PMID:2147124

  2. Within-Home Blood Pressure Variability on a Single Occasion Has Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Seiichi; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that diversely defined blood pressure variability (BPV) is an independent predictor of hypertensive target organ damage (TOD) and cardiovascular events. Several mechanisms have been speculated to underlie episodes of increased BPV, including the impairment of autonomic or hormonal regulation, renal dysfunction, and increased arterial stiffness. Within-home BPV, defined as differences in BP values obtained on a single occasion at home, could have prognostic significance for hypertensive TOD. It is typically thought that BP values are decreased with repeated measurements on a single occasion at home, but in the present subanalysis of 4,149 J-HOP (Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure) study patients, approximately 20% of the patients' home BP values were increased or unchanged by repeated measurements on a single occasion. In addition, those patients were likely to have hypertensive TOD. Thus, home BP measurement should be taken twice or more to detect the increase trend in home BP, which has been defined as within-home BPV. PMID:27493902

  3. Characterization of certain inflammatory variables in the peripheral blood of clinically healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, R; Donahy, C; Jones, B R; Bloomfield, F J

    2006-01-01

    Many laboratory techniques have been developed to study and quantify the inflammatory response, including the release of acid hydrolase enzymes, leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) production, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and complement conversion studies. Although extensively studied in human health and disease, the relevance of such tests in the dog is largely unknown. After isolation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) fractions from the peripheral blood of 38 clinically healthy dogs, values for ROS production were similar for both cell fractions when measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (17,853+/-9,695 U/10(6) cells versus 19,138+/-14,569 U/10(6) cells for the PBMC (n=38) and PMN (n=18) fractions, respectively). However, the mean time taken to reach maximum chemiluminescence was noticeably shorter in the PBMC fraction (5.1+/-3.3 versus 10.7+/-2.5 min for PBMCs (n=36) and PMNs (n=18), respectively). Intracellular concentrations of beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase were assayed by spectrofluorometry. Mean values for all three enzymes were higher in PBMCs (n=31-35) than in PMNs (n=10-14). Both cell fractions released 20% of the intracellular enzyme concentration when stimulated with opsonized zymosan. Following incubation with A23187 (1 microM), mean LTB(4) production was higher in PBMCs (4.45+/-2.92 ng/10(6) cells; n=27) than in PMNs (0.96+/-2.22 ng/10(6) cells; n=13) using a validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that the mean percentage conversion of C3 to C3b following stimulation with opsonized zymosan was 57.3+/-13.4% (n=36). The results provide normal values for clinically healthy dogs that may subsequently be used in future studies investigating dogs with various inflammatory disorders. PMID:16427586

  4. Reproducibility of visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure measured as part of routine clinical care

    PubMed Central

    MUNTNER, Paul; JOYCE, Cara; LEVITAN, Emily B; HOLT, Elizabeth; SHIMBO, Daichi; WEBBER, Larry S; OPARIL, Suzanne; RE, Richard; KROUSEL-WOOD, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Secondary analysis of clinical trial data suggests visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure is strongly associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Measurement of blood pressure in usual practice settings may be subject to substantial error, calling into question the value of VVV in real-world settings. Methods We analyzed data on adults ≥ 65 years of age with diagnosed hypertension who were taking antihypertensive medication from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence among Older Adults (n=772 with 14 or more blood pressure measurements). All blood pressure measurements, taken as part of routine out-patient care over a median of 2.8 years, were abstracted from patients’ medical charts. Results Using each participant’s first 7 systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements, the mean intra-individual standard deviation was 13.5 mmHg. The intra-class correlation coefficient for the standard deviation based on the first 7 and second 7 SBP measurements was 0.28 (95% CI: 0.20 – 0.34). Individuals in the highest quintile of standard deviation of SBP based on their first 7 measurements were more likely to be in the highest quintile of VVV using their second 7 measurements (observed/expected ratio = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.29 – 2.22). Results were similar for other metrics of VVV. The intra-class correlation coefficient was lower for diastolic blood pressure (DBP) than SBP. Conclusions These data suggest VVV of SBP measured in a real-world setting is not random. Future studies are needed to assess the prognostic value of VVV of SBP assessed in routine clinical practice. PMID:22025235

  5. Glycemic variability: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Satya Krishna, Surabhi Venkata; Kota, Sunil K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT) had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV) is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice. PMID:23961476

  6. Blood pressure variability: a novel and important risk factor.

    PubMed

    Floras, John S

    2013-05-01

    Blood pressure is a continuous, not a static, variable. Individuals exhibiting similar clinic or home blood pressure can differ considerably with respect to their average day and nighttime values, beat-by-beat blood pressure variation during wakefulness and sleep, responses to mental and physical stimuli, and intersession and seasonal variation. There now is evidence that several such representations of blood pressure variability, if augmented, increase cardiovascular risk independent of the average of conventionally acquired blood pressure readings. As well, recent retrospective analyses of published trial data have concluded that antihypertensive drug classes differ in their effects on intersession blood pressure variability and associated risk of stroke. If the goal of the hypertension community is to optimize personalized cardiovascular risk assessment and to attenuate fully such risk, future efforts should be directed at determining which representation of blood pressure variability estimates individual cardiovascular risk best, establishing "normal" and "high- risk" variability distributions, testing the hypothesis that attenuating such variability specifically through drug or device therapy reduces cardiovascular risk more than blood pressure reduction per se, and integrating such data into clinical practice. PMID:23618505

  7. Association of Meteorological Variables and Coronary Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ali; Sezen, Yusuf; Gunebakmaz, Ozgur; Kaya, Zekeriya; Altiparmak, Ibrahim Halil; Erkus, Emre; Demirbag, Recep; Yilmaz, Remzi

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of meteorological variables on coronary blood flow (CBF). Coronary blood flow was evaluated using the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count (TFC). The association of CBF with meteorological parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, total solar radiation, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity, and total sunshine duration were investigated as well as demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics. Assessment of 1206 patients (median age = 53 years, 723 females) revealed the presence of slow coronary flow (SCF) in 196 patients. Daily maximum temperature [odds ratio = 0.951, 95% confidence interval = 0.916-0.986, P = .007] was the only independent predictor of the presence of SCF, whereas systolic blood pressure (β = -0.139, P = .026), hematocrit level (β = 0.128, P = .044), and daily maximum temperature (β = -1.479, P = .049) were independent predictors of log10 (mean TFC). Findings of the present study suggest a role of meteorological parameters in CBF regulation. PMID:25313313

  8. The role of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, A

    1997-09-01

    The introduction of noninvasive techniques for the repetitive measurement of blood pressure in ambulant subjects has permitted improved precision in the assessment of hypertension during normal daily life. The traditional clinic (or "office") method of blood pressure measurement has the advantages of simplicity and low cost, and forms the basis of the current operational definitions of hypertension, but it is limited by the normal variability of blood pressure and the "white coat effect." By contrast, ambulatory blood pressure provides information on circadian variations in blood pressure and alterations due to changes in behavior, and may, therefore, be more appropriate for diagnosing hypertension. However, it is important to note that the values used to define normotension and hypertension for clinic blood pressure are not appropriate for ambulatory blood pressure. Recent population studies have proposed that the upper limit for 24-h ambulatory pressure should be 119 to 126/75 to 80 mm Hg, and failure to recognize this may account for at least some cases of "white-coat hypertension." There is increasing evidence that ambulatory blood pressure is more effective than clinic blood pressure in predicting the organ damage associated with hypertension, whereas data from intervention studies indicate that a reduction in ambulatory pressure is correlated with a reduction in left ventricular (LV) mass. Finally, ambulatory blood pressure measurements may provide a number of advantages in the development of antihypertensive therapies: by permitting better identification of trough and peak effects, by confirming that the efficacy of formulations for once-daily dosing is maintained throughout the 24-h period, and by minimizing the placebo effect. PMID:9324116

  9. [Current clinical aspects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Sauza-Sosa, Julio César; Cuéllar-Álvarez, José; Villegas-Herrera, Karla Montserrat; Sierra-Galán, Lilia Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension is the prevalentest disease worldwide that significantly increases cardiovascular risk. An early diagnosis together to achieve goals decreases the risk of complications significatly. Recently have been updated the diagnostic criteria for hypertension and the introduction of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The introduction into clinical practice of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was to assist the diagnosis of «white coat hypertension» and «masked hypertension». Today has also shown that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is better than the traditional method of recording blood pressure in the office, to the diagnosis and to adequate control and adjustment of drug treatment. Also there have been introduced important new concepts such as isloted nocturnal hypertension, morning blood pressure elevation altered and altered patterns of nocturnal dip in blood pressure; which have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several studies have shown significant prognostic value in some stocks. There are still other concepts on which further study is needed to properly establish their introduction to clinical practice as hypertensive load variability, pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. In addition to setting values according to further clinical studies in populations such as elderly and children. PMID:26794338

  10. Blood donation by the elderly. Clinical and policy considerations.

    PubMed

    Pindyck, J; Avorn, J; Kuriyan, M; Reed, M; Iqbal, M J; Levine, S J

    1987-03-01

    At present, healthy potential blood donors older than the age of 66 years often leave the donor pool for reasons of age alone, despite the fact that this demographic group is growing, is a potentially willing source of blood products, and constitutes the cohort with highest per capita use of blood and its derivatives. There is no clinical or physiological rationale for this. We performed a controlled study to measure the feasibility and safety of blood donation by healthy elderly donors aged 66 years and older, compared with a younger cohort aged 55 to 65 years of age. A study group of prior donors aged 66 years and older and a control group of prior donors between the ages of 50 and 65 were sent letters inviting them to donate blood. The volume donated did not differ between the two groups. In the older group, there were eight immediate reactions, seven mild and one moderate. The control population experienced seven immediate reactions, six mild and one severe. We conclude that it is both clinically feasible and efficient to recruit healthy prior donors older than the age of 66 years for blood donation. As a group, this population is potentially able to donate large volumes of blood and do so without any difference in immediate or short-term reactions. Further study of hemodynamic variables as more objective markers of safety is needed. PMID:3806916

  11. [Usefulness for detection of inappropriate blood pressure variability using 'wearable blood pressure sensor'].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    In the clinical settings, it has frequently seen that the elderly have rapid blood pressure (BP) elevation and decline, leading to such as orthostatic disorders and post-urination syncope. Excessive blood pressure variability (BPV) according to aging leads to aggravation of hypertensive target organ damage due to both disturbed baroreflex function and arterial stiffening. We developed continuous BP monitoring sensor using newly developing device 'wearable BP sensor', as our advantageous approach of without a cuff-stress. The new mobile device could reflect continuous beat-to-beat systolic BP, heart rate(HR), these very close changes and double product(sBPX HR) as a major indicator of cardiac lead, in consistent with cuff-based BP value. Our new challenge using this device might approach to the potential to achieve the quality-up of treatment strategy with consideration for very short-term BPV. PMID:26619673

  12. Clinical implications of positive blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, C S

    1989-01-01

    Positive blood cultures can be classified according to their veracity (true-positive or false-positive culture), clinical severity (inconsequential or life threatening), place of origin (community acquired or nosocomial), source (primary or secondary), duration (transient, intermittent, or continuous), pattern of occurrence (single episode, persistent, or recurrent), or intensity (high or low grade). In general, however, positive blood cultures identify a patient population at high risk of death. In my studies, patients with positive blood cultures were 12 times more likely to die during hospitalization than patients without positive blood cultures. Many bacteremias and fungemias occur in complicated clinical settings, and it appears that only about one-half of the deaths among affected patients are due directly to infection. Hence, it is appropriate to speak of "crude mortality" and "attributable mortality." Among hospitalized patients, recent trends include rising incidences of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcal and enterococcal bacteremias and a dramatic increase in the incidence of fungemias. The diagnostic and therapeutic implications of blood cultures positive for specific microorganisms continue to evolve and are the subject of a large and growing medical literature. PMID:2680055

  13. Blood pressure variability and cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Sally; Koshiaris, Constantinos; Law, Kathryn; Glasziou, Paul; McManus, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To systematically review studies quantifying the associations of long term (clinic), mid-term (home), and short term (ambulatory) variability in blood pressure, independent of mean blood pressure, with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Data sources Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and Web of Science, searched to 15 February 2016 for full text articles in English. Eligibility criteria for study selection Prospective cohort studies or clinical trials in adults, except those in patients receiving haemodialysis, where the condition may directly impact blood pressure variability. Standardised hazard ratios were extracted and, if there was little risk of confounding, combined using random effects meta-analysis in main analyses. Outcomes included all cause and cardiovascular disease mortality and cardiovascular disease events. Measures of variability included standard deviation, coefficient of variation, variation independent of mean, and average real variability, but not night dipping or day-night variation. Results 41 papers representing 19 observational cohort studies and 17 clinical trial cohorts, comprising 46 separate analyses were identified. Long term variability in blood pressure was studied in 24 papers, mid-term in four, and short-term in 15 (two studied both long term and short term variability). Results from 23 analyses were excluded from main analyses owing to high risks of confounding. Increased long term variability in systolic blood pressure was associated with risk of all cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.22), cardiovascular disease mortality (1.18, 1.09 to 1.28), cardiovascular disease events (1.18, 1.07 to 1.30), coronary heart disease (1.10, 1.04 to 1.16), and stroke (1.15, 1.04 to 1.27). Increased mid-term and short term variability in daytime systolic blood pressure were also associated with all cause mortality (1.15, 1.06 to 1.26 and 1.10, 1.04 to 1.16, respectively). Conclusions Long term

  14. Blood Pressure Variability and Stress Management Training for Essential Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Vera, Maria Paz; Sanz, Jesus; Labrador, Francisco J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether stress management training reduces blood pressure (BP) variability in hypertensive patients. Previous literature suggests that cardiovascular risk is not only a function of BP levels, but also of BP variability, and this partially depends on changes induced by the stress of everyday life. The…

  15. What variables can influence clinical reasoning?

    PubMed Central

    Ashoorion, Vahid; Liaghatdar, Mohammad Javad; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning is one of the most important competencies that a physician should achieve. Many medical schools and licensing bodies try to predict it based on some general measures such as critical thinking, personality, and emotional intelligence. This study aimed at providing a model to design the relationship between the constructs. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine medical students participated in this study. A battery test devised that consist four parts: Clinical reasoning measures, personality NEO inventory, Bar-On EQ inventory, and California critical thinking questionnaire. All participants completed the tests. Correlation and multiple regression analysis consumed for data analysis. Results: There is low to moderate correlations between clinical reasoning and other variables. Emotional intelligence is the only variable that contributes clinical reasoning construct (r=0.17-0.34) (R2 chnage = 0.46, P Value = 0.000). Conclusion: Although, clinical reasoning can be considered as a kind of thinking, no significant correlation detected between it and other constructs. Emotional intelligence (and its subscales) is the only variable that can be used for clinical reasoning prediction. PMID:23853636

  16. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  17. Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.

    1986-10-01

    Ten male patients with parkinsonism secondary to Parkinson's disease or progressive supranuclear palsy had clinical neurological, speech, and acoustical speech evaluations. In addition, seven of the patients were evaluated by x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Extensive variability of speech features, both clinical and acoustical, were found and seemed to be independent of the severity of any parkinsonian sign, CT, or FDG PET. In addition, little relationship existed between the variability across each measured speech feature. What appeared to be important for the appearance of abnormal acoustic measures was the degree of overall severity of the dysarthria. These observations suggest that a better understanding of hypokinetic dysarthria may result from more extensive examination of the variability between patients. Emphasizing a specific feature such as rapid speaking rate in characterizing hypokinetic dysarthria focuses on a single and inconstant finding in a complex speech pattern.

  18. The clinical utility of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM): a review.

    PubMed

    Harianto, Harry; Valente, Michael; Hoetomo, Soenarno; Anpalahan, Mahesan

    2014-01-01

    The current evidence suggests that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) should be an integral part of the diagnosis and management of hypertension. However, its uptake in routine clinical practice has been variable. This paper reviews the current evidence for the role of ABPM in clinical practice, including in hypotensive disorders and in specific comorbidities. It further discusses the clinical significance of abnormal ambulatory blood pressure patterns and hypertensive syndromes such as white coat, masked and resistant hypertension. PMID:25801624

  19. MEASUREMENT-TO-MEASUREMENT BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY IS RELATED TO COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE: THE MAINE-SYRACUSE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Torres, Rachael V.; Robbins, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the association between variability in blood pressure and cognitive function for sitting, standing and reclining blood pressure values, and variability derived from all 15 measures. In previous studies only sitting blood pressure values have been examined, and only a few cognitive measures have been employed. A secondary objective was to examine associations between blood pressure variability and cognitive performance in hypertensive individuals stratified by treatment success. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on 972 participants of the Maine Syracuse Study for whom 15 serial blood pressure clinic measures (5 sitting, 5 recumbant and 5 standing) were obtained, prior to testing of cognitive performance. Using all 15 measures, higher variability in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was associated with poorer performance on multiple measures of cognitive performance, independent of demographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, and pulse pressure. When sitting, reclining and standing systolic blood pressure values were compared, only variability in standing blood pressure was related to measures of cognitive performance. However, for diastolic blood pressure, variability in all three positions was related to cognitive performance. Mean blood pressure values were weaker predictors of cognition. Furthermore, higher overall variability in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was associated with poorer cognitive performance in unsuccessfully treated hypertensive individuals (with blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg), but these associations were not evident in those with controlled hypertension. PMID:25156168

  20. Current clinical applications of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Stys, A; Stys, T

    1998-10-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has become a popular method for the studies of physiologic mechanisms responsible for the control of heart rate fluctuations, in which the autonomic nervous system appears to play a primary role. Depression of HRV has been observed in many clinical scenarios, including autonomic neuropathy, heart transplantation, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction (MI), and other cardiac and noncardiac diseases. However, it is important to realize that clinical implication of HRV analysis has been clearly recognized in only two clinical conditions: (1) as a predictor of risk of arrhythmic events or sudden cardiac death after acute MI, and (2) as a clinical marker of evolving diabetic neuropathy. Recently, its role in evaluation and management of heart failure has also been recognized. It is pertinent to recognize the limitations of HRV as far as its clinical utility at present is concerned. The methodology of HRV had remained poorly standardized until the recent publication of the Special Report of the Task Force of ESC/NASPE, and thus has been presenting difficulty in comparing earlier existing data. Also, determination of the exact sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of HRV, as well as the normal values of standard measures in the general population, still require further investigation before better standards can be set for existing and future clinical applications. This article reviews the major concepts of HRV measurements, their clinical relevance, and the recent advances in this field. PMID:9789691

  1. Higher Blood Pressure Variability in White Coat Hypertension; from the Korean Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kang, In Sook; Shin, Jinho; Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Ju Han; Park, Sungha; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Soon Gil; Shin, Gil Ja

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Blood pressure variability (BPV) was recently shown to be a risk factor of stroke. White coat hypertension (WCH) used to be regarded as innocuous, but one long-term follow-up study reported that WCH increased stroke rate compared to normotension (NT). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between WCH and BPV. Subjects and Methods We analyzed 1398 subjects from the Korean Ambulatory Blood Pressure Registry, who were divided into NT (n=364), masked hypertension (n=122), white coat hypertension (n=254), and sustained hypertension (n=658) groups. Results Baseline characteristics were similar among groups. The average real variability (ARV), a highly sensitive BPV parameter, was highest in the WCH group, followed by the sustained hypertension, masked hypertension, and NT groups. The results persisted after being adjusted for covariates. The WCH vs. sustained hypertension results (adjusted mean±standard error) were as follows: 24-h systolic ARV, 22.9±0.8 vs. 19.4±0.6; 24-h diastolic ARV, 16.8±0.6 vs. 14.3±0.5; daytime systolic ARV, 21.8±0.8 vs. 16.8±0.6; and daytime diastolic ARV, 16.2±0.6 vs. 13.4±0.5 (p<0.001 for all comparisons). Conclusion From the registry data, we found that subjects with WCH or masked hypertension had higher BPV than NT. However, long-term follow-up data assessing the clinical influences of WCH on stroke are needed.

  2. Is It Daily, Monthly, or Yearly Blood Pressure Variability that Enhances Cardiovascular Risk?

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eamon; O'Brien, Eoin

    2015-11-01

    Variability is a phenomenon common to most biological processes that we can measure and is a particular feature of blood pressure (BP). Variability causes concern for many physicians regarding its clinical meaning and potential impact on cardiovascular risk. In this review, we assess the role of different time periods of blood pressure variability (BPV) in cardiovascular risk stratification. We review the indices of BPV derived from ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM), home blood pressure measurement (HBPM), or at the clinic setting with the intention of providing a clear message for clinical practice. BPV, either derived from ABPM or HBPM, does not consistently augment cardiovascular risk prediction over and beyond that of average BP, particularly in low-risk individuals. That said, it would seem that certain medications such as calcium channel blockers may have a beneficial effect on visit-to-visit BPV and perhaps reduce the associated cardiovascular risk. This highlights the benefits in using combination therapy which might couple a number of therapeutic benefits such as the reductions of mean blood pressure and BPV. Overall, we should remain aware that the average BP level remains the main modifiable risk factor derived from BP measurements and continue to improve the control of hypertension and adverse health outcomes. PMID:26351017

  3. Methodology and technology for peripheral and central blood pressure and blood pressure variability measurement: current status and future directions - Position statement of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, George S; Parati, Gianfranco; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Achimastos, Apostolos; Andreadis, Emanouel; Asmar, Roland; Avolio, Alberto; Benetos, Athanase; Bilo, Grzegorz; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Castiglioni, Paolo; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Dolan, Eamon; Head, Geoffrey; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Kollias, Anastasios; Kotsis, Vasilis; Manios, Efstathios; McManus, Richard; Mengden, Thomas; Mihailidou, Anastasia; Myers, Martin; Niiranen, Teemu; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Padfield, Paul; Palatini, Paolo; Papaioannou, Theodore; Protogerou, Athanasios; Redon, Josep; Verdecchia, Paolo; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Mancia, Giuseppe; O'Brien, Eoin

    2016-09-01

    Office blood pressure measurement has been the basis for hypertension evaluation for almost a century. However, the evaluation of blood pressure out of the office using ambulatory or self-home monitoring is now strongly recommended for the accurate diagnosis in many, if not all, cases with suspected hypertension. Moreover, there is evidence that the variability of blood pressure might offer prognostic information that is independent of the average blood pressure level. Recently, advancement in technology has provided noninvasive evaluation of central (aortic) blood pressure, which might have attributes that are additive to the conventional brachial blood pressure measurement. This position statement, developed by international experts, deals with key research and practical issues in regard to peripheral blood pressure measurement (office, home, and ambulatory), blood pressure variability, and central blood pressure measurement. The objective is to present current achievements, identify gaps in knowledge and issues concerning clinical application, and present relevant research questions and directions to investigators and manufacturers for future research and development (primary goal). PMID:27214089

  4. Blood pressure variability in controlled and uncontrolled blood pressure and its association with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Wittke, E I; Fuchs, S C; Moreira, L B; Foppa, M; Fuchs, F D; Gus, M

    2016-08-01

    High systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability has been associated with higher risk for target-organ damage. In a cross-sectional study done in a tertiary outpatient hypertension clinic, we compared short-term SBP variability among controlled and uncontrolled hypertensive patients and evaluated the association between higher levels of SBP variability and diastolic function and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Patients were evaluated by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and transthoracic Doppler echocardiogram. Blood pressure (BP) variability was evaluated by the time-rate index and high variability corresponded to index values in the top quartile of distribution. Echocardiographic parameters were compared in patients with and without higher BP variability within controlled and uncontrolled office BP (⩽140/90 mm Hg). The analyses included 447 patients with 58±12 years of age, 67% were women, 68% white, 43% current or previous smokers and 32% with diabetes mellitus. Among the whole sample, 137 patients had controlled and 310 uncontrolled BP. The 75th percentile cutoff points for the time-rate index were 0.502 mm Hg min(-1) and 0.576 mm Hg min(-1) for participants with controlled and uncontrolled BP, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, the time-rate index did not differ between controlled and uncontrolled patients. BP variability was not associated with LVH or diastolic function in controlled and uncontrolled BP after adjustment for 24-h SBP and age. Patients with controlled and uncontrolled BP had similar SBP variability assessed by time-rate index, which was not associated with LVH or diastolic function. These findings should be confirmed in studies with larger sample size. PMID:26467817

  5. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  6. Alternative Blood Products and Clinical Needs in Transfusion Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Carolyn; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    The primary focus of national blood programs is the provision of a safe and adequate blood supply. This goal is dependent on regular voluntary donations and a regulatory infrastructure that establishes and enforces standards for blood safety. Progress in ex vivo expansion of blood cells from cell sources including peripheral blood, cord blood, induced pluripotent stem cells, and human embryonic stem cell lines will likely make alternative transfusion products available for clinical use in the near future. Initially, alloimmunized patients and individuals with rare blood types are most likely to benefit from alternative products. However, in developed nations voluntary blood donations are projected to be inadequate in the future as blood usage by individuals 60 years and older increases. In developing nations economic and political challenges may impede progress in attaining self-sufficiency. Under these circumstances, ex vivo generated red cells may be needed to supplement the general blood supply. PMID:22567025

  7. Assessment of Normal Variability in Peripheral Blood Gene Expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Campbell, Catherine; Vernon, Suzanne D.; Karem, Kevin L.; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Unger, Elizabeth R.

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral blood is representative of many systemic processes and is an ideal sample for expression profiling of diseases that have no known or accessible lesion. Peripheral blood is a complex mixture of cell types and some differences in peripheral blood gene expression may reflect the timing of sample collection rather than an underlying disease process. For this reason, it is important to assess study design factors that may cause variability in gene expression not related to what is being analyzed. Variation in the gene expression of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from three healthy volunteers sampled three times onemore » day each week for one month was examined for 1,176 genes printed on filter arrays. Less than 1% of the genes showed any variation in expression that was related to the time of collection, and none of the changes were noted in more than one individual. These results suggest that observed variation was due to experimental variability.« less

  8. Residual feed intake and blood variables in young Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, C F; Branco, R H; Bonilha, S F M; Cyrillo, J N S G; Negrão, J A; Mercadante, M E Z

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate associations of performance traits, feed efficiency, and blood variables with residual feed intake (RFI) in growing Nellore cattle. A total of 118 growing Nellore animals, 62 males and 56 females, were used. A diet containing 2 Mcal/kg was offered ad libitum and individual DMI was measured over a period of 84 d. Animals were classified as low (≤0.128 kg/d; = 40), medium (-0.128 to 0.135 kg/d; = 42), or high RFI (>0.135 kg/d; = 36). Blood samples were collected at the beginning and at the end of the test for determination of plasma concentrations of different blood variables. Data were analyzed using a mixed model that included the random effect of facility the fixed effects of sex, RFI class, and linear effect of the covariate age within sex; and the interaction between RFI class and sex. Least squares means were compared using a -test. Animals of different RFI classes presented similar performance traits and different DMI. Low-RFI animals consumed, on average, 0.670 kg/d less DM than high-RFI animals. Among the blood variables analyzed, significant differences among RFI classes were observed for urea, IGF-1, and insulin. Plasma urea concentrations were lower (5.58 vs. 5.91 mmol/L) and insulin (4.45 vs. 3.70 μIU/mL) and IGF-1 (433 vs. 399 ng/mL) concentrations were higher in low-RFI animals when compared to high-RFI animals. Plasma concentrations of urea, IGF-1, and insulin can be used as indicators of feed utilization efficiency in Nellore cattle. PMID:26020908

  9. [Common variable immunodeficiency: a clinical challenge].

    PubMed

    Warnatz, K; Goldacker, S

    2013-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) represents the most common clinically relevant form of primary immunodeficiency. This heterogeneous antibody deficiency syndrome is characterized not only by susceptibility to bacterial respiratory tract infections but displays additional signs of immune dysregulation, such as autoimmunity, chronic inflammation and lymphoproliferation in more than 30 % of the patients. Due to poor awareness the diagnosis is often delayed by 4-6 years. A close collaboration in patient care with a center specialized in primary immunodeficiency is recommended. Regular follow-up visits include assessment of adequate immunoglobulin replacement therapy and screening for manifestation of secondary complications. Regular substitution with intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulins has more or less normalized life expectancy of patients with isolated susceptibility to bacterial infections. Therefore, the current core task in the management of CVID patients is the elaboration of more effective and safer forms of prophylaxis and treatment of sequelae of immune dysregulation in the lungs, intestines and liver of affected patients. PMID:23929240

  10. Fasting Blood Glucose-A Missing Variable for GFR-Estimation in Type 1 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; McQueen, R. Brett; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Cherney, David; Pyle, Laura; Perkins, Bruce; Rewers, Marian; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is one of the current clinical methods for identifying risk for diabetic nephropathy in subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Hyperglycemia is known to influence GFR in T1D and variability in blood glucose at the time of eGFR measurement could introduce bias in eGFR. We hypothesized that simultaneously measured blood glucose would influence eGFR in adults with T1D. Methods Longitudinal multivariable mixed-models were employed to investigate the relationships between blood glucose and eGFR by CKD-EPI eGFRCYSTATIN C over 6-years in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 diabetes (CACTI) study. All subjects with T1D and complete data including blood glucose and cystatin C for at least one of the three visits (n = 616, 554, and 521, respectively) were included in the longitudinal analyses. Results In mixed-models adjusting for sex, HbA1c, ACEi/ARB, protein and sodium intake positive associations were observed between simultaneous blood glucose and eGFRCYSTATIN C (β±SE:0.14±0.04 per 10 mg/dL of blood glucose, p<0.0001), and hyperfiltration as a dichotomous outcome (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01–1.07 per 10 mg/dL of blood glucose, p = 0.02). Conclusions In our longitudinal data in subjects with T1D, simultaneous blood glucose has an independent positive effect on eGFRCYSTATIN C. The associations between blood glucose and eGFRCYSTATIN C may bias the accurate detection of early diabetic nephropathy, especially in people with longitudinal variability in blood glucose. PMID:24781861

  11. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  12. Variability of laboratory coat resistance to blood strikethrough.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W; Muzik, A C; Lovitt, S A; Nichols, R L

    1994-03-01

    Protection from contamination by potentially infectious fluids is an increasingly important aspect of hospital safety programs. Technical personnel in clinical laboratories may handle numerous samples of human blood and other fluids daily, and to protect themselves against exposure to bloodborne pathogens they routinely wear laboratory coats. We studied the effectiveness of six disposable (polypropylene; either spun-bond or spun-bond/melt-blown/spun-bond construction) and four reusable (polyester-cotton) laboratory coats in preventing blood passage. Fabrics (1018 samples) were tested at six time durations (1 s-5 min) and five pressures [1.7-13.8 kPa (0.25-2.0 psi)]. A standard spray test used to evaluate resistance to wetting showed that reusable coats were less repellent than disposables (P < 0.05). Pressure testing showed that reusable and spun-bond coats allowed greater blood passage than the spun-bond/melt-blown/spun-bond. Laboratory coats should be chosen that have sufficient resistance to blood or other body fluid passage for the task performed and for the period of time used. PMID:8131283

  13. [Blood sampling using "dried blood spot": a clinical biology revolution underway?].

    PubMed

    Hirtz, Christophe; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Blood testing using the dried blood spot (DBS) is used since the 1960s in clinical analysis, mainly within the framework of the neonatal screening (Guthrie test). Since then numerous analytes such as nucleic acids, small molecules or lipids, were successfully measured on the DBS. While this pre-analytical method represents an interesting alternative to classic blood sampling, its use in routine is still limited. We review here the different clinical applications of the blood sampling on DBS and estimate its future place, supported by the new methods of analysis as the LC-MS mass spectrometry. PMID:25582720

  14. Quantifying the Risk of Blood Exposure in Optometric Clinical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    A study attempted to quantify risk of blood exposure in optometric clinical education by surveying optometric interns in their fourth year at the Southern California College of Optometry concerning their history of exposure or use of a needle. Results indicate blood exposure or needle use ranged from 0.95 to 18.71 per 10,000 patient encounters.…

  15. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Spinal Cord Injury: Clinical Practicability

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Trauma to the spinal cord often results not only in sensorimotor but also autonomic impairments. The loss of autonomic control over the cardiovascular system can cause profound blood pressure (BP) derangements in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) and may therefore lead to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in this population. The use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) allows insights into circadian BP profiles, which have been shown to be of good prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in able-bodied subjects. Past studies in SCI subjects using ABPM have shown that alterations in circadian BP patterns are dependent on the spinal lesion level. Tetraplegic subjects with sensorimotor complete lesions have a decreased daytime arterial BP, loss of the physiological nocturnal BP dip, and higher circadian BP variability, including potentially life-threatening hypertensive episodes known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD), compared with paraplegic and able-bodied subjects. The proposed underlying mechanisms of these adverse BP alterations mainly are attributed to a lost or decreased central drive to sympathetic spinal preganglionic neurons controlling the heart and blood vessels. In addition, several maladaptive anatomical changes within the spinal cord and the periphery, as well as the general decrease of physical daily activity in SCI subjects, account for adverse BP changes. ABPM enables the identification of adverse BP profiles and the associated increased risk for CVD in SCI subjects. Concurrently, it also might provide a useful clinical tool to monitor improvements of AD and lost nocturnal dip after appropriate treatments in the SCI population. PMID:24175653

  16. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  17. Ambulatory monitoring derived blood pressure variability and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Magdás, Annamária; Szilágyi, László; Belényi, Boglárka; Incze, Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension in the elderly is characterized by isolated systolic hypertension and high variability, but its clinical significance is not yet fully understood. The goal of this paper was to assess circadian blood pressure variability (BPV) in elderly hypertensives, and to determine its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors. To achieve this goal, a number of 75 inefficiently treated hypertensive patients were studied, 45 elderly, aged over 60 years, 30 middle-aged, younger than 60 years. After 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), blood pressure (BP) values, pulse pressure (PP), morning surge were compared between the groups. BPV was calculated using average real variability (ARV). The relationships between BPV, pulse pressure, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in both groups. As a result, it was found that left ventricular mass (p=0.01), PP, morning surge, 24-hour systolic ARV were significantly higher in the elderly group (p<0.05). In both groups, higher 24-hour BPV was associated with an increase in LVMI. In the elderly population 24-hour BPV was positively correlated to increased PP, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels (p<0.05). Moreover, it was concluded that ABPM-derived BP variability index could be an early predictive marker of end-organ damage in hypertension. Its reduction might be an important objective of hypertension management in elderly. PMID:25226958

  18. Interferences from blood collection tube components on clinical chemistry assays

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Raffick A.R.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Improper design or use of blood collection devices can adversely affect the accuracy of laboratory test results. Vascular access devices, such as catheters and needles, exert shear forces during blood flow, which creates a predisposition to cell lysis. Components from blood collection tubes, such as stoppers, lubricants, surfactants, and separator gels, can leach into specimens and/or adsorb analytes from a specimen; special tube additives may also alter analyte stability. Because of these interactions with blood specimens, blood collection devices are a potential source of pre-analytical error in laboratory testing. Accurate laboratory testing requires an understanding of the complex interactions between collection devices and blood specimens. Manufacturers, vendors, and clinical laboratorians must consider the pre-analytical challenges in laboratory testing. Although other authors have described the effects of endogenous substances on clinical assay results, the effects/impact of blood collection tube additives and components have not been well systematically described or explained. This review aims to identify and describe blood collection tube additives and their components and the strategies used to minimize their effects on clinical chemistry assays. PMID:24627713

  19. Clinical aspects of blood pressure autorhythmometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.; Halberg, F.

    1974-01-01

    Self-measurements made by a 55-year-old physician with mild to moderate hypertension of ten years' duration are considered. The physician had been in excellent health until age 45 when sustained elevation of blood pressure up to 180/100 mmHg and a slight aortic diastolic murmur were noted. On the basis of the investigation it is suggested that physical and mental performance measures provide an objective basis for assessing the desirability of a given physiological change. Such studies will have to be complemented by a search for long-term effects.

  20. Clinical Assessment of Central Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (CBP) is increasingly considered a better cardiovascular prognostic marker than conventional cuff brachial blood pressure. Because CBP cannot be directly measured noninvasively, it has to be estimated from peripheral pressure pulses. To assess estimated CBP appropriately, the accuracy and features of the estimation method should be considered. The aim of this review is to provide basic knowledge and information useful for interpreting and assessing estimated CBP from a methodological point of view. Precise peripheral pressure pulse recording has been enabled by the introduction of arterial applanation tonometry, for which the radial artery may be the optimal site. An automated tonometry device utilizing a sensor array is preferable in terms of reproducibility and objectivity. Calibration of a peripheral pressure waveform has unresolved problems for any estimation method, due to imperfect brachial sphygmomanometry. However, if central and peripheral pressure calibrations are equivalent, two major methods to estimate CBP—those based on generalized pressure transfer function or radial late systolic pressure—may be comparable in their accuracy of CBP parameter estimation. PMID:22866025

  1. External Counterpulsation Reduces Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Variability When Augmenting Blood Pressure and Cerebral Blood Flow in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ge; Xiong, Li; Lin, Wenhua; Han, Jinghao; Chen, Xiangyan; Leung, Thomas Wai Hong; Soo, Yannie Oi Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose External counterpulsation (ECP) is a noninvasive method used to enhance cerebral perfusion by elevating the blood pressure in ischemic stroke. However, the response of the beat-to-beat blood pressure variability (BPV) in ischemic stroke patients during ECP remains unknown. Methods We enrolled recent ischemic stroke patients and healthy controls. Changes in the blood flow velocities in bilateral middle cerebral arteries and the continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure before, during, and after ECP were monitored. Power spectral analysis revealed that the BPV included oscillations at very low frequency (VLF; <0.04 Hz), low frequency (LF; 0.04–0.15 Hz), and high frequency (HF; 0.15–0.40 Hz), and the total power spectral density (TP; <0.40 Hz) and LF/HF ratio were calculated. Results We found that ECP significantly increased the systolic and diastolic blood pressures in both stroke patients and controls. ECP decreased markedly the systolic and diastolic BPVs at VLF and LF and the TP, and the diastolic BPV at HF when compared with baseline. The decreases in diastolic and systolic BPV reached 37.56% and 23.20%, respectively, at VLF, 21.15% and 12.19% at LF, 8.76% and 16.59% at HF, and 31.92% and 23.62% for the total TP in stroke patients, which did not differ from those in healthy controls. The change in flow velocity on the contralateral side was positively correlated with the total TP systolic BPV change induced by ECP (r=0.312, p=0.035). Conclusions ECP reduces the beat-to-beat BPV when increasing the blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity in ischemic stroke patients. ECP might be able to improve the clinical outcome by decreasing the beat-to-beat BPV in stroke patients, and this should be explored further in future studies. PMID:27095525

  2. Determination of Correlation Among Heart Rate Variability, Left Atrium Global Strain, and Nighttime Blood Pressure Among Patients with Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Değirmenci, Hüsnü; Bakırcı, Eftal Murat; Salcan, İsmail; Demirelli, Selami; Duman, Hakan; Ceyhun, Gökhan; Küçüksu, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine the correlation among nighttime blood pressure, heart rate variability, and left atrium peak systolic global longitudinal strain among patients with subjective tinnitus. Material/Methods Eighty patients with tinnitus were assigned to Group 1 and 80 healthy individuals were assigned to Group 2. Clinical blood pressure measurements, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and Holter electrocardiography monitoring were performed. All of the cases included in the study were examined with conventional echocardiography and 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. Results Mean nighttime systolic blood pressure (130.3±5.4) and mean nighttime diastolic blood pressure (82.8±3.9) in Group 1 were higher than in Group 2 (125.1±5.4 and 80.7±4.7, respectively) (p<0.05). Mean heart rate in Group 1 was significantly lower than in Group 2 but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rate variability parameters and left atrium peak systolic global longitudinal strain values (p>0.05). Conclusions Nighttime systolic blood pressure and nighttime diastolic blood pressure were higher among the patients with tinnitus. In light of these results, we can conclude that both clinical blood pressure measurement and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are important for patients with tinnitus. PMID:25249354

  3. Intraocular Pressure, Blood Pressure, and Retinal Blood Flow Autoregulation: A Mathematical Model to Clarify Their Relationship and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Guidoboni, Giovanna; Harris, Alon; Cassani, Simone; Arciero, Julia; Siesky, Brent; Amireskandari, Annahita; Tobe, Leslie; Egan, Patrick; Januleviciene, Ingrida; Park, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigates the relationship between intraocular pressure (IOP) and retinal hemodynamics and predicts how arterial blood pressure (BP) and blood flow autoregulation (AR) influence this relationship. Methods. A mathematical model is developed to simulate blood flow in the central retinal vessels and retinal microvasculature as current flowing through a network of resistances and capacitances. Variable resistances describe active and passive diameter changes due to AR and IOP. The model is validated by using clinically measured values of retinal blood flow and velocity. The model simulations for six theoretical patients with high, normal, and low BP (HBP-, NBP-, LBP-) and functional or absent AR (-wAR, -woAR) are compared with clinical data. Results. The model predicts that NBPwAR and HBPwAR patients can regulate retinal blood flow (RBF) as IOP varies between 15 and 23 mm Hg and between 23 and 29 mm Hg, respectively, whereas LBPwAR patients do not adequately regulate blood flow if IOP is 15 mm Hg or higher. Hemodynamic alterations would be noticeable only if IOP changes occur outside of the regulating range, which, most importantly, depend on BP. The model predictions are consistent with clinical data for IOP reduction via surgery and medications and for cases of induced IOP elevation. Conclusions. The theoretical model results suggest that the ability of IOP to induce noticeable changes in retinal hemodynamics depends on the levels of BP and AR of the individual. These predictions might help to explain the inconsistencies found in the clinical literature concerning the relationship between IOP and retinal hemodynamics. PMID:24876284

  4. Study on Yang-Xu Using Body Constitution Questionnaire and Blood Variables in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Jhang; Lin, Yii-Jeng; Wu, Pei-Chen; Hsu, Wei-Hsiang; Hu, Wan-Chung; Wu, Trong-Neng; Chen, Fang-Pey; Lin, Yun-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulates treatment according to body constitution (BC) differentiation. Different constitutions have specific metabolic characteristics and different susceptibility to certain diseases. This study aimed to assess the Yang-Xu constitution using a body constitution questionnaire (BCQ) and clinical blood variables. A BCQ was employed to assess the clinical manifestation of Yang-Xu. The logistic regression model was conducted to explore the relationship between BC scores and biomarkers. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) and K-fold cross-validation were performed to evaluate the accuracy of a predictive model in practice. Decision trees (DTs) were conducted to determine the possible relationships between blood biomarkers and BC scores. According to the BCQ analysis, 49% participants without any BC were classified as healthy subjects. Among them, 130 samples were selected for further analysis and divided into two groups. One group comprised healthy subjects without any BC (68%), while subjects of the other group, named as the sub-healthy group, had three BCs (32%). Six biomarkers, CRE, TSH, HB, MONO, RBC, and LH, were found to have the greatest impact on BCQ outcomes in Yang-Xu subjects. This study indicated significant biochemical differences in Yang-Xu subjects, which may provide a connection between blood variables and the Yang-Xu BC. PMID:27340421

  5. Private cord blood banking: current use and clinical future.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Peter; McCauley, Catherina

    2009-09-01

    International private umbilical cord blood banking has expanded rapidly in recent years since the first cord blood transplant which was 20 years ago. Private companies offer parents the opportunity to store umbilical cord blood for the possible future use by their child or other family members. The private cord blood industry has been criticised by a number of professional bodies including the EU Ethics Committee, the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the Royal College of Midwives and the US College of Paediatrics. This review presents the arguments from the opponents of private cord blood banking, and then makes the case for private cord banking based on the latest scientific and clinical evidence. PMID:19603288

  6. Gender differences in the relationship between resting heart rate variability and 24-hour blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Friedman, Bruce H; Koenig, Julian

    2016-02-01

    The study explored the relationship between time- and frequency-domain indices of cardiac autonomic control and 24 h blood pressure variability (BPV) in a sample of healthy men and women. Vagally mediated cardiac control was inversely related to 24 h BPV, and measures of cardiac autonomic control were better predictors of systolic BPV in men and better predictors of diastolic BPV in women. These findings may help researchers to understand the disparity in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality between men and women. PMID:26415550

  7. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring-Derived Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability in Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Andrea; Bernardi, Stella; Rebellato, Andrea; Fabris, Bruno; Bardelli, Moreno; Burrello, Jacopo; Rabbia, Franco; Veglio, Franco; Fallo, Francesco; Carretta, Renzo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term blood pressure (BP) variability (BPV) derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA), either idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) or aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA), in comparison with patients with essential hypertension (EH) and normotensive (NT) controls. Thirty patients with PA (16 with IHA and 14 with APA), 30 patients with EH, and 30 NT controls, matched for sex, age, body mass index, and antihypertensive therapy, were studied. The standard deviation (SD) of 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime BP; 24-hour weighted SD of BP; and 24-hour BP average real variability were not different between patients with PA and those with EH (P=not significant). All BPV indices were higher in patients with PA, either IHA or APA subtypes, and patients with EH, compared with NT controls (P<.001 to P<.05). ABPM-derived short-term BPV is increased in patients with PA, and it may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease. The role of aldosterone excess in BPV has to be clarified. PMID:25880017

  8. Pretransfusion blood irradiation: Clinical rationale and dosimetric considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Masterson, M.E.; Febo, R. )

    1992-05-01

    The irradiation of blood before transfusion into immunosuppressed patients is an increasingly common technique used to prevent graft-versus-host disease. A technical procedure is described for the calibration of blood irradiators, including the determination of absolute dose rate and relative dose distribution over the blood volume. Results of dose rate measurements on commercially available irradiators indicate differences of +5% to {minus}13% with manufacturer-supplied calibrations and variations in the relative dose rate over the irradiation volume from 70% to 180%. The clinical implications of these findings and the need for accurate dosimetry are discussed.

  9. From evidence to clinical practice in blood and marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khera, Nandita

    2015-11-01

    Clinical practice in the field of blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) has evolved over time, as a result of thousands of basic and clinical research studies. While it appears that scientific discovery and adaptive clinical research may be well integrated in case of BMT, there is lack of sufficient literature to definitively understand the process of translation of evidence to practice and if it may be selective . In this review, examples from BMT and other areas of medicine are used to highlight the state of and potential barriers to evidence uptake. Strategies to help improve knowledge transfer are discussed and the role of existing framework provided by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Registry (CIBMTR) to monitor uptake and BMT Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) to enhance translation of evidence into practice is highlighted. PMID:25934009

  10. Role of Ambulatory and Home Blood Pressure Recording in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Nimrta; Campbell, Patrick; White, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Due to shortcomings of the office blood pressure (BP) in individuals with hypertension, including white coat and masked hypertension effects, terminal digit bias and large variability in BP among a small number of readings, the utilization of out-of-office blood pressure measurements has become much more common in clinical practice. The presence of the syndromes of white coat and masked hypertension creates the concern that the office BP measurements are not reflective of an individual patient's true BP values. Home (or self) and ambulatory BP assessments have been used in numerous types of clinical trials and have demonstrated their usefulness as reliable research and clinical tools. In this article, we review the recent literature on the benefits and limitations of home (self) and ambulatory monitoring of the BP in clinical practice, particularly how it relates to diagnosis of patients with various presentations of hypertension and to cardiovascular outcomes with long-term follow-ups of population cohorts. PMID:19863865

  11. Variability of capillary blood glucose monitoring measured on home glucose monitoring devices

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Narendra; Pandit, Aditi

    2012-01-01

    Self monitoring of blood glucose helps achieve glycemic goals. Glucometers must be accurate. Many variables affect blood glucose levels. Factors are analytical variables (intrinsic to glucometer and glucose strips) and pre analytical related to patients. Analytical variables depend on factors like shelf life, amount of blood and enzymatic reactions. Preanalytical variables include pH of blood, hypoxia, hypotension, hematocrit etc. CGMS has the potential to revolutionise diabetes care but accuracy needs to be proven beyond doubt before replacing current glucometer devices. PMID:23565391

  12. Blood pressure (BP) assessment-from BP level to BP variability.

    PubMed

    Feber, Janusz; Litwin, Mieczyslaw

    2016-07-01

    The assessment of blood pressure (BP) can be challenging in children, especially in very young individuals, due to their variable body size and lack of cooperation. In the absence of data relating BP with cardiovascular outcomes in children, there is a need to convert absolute BP values (in mmHg) into age-, gender- and height appropriate BP percentiles or Z-scores in order to compare a patient's BP with the BP of healthy children of the same age, but also of children of different ages. Traditionally, the interpretation of BP has been based mainly on the assessment of the BP level obtained by office, home or 24-h BP monitoring. Recent studies suggest that it is not only BP level (i.e. average BP) but also BP variability that is clinically important for the development of target organ damage, including the progression of chronic kidney disease. In this review we describe current methods to evaluate of BP level, outline available methods for BP variability assessment and discuss the clinical consequences of BP variability, including its potential role in the management of hypertension. PMID:26201477

  13. Clinical Implications of Ambulatory and Home Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Because blood pressure (BP) is an ever changing hemodynamic phenomenon, a BP value, once measured at a physician's office (Office BP), is often unrepresentative of an individual's true BP status. Both ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) provide more accurate and reproducible estimate of BP, and produce stronger predictive ability for cardiovascular outcome than conventional office BP. Two BP measuring techniques, ABPM and HBPM have been widely in clinical use for the detection and management of hypertension. However, they have different advantages and limitations in practice. At present, it has become crucial to understand the characteristics and clinical implications of these BP measuring techniques for those responsible for the care of hypertensive patients. PMID:20967142

  14. ICU Blood Pressure Variability May Predict Nadir of Respiratory Depression After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Anne S. M.; Costa, Paulo H. M.; de Lima, Carlos E. B.; Pádua, Luiz E. M.; Campos, Luciana A.; Baltatu, Ovidiu C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical stress induces alterations on sympathovagal balance that can be determined through assessment of blood pressure variability. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is associated with postoperative respiratory depression. In this study we aimed at investigating ICU blood pressure variability and other perioperative parameters that could predict the nadir of postoperative respiratory function impairment. Methods: This prospective observational study evaluated 44 coronary artery disease patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). At the ICU, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was monitored every 30 min for 3 days. MAP variability was evaluated through: standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), variation independent of mean (VIM), and average successive variability (ASV). Respiratory function was assessed through maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures and peak expiratory flow (PEF) determined 1 day before surgery and on the postoperative days 3rd to 7th. Intraoperative parameters (volume of cardioplegia, CPB duration, aortic cross-clamp time, number of grafts) were also monitored. Results: Since, we aimed at studying patients without confounding effects of postoperative complications on respiratory function, we had enrolled a cohort of low risk EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation) with < 2. Respiratory parameters MIP, MEP, and PEF were significantly depressed for 4–5 days postoperatively. Of all MAP variability parameters, the ASV had a significant good positive Spearman correlation (rho coefficients ranging from 0.45 to 0.65, p < 0.01) with the 3-day nadir of PEF after cardiac surgery. Also, CV and VIM of MAP were significantly associated with nadir days of MEP and PEF. None of the intraoperative parameters had any correlation with the postoperative respiratory depression. Conclusions: Variability parameters ASV, CV, and VIM of the MAP

  15. Clinical, haematological and biochemical responses of sheep undergoing autologous blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical, haematological and biochemical responses to autologous blood transfusion and the feasibility of this practice in sheep. Thus, we used eight male, 8 months old sheep, weighing on average 30 kg, from which 15 mL/kg of whole blood was collected and stored in CPDA-1 bags. Blood samples were refrigerated for 8 days and subsequently re-infused. The clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated before blood collection and reinfusion, after 10 minutes of collection and reinfusion, after 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96 and 192 hours after collection and reinfusion. Results With respect to clinical parameters, we observed a decrease in heart rate after 24, 48 and 196 hours from reinfusion compared to basal values (p < 0.05). Haematological variables including globular volume and erythrocyte counts showed a significant decrease (p < 0.01) at all time points after collection and increased (p < 0.01) at all time points after reinfusion. There was a significant increase in total protein and calcium at all time points after reinfusion (p < 0.05). Conclusion Autologous transfusion in sheep slightly altered the physiological, biochemical and haematological responses of sheep, indicating that the technique proposed is safe and can be applied in the clinical practice of this species. The 8 d period was not sufficient for complete recovery of the haematological parameters after blood collection. PMID:22607611

  16. Controlled clinical comparison of three commercial blood culture systems.

    PubMed

    Frank, U; Malkotsis, D; Mlangeni, D; Daschner, F D

    1999-04-01

    In a controlled clinical comparison, three commercial blood culture systems--the standard aerobic BacT/Alert bottle (STD), the aerobic BacT/Alert FAN bottle (FAN) and the Isolator system (ISO; Wampole Laboratories, USA) were compared for their ability to detect aerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms. A total of 945 BacT/Alert (STD and FAN) blood culture sets were compared. Of these, 110 blood culture sets (11.6%) yielded growth of 116 clinically significant bacterial and fungal isolates. Microorganisms were recovered from 10.7% (101/945) of the FAN bottles compared to 8.9% (84/945) of the STD bottles. Of the significant isolates, 78 (67.2%) were recovered by both bottles, 29 (25%) by the FAN bottle only and nine (7.8%) by the STD bottle only (P<0.01). Along with 56.1% (530/945) of BacT/Alert blood culture sets, a concomitant ISO tube was obtained. Of the triple (STD + FAN + ISO) blood culture sets, 54 (10.2%) yielded growth of 59 clinically relevant isolates. Microorganisms were detected in 9.1% (48/530) of the FAN bottles, 8.3% (44/530) of the STD bottles and 4% (21/530) of the ISO tubes (P<0.001). Overall, the BacT/Alert system detected more clinically significant microorganisms than the ISO tube; the STD and the FAN bottle each recovered significantly more staphylococci (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively) and gram-negative rods (P<0.01, both). In conclusion, the BacT/Alert FAN bottle performed better than the BacT/Alert STD bottle; both BacT/Alert bottles, however, were superior to the ISO tube in terms of recovery of clinically significant microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. PMID:10385012

  17. [Artificial blood - coming soon or never reaching clinical maturity?].

    PubMed

    Schöler, M; Frietsch, T; Jambor, C; Knels, R

    2010-03-01

    Formerly developed resuscitation fluids solely imitated the main function of the blood -oxygen transport. A research driven by the army requested an oxygen carrier that does not need cross typing and cooled storage. Artificial oxygen carriers (AOC) use either the molecular oxygen bondage to hemoglobin: HBOC- "hemoglobin based oxygen carriers" or the physical dissolution of oxygen in the blood plasma compartment by hyperbaric pressure in perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFC). Decades of preclinical and clinical research did pass but the results were disappointing- in Russia, a not well designed PFC is available locally and the only approved HBOC in South Africa is not being used much. Other products, just prior to filing for FDA approval, did not achieve convincing study results and research and production was stopped. Some trials have been stopped by the FDA for safety reasons, half of trials with the primary endpoint reduction of allogeneic transfusion requirement were unsuccessful or offset by an increased blood requirement later. However, some ventures currently are trying to use the knowledge gained so far and are investigating third and fourth generation products of artificial blood components. These imitate the cellular structure of red cells as micells, nanocapsules, (ABC- artificial blood cells) or gas bubbles (microbubbles), admixture of volume substitutes such as starches, gelatin or albumin or use hyperbaric oxygenation [38]. Artificial platelets are in clinical phase IIa, recombinant albumin in phase III. In this article, a short overview about the current situation on artificial blood products is given. The critical point for the break through for artificial blood products did not come yet but could be ahead- PMID:20234994

  18. Fimasartan for independent reduction of blood pressure variability in mild-to-moderate hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Seung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Changsoo; Cho, Eun Joo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Joo, Seung Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin receptor antagonist fimasartan lowered blood pressure (BP) in a previous large population study. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether fimasartan treatment for 3 months affects clinical and home BP variability in addition to reducing BP. Methods The study enrolled 1,396 patients (mean age 56.2±10.0 years; males 53.6%) with mild-to-moderate hypertension who had a complete set of home BP measurements (morning and evening) and metabolic risk evaluation. During the 3 months of study, fimasartan alone was used to control BP at a daily dose of 30–120 mg. Clinical and home BP measurements were performed before and after the 3-month treatment. BP variability included beat-to-beat variability (clinical) and day-to-day variability (home). Results Fimasartan reduced BP after 3 months of treatment. The average reduction of clinical systolic BP (c-SBP) was 15.08±18.36 mmHg (P<0.0001), and the average reduction of morning home SBP (m-SBP) was 11.49±19.33 mmHg (P<0.0001). Beat-to-beat variability as standard deviation (SD) of c-SBP was reduced from 4.56±3.22 to 4.24±3.11 mmHg (P=0.0026). Day-to-day variability as SD of m-SBP was reduced from 7.92±6.74 to 6.95±4.97 mmHg (P<0.0001). Multiple regression analysis revealed an independent association between the change in the SD of c-SBP and the change in c-SBP (P=0.0268) and, similarly, between the change in the SD of m-SBP and the change in m-SBP (P=0.0258), after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and change in mean BP. Conclusion This study indicated that 3 months of fimasartan treatment reduced day-to-day BP variability independent of BP reduction in patients with hypertension. PMID:27217724

  19. Expert Assistant For A Clinical Hematology Blood Cell Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Carole; Navlakha, Jainendra K.

    1989-03-01

    The COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments are automated clinical hematology blood cell analyzers which measure the count, volume and population distribution of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, and hemoglobin from patient blood samples. In the clinical laboratory environment, instrument startup consists of a number of component and system checks to assure proper operation and calibration to insure reliable results are produced on patient samples. If a startup check fails, troubleshooting procedures are provided to assist the operator in determining the cause of the error. Troubleshooting requires expertise in instrument operation, troubleshooting procedures and evaluation of the data produced. This expert system is designed and developed to assist the startup diagnostics of COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments. The system reads data produced by the instrument and validates it against expected values. If the values are not all correct, then the troubleshooting starts. Troubleshooting is handled for the most common subsystem problems and those which the operator has the equipment and knowledge to handle, problems that are cheapest to fix and problems that are quickest to fix. The expert system restarts the startup sequence whenever troubleshooting has been successful or recommends calling Customer Service when unsuccessful.

  20. Variability of arterial blood pressure in normal and hypertensive pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Oney, T; Meyer-Sabellek, W

    1990-12-01

    In normal pregnancy the circadian blood pressure rhythm is similar to that in the non-pregnant state, with the highest blood pressure values in the morning and the lowest at midnight. This rhythm is lost in patients with pre-eclampsia. Women with severe pre-eclampsia show a reversed circadian rhythm, with a nocturnal increase in blood pressure during the sleeping phase. Although the reasons for this nocturnal hypertension in severe pre-eclampsia are poorly understood, the results suggest that pre-eclamptic women are endangered by hypertensive emergencies, mostly at night. Therefore blood pressure measurement should be extended to the night, and antihypertensive treatment must be adapted to the demands of a reversed circadian rhythm in relevant subgroups of patients. PMID:2082002

  1. Review and classification of variability analysis techniques with clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of patterns of variation of time-series, termed variability analysis, represents a rapidly evolving discipline with increasing applications in different fields of science. In medicine and in particular critical care, efforts have focussed on evaluating the clinical utility of variability. However, the growth and complexity of techniques applicable to this field have made interpretation and understanding of variability more challenging. Our objective is to provide an updated review of variability analysis techniques suitable for clinical applications. We review more than 70 variability techniques, providing for each technique a brief description of the underlying theory and assumptions, together with a summary of clinical applications. We propose a revised classification for the domains of variability techniques, which include statistical, geometric, energetic, informational, and invariant. We discuss the process of calculation, often necessitating a mathematical transform of the time-series. Our aims are to summarize a broad literature, promote a shared vocabulary that would improve the exchange of ideas, and the analyses of the results between different studies. We conclude with challenges for the evolving science of variability analysis. PMID:21985357

  2. Combining clinical variables to optimize prediction of antidepressant treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Iniesta, Raquel; Malki, Karim; Maier, Wolfgang; Rietschel, Marcella; Mors, Ole; Hauser, Joanna; Henigsberg, Neven; Dernovsek, Mojca Zvezdana; Souery, Daniel; Stahl, Daniel; Dobson, Richard; Aitchison, Katherine J; Farmer, Anne; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of treatment with antidepressants varies markedly across people with the same diagnosis. A clinically significant prediction of outcomes could spare the frustration of trial and error approach and improve the outcomes of major depressive disorder through individualized treatment selection. It is likely that a combination of multiple predictors is needed to achieve such prediction. We used elastic net regularized regression to optimize prediction of symptom improvement and remission during treatment with escitalopram or nortriptyline and to identify contributing predictors from a range of demographic and clinical variables in 793 adults with major depressive disorder. A combination of demographic and clinical variables, with strong contributions from symptoms of depressed mood, reduced interest, decreased activity, indecisiveness, pessimism and anxiety significantly predicted treatment outcomes, explaining 5-10% of variance in symptom improvement with escitalopram. Similar combinations of variables predicted remission with area under the curve 0.72, explaining approximately 15% of variance (pseudo R(2)) in who achieves remission, with strong contributions from body mass index, appetite, interest-activity symptom dimension and anxious-somatizing depression subtype. Escitalopram-specific outcome prediction was more accurate than generic outcome prediction, and reached effect sizes that were near or above a previously established benchmark for clinical significance. Outcome prediction on the nortriptyline arm did not significantly differ from chance. These results suggest that easily obtained demographic and clinical variables can predict therapeutic response to escitalopram with clinically meaningful accuracy, suggesting a potential for individualized prescription of this antidepressant drug. PMID:27089522

  3. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening.

    PubMed

    Ravelo-García, A G; Saavedra-Santana, P; Juliá-Serdá, G; Navarro-Mesa, J L; Navarro-Esteva, J; Álvarez-López, X; Gapelyuk, A; Penzel, T; Wessel, N

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p < 10(-3)), neck circumference (p < 10(-3)), score on a questionnaire scale intended to quantify daytime sleepiness (p < 10(-3)), and intensity of snoring (p < 10(-3)). The validation of this model demonstrated an increase in classification performance when a variable based on non-linear dynamics of HRV (p < 0.01) was used additionally to the other variables. For diagnostic rule based only on clinical and physical variables, the corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.907 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.848, 0.967), (sensitivity 87.10% and specificity 80%). For the model including the average of a symbolic dynamic variable, the area under the ROC curve was increased to 0.941 (95% = 0.897, 0.985), (sensitivity 88.71% and specificity 82.86%). In conclusion, symbolic dynamics, coupled with significant clinical and physical variables can help to prioritize polysomnographies in patients with a high probability of apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique. PMID:24985458

  4. Symbolic dynamics marker of heart rate variability combined with clinical variables enhance obstructive sleep apnea screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo-García, A. G.; Saavedra-Santana, P.; Juliá-Serdá, G.; Navarro-Mesa, J. L.; Navarro-Esteva, J.; Álvarez-López, X.; Gapelyuk, A.; Penzel, T.; Wessel, N.

    2014-06-01

    Many sleep centres try to perform a reduced portable test in order to decrease the number of overnight polysomnographies that are expensive, time-consuming, and disturbing. With some limitations, heart rate variability (HRV) has been useful in this task. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate if inclusion of symbolic dynamics variables to a logistic regression model integrating clinical and physical variables, can improve the detection of subjects for further polysomnographies. To our knowledge, this is the first contribution that innovates in that strategy. A group of 133 patients has been referred to the sleep center for suspected sleep apnea. Clinical assessment of the patients consisted of a sleep related questionnaire and a physical examination. The clinical variables related to apnea and selected in the statistical model were age (p < 10-3), neck circumference (p < 10-3), score on a questionnaire scale intended to quantify daytime sleepiness (p < 10-3), and intensity of snoring (p < 10-3). The validation of this model demonstrated an increase in classification performance when a variable based on non-linear dynamics of HRV (p < 0.01) was used additionally to the other variables. For diagnostic rule based only on clinical and physical variables, the corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.907 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.848, 0.967), (sensitivity 87.10% and specificity 80%). For the model including the average of a symbolic dynamic variable, the area under the ROC curve was increased to 0.941 (95% = 0.897, 0.985), (sensitivity 88.71% and specificity 82.86%). In conclusion, symbolic dynamics, coupled with significant clinical and physical variables can help to prioritize polysomnographies in patients with a high probability of apnea. In addition, the processing of the HRV is a well established low cost and robust technique.

  5. Genome wide analysis of blood pressure variability and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad S; Nalls, Michael A; Bevan, Steve; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Malik, Rainer; McCarthy, Nina S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Speed, Douglas; Hasan, Nazeeha; Pucek, Mateusz; Rinne, Paul E.; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; Maguire, Jane M; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Macleod, Mary J; Attia, John; Markus, Hugh S; Sale, Michele M; Worrall, Bradford B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathy; Meschia, James F; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visit-to-visit variability in BP is associated with ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether such variability has a genetic aetiology and whether genetic variants associated with BP variability are also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A GWAS for loci influencing BP variability was undertaken in 3,802 individuals from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT) study where long-term visit-to-visit and within visit BP measures were available. Since BP variability is strongly associated with ischemic stroke, we genotyped the sentinel SNP in an independent ischemic stroke population comprising of 8,624 cases and 12,722 controls and in 3,900 additional (Scandinavian) participants from the ASCOT study in order to replicate our findings. Results The ASCOT discovery GWAS identified a cluster of 17 correlated SNPs within the NLGN1 gene (3q26.31) associated with BP variability. The strongest association was with rs976683 (p=1.4×10−8). Conditional analysis on rs976683 provided no evidence of additional independent associations at the locus. Analysis of rs976683 in ischemic stroke patients found no association for overall stroke (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97-1.07; p=0.52) or its sub-types: CE (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.16; p=0.17), LVD (OR 0.98; 95% 0.89-1.07; p=0.60) and SVD (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.17; p=0.19). No evidence for association was found between rs976683 and BP variability in the additional (Scandinavian) ASCOT participants (p=0.18). Conclusions We identified a cluster of SNPs at the NLGN1 locus showing significant association with BP variability. Follow up analyses did not support an association with risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes. PMID:23929743

  6. Photoplethysmographic variability: spontaneous fluctuations in the tissue blood volume and in the systolic blood volume increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Meir; Babchenko, Anatoly; Turivnenko, Sergei; Khanokh, Boris

    1997-05-01

    Several parameters of the cardiovascular system such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure and blood flow fluctuate spontaneously due to the autonomic nervous system activity. In the current study, the low frequency fluctuations of the tissue blood volume and the blood volume pulse in the fingertips of healthy subjects were investigated using transmission photoplethysmography (PPG). The baseline of the PPG signal (BL) is inversely related to tissue blood volume so that the parameter BV, defined by: BV equals Const.-BL is directly related to the blood volume. The amplitude (AM) is directly related to the systolic blood volume increase. For most of the examinations BV and AM show positive correlation, which is expected since BV depends on the tissue blood volume and AM depends on the compliance of the blood vessels, both of which decrease during vasoconstriction, which is caused by higher activity of the sympathetic nervous system. The analysis of the PPG signal provides, therefore, a potential tool for study in the mechanism of the regulation of the microcirculation by the sympathetic nerves.

  7. Filterability of blood cells: methods and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Nash, G B

    1990-01-01

    It could be claimed that expansion in clinical aspects of haemorheology has largely been fueled by the development of a simple test of blood flow properties, i.e., analysis of filterability. With time, the level of sophistication in equipment, theory and sample preparation has increased. Theories for the development of flow in the filter have been described and these enable cellular parameters, such as transit times, to be calculated from experimental data. These theories can be quite general, and applied to filtration of red or white cells. Ideally, experimental design requires an understanding of cell behaviour at the filter and of the effects of factors such as the sample concentration and volume, and the presence of different types of cells or subpopulations. Otherwise, results are susceptible to misinterpretation, particularly if impurities or mixed populations of cells are present. It is thus very important to know accurately the constituents of the test suspension. In clinical applications the trend has been to move away from whole blood filtration, toward use of relatively pure suspension of separated red cells and white cells. In the area of red cell filtration this has led to reappraisal of some previously reported abnormalities. The relatively new study of white cell filtration should benefit from previous experience, but there is the added problem of the reactivity of the cells under test, and their mixed nature. In any case, critical evaluation of the meaning and clinical relevance of results is necessary. PMID:2093395

  8. 75 FR 2549 - Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood... public meeting entitled: Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters. The purpose of the public meeting is to discuss the clinical accuracy requirements of blood glucose meters...

  9. Nutrition assessment and its effect on various clinical variables among patients undergoing liver transplant

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kalyani

    2016-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is highly prevalent in patients undergoing liver transplantation and has been associated to various clinical variables and outcome of the surgery. Methods We recruited 54 adult patients undergoing living donor liver transplant (LT) as study sample. Nutrition assessment was performed by body mass index (BMI), BMI for ascites, albumin, subjective global assessment (SGA) and anthropometry [mid upper arm circumference (MUAC), mid arm muscle circumference (MAMC), and triceps skin-fold (TSF)], Hand Grip strength, and phase angle of the body. Prevalence and comparison of malnutrition was performed with various clinical variables: aetiology, Child Turcotte Pugh scores and model for end stage liver disease (ESLD) grades, degree of ascites, blood product usage, blood loss during the surgery, mortality, days [intensive care unit (ICU), Ventilator and Hospital], and Bio-impedance analysis [weight, fat mass, fat free mass (FFM), muscle mass and body fat%]. Results Assessment of nutrition status represents a major challenge because of complications like fluid retention, hypoalbuminemia and hypoproteinemia. Different nutrition assessment tools show great disparity in the level of malnutrition among ESLD patients. In the present study recipient nutrition status evaluation by different nutrition assessment tools used showed malnutrition ranging from 3.7% to 100%. BMI and anthropometric measurements showed lower prevalence of malnutrition than phase angle and SGA whereas hand grip strength showed 100% malnutrition. Agreement among nutrition assessment methods showed moderate agreement (κ=0.444) of SGA with phase angle of the body. Malnutrition by different assessment tools was significantly associated to various clinical variables except MELD and days (ICU, Ventilator and Hospital). SGA was significantly (P<0.05) associated to majority of the clinical variables like aetiology, child Turcotte Pugh grades, degree of ascites, blood product usage, blood loss

  10. Dietary Nitrate Lowers Blood Pressure: Epidemiological, Pre-clinical Experimental and Clinical Trial Evidence.

    PubMed

    Gee, Lorna C; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a potent vasodilator critical in maintaining vascular homeostasis, can reduce blood pressure in vivo. Loss of constitutive NO generation, for example as a result of endothelial dysfunction, occurs in many pathological conditions, including hypertension, and contributes to disease pathology. Attempts to therapeutically deliver NO via organic nitrates (e.g. glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) to reduce blood pressure in hypertensives have been largely unsuccessful. However, in recent years inorganic (or 'dietary') nitrate has been identified as a potential solution for NO delivery through its sequential chemical reduction via the enterosalivary circuit. With dietary nitrate found in abundance in vegetables this review discusses epidemiological, pre-clinical and clinical data supporting the idea that dietary nitrate could represent a cheap and effective dietary intervention capable of reducing blood pressure and thereby improving cardiovascular health. PMID:26815004

  11. Associations of blood pressure variability and retinal arteriolar diameter in participants with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Veloudi, Panagiota; Blizzard, Leigh; Srikanth, Velandai K; McCartney, Paul; Lukoshkova, Elena V; Hughes, Alun D; Head, Geoffrey A; Sharman, James E

    2016-07-01

    Blood pressure variability is associated with macrovascular complications and stroke, but its association with the microcirculation in type II diabetes has not been assessed. This study aimed to determine the relationship between blood pressure variability indices and retinal arteriolar diameter in non-diabetic and type II diabetes participants. Digitized retinal images were analysed to quantify arteriolar diameters in 35 non-diabetic (aged 52 ± 11 years; 49% male) and 28 type II diabetes (aged 61 ± 9 years; 50% male) participants. Blood pressure variability was derived from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. Arteriolar diameter was positively associated with daytime rate of systolic blood pressure variation (p = 0.04) among type II diabetes participants and negatively among non-diabetics (p = 0.008; interaction p = 0.001). This finding was maintained after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index and mean daytime systolic blood pressure. These findings suggest that the blood pressure variability-related mechanisms underlying retinal vascular disease may differ between people with and without type II diabetes. PMID:27056406

  12. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events. PMID:27482253

  13. Individual variability analysis of fluorescence parameters measured in skin with different levels of nutritive blood flow.

    PubMed

    Dunaev, Andrey V; Dremin, Victor V; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A; Rafailov, Ilya E; Litvinova, Karina S; Palmer, Scott G; Stewart, Neil A; Sokolovski, Sergei G; Rafailov, Edik U

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has recently become more common in clinical medicine. However, there are still many unresolved issues related to the methodology and implementation of instruments with this technology. In this study, we aimed to assess individual variability of fluorescence parameters of endogenous markers (NADH, FAD, etc.) measured by fluorescent spectroscopy (FS) in situ and to analyse the factors that lead to a significant scatter of results. Most studied fluorophores have an acceptable scatter of values (mostly up to 30%) for diagnostic purposes. Here we provide evidence that the level of blood volume in tissue impacts FS data with a significant inverse correlation. The distribution function of the fluorescence intensity and the fluorescent contrast coefficient values are a function of the normal distribution for most of the studied fluorophores and the redox ratio. The effects of various physiological (different content of skin melanin) and technical (characteristics of optical filters) factors on the measurement results were additionally studied. The data on the variability of the measurement results in FS should be considered when interpreting the diagnostic parameters, as well as when developing new algorithms for data processing and FS devices. PMID:25922293

  14. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-07-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events. PMID:27482253

  15. Impact of baseline systolic blood pressure on visit-to-visit blood pressure variability: the Kailuan study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anxin; Li, Zhifang; Yang, Yuling; Chen, Guojuan; Wang, Chunxue; Wu, Yuntao; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wu, Shouling

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) and visit-to-visit blood pressure variability in a general population. Methods This is a prospective longitudinal cohort study on cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events. Study participants attended a face-to-face interview every 2 years. Blood pressure variability was defined using the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of all SBP values at baseline and follow-up visits. The coefficient of variation is the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean SBP. We used multivariate linear regression models to test the relationships between SBP and standard deviation, and between SBP and coefficient of variation. Results Approximately 43,360 participants (mean age: 48.2±11.5 years) were selected. In multivariate analysis, after adjustment for potential confounders, baseline SBPs <120 mmHg were inversely related to standard deviation (P<0.001) and coefficient of variation (P<0.001). In contrast, baseline SBPs ≥140 mmHg were significantly positively associated with standard deviation (P<0.001) and coefficient of variation (P<0.001). Baseline SBPs of 120–140 mmHg were associated with the lowest standard deviation and coefficient of variation. The associations between baseline SBP and standard deviation, and between SBP and coefficient of variation during follow-ups showed a U curve. Conclusion Both lower and higher baseline SBPs were associated with increased blood pressure variability. To control blood pressure variability, a good target SBP range for a general population might be 120–139 mmHg. PMID:27536123

  16. The Acute Effect of Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction with Hemodynamic Variables on Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Joamira P.; Silva, Eliney D.; Silva, Julio C. G.; Souza, Thiago S. P.; Lima, Eloíse O.; Guerra, Ialuska; Sousa, Maria S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the heart rate (HR) before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM) and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR). In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years) performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to identify significant variables (2 × 5; group × time). The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity. PMID:25713647

  17. Circadian blood pressure variability in type 1 diabetes subjects and their nondiabetic siblings - influence of erythrocyte electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Normotensive non-diabetic relatives of type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients have an abnormal blood pressure response to exercise testing that is associated with indices of metabolic syndrome and increased oxidative stress. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the circadian variability of blood pressure and the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) in healthy siblings of T1D patients vs healthy control subjects who had no first-degree relative with T1D. Secondary aims of the study were to explore the influence of both cardiovascular autonomic function and erythrocyte electron transfer activity as oxidative marker on the ambulatory blood pressure profile. Methods Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was undertaken in 25 controls, 20 T1D patients and 20 siblings. In addition to laboratory examination (including homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity) and clinical testing of autonomic function, we measured the rate of oxidant-induced erythrocyte electron transfer to extracellular ferricyanide (RBC vfcy). Results Systolic blood pressure (SBP) midline-estimating statistic of rhythm and pulse pressure were higher in T1D patients and correlated positively with diabetes duration and RBC vfcy; autonomic dysfunction was associated with diastolic BP ecphasia and increased AASI. Siblings had higher BMI, lower insulin sensitivity, larger SBP amplitude, and higher AASI than controls. Daytime SBP was positively, independently associated with BMI and RBC vfcy. Among non-diabetic people, there was a significant correlation between AASI and fasting plasma glucose. Conclusions Siblings of T1D patients exhibited a cluster of sub-clinical metabolic abnormalities associated with consensual perturbations in BP variability. Moreover, our findings support, in a clinical setting, the proposed role of transplasma membrane electron transport systems in vascular pathobiology. PMID:20920366

  18. ANALYSIS IN BLOOD OF GOLDEN HAMSTER BY NAA FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, R.; Zamboni, C. B.; Genezini, F. A.

    2009-06-03

    In the present study Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique has been used to determine, simultaneously, some element concentrations of clinical relevance in whole blood samples of Golden Hamster. The normal range for Br, Cl, K and Na concentrations were determined. The knowledge of these values permits clinical investigation of animal model using whole blood as well as to check the similarities with human blood.

  19. Analysis in Blood of Golden Hamster by Naa for Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, R.; Zamboni, C. B.; Genezini, F. A.

    2009-06-01

    In the present study Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique has been used to determine, simultaneously, some element concentrations of clinical relevance in whole blood samples of Golden Hamster. The normal range for Br, Cl, K and Na concentrations were determined. The knowledge of these values permits clinical investigation of animal model using whole blood as well as to check the similarities with human blood.

  20. On the improvement of blood sample collection at clinical laboratories

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood samples are usually collected daily from different collection points, such hospitals and health centers, and transported to a core laboratory for testing. This paper presents a project to improve the collection routes of two of the largest clinical laboratories in Spain. These routes must be designed in a cost-efficient manner while satisfying two important constraints: (i) two-hour time windows between collection and delivery, and (ii) vehicle capacity. Methods A heuristic method based on a genetic algorithm has been designed to solve the problem of blood sample collection. The user enters the following information for each collection point: postal address, average collecting time, and average demand (in thermal containers). After implementing the algorithm using C programming, this is run and, in few seconds, it obtains optimal (or near-optimal) collection routes that specify the collection sequence for each vehicle. Different scenarios using various types of vehicles have been considered. Unless new collection points are added or problem parameters are changed substantially, routes need to be designed only once. Results The two laboratories in this study previously planned routes manually for 43 and 74 collection points, respectively. These routes were covered by an external carrier company. With the implementation of this algorithm, the number of routes could be reduced from ten to seven in one laboratory and from twelve to nine in the other, which represents significant annual savings in transportation costs. Conclusions The algorithm presented can be easily implemented in other laboratories that face this type of problem, and it is particularly interesting and useful as the number of collection points increases. The method designs blood collection routes with reduced costs that meet the time and capacity constraints of the problem. PMID:24406140

  1. Why use automated office blood pressure measurements in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Agaliotis, Gerasimos D; Tsakanikas, Athanasios P; Mousoulis, George P

    2011-09-01

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement with the patient resting alone in a quiet examining room can eliminate the white-coat effect associated with conventional readings taken by manual sphygmomanometer. The key to reducing the white-coat response appears to be multiple blood pressure (BP) readings taken in a non-observer office setting, thus eliminating any interaction that could provoke an office-induced increase in BP. Furthermore, AOBP readings have shown a higher correlation with the mean awake ambulatory BP compared with BP readings recorded in routine clinical practice. Although there is a paucity of studies connecting AOBP with organ damage, AOBP values were recently found to be equally associated with left ventricular mass index as those of ambulatory BP. This concludes that in contrast to routine manual office BP, AOBP readings compare favourably with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in the appraisal of cardiac remodelling and, as such, could be complementary to ambulatory readings in a way similar to home BP measurements. PMID:21950780

  2. Associations of blood pressure variability and retinal arteriolar diameter in participants with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Veloudi, Panagiota; Blizzard, Leigh; Srikanth, Velandai K; McCartney, Paul; Lukoshkova, Elena V; Hughes, Alun D; Head, Geoffrey A; Sharman, James E

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure variability is associated with macrovascular complications and stroke, but its association with the microcirculation in type II diabetes has not been assessed. This study aimed to determine the relationship between blood pressure variability indices and retinal arteriolar diameter in non-diabetic and type II diabetes participants. Digitized retinal images were analysed to quantify arteriolar diameters in 35 non-diabetic (aged 52 ± 11 years; 49% male) and 28 type II diabetes (aged 61 ± 9 years; 50% male) participants. Blood pressure variability was derived from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. Arteriolar diameter was positively associated with daytime rate of systolic blood pressure variation (p = 0.04) among type II diabetes participants and negatively among non-diabetics (p = 0.008; interaction p = 0.001). This finding was maintained after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index and mean daytime systolic blood pressure. These findings suggest that the blood pressure variability–related mechanisms underlying retinal vascular disease may differ between people with and without type II diabetes. PMID:27056406

  3. Assessment of baroreflex sensitivity from spontaneous oscillations of blood pressure and heart rate: proven clinical value?

    PubMed

    Pinna, Gian Domenico; Maestri, Roberto; La Rovere, Maria Teresa

    2015-04-01

    The baroreceptor-heart rate reflex (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS) is a key mechanism contributing to the neural regulation of the cardiovascular system. Several methods have been proposed so far to assess BRS by analyzing the spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. These methods are inherently simple, non-invasive and low-cost. This study is an attempt to address the question of whether spontaneous baroreflex methods have proven to be of value in the clinical setting. In the first part of this article, we critically review most representative clinical studies using spontaneous BRS techniques either for risk stratification or treatment evaluation, these being major issues in the clinical management of the patients. In the second part, we address two important aspects of spontaneous BRS measurements: measurability and reliability. Estimation of BRS in the studies selected for the review was performed according to the sequence, transfer function, alpha-index and phase-rectified signal averaging method. Arterial blood pressure was recorded non-invasively during supine, short-term (<30 min) laboratory recordings. The conclusion from this review is that spontaneous BRS techniques have been shown to be of great value in clinical practice but further work is needed to confirm the validity of previous findings and to widen the field of clinical applications. Measurability and reliability can be a major issue in the measurement of spontaneous BRS, particularly in some patient populations like post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patents. Main causes of poor measurability are: non-sinus rhythm, a high rate of ectopic beats and the need for recorded time series of RR interval and arterial blood pressure to satisfy the constraints of the different BRS estimation algorithms. As for reliability, within-subject variability is rather high in the measurements of spontaneous BRS and, therefore, should be carefully taken into account

  4. Can Ambulatory Blood Pressure Variability Contribute to Individual Cardiovascular Risk Stratification?

    PubMed

    Magdás, Annamária; Szilágyi, László; Incze, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to define the normal range for average real variability (ARV) and to establish whether it can be considered as an additional cardiovascular risk factor. Methods. In this observational study, 110 treated hypertensive patients were included and admitted for antihypertensive treatment adjustment. Circadian blood pressure was recorded with validated devices. Blood pressure variability (BPV) was assessed according to the ARV definition. Based on their variability, patients were classified into low, medium, and high variability groups using the fuzzy c-means algorithm. To assess cardiovascular risk, blood samples were collected. Characteristics of the groups were compared by ANOVA tests. Results. Low variability was defined as ARV below 9.8 mmHg (32 patients), medium as 9.8-12.8 mmHg (48 patients), and high variability above 12.8 mmHg (30 patients). Mean systolic blood pressure was 131.2 ± 16.7, 135.0 ± 12.1, and 141.5 ± 11.4 mmHg in the low, medium, and high variability groups, respectively (p = 0.0113). Glomerular filtration rate was 78.6 ± 29.3, 74.8 ± 26.4, and 62.7 ± 23.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in the low, medium, and high variability groups, respectively (p = 0.0261). Conclusion. Increased values of average real variability represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, reducing BP variability might be as important as achieving optimal BP levels, but there is need for further studies to define a widely acceptable threshold value. PMID:27247614

  5. Can Ambulatory Blood Pressure Variability Contribute to Individual Cardiovascular Risk Stratification?

    PubMed Central

    Magdás, Annamária; Szilágyi, László; Incze, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to define the normal range for average real variability (ARV) and to establish whether it can be considered as an additional cardiovascular risk factor. Methods. In this observational study, 110 treated hypertensive patients were included and admitted for antihypertensive treatment adjustment. Circadian blood pressure was recorded with validated devices. Blood pressure variability (BPV) was assessed according to the ARV definition. Based on their variability, patients were classified into low, medium, and high variability groups using the fuzzy c-means algorithm. To assess cardiovascular risk, blood samples were collected. Characteristics of the groups were compared by ANOVA tests. Results. Low variability was defined as ARV below 9.8 mmHg (32 patients), medium as 9.8–12.8 mmHg (48 patients), and high variability above 12.8 mmHg (30 patients). Mean systolic blood pressure was 131.2 ± 16.7, 135.0 ± 12.1, and 141.5 ± 11.4 mmHg in the low, medium, and high variability groups, respectively (p = 0.0113). Glomerular filtration rate was 78.6 ± 29.3, 74.8 ± 26.4, and 62.7 ± 23.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 in the low, medium, and high variability groups, respectively (p = 0.0261). Conclusion. Increased values of average real variability represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, reducing BP variability might be as important as achieving optimal BP levels, but there is need for further studies to define a widely acceptable threshold value. PMID:27247614

  6. Exercise blood pressure: clinical relevance and correct measurement.

    PubMed

    Sharman, J E; LaGerche, A

    2015-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a mandatory safety measure during graded intensity clinical exercise stress testing. While it is generally accepted that exercise hypotension is a poor prognostic sign linked to severe cardiac dysfunction, recent meta-analysis data also implicate excessive rises in submaximal exercise BP with adverse cardiovascular events and mortality, irrespective of resting BP. Although more data is needed to derive submaximal normative BP thresholds, the association of a hypertensive response to exercise with increased cardiovascular risk may be due to underlying hypertension that has gone unnoticed by conventional resting BP screening methods. Delayed BP decline during recovery is also associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Thus, above and beyond being used as a routine safety measure during stress testing, exercise (and recovery) BP may be useful for identifying high-risk individuals and also as an aid to optimise care through appropriate follow-up after exercise stress testing. Accordingly, careful attention should be paid to correct measurement of exercise stress test BP (before, during and after exercise) using a standardised approach with trained operators and validated BP monitoring equipment (manual or automated). Recommendations for exercise BP measurement based on consolidated international guidelines and expert consensus are presented in this review. PMID:25273859

  7. On the origin of low-frequency blood pressure variability in the conscious dog.

    PubMed Central

    Just, A; Wagner, C D; Ehmke, H; Kirchheim, H R; Persson, P B

    1995-01-01

    1. Baroreceptor denervation increases blood pressure variability below 0.1 Hz. This study was undertaken to determine to what extent these fluctuations originate from the central nervous system or from cardiovascular sources. 2. Blood pressure was recorded at a rate of 10 Hz for approximately 3.5 h in conscious, resting dogs. Power density spectra were calculated from all 2(17) points of each recording session and integrated between 0.0002 and 0.1 Hz. 3. Blockade of the afferent limb of the baroreceptor reflex by surgical denervation of sinoaortic and cardiopulmonary afferents (Den; n = 6) significantly increased integrated power more than sixfold compared with a control group (n = 11). 4. Impairment of the efferent limb in non-deafferented dogs by either alpha 1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin (Praz; n = 7) or ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium (Hex; n = 6) failed to raise variability. 5. Both prazosin (n = 6) and hexamethonium (n = 3) reduced the increased variability in denervated dogs. 6. In non-deafferented dogs receiving hexamethonium, elevation of mean blood pressure to the hypertensive level of the Den group, by a continuous infusion of noradrenaline (n = 4), did not change the variability. 7. It is concluded that in the absence of changes in posture, most of the increased blood pressure variability after baroreceptor denervation is derived from the central nervous system. 8. Direct comparison of power spectra of the Den (total variability) and Hex groups (variability derived from the cardiovascular system only) suggests that the central nervous system is also the prevalent source of low-frequency blood pressure variability in intact animals. PMID:8583405

  8. The physiological basis of pulmonary gas exchange: implications for clinical interpretation of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    The field of pulmonary gas exchange is mature, with the basic principles developed more than 60 years ago. Arterial blood gas measurements (tensions and concentrations of O₂ and CO₂) constitute a mainstay of clinical care to assess the degree of pulmonary gas exchange abnormality. However, the factors that dictate arterial blood gas values are often multifactorial and complex, with six different causes of hypoxaemia (inspiratory hypoxia, hypoventilation, ventilation/perfusion inequality, diffusion limitation, shunting and reduced mixed venous oxygenation) contributing variably to the arterial O₂ and CO₂ tension in any given patient. Blood gas values are then usually further affected by the body's abilities to compensate for gas exchange disturbances by three tactics (greater O₂ extraction, increasing ventilation and increasing cardiac output). This article explains the basic principles of gas exchange in health, mechanisms of altered gas exchange in disease, how the body compensates for abnormal gas exchange, and based on these principles, the tools available to interpret blood gas data and, quantitatively, to best understand the physiological state of each patient. This understanding is important because therapeutic intervention to improve abnormal gas exchange in any given patient needs to be based on the particular physiological mechanisms affecting gas exchange in that patient. PMID:25323225

  9. Laser speckle contrast imaging of cerebral blood flow in humans during neurosurgery: a pilot clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Weber, Erica L.; Richards, Lisa M.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2010-11-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery can provide important physiological information for a variety of surgical procedures. CBF measurements are important for assessing whether blood flow has returned to presurgical baseline levels and for assessing postsurgical tissue viability. Existing techniques for intraoperative monitoring of CBF based on magnetic resonance imaging are expensive and often impractical, while techniques such as indocyanine green angiography cannot produce quantitative measures of blood flow. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical technique that has been widely used to quantitatively image relative CBF in animal models in vivo. In a pilot clinical study, we adapted an existing neurosurgical operating microscope to obtain LSCI images in humans in real time during neurosurgery under baseline conditions and after bipolar cautery. Simultaneously recorded ECG waveforms from the patient were used to develop a filter that helped reduce measurement variabilities due to motion artifacts. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using LSCI to obtain blood flow images during neurosurgeries and its capability to produce full field CBF image maps with excellent spatial resolution in real-time with minimal disruption to the surgical procedure.

  10. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  11. The use of hirudin as universal anticoagulant in haematology, clinical chemistry and blood grouping.

    PubMed

    Menssen, H D; Melber, K; Brandt, N; Thiel, E

    2001-12-01

    Undesirable interactions between anticoagulants and diagnostic test kit procedures so far have prevented the development of a single uniform blood sampling tube. Contrary to K2-EDTA, heparin and other anticoagulants, hirudin only minimally alters blood cells and dissolved blood constituents, thus qualifying as a universal anticoagulant for diagnostic purposes. Automated complete blood counts, automated analyses of clinical chemistry analytes and immunohaematology were performed from hirudinised and routinely processed blood obtained from healthy volunteers (n=35) and hospitalised patients (n=45). Hirudin (400 ATU/ml blood) sufficiently anticoagulated blood for diagnostic purposes. The measurements of automated complete blood counts obtained from K2-EDTA-anticoagulated and hirudinised blood correlated significantly as did the measurements of 24 clinical chemistry analytes from hirudinised plasma and serum. Regression analysis revealed that the results of complete blood counts and clinical chemistry tests were predictable from the respective measurements from hirudinised blood (p=0.001). Immunohaematological tests and cross-matching from hirudinised and native blood of the same donors gave identical results. Single clotting factors, but not global coagulation analytes, could be measured from hirudinised blood. Therefore, a universal hirudin-containing blood sampling tube could be designed for automated analysis of haematological, serological and clinical chemistry analytes. PMID:11798089

  12. Clinical relevance and contemporary methods for counting blood cells in body fluids suspected of inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Chérina; Russcher, Henk; Lindemans, Jan; de Jonge, Robert

    2015-10-01

    In many inflammatory diseases, the cellular components in body fluids [cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), serous fluids] are increased, rendering essential diagnostic information. The diagnostic value of the total white blood cell count (WBC) and differential count has been evaluated extensively over the years, and a remarkable amount of knowledge has been gained; yet, there is a great deal of clinical uncertainty whether the diagnosis should be based solely on these variables. In some diseases, such as peritonitis, the total WBC and differential count has high sensitivity; whereas, in differentiating pleural effusions, it lacks the sensitivity required to be clinically useful. Nevertheless, many guidelines consider these tests as cornerstone parameters, and in combination with clinical variables, they can successfully guide clinical decision making in initiating or postponing a treatment course for infection and/or inflammatory diseases while awaiting culture results. Although other methods are available for detecting and differentiating WBCs in body fluids, manual microscopy is still considered the gold standard despite its many limitations. During the last decade, automated analyzers have become a popular method for first line screening. Continued progress in their design has led to major improvements including their speed, improved accuracy and lower variability compared with microscopy. Disadvantages of this method include high imprecision in low ranges (depending on the method) and interfering factors. In a time where automation is at the front line in clinical laboratories, it is essential the results obtained are precise, accurate and reproducible. This review provides an overview of the relevance for cell counting in a variety of diagnostic body fluids, and highlights the current technologies used. PMID:25879321

  13. Factors Associated with Intention to Donate Blood: Sociodemographic and Past Experience Variables

    PubMed Central

    Pule, Pule Ishmael; Rachaba, Boitshwarelo; Magafu, Mgaywa Gilbert Mjungu Damas; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. This study was conducted to assess the level of intention of the general public towards blood donation and the factors associated with it. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in South-East Botswana amongst participants aged 21–65 years. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was completed for 384 participants. Results. Of the 384 participants, 104 (27.1%) reported that they had donated blood in the past and 269 (70.1%) stated that they were willing to donate blood in the future. Thirteen out of the 104 past donors (12.5%) reported that they had donated blood in the 12 months preceding the survey and only 10 (9.6%) participants reported that they have been regular donors. In the backward logistic regression analysis, the variables that remained significant predictors of the intention to donate blood were secondary education (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 2.92 (1.48, 5.77)), tertiary education (AOR (95% CI): 3.83 (1.52, 9.62)), and knowing a family member who had ever donated blood (AOR (95% CI): 2.84 (1.58, 5.12)). Conclusion. Being informed about blood transfusion and its life-saving benefits through either the education system or the experience made people more likely to intend to donate blood. Evidence-based interventions to retain blood donors as regular donors are recommended. PMID:25431742

  14. Factors associated with intention to donate blood: sociodemographic and past experience variables.

    PubMed

    Pule, Pule Ishmael; Rachaba, Boitshwarelo; Magafu, Mgaywa Gilbert Mjungu Damas; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. This study was conducted to assess the level of intention of the general public towards blood donation and the factors associated with it. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in South-East Botswana amongst participants aged 21-65 years. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was completed for 384 participants. Results. Of the 384 participants, 104 (27.1%) reported that they had donated blood in the past and 269 (70.1%) stated that they were willing to donate blood in the future. Thirteen out of the 104 past donors (12.5%) reported that they had donated blood in the 12 months preceding the survey and only 10 (9.6%) participants reported that they have been regular donors. In the backward logistic regression analysis, the variables that remained significant predictors of the intention to donate blood were secondary education (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 2.92 (1.48, 5.77)), tertiary education (AOR (95% CI): 3.83 (1.52, 9.62)), and knowing a family member who had ever donated blood (AOR (95% CI): 2.84 (1.58, 5.12)). Conclusion. Being informed about blood transfusion and its life-saving benefits through either the education system or the experience made people more likely to intend to donate blood. Evidence-based interventions to retain blood donors as regular donors are recommended. PMID:25431742

  15. The variable clinical manifestations of ulnar neuropathies at the elbow.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J D

    1987-01-01

    In twenty-five cases of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, the involvement of the fibres from three sensory and to four motor branches were examined clinically and, where possible, electrophysiologically. Of the sensory fibres, those from the terminal digital nerves were most commonly involved. The fibres to the hand muscles were much more frequently involved than those to the forearm muscles. These findings suggest that in ulnar neuropathies at the elbow there is variable damage to the fascicles within the nerve. PMID:3031220

  16. Validity and Usefulness of `Wearable Blood Pressure Sensing' for Detection of Inappropriate Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability in the Elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Katsuya; Kameyama, Yumi; Akishita, Masahiro; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Yahagi, Naoki; Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Yamada, Ichiro

    An increase in short-term blood pressure (BP) variability is a characteristic feature in the elderly. It makes the management of hemodynamics more difficult, because it is frequently seen disturbed baro-reflex function and increased arterial stiffness, leading to isolated systolic hypertension. Large BP variability aggravates hypertensive target organ damage and is an independent risk factor for the cardiovascular (CV) events in elderly hypertensive patients. Therefore, appropriate control in BP is indispensable to manage lifestyle-related diseases and to prevent subsequent CV events. In addition, accumulating recent reports show that excessive BP variability is also associated with a decline in cognitive function and fall in the elderly. In the clinical settings, we usually evaluate their health condition, mainly with single point BP measurement using cuff inflation. However, unfortunately we are not able to find the close changes in BP by the traditional way. Here, we can show our advantageous approach of continuous BP monitoring using newly developing device `wearable BP sensing' without a cuff stress in the elderly. The new device could reflect systolic BP and its detailed changes, in consistent with cuff-based BP measurement. Our new challenge suggests new possibility of its clinical application with high accuracy.

  17. Clinical results from a noninvasive blood glucose monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Thomas B.; Ruchti, Timothy L.; Lorenz, Alex D.; Monfre, Stephen L.; Makarewicz, M. R.; Mattu, Mutua; Hazen, Kevin

    2002-05-01

    Non-invasive blood glucose monitoring has long been proposed as a means for advancing the management of diabetes through increased measurement and control. The use of a near-infrared, NIR, spectroscopy based methodology for noninvasive monitoring has been pursued by a number of groups. The accuracy of the NIR measurement technology is limited by challenges related to the instrumentation, the heterogeneity and time-variant nature of skin tissue, and the complexity of the calibration methodology. In this work, we discuss results from a clinical study that targeted the evaluation of individual calibrations for each subject based on a series of controlled calibration visits. While the customization of the calibrations to individuals was intended to reduce model complexity, the extensive requirements for each individual set of calibration data were difficult to achieve and required several days of measurement. Through the careful selection of a small subset of data from all samples collected on the 138 study participants in a previous study, we have developed a methodology for applying a single standard calibration to multiple persons. The standard calibrations have been applied to a plurality of individuals and shown to be persistent over periods greater than 24 weeks.

  18. Effect of Fasting Blood Glucose Level on Heart Rate Variability of Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Mohamed Faisal; Elhakeem, Ramaze Farouke

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies reported increased risk of cardiac events in subjects with fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels lower than the diagnostic threshold of diabetes mellitus. However, whether increased cardiac events in those with upper normal FBG is secondary to the shift of their cardiac sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance is unknown. Aims To assess the association between FBG levels and cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) in euglycaemic healthy subjects based on heart rate variability (HRV) derived indices. Subjects and Methods The study enrolled 42 healthy young adults. Following sociodemographic and clinical assessment, blood samples were collected to measure FBG levels. Five minutes ECG recordings were performed to all participants to obtain frequency domain HRV measurements, namely the natural logarithm (Ln) of total power (LnTP), very low frequency (LnVLF), low frequency (LnLF) and high frequency (LnHF), low frequency/ high frequency ratio (LnLF/HF), normalized low frequency (LF Norm) and high frequency (HF Norm). Results FBG levels correlated positively with LnHF (r = 0.33, P = 0.031) and HF Norm (r = 0.35, P = 0.025) and negatively with LF Norm (r = -0.35, P = 0.025) and LnLF/HF (r = -0.33, P = 0.035). LnHF and HF Norm were significantly decreased in subjects with the lower (4.00 (1.34) ms2/Hz and 33.12 (11.94) n.u) compared to those with the upper FBG quartile (5.64 (1.63) ms2/Hz and 49.43 (17.73) n.u, P = 0.013 and 0.032 respectively). LF Norm and LnLF/HF were significantly increased in subjects with the lower (66.88 (11.94) n.u and 0.73 (0.53)) compared to those with the higher FBG quartile (50.58 (17.83) n.u and 0.03 (0.79), P = 0.032 and 0.038 respectively). Conclusion The present study is the first to demonstrate that rise of blood glucose concentration, within physiological range, is associated with higher parasympathetic, but lower sympathetic CAM. Further researches are needed to set out the glycemic threshold beyond which

  19. Biological variables in the hair uptake of methylmercury from blood in the Macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mottet, N.K.; Body, R.L.; Wilkens, V.; Burbacher, T.M.

    1987-04-01

    The total mercury (Hg) in hair and blood of 45 young healthy adult female Macaque fascicularis given 0, 50, 70, or 90 ..mu..g MeHg/kg body wt orally in apple juice daily revealed a close and constant ratio between blood Hg and hair. The amount of hair Hg does not increase with time (maximum period of observation 490 days) at a given dose level. Also the ratio was unchanged between background and subtoxic dose levels. Individuals at a given dose level with a higher-than-average blood level had a proportionately higher hair level. The Macaque blood/hair ratio is markedly lower than that reported for humans. Pregnancy did not have an appreciable effect on the hair mercury level. Review of the known variables in human and Macaque hair growth and structures does not provide an explanation for the difference. They suggest that an as yet unidentified biological variable(s), possibly circumfollicular blood flow, could account for the difference. This ratio difference notwithstanding, controlled studies on Macaque hair such as this add support for the validity of terminal hair as a trace metal exposure indicator.

  20. Perfusion Quality Improvement and the Reduction of Clinical Variability

    PubMed Central

    Stammers, Alfred H.; Trowbridge, Cody C.; Pezzuto, James; Casale, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to describe the development and utilization of a perfusion quality improvement program to reduce perfusion-to-perfusion variability in a large multi-center perfusion practice. Phase I of the study included the establishment of a perfusion database using standard spreadsheet format to serve multiple administrative functions including patient and procedure sequencing, predictive algorithms for yearly caseload, summary statistics, and inter-perfusionist comparison. The database used 236 separate variables, including demographic and clinical procedure-related categories. Forty of these variables are modifiable by perfusion interaction as established via protocol and algorithm. Phase II of the study used a perfusion electronic data recording system to automatically obtain patient data from physiologic monitors and the heart-lung machine. Data were transferred to a central database for perfusionist comparison. Data analysis used logical functions and macros programming, and statistical analysis used both parametric and non-parametric models within the program. Each quarter all variables underwent analysis with summary data established for the most recent 225 patients undergoing CPB. Twenty-five cases from each perfusionist (n = 9) were compared with the aggregate data of the entire staff, with reference to previous quarter’s summary statistics. The results were discussed in monthly staff meetings and methods for improving compliance were discussed. Individual variation (p < .01) varied in 17 of 40 variables (26.0 ± 8.6), with quarterly improvement (27.4 ± 2.3 vs. 24.2 ± 2.1 vs. 17.0 ± 2.1) demonstrated in seven of nine individuals. In Phase II, performance was analyzed using the same variables as in Phase I but it also included the electronically recorded data from which 27 core measures were derived. All results were discussed with the staff at monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. The perfusion quality

  1. Development of blood vessel searching system using near-infrared light stereo method for clinical blood sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kai; Morita, Yusuke; Nakamachi, Eiji; Honda, Norihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-10-01

    We developed an accurate three-dimensional blood vessel search (3D BVS) system using NIR light for the clinical blood sampling. In the previous study, the 3D BVS system, which used near-infrared (NIR) light imaging and the stereo method to locate blood vessel accurately in three dimensions has been developed(1). However, as NIR lights could not transmit the human arm, this system could not be used for the subcutaneous blood vessel detection. In this study, we developed a BVS by using the reflecting NIR light for blood sampling assist. The light scattering in human tissue will cause blur of blood vessel edge in image, that makes the diameter of blood vessel became uncertain. In this study, a light propagation simulation and a multilayer phantom were adopted to estimate the measurement error of blood vessel diameter in our BSV system. In the simulation, the optical properties of scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient, and refractive index were set similar with human skin. Next, we fabricated a multilayer phantom, which has the similar structure and optical properties with the human skin to confirm availability of the simulation. Also, the optical properties of our phantom are adjustable in our phantom to imitate the different color of skin. We established the estimation algorithm to detect the blood vessel accurately. Finally, we confirm the availability of our BVS for the blood sampling assist system.

  2. Short term Heart Rate Variability to predict blood pressure drops due to standing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Standing from a bed or chair may cause a significant lowering of blood pressure (ΔBP), which may have severe consequences such as, for example, falls in older subjects. The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict the ΔBP due to standing in healthy subjects, based on their Heart Rate Variability, recorded in the 5 minutes before standing. Methods Heart Rate Variability was extracted from an electrocardiogram, recorded from 10 healthy subjects during the 5 minutes before standing. The blood pressure value was measured before and after rising. A mathematical model aiming to predict ΔBP based on Heart Rate Variability measurements was developed using a robust multi-linear regression and was validated with the leave-one-subject-out cross-validation technique. Results The model predicted correctly the ΔBP in 80% of experiments, with an error below the measurement error of sphygmomanometer digital devices (±4.5 mmHg), a false negative rate of 7.5% and a false positive rate of 10%. The magnitude of the ΔBP was associated with a depressed and less chaotic Heart Rate Variability pattern. Conclusions The present study showes that blood pressure lowering due to standing can be predicted by monitoring the Heart Rate Variability in the 5 minutes before standing. PMID:26391336

  3. Heart rate variability in shift workers: responses to orthostatism and relationships with anthropometry, body composition, and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Monteze, Nayara Mussi; Souza, Breno Bernardes; Alves, Henrique José de Paula; de Oliveira, Fernando Luiz Pereira; de Oliveira, José Magalhães; de Freitas, Silvia Nascimento; do Nascimento Neto, Raimundo Marques; Sales, Maria Lilian; Souza, Gabriela Guerra Leal

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the response of heart rate variability (HRV) components to postural change and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in shift workers, a cross-sectional study with 438 Brazilian males rotating shift workers was done. Anthropometric, body composition, and clinical measures were collected. Electrocardiogram was recorded for 3 minutes, in the supine and orthostatic position, and HRV components were extracted. Descriptive analyses showed that mean values of body mass index, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio, visceral fat area (VFA), and blood pressure (BP) were higher than the reference values. In the regression model, age, WC, VFA, and systolic BP showed negative association with HRV components. These findings suggest the need for determining effective strategies for the evaluation and promotion of health among shift workers focused on the altered variables. PMID:26495293

  4. Heart Rate Variability in Shift Workers: Responses to Orthostatism and Relationships with Anthropometry, Body Composition, and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Monteze, Nayara Mussi; Souza, Breno Bernardes; Alves, Henrique José de Paula; de Oliveira, Fernando Luiz Pereira; de Oliveira, José Magalhães; de Freitas, Silvia Nascimento; do Nascimento Neto, Raimundo Marques; Sales, Maria Lilian; Souza, Gabriela Guerra Leal

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the response of heart rate variability (HRV) components to postural change and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in shift workers, a cross-sectional study with 438 Brazilian males rotating shift workers was done. Anthropometric, body composition, and clinical measures were collected. Electrocardiogram was recorded for 3 minutes, in the supine and orthostatic position, and HRV components were extracted. Descriptive analyses showed that mean values of body mass index, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio, visceral fat area (VFA), and blood pressure (BP) were higher than the reference values. In the regression model, age, WC, VFA, and systolic BP showed negative association with HRV components. These findings suggest the need for determining effective strategies for the evaluation and promotion of health among shift workers focused on the altered variables. PMID:26495293

  5. Predictive variables for the occurrence of early clinical mastitis in primiparous Holstein cows under field conditions in France.

    PubMed Central

    Barnouin, J; Chassagne, M

    2001-01-01

    Holstein heifers from 47 dairy herds in France were enrolled in a field study to determine predictors for clinical mastitis within the first month of lactation. Precalving and calving variables (biochemical, hematological, hygienic, and disease indicators) were collected. Early clinical mastitis (ECM) predictive variables were analyzed by using a multiple logistic regression model (99 cows with ECM vs. 571 without clinical mastitis throughout the first lactation). Two variables were associated with a higher risk of ECM: a) difficult calving and b) medium and high white blood cell (WBC) counts in late gestation. Two prepartum indicators were associated with a lower ECM risk: a) medium and high serum concentrations of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and b) high percentage of eosinophils among white blood cells. Calving difficulty and certain biological blood parameters (IgG1, eosinophils) could represent predictors that would merit further experimental studies, with the aim of designing programs for reducing the risk of clinical mastitis in the first lactation. PMID:11195522

  6. Clinical Evaluation of a Dried Blood Spot Assay for Atazanavir▿

    PubMed Central

    Van Schooneveld, Trevor; Swindells, Susan; Nelson, Sarah R.; Robbins, Brian L.; Moore, Ryan; Fletcher, Courtney V.

    2010-01-01

    Current procedures for obtaining and measuring plasma concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) are technically challenging. Dried blood spot (DBS) assays offer a way to overcome many of the obstacles. We sought to develop a DBS assay for quantitation of the PI atazanavir (ATV) and to compare this method with a previously validated plasma assay. We prospectively enrolled 48 patients with well-controlled HIV disease who had been on ATV for at least 7 days. ATV was quantified from plasma by use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A reversed-phase ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) assay was utilized for DBS samples. The concentrations of ATV quantified in a DBS matrix showed very strong agreement with those measured in plasma (r2 = 0.988). The mean difference in ATV concentration between the two methods was −10.8% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], −7.65% to −13.95%), indicating that the DBS method has a slight negative bias. A majority (97.8%) of the differences in concentration between the two assays fell within ±2 standard deviations. ATV concentrations were lower in subjects who had detectable HIV RNA in plasma (mean, 543 ng/ml) than in those with HIV RNA of <50 copies/ml (mean, 1,582 ng/ml) (P = 0.03, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that ATV quantitation in a DBS matrix is feasible and accurate. DBS use offers a convenient alternative for measuring plasma concentrations of ATV and may have utility in monitoring of drug concentrations in clinical practice and in future studies. PMID:20660680

  7. Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jun; Zhang, Li; Qi, Rongfeng; Xu, Qiang; Li, Weihui; Hou, Cailan; Zhong, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; He, Zhong; Li, Lingjiang; Lu, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research suggests that variability in brain signal provides important information about brain function in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability is altered in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We aimed to identify the BOLD signal variability changes of PTSD patients during symptom provocation and compare the brain patterns of BOLD signal variability with those of brain activation. Methods Twelve PTSD patients and 14 age-matched controls, who all experienced a mining accident, underwent clinical assessment as well as fMRI scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. BOLD signal variability and brain activation were respectively examined with standard deviation (SD) and general linear model analysis, and compared between the PTSD and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between PTSD symptom severity and these two brain measures across all subjects as well as in the PTSD group. Results PTSD patients showed increased activation in the middle occipital gyrus compared with controls, and an inverse correlation was found between PTSD symptom severity and brain activation in the hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex. Brain variability analysis revealed increased SD in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex, and vermis, and decreased SD in the parahippocapal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, somatosensory cortex, and striatum. Importantly, SD alterations in several regions were found in both traumatic and neutral conditions and were stratified by PTSD symptom severity. Conclusion BOLD signal variability may be a reliable and sensitive biomarker of PTSD, and combining brain activation and brain variability analysis may provide complementary insight into the neural basis of this disorder. PMID:26229476

  8. Latent class instrumental variables: a clinical and biostatistical perspective.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G; Kramer, Barnett S; Lindeman, Karen S

    2016-01-15

    In some two-arm randomized trials, some participants receive the treatment assigned to the other arm as a result of technical problems, refusal of a treatment invitation, or a choice of treatment in an encouragement design. In some before-and-after studies, the availability of a new treatment changes from one time period to this next. Under assumptions that are often reasonable, the latent class instrumental variable (IV) method estimates the effect of treatment received in the aforementioned scenarios involving all-or-none compliance and all-or-none availability. Key aspects are four initial latent classes (sometimes called principal strata) based on treatment received if in each randomization group or time period, the exclusion restriction assumption (in which randomization group or time period is an instrumental variable), the monotonicity assumption (which drops an implausible latent class from the analysis), and the estimated effect of receiving treatment in one latent class (sometimes called efficacy, the local average treatment effect, or the complier average causal effect). Since its independent formulations in the biostatistics and econometrics literatures, the latent class IV method (which has no well-established name) has gained increasing popularity. We review the latent class IV method from a clinical and biostatistical perspective, focusing on underlying assumptions, methodological extensions, and applications in our fields of obstetrics and cancer research. PMID:26239275

  9. Excess Weight, Anthropometric Variables and Blood Pressure in Schoolchildren aged 10 to 18 years

    PubMed Central

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Barbiero, Sandra Mari; Cesa, Cláudia Ciceri; Oliveira, Rosemary; Silva, Anelise Damiani; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of hypertension among children and adolescents is estimated to range between 1% and 13%. Excess weight and central obesity are related to blood pressure levels in adults, and may be important in the early pathogenesis of SH when present in childhood. Objectives To study the association between anthropometric variables and blood pressure levels in schoolchildren from the 5th and 8th grades, and to identify which parameter was more strongly correlated with blood pressure levels. Methods Contemporary cross-sectional study with probabilistic population-based cluster sampling of schoolchildren enrolled from the 5th to the 8th grades in public elementary schools of Porto Alegre. Data on familial risk factors and anthropometry were collected. Statistical analysis included correlations and cluster-adjusted confidence intervals. Results The mean age of participants was 12.57 (± 1.64) years, and 55.2% of them were females. Abnormal blood pressure levels were found in 11.3% of the sample and borderline values, in 16.2%. Among the anthropometric variables analyzed, hip circumference was the one with the strongest correlation with increased blood pressure (r = 0.462, p < 0.001), followed by waist circumference (r = 0.404, p < 0.001) and abdominal skinfold (r = 0.291, p < 0.001). Conclusion We observed an association of waist circumference and skinfolds with increased blood pressure levels in the schoolchildren of the sample. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance that early measurements of blood pressure, and waist and hip circumferences become a routine in health services in order to prevent this condition. PMID:24676224

  10. Variable Clinical Presentation of an MUC1 Mutation Causing Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, Stanislav; Antignac, Corinne; Robins, Vicki; Kidd, Kendrah; Kelsoe, John R.; Hladik, Gerald; Klemmer, Philip; Knohl, Stephen J.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Vo, Nam; Santi, Ann; Harris, Alese; Canaday, Omar; Weller, Nelson; Hulick, Peter J.; Vogel, Kristen; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederick F.; Tuazon, Jennifer; Deltas, Constantinos; Somers, Douglas; Megarbane, Andre; Kimmel, Paul L.; Sperati, C. John; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Waugh, David A.; McGinn, Stella; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vylet'al, Petr; Živná, Martina; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The genetic cause of medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 was recently identified as a cytosine insertion in the variable number of tandem repeat region of MUC1 encoding mucoprotein-1 (MUC1), a protein that is present in skin, breast, and lung tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the distal tubules of the kidney. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the clinical characteristics of families and individuals with this mutation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Families with autosomal dominant interstitial kidney disease were referred for genetic analysis over a 14-year period. Families without UMOD or REN mutations prospectively underwent genotyping for the presence of the MUC1 mutation. Clinical characteristics were retrospectively evaluated in individuals with the MUC1 mutation and historically affected individuals (persons who were both related to genetically affected individuals in such a way that ensured that they could be genetically affected and had a history of CKD stage IV or kidney failure resulting in death, dialysis, or transplantation). Results Twenty-four families were identified with the MUC1 mutation. Of 186 family members undergoing MUC1 mutational analysis, the mutation was identified in 95 individuals, 91 individuals did not have the mutation, and111 individuals were identified as historically affected. Individuals with the MUC1 mutation suffered from chronic kidney failure with a widely variable age of onset of end stage kidney disease ranging from 16 to >80 years. Urinalyses revealed minimal protein and no blood. Ultrasounds of 35 individuals showed no medullary cysts. There were no clinical manifestations of the MUC1 mutation detected in the breasts, skin, respiratory system, or gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion MUC1 mutation results in progressive chronic kidney failure with a bland urinary sediment. The age of onset of end stage kidney disease is highly variable, suggesting that gene

  11. Mechanism of blood pressure and R-R variability: insights from ganglion blockade in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Rong; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Behbehani, Khosrow; Crandall, Craig G.; Levine, Benjamin D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous blood pressure (BP) and R-R variability are used frequently as 'windows' into cardiovascular control mechanisms. However, the origin of these rhythmic fluctuations is not completely understood. In this study, with ganglion blockade, we evaluated the role of autonomic neural activity versus other 'non-neural' factors in the origin of BP and R-R variability in humans. Beat-to-beat BP, R-R interval and respiratory excursions were recorded in ten healthy subjects (aged 30 +/- 6 years) before and after ganglion blockade with trimethaphan. The spectral power of these variables was calculated in the very low (0.0078-0.05 Hz), low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and high (0.15-0.35 Hz) frequency ranges. The relationship between systolic BP and R-R variability was examined by cross-spectral analysis. After blockade, R-R variability was virtually abolished at all frequencies; however, respiration and high frequency BP variability remained unchanged. Very low and low frequency BP variability was reduced substantially by 84 and 69 %, respectively, but still persisted. Transfer function gain between systolic BP and R-R interval variability decreased by 92 and 88 % at low and high frequencies, respectively, while the phase changed from negative to positive values at the high frequencies. These data suggest that under supine resting conditions with spontaneous breathing: (1) R-R variability at all measured frequencies is predominantly controlled by autonomic neural activity; (2) BP variability at high frequencies (> 0.15 Hz) is mediated largely, if not exclusively, by mechanical effects of respiration on intrathoracic pressure and/or cardiac filling; (3) BP variability at very low and low frequencies (< 0.15 Hz) is probably mediated by both sympathetic nerve activity and intrinsic vasomotor rhythmicity; and (4) the dynamic relationship between BP and R-R variability as quantified by transfer function analysis is determined predominantly by autonomic neural activity rather than other

  12. Association of blood pressure variability with induction of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Yoneda, Y; Fujita, H; Uchida, A; Takenaka, K; Takesako, T; Itoh, H; Nakata, T; Takeda, K; Nakagawa, M

    1994-05-01

    The influence of increased lability of blood pressure on the development of aortic atherosclerosis was examined. Because sinoaortic denervation (SAD) produced increased lability of blood pressure without blood pressure elevation, the development of atheromatous plaque was examined in SAD rats. These rats were fed a high-cholesterol diet and were denuded of endothelium so that development of atherosclerosis was accelerated. Five groups of male Wistar rats were used: A) controls, B) high-cholesterol diet (HC), C) HC+denudation (DN), D) HC+DN+renal artery clipping (2K1C), and E) HC+DN+sinoaortic denervation (SAD). Denudation was accomplished by scraping the aortic lumen with a balloon catheter, and hypertension was induced by clipping the left renal artery. After recording blood pressure and heart rate for 6 weeks, the rats were killed, blood samples were collected, and thoracic aortas were removed for pathologic examination. All the groups of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet developed marked hypercholesterolemia and hypotriglyceridemia. High-cholesterol diet alone could not induce aortic atherosclerosis, whereas aorta of HC+DN rats showed slight intimal thickening with smooth muscle cell proliferation. On the other hand, aorta of HC+DN + 2K1C rats showed marked atheromatous plaque with prominent cellular proliferation, and aorta of SAD rats also showed mild to moderate atheromatous plaque. Accordingly, we concluded that increased variability in circadian blood pressure per se, as well as hypertension, could induce aortic atherosclerosis in the hypercholesterolemic and endothelium-denuded rats. PMID:8060580

  13. Separate estimation of long- and short-term systolic blood pressure variability from photoplethysmograph.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Riho; Bhuiyan, Md Shoaib; Kawanaka, Haruki; Oguri, Koji

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a method to monitor systolic blood pressure (BP) variability without using a cuff during the daytime. In this method, BP variability of long-term and short-term were separated and estimated respectively from features of phoplethysmograph (PPG) through the use of a frequency filter. Then, total variability was obtained from the combination of long-term and short-term. BP by using a cuff (ground truth) and PPG of nine healthy young subjects were measured during the daytime; then BP variability was estimated from PPG to verify the validity of our method. As a result, the correlation coefficients between measured BP variability and estimated BP variability was improved from r = 0.35 in previous method to r = 0.41 in proposed method. In particular, the estimation results in short-term BP variability showed good accuracy (r = 0.67). This method of estimating BP variability has the potential to be a simple and continuous BP monitoring system during the daytime. PMID:25570338

  14. Evaluation of Two New Indices of Blood Pressure Variability Using Postural Change in Older Fallers

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Choon-Hian; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B.; Chin, Ai-Vyrn; Poi, Philip J. H.; Chee, Kok Han; Imran, Z. Abidin; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the utility of blood pressure variability (BPV) calculated using previously published and newly introduced indices using the variables falls and age as comparators. While postural hypotension has long been considered a risk factor for falls, there is currently no documented evidence on the relationship between BPV and falls. A case-controlled study involving 25 fallers and 25 nonfallers was conducted. Systolic (SBPV) and diastolic blood pressure variability (DBPV) were assessed using 5 indices: standard deviation (SD), standard deviation of most stable continuous 120 beats (staSD), average real variability (ARV), root mean square of real variability (RMSRV), and standard deviation of real variability (SDRV). Continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure was recorded during 10 minutes’ supine rest and 3 minutes’ standing. Standing SBPV was significantly higher than supine SBPV using 4 indices in both groups. The standing-to-supine-BPV ratio (SSR) was then computed for each subject (staSD, ARV, RMSRV, and SDRV). Standing-to-supine ratio for SBPV was significantly higher among fallers compared to nonfallers using RMSRV and SDRV (P = 0.034 and P = 0.025). Using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), 3 indices (ARV, RMSRV, and SDRV) of SSR SBPV provided accuracies of 61.6%, 61.2%, and 60.0% for the prediction of falls which is comparable with timed-up and go (TUG), 64.4%. This study suggests that SSR SBPV using RMSRV and SDRV is a potential predictor for falls among older patients, and deserves further evaluation in larger prospective studies. PMID:27175670

  15. Development of a portable blood irradiator for potential clinical uses

    SciTech Connect

    Hungate, F.P.

    1988-12-01

    This document provides an account of the development of a fully portable blood irradiator and the evaluation of its safety and efficacy when implanted in goats, sheep, a baboon and dogs. The program was initiated because the control of lymphocyte populations by irradiation is a potential method for improving success in organ or tissue transplantation and for treating a variety of blood diseases. 15 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Genetic variability in the sable (Martes zibellina L.) with respect to genes encoding blood proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, S.N.; Kazakova, T.I.

    1995-02-01

    Electrophoresis of blood proteins was used to determine, for the first time, the level of genetic variability of certain loci in the sable (Martes zibellina L., Mustelidae). Variation of 23 blood proteins encoded by 25 genes was analyzed. Polymorphism was revealed in six genes. The level of heterozygosity was estimated at 0.069; the proportion of polymorphic loci was 24%. Data on the history of the sable population maintained at the farm, on geographical distribution of natural sable populations, and on the number of animals selected for reproduction in captivity is presented. The great number of animals studies and the extensive range of natural sable populations, on the basis of which the population maintained in captivity was obtained, suggest that the results of this work can be used for estimating the variability of the gene pool of sable as a species. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Variability under Moon, Mars and Zero Gravity Conditions During Parabolic Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Wouter; Joosen, Pieter; Widjaja, Devy; Varon, Carolina; Vandeput, Steven; Van Huffel, Sabine; Aubert, Andre E.

    2013-02-01

    Gravity changes during partial-G parabolic flights (0g -0.16g - 0.38g) lead to changes in modulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), studied via the heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV). HRV and BPV were assessed via classical time and frequency domain measures. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure show both increasing trends towards higher gravity levels. The parasympathetic and sympathetic modulation show both an increasing trend with decreasing gravity, although the modulation is sympathetic predominant during reduced gravity. For the mean heart rate, a non-monotonic relation was found, which can be explained by the increased influence of stress on the heart rate. This study shows that there is a relation between changes in gravity and modulations in the ANS. With this in mind, countermeasures can be developed to reduce postflight orthostatic intolerance.

  18. Effect of One-Week Salt Restriction on Blood Pressure Variability in Hypertensive Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Kayama, Yosuke; Ohashi, Kennosuke; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ishizawa, Sho; Yokota, Tamotsu; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased short-term blood pressure (BP) variability on 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) is known to be a risk factor for cardiovascular events. However, very few studies have evaluated the effect of salt restriction on BP variability particularly in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the effect of salt restriction on systolic BP (SBP) variability. Methods and Results 10 hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes and not receiving antihypertensive agents were enrolled in the study. After admission, all patients received a salt-restricted diet and appropriate anti-diabetic treatments and were followed up for 7 consecutive days using ABPM. After the 7-day treatment, the median [interquartile range (IQR)] coefficient of variation (CV) for diurnal SBP variability changed from day 1 to day 7–13.0 [10.8 to 16.8] % to 13.3 [9.1 to 18.9] % (P = 0.959)—and the median [IQR] change between days 1 and 7 was -0.3 [-3.2 to 2.9] %. In addition, CV for BP variability and circadian rhythm of BP varied greatly on a day-by-day basis for 7 days, compared to mean BP values. Interestingly, increased SBP variability was associated with greater day-by-day changes in circadian rhythm of BP. Conclusions Salt restriction during 7-day hospitalization led to a -0.3 [-3.2 to 2.9] (median [IQR]) % change from baseline in CV for diurnal SBP variability in 10 hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes not receiving antihypertensive agents. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000016243 PMID:26731185

  19. Relationship between blood calcium level and ST peak interval of electrocardiographic variables in peripartum Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Megumi; Sakurai, Yoshie; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Kawamoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The association between blood calcium levels and electrocardiographic variables was compared in 137 normal parturient and 36 peripartum recumbent Holstein cows to determine whether hypocalcemia in peripartum dairy cows can be rapidly diagnosed using electrocardiograph. Inverse of STc (ST peak interval/SS interval(0.5)) and blood ionized calcium or serum calcium concentrations were strongly correlated, and both correlation coefficients were 0.81 (P<0.001). The 95% prediction interval indicated that cows with STc >0.385 ± 0.001 sec are very likely to be hypocalcemic (blood ionized or serum calcium concentrations of <0.9 mmol/l or <7.5 mg/dl, respectively). These findings indicate that hypocalcemia in parturient cows can be non-invasively estimated using the STc. PMID:26118411

  20. Relationship between blood calcium level and ST peak interval of electrocardiographic variables in peripartum Holstein cows

    PubMed Central

    ITOH, Megumi; SAKURAI, Yoshie; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; KAWAMOTO, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The association between blood calcium levels and electrocardiographic variables was compared in 137 normal parturient and 36 peripartum recumbent Holstein cows to determine whether hypocalcemia in peripartum dairy cows can be rapidly diagnosed using electrocardiograph. Inverse of STc (ST peak interval/SS interval0.5) and blood ionized calcium or serum calcium concentrations were strongly correlated, and both correlation coefficients were 0.81 (P<0.001). The 95% prediction interval indicated that cows with STc >0.385 ± 0.001 sec are very likely to be hypocalcemic (blood ionized or serum calcium concentrations of <0.9 mmol/l or <7.5 mg/dl, respectively). These findings indicate that hypocalcemia in parturient cows can be non-invasively estimated using the STc. PMID:26118411

  1. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  2. Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP)

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Richard; Gill, Paramjit; Martin, Una; Godwin, Marshall; Hanley, Janet; Heneghan, Carl; Hobbs, F.D. Richard; Mant, Jonathan; McKinstry, Brian; Myers, Martin; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home–clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home–clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48–0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85–0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient’s blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient’s ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment. PMID:27001299

  3. Influence of transport and time on blood variables commonly measured for the athlete biological passport.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Neil; Giraud, Sylvain; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Saugy, Martial

    2016-02-01

    Some recent studies have characterized the stability of blood variables commonly measured for the Athlete Biological Passport. The aim of this study was to characterize the impact of different shipments conditions and the quality of the results returned by the haematological analyzer. Twenty-two healthy male subjects provided five EDTA tubes each. Four shipment conditions (24, 36, 48, 72 h) under refrigerated conditions were tested and compared to a set of samples left in the laboratory also under refrigerated conditions (group control). All measurements were conducted using two Sysmex XT-2000i analyzers. Haemoglobin concentration, reticulocytes percentage, and OFF-score numerical data were the same for samples analyzed just after collection and after a shipment under refrigerated conditions up to 72 h. Detailed information reported especially by the differential (DIFF) channel scatterplot of the Sysmex XT-2000i indicated that there were signs of blood deterioration, but were not of relevance for the variables used in the Athlete Biological Passport. As long as the cold chain is guaranteed, the time delay between the collection and the analyses of blood variables can be extended. PMID:25924812

  4. A brief history of the early years of blood transfusion at the Mayo Clinic: the first blood bank in the United States (1935).

    PubMed

    Moore, S Breanndan

    2005-07-01

    At the Mayo Clinic in 1914, Francis McGrath modified an existing aspiration-injection apparatus and adapted it for arm-to-arm blood transfusions. Separately, in 1919, both Pemberton and Sanford described in detail the Mayo Clinic experience with more than 1000 transfusions between January 1915 and January 1918. Most transfusions were by the indirect citrate method from freshly drawn blood. In 1935, John Lundy established a bank of refrigerated blood for transfusions at Mayo Clinic and reported on the activity in that and subsequent years. The functioning clinical blood bank established by Lundy at Mayo Clinic predated that of Bernard Fantus in Chicago by almost 2 years. PMID:16010654

  5. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Halbrook, R S; Shugart, L R; Watson, A P; Munro, N B; Linnabary, R D

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release. PMID:1399773

  6. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  7. The association of resting state heart rate variability and 24-hour blood pressure variability in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Clamor, Annika; Koenig, Julian; Hagglund, Kristofer J

    2016-02-15

    Patients with high cervical complete spinal cord injuries (tetraplegia) sustain damage to the autonomic neural pathways that influence cardiovascular functioning and produce variability in the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). In non-injured individuals, an inverse relationship exists between resting autonomic control of the heart (as evidenced by HR variability (HRV)) and BP variability (BPV). This study examined the relationship between HRV, BP and BPV in individuals with tetraplegic (n=10) and paraplegic (n=10) spinal cord injuries, and a group of healthy controls (n=14). Resting HRV at baseline and 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements were collected from electrocardiogram measures of each participant. HRV was quantified using time- and frequency-domain measures. The standard deviation of the BP measurements was used as an index of BPV. Multivariate analyses of variance were performed to examine group differences for laboratory-based and 24-h dependent variables. The MANOVAs for HRV parameters (λ(14,50)=.352, p=.010, η(2)=.407) and for BP indices and HR (λ(16,48)=.318, p=.013, η(2)=.436) were significant. Furthermore, in line with existing evidence, we found that vagally mediated HRV was inversely related to BPV in healthy controls. However, this relationship did not hold for the tetraplegia group (ρ<|.42|), and mixed results were found for the paraplegia group (e.g., ρ<|.29| for time domain HRV, ρ>|.65| for low-frequency power). These results support the conclusion that the damage to the spinal sympathetic pathways to the heart found in people with tetraplegia causes a significant disruption in baroreflex control of BP. PMID:26810517

  8. Clinical and Immunological Features of Common Variable Immunodeficiency in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lian-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chuan; Liu, Xin-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is one of the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency syndromes. The purpose of this article was to broaden our knowledge about CVID for better diagnosis and treatment. Methods: Clinical and immunological features of 40 Chinese patients with CVID were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The median age at onset was 11-year-old (range 4–51 years). The median age at diagnosis was 14.5-year-old (range 5–66 years). The average time of delay in diagnosis was 5.3 years (range 1–41 years). The most common main complaint was fever due to infections (35 cases, 87.5%). Pneumonia (28 cases, 70%) was the most common type of infections. Bronchiectasis was present in 6 patients (15%). Autoimmune disease was detected in 6 cases of CVID, and malignancy in 2 cases. The median total serum levels of IgG, IgA, and IgM at diagnosis were 1.07 g/L, 0.07 g/L, and 0.28 g/L, respectively. The percentages of CD3−/CD10+ B-cells were 1%–3.14%. Conclusions: Infection is the most frequent presentation of CVID. Patients with unexplainable infections should receive further examination including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) and lymphocyte subset analysis. Regular and sufficient substitution with Ig is recommended. PMID:25635425

  9. Does Measurement of Central Blood Pressure have Treatment Consequences in the Clinical Praxis?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-08-01

    Interest in relations between central aortic pressure and cardiovascular disease risk has increased markedly over the past two decades. Numerous studies have shown that higher pulse pressure is associated with increased risk. Further, pulse pressure differs variably and sometimes dramatically between the central aorta and the brachial artery, where blood pressure is generally measured. In light of the potential for variable misclassification of central systolic and pulse pressure by brachial measurements, central blood pressure has emerged as a potentially superior blood pressure measure. This brief review will examine the evidence supporting the use of central pressure to stratify risk and guide therapy in patients with hypertension. PMID:26142539

  10. Cooperative study of clinical benefits from use of the fully portable blood irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Hungate, F.P.

    1994-10-01

    This report looks at the clinical benefits from use of a fully portable blood irradiator, techniques developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Significant accomplishments included the following: blood irradiators were successfully fabricated by PNL; irradiators were activated at the University of Missouri and quality tested at PNL; A-V shunts for irradiators were successfully fabricated in the PNL plastics shop; all activities necessary for experimental work on animals using the blood irradiators were completed.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of stored red blood cells: evaluating clinically-relevant biochemical markers in donated blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Chad G.; Buckley, Kevin; Chen, Deborah; Schulze, H. G.; Devine, Dana V.; Blades, Michael W.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    2015-07-01

    Modern transfusion medicine relies on the safe, secure, and cost-effective delivery of donated red blood cells (RBCs). Once isolated, RBCs are suspended in a defined additive solution and stored in plastic blood bags in which, over time, they undergo chemical, physiological, and morphological changes that may have a deleterious impact on some patients. Regulations limit the storage period to 42 days and the cells do not routinely undergo analytical testing before use. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy to interrogate stored RBCs and we identify metabolic and cell-breakdown products, such as haemoglobin and membrane fragments, that build-up in the blood bags as the cells age. Our work points the way to the development of an instrument which could quickly and easily assess the biochemical nature of stored RBC units before they are transfused.

  12. [Common variable immunodeficiency. Epidemiology and clinical manifestations in 69 patients].

    PubMed

    Fernández Romero, Diego S; Juri, María C; Paolini, María V; Malbrán, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by an impaired antibody production and an increased susceptibility to recurrent infections of the respiratory tract, mainly by extracellular encapsulated bacteria. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of 69 patients evaluated over a period of 10 years at three centers in the city of Buenos Aires. At the onset of the study 14 patients were on follow up, and at its end the number of patients reached to 60. Most of them consulted for infection or hypogammaglobulinemia and nearly half had an established diagnosis of immunodeficiency. Sixty-five (94.2%) patients had infections by encapsulated bacteria, four (6.1%) sepsis and two tuberculosis. The average age of onset of infectious symptoms was 18.1 years; the average age at diagnosis was 29.6 years and the delay to diagnosis 11.9 years. Forty one (59.4%) patients reported a history of recurrent or chronic diarrhea. In 22 (31.9%) 13 autoimmune diseases were diagnosed, being the most frequent the hematological disorders and hypothyroidism. Eight patients had histological polyclonal lymphoproliferation, four (5.8%) with granulomatous disease affecting the liver, the larynx and/or the skin; and four as lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (LIP). Nineteen (27.5%) patients had splenomegaly and 23/57 (40.3%) images suggestive of lymphocytic or granulomatous processes (including the 4 with LIP) in the chest CT. Three (4.3%) patients developed B cell lymphoma, four (5.8%) stomach adenocarcinoma and one breast cancer. The study had a median follow-up of 54 months, range 1-353 and four patients (5.8%) died during the follow up. PMID:23924529

  13. Mechanism of blood pressure and R-R variability: insights from ganglion blockade in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Zuckerman, Julie H; Behbehani, Khosrow; Crandall, Craig G; Levine, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous blood pressure (BP) and R-R variability are used frequently as ‘windows’ into cardiovascular control mechanisms. However, the origin of these rhythmic fluctuations is not completely understood. In this study, with ganglion blockade, we evaluated the role of autonomic neural activity versus other ‘non-neural’ factors in the origin of BP and R-R variability in humans. Beat-to-beat BP, R-R interval and respiratory excursions were recorded in ten healthy subjects (aged 30 ± 6 years) before and after ganglion blockade with trimethaphan. The spectral power of these variables was calculated in the very low (0.0078-0.05 Hz), low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and high (0.15-0.35 Hz) frequency ranges. The relationship between systolic BP and R-R variability was examined by cross-spectral analysis. After blockade, R-R variability was virtually abolished at all frequencies; however, respiration and high frequency BP variability remained unchanged. Very low and low frequency BP variability was reduced substantially by 84 and 69 %, respectively, but still persisted. Transfer function gain between systolic BP and R-R interval variability decreased by 92 and 88 % at low and high frequencies, respectively, while the phase changed from negative to positive values at the high frequencies. These data suggest that under supine resting conditions with spontaneous breathing: (1) R-R variability at all measured frequencies is predominantly controlled by autonomic neural activity; (2) BP variability at high frequencies (> 0.15 Hz) is mediated largely, if not exclusively, by mechanical effects of respiration on intrathoracic pressure and/or cardiac filling; (3) BP variability at very low and low frequencies (< 0.15 Hz) is probably mediated by both sympathetic nerve activity and intrinsic vasomotor rhythmicity; and (4) the dynamic relationship between BP and R-R variability as quantified by transfer function analysis is determined predominantly by autonomic neural activity rather than

  14. A “Crossomics” Study Analysing Variability of Different Components in Peripheral Blood of Healthy Caucasoid Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Ana; Blejec, Andrej; Albrecht, Tanja; Selbig, Joachim; Bauer, Chris; Schuchardt, Johannes; Or-Guil, Michal; Zupančič, Klemen; Švajger, Urban; Štabuc, Borut; Ihan, Alojz; Kopitar, Andreja Nataša; Ravnikar, Maja; Knežević, Miomir; Rožman, Primož; Jeras, Matjaž

    2012-01-01

    Background Different immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases are being developed and tested in clinical studies worldwide. Their resulting complex experimental data should be properly evaluated, therefore reliable normal healthy control baseline values are indispensable. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess intra- and inter-individual variability of various biomarkers, peripheral blood of 16 age and gender equilibrated healthy volunteers was sampled on 3 different days within a period of one month. Complex “crossomics” analyses of plasma metabolite profiles, antibody concentrations and lymphocyte subset counts as well as whole genome expression profiling in CD4+T and NK cells were performed. Some of the observed age, gender and BMI dependences are in agreement with the existing knowledge, like negative correlation between sex hormone levels and age or BMI related increase in lipids and soluble sugars. Thus we can assume that the distribution of all 39.743 analysed markers is well representing the normal Caucasoid population. All lymphocyte subsets, 20% of metabolites and less than 10% of genes, were identified as highly variable in our dataset. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows that the intra-individual variability was at least two-fold lower compared to the inter-individual one at all investigated levels, showing the importance of personalised medicine approach from yet another perspective. PMID:22253695

  15. Changes in certain iron metabolism variables after a single blood donation.

    PubMed

    Liedén, G; Höglund, S; Ehn, L

    1975-01-01

    Signs of iron deficiency have been studied after the first blood donation in 11 healthy men. Six were given 100 mg iron daily, and five received placebo tablets. The total iron-binding capacity and iron absoprtion remained raised for more than 26 days, but had almost returned to the initial values after 70 days. A significant decrease in the stainable bone marrow iron could be shown in all subjects after 26 days; later some restitution was seen in subjects given iron supplements, but not in those given placebo. As the restitution times are long, the interval after blood donation must be taken into account when judging iron metabolism variables in active donors. PMID:1092130

  16. Use of generalised additive models to categorise continuous variables in clinical prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In medical practice many, essentially continuous, clinical parameters tend to be categorised by physicians for ease of decision-making. Indeed, categorisation is a common practice both in medical research and in the development of clinical prediction rules, particularly where the ensuing models are to be applied in daily clinical practice to support clinicians in the decision-making process. Since the number of categories into which a continuous predictor must be categorised depends partly on the relationship between the predictor and the outcome, the need for more than two categories must be borne in mind. Methods We propose a categorisation methodology for clinical-prediction models, using Generalised Additive Models (GAMs) with P-spline smoothers to determine the relationship between the continuous predictor and the outcome. The proposed method consists of creating at least one average-risk category along with high- and low-risk categories based on the GAM smooth function. We applied this methodology to a prospective cohort of patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The predictors selected were respiratory rate and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood (PCO2), and the response variable was poor evolution. An additive logistic regression model was used to show the relationship between the covariates and the dichotomous response variable. The proposed categorisation was compared to the continuous predictor as the best option, using the AIC and AUC evaluation parameters. The sample was divided into a derivation (60%) and validation (40%) samples. The first was used to obtain the cut points while the second was used to validate the proposed methodology. Results The three-category proposal for the respiratory rate was ≤ 20;(20,24];> 24, for which the following values were obtained: AIC=314.5 and AUC=0.638. The respective values for the continuous predictor were AIC=317.1 and AUC=0.634, with no statistically

  17. Clinical Response and Transfusion Reactions of Sheep Subjected to Single Homologous Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rejane Santos; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Araújo, Carolina Akiko Sato Cabral; Rodrigues, Frederico Augusto Mazzocca Lopes; Oliveira, Francisco Leonardo Costa; Zaminhan, Janaina Larissa Rodrigues; Moreira, Thiago Rocha; Sousa, Isadora Karolina Freitas; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Barrêto Júnior, Raimundo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Studies in relation to blood conservation and responses to transfusion are scarce for ruminants. We evaluated the clinical manifestations of sheep that received a single homologous transfusion of whole blood, focusing on transfusion reactions. Eighteen adult sheep were subjected to a single phlebotomy to withdraw 40% of the total blood volume, which was placed into CPDA-1 bags and then divided into G0, animals that received fresh blood, and G15 and G35, animals that received blood stored for 15 or 35 days, respectively. Clinical observations were recorded throughout the transfusion, whereas heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were assessed at the following times: 24 hours after phlebotomy and before transfusion; 30 minutes, six, twelve, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and eight and 16 days after transfusion. All groups presented transfusion reactions, among which hyperthermia was the most frequent (50% of animals). Tachycardia occurred most frequently in the G35 animals (50% of them). During transfusion G35 animals presented more clinical manifestation (P < 0.05). Transfusion of fresh or stored total blood improved the blood volume, but transfusion reactions occurred, demonstrating that a single transfusion of fresh or stored blood can cause inflammatory and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in sheep. PMID:25544959

  18. The relationship between blood pressure variability, obesity and left atrial phasic function in hypertensive population.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare; Ilic, Irena; Suzic-Lazić, Jelena; Zivanovic, Vladimir; Jozika, Ljilja; Celic, Vera

    2016-04-01

    We sought to investigate the relationship between blood pressure (BP) variability and left atrial (LA) phasic function assessed by volumetric and speckle tracking method in normal-weight, overweight and obese hypertensive patients. This cross-sectional study included 164 untreated hypertensive subjects who underwent a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and complete two-dimensional echocardiographic examination (2DE). All the patients were separated into three groups according to their body mass index (BMI): normal-weight patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)), overweight patients (25 ≤ BMI < 30 kg/m(2)), and obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Daytime, nighttime and 24 h BP variability indices were higher in obese hypertensive subjects than in lean patients. Maximum and minimum LA volumes and volume indexes gradually and significantly increased, whereas pre-A LAV decreased, from normal-weight to obese subjects. Total and passive LA emptying fractions, representing LA reservoir and conduit function, gradually reduced from lean to obese individuals. Active LA EF, the parameter of LA booster pump function, increased in the same direction. Similar results were obtained by 2DE strain analysis. BP variability parameters were associated with structural, functional and mechanical parameters of LA remodeling in the whole study population. The parameters of LA reservoir function were negatively related with BP variability indices, whereas the parameters of LA pump function were positively related with BP variability indices. Obesity significantly impacts BP variability and LA phasic function in untreated hypertensive subjects. BP variability is associated with LA remodeling independent of BP, left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. PMID:26662267

  19. Visit-to-Visit Variability in Blood Pressure Is Related to Late-Life Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Qin, Bo; Viera, Anthony J; Muntner, Paul; Plassman, Brenda L; Edwards, Lloyd J; Adair, Linda S; Popkin, Barry M; Mendez, Michelle A

    2016-07-01

    The association between visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure (BP) and cognitive decline over time remains incompletely understood in a general population of older adults. We assessed the hypothesis that higher visit-to-visit variability in BP, but not mean BP, would be associated with faster decline in cognitive function among community-dwelling older adults. This prospective cohort study comprised 976 adults who had 3 or 4 visits with BP measurements as part of the China Health and Nutrition Survey from 1991, up to their first cognitive tests, and completed cognitive screening tests at ≥2 visits in 1997, 2000, or 2004. Visit-to-visit BP variability was expressed as the SD, coefficient of variation, or as the variation independent of mean BP across visits conducted at a mean interval of 3.2 years. Mean (SD) age at the first cognitive test was 64 (6) years. Using multivariable-adjusted linear mixed-effects models, we found higher visit-to-visit variability in systolic BP, but not mean systolic BP, was associated with a faster decline of cognitive function (adjusted mean difference [95% confidence interval] for high versus low tertile of SD variability: standardized composite scores -0.038 standard units (SU)/y [-0.066 to -0.009] and verbal memory -0.041 SU/y [-0.075 to -0.008]). Higher visit-to-visit variability in diastolic BP was associated with a faster decline of cognitive function, independent of mean diastolic BP, among adults aged 55 to 64 years but not those ≥65 years. Our results suggest that higher long-term BP visit-to-visit variability is associated with a faster rate of cognitive decline among older adults. PMID:27217401

  20. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in daily clinical practice - the Spanish ABPM Registry experience.

    PubMed

    Gorostidi, Manuel; Banegas, José R; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Vinyoles, Ernest; Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Many patients are hypertensive at the medical settings but show normal blood pressure out of the doctor's office, and are classified as white-coat hypertensives. On the other hand, many patients with controlled hypertension at the clinic show ambulatory blood pressure levels above the thresholds considered for an adequate blood pressure control, known as having masked hypertension. Using data from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry (Spanish ABPM Registry), a national program developed to promote the use of the ambulatory technique for hypertension management in daily practice, we have reviewed the main strengths of this approach, that is the ability to detect discrepancies of blood pressure status with respect to office blood pressure measurement, and to better assess accurate rates of hypertension control. White-coat hypertension within patients with elevated office blood pressure, and masked hypertension within office-controlled patients affected one of three patients in each office status. On the other hand, rates of ambulatory blood pressure control (50%) doubled those of office blood pressure control (25%), still remaining half the patients uncontrolled. We think that a systematic use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and strategies to improve blood pressure control constitute key priorities in hypertension management. PMID:26541761

  1. Impact and management of physiological calibration in spectral analysis of blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Hintsala, Heidi; Hautala, Arto J; Ikäheimo, Tiina M; Jaakkola, Jouni J; Tiinanen, Suvi; Seppänen, Tapio; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2014-01-01

    Physiological calibration (Physiocal) improves the quality of continuous blood pressure (BP) signal from finger. However, the effects of Physiocal on spectral characteristics of systolic BP (SBP) variability are not well-known. We tested the hypothesis that the use of Physiocal may alter the results on SBP variability when compared with BP recording without Physiocal. Continuous BP was recorded simultaneously from fingers of both arms during 10-min standing by two Nexfin devices, one with (ON) and the other without (OFF) Physiocal (n = 19). Missing SBP values in ON signal were linearly interpolated over Physiocal sequences (ONinter). The OFF signal was analyzed without any corrections (OFFreference) and after linear interpolation of corresponding sequences when Physiocal appeared in the ON signal (OFFinter). Mean low frequency power of SBP oscillations (LFSBP, 0.04-0.15 Hz) did not differ between the OFFreference, OFFinter, and ONinter. However, LFSBP deviated more from OFFreference when analyzed from ONinter compared with the analysis from OFFinter [median (interquartile range): 14.7 (4.6-38.6) vs. 0.9 (0.5-1.8) %, p < 0.05]. In conclusion, the use of Physiocal had a significant effect on the spectral SBP variability that overwhelms the impact of linear interpolation of short data sequences. Therefore, caution is needed when comparing SBP variability between BP datasets acquired with and without Physiocal. PMID:25520670

  2. Impact and management of physiological calibration in spectral analysis of blood pressure variability

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Antti M.; Hintsala, Heidi; Hautala, Arto J.; Ikäheimo, Tiina M.; Jaakkola, Jouni J.; Tiinanen, Suvi; Seppänen, Tapio; Tulppo, Mikko P.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological calibration (Physiocal) improves the quality of continuous blood pressure (BP) signal from finger. However, the effects of Physiocal on spectral characteristics of systolic BP (SBP) variability are not well-known. We tested the hypothesis that the use of Physiocal may alter the results on SBP variability when compared with BP recording without Physiocal. Continuous BP was recorded simultaneously from fingers of both arms during 10-min standing by two Nexfin devices, one with (ON) and the other without (OFF) Physiocal (n = 19). Missing SBP values in ON signal were linearly interpolated over Physiocal sequences (ONinter). The OFF signal was analyzed without any corrections (OFFreference) and after linear interpolation of corresponding sequences when Physiocal appeared in the ON signal (OFFinter). Mean low frequency power of SBP oscillations (LFSBP, 0.04–0.15 Hz) did not differ between the OFFreference, OFFinter, and ONinter. However, LFSBP deviated more from OFFreference when analyzed from ONinter compared with the analysis from OFFinter [median (interquartile range): 14.7 (4.6–38.6) vs. 0.9 (0.5–1.8) %, p < 0.05]. In conclusion, the use of Physiocal had a significant effect on the spectral SBP variability that overwhelms the impact of linear interpolation of short data sequences. Therefore, caution is needed when comparing SBP variability between BP datasets acquired with and without Physiocal. PMID:25520670

  3. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability on Recently Diagnosed Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Michel-Chávez, Anaclara; Estañol, Bruno; Gien-López, José Antonio; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Huitrado-Duarte, María Elena; Moreno-Morales, René; Becerra-Luna, Brayans

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects approximately 250 million people in the world. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that leads to severe postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction. Objective To determine the variability of heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in recently diagnosed diabetic patients. Methods The study included 30 patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes of less than 2 years and 30 healthy controls. We used a Finapres® device to measure during five minutes beat-to-beat HR and blood pressure in three experimental conditions: supine position, standing position, and rhythmic breathing at 0.1 Hz. The results were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Results In the HR analysis, statistically significant differences were found in the time domain, specifically on short-term values such as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), and number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by more than 50 ms (pNN50). In the BP analysis, there were no significant differences, but there was a sympathetic dominance in all three conditions. The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) decreased in patients with early diabetes compared with healthy subjects during the standing maneuver. Conclusions There is a decrease in HR variability in patients with early type 2 diabetes. No changes were observed in the BP analysis in the supine position, but there were changes in BRS with the standing maneuver, probably due to sympathetic hyperactivity. PMID:26176187

  4. Augmented blood pressure measurement through the noninvasive estimation of physiological arterial pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Soueidan, Karen; Chen, Silu; Dajani, Hilmi R; Bolic, Miodrag; Groza, Voicu

    2012-06-01

    Current noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement methods, such as the oscillometric method, estimate the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) at two random instants in time and do not take into account the natural variability in BP. The standard for automated BP devices sets a maximum allowable system error of ±5 mmHg, even though natural BP variability often exceeds these limits. This paper proposes a new approach using simultaneous recordings of the oscillometric and continuous arterial pulse waveforms to augment the conventional noninvasive measurement by providing (1) the mean SBP and DBP over the measurement interval and the associated confidence intervals of the mean, (2) the standard deviation of SBP and DBP over the measurement interval, which indicates the degree of fluctuation in BP and (3) an indicator as to whether or not the oscillometric reading is an outlier. Recordings with healthy subjects demonstrate the potential utility of this approach to characterize BP, to detect outlier measurements, and that it does not suffer from bias relative to the conventional oscillometric method. PMID:22551623

  5. Detection of impaired cerebral autoregulation improves by increasing arterial blood pressure variability

    PubMed Central

    Katsogridakis, Emmanuel; Bush, Glen; Fan, Lingke; Birch, Anthony A; Simpson, David M; Allen, Robert; Potter, John F; Panerai, Ronney B

    2013-01-01

    Although the assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) based on measurements of spontaneous fluctuations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a convenient and much used method, there remains uncertainty about its reliability. We tested the effects of increasing ABP variability, provoked by a modification of the thigh cuff method, on the ability of the autoregulation index to discriminate between normal and impaired CA, using hypercapnia as a surrogate for dynamic CA impairment. In 30 healthy volunteers, ABP (Finapres) and CBF velocity (CBFV, transcranial Doppler) were recorded at rest and during 5% CO2 breathing, with and without pseudo-random sequence inflation and deflation of bilateral thigh cuffs. The application of thigh cuffs increased ABP and CBFV variabilities and was not associated with a distortion of the CBFV step response estimates for both normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions (P=0.59 and P=0.96, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity of CA impairment detection were improved with the thigh cuff method, with the area under the receiver–operator curve increasing from 0.746 to 0.859 (P=0.031). We conclude that the new method is a safe, efficient, and appealing alternative to currently existing assessment methods for the investigation of the status of CA. PMID:23232946

  6. Changes in echocardiography and blood variables during and after development of Ballantyne syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umazume, Takeshi; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takahiro; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-01-01

    We report a pregnant woman who was monitored by echocardiography and determination of blood variables, including components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), cardiac biomarkers and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), during and after the development of Ballantyne syndrome. Generalised maternal oedema with dyspnoea following fetal and placental hydrops necessitated a caesarean section at 33 weeks of gestation. Changes in blood variables and simultaneous echocardiography changes indicated acutely enhanced RAAS and hyperdynamic left ventricular function in response to excessive volume overload (as evidenced by brain-type natriuretic peptide level of 523 pg/mL) in the absence of increased systemic vascular resistance. Elevated sFlt-1 (15 600 pg/mL) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (404 000 IU/L) levels were also noted. The increased plasma aldosterone concentration (2070 pg/mL) may have been responsible for the increase in circulating plasma volume, and the increased sFlt-1 level was responsible for generalised maternal oedema. It remains unclear which factor(s) triggered RAAS activation. PMID:27329098

  7. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... fight infection and are part of your body's defense system. Platelets help blood to clot when you have a cut or wound. Bone marrow, the spongy material inside your bones, makes new blood cells. Blood cells ...

  8. Criminal Behavior as a Function of Clinical and Actuarial Variables in a Sexual Offender Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Gordon C. Nagayama

    1988-01-01

    Investigated ability of clinical and actuarial variables to predict criminal behavior of 342 sexual offenders previously studied in 1987. Results suggested linear combination of actuarial variables was significantly predictive of sexual reoffenses against adults and of nonsexual reoffending. Clinical judgment was not significantly predictive of…

  9. Long-term Prognosis in COPD Exacerbation: Role of Biomarkers, Clinical Variables and Exacerbation Type.

    PubMed

    Grolimund, Eva; Kutz, Alexander; Marlowe, Robert J; Vögeli, Alaadin; Alan, Murat; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Falconnier, Claudine; Hoess, Claus; Henzen, Christoph; Zimmerli, Werner; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Long-term outcome prediction in COPD is challenging. We conducted a prospective 5-7-year follow-up study in patients with COPD to determine the association of exacerbation type, discharge levels of inflammatory biomarkers including procalctionin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count (WBC) and plasma proadrenomedullin (ProADM), alone or combined with demographic/clinical characteristics, with long-term all-cause mortality in the COPD setting. The analyzed cohort comprised 469 patients with index hospitalization for pneumonic (n = 252) or non-pneumonic (n = 217) COPD exacerbation. Five-to-seven-year vital status was ascertained via structured phone interviews with patients or their household members/primary care physicians. We investigated predictive accuracy using univariate and multivariate Cox regression models and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). After a median [25th-75th percentile] 6.1 [5.6-6.5] years, mortality was 55% (95%CI 50%-59%). Discharge ProADM concentration was strongly associated with 5-7-year non-survival: adjusted hazard ratio (HR)/10-fold increase (95%CI) 10.4 (6.2-17.7). Weaker associations were found for PCT and no significant associations were found for CRP or WBC. Combining ProADM with demographic/clinical variables including age, smoking status, BMI, New York Heart Association dyspnea class, exacerbation type, and comorbidities significantly improved long-term predictive accuracy over that of the demographic/clinical model alone: AUC (95%CI) 0.745 (0.701-0.789) versus 0.727 (0.681-0.772), (p) = .043. In patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbation, discharge ProADM levels appeared to accurately predict 5-7-year all-cause mortality and to improve long-term prognostic accuracy of multidimensional demographic/clinical mortality risk assessment. PMID:25230352

  10. Self-Organization of Blood Pressure Regulation: Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Gharib, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of vasovagal syncope has remained elusive despite many efforts to identify an underlying dysfunction. Catastrophe theory explains the spontaneous occurrence of sudden events in some mathematically complex systems known as self-organized systems poised at criticality. These systems universally exhibit a power law initially described in earthquake occurrence: the Gutenberg Richter law. The magnitude plotted against the total number of earthquakes of at least this magnitude draw a straight line on log-log graph. We hypothesized that vasovagal syncope is a catastrophe occurring spontaneously in the cardiovascular system. We counted the number and magnitude (number of beats) of vasovagal reactions (simultaneous decreases in both blood pressure and heart rate on consecutive beats) in 24 patients with vasovagal symptoms during a head-up tilt test and 24 paired patients with no symptoms during the test. For each patient, we checked whether vasovagal reaction occurrence followed the Gutenberg Richter law. The occurrence followed the Gutenberg Richter law in 43 patients (correlation coefficient |r| = 0.986 ± 0.001, mean ± SEM) out of 48, with no difference between patients with and without symptoms. We demonstrated that vasovagal syncope matches a catastrophe model occurring in a self-organized cardiovascular complex system poised at criticality. This is a new vision of cardiovascular regulation and its related disorders. PMID:27065881

  11. Self-Organization of Blood Pressure Regulation: Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Gharib, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of vasovagal syncope has remained elusive despite many efforts to identify an underlying dysfunction. Catastrophe theory explains the spontaneous occurrence of sudden events in some mathematically complex systems known as self-organized systems poised at criticality. These systems universally exhibit a power law initially described in earthquake occurrence: the Gutenberg Richter law. The magnitude plotted against the total number of earthquakes of at least this magnitude draw a straight line on log-log graph. We hypothesized that vasovagal syncope is a catastrophe occurring spontaneously in the cardiovascular system. We counted the number and magnitude (number of beats) of vasovagal reactions (simultaneous decreases in both blood pressure and heart rate on consecutive beats) in 24 patients with vasovagal symptoms during a head-up tilt test and 24 paired patients with no symptoms during the test. For each patient, we checked whether vasovagal reaction occurrence followed the Gutenberg Richter law. The occurrence followed the Gutenberg Richter law in 43 patients (correlation coefficient |r| = 0.986 ± 0.001, mean ± SEM) out of 48, with no difference between patients with and without symptoms. We demonstrated that vasovagal syncope matches a catastrophe model occurring in a self-organized cardiovascular complex system poised at criticality. This is a new vision of cardiovascular regulation and its related disorders. PMID:27065881

  12. Orthostatic stress causes immediately increased blood pressure variability in women with vasovagal syncope.

    PubMed

    Reulecke, S; Charleston-Villalobos, S; Voss, A; González-Camarena, R; González-Hermosillo, J; Gaitán-González, M J; Hernández-Pacheco, G; Schroeder, R; Aljama-Corrales, T

    2016-04-01

    The cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation has been studied mainly by hemodynamic responses during different physical stressors. In this study, dynamics of autonomic response to an orthostatic challenge was investigated by hemodynamic variables and by diverse linear and nonlinear indices calculated from time series of beat-to-beat intervals (BBI), respiratory cycle duration (RESP), systolic (SYS) and diastolic (DIA) blood pressure. This study included 16 young female patients (SYN) with vasovagal syncope and 12 age-matched female controls (CON). The subjects were enrolled in a head-up tilt (HUT) test, breathing normally, including 5min of baseline (BL, supine position) and 18min of 70° orthostatic phase (OP). To increase the time resolution of the analysis the time series were segmented in five-minute overlapping windows with a shift of 1min. Hemodynamic parameters did not show any statistical differences between SYN and CON. Time domain linear analysis revealed increased respiratory frequency and increased blood pressure variability (BPV) in patients during OP meaning increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal. Frequency domain analysis confirmed a predominance of sympathetic tone by steadily increased values of low over high frequency power in BBI and of low frequency power in SYS and DIA in patients during OP. The nonlinear analysis by symbolic dynamics seemed to be highly suitable for differentiation of SYN and CON in the early beginning of OP, i.e., 5min after tilt-up. In particular the index SYS_plvar3 showed less patterns of low variability in patients reflecting a steadily increase in both BPV and sympathetic activity. The proposed dynamical analysis could lead to a better understanding of the temporal underlying mechanisms in healthy subjects and patients under orthostatic stress. PMID:26775735

  13. Central blood pressure: current evidence and clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    McEniery, Carmel M.; Cockcroft, John R.; Roman, Mary J.; Franklin, Stanley S.; Wilkinson, Ian B.

    2014-01-01

    Pressure measured with a cuff and sphygmomanometer in the brachial artery is accepted as an important predictor of future cardiovascular risk. However, systolic pressure varies throughout the arterial tree, such that aortic (central) systolic pressure is actually lower than corresponding brachial values, although this difference is highly variable between individuals. Emerging evidence now suggests that central pressure is better related to future cardiovascular events than is brachial pressure. Moreover, anti-hypertensive drugs can exert differential effects on brachial and central pressure. Therefore, basing treatment decisions on central, rather than brachial pressure, is likely to have important implications for the future diagnosis and management of hypertension. Such a paradigm shift will, however, require further, direct evidence that selectively targeting central pressure, brings added benefit, over and above that already provided by brachial artery pressure. PMID:24459197

  14. Central blood pressure: current evidence and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    McEniery, Carmel M; Cockcroft, John R; Roman, Mary J; Franklin, Stanley S; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-07-01

    Pressure measured with a cuff and sphygmomanometer in the brachial artery is accepted as an important predictor of future cardiovascular risk. However, systolic pressure varies throughout the arterial tree, such that aortic (central) systolic pressure is actually lower than corresponding brachial values, although this difference is highly variable between individuals. Emerging evidence now suggests that central pressure is better related to future cardiovascular events than is brachial pressure. Moreover, anti-hypertensive drugs can exert differential effects on brachial and central pressure. Therefore, basing treatment decisions on central, rather than brachial pressure, is likely to have important implications for the future diagnosis and management of hypertension. Such a paradigm shift will, however, require further, direct evidence that selectively targeting central pressure, brings added benefit, over and above that already provided by brachial artery pressure. PMID:24459197

  15. Association between Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure and Autonomic Activity in Cyclic Alternating Pattern during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hideaki; Ozone, Motohiro; Ohki, Noboru; Sagawa, Yohei; Yamamichi, Keiichirou; Fukuju, Mitsuki; Yoshida, Takeshi; Nishi, Chikako; Kawasaki, Akiko; Mori, Kaori; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Izumi, Motomori; Hishikawa, Yasuo; Nishino, Seiji; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) is frequently followed by changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), but the sequential associations between CAP and autonomic nerve activity have not been studied. The study aimed to reveal the precise changes in heart rate variability (HRV) during phase A of the CAP cycle. Design: Polysomnography was recorded according to the CAP Atlas (Terzano, 2002), and BP and electrocardiogram were simultaneously recorded. The complex demodulation method was used for analysis of HRV and evaluation of autonomic nerve activity. Setting: Academic sleep laboratory. Participants: Ten healthy males. Measurements and Results: The increase in HR (median [first quartile – third quartile]) for each subtype was as follows: A1, 0.64 (-0.30 to 1.69), A2, 1.44 (0.02 to 3.79), and A3, 6.24 (2.53 to 10.76) bpm (A1 vs. A2 P < 0.001, A1 vs. A3 P < 0.001, A2 vs. A3 P < 0.001). The increase in BP for each subtype was as follows: A1, 1.23 (-2.04 to 5.75), A2, 1.76 (-1.46 to 9.32), and A3, 12.51 (4.75 to 19.94) mm Hg (A1 vs. A2 P = 0.249, A1 vs. A3 P < 0.001, A2 vs. A3 P < 0.001). In all of phase A, the peak values for HR and BP appeared at 4.2 (3.5 to 5.4) and 8.4 (7.0 to 10.3) seconds, respectively, after the onset of phase A. The area under the curve for low-frequency and high-frequency amplitude significantly increased after the onset of CAP phase A (P < 0.001) and was higher in the order of subtype A3, A2, and A1 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: All phase A subtypes were accompanied with increased heart rate variability, and the largest heart rate variability was seen in subtype A3, while a tendency for less heart rate variability was seen in subtype A1. Citation: Kondo H; Ozone M; Ohki N; Sagawa Y; Yamamichi K; Fukuju M; Yoshida T; Nishi C; Kawasaki; Mori; Kanbayashi T; Izumi M; Hishikawa Y; Nishino S; Shimizu T. Association between heart rate variability, blood pressure and autonomic activity in cyclic alternating pattern during sleep

  16. Precision and accuracy of clinical quantification of myocardial blood flow by dynamic PET: A technical perspective.

    PubMed

    Moody, Jonathan B; Lee, Benjamin C; Corbett, James R; Ficaro, Edward P; Murthy, Venkatesh L

    2015-10-01

    A number of exciting advances in PET/CT technology and improvements in methodology have recently converged to enhance the feasibility of routine clinical quantification of myocardial blood flow and flow reserve. Recent promising clinical results are pointing toward an important role for myocardial blood flow in the care of patients. Absolute blood flow quantification can be a powerful clinical tool, but its utility will depend on maintaining precision and accuracy in the face of numerous potential sources of methodological errors. Here we review recent data and highlight the impact of PET instrumentation, image reconstruction, and quantification methods, and we emphasize (82)Rb cardiac PET which currently has the widest clinical application. It will be apparent that more data are needed, particularly in relation to newer PET technologies, as well as clinical standardization of PET protocols and methods. We provide recommendations for the methodological factors considered here. At present, myocardial flow reserve appears to be remarkably robust to various methodological errors; however, with greater attention to and more detailed understanding of these sources of error, the clinical benefits of stress-only blood flow measurement may eventually be more fully realized. PMID:25868451

  17. Clinical variability and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shoag, Jonathan; Barbieri, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease, with some men having indolent disease that can safely be observed, while others have aggressive, lethal disease. Over the past decade, researchers have begun to unravel some of the genomic heterogeneity that contributes to these varying clinical phenotypes. Distinct molecular sub-classes of prostate cancer have been identified, and the uniqueness of these sub-classes has been leveraged to predict clinical outcomes, design novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis, and develop novel therapeutics. Recent work has also elucidated the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of prostate cancer, helping us understand disease pathogenesis, response to therapy, and progression. New genomic techniques have provided us with a window into the remarkable clinical and genomic heterogeneity of prostate cancer, and this new perspective will increasingly impact patient care. PMID:27080479

  18. Clinical variability and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shoag, Jonathan; Barbieri, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease, with some men having indolent disease that can safely be observed, while others have aggressive, lethal disease. Over the past decade, researchers have begun to unravel some of the genomic heterogeneity that contributes to these varying clinical phenotypes. Distinct molecular sub-classes of prostate cancer have been identified, and the uniqueness of these sub-classes has been leveraged to predict clinical outcomes, design novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis, and develop novel therapeutics. Recent work has also elucidated the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of prostate cancer, helping us understand disease pathogenesis, response to therapy, and progression. New genomic techniques have provided us with a window into the remarkable clinical and genomic heterogeneity of prostate cancer, and this new perspective will increasingly impact patient care. PMID:27080479

  19. Regional Fat Distribution and Blood Pressure Level and Variability: The Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Ayers, Colby; Turer, Aslan; Chandra, Alvin; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Greenland, Philip; de Lemos, James A; Neeland, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the associations of regional fat distribution with home and office blood pressure (BP) levels and variability. Participants in the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic cohort, underwent 5 BP measurements on 3 occasions during 5 months (2 in home and 1 in office) and quantification of visceral adipose tissue, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, and liver fat by magnetic resonance imaging, and lower body subcutaneous fat by dual x-ray absorptiometry. The relation of regional adiposity with short-term (within-visit) and long-term (overall visits) mean BP and average real variability was assessed with multivariable linear regression. We have included 2595 participants with a mean age of 44 years (54% women; 48% black), and mean body mass index was 29 kg/m(2) Mean systolic BP/diastolic BP was 127/79 mm Hg and average real variability systolic BP was 9.8 mm Hg during 3 visits. In multivariable-adjusted models, higher amount of visceral adipose tissue was associated with higher short-term (both home and office) and long-term mean systolic BP (β[SE]: 1.9[0.5], 2.7[0.5], and 2.1[0.5], respectively; all P<0.001) and with lower long-term average real variability systolic BP (β[SE]: -0.5[0.2]; P<0.05). In contrast, lower body fat was associated with lower short-term home and long-term mean BP (β[SE]: -0.30[0.13] and -0.24[0.1], respectively; both P<0.05). Neither subcutaneous adipose tissue or liver fat was associated with BP levels or variability. In conclusion, excess visceral fat was associated with persistently higher short- and long-term mean BP levels and with lower long-term BP variability, whereas lower body fat was associated with lower short- and long-term mean BP. Persistently elevated BP, coupled with lower variability, may partially explain increased risk for cardiac hypertrophy and failure related to visceral adiposity. PMID:27432862

  20. Increasing Blood Glucose Variability Is a Precursor of Sepsis and Mortality in Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pisarchik, Alexander N.; Pochepen, Olga N.; Pisarchyk, Liudmila A.

    2012-01-01

    High glycemic variability, rather than a mean glucose level, is an important factor associated with sepsis and hospital mortality in critically ill patients. In this retrospective study we analyze the blood glucose data of 172 nondiabetic patients 18–60 yrs old with second and third-degree burns of total body surface area greater than 30% and 5%, respectively, admitted to ICU in 2004–2008. The analysis identified significant association of increasing daily glucose excursion (DELTA) accompanied by evident episodes of hyperglycemia (>11 mmol/l) and hypoglycemia (<2.8 mmol/l), with sepsis and forthcoming death, even when the mean daily glucose was within a range of acceptable glycemia. No association was found in sepsis complication and hospital mortality with doses of intravenous insulin and glucose infusion. A strong increase in DELTA before sepsis and death is treated as fluctuation amplification near the onset of dynamical instability. PMID:23056354

  1. Variability in Clinical Integration Achieved by Athletic Training Students across Different Clinical Sport Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical integration impacts athletic training students' (ATSs) motivation and persistence. Research has yet to elucidate the manner in which different clinical placements can influence clinical integration. Objective: To examine differences in the levels of clinical integration achieved by ATSs across various clinical sport assignments.…

  2. Within-visit blood pressure variability is associated with prediabetes and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Rieko; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Tsushita, Kazuyo; Wakai, Kenji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Matsuo, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between within-visit blood pressure variability (BPV) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The study subjects included 17,795 people aged 40–74 years who underwent health check-ups in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, and completed two blood pressure measurements. Subjects were categorized into three groups according to the difference of systolic blood pressure (ΔSBP), namely, low-BPV (≤10 mmHg), moderate-BPV (11–20 mmHg), and high-BPV (>20 mmHg). Subjects were also divided into three categories as those without prediabetes (glycosylated hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] < 5.7%), prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7–6.4%) and diabetes (HbA1c ≥ 6.5% or under treatment for diabetes). The proportion of prediabetes and diabetes were significantly higher in subjects with high-BPV than in those with low-BPV after adjusting for age, sex, and mean SBP (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] was 1.16 [1.01–1.33] for prediabetes and 1.33 [1.06–1.66] for diabetes). Other CVD risk factors were not associated with high-BPV after the adjustment. In conclusion, increased within-visit BPV was significantly associated with the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes, independent of mean SBP, in a large general population. Therefore, assessing BPV in a single visit may help to identify subjects at increased risk of impaired glycemic control. PMID:25589061

  3. Interferon Signature in the Blood in Inflammatory Common Variable Immune Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon; Munagala, Indira; Xu, Hui; Blankenship, Derek; Maffucci, Patrick; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    About half of all subjects with common variable immune deficiency (CVID) are afflicted with inflammatory complications including hematologic autoimmunity, granulomatous infiltrations, interstitial lung disease, lymphoid hyperplasia and/or gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. The pathogenesis of these conditions is poorly understood but singly and in aggregate, these lead to significantly increased (11 fold) morbidity and mortality, not experienced by CVID subjects without these complications. To explore the dysregulated networks in these subjects, we applied whole blood transcriptional profiling to 91 CVID subjects, 47 with inflammatory conditions and 44 without, in comparison to subjects with XLA and healthy controls. As compared to other CVID subjects, males with XLA or healthy controls, the signature of CVID subjects with inflammatory complications was distinguished by a marked up-regulation of IFN responsive genes. Chronic up-regulation of IFN pathways is known to occur in autoimmune disease due to activation of TLRs and other still unclarified cytoplasmic sensors. As subjects with inflammatory complications were also more likely to be lymphopenic, have reduced B cell numbers, and a greater reduction of B, T and plasma cell networks, we suggest that more impaired adaptive immunity in these subjects may lead to chronic activation of innate IFN pathways in response to environmental antigens. The unbiased use of whole blood transcriptome analysis may provides a tool for distinguishing CVID subjects who are at risk for increased morbidity and earlier mortality. As more effective therapeutic options are developed, whole blood transcriptome analyses could also provide an efficient means of monitoring the effects of treatment of the inflammatory phenotype. PMID:24069364

  4. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  5. Blood pressure variability provokes vascular β-adrenoceptor desensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Matheus L; Silva, Bruno R; Lunardi, Claure N; Ramalho, Leandra N Z; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous variation in blood pressure is defined as 'blood pressure variability' (BPV). Sinoaortic denervation (SAD) is characterized by BPV without sustained hypertension. In the present study, we investigated whether BPV could be related to vascular β-adrenoceptor desensitization in rats. Three days after surgery (SAD and control), aortic rings were placed in an organ chamber and the relaxation stimulated by β-adrenoceptor agonists, isoprenaline, terbutaline, BRL37344 and cyanopindolol was verified. The participation of intracellular nucleotides signaling pathways was also verified using forskolin, sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine to induce relaxation. The effects of BPV on the increase in endothelial cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration stimulated by the β2-adrenoceptor agonist was examined by confocal microscopy. In addition, the vascular expression of the β2-adrenoceptor was also examined by immunohistochemistry. The results show that isoprenaline and terbutaline-induced relaxation was lower in the aortas of rats with BPV. Relaxation responses to other vasorelaxant compounds were similar in both groups of rats. Histological analysis revealed a lower level of β2-adrenoceptor and confocal microscopy showed minor cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in endothelial cells stimulated by the β2-adrenoceptor agonist in rats with BPV. In conclusion, BPV leads to desensitization of the β2-adrenoceptor, which could contribute to worse β-adrenoceptor agonist-induced relaxation in isolated aortas. PMID:27234170

  6. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy: variable clinical expression within a single kindred.

    PubMed Central

    Crimmins, D; Morris, J G; Walker, G L; Sue, C M; Byrne, E; Stevens, S; Jean-Francis, B; Yiannikas, C; Pamphlett, R

    1993-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy are described in four generations of a single kindred. The age of onset of major neurological disturbance varied from 3-70 years. In some patients, deafness was the only manifestation; in others, recurrent bouts of status epilepticus associated with focal neurological deficits and headache, caused severe disability or death. Examples of all three adult forms of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy: MELAS, MERFF and Kearns Sayre syndrome, were represented within the kindred. Associated features included deafness, short stature, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, migraine, peptic ulceration and severe constipation. The nt 3243 A-G MELAS mutation was detected in two members of the kindred. This study highlights the diversity of clinical expression of a mitochondrial mutation within a single kindred. Images PMID:8350109

  7. Umbilical cord blood graft enhancement strategies: has the time come to move these into the clinic?

    PubMed

    Norkin, M; Lazarus, H M; Wingard, J R

    2013-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an attractive stem cell graft option for patients who need allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell support, but lack a suitable HLA-matched donor. However, the limited number of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a single cord blood unit can lead to an increased risk of graft failure, delayed hematological recovery and prolonged immunosuppression, particularly in adult patients. Several strategies to overcome these potential limitations are being evaluated. In this review, we discuss promising ex vivo manipulations to enhance cord blood engraftment capacity such as culture of UCB cells with stimulatory cytokines and growth factors, mesenchymal cells, Notch ligand, copper chelators, prostaglandins, complement components, nicotinamide and CD26/DPPIV inhibitors. All these approaches are now in early clinical trials. However, despite the fact that several cord blood enhancement strategies have resulted in increased numbers of progenitor cells and faster neutrophil recovery, the ability of these techniques to significantly shorten engraftment time and permit the use of cord units with low numbers of total nucleated cells, or accomplish reliable engraftment with a single cord, have yet to be convincingly demonstrated. The ultimate clinical value of ex vivo cord blood expansion or manipulation has not been defined yet, and the current data do not permit predicting which technology will prove to be the optimal strategy. Nevertheless, expectations remain high that eventually ex vivo enhancement will be able to improve clinical outcomes and significantly extend the applicability of UCB transplantation. PMID:22941377

  8. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive blood pressure monitoring during clinical anaesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Paul D; Grint, Nicola; Dugdale, Alexandra

    2010-03-01

    Monitoring blood pressure during anaesthesia is widely recommended in man and animals. The accuracy of any device used to measure blood pressure is an important consideration when selecting monitoring equipment, the ANSI/AAMI SP10 standard is widely cited in this respect in recent veterinary publications. Blood pressure was monitored using invasive and non-invasive techniques during clinical anaesthesia in 19 dogs. The results were compared using Bland-Altman analysis. The bias (and limits of agreement) between invasive and non-invasive measurement was 7.1 mmHg (+/-34.7) for systolic blood pressure, -1.8 mmHg (+/-27.4) for mean blood pressure and 6.9 mmHg (+/-27.5) for diastolic blood pressure. In a clinical setting the bias between invasive and non-invasive measurement techniques was similar or smaller than laboratory reports, however the limits of agreement were considerably wider suggesting that care should be exercised when interpreting NIBP values. PMID:20306347

  9. Stereotypies in autism: a video demonstration of their clinical variability

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Sylvie; Greene, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    In autism, stereotypies are frequent and disabling, and whether they correspond to a hyperkinetic movement disorder, a homeostatic response aiming at sensory modulation, or a regulator of arousal remains to be established. So far, it has been challenging to distinguish among these different possibilities, not only because of lack of objective and quantitative means to assess stereotypies, but in our opinion also because of the underappreciated diversity of their clinical presentations. Herein, we illustrate the broad spectrum of stereotypies and demonstrate the usefulness of video-assisted clinical observations of children with autism. The clips presented were extracted from play sessions of 129 children with autism disorder. We conclude that compared to widely used questionnaires and interviews, systematic video observations provide a unique means to classify and score precisely the clinical features of stereotypies. We believe this approach will prove useful to both clinicians and researchers as it offers the level of detail from retrievable images necessary to begin to assess effects of age and treatments on stereotypies, and to embark on the type of investigations required to unravel the physiological basis of motor behaviors in autism. PMID:23316144

  10. Does exposure to an artificial ULF magnetic field affect blood pressure, heart rate variability and mood?

    PubMed

    Mitsutake, Gen; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Oinuma, Sachiko; Ferguson, Ian; Cornélissen, Germaine; Wanliss, James; Halberg, Franz

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an artificial magnetic field with an amplitude and frequency equivalent to those of geomagnetic pulsations during geomagnetic storms could affect physiology and psychology. Three healthy volunteers wore anambulatory BP monitor and an ECG recorder around the clock for 12 consecutive weekends in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. In a room shielded against ELF and VLF waves, they were exposed for 8 hours per week to either a 50 nT 0.0016 Hz or a sham magnetic field at one of six circadian stages. Real exposure randomly alternated with sham exposure. They provided saliva and recorded mood and reaction time every 4 hours while awake. Systolic (S) and diastolic (D) blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded every 30 minutes. Spectral analysis of HR variability (HRV) was performed using the maximum entropy method and a complex demodulation method. For these variables, daily means were compared between real and sham exposure, using paired t-tests. Their circadian MESOR, amplitude, and acrophase were analyzed and summarized using single cosinor and population-mean cosinor. Circadian rhythms were demonstrated for HR, SBP, DBP for sham exposure, salivary flow rate, positive affect, vigor, and subjective alertness (p < 0.001, -0.02). One participant showed higher HR, lower LF, HF, and VLF powers, and a steeper power-law slope (p < 0.005, -0.0001) in an early night exposure to the real magnetic field, but not in other circadian stages. There was no significant difference between circadian responses to real and sham exposure in any variable at any circadian stage. PMID:15754834

  11. How Many Measurements Are Needed to Estimate Blood Pressure Variability Without Loss of Prognostic Information?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Average real variability (ARV) is a recently proposed index for short-term blood pressure (BP) variability. We aimed to determine the minimum number of BP readings required to compute ARV without loss of prognostic information. METHODS ARV was calculated from a discovery dataset that included 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements for 1,254 residents (mean age = 56.6 years; 43.5% women) of Copenhagen, Denmark. Concordance between ARV from full (≥80 BP readings) and randomly reduced 24-hour BP recordings was examined, as was prognostic accuracy. A test dataset that included 5,353 subjects (mean age = 54.0 years; 45.6% women) with at least 48 BP measurements from 11 randomly recruited population cohorts was used to validate the results. RESULTS In the discovery dataset, a minimum of 48 BP readings allowed an accurate assessment of the association between cardiovascular risk and ARV. In the test dataset, over 10.2 years (median), 806 participants died (335 cardiovascular deaths, 206 cardiac deaths) and 696 experienced a major fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular event. Standardized multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were computed for associations between outcome and BP variability. Higher diastolic ARV in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings predicted (P < 0.01) total (HR = 1.12), cardiovascular (HR = 1.19), and cardiac (HR = 1.19) mortality and fatal combined with nonfatal cerebrovascular events (HR = 1.16). Higher systolic ARV in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings predicted (P < 0.01) total (HR = 1.12), cardiovascular (HR = 1.17), and cardiac (HR = 1.24) mortality. CONCLUSIONS Forty-eight BP readings over 24 hours were observed to be adequate to compute ARV without meaningful loss of prognostic information. PMID:23955605

  12. The study of some possible measurement errors in clinical blood electrolyte potentiometric (ISE) analysers.

    PubMed

    Rumenjak, Vlatko; Milardović, Stjepan; Kruhak, Ivan; Grabarić, Bozidar S

    2003-09-01

    The understanding of the most important sources of error in potentiometric blood analyser which might contribute to better instruments measurement repeatability is very often marginalized in fabrications and daily operation of some commercial blood analysers. In this paper ISEs-potentiometric measurements were performed and validated in Clinical Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis of the Zagreb University School of Medicine and Clinical Hospital Centre, using a carefully designed and constructed fully automated (computerised) homemade ISE-based blood electrolyte analyser constructed with an in-line five-channel flow-through measuring cell. The influence of electrolyte concentration of the salt bridge is reported. Special attention has been paid to the reference electrode design, and constructions which can operate in open liquid junction and membrane restricted liquid junction modes are described. PMID:12927687

  13. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  14. Primary Vascular Leiomyosarcoma: Clinical Observations and Molecular Variables

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Christina L.; Boland, Genevieve M.; Demicco, Elizabeth G.; Lusby, Kristelle; Ingram, Davis; May, Caitlin D.; Kivlin, Christine M.; Watson, Kelsey; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A.; Wang, Wei-Lien; Ravi, Vinod; Pollock, Raphael E.; Lev, Dina; Cormier, Janice N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Feig, Barry W.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Torres, Keila E.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Vascular leiomyosarcomas (vLMS) are a rare subtype of leiomyosarcomas (LMS) most commonly affecting the inferior vena cava and accounting for 5% of all LMS. These tumors are aggressive malignancies for which adjuvant modalities have not shown increased efficacy compared over surgery. Our study evaluates potential molecular markers that should be evaluated in prospective studies to determine their prognostic and therapeutic utility. Objective To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vLMS and associations with immunohistochemical prognostic markers. Design Retrospective chart review Setting Single institution Participants A cohort of 77 patients that presented to MDACC from 1993–2012 was analyzed. All of the cases had a confirmed diagnosis of vascular leiomyosarcoma. Immunohistochemical studies for biomarkers were performed on a tissue microarray that included 26 primary vLMS specimens. Main Outcomes and Measures Demographic, and clinical factors were evaluated to assess clinical course, patterns of recurrence and survival outcomes for patients with primary vLMS. Univariate Cox proportional hazards model was utilized to correlate DSS and time to recurrence with potential prognostic indicators. Results Five year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates after tumor resection was 65%. Median time to local recurrence was 43 months, versus 25 months for distant recurrence versus 15 months for concurrent local and distant recurrences; p=0.04. Strong cytoplasmic β-catenin (p=0.06) and IGF-1R (p=0.04) expression were associated with inferior DSS. Conclusions and Relevance vLMS are aggressive malignancies, with high recurrence rates. Expression of β-catenin and IGF-1R were associated with poor DSS. Prospective studies should evaluate their clinical and therapeutic utility. PMID:26629783

  15. Noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring: clinical test of multiwavelength optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Y. Y.; Prough, D. S.; Petrova, I.; Patrikeev, I. A.; Cicenaite, I.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2007-02-01

    Continuous monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation is critically important for treatment of patients with life-threatening conditions like severe brain injury or during cardiac surgery. We designed and built a novel multiwavelength optoacoustic system for noninvasive, continuous, and accurate monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation. We use an Optical Parametric Oscillator as a light source. We successfully tested the system in vitro as well as in vivo in large animals (sheep) through thick tissues overlying blood vessels which drain venous blood out of the brain (e.g., superior sagittal sinus or jugular vein). Here we present the results of clinical tests of the system for continuous noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring in the internal jugular vein of healthy volunteers. We applied our custom-built optoacoustic probe (which incorporated a wide-band acoustic transducer and an optical fiber) to the neck area overlying the internal jugular vein. We performed measurements with volunteers at 18 wavelengths in the near-infrared spectral range. Despite a thick layer of overlying connective tissue and low energy used in the experiments, we recorded signals with high signal-to-noise ratios for all volunteers. We found that the temporal (independent of signal amplitude) parameters of recorded profiles for different levels of blood oxygenation correlated well with the spectrum of effective attenuation coefficients of blood.

  16. Role of clinical pharmacist in the management of blood pressure in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Qudah, Bonyan; Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Alawa, Ezat; Mehyar, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    Background Hypertension is highly prevalent yet undertreated condition in hemodialysis patients. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical pharmacist's role in the management of blood pressure in hemodialysis patients guided by home blood pressure monitoring. Setting Outpatient hemodialysis units of Jordan University Hospital and Isra'a Hospital. Method This was a randomized controlled study. It lasted 6 months (September 2011 till the end of March 2012). All hypertensive patients receiving hemodialysis were invited to participate in the study. Out of 60 patients approached, 56 were actually included. Patients were randomly allocated to an intervention (29) or control group (27). In the intervention arm, patients received physician-pharmacist collaborative care. While in the control arm patients received standard medical care. Main outcome measure Percentage of patients achieving weekly average home blood pressure below or equal 135/85 mmHg. Other secondary measures that were assessed include absolute reduction in peridialysis blood pressure, interdialytic weight gain, adherence to medications and dialysis sessions. Results A total of 52 patients completed the study. Forty-six percent of patients in the intervention arm achieved BP target (mean home blood pressure ≤135/85 mmHg) compared to only 14.3 % of patients in the control arm (p = 0.02). Average decline in weekly mean home systolic blood pressure was 10.9 ± 17.7 mmHg in the intervention arm (p = 0.004), while weekly mean home systolic blood pressure increased by 3.5 ± 18.4 mmHg in the control arm (p = 0.396). No significant reduction was achieved in weekly home diastolic blood pressure, dialysis blood pressure readings, or interdialytic weight gain in either arm. Conclusions Clinical pharmacist-physicians' collaboration improved rate of blood pressure control in hemodialysis patients. Using home blood pressure monitoring was found to be an efficient way to guide blood

  17. The Effects of Acute Blood Loss for Diagnostic Bloodwork and Fluid Replacement in Clinically Ill Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marx, James O; Jensen, JanLee A; Seelye, Stacie; Walton, Raquel M; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great value of diagnostic bloodwork for identifying disease in animals, the volume of blood required for these analyses limits its use in laboratory mice, particularly when they are clinically ill. We sought to determine the effects of acute blood loss (ABL) following blood collection for diagnostic bloodwork in healthy mice compared with streptozotocin-induced diabetic and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-treated dehydrated mice. ABL caused several mild changes in the control mice, with significant decreases in body weight, temperature, and activity in both experimental groups; increased dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice; and a significant drop in the blood pressure of the diabetic mice. To determine whether these negative outcomes could be ameliorated, we treated mice with intraperitoneal lactated Ringers solution either immediately after or 30 min before ABL. Notably, preABL administration of fluids helped prevent the worsening of the dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice and the changes in blood pressure in the diabetic mice. However, fluid administration provided no benefit in control of blood pressure when administered after ABL in the diabetic mice. Furthermore, fluid therapy did not prevent ABL-induced drops in body weight and activity. Although one mouse not receiving fluid therapy became moribund at the 24-h time point, no animals died during the 24-h study. This investigation demonstrates that blood for diagnostic bloodwork can be collected safely from clinically ill mice and that preemptive fluid therapy mitigates some of the negative changes associated with this blood loss. PMID:26141445

  18. Low-frequency variability in the blood volume and in the blood volume pulse measured by photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Meir; Turivnenko, Sergei; Milston, Adina; Babchenko, Anatoly; Mahler, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Besides heart rate and arterial blood pressure, several parameters of the cardiovascular system fluctuate spontaneously. In the current study, the fluctuations of tissue blood content and blood volume pulse were investigated using two parameters of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal: the parameter BV, defined by: BV equals Const-BL where BL is the baseline of the PPG signal, and the amplitude (AM), which are related to the blood volume an to the systolic blood volume increase, respectively. The PPG measurements were performed on the fingertips of ten healthy male subjects for 5 to 10 min and the PPG signal was digitally analyzed. Both BV and AM show low frequency fluctuations, which, for 23 out of 26 examinations, were positively correlated, with a lag of BV relative to AM. In three examinations, however, the two parameters were inversely correlated. A lower correlation was found between each of these parameters and the PPG period, which is actually the cardiac period. The results show that several mechanisms are involved in the spontaneous periodic fluctuations in the vascoconstriction level, which are known to be mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. The digital PPG provides, therefore, a potential tool for evaluating the role of the sympathetic nerves in the regulation of the microcirculation.

  19. Variable Effect of P2Y12 Inhibition on Platelet Thrombus Volume in Flowing Blood

    PubMed Central

    Mendolicchio, G. L.; Zavalloni, D.; Bacci, M.; Corrada, E.; Marconi, M.; Lodigiani, C.; Presbitero, P.; Rota, L.; Ruggeri, Z. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives Patients treated by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) receive aspirin and P2Y12 ADP receptor inhibitors to reduce thrombotic complications. The choice of methodology for monitoring the effects of treatment and assessing its efficacy is still a topic of debate. We evaluated how decreased P2Y12 function influences platelet aggregate (thrombus) size measured ex vivo. Methods and Results We used confocal videomicroscopy to measure in real time the volume of platelet thrombi forming upon blood perfusion over fibrillar collagen type I at the wall shear rate of 1,500 s−1. The average volume was significantly smaller in 31 patients receiving aspirin and clopidogrel (19) or ticlopidine (12) than 21 controls, but individual values were above the lower limit of the normal distribution, albeit mostly within the lower quartile, in 61.3% of cases. Disaggregation of platelet thrombi at later perfusion times occurred frequently in the patients. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation, reflecting P2Y12 inhibition, was also decreased in the patient group and only 22.6% of individual values were above the lower normal limit. We found no correlation between thrombus volume formed onto collagen fibrils and level of P2Y12 inhibition, suggesting that additional and individually variable factors can influence the inhibitory effect of treatment on platelet function. Conclusions Measuring platelet thrombus formation in flowing blood reflects the consequences of anti-platelet therapy in a manner that is not proportional to P2Y12 inhibition. Combining the results of the two assays may improve the assessment of thrombotic risk. PMID:21083646

  20. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is a Novel Risk Factor for Rebleeding in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing-Song; Ping-Chen; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Yu, Liang-Hong; Dai, Lin-Sun; Kang, De-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rebleeding of an aneurysm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated predictors of rebleeding and effect of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) on stroke, few data on the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Here, we sought to identify the effect of SBPV on rebleeding in acute aneurysmal SAH. Case–control study. From January 2010 to June 2015, 612 patients with aneurysmal SAH were enrolled in our tertiary care medical center. Main outcome measures: Consecutive patients with acute (<3 days from ictus) aneurismal rebleeding or repair or death were retrospectively included. Antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol was prescribed to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg. SBP was measured hourly until a censoring event occurred. SBPV was determined as standard deviation (SD) and successive variation (SV). Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Rebleeding occurred in 61 (10.0%) of the 612 patients. We identified 47 acute rebleeding as cases and 382 early repair or early death as controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, rebleeding was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio [OR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.131–1.391; P < 0.001) and the SV of SBP (OR, 1.131; 95% CI, 1.039–1.231; P = 0.004). No significant difference was seen between rebleeding and mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP). SBPV is associated with increased rates of acute aneurysmal rebleeding. Further prospective research is warranted to confirm that SBP stability prevents acute aneurysm rebleeding. PMID:26986118

  1. The relationships among heart rate variability, executive functions, and clinical variables in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Pallesen, Ståle; Hammar, Åsa; Hansen, Anita Lill; Thayer, Julian F; Tarvainen, Mika P; Nordhus, Inger Hilde

    2012-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in patients who suffer from panic disorder (PD). Reduced HRV is related to hypoactivity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which negatively affects executive functioning. The present study assessed the relationships between vagally mediated HRV at baseline and measures of executive functioning in 36 patients with PD. Associations between these physiological and cognitive measures and panic-related variables were also investigated. HRV was measured using HF-power (ms(2)), and executive functions were assessed with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the Color-Word Interference Test (CWIT) from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS). Panic-related variables comprised panic frequency, panic-related distress, and duration of PD. Performance on the neuropsychological measures correlated significantly with HRV. Both panic-related distress and duration of PD were inversely related with measures of HRV and cognitive inhibition. The current findings support the purported relationship between HRV and executive functions involving the PFC. PMID:23069273

  2. Variability in pathogenicity prediction programs: impact on clinical diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Walters-Sen, Lauren C; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Reshmi, Shalini; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Astbury, Caroline; Pyatt, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Current practice by clinical diagnostic laboratories is to utilize online prediction programs to help determine the significance of novel variants in a given gene sequence. However, these programs vary widely in their methods and ability to correctly predict the pathogenicity of a given sequence change. The performance of 17 publicly available pathogenicity prediction programs was assayed using a dataset consisting of 122 credibly pathogenic and benign variants in genes associated with the RASopathy family of disorders and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Performance metrics were compared between the programs to determine the most accurate program for loss-of-function and gain-of-function mechanisms. No one program correctly predicted the pathogenicity of all variants analyzed. A major hindrance to the analysis was the lack of output from a significant portion of the programs. The best performer was MutPred, which had a weighted accuracy of 82.6% in the full dataset. Surprisingly, combining the results of the top three programs did not increase the ability to predict pathogenicity over the top performer alone. As the increasing number of sequence changes in larger datasets will require interpretation, the current study demonstrates that extreme caution must be taken when reporting pathogenicity based on statistical online protein prediction programs in the absence of functional studies. PMID:25802880

  3. [The blood vessels of the posterior cranial fossa. anatomy, pathophysiology, clinic--a survey (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Helms, J

    1978-04-20

    Pathophysiology and tomography of the blood vessels of the posterior cranial fossa gain clinical interest in treatment of diseases of the inner ear, complications of middle ear inflammations, tumors of the pyramid and cerebello-pontine angle. Numerous variations in the arterial venous system restrict neuroradiological procedures. Techniques to treat a thrombosis of the sinuses were developed 50 years ago. Surgical procedures to remove glomus tumors of the pyramid could be improved by new anatomical and surgical experiences. Unilateral neck dissection occasionally alters the blood flow in the sinuses of the posterior cranial fossa causing serious complications. PMID:350206

  4. Verification and standardization of blood cell counters for routine clinical laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Huisman, Albert

    2015-03-01

    The use of automated blood cell counters (automated hematology analyzers) for diagnostic purposes is inextricably linked to clinical laboratories. However, the need for uniformity among the various methods and parameters is increasing and standardization of the automated analyzers is therefore crucial. Standardization not only involves procedures based on reference methods but it also involves validation, verification, quality assurance, and quality control, and it includes the involvement of several participants. This article discusses the expert guidelines and provides an overview of issues involved in complete blood count parameter reference methods and standardization of reporting units. PMID:25676379

  5. Blood transcriptomic markers for major depression: from animal models to clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Redei, Eva E; Mehta, Neha S

    2015-05-01

    Depression is a heterogeneous disorder and, similar to other spectrum disorders, its manifestation varies by age of onset, severity, comorbidity, treatment responsiveness, and other factors. A laboratory blood test based on specific biomarkers for major depressive disorder (MDD) and its subgroups could increase diagnostic accuracy and expedite the initiation of treatment. We identified candidate blood biomarkers by examining genome-wide expression differences in the blood of animal models representing both the genetic and environmental/stress etiologies of depression. Human orthologs of the resulting transcript panel were tested in pilot studies. Transcript abundance of 11 blood markers differentiated adolescent subjects with early-onset MDD from adolescents with no disorder (ND). A set of partly overlapping transcripts distinguished adolescent patients who had comorbid anxiety disorders from those with only MDD. In adults, blood levels of nine transcripts discerned subjects with MDD from ND controls. Even though cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) resulted in remission of some patients, the levels of three transcripts consistently signaled prior MDD status. A coexpression network of transcripts seems to predict responsiveness to CBT. Thus, our approach can be developed into clinically valid diagnostic panels of blood transcripts for different manifestations of MDD, potentially reducing diagnostic heterogeneity and advancing individualized treatment strategies. PMID:25823952

  6. Association of clinical and pathological variables with survival in thymoma.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Adnan; Toker, Alper; Sen, Fatma; Bicakci, Ercan; Saglam, Esra Kaytan; Erus, Suat; Eralp, Yesim; Tas, Faruk; Oral, Ethem Nezih; Topuz, Erkan; Dilege, Sukru

    2012-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate clinical and pathological features in prognosis of thymoma patients with particular emphasis on patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). From 1995 to 2010, 140 thymoma patients (women/men: 63/77) with a median age of 46 years (11-80 years) were admitted to our institution. According to World Health Organization (WHO), there were 23 (17%) type A, 12 (9%) type AB, 24 (17%) type B1, 42 (31%) type B2 and 36 (26%) type B3. The distribution of Masaoka stages I, II, III and IV was 24 (17%), 71 (51%), 18 (13%) and 27 (19%), respectively. MG coexisted in 61% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 34 months (1-158 months), 102 (73%) patients are alive and well while 14 (10%) are alive with disease. Twenty-three patients (16%) have died, only 9 died of thymoma. In univariate analyses, completeness of resection (P < .001), WHO histology (P = .008), Masaoka stage (P < .001) and MG (P = .002) were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS). Young age (P = .008); Masaoka stages 1 and 2 (P = .039); WHO types A, AB and B1 (P = .031); complete resection (P = .024) and presence of MG (P = .05) significantly correlated with overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, Masaoka stages 1 and 2 (P = .038) and presence of MG (P = .01) were significantly correlated with a longer PFS; MG (P = .021) and WHO subtype (P = .022) were found to be significant prognostic factors for OS. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved neither OS nor PFS in completely resected stage 2 thymoma. Masaoka staging, WHO and MG are major determinants of prognosis in Turkish thymoma patients. Additionally, radiotherapy did not provide survival advantage to stage 2 patients with complete resection. PMID:22057358

  7. Clinical value of anaerobic blood culture: a retrospective analysis of positive patient episodes

    PubMed Central

    James, P.; Al-Shafi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Aim—To investigate the clinical value of anaerobic blood culture. Methods—Blood culture bottles (n = 25 185) submitted for culture over a two year period were reviewed. Results—The bottles yielded 1992 positive patient episodes, a positive rate of 14.4/1000 hospital admissions. Significantly more isolations were obtained from aerobic than from anaerobic bottles. Twelve of the 38 anaerobic episodes were detected in aerobic bottles. Clinical management was influenced in one of 24 patients whose cultures yielded anaerobes from anaerobic bottles only. For a further six patients it was unlikely that the result had any effect on clinical management. Conclusions—If aerobic bottles were substituted for the anaerobic bottles, detection of positive patient episodes would increase by at least 6%. A higher yield would be achieved by using two aerobic bottles for routine culture and using anaerobic bottles only for patients where anaerobic culture may influence clinical management. Key Words: blood culture • anaerobes • BacT/Alert PMID:10823145

  8. Effects of color temperatures (kelvin) of led bulbs on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light-emitting diode (LED) lighting is being used in the poultry industry to reduce energy usage in broiler production facilities. However, limited data are available comparing efficacy of different spectral distribution of LED bulbs on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weight...

  9. Effects of genetic strain and light intensity on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of genetic strain, light intensity and their interaction were examined on blood physiological variables of broilers maintained in environmentally-controlled rooms in each of 5 trials. The study consisted of a 2 × 5 factorial arranged in a randomized complete block design with 10 treatmen...

  10. Relationship between cardiovascular health score and year-to-year blood pressure variability in China: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    An, Shasha; Bao, Minghui; Wang, Yang; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Chen, Shuohua; Li, Junjuan; Yang, Xinchun; Wu, Shouling; Cai, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives On the basis of cardiovascular health factors and behaviours, the American Heart Association proposed the Cardiovascular Health Score (CHS). It has been widely used to estimate the cardiovascular health status of individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CHS and year-to-year blood pressure variability (BPV). Design Prospective cohort study. Settings We stratified participants into two groups by gender: first group, female group; second group, male group. The relationship between CHS and year-to-year blood pressure variability were analysed. Participants A total of 41 613 individuals met the inclusion criteria (no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack, myocardial infarction, malignant tumour or atrial fibrillation) and had complete blood pressure data. Results The coefficient of the variation of systolic blood pressure (SCV) was 8.33% in the total population and 8.68% and 8.22% in female and male groups, respectively (p<0.05). Multivariable linear regression analysis revealed that higher CHS was inversely associated with increasing year-to-year BPV, which persisted after adjusting for baseline systolic blood pressure and other risk factors. Each SD increase in CHS could lead to a 0.016SD decrease in SCV (p<0.05). Conclusions In summary, CHS was inversely related to year-to-year BPV, which suggested that a healthy lifestyle may contribute to better blood pressure management. PMID:26503389

  11. Clinical Trials With Large Numbers of Variables: Important Advantages of Canonical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cleophas, Ton J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical analysis assesses the combined effects of a set of predictor variables on a set of outcome variables, but it is little used in clinical trials despite the omnipresence of multiple variables. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of canonical analysis as compared with traditional multivariate methods using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). As an example, a simulated data file with 12 gene expression levels and 4 drug efficacy scores was used. The correlation coefficient between the 12 predictor and 4 outcome variables was 0.87 (P = 0.0001) meaning that 76% of the variability in the outcome variables was explained by the 12 covariates. Repeated testing after the removal of 5 unimportant predictor and 1 outcome variable produced virtually the same overall result. The MANCOVA identified identical unimportant variables, but it was unable to provide overall statistics. (1) Canonical analysis is remarkable, because it can handle many more variables than traditional multivariate methods such as MANCOVA can. (2) At the same time, it accounts for the relative importance of the separate variables, their interactions and differences in units. (3) Canonical analysis provides overall statistics of the effects of sets of variables, whereas traditional multivariate methods only provide the statistics of the separate variables. (4) Unlike other methods for combining the effects of multiple variables such as factor analysis/partial least squares, canonical analysis is scientifically entirely rigorous. (5) Limitations include that it is less flexible than factor analysis/partial least squares, because only 2 sets of variables are used and because multiple solutions instead of one is offered. We do hope that this article will stimulate clinical investigators to start using this remarkable method. PMID:23591025

  12. Sex and Gender: Critical Variables in Pre-Clinical and Clinical Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Frank, Aaron P; Santos, Roberta S; Fátima, Luciana A; Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2016-08-01

    In this Essay, we discuss the critical need to incorporate sex and gender in pre-clinical and clinical research to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which metabolic processes differ by sex and gender. This knowledge will allow for development of personalized medicine which will optimize therapies specific for individuals. PMID:27508869

  13. Recommendations for blood pressure measuring devices for office/clinic use in low resource settings.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Mendis, Shanthi; Abegunde, Dele; Asmar, Ronald; Mieke, Stephan; Murray, Alan; Shengelia, Bakuti; Steenvoorden, Gijs; Van Montfrans, Gert; O'Brien, Eoin

    2005-02-01

    This paper, which summarizes the conclusions of a WHO Expert meeting, is aimed at proposing indications to develop technical specifications for an accurate and affordable blood pressure measuring device for office/clinic use in low resource settings. Blood pressure measuring devices to be used in low resource settings should be accurate, affordable, and easily available worldwide. Given the serious inherent inaccuracy of the auscultatory technique, validated and affordable electronic devices, that have the option to select manual readings, seem to be a suitable solution for low resource settings. The agreement on the technical specifications for automated blood pressure measuring devices for office/clinic use in low resource settings included the following features: high accuracy, adoption of electronic transducers and solar batteries for power supply, standard rates of cuff inflation and deflation, adequate cuff size, digital display powered by solar batteries, facilities for adequate calibration, environmental requirements, no need of memory function, resistance to shock and temperature changes, and low cost. Availability of a device with these features should be accompanied by adequate training of health care personnel, who should guarantee implementation of the procedures recommended in recent European and American Guidelines for accurate blood pressure measurement. PMID:15687867

  14. Is there a relationship between admission blood glucose level following acute poisoning and clinical outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Gheshlaghi, Farzad; Adib, Nooshin; Safaeian, Leila

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the admission blood glucose level following acute poisoning, severity of acute poisoning and clinical outcome. Material and methods This prospective study was conducted on 345 deliberate self-poisoning patients. Standard demographic and clinical information; admission blood glucose level; poisoning severity score and outcome were recorded. Patients with a history of diabetes mellitus, receipt of pre-sampling intravenous dextrose solution or glucocorticoids, and poisoning with toxic agents which produce hyper- or hypoglycaemia were excluded. Results Mean age of the patients was 27.5 ±8.6 years. Females outnumbered males (57.9%). Oral ingestion of more than one drug (46.7%) and opiates (14.2%) were the main causes of poisoning. Blood glucose values ranged from 50 mg/dl to 396 mg/dl. Hyper- and hypoglycaemia were observed in 23.8% and 13.91% respectively. A total of 24.41% and 22.92% of the patients in hyper- and hypoglycaemic groups had grade 3 and 4 severity score in comparison with 4.18% in the normoglycaemic group. Development of complications and death were 14.64% and 10.42% in patients with hyper- and hypoglycaemia versus 3.73% in patients with normoglycaemia. A significant difference between normoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic patients in the severity of poisoning and clinical outcome was observed (P < 0.001). Conclusions Admission blood glucose levels may have a relationship with the severity of poisoning and clinical outcome following acute poisoning. PMID:22291737

  15. Long-term and ultra long-term blood pressure variability during follow-up and mortality in 14,522 patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Claire E; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Coleman, Holli; McCallum, Linsay; Patel, Rajan; Dawson, Jesse; Sloan, William; Meredith, Peter; Jones, Gregory C; Muir, Scott; Walters, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F; Morrison, David; McInnes, Gordon T; Padmanabhan, Sandosh

    2013-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that long-term visit-to-visit blood pressure variability (BPV) may be an independent cardiovascular risk predictor. The implication of this variability in hypertension clinical practice is unclear. BPV as average real variability (ARV) was calculated in 14,522 treated patients with hypertension in 4 time frames: year 1 (Y1), years 2 to 5 (Y2-5), years 5 to 10 (Y5-10), and years >10 (Y10+) from first clinic visit. Cox proportional hazards models for cause-specific mortality were used in each time frame separately for long-term BPV, across time frames based on ultra long-term BPV, and within each time frame stratified by mean BP. ARV in systolic blood pressure (SBP), termed ARV(SBP), was higher in Y1 (21.3±11.9 mm Hg) in contrast to Y2-5 (17.7±9.9 mm Hg), Y5-10 (17.4±9.6 mm Hg), and Y10+ (16.8±8.5 mm Hg). In all time frames, ARV(SBP) was higher in women (P<0.01) and in older age (P<0.001), chronic kidney disease (P<0.01), and prevalent cardiovascular disease (P<0.01). Higher long-term and ultra long-term BPV values were associated with increased mortality (all-cause, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality; P for trend, <0.001). This relationship was also evident in subgroups with mean SBP<140 mm Hg in all time frames. Monitoring BPV in clinical practice may facilitate risk reduction strategies by identifying treated hypertensive individuals at high risk, especially those with BP within the normal range. PMID:23959561

  16. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Cadore, Peterson; Gallon, Andrea; Imanishi, Soraia Almeida Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Background: More than 200 different diseases may be transmitted from exposure to blood in the dental setting. The aim of this study is to identify possible faults in the crosscontamination chain control in a dental school clinic searching for traces of blood in the clinical contact surfaces (CCS) through forensic luminol blood test. Methods: Traces of invisible blood where randomly searched in CCS of one dental school clinic. Results: Forty eight surfaces areas in the CCS were tested and the presence of invisible and remnant blood was identified in 28 (58.3%) items. Conclusions: We suggest that the luminol method is suitable for identifying contamination with invisible blood traces and this method may be a useful tool to prevent cross-contamination in the dental care setting. PMID:25400895

  17. Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP): Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, James P; Stevens, Richard; Gill, Paramjit; Martin, Una; Godwin, Marshall; Hanley, Janet; Heneghan, Carl; Hobbs, F D Richard; Mant, Jonathan; McKinstry, Brian; Myers, Martin; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Patients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home-clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home-clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48-0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85-0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient's blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient's ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment. PMID:27001299

  18. Hyposecretion of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and its relation to clinical variables in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dessein, P H; Joffe, B I; Stanwix, A E; Moomal, Z

    2001-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal underactivity has been reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This phenomenon has implications with regard to the pathogenesis and treatment of the disease. The present study was designed to evaluate the secretion of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and its relation to clinical variables in RA, spondyloarthropathy (Spa), and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis (UIA). Eighty-seven patients (38 with RA, 29 with Spa, and 20 with UIA) were studied, of whom 54 were women. Only 12 patients (14%) had taken glucocorticoids previously. Age-matched, healthy women (134) and men (149) served as controls. Fasting blood samples were taken for determination of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), serum DHEAS and insulin, and plasma glucose. Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis-model assessment (HOMAIR). DHEAS concentrations were significantly decreased in both women and men with inflammatory arthritis (IA) (P < 0.001). In 24 patients (28%), DHEAS levels were below the lower extreme ranges found for controls. Multiple intergroup comparisons revealed similarly decreased concentrations in each disease subset in both women and men. After the ESR, previous glucocorticoid usage, current treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, duration of disease and HOMAIR were controlled for, the differences in DHEAS levels between patients and controls were markedly attenuated in women (P = 0.050) and were no longer present in men (P = 0.133). We concluded that low DHEAS concentrations are commonly encountered in IA and, in women, this may not be fully explainable by disease-related parameters. The role of hypoadrenalism in the pathophysiology of IA deserves further elucidation. DHEA replacement may be indicated in many patients with IA, even in those not taking glucocorticoids. PMID:11299059

  19. Muscle activation, blood lactate, and perceived exertion responses to changing resistance training programming variables.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, Daniel J; Dawson, Brian; Donnelly, Cyril J; Peeling, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE: 0-10) during resistance training with varying programming demands were examined. Blood lactate (BLa) and muscle activation (using surface electromyography: EMG) were measured as potential mediators of RPE responses. Participants performed three sets of single arm (preferred side) bicep curls at 70% of 1 repetition maximum over 4 trials: Trial (A) 3 sets × 8 repetitions × 120 s recovery between sets; (B) 3 sets × 8 repetitions × 240 s recovery; (C) 3 sets × maximum number of repetitions (MNR) × 120 s recovery; (D) 3 sets × MNR × 240 s recovery. Overall body (RPE-O) and active muscle (RPE-AM) perceptual responses were assessed following each set in each trial. Biceps brachii and brachioradialis muscle EMG was measured during each set for each trial. RPE-O and RPE-AM were not different between Trial A (3.5 ± 1 and 6 ± 1, respectively) and Trial B (3.5 ± 1 and 5.5 ± 1, respectively) (p < .05). However, RPE-AM was significantly greater in Trial C (7.5 ± 1.5) and Trial D (7.5 ± 1.5) than in Trial B (p < .05). There were no significant differences in muscle activation or BLa between trials; however, work rate (tonnage/min) was greater in Trials C and D compared to Trial B. In conclusion, BLa and muscle activation were not related to RPE, but resistance training variables, such as work rate, may impact on RPE when intensity (%1RM) and the number of sets completed remain constant. PMID:26267339

  20. Blood pressure variability and closed-loop baroreflex assessment in adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome during supine rest and orthostatic stress.

    PubMed

    Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Barbieri, Riccardo; Saul, J Philip

    2011-03-01

    Hemodynamic abnormalities have been documented in the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), indicating functional disturbances of the autonomic nervous system responsible for cardiovascular regulation. The aim of this study was to explore blood pressure variability and closed-loop baroreflex function at rest and during mild orthostatic stress in adolescents with CFS. We included a consecutive sample of 14 adolescents 12-18 years old with CFS diagnosed according to a thorough and standardized set of investigations and 56 healthy control subjects of equal sex and age distribution. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded continuously and non-invasively during supine rest and during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of -20 mmHg to simulate mild orthostatic stress. Indices of blood pressure variability and baroreflex function (α-gain) were computed from monovariate and bivariate spectra in the low-frequency (LF) band (0.04-0.15 Hz) and the high-frequency (HF) band (0.15-0.50 Hz), using an autoregressive algorithm. Variability of systolic blood pressure in the HF range was lower among CFS patients as compared to controls both at rest and during LBNP. During LBNP, compared to controls, α-gain HF decreased more, and α-gain LF and the ratio of α-gain LF/α-gain HF increased more in CFS patients, all suggesting greater shift from parasympathetic to sympathetic baroreflex control. CFS in adolescents is characterized by reduced systolic blood pressure variability and a sympathetic predominance of baroreflex heart rate control during orthostatic stress. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of CFS in adolescents. PMID:20890710

  1. Clinical utility of blood tests in elite athletes with short term fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, K E

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine, in a population of elite athletes at their initial presentation with tiredness or fatigue, whether a set of haematological and biochemical investigations enhances the diagnostic process over and above the information gained from clinical history and examination. Methods A sequential series of 50 elite athletes were studied at the initial consultation for a primary complaint of fatigue, tiredness, or a synonym thereof. A standardised clinical history, physical examination, and series of haematological and biochemical test were performed. The effects of the results of the blood tests on the diagnosis made after the clinical history and examination were examined. Results In only one case did the test results lead to an alteration in diagnosis. Physical examination did not provide any findings that would not have been suspected from the history, except for a number of incidental findings not relevant to the presenting symptom. Discussion In cases of short term fatigue in elite athletes, a thorough clinical history is mandatory. Physical examination is unlikely to reveal any findings not suspected from the history. Routine ordering of a panel of blood tests at the initial consultation should be discouraged. Unless specifically indicated by the history and examination, investigations are not required at the initial consultation. PMID:16547143

  2. Urine as a biological specimen for forensic analysis of alcohol and variability in the urine-to-blood relationship.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan W

    2006-01-01

    This article concerns the use of urine as a biological specimen for determination of alcohol in clinical and forensic toxicology and discusses factors that might influence variability in the urine/blood concentration ratio of alcohol. A large number of human drinking experiments were conducted to determine the time course of urine-alcohol concentrations (UAC) in relation to blood-alcohol concentrations (BAC). The UAC and BAC curves were shifted in time and the BAC curve always began to decrease before the UAC started to decline. During the early absorption phase the UAC/BAC ratio was less than unity, whereas in the late absorption/distribution period the ratio was between 1.0-1.2. On reaching the post-absorptive phase, the UAC always exceeded BAC and UAC/BAC ratios averaged 1.3-1.4, increasing appreciably as BAC decreased towards zero. Alcohol-induced diuresis was most pronounced during the rising portion of the BAC curve and near to the peak value. After about 2 hours post-drinking, the production rate of urine diminished to the pre-drinking rate of about 0.5-1 mL/min. Drinking water during the post-absorptive phase of the alcohol curve produced dilute urine, as reflected in lower creatinine content and osmolality, although the concentration of ethanol remained unchanged. After subjects drank a moderate dose of ethanol (0.54-0.85 g/kg) about 2% of the dose was recoverable in the urine after 7 hours. Ethyl glucuronide, a minor metabolite of ethanol, was measured in urine samples from drunk drivers. The UAC/BAC ratio of ethanol in drunk drivers did not depend on the creatinine content of the urine and therefore the relative dilution of the specimens. When alcohol-free urine was spiked with glucose and infected with the yeast species Candida albicans, ethanol was produced by fermentation after approximately 24 hours storage at room temperature. This post-sampling synthesis of ethanol was prevented by sodium fluoride (1% weight by volume) in the urine tubes or by

  3. EDUCORE project: a clinical trial, randomised by clusters, to assess the effect of a visual learning method on blood pressure control in the primary healthcare setting

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High blood pressure (HBP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). European hypertension and cardiology societies as well as expert committees on CVD prevention recommend stratifying cardiovascular risk using the SCORE method, the modification of lifestyles to prevent CVD, and achieving good control over risk factors. The EDUCORE (Education and Coronary Risk Evaluation) project aims to determine whether the use of a cardiovascular risk visual learning method - the EDUCORE method - is more effective than normal clinical practice in improving the control of blood pressure within one year in patients with poorly controlled hypertension but no background of CVD; Methods/Design This work describes a protocol for a clinical trial, randomised by clusters and involving 22 primary healthcare clinics, to test the effectiveness of the EDUCORE method. The number of patients required was 736, all between 40 and 65 years of age (n = 368 in the EDUCORE and control groups), all of whom had been diagnosed with HBP at least one year ago, and all of whom had poorly controlled hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic ≥ 90 mmHg). All personnel taking part were explained the trial and trained in its methodology. The EDUCORE method contemplates the visualisation of low risk SCORE scores using images embodying different stages of a high risk action, plus the receipt of a pamphlet explaining how to better maintain cardiac health. The main outcome variable was the control of blood pressure; secondary outcome variables included the SCORE score, therapeutic compliance, quality of life, and total cholesterol level. All outcome variables were measured at the beginning of the experimental period and again at 6 and 12 months. Information on sex, age, educational level, physical activity, body mass index, consumption of medications, change of treatment and blood analysis results was also recorded; Discussion The EDUCORE method could provide a

  4. Exposure–Response Modeling of Clinical End Points Using Latent Variable Indirect Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Hu, C

    2014-01-01

    Exposure–response modeling facilitates effective dosing regimen selection in clinical drug development, where the end points are often disease scores and not physiological variables. Appropriate models need to be consistent with pharmacology and identifiable from the time courses of available data. This article describes a general framework of applying mechanism-based models to various types of clinical end points. Placebo and drug model parameterization, interpretation, and assessment are discussed with a focus on the indirect response models. PMID:24897307

  5. Rapid optical heating of blood for clinical point-of-care diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Brian E.; Hill, Ted; Hankins, Steve; Gandola, Kent

    2010-02-01

    Clinical testing of human blood requires adherence to a number of regulatory standards, including maintaining a temperature that is representative of the human body (e.g. 37 C). The economics of private and public healthcare drives blood assays to be conducted using low cost, disposable assay devices that also eliminate the possibility of cross contamination. Unfortunately, the materials that meet the economic and disposable constraints of the marketplace are thermal insulators, not ideal for rapid heating. We present a novel means of optically heating blood samples in plastic assay devices within a time period suitable for point-of-care use. The novel approach uses LED's in the red portion of the visible spectrum. The lower absorption of optical radiation in the visible spectrum enables the absorption of energy deep into the assay device. This produces even heating, avoiding the gradients that can occur by surface heating (conduction) or surface absorption (highly absorbing wavelengths). Analytical and computational models will be discussed. A specific application to a point-of-care blood assay instrument will be reviewed. In this application, optical heating was achieved using a small array of high brightness LED's. Experimental results will be discussed. The experimental results with this instrument validated the predictions.

  6. Clinical comparison of the isolator and BacT/Alert aerobic blood culture systems.

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, W C; Cawley, J J; Alvarez, S; Hogan, S F; Harmsen, W S; Ilstrup, D M; Cockerill, F R

    1995-01-01

    The performance characteristics of the Isolator (Wampole Laboratories, Cranbury, N.J.) and the BacT/Alert (Organon Teknika Corporation, Durham, N.C.) aerobic blood culture systems were compared for 6,009 blood culture sets obtained from patients with suspected bloodstream infections. The BacT/Alert aerobic bottle [BTA(O2)] was continuously agitated while it was incubated in 5% CO2 at 36 degrees C; culture plates prepared from the Isolator tube [I(O2)] were incubated in 5% CO2 at 37 degrees C. From 394 blood cultures, 416 clinically significant isolates of bacteria and yeasts were recovered. The overall yields for BTA(O2) and I(O2) were not significantly different (319 versus 336; P = 0.20). I(O2) recovered significantly more staphylococcus (P < 0.05) and yeast isolates (P < 0.01). BTA(O2) recovered significantly more aerobic and facultatively anaerobic gram-negative bacilli (P < 0.05). In blood culture sets which produced growth of the same organisms in both the BTA(O2) and I(O2) systems, the BTA(O2) system detected growth sooner, but more rapid identification was possible with the I(O2) system by virtue of earlier isolation of colonies on solid media. PMID:7665647

  7. Contaminating fat in pericardial suction blood: a clinical, technical and scientific challenge.

    PubMed

    Engström, Karl Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Stroke and diffuse brain damage after cardiac surgery are too common. It is important to find means to reduce the incidence in view of future competition to surgery from less invasive procedures. Stroke is fairly well defined in clinical terms and with several identified mechanisms. Diffuse brain damage is less well defined and more complex in nature. One suggested mechanism is from cerebral fat microembolization of retrieved pericardial suction blood (PSB). The present study aimed to describe a simple method to measure fat content of PSB, how experimental artefacts interfere with the results, and how the unstable character of a fat-blood suspension can be used to design a simple fat-separation system. The quantity of small amounts of fat can be amplified by centrifugation to the tapered tip of a standard glass pipette. The coefficient of variation after repeated experiments was 9.5%. PSB after coronary bypass surgery contained 0.22 +/- 0.04% fat of which 15 +/- 3% was bound to the surface of the plastic collecting bag. Experimentation requires standardized routines. Static incubation, blood-fat mixing routines, and transfer steps of blood samples between syringes induce substantial artefacts from spontaneous density separation and surface-adhesion of fat. Soya oil is a common reference substance replacing human fat in technical laboratory science, but is associated with artefacts of its own. These artefacts cause problems during experimentation but the oil is a good resource in the design of a simple fat-separation system. PMID:15161061

  8. Trends and variability in blood lead concentrations among US children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ram B

    2016-04-01

    Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the period 2003-2012, the objective of this study was to evaluate trends in blood lead levels (BLL) among children aged 1-5 and 6-11 years and smoker and nonsmoker adolescents aged 12-19 years. Regression models with log10 transformed values of BLLs as dependent variable were fitted to evaluate how gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, and exposure to secondhand smoke at home affect BLLs. Irrespective of age, gender, and race/ethnicity, BLLs declined over the study period (p ≤ 0.01). Overall, adjusted BLLs declined by 0.00114 μg/dL for every 2 years. Children aged 1-5 years had about 50 % higher BLLs than smoker adolescents, about 75 % higher BLLs than nonsmoker adolescents, and about 45 % higher BLLs than children aged 6-11 years. While overall, children aged 1-5 years with BLL ≥ 5 μg/dL made up 3.24 %, 7.8 % non-Hispanic Black children aged 1-5 years had BLL ≥ 5 μg/dL. Males were found to have higher adjusted BLLs than females, and non-Hispanic Blacks were found to have higher adjusted BLLs than non-Hispanic Whites. Higher poverty income ratio was associated with lower adjusted BLLs (β = -0.02916, p < 0.01). Children living in owner-occupied homes had lower adjusted BLLs than children living in renter-occupied homes. BLLs increased with increase in number of smokers smoking inside the home (β = 0.02496, p = 0.02). In conclusion, while BLLs have declined for all age groups, genders, and races/ethnicities, certain races/ethnicities like non-Hispanic Blacks continue to have substantially higher BLLs than non-Hispanic Whites. PMID:26758308

  9. Ambient particulate air pollution, heart rate variability, and blood markers of inflammation in a panel of elderly subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, C Arden; Hansen, Matthew L; Long, Russell W; Nielsen, Karen R; Eatough, Norman L; Wilson, William E; Eatough, Delbert J

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies report associations between particulate air pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. Although the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unclear, it has been hypothesized that altered autonomic function and pulmonary/systemic inflammation may play a role. In this study we explored the effects of air pollution on autonomic function measured by changes in heart rate variability (HRV) and blood markers of inflammation in a panel of 88 elderly subjects from three communities along the Wasatch Front in Utah. Subjects participated in multiple sessions of 24-hr ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring and blood tests. Regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between fine particulate matter [aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] and HRV, C-reactive protein (CRP), blood cell counts, and whole blood viscosity. A 100- microg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with approximately a 35 (SE = 8)-msec decline in standard deviation of all normal R-R intervals (SDNN, a measure of overall HRV); a 42 (SE = 11)-msec decline in square root of the mean of the squared differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals (r-MSSD, an estimate of short-term components of HRV); and a 0.81 (SE = 0.17)-mg/dL increase in CRP. The PM2.5-HRV associations were reasonably consistent and statistically robust, but the CRP association dropped to 0.19 (SE = 0.10) after excluding the most influential subject. PM2.5 was not significantly associated with white or red blood cell counts, platelets, or whole-blood viscosity. Most short-term variability in temporal deviations of HRV and CRP was not explained by PM2.5; however, the small statistically significant associations that were observed suggest that exposure to PM2.5 may be one of multiple factors that influence HRV and CRP. PMID:14998750

  10. The effect of music on the level of cortisol, blood glucose and physiological variables in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mottahedian Tabrizi, Elaheh; Sahraei, Hedayat; Movahhedi Rad, Saeid; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Lak, Marziyeh

    2012-01-01

    Surgical procedures performed using spinal anesthetic techniques present a special challenge to anesthesiologists, because patients are awake and are exposed to multiple anxiety provoking visual and auditory stimuli. Therefore, this study was carried out to define the effect of music on the level of cortisol, blood glucose and physiological variables in patients under spinal anesthesia. In this semi-experimental research, 90 men aging from 18-48 years with ASA (acetylsalicylic acid) class I, who underwent urological and abdominal surgery, were investigated. Patients were divided randomly into three groups of thirty subjects. Music group (headphone with music), Silence group (headphone without music) and the control group (without interference). The level of cortisol and blood sugar was measured half an hour before and after the operation. Moreover, the physiological indicators in each of these three groups were monitored and recorded from ten minutes before getting spinal anesthesia to ten minutes after the operation. The level of blood cortisol didn't have any increase in the music group after operation compared to the time before that. However, in the groups of silence and control this level had risen (p< 0.05). The level of blood glucose in music group had declined and in the other two groups it had increased. Our data showed that listening to music during surgery under regional anesthesia has effects on cortisol levels and some of the physiological variables. Therefore the researcher offers to be used music therapy as a complementary method in patients on the reduce anxiety. PMID:27350774

  11. Predicting frequent asthma exacerbations using blood eosinophil count and other patient data routinely available in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Price, David; Wilson, Andrew M; Chisholm, Alison; Rigazio, Anna; Burden, Anne; Thomas, Michael; King, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute, severe asthma exacerbations can be difficult to predict and thus prevent. Patients who have frequent exacerbations are of particular concern. Practical exacerbation predictors are needed for these patients in the primary-care setting. Patients and methods Medical records of 130,547 asthma patients aged 12–80 years from the UK Optimum Patient Care Research Database and Clinical Practice Research Datalink, 1990–2013, were examined for 1 year before (baseline) and 1 year after (outcome) their most recent blood eosinophil count. Baseline variables predictive (P<0.05) of exacerbation in the outcome year were compared between patients who had two or more exacerbations and those who had no exacerbation or only one exacerbation, using uni- and multivariable logistic regression models. Exacerbation was defined as asthma-related hospital attendance/admission (emergency or inpatient) or acute oral corticosteroid (OCS) course. Results Blood eosinophil count >400/µL (versus ≤400/µL) increased the likelihood of two or more exacerbations >1.4-fold (odds ratio [OR]: 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39, 1.58); P<0.001). Variables that significantly increased the odds by up to 1.4-fold included increasing age (per year), female gender (versus male), being overweight or obese (versus normal body mass index), being a smoker (versus nonsmoker), having anxiety/depression, diabetes, eczema, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or rhinitis, and prescription for acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Compared with treatment at British Thoracic Society step 2 (daily controller ± reliever), treatment at step 0 (none) or 1 (as-needed reliever) increased the odds by 1.2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, and treatment at step 3, 4, or 5 increased the odds by 1.3-, 1.9-, or 3.1-fold, respectively (all P<0.05). Acute OCS use was the single best predictor of two or more exacerbations. Even one course increased the odds by more than threefold (OR: 3.75 [95% CI: 3

  12. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1) identification of the extent of a multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) burden, 2) patients with balanced 3-vessel CAD, 3) patients with subclinical CAD, and 4) patients with regional flow variance, despite of a high global MFR. A more accurate assessment of the ischemic burden in patients with intermediate pretest probability of CAD can support the clinical decision-making in treatment of CAD patients as a complementary tool to the invasive coronary angiography (CAG). Recently, several studies have proven Rubidium-82 ((82)Rb) PET's long-term prognostic value by a significant association between compromised global MFR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and together with new diagnostic possibilities from measuring the longitudinal myocardial perfusion gradient, cardiac (82)Rb PET faces a promising clinical future. This article reviews current evidence on quantitative (82)Rb PET's ability to diagnose and risk stratify CAD patients, while assessing the potential of the modality in clinical practice. PMID:26550537

  13. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1) identification of the extent of a multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) burden, 2) patients with balanced 3-vessel CAD, 3) patients with subclinical CAD, and 4) patients with regional flow variance, despite of a high global MFR. A more accurate assessment of the ischemic burden in patients with intermediate pretest probability of CAD can support the clinical decision-making in treatment of CAD patients as a complementary tool to the invasive coronary angiography (CAG). Recently, several studies have proven Rubidium-82 (82Rb) PET’s long-term prognostic value by a significant association between compromised global MFR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and together with new diagnostic possibilities from measuring the longitudinal myocardial perfusion gradient, cardiac 82Rb PET faces a promising clinical future. This article reviews current evidence on quantitative 82Rb PET’s ability to diagnose and risk stratify CAD patients, while assessing the potential of the modality in clinical practice. PMID:26550537

  14. Graduate-Entry Medical Student Variables that Predict Academic and Clinical Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Ian; Darmawan, I Gusti Ngurah

    2004-01-01

    A hypothetical model was formulated to explore factors that influenced academic and clinical achievement for graduate-entry medical students completing their third year of university studies. Nine latent variables were considered including the students' background, previous successes with their undergraduate and postgraduate studies and their…

  15. Undergraduate Nurse Variables that Predict Academic Achievement and Clinical Competence in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Ian; Hall, Margaret; Darmawan, I Gusti Ngurah.

    2007-01-01

    A hypothetical model was formulated to explore factors that influenced academic and clinical achievement for undergraduate nursing students. Sixteen latent variables were considered including the students' background, gender, type of first language, age, their previous successes with their undergraduate nursing studies and status given for…

  16. Spectroscopic Study of Human Teeth and Blood from Visible to Terahertz Frequencies for Clinical Diagnosis of Dental Pulp Vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirmer, Marion; Danilov, Sergey N.; Giglberger, Stephan; Putzger, Jürgen; Niklas, Andreas; Jäger, Andreas; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Löffler, Susanne; Schmalz, Gottfried; Redlich, Britta; Schulz, Irene; Monkman, Gareth; Ganichev, Sergey D.

    2012-03-01

    Transmission spectra of wet human teeth and dentin slices, together with blood of different flow rates were investigated. The measurements carried out over a wide spectral range, from visible light down to terahertz radiation. The results make it possible to find the optimum light frequency for an all-optical determination of pulpal blood flow and, consequently, for clinically diagnosis of tooth vitality.

  17. Evidence of Blood Stage Efficacy with a Virosomal Malaria Vaccine in a Phase IIa Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Fiona M.; Porter, David W.; Okitsu, Shinji L.; Westerfeld, Nicole; Vogel, Denise; Todryk, Stephen; Poulton, Ian; Correa, Simon; Hutchings, Claire; Berthoud, Tamara; Dunachie, Susanna; Andrews, Laura; Williams, Jack L.; Sinden, Robert; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Pluschke, Gerd; Zurbriggen, Rinaldo; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research indicates that a combination vaccine targeting different stages of the malaria life cycle is likely to provide the most effective malaria vaccine. This trial was the first to combine two existing vaccination strategies to produce a vaccine that induces immune responses to both the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages of the P. falciparum life cycle. Methods This was a Phase I/IIa study of a new combination malaria vaccine FFM ME-TRAP+PEV3A. PEV3A includes peptides from both the pre-erythrocytic circumsporozoite protein and the blood-stage antigen AMA-1. This study was conducted at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. The participants were healthy, malaria naïve volunteers, from Oxford. The interventions were vaccination with PEV3A alone, or PEV3A+FFM ME-TRAP. The main outcome measure was protection from malaria in a sporozoite challenge model. Other outcomes included measures of parasite specific immune responses induced by either vaccine; and safety, assessed by collection of adverse event data. Results We observed evidence of blood stage immunity in PEV3A vaccinated volunteers, but no volunteers were completely protected from malaria. PEV3A induced high antibody titres, and antibodies bound parasites in immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, we observed boosting of the vaccine-induced immune response by sporozoite challenge. Immune responses induced by FFM ME-TRAP were unexpectedly low. The vaccines were safe, with comparable side effect profiles to previous trials. Although there was no sterile protection two major observations support an effect of the vaccine-induced response on blood stage parasites: (i) Lower rates of parasite growth were observed in volunteers vaccinated with PEV3A compared to unvaccinated controls (p = 0.012), and this was reflected in the PCR results from PEV3A vaccinated volunteers. These showed early control of parasitaemia by some volunteers in this

  18. Changes in Heart Rate Variability after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Clinical Importance of These Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lakusic, Nenad; Mahovic, Darija; Cerkez Habek, Jasna; Novak, Miroslav; Cerovec, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability is a physiological feature indicating the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart rate. Association of the reduced heart rate variability due to myocardial infarction and the increased postinfarction mortality was first described more than thirty years ago. Many studies have unequivocally demonstrated that coronary artery bypass grafting surgery generally leads to significant reduction in heart rate variability, which is even more pronounced than after myocardial infarction. Pathophysiologically, however, the mechanisms of heart rate variability reduction associated with acute myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass grafting are different. Generally, heart rate variability gradually recovers to the preoperative values within six months of the procedure. Unlike the reduced heart rate variability in patients having sustained myocardial infarction, a finding of reduced heart rate variability after coronary artery bypass surgery is not considered relevant in predicting mortality. Current knowledge about changes in heart rate variability in coronary patients and clinical relevance of such a finding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are presented. PMID:26078960

  19. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID

  20. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID

  1. Blood pressure control in treated hypertensive patients: clinical performance of general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    Frijling, B D; Spies, T H; Lobo, C M; Hulscher, M E; van Drenth, B B; Braspenning, J C; Prins, A; van der Wouden, J C; Grol, R P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The blood pressure of many treated hypertensive patients remains above recommended target levels. This discrepancy may be related to general practitioners' (GPs') actions. AIM: To assess clinical performance of GPs in blood pressure control in treated hypertensive patients and to explore the influence of patient and GP characteristics on clinical performance. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional study conducted on 195 GPs with invitations to participate made via bulletins and by letter. SETTING: One hundred and thirty-two practices in the southern half of The Netherlands from November 1996 to April 1997. METHOD: Performance criteria were selected from Dutch national hypertension guidelines for general practice. GPs completed self-report forms immediately after follow-up visits of hypertensive patients treated with antihypertensive medication. RESULTS: The GPs recorded 3526 follow-up visits. In 63% of these consultations the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was 90 mmHg or above. The median performance rates of the GPs were less than 51% for most of the recommended actions, even at a DBP of > or = 100 mmHg. Performance of non-pharmacological actions increased gradually with increasing DBP; prescribing an increase in antihypertensive medication and making a follow-up appointment scheduled within six weeks rose steeply at a DBP of > or = 100 mmHg. Patient and GP characteristics contributed little to clinical performance. Action performance rates varied considerably between GPs. CONCLUSION: GPs seem to target their actions at a DBP of below 100 mmHg, whereas guidelines recommend targeting at a DBP of below 90 mmHg. PMID:11271892

  2. Blood infections in patients treated at transplantation wards of a clinical hospital in Warsaw.

    PubMed

    Kierzkowska, M; Majewska, A; Dobrzaniecka, K; Sawicka-Grzelak, A; Mlynarczyk, A; Chmura, A; Durlik, M; Deborska-Materkowska, D; Paczek, L; Mlynarczyk, G

    2014-10-01

    Establishment of the etiology in blood infection is always advisable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proportion of different bacterial species, including aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in blood cultures of patients hospitalized in transplantation wards of a large clinical hospital between 2010 and 2012. A total of 1994 blood samples from patients who were treated at one of two transplantation wards of a large hospital in Warsaw were analyzed using an automated blood culture system, BacT/ALERT (bioMerieux, France). The 306 bacterial strains were obtained from the examined samples. The highest proportion were bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae (112 strains; 36.6%) with Escherichia coli (61 strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae (30 strains), and Enterobacter cloacae (10 strains) most commonly isolated. The non-fermenting bacilli constituted 21.6% (66 strains), with most common Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (31 strains), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14 strains), Achromobacter spp. (12 strains), and Acinetobacter baumannii (3 strains). Most frequent Gram-positive bacteria were staphylococci (25.2%). Of 77 staphylococcal strains, 56 were coagulase-negative staphylococci and 21 Staphylococcus aureus. Other Gram-positive bacteria included enterococci (14 strains) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (1 strain). Obligatory anaerobic bacteria were represented by 19 strains (6.2% of total isolates). Among all Enterobacteriaceae, 49 isolates (43.7%) produced extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs). Resistance to methicillin was detected in 62% of S aureus isolates and in 46% of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Of 14 enterococci cultured from blood samples, 2 strains (14.3%) were resistant to vancomycin. Both were Enterococcus faecium. Resistant strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria are significant problems for patients in the transplantation ward. PMID:25380873

  3. Renal sympathetic denervation: effect on ambulatory blood pressure and blood pressure variability in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. The ReShape CV-risk study.

    PubMed

    Miroslawska, A; Solbu, M; Skjølsvik, E; Toft, I; Steigen, T K

    2016-03-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) represents a potential treatment option for highly selected patients with resistant arterial hypertension. In this open label study, we aimed to investigate the response of blood pressure (BP) and short-term BP variability (BPV) to RDN 6 months after procedure. We defined treatment-resistant hypertension as office systolic BP>140 mm Hg, despite maximum tolerated doses of ⩾4 antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic. In addition, daytime systolic ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM) >135 mm Hg was required after witnessed intake of antihypertensive drugs. Bilateral RDN was performed with the Symplicity Catheter System (n=23). The mean systolic office BP and ABPM fell from 162±20 mm Hg to 139±19 mm Hg (P<0.001) and from 154±20 mm Hg to 144±16 mm Hg (P<0.038), respectively. In addition, we observed a significant reduction in diastolic office BP and ABPM. The current study also demonstrated a significant decrease of both systolic and diastolic average real variability, weighted standard deviation (s.d.) as well as conventional s.d. of mean and daytime BP, but not of s.d. of nighttime BP. RDN after witnessed intake of ⩾4 antihypertensive drugs reduced both office BP and ABPM at 6 months in patients with truly resistant hypertension. Also BPV improved, possibly reflecting an additional effect from intervening on the sympathetic nerve system. PMID:26134621

  4. Classification Models for Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV Infection Based on Demographic and Clinical Variables

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Moreno, Jose A.; Pérez-Álvarez, Núria; Muñoz-Murillo, Amalia; Prats, Anna; Garolera, Maite; Jurado, M. Àngels; Fumaz, Carmina R.; Negredo, Eugènia; Ferrer, Maria J.; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2014-01-01

    Objective We used demographic and clinical data to design practical classification models for prediction of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in people with HIV infection. Methods The study population comprised 331 HIV-infected patients with available demographic, clinical, and neurocognitive data collected using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Classification and regression trees (CART) were developed to obtain detailed and reliable models to predict NCI. Following a practical clinical approach, NCI was considered the main variable for study outcomes, and analyses were performed separately in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Results The study sample comprised 52 treatment-naïve and 279 experienced patients. In the first group, the variables identified as better predictors of NCI were CD4 cell count and age (correct classification [CC]: 79.6%, 3 final nodes). In treatment-experienced patients, the variables most closely related to NCI were years of education, nadir CD4 cell count, central nervous system penetration-effectiveness score, age, employment status, and confounding comorbidities (CC: 82.1%, 7 final nodes). In patients with an undetectable viral load and no comorbidities, we obtained a fairly accurate model in which the main variables were nadir CD4 cell count, current CD4 cell count, time on current treatment, and past highest viral load (CC: 88%, 6 final nodes). Conclusion Practical classification models to predict NCI in HIV infection can be obtained using demographic and clinical variables. An approach based on CART analyses may facilitate screening for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and complement clinical information about risk and protective factors for NCI in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25237895

  5. Mapping cerebral blood flow by xenon-enhanced computed tomography: clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, H.; Good, W.F.; Gur, D.; Wolfson, S.K. Jr.; Latchaw, R.E.; Good, B.C.; Leanza, R.; Miller, S.L.

    1984-08-01

    Local cerebral blood flow was measured and mapped using xenon-enhanced x-ray transmission computed tomography. Studies involving 4-6 minutes of xenon-oxygen inhalation can be performed routinely in awake and anesthetized patients with acceptable patient tolerance and compliance. Several case studies of patients with acute and chronic ischemic injuries and other cerebral abnormalities are presented to illustrate characterization of flow pattern in normal and abnormal tissue, as well as the relevance of this flow information to clinical patient management.

  6. 2D gel blood serum biomarkers reveal differential clinical proteomics of the neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Sheta, Essam A; Appel, Stanley H; Goldknopf, Ira L

    2006-02-01

    This review addresses the challenges of neuroproteomics and recent progress in biomarkers and tests for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The review will discuss how the application of quantitative 2D gel electrophoresis, combined with appropriate single-variable and multivariate biostatistics, allows for selection of disease-specific serum biomarkers. It will also address how the use of large cohorts of specifically targeted patient blood serum samples and complimentary age-matched controls, in parallel with the use of selected panels of these biomarkers, are being applied to the development of blood tests to specifically address unmet pressing needs in the differential diagnosis of these diseases, and to provide potential avenues for mechanism-based drug targeting and treatment monitoring. While exploring recent findings in this area, the review discusses differences in critical pathways of immune/inflammation and amyloid formation between Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as discernable synergistic relationships between these pathways that are revealed by this approach. The potential for pathway measurement in blood tests for differential diagnosis, disease burden and therapeutic monitoring is also outlined. PMID:16445350

  7. Relative effectiveness of clinic and home blood pressure monitoring compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in diagnosis of hypertension: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, J; Mant, J; Martin, U; Guo, B; Hobbs, F D R; Deeks, J J; Heneghan, C; Roberts, N

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the relative accuracy of clinic measurements and home blood pressure monitoring compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as a reference standard for the diagnosis of hypertension. Design Systematic review with meta-analysis with hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic models. Methodological quality was appraised, including evidence of validation of blood pressure measurement equipment. Data sources Medline (from 1966), Embase (from 1980), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, Medion, ARIF, and TRIP up to May 2010. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Eligible studies examined diagnosis of hypertension in adults of all ages using home and/or clinic blood pressure measurement compared with those made using ambulatory monitoring that clearly defined thresholds to diagnose hypertension. Results The 20 eligible studies used various thresholds for the diagnosis of hypertension, and only seven studies (clinic) and three studies (home) could be directly compared with ambulatory monitoring. Compared with ambulatory monitoring thresholds of 135/85 mm Hg, clinic measurements over 140/90 mm Hg had mean sensitivity and specificity of 74.6% (95% confidence interval 60.7% to 84.8%) and 74.6% (47.9% to 90.4%), respectively, whereas home measurements over 135/85 mm Hg had mean sensitivity and specificity of 85.7% (78.0% to 91.0%) and 62.4% (48.0% to 75.0%). Conclusions Neither clinic nor home measurement had sufficient sensitivity or specificity to be recommended as a single diagnostic test. If ambulatory monitoring is taken as the reference standard, then treatment decisions based on clinic or home blood pressure alone might result in substantial overdiagnosis. Ambulatory monitoring before the start of lifelong drug treatment might lead to more appropriate targeting of treatment, particularly around the diagnostic threshold. PMID:21705406

  8. Consensus Report of the Coalition for Clinical Research—Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.; Bergenstal, Richard; Blonde, Lawrence; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Church, Timothy S.; Gaffaney, Jenifer; Jovanovič, Lois; Kendall, David M.; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris P.; Leippert, Claudia; DDG, Diabetesberaterin; Owens, David R.; Polonsky, William H.; Reach, Gérard; Renard, Eric; Riddell, Michael C.; Rubin, Richard R.; Schnell, Oliver; Siminiero, Linda M.; Vigersky, Robert A.; Wilson, Darrell M.; Wollitzer, Alison Okada

    2008-01-01

    The Coalition for Clinical Research—Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Scientific Board, a group of nine academic clinicians and scientists from the United States and Europe, convened in San Francisco, California, on June 11–12, 2008, to discuss the appropriate uses of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and the measures necessary to accurately assess the potential benefit of this practice in noninsulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thirteen consultants from the United States, Europe, and Canada from academia, practice, and government also participated and contributed based on their fields of expertise. These experts represent a range of disciplines that include adult endocrinology, pediatric endocrinology, health education, mathematics, statistics, psychology, nutrition, exercise physiology, and nursing. This coalition was organized by Diabetes Technology Management, Inc. Among the participants, there was consensus that: protocols assessing the performance of SMBG in noninsulin treated T2DM must provide the SMBG intervention subjects with blood glucose (BG) goals and instructions on how to respond to BG data in randomized controlled trials (RCTs);intervention subjects in clinical trials of SMBG-driven interventions must aggressively titrate their therapeutic responses or lifestyle changes in response to hyperglycemia;control subjects in clinical trials of SMBG must be isolated from SMBG-driven interventions and not be contaminated by physician experience with study subjects receiving a SMBG intervention;the best endpoints to measure in a clinical trial of SMBG in T2DM include delta Hemoglobin A1c levels, hyperglycemic events, hypoglycemic events, time to titrate noninsulin therapy to a maximum necessary dosage, and quality of life indices;either individual randomization or cluster randomization may be appropriate methods for separating control subjects from SMBG intervention subjects, provided that precautions are taken to avoid bias and that the

  9. Clinical significance of regulatory B cells in the peripheral blood of patients with oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Bian, Guang-Rong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Juan; Liu, Xia; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    B cell subsets have been found to exhibit a negative regulatory function, like Tregs. The present study investigates the effects of CD5+CD19+ interleukin (IL)-10 (B10) on the occurrence and development of oesophageal carcinoma by analysing B10 levels in the peripheral blood of patients with oesophageal carcinoma. Peripheral blood of 120 oesophageal cancer patients and 120 healthy controls were collected, and regulatory B cell counts were determined by flow cytometry. The level of B10 cells in the peripheral blood of patients with oesophageal carcinoma was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p < 0.05). In addition, B10 levels in stage III-IV patients (3.5 ±0.7%) were higher than those in stage I-II patients (2.5 ±0.6%), which were in turn higher than those in the healthy controls (1.3 ±0.3%). The level of B10 increased with clinical progression of oesophageal cancer, suggesting that B10 cells may influence the development or progression of oesophageal cancer. PMID:26557042

  10. Clinical evaluation of sodium ion selective field effect transistors for whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J M; Smith, S C; Cramb, R; Hutton, P

    1994-01-01

    Sodium ion selective field effect transistors (ISFETs) were evaluated for their performance in measurement of sodium ions in whole blood for 'near patient' analysis in operating theatres and intensive care units. Performance was evaluated in comparison with a standard clinical laboratory sodium/potassium ion analyser (Radiometer KNA1) and with sodium and potassium assays using flame photometry on the plasma from each whole blood specimen. The imprecisions (coefficients of variation) of three ISFETs for sodium ion assay were 1.08, 1.56 and 1.10%, respectively. Robust bivariate linear regression (reweighted least squares preceded by least median of squares) of the ISFET versus KNA1 sodium ion activity yielded a regression coefficient of 1.08 and an intercept of -18.2 mM. The influence of potassium, protein and lipid on the measurement of sodium ions by both ISFETs and the KNA1 was assessed using robust multiple regression (also based on reweighted least squares preceded by least median of squares). In the regression versus flame photometry, protein was found to be more influential for the KNA1 (glass sodium ion selective electrode) than for the ISFET. Potassium had no influence on assays using the ISFET, but had a weak negative influence on assays using the KNA1. Two ISFETs lasted for more than 200 assays each demonstrating their robustness in the assay of whole blood. PMID:8154847

  11. The prognostic blood biomarker proadrenomedullin for outcome prediction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a qualitative clinical review.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Philipp; Marlowe, Robert J; Mueller, Beat

    2015-03-01

    Plasma proadrenomedullin (ProADM) is a blood biomarker that may aid in multidimensional risk assessment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Co-secreted 1:1 with adrenomedullin (ADM), ProADM is a less biologically active, more chemically stable surrogate for this pluripotent regulatory peptide, which due to biological and ex vivo physical characteristics is difficult to reliably directly quantify. Upregulated by hypoxia, inflammatory cytokines, bacterial products, and shear stress and expressed widely in pulmonary cells and ubiquitously throughout the body, ADM exerts or mediates vasodilatory, natriuretic, diuretic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and metabolic effects. Observational data from four separate studies totaling 1366 patients suggest that as a single factor, ProADM is a significant independent, and accurate, long-term all-cause mortality predictor in COPD. This body of work also suggests that combined with different groups of demographic/clinical variables, ProADM provides significant incremental long-term mortality prediction power relative to the groups of variables alone. Additionally, the literature contains indications that ProADM may be a global cardiopulmonary stress marker, potentially supplying prognostic information when cardiopulmonary exercise testing results such as 6-min walk distance are unavailable due to time or other resource constraints or to a patient's advanced disease. Prospective, randomized, controlled interventional studies are needed to demonstrate whether ProADM use in risk-based guidance of site-of-care, monitoring, and treatment decisions improves clinical, quality-of-life, or pharmacoeconomic outcomes in patients with COPD. PMID:25252756

  12. Extended duration orbiter medical project variability of blood pressure and heart rate (STS-50/USML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Boettcher, Sheila W.

    1994-01-01

    Decreases in arterial baroreflex function after space flight may be related to changes in blood pressure and heart rate patterns during flight. Ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate were measured for 24 hours, in fourteen astronauts on two occasions before flight, two to three occasions in flight, and 2 days after landing on Shuttle missions lasting 4 to 14 days. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded every 20minutes during awake periods and every 30 minutes during sleep. In pre- and postflight studies, the 24-hour ambulatory measurements were followed by studies of carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses. Carotid baroreceptors were stimulated using a sequence of neck pressure and suction from +40 to -65 mmHg.

  13. Temporal profiles of blood pressure, circulating nitric oxide, and adrenomedullin as predictors of clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    SERRANO-PONZ, MARTA; RODRIGO-GASQUÉ, CARMEN; SILES, EVA; MARTÍNEZ-LARA, ESTHER; OCHOA-CALLEJERO, LAURA; MARTÍNEZ, ALFREDO

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains an important health and social challenge. The present study investigated whether blood pressure (BP) parameters and circulating levels of nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and adrenomedullin (AM) may predict clinical outcomes of stroke. Patients (n=76) diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke were admitted to the stroke unit and clinical history data and monitored parameters were recorded. Blood plasma was collected at days 1, 2, and 7 to measure NOx and AM levels. Infarct volume, neurological severity [on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)], and functional prognosis (on the Rankin scale) were measured as clinical outcomes. Patients with higher BP had more severe symptoms (NIHSS >3; P<0.01) and BP variability predicted neurological severity and growth of infarct volume. NOx values were significantly lower in stroke patients than in healthy controls (P<0.01). An increase in NOx levels from day 1 to day 2 was beneficial for the patients as measured by NIHSS at 7 days and 3 months, and by Rankin at 3 months [odds ratio (OR), 0.91] whereas a steep increase from day 2 to day 7 was detrimental and associated with an increase in infarct volume (OR, 35.3). AM levels were significantly higher in patients at day 1 and 2 than in healthy individuals (P<0.01) and these levels returned to normal at day 7. Patients with high AM levels at day 2 had significantly higher NIHSS scores measured at day 1 (P<0.05) and 7 (P<0.01). A receiving operating characteristic curve analysis identified that AM levels at day 2 of >522.13 pg/ml predicted increased neurological severity at day 7 (area under the curve=0.721). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that AM levels at day 2 predicted increased neurological severity at 7 days and at 3 months. BP parameters and changing levels for NOx and AM predicted long-term clinical outcomes as measured by infarct volume, neurological severity scale, and functional prognosis. PMID:27035412

  14. Temporal profiles of blood pressure, circulating nitric oxide, and adrenomedullin as predictors of clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Ponz, Marta; Rodrigo-Gasqué, Carmen; Siles, Eva; Martínez-Lara, Esther; Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-05-01

    Stroke remains an important health and social challenge. The present study investigated whether blood pressure (BP) parameters and circulating levels of nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and adrenomedullin (AM) may predict clinical outcomes of stroke. Patients (n=76) diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke were admitted to the stroke unit and clinical history data and monitored parameters were recorded. Blood plasma was collected at days 1, 2, and 7 to measure NOx and AM levels. Infarct volume, neurological severity [on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)], and functional prognosis (on the Rankin scale) were measured as clinical outcomes. Patients with higher BP had more severe symptoms (NIHSS >3; P<0.01) and BP variability predicted neurological severity and growth of infarct volume. NOx values were significantly lower in stroke patients than in healthy controls (P<0.01). An increase in NOx levels from day 1 to day 2 was beneficial for the patients as measured by NIHSS at 7 days and 3 months, and by Rankin at 3 months [odds ratio (OR), 0.91] whereas a steep increase from day 2 to day 7 was detrimental and associated with an increase in infarct volume (OR, 35.3). AM levels were significantly higher in patients at day 1 and 2 than in healthy individuals (P<0.01) and these levels returned to normal at day 7. Patients with high AM levels at day 2 had significantly higher NIHSS scores measured at day 1 (P<0.05) and 7 (P<0.01). A receiving operating characteristic curve analysis identified that AM levels at day 2 of >522.13 pg/ml predicted increased neurological severity at day 7 (area under the curve=0.721). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that AM levels at day 2 predicted increased neurological severity at 7 days and at 3 months. BP parameters and changing levels for NOx and AM predicted long‑term clinical outcomes as measured by infarct volume, neurological severity scale, and functional prognosis. PMID:27035412

  15. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites present in human blood document individual physiological states influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we performed nontargeted, quantitative metabolomics analysis in blood of 15 young (29 ± 4 y of age) and 15 elderly (81 ± 7 y of age) individuals. Coefficients of variation (CV = SD/mean) were obtained for 126 blood metabolites of all 30 donors. Fifty-five RBC-enriched metabolites, for which metabolomics studies have been scarce, are highlighted here. We found 14 blood compounds that show remarkable age-related increases or decreases; they include 1,5-anhydroglucitol, dimethyl-guanosine, acetyl-carnosine, carnosine, ophthalmic acid, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine, N-acetyl-arginine, N6-acetyl-lysine, pantothenate, citrulline, leucine, isoleucine, NAD+, and NADP+. Six of them are RBC-enriched, suggesting that RBC metabolomics is highly valuable for human aging research. Age differences are partly explained by a decrease in antioxidant production or increasing inefficiency of urea metabolism among the elderly. Pearson’s coefficients demonstrated that some age-related compounds are correlated, suggesting that aging affects them concomitantly. Although our CV values are mostly consistent with those CVs previously published, we here report previously unidentified CVs of 51 blood compounds. Compounds having moderate to high CV values (0.4–2.5) are often modified. Compounds having low CV values, such as ATP and glutathione, may be related to various diseases because their concentrations are strictly controlled, and changes in them would compromise health. Thus, human blood is a rich source of information about individual metabolic differences. PMID:27036001

  16. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences.

    PubMed

    Chaleckis, Romanas; Murakami, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-04-19

    Metabolites present in human blood document individual physiological states influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we performed nontargeted, quantitative metabolomics analysis in blood of 15 young (29 ± 4 y of age) and 15 elderly (81 ± 7 y of age) individuals. Coefficients of variation (CV = SD/mean) were obtained for 126 blood metabolites of all 30 donors. Fifty-five RBC-enriched metabolites, for which metabolomics studies have been scarce, are highlighted here. We found 14 blood compounds that show remarkable age-related increases or decreases; they include 1,5-anhydroglucitol, dimethyl-guanosine, acetyl-carnosine, carnosine, ophthalmic acid, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine,N-acetyl-arginine,N6-acetyl-lysine, pantothenate, citrulline, leucine, isoleucine, NAD(+), and NADP(+) Six of them are RBC-enriched, suggesting that RBC metabolomics is highly valuable for human aging research. Age differences are partly explained by a decrease in antioxidant production or increasing inefficiency of urea metabolism among the elderly. Pearson's coefficients demonstrated that some age-related compounds are correlated, suggesting that aging affects them concomitantly. Although our CV values are mostly consistent with those CVs previously published, we here report previously unidentified CVs of 51 blood compounds. Compounds having moderate to high CV values (0.4-2.5) are often modified. Compounds having low CV values, such as ATP and glutathione, may be related to various diseases because their concentrations are strictly controlled, and changes in them would compromise health. Thus, human blood is a rich source of information about individual metabolic differences. PMID:27036001

  17. Integration of noninvasive prenatal prediction of fetal blood group into clinical prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Frederik Banch

    2014-05-01

    Incompatibility of red blood cell blood group antigens between a pregnant woman and her fetus can cause maternal immunization and, consequently, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Noninvasive prenatal testing of cell-free fetal DNA can be used to assess the risk of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn to fetuses of immunized women. Prediction of the fetal RhD type has been very successful and is now integrated into clinical practice to assist in the management of the pregnancies of RhD immunized women. In addition, noninvasive prediction of the fetal RhD type can be applied to guide targeted prenatal prophylaxis, thus avoiding unnecessary exposure to anti-D in pregnant women. The analytical aspect of noninvasive fetal RHD typing is very robust and accurate, and its routine utilization has demonstrated high sensitivities for fetal RHD detection. A high compliance with administering anti-D is essential for obtaining a clinical effect. Noninvasive fetal typing of RHC/c, RHE/e, and KEL may become more widely used in the future. PMID:24431264

  18. Variability sensitivity of dynamic texture based recognition in clinical CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitt, Roland; Razzaque, Sharif; Lowell, Jeffrey; Aylward, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic texture recognition using a database of template models has recently shown promising results for the task of localizing anatomical structures in Ultrasound video. In order to understand its clinical value, it is imperative to study the sensitivity with respect to inter-patient variability as well as sensitivity to acquisition parameters such as Ultrasound probe angle. Fully addressing patient and acquisition variability issues, however, would require a large database of clinical Ultrasound from many patients, acquired in a multitude of controlled conditions, e.g., using a tracked transducer. Since such data is not readily attainable, we advocate an alternative evaluation strategy using abdominal CT data as a surrogate. In this paper, we describe how to replicate Ultrasound variabilities by extracting subvolumes from CT and interpreting the image material as an ordered sequence of video frames. Utilizing this technique, and based on a database of abdominal CT from 45 patients, we report recognition results on an organ (kidney) recognition task, where we try to discriminate kidney subvolumes/videos from a collection of randomly sampled negative instances. We demonstrate that (1) dynamic texture recognition is relatively insensitive to inter-patient variation while (2) viewing angle variability needs to be accounted for in the template database. Since naively extending the template database to counteract variability issues can lead to impractical database sizes, we propose an alternative strategy based on automated identification of a small set of representative models.

  19. An in vivo model of double-unit cord blood transplantation that correlates with clinical engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Eldjerou, Lamis K.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Baisre-de Leon, Ada; He, Mai; Arcila, Maria E.; Heller, Glenn; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Moore, Malcolm A.

    2010-01-01

    Double-unit cord blood transplantation (DCBT) appears to enhance engraftment despite sustained hematopoiesis usually being derived from a single unit. To investigate DCBT biology, in vitro and murine models were established using cells from 39 patient grafts. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34+ cells from each unit alone and in DCB combination were assessed for colony-forming cell and cobblestone area-forming cell potential, and multilineage engraftment in NOD/SCID/IL2R-γnull mice. In DCB assays, the contribution of each unit was measured by quantitative short tandem repeat region analysis. There was no correlation between colony-forming cell (n = 10) or cobblestone area-forming cell (n = 9) numbers and clinical engraftment, and both units contributed to DCB cocultures. In MNC transplantations in NOD/SCID/IL2R-γnull mice, each unit engrafted alone, but MNC DCBT demonstrated single-unit dominance that correlated with clinical engraftment in 18 of 21 cases (86%, P < .001). In contrast, unit dominance and clinical correlation were lost with CD34+ DCBT (n = 11). However, add-back of CD34− to CD34+ cells (n = 20) restored single-unit dominance with the dominant unit correlating not with clinical engraftment but also with the origin of the CD34− cells in all experiments. Thus, unit dominance is an in vivo phenomenon probably associated with a graft-versus-graft immune interaction mediated by CD34− cells. PMID:20587781

  20. Intra-subject variability of snoring sounds in relation to body position, sleep stage, and blood oxygen level.

    PubMed

    Azarbarzin, Ali; Moussavi, Zahra

    2013-04-01

    In a multidimensional feature space, the snoring sounds can extend from a very compact cluster to highly distinct clusters. In this study, we investigated the cause of snoring sound's variation within the snorers. It is known that a change in body position and sleep stage can affect snoring during sleep but it is unclear whether positional, sleep state, and blood oxygen level variations cause the snoring sounds to have different characteristics, and if it does how significant that effect would be. We extracted 12 characteristic features from snoring sound segments of 57 snorers and transformed them into a 4-D feature space using principal component analysis (PCA). Then, they were grouped based on the body position (side, supine, and prone), sleep stage (NREM, REM, and Arousal), and blood oxygen level (Normal and Desaturation). The probability density function of the transformed features was calculated for each class of categorical variables. The distance between the class-densities were calculated to determine which of these parameters affects the snoring sounds significantly. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was run for each categorical variable. The results show that the positional change has the highest effect on the snoring sounds; it results in forming distinct clusters of snoring sounds. Also, sleep state and blood oxygen level variation have been found to moderately affect the snoring sounds. PMID:23269579

  1. Can we predict the presence of coronary lesions from blood pressure measurement? A new clinical method.

    PubMed

    El Tahlawi, Mohammad; Abdelbaset, Mohammad; Gouda, Mohammad; Hussein, Ikhlas

    2015-04-01

    The roles of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology have expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes. We aimed to find a simple, clinical, noninvasive method to predict atherosclerosis that leads to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to find a simple, clinical, noninvasive method to predict atherosclerosis that leads to the development of CAD. We included 100 cases that underwent coronary angiography in our center owing to different indications. The blood pressure in all cases was measured by two different observers. The oscillatory systolic blood pressure (OSBP) was defined as the point at which the mercury began to oscillate to a minimum level of 1 mm Hg. The auscultatory systolic blood pressure (AUSBP) was defined as the first Korotkoff sound. The difference between OSBP and AUSBP was calculated and called the oscillatory gap (OG). The correlation between the OG and the presence of coronary lesion in coronary angiography was statistically calculated. The study populations had a mean age of 57.3±9 years. The mean±s.d. OG was 14.44±10.44. There was a highly significantly positive correlation between the OG and the presence of coronary artery lesions (r=0.399 and P-value <0.000). There was also a significantly positive correlation between the presence of hypertension and the OG (r=0.376 and P-value <0.000). The difference between OSBP and AUSBP could be used as a simple method to detect atherosclerotic arterial changes. This method could indicate the degree of arterial stiffness. There was a significantly positive correlation between this new indicator of arterial stiffness and the presence of CAD. Any patient with a wide gap between OSBP and AUSBP should be treated early with antihypertensive drugs and statins before the development of CAD. PMID:25567772

  2. HIV-1 Genetic Variability in Cuba and Implications for Transmission and Clinical Progression.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Madeline; Machado, Liuber Y; Díaz, Héctor; Ruiz, Nancy; Romay, Dania; Silva, Eladio

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Serological and molecular HIV-1 studies in Cuba have shown very low prevalence of seropositivity, but an increasing genetic diversity attributable to introduction of many HIV-1 variants from different areas, exchange of such variants among HIV-positive people with several coinciding routes of infection and other epidemiologic risk factors in the seropositive population. The high HIV-1 genetic variability observed in Cuba has possible implications for transmission and clinical progression. OBJECTIVE Study genetic variability for the HIV-1 env, gag and pol structural genes in Cuba; determine the prevalence of B and non-B subtypes according to epidemiologic and behavioral variables and determine whether a relationship exists between genetic variability and transmissibility, and between genetic variability and clinical disease progression in people living with HIV/AIDS. METHODS Using two molecular assays (heteroduplex mobility assay and nucleic acid sequencing), structural genes were characterized in 590 people with HIV-1 (480 men and 110 women), accounting for 3.4% of seropositive individuals in Cuba as of December 31, 2013. Nonrandom sampling, proportional to HIV prevalence by province, was conducted. Relationships between molecular results and viral factors, host characteristics, and patients' clinical, epidemiologic and behavioral variables were studied for molecular epidemiology, transmission, and progression analyses. RESULTS Molecular analysis of the three HIV-1 structural genes classified 297 samples as subtype B (50.3%), 269 as non-B subtypes (45.6%) and 24 were not typeable. Subtype B prevailed overall and in men, mainly in those who have sex with men. Non-B subtypes were prevalent in women and heterosexual men, showing multiple circulating variants and recombinant forms. Sexual transmission was the predominant form of infection for all. B and non-B subtypes were encountered throughout Cuba. No association was found between subtypes and

  3. Clinical review: Canadian National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products - Massive Transfusion Consensus Conference 2011: report of the panel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In June 2011 the Canadian National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products sponsored an international consensus conference on transfusion and trauma. A panel of 10 experts and two external advisors reviewed the current medical literature and information presented at the conference by invited international speakers and attendees. The Consensus Panel addressed six specific questions on the topic of blood transfusion in trauma. The questions focused on: ratio-based blood resuscitation in trauma patients; the impact of survivorship bias in current research conclusions; the value of nonplasma coagulation products; the role of protocols for delivery of urgent transfusion; the merits of traditional laboratory monitoring compared with measures of clot viscoelasticity; and opportunities for future research. Key findings include a lack of evidence to support the use of 1:1:1 blood component ratios as the standard of care, the importance of early use of tranexamic acid, the expected value of an organized response plan, and the recommendation for an integrated approach that includes antifibrinolytics, rapid release of red blood cells, and a foundation ratio of blood components adjusted by results from either traditional coagulation tests or clot viscoelasticity or both. The present report is intended to provide guidance to practitioners, hospitals, and policy-makers. PMID:22188866

  4. Rapid identification of Candida species in blood cultures by a clinically useful PCR method.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, J H; Nolte, F S; Morrison, C J

    1997-01-01

    Widespread use of fluconazole for the prophylaxis and treatment of candidiasis has led to a reduction in the number of cases of candidemia caused by Candida albicans but has also resulted in the emergence of candidemias caused by innately fluconazole-resistant, non-C. albicans Candida species. Given the fulminant and rapidly fatal outcome of acute disseminated candidiasis, rapid identification of newly emerging Candida species in blood culture is critical for the implementation of appropriately targeted antifungal drug therapy. Therefore, we used a PCR-based assay to rapidly identify Candida species from positive blood culture bottles. This assay used fungus-specific, universal primers for DNA amplification and species-specific probes to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, or C. glabrata amplicons. It also used a simpler and more rapid (1.5-h) sample preparation technique than those described previously and used detergent, heat, and mechanical breakage to recover Candida species DNA from blood cultures. A simple and rapid (3.5-h) enzyme immunosorbent assay (EIA)-based format was then used for amplicon detection. One hundred fifty blood culture bottles, including 73 positive blood culture bottle sets (aerobic and anaerobic) from 31 patients with candidemia, were tested. The combined PCR and EIA methods (PCR-EIA) correctly identified all Candida species in 73 blood culture bottle sets, including bottles containing bacteria coisolated with yeasts and 3 cultures of samples from patients with mixed candidemias originally identified as single-species infections by routine phenotypic identification methods. Species identification time was reduced from a mean of 3.5 days by routine phenotypic methods to 7 h by the PCR-EIA method. No false-positive results were obtained for patients with bacteremias (n = 18), artificially produced non-Candida fungemias (n = 3), or bottles with no growth (n = 20). Analytical sensitivity was 1 cell per 2-microl

  5. A clinical method for mapping and quantifying blood stasis in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Vu, Vi; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Pérez Del Villar, Candelas; Rodríguez-López, Sara; Benito, Yolanda; Borja, María-Guadalupe; Pastor-Escuredo, David; Yotti, Raquel; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Kahn, Andrew M; Ibáñez, Borja; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; May-Newman, Karen; Bermejo, Javier; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2016-07-26

    In patients at risk of intraventrcular thrombosis, the benefits of chronic anticoagulation therapy need to be balanced with the pro-hemorrhagic effects of therapy. Blood stasis in the cardiac chambers is a recognized risk factor for intracardiac thrombosis and potential cardiogenic embolic events. In this work, we present a novel flow image-based method to assess the location and extent of intraventricular stasis regions inside the left ventricle (LV) by digital processing flow-velocity images obtained either by phase-contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) or 2D color-Doppler velocimetry (echo-CDV). This approach is based on quantifying the distribution of the blood Residence Time (TR) from time-resolved blood velocity fields in the LV. We tested the new method in illustrative examples of normal hearts, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and one patient before and after the implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The method allowed us to assess in-vivo the location and extent of the stasis regions in the LV. Original metrics were developed to integrate flow properties into simple scalars suitable for a robust and personalized assessment of the risk of thrombosis. From a clinical perspective, this work introduces the new paradigm that quantitative flow dynamics can provide the basis to obtain subclinical markers of intraventricular thrombosis risk. The early prediction of LV blood stasis may result in decrease strokes by appropriate use of anticoagulant therapy for the purpose of primary and secondary prevention. It may also have a significant impact on LVAD device design and operation set-up. PMID:26680013

  6. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  7. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Hrv, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  8. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  9. The Effect of Chance Variability in Blood Pressure Readings on the Decision Making of General Practitioners: An Internet-Based Case Vignette Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Marshall, Tom; Gill, Paramjit

    2012-01-01

    Background Guidelines for the management of blood pressure (BP) in primary care generally suggest that decisions be made on the basis of specific threshold values (e.g. BP 140/90 mmHg); but this fails to adequately accommodate a common cause of variation – the play of chance. Objective To determine the impact of chance variability in BP readings on the clinical decision making of general practitioners (GPs) regarding anti-hypertensive treatment and cardiovascular risk management. Method We used an internet based study design, where 109 GPs were assigned to manage one of eight case vignettes (guidelines would recommend treatment for only one of the eight) and presented with blood pressure readings that were randomly selected from an underlying population. Results Seventeen (15.6%, 17/109) GPs consulted the vignette for whom treatment was recommended, but only 7/17 (41.2%) GPs prescribed treatment, whereas 14/92 (15.2%) GPs prescribed medication to the other vignettes. When deciding to follow-up a vignette GPs were influenced by threshold values for systolic and diastolic BP, but not by the overall cardiovascular risk. If the first reading was a low BP (systolic <140, diastolic <90) GPs were highly likely to discharge the vignette and follow-up a high BP reading (diastolic >90 or systolic BP≥140). Similar factors predicted the decision to prescribe a drug, although the vignette’s cardiovascular risk (>20%) was now statistically significant (p = 0.03). Conclusions GP decision making, whilst generally consistent with guidelines, appears to be compromised by chance variation leading to under and over treatment. Interventions to adequately accommodate chance variability into clinical decision making are required. PMID:23133591

  10. Coupled variable selection for regression modeling of complex treatment patterns in a clinical cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Schmidtmann, I; Elsäßer, A; Weinmann, A; Binder, H

    2014-12-30

    For determining a manageable set of covariates potentially influential with respect to a time-to-event endpoint, Cox proportional hazards models can be combined with variable selection techniques, such as stepwise forward selection or backward elimination based on p-values, or regularized regression techniques such as component-wise boosting. Cox regression models have also been adapted for dealing with more complex event patterns, for example, for competing risks settings with separate, cause-specific hazard models for each event type, or for determining the prognostic effect pattern of a variable over different landmark times, with one conditional survival model for each landmark. Motivated by a clinical cancer registry application, where complex event patterns have to be dealt with and variable selection is needed at the same time, we propose a general approach for linking variable selection between several Cox models. Specifically, we combine score statistics for each covariate across models by Fisher's method as a basis for variable selection. This principle is implemented for a stepwise forward selection approach as well as for a regularized regression technique. In an application to data from hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the coupled stepwise approach is seen to facilitate joint interpretation of the different cause-specific Cox models. In conditional survival models at landmark times, which address updates of prediction as time progresses and both treatment and other potential explanatory variables may change, the coupled regularized regression approach identifies potentially important, stably selected covariates together with their effect time pattern, despite having only a small number of events. These results highlight the promise of the proposed approach for coupling variable selection between Cox models, which is particularly relevant for modeling for clinical cancer registries with their complex event patterns. PMID:25345575

  11. The design and rationale of a multi-center clinical trial comparing two strategies for control of systolic blood pressure: The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is an important public health concern because it is highly prevalent and a risk factor for adverse health outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, decompensated heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and decline in cognitive function. Observational studies show a progressive increase in risk associated with blood pressure above 115/75 mm Hg. Prior research has shown that reducing elevated systolic blood pressure lowers the risk of subsequent clinical complications from cardiovascular disease. However, the optimal systolic blood pressure to reduce blood pressure-related adverse outcomes is unclear, and the benefit of treating to a level of systolic blood pressure well below 140 mm Hg has not been proven in a large, definitive clinical trial. Purpose To describe the design considerations of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) and the baseline characteristics of trial participants. Methods SPRINT is a multi-center, randomized, controlled trial that compares two strategies for treating systolic blood pressure: one targets the standard target of <140 mm Hg, and the other targets a more intensive target of <120 mm Hg. Enrollment focused on volunteers of age ≥50 years (no upper limit) with an average baseline systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg and evidence of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, 10-year Framingham cardiovascular disease risk score ≥15%, or age ≥75 years. SPRINT recruitment also targeted three pre-specified subgroups: participants with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73m2), participants with a history of cardiovascular disease, and participants 75 years of age or older. The primary outcome is first occurrence of a myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, heart failure, or cardiovascular disease death. Secondary outcomes include all-cause mortality, decline in kidney function or development of end-stage renal disease

  12. Blood-Brain Barrier Experiments with Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Han, Hyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of study was to evaluate the feasibility of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images of the rat obtained using a 1.5T MR machine in several blood-brain barrier (BBB) experiments. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. MR images were obtained using a clinical 1.5T MR machine. A microcatheter was introduced via the femoral artery to the carotid artery. Normal saline (group 1, n = 4), clotted autologous blood (group 2, n = 4), triolein emulsion (group 3, n = 4), and oleic acid emulsion (group 4, n = 4) were infused into the carotid artery through a microcatheter. Conventional and diffusion-weighted images, the apparent coefficient map, perfusion-weighted images, and contrast-enhanced MR images were obtained. Brain tissue was obtained and triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining was performed in group 2. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran images and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) studies were performed in group 4. Results The MR images in group 1 were of good quality. The MR images in group 2 revealed typical findings of acute cerebral infarction. Perfusion defects were noted on the perfusion-weighted images. The MR images in group 3 showed vasogenic edema and contrast enhancement, representing vascular damage. The rats in group 4 had vasogenic edema on the MR images and leakage of dextran on the FITC-labeled dextran image, representing increased vascular permeability. The immune reaction was decreased on the EBA study. Conclusion Clinical 1.5T MR images using a rat depicted many informative results in the present study. These results can be used in further researches of the BBB using combined clinical MR machines and immunohistochemical examinations. PMID:20379473

  13. A preliminary report relating frequency of vaginal intercourse to heart rate variability, Valsalva ratio, blood pressure, and cohabitation status.

    PubMed

    Brody, S; Veit, R; Rau, H

    2000-04-01

    The relationship between recalled frequency of penile-vaginal intercourse (FSI) and resting heart rate variability (HRV; an index of parasympathetic tone), resting diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) response to the Valsalva maneuver was examined in 51 healthy adults aged 20-47 (subjects scoring above the 86th percentile on the Lie scale of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) were excluded). As hypothesized, greater HRV and lower DBP were both associated with greater FSI (but not masturbation or non-coital sex with a partner) in cohabiting subjects, but not in non-cohabiting subjects. Valsalva ratio was unrelated to sexual behavior. Results are discussed in terms of both the modulating role of blood pressure on a number of psychological functions and the role of parasympathetic tone in HRV, FSI, and possibly pair-bonding. PMID:10725567

  14. Interpretable Probabilistic Latent Variable Models for Automatic Annotation of Clinical Text

    PubMed Central

    Kotov, Alexander; Hasan, Mehedi; Carcone, April; Dong, Ming; Naar-King, Sylvie; BroganHartlieb, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    We propose Latent Class Allocation (LCA) and Discriminative Labeled Latent Dirichlet Allocation (DL-LDA), two novel interpretable probabilistic latent variable models for automatic annotation of clinical text. Both models separate the terms that are highly characteristic of textual fragments annotated with a given set of labels from other non-discriminative terms, but rely on generative processes with different structure of latent variables. LCA directly learns class-specific multinomials, while DL-LDA breaks them down into topics (clusters of semantically related words). Extensive experimental evaluation indicates that the proposed models outperform Naïve Bayes, a standard probabilistic classifier, and Labeled LDA, a state-of-the-art topic model for labeled corpora, on the task of automatic annotation of transcripts of motivational interviews, while the output of the proposed models can be easily interpreted by clinical practitioners. PMID:26958214

  15. Effects of calcium channel blocker-based combinations on intra-individual blood pressure variability: post hoc analysis of the COPE trial.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Seiji; Ogihara, Toshio; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Rakugi, Hiromi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Saruta, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) variability is an important predictor of stroke. However, which antihypertensive drug combination is better at reducing visit-to-visit BP variability and therefore at reducing stroke incidence remains uncertain. We have previously reported that the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker benidipine combined with a β-blocker appeared to be less beneficial in reducing the risk of stroke than a combination of benidipine and thiazide. Here, we further compare the visit-to-visit BP variability among three benidipine-based regimens, namely angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), β-blocker and thiazide combinations. The present post hoc analysis included 2983 patients without cardiovascular events or death during the first 18 months after randomization. We compared the BP variability (defined as the s.d. and the coefficient of variation (CV)), maximum systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) of the clinic mean on-treatment BPs obtained at 6-month intervals, starting 6 months after the treatment initiation, among the 3 treatments (ARB, n=1026; β-blocker, n=966; thiazide, n=991). During the first 6-36 months after randomization, both the s.d. and CV-BPs were lower in the benidipine-thiazide group than in the benidipine-β-blocker group (s.d.-SBP, P=0.019; s.d.-DBP, P=0.030; CV-SBP, P=0.012; CV-DBP, P=0.022). The s.d. and CV in the ARB group did not reach statistical significance compared with the other two groups. The maximum BPs did not differ among the three treatments. These findings suggest that the benidipine-thiazide combination may reduce visit-to-visit BP variability more than the benidipine-β-blocker combination. PMID:26490089

  16. Variability in platelet responses to collagen--comparison between whole blood perfusions, traditional platelet function tests and PFA-100.

    PubMed

    Lepäntalo, A; Beer, J H; Siljander, P; Syrjälä, M; Lassila, R

    2001-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the results obtained in platelet function tests and whole blood perfusions are associated with those in platelet function analyser (PFA)-100. We used collagen type I monomers and fibrils to analyse the distinct roles of glycoprotein (GP) Ia/IIa and other collagen receptors in flowing blood under a high shear rate (1600/s) and in aggregation studies. Also, anticoagulation [citrate vs. D-phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1 arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK)] was varied to enhance the functions of GP Ia/IIa, since it has been shown that the cation-poor environment of citrated blood impairs GP Ia/IIa-dependent platelet recruitment. Large interindividual variability (45-fold) was detected in deposition of platelets in whole blood perfusions over collagen monomers, whereas this variation was only fourfold in fibrils. In PFA, this variation was reduced to 2.5-fold. However, platelet deposition on monomers is associated with epinephrine-enhanced PFA (r=-.49, P<.03), whereas platelet deposition on fibrils is correlated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-enhanced PFA (r=-.47, P<.05), suggesting a distinct synergism between epinephrine and monomers (GP Ia/IIa) as well as ADP with fibrils (other collagen receptors). Donors with 807 C/C polymorphism of GP Ia (n=14) had longer lag phase in aggregation experiments compared with C/T (n=7) both by monomers and fibrils (P<.04), but these polymorphisms with their mild impact on GP Ia/IIa activity did not markedly differ in other tests. In conclusion, the results obtained in perfusion studies and PFA experiments correlated, but PFA fails to reveal the large-scale variability related to collagen-induced platelet responses. PMID:11457470

  17. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M.; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Darton, Thomas C.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    lower limit of detection equal to 0.3 CFU/ml blood, and it performed at least as well as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood) of clinical specimens despite using half the volume of blood. The findings warrant its further study in endemic populations with a potential use as a novel diagnostic which fills the present gap of paratyphoid diagnostics. PMID:26930553

  18. [Primary immunodeficiency in adults: common variable immunodeficiency--clinical manifestations, immunological and genetic defects, treatment].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The most prevalent form of primary immunodeficiency with a total defect of antibody production in adults is common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Compared to other forms of primary immunodeficiency, CVID is characterized by later onset of clinical manifestations represented by infectious, autoimmune and malignant diseases. To avoid development of complications and patient incapacitation, it is necessary to make an early diagnosis and initiate regular replacement therapy with intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:22185026

  19. Assessment of published models and prognostic variables in epithelial ovarian cancer at Mayo Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Andrea Wahner; Hawthorne, Kieran M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Goergen, Krista M.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Cliby, William A.; Keeney, Gary L.; Visscher, Dan W.; Tarabishy, Yaman; Oberg, Ann L.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Maurer, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is an aggressive disease in which first line therapy consists of a surgical staging/debulking procedure and platinum based chemotherapy. There is significant interest in clinically applicable, easy to use prognostic tools to estimate risk of recurrence and overall survival. In this study we used a large prospectively collected cohort of women with EOC to validate currently published models and assess prognostic variables. Methods Women with invasive ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer diagnosed between 2000-2011 and prospectively enrolled into the Mayo Clinic Ovarian Cancer registry were identified. Demographics and known prognostic markers as well as epidemiologic exposure variables were abstracted from the medical record and collected via questionnaire. Six previously published models of overall and recurrence-free survival were assessed for external validity. In addition, predictors of outcome were assessed in our dataset. Results Previously published models validated with a range of c-statistics (0.587-0.827), though application of models containing variables not part of routine practice were somewhat limited by missing data; utilization of all applicable models and comparison of results is suggested. Examination of prognostic variables identified only the presence of ascites and ASA score to be independent predictors of prognosis in our dataset, albeit with marginal gain in prognostic information, after accounting for stage and debulking. Conclusions Existing prognostic models for newly diagnosed EOC showed acceptable calibration in our cohort for clinical application. However, modeling of prospective variables in our dataset reiterates that stage and debulking remain the most important predictors of prognosis in this setting. PMID:25620544

  20. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) examination on blood flow through a multiple stenosed artery with variable nanofluid viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Ijaz, S.

    2015-10-01

    The present theoretical model deals with the analysis of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity of a single wall carbon nanotube within the considered base fluid flowing through multiple stenosed arteries. A mathematical model is presented for the mild stenosis case and then solved by using symmetry boundary conditions to determine the exact solution of temperature, axial velocity and pressure gradient. The main hemodynamics due to multiple stenosis is also computed under the influence of a SWCNT. Numerical simulations are presented for the SWCNT with different values of nanoparticles volume fraction. The behavior of fluid flow for blood based SWCNT is discussed through graphs and streamlines.

  1. KINEMATIC VARIABLES AND BLOOD ACID-BASE STATUS IN THE ANALYSIS OF COLLEGIATE SWIMMERS’ ANAEROBIC CAPACITY

    PubMed Central

    Bielec, G.; Makar, P.; Laskowski, R.

    2013-01-01

    Short duration repeated maximal efforts are often used in swimming training to improve lactate tolerance, which gives swimmers the ability to maintain a high work rate for a longer period of time. The aim of the study was to examine the kinematics of swimming and its relation to the changes in blood acid-base status and potassium level. Seven collegiate swimmers, with at least 6 years of training experience, volunteered to participate in the study. The test consisted of 8 x 25 m front crawl performed with maximum effort. The rest period between repetitions was set to five seconds. Blood samples were taken from the fingertip at rest, after warm-up and in the 3rd minute after completion of the test. The swimming was recorded with a video recorder, for later analysis of time, velocity and technique (stroke index). Based on the swimming velocity results, the obtained curve can be divided into rapid decrease of velocity and relatively stable velocities. The breaking point of repetition in swimming velocity was assumed as the swimming velocity threshold and it was highly correlated with the decrease of the blood acid-base status (pH r=0.82, BE r=0.87, HCO3 - r=0.76; p<0.05 in all cases). There was no correlation between stroke index or fatigue index and blood acid-base status. Analysis of the swimming speed in the 8 x 25 m test seems to be helpful in evaluation of lactate tolerance (anaerobic capacity) in collegiate swimmers. PMID:24744491

  2. Prognostic Significance of the Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Clinical Practice: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, James; Riley, Richard; Martin, Una; Bayliss, Susan; McManus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND An exaggerated morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) may be associated with stroke and other cardiovascular events, but the threshold at which an MBPS becomes pathological is unclear. This study aimed to systematically review the existing literature and establish the most appropriate definition of pathological MBPS. METHODS A MEDLINE search strategy was adapted for a range of literature databases to identify all prospective studies relating an exaggerated MBPS to cardiovascular endpoints. Hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted and synthesized using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS The search strategy identified 2,964 unique articles, of which 17 were eligible for the study. Seven different definitions of MBPS were identified; the most common was a prewaking surge (mean blood pressure for 2 hours after wake-up minus mean blood pressure for 2 hours before wake-up; n = 6 studies). Summary meta-analysis gave no clear evidence that prewaking MBPS (defined by a predetermined threshold: >25–55mm Hg) was associated with all cardiovascular events (n = 2 studies; HR = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.39–2.28) or stroke (n = 2 studies; HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.92–1.71). However, using a continuous scale, which has more power to detect an association, there was evidence that a 10 mm Hg increase in MBPS was related to an increased risk of stroke (n = 3 studies; HR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.03–1.20). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that when measured and analyzed as a continuous variable, increasing levels of MBPS may be associated with increased risk of stroke. Large, protocol-driven individual patient data analyses are needed to accurately define this relationship further. PMID:25315474

  3. Clinical trial of blood-brain barrier disruption by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Canney, Michael; Vignot, Alexandre; Reina, Vincent; Beccaria, Kevin; Horodyckid, Catherine; Karachi, Carine; Leclercq, Delphine; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Capelle, Laurent; Cornu, Philippe; Sanson, Marc; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2016-06-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the delivery of systemically administered drugs to the brain. Methods to circumvent the BBB have been developed, but none are used in standard clinical practice. The lack of adoption of existing methods is due to procedural invasiveness, serious adverse effects, and the complications associated with performing such techniques coincident with repeated drug administration, which is customary in chemotherapeutic protocols. Pulsed ultrasound, a method for disrupting the BBB, was shown to effectively increase drug concentrations and to slow tumor growth in preclinical studies. We now report the interim results of an ultrasound dose-escalating phase 1/2a clinical trial using an implantable ultrasound device system, SonoCloud, before treatment with carboplatin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). The BBB of each patient was disrupted monthly using pulsed ultrasound in combination with systemically injected microbubbles. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated that the BBB was disrupted at acoustic pressure levels up to 1.1 megapascals without detectable adverse effects on radiologic (MRI) or clinical examination. Our preliminary findings indicate that repeated opening of the BBB using our pulsed ultrasound system, in combination with systemic microbubble injection, is safe and well tolerated in patients with recurrent GBM and has the potential to optimize chemotherapy delivery in the brain. PMID:27306666

  4. Replacing manual sphygmomanometers with automated blood pressure measurement in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G

    2014-01-01

    1. Conventional manual measurement of blood pressure (BP) in clinical practice is no longer considered to be the best method for evaluating a patient's BP status. Home BP and 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring are now recommended for the diagnosis and management of hypertension.  2. Recent studies provide an alternative to conventional office BP, namely automated office (AO) BP, which involves multiple BP readings taken with a fully automated device with the patient resting quietly alone. Automated office BP is preferable to routine manual office BP in that it exhibits improved accuracy and a stronger relationship to both ambulatory BP and target organ damage. 3. Having the patient alone eliminates conversation between the patient and the observer, a cause of 'white coat hypertension'. The use of an automated device improves accuracy, reduces digit preference, minimizes observer bias and facilitates the recording of multiple BP readings.  4. Comparative BP data obtained in clinical studies in both research settings and routine community practice support the use of a cut-off point of 135/85 mmHg for defining hypertension using AOBP, which is the same cut-off point currently recommended for awake ambulatory BP and home BP. 5. Reduction of the white coat response using AOBP should reduce the need to monitor patients with ambulatory BP and home BP after initiation of antihypertensive therapy. There is now sufficient evidence to consider replacing manual office BP with AOBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:23819734

  5. Blood stream infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii group in Japan - Epidemiological and clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Yuji; Yuki, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Kawana, Akihiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex, especially A. baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis, constitutes an important group of nosocomial pathogens; however, epidemiological or clinical characteristics and prognosis is limited in Japan. From 2009 to 2013, 47 blood stream infection cases resulting from A. baumannii group were reviewed at the National Defense Medical College, an 800-bed tertiary hospital. To determine the genospecies, further comparative nucleotide sequence analyses of the RNA polymerase b-subunit (rpoB) gene were performed. Sequence analysis of rpoB gene showed that 25 (49.0%), 17 (33.3%) and 5 (9.8%) cases were caused by A. baumannii, A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, respectively. The 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates of A. baumannii were 8.5% and 25.5%, respectively, and there were no significant differences between Acinetobacter species. Clinical characteristics were statistically insignificant. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species were detected in 3 cases (5.9%) with same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern and A. baumannii was less susceptible to amikacin and levofloxacin. In this study, the mortality and clinical characteristics were similar among A. baumannii group isolate cases despite some showing drug resistance. However, identification of Acinetobacter species helps to initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy in earlier treatment phase, because A. baumannii shows some drug resistance. PMID:26993173

  6. Implications of Variability in Clinical Bedside Swallowing Assessment Practices by Speech Language Pathologists.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Sue; Kruger, Samantha; Doeltgen, Sebastian; Tyler-Boltrek, Emma

    2016-10-01

    Speech language pathology (SLP) clinical bedside swallowing assessments (CBSA) are a cornerstone of quality care for patients in acute hospitals who have dysphagia. The CBSA informs clinical diagnosis and decisions regarding further instrumental assessment, and is used to develop a management plan and monitor progress. However, self-report and retrospective research shows that SLPs are highly variable in their use of assessment components considered by experts to be important for quality CBSA, casting doubt on the validity and reliability of CBSA. This prospective study describes the components included by SLPs when designing a standardised evidence based dysphagia assessment protocol for acute care patients and observed patterns of component use. The findings confirm that SLPs use the CBSA for multiple purposes beyond diagnosis of aspiration risk and dysphagia presence/severity. They are highly variable in their use of certain components, but also demonstrate consistent use of a core set. It is apparent that SLPs prioritise the application of clinical reasoning to tailor their CBSA to the patient over following a highly structured item-based protocol. The variability in component use likely reflects a complex clinical reasoning process that draws on a wide variety of information combined with expert knowledge as is also observed in many other medical specialties. Rather than promoting the standardisation of CBSA protocols that constrain SLP practice to strict item-based assessment protocols, consideration should be given to promoting the value and facilitating the clinical reasoning process that supports the utility of the CBSA for diagnosis, patient centred management and treatment planning. PMID:27405423

  7. Clinical laboratory comparison of the 10-ml isolator blood culture system with BACTEC radiometric blood culture media.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, J A; Manzella, J P; McConville, J H

    1984-10-01

    The efficiency of the 10-ml Isolator (E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.) for recovery of pathogens from blood was compared with that of BACTEC 6B and 7C media (Johnston Laboratories) by using 4,195 cultures from 1,662 patients. During the first phase of the study, BACTEC bottles were inoculated with 3 ml of blood; in the second phase, bottles were inoculated with 5 ml. The objectives were to compare results with similar blood volumes used for the detection of anaerobes as well as similar overall volumes and to determine the relative sensitivity of BACTEC media inoculated with the minimum and maximum volumes suggested by the manufacturer. From 180 patients, 391 significant isolates were recovered, 354 (91%) with the Isolator and 304 (78%) with the bottles. Isolators recovered 31 (15%) and 19 (18%) more pathogens overall than did the two-bottle system inoculated with 3 and 5 ml of blood, respectively, including 30 (36%) and 10 (34%) more Enterobacteriaceae. Recovery of anaerobes was greater in the BACTEC anaerobic medium, but only when its inoculum was increased to 5 ml. No significant differences existed between the two systems in pathogen detection times or detection of polymicrobic bacteremia. The Isolator contamination rate (8.3%) was approximately 4 times that of the bottles. The number of CFU of pathogen per milliliter of blood, blood volume sampled, and number of Isolators collected were more important than antimicrobial agent pretreatment in contributing to patient bacteremia of fungemia undetected by the Isolator. The Isolator appeared to be a practical alternative for recovery of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic pathogens from the blood. PMID:6386871

  8. Efficacy of Dragon's blood cream on wound healing: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Namjoyan, Foroogh; Kiashi, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Zahra Beigom; Saffari, Fatemeh; Makhmalzadeh, Behzad Sharif

    2016-01-01

    The blood-red sap of Dragon's blood has been used in folk medicine for fractures, wounds, inflammation, gastrointestinal disorders, rheumatism, blood circulation dysfunctions, and cancer. Existing in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of this herb on different mechanisms of healing shows strong potential of this sap in wound healing. This clinical trial study was designated to evaluate the wound healing effect of Dragon's blood on human wounds. Sixty patients, between the ages of 14-65 years, who were referred to remove their skin tag, were assigned to this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial and received either Dragon's blood or a placebo cream. They were visited on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 10th, 14th, and 20th day of the trial to check the process of healing and to measure the wound's surface. At the end of trial, there was a significant difference in the mean duration of wound healing between the two groups (p = 0.0001). The phenolic compounds and the alkaloid taspine, which exist in Dragon's-blood resin, are probably the main reasons for the wound healing property of this plant. Being natural accessible, safe, and affordable makes Dragon's blood cream, a good choice for addition to the wound healing armamentarium. Further studies on wounds with different causes and among larger populations are suggested to ensure the effectiveness and safety of Dragon's blood. PMID:26870678

  9. Efficacy of Dragon's blood cream on wound healing: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Namjoyan, Foroogh; Kiashi, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Zahra Beigom; Saffari, Fatemeh; Makhmalzadeh, Behzad Sharif

    2015-01-01

    The blood-red sap of Dragon's blood has been used in folk medicine for fractures, wounds, inflammation, gastrointestinal disorders, rheumatism, blood circulation dysfunctions, and cancer. Existing in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of this herb on different mechanisms of healing shows strong potential of this sap in wound healing. This clinical trial study was designated to evaluate the wound healing effect of Dragon's blood on human wounds. Sixty patients, between the ages of 14–65 years, who were referred to remove their skin tag, were assigned to this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial and received either Dragon's blood or a placebo cream. They were visited on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 10th, 14th, and 20th day of the trial to check the process of healing and to measure the wound's surface. At the end of trial, there was a significant difference in the mean duration of wound healing between the two groups (p = 0.0001). The phenolic compounds and the alkaloid taspine, which exist in Dragon's-blood resin, are probably the main reasons for the wound healing property of this plant. Being natural accessible, safe, and affordable makes Dragon's blood cream, a good choice for addition to the wound healing armamentarium. Further studies on wounds with different causes and among larger populations are suggested to ensure the effectiveness and safety of Dragon's blood. PMID:26870678

  10. Nonrepresentative PCR amplification of variable gene sequences in clinical specimens containing dilute, complex mixtures of microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C J; Jerse, A E; Cohen, M S; Cannon, J G; Seifert, H S

    1994-01-01

    PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the expression locus from Neisseria gonorrhoeae contained in urine sediments collected from experimentally infected human subjects produced two observations. First, different pilin sequences were obtained when separate aliquots of the same sample were amplified and sequenced. In contrast, the same pilin sequence was obtained when repeated amplifications were performed on individual colonies grown from the clinical samples. Second, mixed sequences (i.e., more than one nucleotide at variable positions in the pilin gene sequence) were observed in both the direct clinical isolates and individual cultures grown from the isolates. These results suggest that when clinical samples are directly examined by PCR amplification and sequencing, multiple amplifications may be required to detect sequence variants in the sample and minority variant sequences will not always be detected. Images PMID:7908674

  11. Audit of clinical-laboratory practices in haematology and blood transfusion at Muhimbili National Hospital in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Makubi, Abel N; Meda, Collins; Magesa, Alex; Minja, Peter; Mlalasi, Juliana; Salum, Zubeda; Kweka, Rumisha E; Rwehabura, James; Quaresh, Amrana; Magesa, Pius M; Robert, David; Makani, Julie; Kaaya, Ephata

    2012-10-01

    In Tanzania, there is paucity of data for monitoring laboratory medicine including haematology. This therefore calls for audits of practices in haematology and blood transfusion in order to provide appraise practice and devise strategies that would result in improved quality of health care services. This descriptive cross-sectional study which audited laboratory practice in haematology and blood transfusion at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) aimed at assessing the pre-analytical stage of laboratory investigations including laboratory request forms and handling specimen processing in the haematology laboratory and assessing the chain from donor selection, blood component processing to administration of blood during transfusion. A national standard checklist was used to audit the laboratory request forms (LRF), phlebotomists' practices on handling and assessing the from donor selection to administration 6f blood during transfusion. Both interview and observations were used. A total of 195 LRF were audited and 100% of had incomplete information such as patients' identification numbers, time sample ordered, reason for request, summary of clinical assessment and differential diagnoses. The labelling of specimens was poorly done by phlebotomists/clinicians in 82% of the specimens. Also 65% (132/202) of the blood samples delivered in the haematology laboratory did not contain the recommended volume of blood. There was no laboratory request form specific for ordering blood and there were no guidelines for indication of blood transfusion in the wards/ clinics. The blood transfusion laboratory section was not participating in external quality assessment and the hospital transfusion committee was not in operation. It is recommended that a referral hospital like MNH should have a transfusion committee to provide an active forum to facilitate communication between those involved with transfusion, monitor, coordinate and audit blood transfusion practices as per national

  12. Quality Control Methods for Optimal BCR-ABL1 Clinical Testing in Human Whole Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Stanoszek, Lauren M.; Crawford, Erin L.; Blomquist, Thomas M.; Warns, Jessica A.; Willey, Paige F.S.; Willey, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable breakpoint cluster region (BCR)–Abelson (ABL) 1 measurement is essential for optimal management of chronic myelogenous leukemia. There is a need to optimize quality control, sensitivity, and reliability of methods used to measure a major molecular response and/or treatment failure. The effects of room temperature storage time, different primers, and RNA input in the reverse transcription (RT) reaction on BCR-ABL1 and β-glucuronidase (GUSB) cDNA yield were assessed in whole blood samples mixed with K562 cells. BCR-ABL1 was measured relative to GUSB to control for sample loading, and each gene was measured relative to known numbers of respective internal standard molecules to control for variation in quality and quantity of reagents, thermal cycler conditions, and presence of PCR inhibitors. Clinical sample and reference material measurements with this test were concordant with results reported by other laboratories. BCR-ABL1 per 103 GUSB values were significantly reduced (P = 0.004) after 48-hour storage. Gene-specific primers yielded more BCR-ABL1 cDNA than random hexamers at each RNA input. In addition, increasing RNA inhibited the RT reaction with random hexamers but not with gene-specific primers. Consequently, the yield of BCR-ABL1 was higher with gene-specific RT primers at all RNA inputs tested, increasing to as much as 158-fold. We conclude that optimal measurement of BCR-ABL1 per 103 GUSB in whole blood is obtained when gene-specific primers are used in RT and samples are analyzed within 24 hours after blood collection. PMID:23541592

  13. Clinical non-invasive measurement of effective pulmonary capillary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Winter, S M

    1995-01-01

    Since traditional pulmonary function testing is centered on measurements of air flow and lung volume, a method to assess the pulmonary circulation might improve our ability to evaluate diseases that impact upon pulmonary hemodynamics. We have developed a PC based application that rapidly calculates pulmonary blood flow. Subjects rebreath a mixture of 10% argon and 3.5% freon for 20 seconds. Gas concentrations at the mouth are monitored by a clinical mass spectrometer and signals are acquired and processed with off-the-shelf hardware. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of this technique, patients with pulmonary artery catheters were assessed by standard thermodilution methods and the rebreathing test. Measurements using this non-invasive technology closely corelate with invasive thermodilution methods (r = 0.980) and show equivalent reproducibility (average standard error = 2.5%). This application of signal processing technology can extend the role of pulmonary function testing to include routine evaluation of the pulmonary circulation. PMID:8583166

  14. Blood lactate concentration after exposure to conducted energy weapons (including TASER® devices): is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2013-09-01

    In previous studies, blood lactate concentration (BLac) consistently increased in anesthetized animals and in human subjects after exposures to TASER(®) conducted energy weapons (CEWs). Some have suggested the increased BLac would have detrimental consequences. In the current review, the following are evaluated: (a) the nature of muscle contractions due to CEWs, (b) general aspects of increased BLac, (c) previous studies of conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and CEW exposures, and (d) BLac in disease states. On the basis of these analyses, one can conclude that BLac, per se (independent of acidemia), would not be clinically relevant immediately after short-duration CEW applications, due to the short time course of any increase. PMID:23605975

  15. Nutraceuticals and Blood Pressure Control: Results from Clinical Trials and Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Colletti, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Beyond the well-known effects on blood pressure (BP) of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean diets, a large number of studies has investigated the possible BP lowering effect of different dietary supplements and nutraceuticals, the most part of them being antioxidant agents with a high tolerability and safety profile. In particular relatively large body of evidence support the use of potassium, L-arginine, vitamin C, cocoa flavonoids, beetroot juice, coenzyme Q10, controlled-release melatonin, and aged garlic extract. However there is a need for data about the long-term safety of a large part of the above discussed products. Moreover further clinical research is advisable to identify between the available active nutraceuticals those with the best cost-effectiveness and risk-benefit ratio for a large use in general population with low-added cardiovascular risk related to uncomplicated hypertension. PMID:25788027

  16. Clinically meaningful blood pressure reductions with low intensity isometric handgrip exercise. A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hess, N Cl; Carlson, D J; Inder, J D; Jesulola, E; McFarlane, J R; Smart, N A

    2016-07-18

    There exists no examination of what is the minimum anti-hypertensive threshold intensity for isometric exercise training. Twenty two normotensive participants were randomly assigned to training intensities at either 5 % or 10 % of their maximal contraction. Twenty participants completed the study. Clinical meaningful, but not statistically significant, reductions in systolic blood pressure were observed in both 5 % and 10 % groups -4.04 mm Hg (95 % CI -8.67 to +0.59, p=0.08) and -5.62 mm Hg (95 % CI -11.5 to +0.29, p=0.06) respectively after 6 weeks training. No diastolic blood pressure reductions were observed in either 5 % -0.97 mm Hg (95 % CI -2.56 to +0.62, p=0.20) or 10 % MVC +1.8 mm Hg (95 % CI -1.29 to +4.89, p=0.22) groups respectively after training. In those unable to complete isometric exercise at the traditional 30 % intensity, our results suggest there is no difference between 5 and 10 % groups and based on the principle of regression to the mean, this could mean both interventions induce a similar placebo-effect. PMID:27070747

  17. The effect of the first office blood pressure reading on hypertension-related clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Oladipo, Idris; Ayoade, Adedokun

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the first office blood pressure reading (FBPR) on hypertension-related decisions was evaluated using blood pressure (BP) readings taken with the BpTRU BPM-100 device. BP readings were grouped into three pairs: (1) single readings (first and second readings), (2) computed average of three readings (one including and one excluding the first reading), and (3) computed average of five readings (one including and one excluding the first reading). Categorisation of BP readings under JNC-7 classes and distribution into < 140/90 and ≥ 140/90 mmHg groups were selected as parameters guiding hypertension-related decisions. Readings including FBPR had strong positive correlations to those excluding FBPR (Pearson's correlation coefficient ranged from 0.86-1.00). Also, FBPR-included and FBPR-excluded readings did not differ statistically in JNC-7 categorisation or distribution into < 140/90 or ≥ 140/90 mmHg groups. Our findings suggest that exclusion of FBPR may have no significant impact on hypertension-related clinical decisions. PMID:23044502

  18. Effects of genetic variation in H3K79 methylation regulatory genes on clinical blood pressure and blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nearly one-third of the United States adult population suffers from hypertension. Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), one of the most commonly used medications to treat hypertension, has variable efficacy. The renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) provides a mechanism for fine-tuning sodium excretion, and is a major regulator of blood pressure homeostasis. DOT1L, MLLT3, SIRT1, and SGK1 encode genes in a pathway that controls methylation of the histone H3 globular domain at lysine 79 (H3K79), thereby modulating expression of the ENaCα subunit. This study aimed to determine the role of variation in these regulatory genes on blood pressure response to HCTZ, and secondarily, untreated blood pressure. Methods We investigated associations between genetic variations in this candidate pathway and HCTZ blood pressure response in two separate hypertensive cohorts (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00246519 and NCT00005520). In a secondary, exploratory analysis, we measured associations between these same genetic variations and untreated blood pressure. Associations were measured by linear regression, with only associations with P ≤ 0.01 in one cohort and replication by P ≤ 0.05 in the other cohort considered significant. Results In one cohort, a polymorphism in DOT1L (rs2269879) was strongly associated with greater systolic (P = 0.0002) and diastolic (P = 0.0016) blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide in Caucasians. However, this association was not replicated in the other cohort. When untreated blood pressure levels were analyzed, we found directionally similar associations between a polymorphism in MLLT3 (rs12350051) and greater untreated systolic (P < 0.01 in both cohorts) and diastolic (P < 0.05 in both cohorts) blood pressure levels in both cohorts. However, when further replication was attempted in a third hypertensive cohort and in smaller, normotensive samples, significant associations were not observed. Conclusions Our data suggest polymorphisms in DOT1L, MLLT3

  19. Degradation profile and preliminary clinical testing of a resorbable device for ligation of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Aminlashgari, Nina; Höglund, Odd V; Borg, Niklas; Hakkarainen, Minna

    2013-06-01

    A resorbable device for ligation of blood vessels was developed and tested in vitro to reveal the degradation profile of the device and to predict the clinical performance in terms of adequate mechanical support during a healing period of 1week. In addition, preliminary clinical testing was performed that showed complete hemostasis and good tissue grip of renal arteries in five pigs. The device was made by injection molding of poly(glycolide-co-trimethylene carbonate) triblock copolymer, and it consisted of a case with a locking mechanism connected to a partly perforated flexible band. A hydrolytic degradation study was carried out for 7, 30 and 60days in water and buffer medium, following the changes in mass, water absorption, pH and mechanical properties. A new rapid matrix-free laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) method was developed for direct screening of degradation products released into the degradation medium. The combination of LDI-MS and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analyses enabled the comparison of the degradation product patterns in water and buffer medium. The identified degradation products were rich in trimethylene carbonate units, indicating preferential hydrolysis of amorphous regions where trimethylene units are located. The crystallinity of the material was doubled after 60days of hydrolysis, additionally confirming the preferential hydrolysis of trimethylene carbonate units and the enrichment of glycolide units in the remaining solid matrix. The mechanical performance of the perforated band was followed for the first week of hydrolysis and the results suggest that sufficient strength is retained during the healing time of the blood vessels. PMID:23438863

  20. Genetic variability of the pattern of night melatonin blood levels in relation to coat changes development in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Daniel; Malpaux, Benoit; Puechal, François; Thébault, René Gérard; de Rochambeau, Hubert; Chemineau, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    To assess the genetic variability in both the nocturnal increase pattern of melatonin concentration and photoresponsiveness in coat changes, an experiment on 422 Rex rabbits (from 23 males) raised under a constant light programme from birth was performed. The animals were sampled at 12 weeks of age, according to 4 periods over a year. Blood samples were taken 7 times during the dark phase and up to 1 h after the lighting began. Maturity of the fur was assessed at pelting. Heritability estimates of blood melatonin concentration (0.42, 0.17 and 0.11 at mid-night, 13 and 15 h after lights-out respectively) and strong genetic correlations between fur maturity and melatonin levels at the end of the dark phase (-0.64) indicates that (i) the variability of the nocturnal pattern of melatonin levels is under genetic control and (ii) the duration of the nocturnal melatonin increase is a genetic component of photoresponsiveness in coat changes. PMID:15040899

  1. Effects of color temperatures (Kelvin) of LED bulbs on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights.

    PubMed

    Olanrewaju, H A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2015-08-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) lighting is being used in the poultry industry to reduce energy usage in broiler production facilities. However, limited data are available comparing efficacy of different spectral distribution of LED bulbs on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights (>3 kg). The present study evaluated the effects of color temperature (Kelvin) of LED bulbs on blood physiological variables of heavy broilers in 2 trials with 4 replicates/trial. The study was a randomized complete block design. Four light treatments consisted of 3 LED light bulbs [2,700 K, (Warm-LED); 5,000 K, (Cool-LED-#1); 5,000 K, (Cool-LED-#2)] and incandescent light (ICD, standard) from 1 to 56 d age. A total of 960 1-day-old Ross × Ross 708 chicks (30 males/room 30 females/room) were equally and randomly distributed among 16 environmentally controlled rooms at 50% RH. Each of the 4 treatments was represented by 4 rooms. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. All treatment groups were provided the same diet. Venous blood samples were collected on d 21, 28, 42, and 56 for immediate analysis of selected physiological variables and plasma collection. In comparison with ICD, Cool-LED-#1 had greater (P < 0.05) effects on pH, partial pressure of CO₂(pCO₂), partial pressure of O₂(pO₂), saturated O₂(sO₂), and K⁺. However, all these acid-base changes remained within the normal venous acid-base homeostasis and physiological ranges. In addition, no effect of treatments was observed on HCO(3)(-), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Hb), Na⁺, Ca²⁺, Cl⁻, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (McHc), osmolality, and anion gap. Moreover, blood glucose concentrations were not affected by treatments. This study shows that the 3 LED light bulbs evaluated in this study may be suitable for replacement of ICD light sources in commercial poultry facilities to reduce energy cost and optimize production efficiency without inducing physiological stress on

  2. Effects of acute exposure to WIFI signals (2.45GHz) on heart variability and blood pressure in Albinos rabbit.

    PubMed

    Saili, Linda; Hanini, Amel; Smirani, Chiraz; Azzouz, Ines; Azzouz, Amina; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Bouslama, Zihad

    2015-09-01

    Electrocardiogram and arterial pressure measurements were studied under acute exposures to WIFI (2.45GHz) during one hour in adult male rabbits. Antennas of WIFI were placed at 25cm at the right side near the heart. Acute exposure of rabbits to WIFI increased heart frequency (+22%) and arterial blood pressure (+14%). Moreover, analysis of ECG revealed that WIFI induced a combined increase of PR and QT intervals. By contrast, the same exposure failed to alter maximum amplitude and P waves. After intravenously injection of dopamine (0.50ml/kg) and epinephrine (0.50ml/kg) under acute exposure to RF we found that, WIFI alter catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine) action on heart variability and blood pressure compared to control. These results suggest for the first time, as far as we know, that exposure to WIFI affect heart rhythm, blood pressure, and catecholamines efficacy on cardiovascular system; indicating that radiofrequency can act directly and/or indirectly on cardiovascular system. PMID:26356390

  3. Blood Group O-Dependent Cellular Responses to Cholera Toxin: Parallel Clinical and Epidemiological Links to Severe Cholera.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, F Matthew; Santhanam, Srikanth; Kumar, Pardeep; Luo, Qingwei; Ciorba, Matthew A; Fleckenstein, James M

    2016-08-01

    Because O blood group has been associated with more severe cholera infections, it has been hypothesized that cholera toxin (CT) may bind non-O blood group antigens of the intestinal mucosae, thereby preventing efficient interaction with target GM1 gangliosides required for uptake of the toxin and activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in target epithelia. Herein, we show that after exposure to CT, human enteroids expressing O blood group exhibited marked increase in cAMP relative to cells derived from blood group A individuals. Likewise, using CRISPR/Cas9 engineering, a functional group O line (HT-29-A(-/-)) was generated from a parent group A HT-29 line. CT stimulated robust cAMP responses in HT-29-A(-/-) cells relative to HT-29 cells. These findings provide a direct molecular link between blood group O expression and differential cellular responses to CT, recapitulating clinical and epidemiologic observations. PMID:27162272

  4. Comparative usefulness of inflammatory markers to indicate bacterial infection-analyzed according to blood culture results and related clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hirokazu; Shirano, Michinori; Kasamatsu, Yu; Morimura, Ayumi; Iida, Ko; Kishi, Tomomi; Goto, Tetsushi; Okamoto, Saki; Ehara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships of inflammatory markers and 2 related clinical factors with blood culture results, we retrospectively investigated inpatients' blood culture and blood chemistry findings that were recorded from January to December 2014 using electronic medical records and analyzed the data of 852 subjects (426 culture-positive and 426 culture-negative). Results suggested that the risk of positive blood culture statistically increased as inflammatory marker levels and the number of related factors increased. Concerning the effectiveness of inflammatory markers, when the outcome definition was also changed for C-reactive protein (CRP), the odds ratio had a similar value, whereas when the outcome definition of blood culture positivity was used for procalcitonin (PCT), the greatest effectiveness of that was detected. Therefore, the current results suggest that PCT is more useful than CRP as an auxiliary indication of bacterial infection. PMID:26525643

  5. Evaluation of peripheral blood and abdominal fluid variables as predictors of intestinal surgical site failure in dogs with septic peritonitis following celiotomy and the placement of closed-suction abdominal drains.

    PubMed

    Guieu, Liz-Valérie S; Bersenas, Alexa M; Brisson, Brigitte A; Holowaychuk, Marie K; Ammersbach, Melanie A; Beaufrère, Hugues; Fujita, Hiroshi; Weese, J Scott

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate peripheral blood and abdominal fluid variables as predictors of intestinal surgical site failure in dogs with septic peritonitis following celiotomy and closed-suction abdominal drain (CSAD) placement. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 26 dogs with septic peritonitis that underwent celiotomy and CSAD placement. PROCEDURES Abdominal fluid and blood samples were collected prior to surgery and daily thereafter until CSAD removal. Abdominal fluid was collected through the CSAD. Analysis of all samples included pH, PCO2, PO2, PCV, WBC count, and total solids, glucose, lactate, and electrolyte concentrations. Abdominal fluid samples also underwent cytologic evaluation and bacterial culture, and the volume of fluid removed through the drain was recorded daily. The blood-to-fluid glucose and lactate differences, fluid-to-blood lactate ratio and blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios were determined daily. Dogs were categorized into 2 groups on the basis of whether they had an uneventful recovery (UR) or developed postoperative septic peritonitis (POSP). RESULTS 23 dogs had a UR and 3 developed POSP. On the third day after surgery, the abdominal fluid WBC count was significantly lower and the blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios were significantly higher for dogs in the POSP group, compared with those for dogs in the UR group. None of the other blood and abdominal fluid variables assessed differed significantly between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results failed to identify any objective predictive indicators for POSP in dogs with CSADs. Use of blood-to-fluid WBC and neutrophil ratios as predictive indicators for POSP requires further investigation. PMID:27556266

  6. Mass spectrometry in cancer biomarker research: a case for immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins from clinical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, DaRue A; Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Nissley, Dwight V; Simpson, R Mark; Citrin, Deborah E; Mackall, Crystal L; Linehan, W Marston; Blonder, Josip

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven difficult, primarily because of the enormous dynamic range of blood-derived protein concentrations and the fact that the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass. Immunodepletion of clinical body fluid specimens (e.g., serum/plasma) for the removal of highly abundant proteins is a reasonable and reproducible solution. Often overlooked, clinical tissue specimens also contain a formidable amount of highly abundant blood-derived proteins present in tissue-embedded networks of blood/lymph capillaries and interstitial fluid. Hence, the dynamic range impediment to biomarker discovery remains a formidable obstacle, regardless of clinical sample type (solid tissue and/or body fluid). Thus, we optimized and applied simultaneous immunodepletion of blood-derived proteins from solid tissue and peripheral blood, using clear cell renal cell carcinoma as a model disease. Integrative analysis of data from this approach and genomic data obtained from the same type of tumor revealed concordant key pathways and protein targets germane to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This includes the activation of the lipogenic pathway characterized by increased expression of adipophilin (PLIN2) along with 'cadherin switching', a phenomenon indicative of transcriptional reprogramming linked to renal epithelial dedifferentiation. We also applied immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins to various tissue types (e.g., adipose tissue and breast tissue) showing unambiguously that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins represents a powerful tool for the reproducible profiling of tissue proteomes. Herein, we show that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins from solid tissue specimens is of equal importance to depletion of body fluids and recommend its routine use in the context of biological discovery and

  7. Episiotomy and its relationship to various clinical variables that influence its performance

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Meseguer, Carmen; Carrillo-García, César; Meseguer-de-Pedro, Mariano; Canteras-Jordana, Manuel; Martínez-Roche, Mª Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to understand the episiotomy rate and its relationship with various clinical variables. Method: a descriptive, cross-sectional, analytic study of 12,093 births in a tertiary hospital. Variables: Parity, gestational age, start of labor, use of epidural analgesia, oxytocin usage, position during fetal explusion, weight of neonate, and completion of birth. The analysis was performed with SPSS 19.0. Results: the global percentage of episiotomies was 50%. The clinical variables that presented a significant association were primiparity (RR=2.98), gestational age >41 weeks (RR=1.2), augmented or induced labor (RR=1.33), epidural analgesia use (RR=1,95), oxytocin use (RR=1.58), lithotomy position during fetal expulsion (RR=6.4), and instrumentation (RR=1.84). Furthermore, maternal age ≥35 years (RR=0.85) and neonatal weight <2500 g (RR=0.8) were associated with a lower incidence of episiotomy. Conclusions: episiotomy is dependent on obstetric interventions performed during labor. If we wish to reduce the episiotomy rate, it will be necessary to bear in mind these risk factors when establishing policies for reducing this procedure. PMID:27224064

  8. Cellular softening mediates leukocyte demargination and trafficking, thereby increasing clinical blood counts.

    PubMed

    Fay, Meredith E; Myers, David R; Kumar, Amit; Turbyfield, Cory T; Byler, Rebecca; Crawford, Kaci; Mannino, Robert G; Laohapant, Alvin; Tyburski, Erika A; Sakurai, Yumiko; Rosenbluth, Michael J; Switz, Neil A; Sulchek, Todd A; Graham, Michael D; Lam, Wilbur A

    2016-02-23

    Leukocytes normally marginate toward the vascular wall in large vessels and within the microvasculature. Reversal of this process, leukocyte demargination, leads to substantial increases in the clinical white blood cell and granulocyte count and is a well-documented effect of glucocorticoid and catecholamine hormones, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that alterations in granulocyte mechanical properties are the driving force behind glucocorticoid- and catecholamine-induced demargination. First, we found that the proportions of granulocytes from healthy human subjects that traversed and demarginated from microfluidic models of capillary beds and veins, respectively, increased after the subjects ingested glucocorticoids. Also, we show that glucocorticoid and catecholamine exposure reorganizes cellular cortical actin, significantly reducing granulocyte stiffness, as measured with atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, using simple kinetic theory computational modeling, we found that this reduction in stiffness alone is sufficient to cause granulocyte demargination. Taken together, our findings reveal a biomechanical answer to an old hematologic question regarding how glucocorticoids and catecholamines cause leukocyte demargination. In addition, in a broader sense, we have discovered a temporally and energetically efficient mechanism in which the innate immune system can simply alter leukocyte stiffness to fine tune margination/demargination and therefore leukocyte trafficking in general. These observations have broad clinically relevant implications for the inflammatory process overall as well as hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and homing. PMID:26858400

  9. Cellular softening mediates leukocyte demargination and trafficking, thereby increasing clinical blood counts

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Meredith E.; Myers, David R.; Kumar, Amit; Turbyfield, Cory T.; Byler, Rebecca; Crawford, Kaci; Mannino, Robert G.; Laohapant, Alvin; Tyburski, Erika A.; Sakurai, Yumiko; Rosenbluth, Michael J.; Switz, Neil A.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes normally marginate toward the vascular wall in large vessels and within the microvasculature. Reversal of this process, leukocyte demargination, leads to substantial increases in the clinical white blood cell and granulocyte count and is a well-documented effect of glucocorticoid and catecholamine hormones, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that alterations in granulocyte mechanical properties are the driving force behind glucocorticoid- and catecholamine-induced demargination. First, we found that the proportions of granulocytes from healthy human subjects that traversed and demarginated from microfluidic models of capillary beds and veins, respectively, increased after the subjects ingested glucocorticoids. Also, we show that glucocorticoid and catecholamine exposure reorganizes cellular cortical actin, significantly reducing granulocyte stiffness, as measured with atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, using simple kinetic theory computational modeling, we found that this reduction in stiffness alone is sufficient to cause granulocyte demargination. Taken together, our findings reveal a biomechanical answer to an old hematologic question regarding how glucocorticoids and catecholamines cause leukocyte demargination. In addition, in a broader sense, we have discovered a temporally and energetically efficient mechanism in which the innate immune system can simply alter leukocyte stiffness to fine tune margination/demargination and therefore leukocyte trafficking in general. These observations have broad clinically relevant implications for the inflammatory process overall as well as hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and homing. PMID:26858400

  10. Comparison of stethoscope bell and diaphragm, and of stethoscope tube length, for clinical blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Clive; Murray, Alan; Zheng, Dingchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effect of stethoscope side and tube length on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Methods Thirty-two healthy participants were studied. For each participant, four measurements with different combinations of stethoscope characteristics (bell or diaphragm side, standard or short tube length) were each recorded at two repeat sessions, and eight Korotkoff sound recordings were played twice on separate days to one experienced listener to determine the systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Analysis of variance was carried out to study the measurement repeatability between the two repeat sessions and between the two BP determinations on separate days, as well as the effects of stethoscope side and tube length. Results There was no significant paired difference between the repeat sessions and between the repeat determinations for both SBP and DBP (all P-values>0.10, except the repeat session for SBP using short tube and diaphragm). The key result was that there was a small but significantly higher DBP on using the bell in comparison with the diaphragm (0.66 mmHg, P=0.007), and a significantly higher SBP on using the short tube in comparison with the standard length (0.77 mmHg, P=0.008). Conclusion This study shows that stethoscope characteristics have only a small, although statistically significant, influence on clinical BP measurement. Although this helps understand the measurement technique and resolves questions in the published literature, the influence is not clinically significant. PMID:26741415

  11. Long-Term Blood Pressure Variability, New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus, and New-Onset Chronic Kidney Disease in the Japanese General Population.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Kramer, Holly; Sato, Yuji; Konta, Tsuneo; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Iseki, Chiho; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Kimura, Kenjiro; Asahi, Koichi; Kurahashi, Issei; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Whether long-term blood pressure (BP) variability among individuals without diabetes mellitus is associated with new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk, independently of other BP parameters (eg, mean BP, cumulative exposure to BP) and metabolic profile changes during follow-up, remains uncertain. We used data from a nationwide study of 48 587 Japanese adults aged 40 to 74 years (mean age, 61.7 years; 39% men) without diabetes mellitus or CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or proteinuria by dipstick). BP was measured at baseline and during 3 annual follow-up visits (4 visits). BP variability was defined as standard deviation (SD) and average real variability during the 4 visits. At the year 3 follow-up visit, 6.3% of the population had developed CKD. In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models, 1 SD increases in SDSBP (per 5 mmHg), SDDBP (per 3 mmHg), average real variabilitySBP (per 6 mmHg), and average real variabilityDBP (per 4 mmHg) were associated with new-onset CKD (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence intervals, 1.15 [1.11-1.20], 1.08 [1.04-1.12], 1.13 [1.09-1.17], 1.06 [1.02-1.10], respectively; all P<0.01) after adjustment for clinical characteristics, and with mean BP from year 0 to year 3. The associations of SDBP and average real variabilityBP with CKD remained significant after additional adjustments for metabolic parameter changes during follow-up (ORs, 1.06-1.15; all P<0.01). Sensitivity analyses by sex, antihypertensive medication use, and the presence of hypertension showed similar conclusions. Among those in the middle-aged and elderly general population without diabetes mellitus, long-term BP variability during 3 years was associated with new-onset CKD risk, independently of mean or cumulative exposure to BP and metabolic profile changes during follow-up. PMID:25987664

  12. IL8 gene as modifier of cystic fibrosis: unraveling the factors which influence clinical variability.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Larissa Lazzarini; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia; Salomão Junior, João Batista; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva

    2016-08-01

    The severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with classes of mutations in the CFTR gene (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator), physical environment and modifier genes interaction. The IL8 gene (interleukin 8), according to its respective polymorphisms, influences inflammatory responses. This study analyzed IL8 gene polymorphisms (rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307), by means of PCR/RFLP, and their association with pulmonary function markers and clinical severity scores in 186 patients with CF, considering the CFTR genotype. There was an association between rs2227307 and precocity of the disease. The severity of lung disease was associated with the following markers: transcutaneous arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO2) (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307); mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs2227306 and rs2227307). Pulmonary function markers (SaO2 and spirometric variables) and clinical severity scores were also associated with IL8 gene polymorphisms. This study identified the IL8 gene, represented by rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms, and particularly the rs2227307 polymorphism, as potentiating factors for the degree of variability in the severity of CF, especially in pulmonary clinical manifestation correlated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:27209008

  13. Clinical variables and implications of the personality on the outcome of bipolar illness: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Barquero, Nieves; García-López, Olga; Fernández-Argüelles, Pedro; Camacho-Laraña, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Outcome in bipolar patients is affected by comorbidity. Comorbid personality disorders are frequent and may complicate the course of bipolar illness. This pilot study examined a series of 40 euthymic bipolar patients (DSM-IV criteria) (bipolar I disorder 31, bipolar II disorder 9) to assess the effect of clinical variables and the influence of comorbid personality on the clinical course of bipolar illness. Bipolar patients with a diagnosis of comorbid personality disorder (n = 30) were compared with “pure” bipolar patients (n = 10) with regard to demographic, clinical, and course of illness variables. Comorbid personality disorder was diagnosed in 75% of patients according to ICD-10 criteria, with obsessive-compulsive personality disorder being the most frequent type. Sixty-three per cent of subjects had more than one comorbid personality disorder. Bipolar patients with and without comorbid personality disorder showed no significant differences regarding features of the bipolar illness, although the group with comorbid personality disorder showed a younger age at onset, more depressive episodes, and longer duration of bipolar illness. In subjects with comorbid personality disorders, the number of hospitalizations correlated significantly with depressive episodes and there was an inverse correlation between age at the first episode and duration of bipolar illness. These findings, however, should be interpreted taking into account the preliminary nature of a pilot study and the contamination of the sample with too many bipolar II patients. PMID:19300559

  14. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) versus Autologous Whole Blood on Pain and Function Improvement in Tennis Elbow: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Sedighipour, Leyla; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Bayat, Masume; Rahimi, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) have been both suggested to treat chronic tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in chronic tennis elbow. Methods. Forty patients with tennis elbow were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous PRP and group 2 with 2 mL of autologous blood. Tennis elbow strap, stretching, and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups during a 2-month followup. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS), modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Results. All pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain scores in 4-week follow-up examination (P > 0.05). At 8-week reevaluations, VAS and Mayo scores improved only in PRP group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis. PRP might be slightly superior in 8-week followup. However, further studies are suggested to get definite conclusion. PMID:24579044

  15. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  16. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  17. Associations between day-by-day variability in blood pressure measured at home and antihypertensive drugs: the J-HOME-Morning study.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Kazuki; Obara, Taku; Kato, Tetsuo; Kikuya, Masahiro; Shibamiya, Taku; Shinki, Takahiro; Ikeda, Urara; Kobayashi, Yuka; Metoki, Hirohito; Mano, Nariyasu; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    We identified the factors associated with home blood pressure (BP) variability in 1933 patients treated with hypertensive drugs (mean age, 67 years; women, 55%). Multivariate regression analysis showed that female gender, advanced age, home BP value, and home heart rate variability were positively associated with home BP variability, whereas home heart rate, body mass index, and duration of antihypertensive treatment were negatively associated with home BP variability. Moreover, not being medicated with amlodipine and being medicated with angiotensin II receptor blockers were associated with increased home systolic BP variability only among patients who were treated for less than 12 months. PMID:22564087

  18. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. PMID:24863549

  19. Discordance between ambulatory versus clinic blood pressure according to global cardiovascular risk group

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jinho; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Ju Han; Ihm, Sang Hyun; Kim, Kwang-il; Kim, Woo Shik; Pyun, Wook Bum; Kim, Yu-Mi; Choi, Sung-il; Kim, Soon Kil

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: The detection of white coat hypertension (WCH), treated normalized hypertension, and masked hypertension (MH) is important to improve the effectiveness of hypertension management. However, whether global cardiovascular risk (GCR) profile has any effect on the discordance between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and clinic blood pressure (CBP) is unknown. Methods: Data from 1,916 subjects, taken from the Korean Multicenter Registry for ABP monitoring, were grouped according to diagnostic and therapeutic thresholds for CBP and ABP (140/90 and 135/85 mmHg, respectively). GCR was assessed using European Society of Hypertension 2007 guidelines. Results: The mean subject age was 54.1 ± 14.9 years, and 48.9% of patients were female. The discordancy rate between ABP and CBP in the untreated and treated patients was 32.5% and 26.5%, respectively (p = 0.02). The prevalence of WCH or treated normalized hypertension and MH was 14.4% and 16.0%, respectively. Discordance between ABP and CBP was lower in the very high added-risk group compared to the moderate added-risk group (odds ratio [OR], 0.649; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.487 to 0.863; p = 0.003). The prevalence of WCH or treated normalized hypertension was also lower in the very high added-risk group (OR, 0.451; 95% CI, 0.311 to 0.655). Conclusions: Discordance between ABP and CBP was observed more frequently in untreated subjects than in treated subjects, and less frequently in the very high added-risk group, which was due mainly to the lower prevalence of WCH or treated normalized hypertension. PMID:26354055

  20. Liver function in Huntington's disease assessed by blood biochemical analyses in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe Marie Borch; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nørremølle, Anne; Hasholt, Lis; Hjermind, Lena E; Josefsen, Knud

    2016-03-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurological disorder caused by a CAG repeat elongation in the huntingtin gene. In addition to motor-, psychiatric- and cognitive dysfunction, peripheral disease manifestations in the form of metabolic changes and cellular dysfunction are seen. Blood levels of a wide range of hormones, metabolites and proteins have been analyzed in HD patients, identifying several changes associated with the disease. However, a comprehensive panel of liver function tests (LFT) has not been performed. We investigated a cohort of manifest and premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and controls, using a clinically applied panel of LFTs. Here, we demonstrate that the level of alkaline phosphatase is increased in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers compared to premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and correlate with increased disease severity indicated by the Unified Huntington's disease rating scale-Total Functional Capacity Score (UHDRS-TFC). For gamma-glutamyl transferase, elevated levels were more frequent in the manifest groups than in both the HD gene-expansion negative controls and premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers. Finally, the manifest HD gene-expansion carriers displayed moderate increases in total cholesterol and blood glucose relative to the premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers, as well as increased C-reactive protein relative to HD gene-expansion negative controls. Our results show that LFT values are elevated more frequently in manifest compared to premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and controls. The majority of the manifest HD gene-expansion carriers receive medication, and it is possible that this can influence the liver function tests performed in this study. PMID:26944172

  1. Prediction of the Chemoreflex Gain by Common Clinical Variables in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mirizzi, Gianluca; Giannoni, Alberto; Ripoli, Andrea; Iudice, Giovanni; Bramanti, Francesca; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral and central chemoreflex sensitivity, assessed by the hypoxic or hypercapnic ventilatory response (HVR and HCVR, respectively), is enhanced in heart failure (HF) patients, is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease, and is under investigation as a potential therapeutic target. Chemoreflex sensitivity assessment is however demanding and, therefore, not easily applicable in the clinical setting. We aimed at evaluating whether common clinical variables, broadly obtained by routine clinical and instrumental evaluation, could predict increased HVR and HCVR. Methods and results 191 patients with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction—LVEF—<50%) underwent chemoreflex assessment by rebreathing technique to assess HVR and HCVR. All patients underwent clinical and neurohormonal evaluation, comprising: echocardiogram, cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), daytime cardiorespiratory monitoring for breathing pattern evaluation. Regarding HVR, multivariate penalized logistic regression, Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) logistic regression and random forest analysis identified, as predictors, the presence of periodic breathing and increased slope of the relation between ventilation and carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) during exercise. Again, the above-mentioned statistical tools identified as HCVR predictors plasma levels of N-terminal fragment of proBNP and VE/VCO2 slope. Conclusions In HF patients, the simple assessment of breathing pattern, alongside with ventilatory efficiency during exercise and natriuretic peptides levels identifies a subset of patients presenting with increased chemoreflex sensitivity to either hypoxia or hypercapnia. PMID:27099934

  2. Total knee arthroplasty: indication of blood transfusion according to hematimetric variation and clinical symptoms of hypoperfusion☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Tavares Cardozo, Rodrigo; Fidelis de Souza Junior, Edison; Campoli Alves, Wagner; Barbi Filho, Flávio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between hematimetric variation and the presence of clinical symptoms of hypoperfusion for indicating blood transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on data gathered from the medical files of 55 patients with a diagnosis of gonarthrosis, who underwent total knee arthroplasty at a hospital orthopedics and traumatology service between February 2011 and December 2012. The patients studied presented unilateral joint degeneration and fitted into the indications for surgical treatment. All the patients underwent a preoperative cardiological evaluation, presenting a pattern of ASA I–III and absence of blood dyscrasia, and preoperative hemoglobin measurements were made. However, no minimum hematimetric value was established for the surgical treatment; there were only clinical criteria for blood perfusion. Results Among the 55 patients, 35 were female and 20 were male, and the mean age was 68 years. Six patients underwent homologous blood transfusion, because of their clinical condition of tissue hypoperfusion, persistent hypotension, loss of consciousness, sweating and coercible vomiting. They presented postoperative hemoglobin of 7.5–8.8 g/dL. Conclusion For patients with falls in hemoglobin counts greater than 20% and values lower than 9 g/dL after the surgery, there is a possible need for blood transfusion, which should only be indicated when accompanied by major symptoms of tissue hypoperfusion. PMID:26229853

  3. Impact of hypobaric hypoxia in pressurized cabins of simulated long-distance flights on the 24 h patterns of biological variables, fatigue, and clinical status.

    PubMed

    Coste, Olivier; Van Beers, Pascal; Touitou, Yvan

    2007-01-01

    Long-distance flights can cause a number of clinical problems in both passengers and crewmembers. Jet lag as well as mild hypoxia resulting from incomplete cabin pressurization could contribute to these problems. The objective of this study was to assess, using a chronobiological approach, the clinical impact of diurnal hypobaric, hypoxic exposure on fatigue and other common symptoms encountered during high-altitude exposure and to measure changes in blood chemistry (i.e., plasma creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, calcium, phosphorus, glycemia, and lipids). Fourteen healthy, diurnally active (from 07:00 to 23:00 h) male volunteers, aged 23 to 39 yrs, spent 8.5 h in a hypobaric chamber (08:00 to 16:30 h), at a simulated altitude of 8,000 ft (2,438 m). This was followed by an additional 8.5 h of study four weeks later at a simulated altitude of 12,000 ft (3,658 m). Clinical data were collected every 2 h between 08:00 and 18:00 h, and biological variables were assayed every 2 h over two (control and hypoxic-exposure) 24 h cycles. Clinical symptoms were more frequent with the 12,000 ft exposure. Wide interindividual variability was observed in the clinical tolerance to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia. The 24 h profiles of most biochemical variables were significantly altered at each altitude, with changes in mean plasma levels and a tendency toward phase delay, except for uric acid, which showed a phase advance. Changes in appetite mainly occurred with the simulated 12,000 ft exposure and may have been associated with changes in the postprandial glycemia profile. Finally, though the observed biochemical changes were significant, their clinical relevance must be clarified in studies involving actual long-distance flights. PMID:18075804

  4. Short-term blood pressure variability over 24 h and target organ damage in middle-aged men and women.

    PubMed

    Madden, J M; O'Flynn, A M; Dolan, E; Fitzgerald, A P; Kearney, P M

    2015-12-01

    Blood pressure variability (BPV) has been associated with cardiovascular events; however, the prognostic significance of short-term BPV remains uncertain. As uncertainty also remains as to which measure of variability most accurately describes short-term BPV, this study explores different indices and investigates their relationship with subclinical target organ damage (TOD). We used data from the Mitchelstown Study, a cross-sectional study of Irish adults aged 47-73 years (n=2047). A subsample (1207) underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). As measures of short-term BPV, we estimated the s.d., weighted s.d. (wSD), coefficient of variation (CV) and average real variability (ARV). TOD was documented by microalbuminuria and electrocardiogram (ECG) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). There was no association found between any measure of BPV and LVH in both unadjusted and fully adjusted logistic regression models. Similar analysis found that ARV (24 h, day and night), s.d. (day and night) and wSD were all univariately associated with microalbuminuria and remained associated after adjustment for age, gender, smoking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes and antihypertensive treatment. However, when the models were further adjusted for the mean BP the association did not persist for all indices. Our findings illustrate choosing the appropriate summary measure, which accurately captures that short-term BPV is difficult. Despite discrepancies in values between the different measures, there was no association between any indexes of variability with TOD measures after adjustment for the mean BP. PMID:25787777

  5. Day/Night Variability in Blood Pressure: Influence of Posture and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blood pressure (BP) is highest during the day and lowest at night. Absence of this rhythm is a predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Contributions of changes in posture and physical activity to the 24-hour day/night rhythm in BP are not well understood. We hypothesized that postural changes and physical activity contribute substantially to the day/night rhythm in BP. METHODS Fourteen healthy, sedentary, nonobese, normotensive men (aged 19–50 years) each completed an ambulatory and a bed rest condition during which BP was measured every 30–60 minutes for 24 hours. When ambulatory, subjects followed their usual routines without restrictions to capture the “normal” condition. During bed rest, subjects were constantly confined to bed in a 6-degree head-down position; therefore posture was constant, and physical activity was minimized. Two subjects were excluded from analysis because of irregular sleep timing. RESULTS The systolic and diastolic BP reduction during the sleep period was similar in ambulatory (−11±2mmHg/−8±1mmHg) and bed rest conditions (−8±3mmHg/−4±2mmHg; P = 0.38/P = 0.12). The morning surge in diastolic BP was attenuated during bed rest (P = 0.001), and there was a statistical trend for the same effect in systolic BP (P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS A substantial proportion of the 24-hour BP rhythm remained during bed rest, indicating that typical daily changes in posture and/or physical activity do not entirely explain 24-hour BP variation under normal ambulatory conditions. However, the morning BP increase was attenuated during bed rest, suggesting that the adoption of an upright posture and/or physical activity in the morning contributes to the morning BP surge. PMID:23535155

  6. Guidelines for the standardization of preanalytic variables for blood-based biomarker studies in Alzheimer's disease research.

    PubMed

    O'Bryant, Sid E; Gupta, Veer; Henriksen, Kim; Edwards, Melissa; Jeromin, Andreas; Lista, Simone; Bazenet, Chantal; Soares, Holly; Lovestone, Simon; Hampel, Harald; Montine, Thomas; Blennow, Kaj; Foroud, Tatiana; Carrillo, Maria; Graff-Radford, Neill; Laske, Christoph; Breteler, Monique; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Schupf, Nicole; Rissman, Robert A; Fagan, Anne M; Oberoi, Pankaj; Umek, Robert; Weiner, Michael W; Grammas, Paula; Posner, Holly; Martins, Ralph

    2015-05-01

    The lack of readily available biomarkers is a significant hindrance toward progressing to effective therapeutic and preventative strategies for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Blood-based biomarkers have potential to overcome access and cost barriers and greatly facilitate advanced neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker approaches. Despite the fact that preanalytical processing is the largest source of variability in laboratory testing, there are no currently available standardized preanalytical guidelines. The current international working group provides the initial starting point for such guidelines for standardized operating procedures (SOPs). It is anticipated that these guidelines will be updated as additional research findings become available. The statement provides (1) a synopsis of selected preanalytical methods utilized in many international AD cohort studies, (2) initial draft guidelines/SOPs for preanalytical methods, and (3) a list of required methodological information and protocols to be made available for publications in the field to foster cross-validation across cohorts and laboratories. PMID:25282381

  7. Guidelines for the standardization of preanalytic variables for blood-based biomarker studies in Alzheimer’s disease research

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Veer; Henriksen, Kim; Edwards, Melissa; Jeromin, Andreas; Lista, Simone; Bazenet, Chantal; Soares, Holly; Lovestone, Simon; Hampel, Harald; Montine, Thomas; Blennow, Kaj; Foroud, Tatiana; Carrillo, Maria; Graff-Radford, Neill; Laske, Christoph; Breteler, Monique; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q.; Schupf, Nicole; Rissman, Robert A.; Fagan, Anne M.; Oberoi, Pankaj; Umek, Robert; Weiner, Michael W.; Grammas, Paula; Posner, Holly; Martins, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The lack of readily available biomarkers is a significant hindrance towards progressing to effective therapeutic and preventative strategies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Blood-based biomarkers have potential to overcome access and cost barriers and greatly facilitate advanced neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker approaches. Despite the fact that preanalytical processing is the largest source of variability in laboratory testing, there are no currently available standardized preanalytical guidelines. The current international working group provides the initial starting point for such guidelines for standardized operating procedures (SOPs). It is anticipated that these guidelines will be updated as additional research findings become available. The statement provides (1) a synopsis of selected preanalytical methods utilized in many international AD cohort studies, (2) initial draft guidelines/SOPs for preanalytical methods, and (3) a list of required methodological information and protocols to be made available for publications in the field in order to foster cross-validation across cohorts and laboratories. PMID:25282381

  8. Well-balanced high-order solver for blood flow in networks of vessels with variable properties.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lucas O; Toro, Eleuterio F

    2013-12-01

    We present a well-balanced, high-order non-linear numerical scheme for solving a hyperbolic system that models one-dimensional flow in blood vessels with variable mechanical and geometrical properties along their length. Using a suitable set of test problems with exact solution, we rigorously assess the performance of the scheme. In particular, we assess the well-balanced property and the effective order of accuracy through an empirical convergence rate study. Schemes of up to fifth order of accuracy in both space and time are implemented and assessed. The numerical methodology is then extended to realistic networks of elastic vessels and is validated against published state-of-the-art numerical solutions and experimental measurements. It is envisaged that the present scheme will constitute the building block for a closed, global model for the human circulation system involving arteries, veins, capillaries and cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:23913466

  9. An alternative approach to approximate entropy threshold value (r) selection: application to heart rate variability and systolic blood pressure variability under postural challenge.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Saini, B S; Singh, D

    2016-05-01

    This study presents an alternative approach to approximate entropy (ApEn) threshold value (r) selection. There are two limitations of traditional ApEn algorithm: (1) the occurrence of undefined conditional probability (CPu) where no template match is found and (2) use of a crisp tolerance (radius) threshold 'r'. To overcome these limitations, CPu is substituted with optimum bias setting ɛ opt which is found by varying ɛ from (1/N - m) to 1 in the increments of 0.05, where N is the length of the series and m is the embedding dimension. Furthermore, an alternative approach for selection of r based on binning the distance values obtained by template matching to calculate ApEnbin is presented. It is observed that ApEnmax, ApEnchon and ApEnbin converge for ɛ opt = 0.6 in 50 realizations (n = 50) of random number series of N = 300. Similar analysis suggests ɛ opt = 0.65 and ɛ opt = 0.45 for 50 realizations each of fractional Brownian motion and MIX(P) series (Lu et al. in J Clin Monit Comput 22(1):23-29, 2008). ɛ opt = 0.5 is suggested for heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) signals obtained from 50 young healthy subjects under supine and upright position. It is observed that (1) ApEnbin of HRV is lower than SBPV, (2) ApEnbin of HRV increases from supine to upright due to vagal inhibition and (3) ApEnbin of BPV decreases from supine to upright due to sympathetic activation. Moreover, merit of ApEnbin is that it provides an alternative to the cumbersome ApEnmax procedure. PMID:26253284

  10. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. PMID:27245647

  11. Annual, seasonal and individual variation in hematology and clinical blood chemistry profiles in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Sarasota Bay, Florida.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ailsa J; Wells, Randall S; Sweeney, Jay C; Townsend, Forrest I; Balmer, Brian C; Hohn, Aleta A; Rhinehart, Howard L

    2007-10-01

    Hematology and clinical blood chemistry (HCBC) profiles in free-living bottlenose dolphins from Sarasota Bay, Florida have been monitored over a 14-year period. This long-term dataset includes samples from recaptured dolphins, enabling individual variation to be accounted for when investigating seasonal and annual variability. Four different laboratories carried out the assays and inter-laboratory comparisons found significant differences in 31 of 39 parameters measured. However, variability in comparable HCBCs by sex, age, condition, season and year could be investigated. Significant relationships with the independent variables were found for the majority of the HCBCs. Notable consistent seasonal differences included significantly elevated glucose and significantly lower creatinine concentrations in winter compared to summer. These differences may be due to energetic or thermoregulatory fluctuations in the animals by season and do not necessarily have any clinical significance. Erythrocyte counts were significantly lower in the winter, possibly also due to nutritional differences. Albumin and calcium levels in this population have increased significantly over the years of monitoring and consistently across seasons, being higher in the winter than the summer. Again, nutritional and thermal constraints seem to be the most likely environmental factors influencing these patterns. PMID:17524692

  12. Clinical variables associated with suicide attempts in schizophrenia before and after the first episode.

    PubMed

    Togay, Bilge; Noyan, Handan; Tasdelen, Rumeysa; Ucok, Alp

    2015-09-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate variables associated with suicide attempts in schizophrenia before and after the first episode. We evaluated history of past sucide attempts, clinical symptoms, level of functioning and cognitive performances of 172 patients with first-episode schizophrenia at first admission. Information was collected regarding clinical symptom severity, treatment compliance, and suicide attempts during the follow-up. We found that 16.5% of the patients attempted suicide before admission, and 6.2% of them attempted suicide during the follow-up. The patients who had attempted suicide before admission were mostly women, and more likely to be hospitalized in first year of follow up. BPRS-depression subscale score at admission and alcohol/substance use appeared as independent variables that found associated with suicide attempts prior to admission in logistic regression analysis. The patients who attempted suicide during the follow-up had significantly higher BPRS-depression subcale scores at sixth months of follow-up. Treatment compliance during the first 6 months and duration of remission was lower in this group. Our findings suggest that longer duration of first hospital treatment, the presence of depressive symptoms, and nonadherence to treatment in early phases of follow up after FES are predictors of suicide attempts. On the other hand, keeping remission during the follow-up protects against suicide attempts. PMID:26210651

  13. Evaluation of heart rate and blood pressure variability as indicators of physiological compensation to hemorrhage before shock.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Kramer, George C; Strauss, David G

    2015-05-01

    Individual responses to hemorrhage vary, with varying periods of compensation before the development of shock. We characterized heart rate and blood pressure variability measures during hemorrhage of 25 mL/kgBody Weight for 15 min in conscious sheep (N = 7, 14 total hemorrhages) as markers of the transition from compensated to decompensated shock using the continuous wavelet transform. Heart rate-low frequency (HR-LF) and systolic blood pressure-low frequency (SBP-LF) indices were developed to represent the change in spectral power during hemorrhage as low-frequency (0.06 - 0.15 Hz) power divided by the sum of high (0.15 - 1.0 Hz)- and very low (0.02 - 0.06 Hz) frequency power. Heart rate rose from 96.3 (22.2) beats/min (mean [SD] across all trials) to a peak of 176.0 (25.4) beats/min occurring at a minimum time of 5.3 min to a maximum of 22.1 min (11.7 [1.6] min), depending on the trial, after the start of hemorrhage. During the HR-compensated response to hemorrhage, there was elevated HR-LF and SBP-LF in five of the seven animals. In these animals, HR-LF and SBP-LF dropped to below baseline levels around the time of the peak HR. The results from this conscious-animal study suggest that HR and SBP low-frequency power rise during the compensation phase of the response to hemorrhage in conscious sheep. Use of variability monitoring could aid in describing an individual's current response to hemorrhage and anticipation of impending decompensation; however, individual differences in the response limit this potential. PMID:25692248

  14. Classification of Blood Culture Isolates Into Contaminants and Pathogens on the Basis of Clinical and Laboratory Data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Belal; Weber, Martin W; Hamer, Davidson H; Hibberd, Patricia L; Ahmed, A S M Nawshad Uddin; Marzan, Mahfuza; Islam, Maksuda; Connor, Nicholas E; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Zaidi, Anita K; Baqui, Abdullah H; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Qureshi, Shahida M; Rafiqullah, Iftekhar; McGee, Lesley; Saha, Samir K

    2016-05-01

    The multisite community-based study, Aetiology of Neonatal Infection in South Asia (ANISA), uses blood culture as the gold standard for identifying the etiology of neonatal infection. Considering the importance of this age-old diagnostic tool and the risk of contamination, ANISA has employed rigorous measures to prevent contamination at all stages of blood collection, processing and culture. Because contamination may still occur, an independent expert group evaluates the routinely collected clinical and laboratory data to determine whether a blood culture isolate is a contaminant or a true pathogen. This article describes the methodology used by ANISA to determine whether a blood culture isolate is likely to be a true pathogen or a contaminant in neonatal sepsis. PMID:27070065

  15. Normalization of Phenotypic Data from a Clinical Data Warehouse: Case Study of Heterogeneous Blood Type Data with Surprising Results.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses often contain analogous data from disparate sources, resulting in heterogeneous formats and semantics. We have developed an approach that attempts to represent such phenotypic data in its most atomic form to facilitate aggregation. We illustrate this approach with human blood antigen typing (ABO-Rh) data drawn from the National Institutes of Health's Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS). In applying the method to actual patient data, we discovered a 2% incidence of changed blood types. We believe our approach can be applied to any institution's data to obtain comparable patient phenotypes. The actual discrepant blood type data will form the basis for a future study of the reasons for blood typing variation. PMID:26262113

  16. Blood-retinal barrier in hypoxic ischaemic conditions: basic concepts, clinical features and management.

    PubMed

    Kaur, C; Foulds, W S; Ling, E A

    2008-11-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) plays an important role in the homeostatic regulation of the microenvironment in the retina. It consists of inner and outer components, the inner BRB (iBRB) being formed by the tight junctions between neighbouring retinal capillary endothelial cells and the outer barrier (oBRB) by tight junctions between retinal pigment epithelial cells. Astrocytes, Müller cells and pericytes contribute to the proper functioning of the iBRB. In many clinically important conditions including diabetic retinopathy, ischaemic central retinal vein occlusion, and some respiratory diseases, retinal hypoxia results in a breakdown of the iBRB. Disruption of the iBRB associated with increased vascular permeability, results in vasogenic oedema and tissue damage, with consequent adverse effects upon vision. Factors such as enhanced production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), NO, oxidative stress and inflammation underlie the increased permeability of the iBRB and inhibition of these factors is beneficial. Experimental studies in our laboratory have shown melatonin to be a protective agent for the iBRB in hypoxic conditions. Although oBRB breakdown can occur in conditions such as accelerated hypertension and the toxaemia of pregnancy, both of which are associated with choroidal ischaemia and in age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and is a feature of exudative (serous) retinal detachment, our studies have shown that the oBRB remains intact in hypoxic/ischaemic conditions. Clinically, anti-VEGF therapy has been shown to improve vision in diabetic maculopathy and in neovascular ARMD. The visual benefit in both conditions appears to arise from the restoration of BRB integrity with a reduction of retinal oedema. PMID:18940262

  17. Clinic and Home Blood Pressure Lowering Effect of an Angiotensin Receptor Blocker, Fimasartan, in Postmenopausal Women with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Joo, Seung-Jae; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Changsoo; Cho, Eun Joo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin receptor blockers may be an appropriate first-line agent for postmenopausal women with hypertension because the activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system is suggested as one possible mechanism of postmenopausal hypertension. However, there are few studies substantiating this effect. This study aimed to investigate clinic and home blood pressure (BP) lowering effect of fimasartan, a new angiotensin receptor blocker, in postmenopausal women with hypertension. Among patients with hypertension enrolled in K-Mets Study, 1373 women with fimasartan as a first antihypertensive drug and 3-months follow-up data were selected. They were divided into 2 groups; premenopausal women (pre-MPW; n = 382, 45.3 ± 4.6 years) and postmenopausal women (post-MPW; n = 991, 60.9 ± 8.2 years). Baseline clinic systolic BP was not different (pre-MPW; 152.9 ± 15.2 vs. post-MPW; 152.8 ± 13.5 mm Hg), but diastolic BP was lower in post-MPW (pre-MPW; 95.7 ± 9.4 vs. post-MPW; 91.9 ± 9.4 mm Hg, P <0.001). After 3-month treatment, clinic BP declined effectively without significant differences between 2 groups (Δsystolic/diastolic BP: pre-MPW; −25.7 ± 17.7/−14.2 ± 11.3 vs. post-MPW; −25.7 ± 16.3/−13.1 ± 10.9 mm Hg). Home morning and evening systolic BP decreased similarly in both groups (Δmorning/evening systolic BP: pre-MPW; −21.3 ± 17.9/−23.1 ± 15.8 vs. post-MPW; −20.4 ± 17.3/−20.2 ± 19.2 mm Hg). Fimasartan also significantly decreased the standard deviations of home morning and evening systolic BP of pre-MPW and post-MPW. Fimasartan was a similarly effective BP lowering agent in both post-MPW and pre-MPW with hypertension, and it also decreased day-to-day BP variability. PMID:27258507

  18. Multicentre standardisation of a clinical grade procedure for the preparation of allogeneic platelet concentrates from umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Rebulla, Paolo; Pupella, Simonetta; Santodirocco, Michele; Greppi, Noemi; Villanova, Ida; Buzzi, Marina; De Fazio, Nicola; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to a largely prevalent use for bleeding prophylaxis, platelet concentrates from adult blood have also been used for many years to prepare platelet gels for the repair of topical skin ulcers. Platelet gel can be obtained by activation of fresh, cryopreserved, autologous or allogeneic platelet concentrates with calcium gluconate, thrombin and/or batroxobin. The high content of tissue regenerative factors in cord blood platelets and the widespread availability of allogeneic cord blood units generously donated for haematopoietic transplant but unsuitable for this use solely because of low haematopoietic stem cell content prompted us to develop a national programme to standardise the production of allogeneic cryopreserved cord blood platelet concentrates (CBPC) suitable for later preparation of clinical-grade cord blood platelet gel. Materials and methods Cord blood units collected at public banks with total nucleated cell counts <1.5×109, platelet count >150×109/L and volume >50 mL, underwent soft centrifugation within 48 hours of collection. Platelet-rich plasma was centrifuged at high speed to obtain a CBPC with target platelet concentration of 800–1,200×109/L, which was cryopreserved, without cryoprotectant, below −40 °C. Results During 14 months, 13 banks produced 1,080 CBPC with mean (± standard deviation) volume of 11.4±4.4 mL and platelet concentration of 1,003±229×109/L. Total platelet count per CBPC was 11.3±4.9×109. Platelet recovery from cord blood was 47.7±17.8%. About one-third of cord blood units donated for haematopoietic transplant could meet the requirements for preparation of CBPC. The cost of preparation was € 160.92/CBPC. About 2 hours were needed for one technician to prepare four CBPC. Discussion This study yielded valuable scientific and operational information regarding the development of clinical trials using allogeneic CBPC. PMID:26509822

  19. Molecular Probes for Diagnosis of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Infections in Blood Cultures▿

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Wendy L. J.; Beuving, Judith; Bruggeman, Cathrien A.; Wolffs, Petra F. G.

    2010-01-01

    Broad-range real-time PCR and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene region is a widely known method for the detection and identification of bacteria in clinical samples. However, because of the need for sequencing, such identification of bacteria is time-consuming. The aim of our study was to develop a more rapid 16S real-time PCR-based identification assay using species- or genus-specific probes. The Gram-negative bacteria were divided into Pseudomonas species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and other Gram-negative species. Within the Gram-positive species, probes were designed for Staphylococcus species, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus species, Streptococcus species, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The assay also included a universal probe within the 16S rRNA gene region for the detection of all bacterial DNA. The assay was evaluated with a collection of 248 blood cultures. In this study, the universal probe and the probes targeting Pseudomonas spp., P. aeruginosa, E. coli, Streptococcus spp., S. pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. all had a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The probe specific for S. aureus showed eight discrepancies, resulting in a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 93%. These data showed high agreement between conventional testing and our novel real-time PCR assay. Furthermore, this assay significantly reduced the time needed for identification. In conclusion, using pathogen-specific probes offers a faster alternative for pathogen detection and could improve the diagnosis of bloodstream infections. PMID:20962139

  20. Patient perceptions of an art-making experience in an outpatient blood and marrow transplant clinic.

    PubMed

    Mische Lawson, L; Glennon, C; Amos, M; Newberry, T; Pearce, J; Salzman, S; Young, J

    2012-05-01

    This study explored blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) patients' perceptions of an art-making experience during BMT treatment. Participants including patients receiving BMT for a variety of cancers (10 men/10 women, aged 20-68) were offered a 1 hour tile-painting activity during treatment. Participants with cognitive impairment and respiratory precautions were excluded from the study. Researchers followed immune precaution protocols for the safety of participants. Data were collected through semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 20 participants to gather information about their perceptions of the art-making experience in a BMT clinic setting. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed. Researchers coded transcripts independently and discussed outcomes together to achieve agreement on themes. Twelve themes emerged from the data, with the three most prevalent themes being Occupying Time (20.5%), Creative Expression (13.5%), and Reactions to Tile Painting (13.5%). Other themes included Support (12.2%), Side Effects (7.3%), Other Activities Suggested by Patients (7%), BMT Treatment Process (6.2%), Shared Painting Experience (5.9%), Life Outlook (5.2%), BMT Life Changes (3.8%), Spirituality (3%) and Barriers (1.9%). Through analysis of these themes, researchers have identified this art-making experience as a diversional or meaningful way to spend time during treatment, a medium for creative expression, and a distraction from negative side effects of the BMT process. PMID:22150782

  1. Perioperative Allogenenic Blood Transfusion is Associated With Worse Clinical Outcome for Patients Undergoing Gastric Carcinoma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihong; Zhu, Dajian; Chen, Xiaowu; Huang, Yanfeng; Ouyang, Manzhao; Zhang, Weijie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusion (ABT) has adverse effect on patients with gastric carcinoma (GC) surgery or not, that is controversial. Our study evaluated the association between ABT and some clinical outcomes of GC surgery patients. Data of relevant studies were based on PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library search. The relative risk (RR) of 5-year survival rates, tumor recurrence, and postoperative complications were performed; subgroup analyses included district, transfusion rates, age, participants, sex, and tumor stage. The study was approved by the ethics committee of the First People's Hospital of Shunde. In total, 9189 participants from 16 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The 5-year survival rate was decreased for the GC patients with ABT (RR = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69–0.79), the risk of tumor recurrence was significantly higher for ABT patients (RR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.32–2.51), and postoperative complications increased in ABT patients (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.02–1.81), respectively; in subgroup analyses, 5-year survival rates were not associated with the transfusion rates (χ2 = 0.37, P = 0.54). Transfusion for patients undergoing GC surgery, even low transfusion rates, would reduce the 5-year survival rates, and elevated the risk of tumor recurrence and postoperative complication. PMID:26426632

  2. Improving clinical outcomes using adoptively transferred immune cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick J; Cruz, Conrad Russell; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Bollard, Catherine M

    2010-10-01

    Because of the necessary immunodepletion prior to cord blood transplantation as well as the immaturity of cord blood immune cells, recipients experience a high incidence of viral infection in addition to complications observed after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, such as relapse and graft-versus-host disease. We describe current immunotherapeutic approaches to treating these complications, including the generation of antigen-specific T cells from cord blood, redirecting cord blood T cells using chimeric antigen receptors, and generating cord blood-derived natural killer cells and regulatory T cells. PMID:20818913

  3. Association of socioeconomic and clinical variables with the state of frailty among older inpatients1

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Darlene Mara dos Santos; Nader, Isabella Danielle; de Paiva, Mariana Mapelli; Dias, Flavia Aparecida; Pegorari, Maycon Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to identify the prevalence of frailty among inpatient older adults in a clinical hospital and check the association of the socioeconomic and clinical characteristics with the state of frailty. Method: observational, cross-sectional and analytical study, conducted with 255 hospitalized patients. Materials used: structured instrument for the economical and clinical data and frailty phenotype of Fried. Descriptive and bivariate statistical analysis was carried out and, by means of chi-square tests and ANOVA One-way (p<0.05). Results: the prevalence of frailty corresponded to 26.3%, while pre-frailty represented 53.3%. The highest proportion of frail seniors was identified for 80 years or older (p = 0.004), widowed (p = 0.035) and with the highest average length of stay (p = 0.006). Conclusion: inpatient older adults presented high percentages of frail states associated with socioeconomic variables and hospitalization period. The identification of the health conditions related to pre-frailty and frailty can foster the planning and implementation of the assistance to older adults in this context. PMID:26626004

  4. Variable clinical course in acute necrotizing encephalopathy and identification of a novel RANBP2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Sell, Katharina; Storch, Katja; Hahn, Gabriele; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Ramantani, Georgia; Jackson, Sandra; Neilson, Derek; von der Hagen, Maja; Hehr, Ute; Smitka, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare disease presenting with rapidly progressing encephalopathy. It usually occurs in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections. The hallmarks of ANE are the neuroradiological findings of multiple symmetric lesions in the thalami, midbrain, pons and brainstem. Most cases are sporadic and non recurrent. However, recurrent or familial forms of ANE due to mutations in RANBP2 gene have been reported. It has been suggested to give these cases the term ANE1. We report the clinical course in two male infants (P1, P2) with ANE1 and a variable clinical course and outcome. One patient is heterozygous for the most common RANBP2 missense mutation p.Thr585Met. In the other patient we observed a novel de novo missense mutation p.Trp681Cys in the RANBP2 gene causing recurrent ANE. Clinical and radiological features are presented and differential diagnoses are discussed. This report adds to the current knowledge of the phenotype in ANE, caused by mutations in RANBP2 gene. PMID:26923722

  5. Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and classes of antihypertensive agents; associations with artery remodeling and the risk of stroke.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Michiaki; Dote, Keigo; Kato, Masaya; Sasaki, Shota; Oda, Noboru; Kagawa, Eisuke; Nakano, Yoshinori; Yamane, Aya; Kubo, Yumiko; Higashihara, Tasuku; Miyauchi, Shunsuke; Harada, Wakako

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) variability was emerging as an independent risk factor for stroke. Although the mechanism is not fully understood, artery remodeling would be closely associated with the relationship between visit-to-visit BP variability and stroke. In addition, the class of antihypertensive agents is suggested to be an important determinant of visit-to-visit BP variability. This review article summarizes the recent literature on these topics. In the elderly hypertensives, strict BP control using calcium channel blockade would play a crucial role to prevent stroke via reducing the visit-to-visit BP variability. PMID:26561058

  6. [Molecular features of beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors].

    PubMed

    Asami, Ryoko; Okada, Keisuke; Chiba, Naoko; Ubukata, Kimiko; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    We studied the relationship between features of beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 45) isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors observed from January 2001 through August at a hospital for the elderly. The meanage of subjects having invasive streptococcal infection with 22 invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) strains, 2 S. pyogenes isolates, and 21 S. agalactiae (GBS) was 80 years, and 85.7% and 86.4% had underly diseases in the GBS and SDSE infections. SDSE-infected were mainly emergency woman outpatients and GBS infected were mainly man inpatients. The clinical syndrome involved pneumonia, urosepsis, and cellulitis. GBS mortality was 14.3% and SDSE mortality 27.3%. Compared to survivors, nonsurvivors had more thrombocytopenia and marked serum C-reactive protein elevation when blood culture were performed. No difference was seen in white blood cell count between bath groups. Our observations suggest that blood culture should be obtained before antimicrobials administration in elderly individuals with underlying illness who are seen at the emergency department and have laboratory blood data suggestive of infectious disease. PMID:20560419

  7. The Cord Blood Separation League Table: a Comparison of the Major Clinical Grade Harvesting Techniques for Cord Blood Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Basford, Christina; Forraz, Nicolas; Habibollah, Saba; Hanger, Kendal; McGuckin, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Well over 1 million Umbilical Cord Blood units (UCB) have been stored globally in the last 10 years. Already, over 20,000 transplants been performed using UCB for haematopoietic reconstitution alone, now this potential is joined by regenerative medicine. However, more needs to be known about processing of this stem cell source for it to reach full potential. Methods and Results: In this study we evaluated five separation methods: plasma depletion, density gradient, Hetastarch, a novel method known as PrepaCyte-CB and an automated centrifugal machine. Sepax gives the highest recovery of nucleated cells, an average of 78.8% (SD±21.36). When looking at CD34+ haematopoietic stem cells PrepaCyte-CB provided the greatest recovery at 74.47% (SD±8.89). For volume reduction density gradient was the most effective leaving 0.03×106 RBC/ml, 8 times more efficient than its nearest competitor PrepaCyte-CB (p<0.05). Finally PrepaCyte-CB processing left samples with the highest clonogenic potential after processing and more significantly after cryopreservation: 9.23 CFU/108 cells (SD±2.33), 1.5 fold more effective than its nearest rival Sepax (p<0.05). Conclusions: PrepaCyte-CB was the most flexible method; the only processing type unaffected by volume. Results indicate that processing choice is important depending on your final intended use. PMID:24855539

  8. Development of an Experimental Model to Study the Relationship Between Day-to-Day Variability in Blood Pressure and Aortic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Bouissou-Schurtz, Camille; Lindesay, Georges; Regnault, Véronique; Renet, Sophie; Safar, Michel E.; Molinie, Vincent; Dabire, Hubert; Bezie, Yvonnick

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to develop an animal model of long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and to investigate its consequences on aortic damage. We hypothesized that day-to-day BPV produced by discontinuous treatment of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) by valsartan may increase arterial stiffness. For that purpose, rats were discontinuously treated, 2 days a week, or continuously treated by valsartan (30 mg/kg/d in chow) or placebo. Telemetered BP was recorded during 2 min every 15 min, 3 days a week during 8 weeks to cover the full BP variations in response to the treatment schedule. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and aortic structure evaluated by immunohistochemistry were investigated in a second set of rats treated under the same conditions. Continuous treatment with valsartan reduced systolic BP (SBP) and reversed the aortic structural alterations observed in placebo treated SHR (decrease of medial cross-sectional area). Discontinuous treatment with valsartan decreased SBP to a similar extent but increased the day-to-day BPV, short term BPV, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and PWV as compared with continuous treatment. Despite no modifications in the elastin/collagen ratio and aortic thickness, an increase in PWV was observed following discontinuous treatment and was associated with a specific accumulation of fibronectin and its αv-integrin receptor compared with both groups of rats. Taken together the present results indicate that a discontinuous treatment with valsartan is able to induce a significant increase in day-to-day BPV coupled to an aortic phenotype close to that observed in hypertension. This experimental model should pave the way for future experimental and clinical studies aimed at assessing how long-term BPV increases aortic stiffness. PMID:26696902

  9. Improving Efficiency Using a Hybrid Approach: Revising an Intravenous/Blood Workshop in a Clinical Research Environment.

    PubMed

    Parchen, Debra A; Phelps, Sandra E; Johnson, Eunice M; Fisher, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Orienting to a new job can be overwhelming, especially if the nurse is required to develop or refine new skills, such as intravenous (IV) therapy or blood administration. At the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Nursing Department, a group of nurse educators redesigned their IV/Blood Workshop to prepare nurses with skills needed when caring for patients on protocol in a research intensive environment. Innovative teaching strategies and a hybrid instructional approach were used along with a preworkshop activity, skills lab practice, and follow-up skill validation at the unit level to provide a comprehensive curriculum while decreasing resource utilization. PMID:27187829

  10. Clinical test on circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients, based on novel immunomagnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Daoyun; Guo, Hongyin; Zhang, Lianbin; Zhou, Wenpeng

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims to establish a novel and highly sensitive method to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer. This therefore enables the discovery of invisible micrometastasis in the early stage of lung cancer, leading to better prognostic assessments of lung cancer and detection of the post-operative tumor recurrence and metastasis, treatment options, and evaluation of curative effects. In this research study, various lung cancer cells were mixed with adult blood samples to simulate blood samples of tumor patients. With novel test methods, CTCs in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients were calculated, after the reaction between the cells obtained from the mix and EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) antibodies which were marked by immunomagnetic beads. The results showed that 18 out of 42 (42.9%) lung cancer patients had a positive CTCs, which increased with tumor enlargement or metastasis. CTCs were not detected in a total of 20 blood samples from healthy volunteers. This indicated that the technology of novel immunomagnetic bead-enrichment could effectively separate and identify CTCs in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients, which is of great clinical value for prognostic assessments and treatment guidance of lung cancer. PMID:25682839

  11. Application to cows and horses of Spotchem, a dry-chemistry blood analyzer for use in veterinary clinics.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, F; Satho, M; Koyama, S; Nakadaka, K; Chiba, M; Ikeda, N; Hakamada, R; Higuchi, S; Kawamura, S

    1994-02-01

    The usefulness of a dry-chemistry blood analyzer, Spotchem SP-4410 (SP-4410) in a veterinary clinic for analysis of bovine and equine blood chemistry was studied. We quantitated total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), total bilirubin (T-Bil), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total cholesterol (T-Cho), glucose (Glu), calcium (Ca), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in bovine sera. Each sample was assayed with both the SP-4410 and an automated blood analyzer which served as a wet-chemistry reference system, and the data were analyzed with regression analysis. The correlation coefficient for AST was 0.997 being the highest for all the parameters, and all the correlation coefficients were 0.93 or higher. The coefficients of variation were lower than 5.0 except in the case of bovine T-Bil where it was 5,756. The ranges of normal reference values measured by SP-4410 were the same as those reported by other investigators in most cases, but those for GGT and CPK were slightly higher. The strongest interference was observed with hemoglobin. It seems that dry-chemical-analysis of blood serum using the SP-4410 is useful for analysis of bovine and equine blood. PMID:8085395

  12. Clinical observation of the application of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for the treatment of diabetic foot gangrene

    PubMed Central

    XU, SHI-MIN; LIANG, TING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the optimal mobilization plan in autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for the treatment of diabetic foot and to observe its clinical curative effect. A total of 127 patients with diabetic foot were treated with different doses of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize their hematopoietic stem cells. Subsequently, the extracted stem cell suspension was injected into the ischemic lower extremities along the blood vessels in the areas presenting with pathological changes. Following the treatment, the intermittent claudication distance, skin temperature, ankle brachial index and pain scores of the patients were evaluated. In addition, the associations among the mobilization time, doses and peripheral blood CD34+ level were analyzed. The collection efficiency of the stem cells was associated with the dose of G-CSF and the mobilization time. Following the injection of the autologous peripheral blood stem cell suspension, the ischemic area of the patients was improved significantly. In conclusion, autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation can promote the establishment of collateral circulation in patients with diabetic foot, and the optimal time for gathering stem cells is closely correlated with the peripheral blood CD34+ level. PMID:26889255

  13. Simple blood tests as predictive markers of disease severity and clinical condition in patients with venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Oguz; Yavuz, Celal; Kankilic, Nazim; Demirtas, Sinan; Tezcan, Orhan; Caliskan, Ahmet; Mavitas, Binali

    2016-09-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a progressive inflammatory disease. Because of its inflammatory nature, several circulating markers were investigated for predicting disease progression. We aimed to investigate simple inflammatory blood markers as predictors of clinical class and disease severity in patients with CVI. Eighty patients with CVI were divided into three groups according to clinical class (grade 1, 2 and 3) and score of disease severity (mild, moderate and severe). The basic inflammatory blood markers [neutrophil, lymphocyte, mean platelet volume (MPV), white blood cell (WBC), platelet, albumin, D-dimer, fibrinogen, fibrinogen to albumin ratio, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio] were investigated in each group. Serum neutrophil, lymphocyte, MPV, platelet count, D-dimer and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio levels were similar among the groups (P > 0.05). Although the serum WBC levels were significant in the clinical severity groups (P < 0.05), it was useless to separate each severity class. However, albumin, fibrinogen and the fibrinogen to albumin ratio were significant predictors of clinical class and disease severity. Especially, the fibrinogen to albumin ratio was detected as an independent indicator for a clinical class and disease severity with high sensitivity and specificity (75% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity for clinical class and 90% sensitivity and 88.3% specificity for disease severity). Serum fibrinogen and albumin levels can be useful parameters to determine clinical class and disease severity in patients with CVI. Moreover, the fibrinogen to albumin ratio is a more sensitive and specific predictor of the progression of CVI. PMID:26650463

  14. High Frequency of Detection by PCR of Viral Nucleic Acid in The Blood of Infants Presenting with Clinical Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen E; Storch, Gregory A; Lee, Caroline K; Ward, Kent E; Danon, Saar; Simon, Catherine M; Delaney, Jeffrey W; Tong, Alan; Canter, Charles E

    2016-02-01

    Specific viruses are associated with pediatric myocarditis, but the prevalence of viral DNAemia detected by blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is unknown. We evaluated the prevalence of known cardiotropic viruses (enterovirus, adenovirus, human herpesvirus 6, and parvovirus B19) in children with clinical myocarditis (n = 21). Results were compared to pediatric controls with similar viral PCR testing. The majority of positive PCR (89 %) was noted in children ≤12 months of age at diagnosis compared to older children. Infant myocarditis patients (8/10) had increased the prevalence of PCR positivity compared to infant pediatric controls (4/114) (p < 0.0001). Other than age, patient characteristics at diagnosis were similar between PCR-positive and PCR-negative patients. Both PCR-negative myocarditis infants had clinical recovery at follow-up. Of the PCR-positive myocarditis infants, 4 had clinical recovery, 2 developed chronic cardiomyopathy, 1 underwent heart transplant, and 1 died. Infants with clinical myocarditis have a high rate of blood viral positivity, which is higher compared to older children with myocarditis and healthy infant controls. Age-related differences in PCR positivity may be due to differences in host and/or virus characteristics. Our findings suggest that viral blood PCR may be a useful diagnostic tool and identify patients who would potentially benefit from virus-specific therapy. PMID:26499513

  15. Psychological Variables Potentially Implicated in Opioid-Related Mortality as Observed in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Passik, Steven D.; Lowery, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-related deaths in the United States have become a public health problem, with accidental and unintended overdoses being especially troubling. Screening for psychological risk factors is an important first step in safeguarding against nonadherence practices and identifying patients who may be vulnerable to the risks associated with opioid therapy. Validated screening instruments can aid in this attempt as a complementary tool to clinicians’ assessments. A structured screening is imperative as part of an assessment, as clinician judgment is not the most reliable method of identifying nonadherence. As a complement to formal screening, we present for discussion and possible future study certain psychological variables observed during years of clinical practice that may be linked to medication nonadherence and accidental overdose. These variables include catastrophizing, fear, impulsivity, attention deficit disorders, existential distress, and certain personality disorders. In our experience, chronic pain patients with dual diagnoses may become “chemical copers” as a way of coping with their negative emotion. For these patients, times of stress could lead to accidental overdose. Behavioral, cognitive-behavioral (acceptance and commitment, dialectical behavior), existential (meaning-centered, dignity), and psychotropic therapies have been effective in treating these high-risk comorbidities, while managing expectations of pain relief appears key to preventing accidental overdose. PMID:21668755

  16. Variable number of tandem repeats in clinical strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Scherer, S; van Leeuwen, W; Willemse, D; van Alphen, L; Verbrugh, H

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm capable of identifying short repeat motifs was developed and used to screen the whole genome sequence available for Haemophilus influenzae, since some of these repeats have been shown to affect bacterial virulence. Various di- to hexanucleotide repeats were identified, confirming and extending previous findings on the existence of variable-number-of-tandem-repeat loci (VNTRs). Repeats with units of 7 or 8 nucleotides were not encountered. For all of the 3- to 6-nucleotide repeats in the H. influenzae chromosome, PCR tests capable of detecting allelic polymorphisms were designed. Fourteen of 18 of the potential VNTRs were indeed highly polymorphic when different strains were screened. Two of the potential VNTRs appeared to be short and homogeneous in length; another one may be specific for the H. influenzae Rd strain only. One of the primer sets generated fingerprint-type DNA banding patterns. The various repeat types differed with respect to intrinsic stability as well. It was noted for separate colonies derived from a single clinical specimen or strains passaged for several weeks on chocolate agar plates that the lengths of the VNTRs did not change. When several strains from different patients infected during an outbreak of lung disease were analyzed, increased but limited variation was encountered in all VNTR sites analyzed. One of the 5-nucleotide VNTRs proved to be hypervariable. This variability may reflect the molecular basis of a mechanism used by H. influenzae bacteria to successfully colonize and infect different human individuals. PMID:9393791

  17. Prevalence of inter-arm blood pressure difference among clinical out-patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Balkishan; Ramawat, Pramila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An increased inter-arm blood pressure difference is an easily determined physical finding, may use as an indicator of cardio vascular event and other sever diseases. Authors evaluated 477 patients to determine the prevalence and significance of inter-arm blood pressure difference. Methodology 477 routine outdoor patients selected to observe the inter-arm blood pressure difference. Age, height, weight, body mass index, history of disease and blood pressure recorded. Results The prevalence of ≥10 mmHg systolic inter-arm blood pressure difference was 5.0% was more as compared to 3.8% had diastolic inter-arm blood pressure difference. The prevalence of systolic and diastolic inter-arm difference between 6 to 10 mmHg was 31.4% and 27.9% respectively. Mean systolic inter-arm blood pressure difference was significantly higher among those patients had a multisystem disorder (10.57±0.98 mmHg) and followed by patients with cardiovascular disease (10.22±0.67 mmHg) as compared to healthy patients (2.71±0.96 mmHg). Various diseases highly influenced the increase in blood pressure irrespective of systolic or diastolic was confirmed strongly significant (p<0.001) at different inter arm blood pressure difference levels. Conclusion This study supports the view of inter-arm blood pressure difference as an alarming stage of increased disease risk that incorporated to investigate potential problems at an early diagnostic stage. A significant mean difference between left and right arm blood pressure recorded for many diseases. PMID:27103905

  18. ECT of major depressed patients in relation to biological and clinical variables: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Wahlund, Björn; von Rosen, Dietrich

    2003-07-01

    The knowledge that spontaneous or induced convulsions can improve mental disorders has been present for several centuries. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has undergone fundamental changes since its introduction, and in the last 15-20 years there has been a legitimate renewal of interest for this therapy. Today the indications for use of ECT seem well codified, and its technique and practices have evolved considerably. It is now firmly established as an important and effective method of treating certain severe forms of depression. However, still very little is known about the mechanism of ECT. In this paper, first, we will give a short overview as to how far we have got concerning ECT in relation to various clinical and biological variables. Second, we will describe ECT in relation to electroencephalographic (EEG) technique and clinical outcome as well as give some proposals as to how to go on with the data analysis of EEG. In conclusion, the superior effect of ECT compared to other antidepressives in severe depression may depend on neurochemical and neurobiological cascade effects initiated by repeated treatments. Above all, ECT offers a unique experimental opportunity to study how neuromodulation of the major transmitter systems may be involved in brain dynamics and alteration of connectivity. PMID:12827140

  19. Comparison of plastic vs. glass evacuated serum-separator (SST) blood-drawing tubes for common clinical chemistry determinations.

    PubMed

    Hill, B M; Laessig, R H; Koch, D D; Hassemer, D J

    1992-08-01

    We evaluated a plastic evacuated blood-drawing tube containing an integral serum-separating barrier gel, by direct comparison with a glass counterpart. The plastic tube demonstrated no differences when compared for common clinical chemistry analytes with multiple types of instruments and systems. A total of 260 such different combinations were studied with emphasis on tests sensitive to drawing and handling indexes such as lactate dehydrogenase and potassium. A total of six separate blood drawings were tested with no significant differences noted in these tests. The total study included subjective evaluations of the plastic tube's use as a blood-drawing device and objective studies based on quantitative test results from normal and hospitalized patients and use of the primary sampling tubes (both plastic and glass) for 48-h storage. PMID:1643717

  20. A comparative study on the blood and milk cell counts of healthy, subclinical, and clinical mastitis Karan Fries cows

    PubMed Central

    Alhussien, Mohanned; Kaur, Mandheer; Manjari, Pasumarti; Kimothi, Shiv Prasad; Mohanty, Ashok K.; Dang, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was aimed to study the use of cell counts as an early indicator of mammary health. Materials and Methods: Milk and blood cell counts were estimated from 8 healthy, 8 subclinical (SCM), and 8 clinically mastitis (CM) groups of Karan Fries (KF) cows. Results: Total leucocyte counts and neutrophil percent in blood and milk somatic cells and milk neutrophil percent of healthy cows increased significantly (p<0.05) in SCM cows and CM cows. Viability of blood and milk neutrophils was more in healthy cows, but decreased significantly (p<0.05) in SCM and CM cows. Significant (p<0.05) decrease were also observed in both the blood and milk lymphocytes and monocytes of SCM and CM cows. Phagocytic activity (PA) of blood neutrophils also decreased significantly (p<0.05) in SCM cows. There was no difference between the PA of SCM and CM cows. Milk neutrophil percent was more in the SCM and clinically infected milk than in the blood of these cows. About 96-97% of the neutrophils had segmented nucleus in both healthy and subclinical milk, whereas, 2-3% were having band shaped or immature nuclei. There was a significant decrease in the segmented neutrophils, whereas, band neutrophils increase significantly to about 5% in the infected milk of mastitic cows. Viability of the milk neutrophils decreased more in case of subclinical and clinical milk as compared to that of blood. PA was found to be highest in the milk of healthy group of cows, but decreased significantly (p<0.05) in subclinically infected cows. However, there was no difference between the PA of milk neutrophils of SCM and CM cows. PA of milk was also found to be significantly lower in the milk of healthy cows when compared to that of blood neutrophils. Conclusion: This study indicated that percent neutrophils and their type in conjunction with milk somatic cell counts can be used as a more reliable indicator of mammary health in cows. PMID:27047156

  1. Demographic variables, clinical aspects, and medicolegal implications in a population of patients with adjustment disorder

    PubMed Central

    Anastasia, Annalisa; Colletti, Chiara; Cuoco, Valentina; Quartini, Adele; Urso, Stefania; Rinaldi, Raffaella; Bersani, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although adjustment disorder (AD) is considered as residual diagnosis and receives little attention in research, it plays an important role in clinical practice and also assumes an increasingly important role in the field of legal medicine, where the majority of diagnostic frameworks (eg, mobbing) often refer to AD. Our study aimed to look for specific stressor differences among demographic and clinical variables in a naturalistic setting of patients with AD. Methods A restrospective statistical analysis of the data of patients diagnosed with AD from November 2009 to September 2012, identified via manual search from the archive of the outpatient setting at the University Unit of Psychiatry “A. Fiorini” Hospital, Terracina (Latina, Italy), was performed. Results The sample consisted of 93 patients (46 males and 47 females), aged between 26 and 85, with medium–high educational level who were mainly employed. In most cases (54.80%), a diagnosis of AD with mixed anxiety and depressed mood was made. In all, 72% of the sample reported a negative family history for psychiatric disorders. In 22.60%, a previous history of psychopathology, especially mood disorders (76.19%), was reported. The main stressors linked to the development of AD were represented by working problems (32.30%), family problems (23.70%), and/or somatic disease (22.60%) with significant differences with respect to age and sex. Half of the patients were subjected to a single first examination; 24.47% requested a copy of medical records. Conclusion Confirming previous data from previous reports, our results suggest that AD may have a distinct profile in demographic and clinical terms. Increased scientific attention is hoped, particularly focused on addressing a better definition of diagnostic criteria, whose correctness and accuracy are critical, especially in situations with medicolegal implications. PMID:27099504

  2. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Coderre, Terence J; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2009-01-01

    Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients. PMID:19775468

  3. Pancratistatin induces apoptosis in clinical leukemia samples with minimal effect on non-cancerous peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancratistatin, a natural compound extracted from Hymenocallis littoralis, can selectively induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. In this ex vivo study, we evaluated the effect of pancratistatin on peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from 15 leukemia patients prior to clinical intervention of newly diagnosed patients, as well as others of different ages in relapse and at various disease progression states. Results Mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers and leukemia patients were exposed to 1 μM pancratistatin for up to 48 h. Irrespective of leukemia type, pancratistatin induced apoptosis in the leukemic samples, with minimal effects on non-cancerous peripheral blood mononuclear control cells. Conclusion Our results show that pancratistatin is an effective and selective anti-cancer agent with potential for advancement to clinical trials. PMID:20205924

  4. An overview of the role of microparticles/microvesicles in blood components: Are they clinically beneficial or harmful?

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Chou, Ming-Li; Goubran, Hadi; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2015-10-01

    blood collection on MP generation, while clinical research should clarify links of MPs with transfusion reactions and certain clinical disorders. Harmonization and consensus in sampling protocols, sample handling and processing, and assessment methods are needed to achieve consensual interpretations. This review focuses on the role of MPs as an essential laboratory tool and as a most effective player in transfusion science and medicine and in health and disease. PMID:26596959

  5. A facile method to establish human induced pluripotent stem cells from adult blood cells under feeder-free and xeno-free culture conditions: a clinically compliant approach.

    PubMed

    Chou, Bin-Kuan; Gu, Haihui; Gao, Yongxing; Dowey, Sarah N; Wang, Ying; Shi, Jun; Li, Yanxin; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Tao; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-04-01

    Reprogramming human adult blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) cells by transient plasmid expression is becoming increasingly popular as an attractive method for generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells without the genomic alteration caused by genome-inserting vectors. However, its efficiency is relatively low with adult MNCs compared with cord blood MNCs and other fetal cells and is highly variable among different adult individuals. We report highly efficient iPS cell derivation under clinically compliant conditions via three major improvements. First, we revised a combination of three EBNA1/OriP episomal vectors expressing five transgenes, which increased reprogramming efficiency by ≥10-50-fold from our previous vectors. Second, human recombinant vitronectin proteins were used as cell culture substrates, alleviating the need for feeder cells or animal-sourced proteins. Finally, we eliminated the previously critical step of manually picking individual iPS cell clones by pooling newly emerged iPS cell colonies. Pooled cultures were then purified based on the presence of the TRA-1-60 pluripotency surface antigen, resulting in the ability to rapidly expand iPS cells for subsequent applications. These new improvements permit a consistent and reliable method to generate human iPS cells with minimal clonal variations from blood MNCs, including previously difficult samples such as those from patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. In addition, this method of efficiently generating iPS cells under feeder-free and xeno-free conditions allows for the establishment of clinically compliant iPS cell lines for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25742692

  6. Brain Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade Improves Dairy Blood Pressure Variability via Sympathoinhibition in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal blood pressure (BP) elevation in early morning is known to cause cardiovascular events. Previous studies have suggested that one of the reasons in abnormal dairy BP variability is sympathoexcitation. We have demonstrated that brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) causes sympathoexcitation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether central AT1R blockade attenuates the excess BP elevation in rest-to-active phase in hypertensive rats or not. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with intracerebroventricular infusion (ICV) of AT1R receptor blocker (ARB), oral administration of hydralazine (HYD), or ICV of vehicle (VEH). Telemetric averaged mean BP (MBP) was measured at early morning (EM), after morning (AM), and night (NT). At EM, MBP was significantly lower in ARB to a greater extent than in HYD compared to VEH, though MBP at AM was the same in ARB and HYD. At NT, MBP was also significantly lower in ARB than in HYD. These results in MBP were compatible to those in sympathoexcitation and suggest that central AT1R blockade attenuates excess BP elevation in early active phase and continuous BP elevation during rest phase independent of depressor response in hypertensive rats. PMID:25918643

  7. Clinically suspected acute myopericarditis with cardiac tamponade associated with peripheral blood eosinophilia presenting in early pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical presentation of eosinophilic myocarditis may vary from asymptomatic to the manifestation of severe symptoms, including cardiac tamponade and arrhythmias. In pregnant patients with this condition, drugs must be used cautiously up to approximately the 4th month of pregnancy because drug use should be limited during the period of fetal organogenesis. Case presentation A 30-year-old Asian woman at 14 weeks of pregnancy with progressive malaise was hospitalized. The electrocardiogram revealed ST elevation and low QRS voltage. Echocardiography revealed massive pericardial effusion and myocardial swelling. A laboratory examination revealed an increase in her white blood cell count, with a predominance of neutrophils. Pericardial drainage was performed for relief of the cardiac tamponade. The pericardial effusion revealed an abundance of eosinophils. Subsequently, the peripheral blood eosinophil count began to rise, and the patient was clinically diagnosed with eosinophilic myopericarditis. The patient’s condition improved rapidly following the initiation of prednisolone treatment, and she finally delivered a full-term normal infant. Conclusions A patient with clinically suspected myopericarditis in the early stage of pregnancy who improved rapidly with pericardial drainage and prednisolone therapy, and successfully delivered a normal full-term infant; the diagnosis was made in the early stage of the disease, based on the detection of an abundance of eosinophils in the pericardial effusion preceding the subsequent development of peripheral blood eosinophilia. PMID:23668918

  8. Blood donors on teratogenic drugs and donor deferral periods in a clinical situation.

    PubMed

    Shin, S Y; Shin, Y H; Lee, S W; Shin, J Y; Kim, C H

    2012-05-01

    Deferral of blood donors taking teratogenic drugs is critical. From March 2008 to January 2009, we analysed stored blood specimens from donors who had taken teratogenic drugs and whose blood was transfused to women of childbearing age to determine the plasma concentration at the time of donation using high-performance liquid chromatography. In total, 167 specimens were examined. The numbers of specimens exceeding the quantification limit were 7, 39, 4, 2 and 1 for finasteride, isotretinoin, acitretin, etretinate and dutasteride, respectively. Finasteride was beyond the recommended drug deferral period in one specimen. These results may help create practical deferral policies. PMID:22211799

  9. Effect of Camel Milk on Blood Sugar and Lipid Profile of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ejtahed, Hanieh Sadat; Niasari Naslaji, Amir; Mirmiran, Parvin; Zraif Yeganeh, Maryam; Hedayati, Mehdi; Azizi, Fereidoun; Moosavi Movahedi, Aliakbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that camel milk consumption has a definite decreasing effect on the prevalence of diabetes. However, most of these studies were conducted on patients with type 1 diabetes, whereas studies on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are limited. In vitro experiments have shown that camel milk was able to decrease blood glucose concentration. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of camel and cow milk on blood sugar, lipid profile, and blood pressure of patients with T2DM. Patients and Methods: In a randomized single-blinded controlled clinical trial, 20 patients with T2DM were randomly allocated into two groups. Participants consumed 500 mL of either camel milk (intervention group) or cow milk (control group) daily for two months. Results: Mean of insulin concentration was significantly increased from 64.59 to 84.03 pmol/L in the camel milk group during the study (P < 0.05). No significant differences were shown in fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and blood pressure between the two groups at the end of study. There was significant increase in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the study in both groups, but no significant difference was seen between the two groups. Conclusions: Camel milk increased insulin level in patients with T2DM and might contribute to glycemic control in T2DM. PMID:25745496

  10. The state of the science of whole blood: lessons learned at Mayo Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, James R.; Zielinski, Martin D.; Jenkins, Donald

    2016-01-01

    AABB Standards specify that ABO group-specific whole blood is the only acceptable choice for whole blood transfusions. Although universal donor group O stored whole blood (SWB) was used extensively by the military during the wars of the mid-twentieth century, its use has fallen out of favor and has never been used to great extent in the civilian trauma population. Interest in the use of whole blood has been renewed, particularly in light of its potential value in far-forward military and other austere environments. Evidence of preserved platelet function in SWB has heightened enthusiasm for a “one stop shop” resuscitation product providing volume, oxygen carrying capacity, and hemostatic effects. Experience with universal donor group O SWB is required to ascertain whether its use will be an advance in trauma care. Described here is the process of establishing a universal donor group O SWB at a civilian trauma center in the United States. PMID:27100754

  11. [Clinical value of indirect automatic blood pressure determination in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Banasiak, W; Telichowski, C; Telichowski, A; Kokot, K

    1992-02-01

    The value of indirect blood pressure in patients with atrial fibrillation was studied. Three methods were compared; single measurement, mean of three measurements and mean value of automatic measurement during 2-hours and whole day. The study comprised 13 patients; 7 men and 6 women aged 52-77 (mean 62.8 congruent to 6.6) hospitalized for cardiac diseases. The measurement were done using the mercury sphygmomanometer and auscultatory Korotkoff technique and automatic blood pressure monitoring (Acutracker--Medilog Oxford). The investigations showed that systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hours monitoring were lower than single or repeated three measurements. The highest correlation coefficient to 24-hours recording was found for the mean value of 2-hours recording. It seems that blood pressure measurement in patients with atrial fibrillation (3-times in few minutes intervals) should be verified by using prolonged automatic recording. PMID:1523142

  12. The state of the science of whole blood: lessons learned at Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, James R; Zielinski, Martin D; Jenkins, Donald

    2016-04-01

    AABB Standards specify that ABO group-specific whole blood is the only acceptable choice for whole blood transfusions. Although universal donor group O stored whole blood (SWB) was used extensively by the military during the wars of the mid-twentieth century, its use has fallen out of favor and has never been used to great extent in the civilian trauma population. Interest in the use of whole blood has been renewed, particularly in light of its potential value in far-forward military and other austere environments. Evidence of preserved platelet function in SWB has heightened enthusiasm for a "one stop shop" resuscitation product providing volume, oxygen carrying capacity, and hemostatic effects. Experience with universal donor group O SWB is required to ascertain whether its use will be an advance in trauma care. Described here is the process of establishing a universal donor group O SWB at a civilian trauma center in the United States. PMID:27100754

  13. Multifactorial analysis of human blood cell responses to clinical total body irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, J. M.; Stokes, T. R.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Multiple regression analysis techniques are used to study the effects of therapeutic radiation exposure, number of fractions, and time on such quantal responses as tumor control and skin injury. The potential of these methods for the analysis of human blood cell responses is demonstrated and estimates are given of the effects of total amount of exposure and time of protraction in determining the minimum white blood cell concentration observed after exposure of patients from four disease groups.

  14. The Location of The Inferior and Superior Temporal Blood Vessels and Inter-Individual Variability of The Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Donald C.; Salant, Jennifer A.; Arthur, Stella N.; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if adjusting for blood vessel location can decrease the inter-subject variability of retinal nerve fiber (RNFL) thickness measured with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Subjects and Methods One eye of 50 individuals with normal vision was tested with OCT and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). The SLP and OCT RNFL thickness profiles were determined for a peripapillary circle 3.4 mm in diameter. The midpoints between the superior temporal vein and artery (STva) and the inferior temporal vein and artery (ITva) were determined at the location where the vessels cross the 3.4 mm circle. The average OCT and SLP RNFL thicknesses for quadrants and arcuate sectors of the lower and upper optic disc were obtained before and after adjusting for blood vessel location. This adjustment was done by shifting the RNFL profiles based upon the locations of the STva and ITva relative to the mean locations of all 50 individuals. Results Blood vessel locations ranged over 39° (STva) and 33° (ITva) for the 50 eyes. The location of the leading edge of the OCT and SLP profiles was correlated with the location of the blood vessels for both the superior [r=0.72 (OCT) and 0.72(SLP)] and inferior [r=0.34 and 0.43] temporal vessels. However, the variability in the OCT and SLP thickness measurements showed little change due to shifting. After shifting, the difference in the coefficient of variation ranged from −2.1% (shifted less variable) to +1.7% (unshifted less variable). Conclusion The shape of the OCT and SLP RNFL profiles varied systematically with the location of the superior and inferior superior veins and arteries. However, adjusting for the location of these major temporal blood vessels did not decrease the variability for measures of OCT or SLP RNFL thickness. PMID:19661824

  15. Clinical variables impacting on the estimation of utilities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Miravitlles, Marc; Huerta, Alicia; Valle, Manuel; García-Sidro, Patricia; Forné, Carles; Crespo, Carlos; López-Campos, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Health utilities are widely used in health economics as a measurement of an individual’s preference and show the value placed on different health states over a specific period. Thus, health utilities are used as a measure of the benefits of health interventions in terms of quality-adjusted life years. This study aimed to determine the demographic and clinical variables significantly associated with health utilities for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Patients and methods This was a multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013. Patients were aged ≥40 years, with spirometrically confirmed COPD. Utility values were derived from the preference-based generic questionnaire EQ-5D-3L applying weighted Spanish societal preferences. Demographic and clinical variables associated with utilities were assessed by univariate and multivariate linear regression models. Results Three hundred and forty-six patients were included, of whom 85.5% were male. The mean age was 67.9 (standard deviation [SD] =9.7) years and the mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (%) was 46.2% (SD =15.5%); 80.3% were former smokers, and the mean smoking history was 54.2 (SD =33.2) pack-years. Median utilities (interquartile range) were 0.81 (0.26) with a mean value of 0.73 (SD =0.29); 22% of patients had a utility value of 1 (ceiling effect) and 3.2% had a utility value lower than 0. The factors associated with utilities in the multivariate analysis were sex (beta =-0.084, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.154; -0.013 for females), number of exacerbations the previous year (−0.027, 95% CI: −0.044; -0.010), and modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale (mMRC) score (−0.123 [95% CI: −0.185; −0.061], −0.231 [95% CI: −0.301; −0.161], and −0.559 [95% CI: −0.660; −0.458] for mMRC scores 2, 3, and 4 versus 1), all P<0.05. Conclusion Multivariate analysis showed that female sex, frequent

  16. Incidence and clinical variables associated with streptococcal throat infections: a prospective diagnostic cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Little, Paul; Hobbs, FD Richard; Mant, David; McNulty, Cliodna AM; Mullee, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of pharyngitis is commonly based on features which are thought to be associated with Lancefield group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GABHS) but it is debatable which features best predict GABHS. Non-group A strains share major virulence factors with group A, but it is unclear how commonly they present and whether their presentation differs. Aim To assess the incidence and clinical variables associated with streptococcal infections. Design and setting Prospective diagnostic cohort study in UK primary care. Method The presence of pathogenic streptococci from throat swabs was assessed among patients aged ≥5 years presenting with acute sore throat. Results Pathogenic streptococci were found in 204/597 patients (34%, 95% CI = 31 to 38%): 33% (68/204) were non-group A streptococci, mostly C (n = 29), G (n = 18) and B (n = 17); rarely D (n = 3) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 1). Patients presented with similar features whether the streptococci were group A or non-group A. The features best predicting A, C or G beta-haemolytic streptococci were patient’s assessment of severity (odds ratio [OR] for a bad sore throat 3.31, 95% CI = 1.24 to 8.83); doctors’ assessment of severity (severely inflamed tonsils OR 2.28, 95% CI = 1.39 to 3.74); absence of a bad cough (OR 2.73, 95% CI = 1.56 to 4.76), absence of a coryza (OR 1.54, 95% CI = 0.99 to 2.41); and moderately bad or worse muscle aches (OR 2.20, 95% CI = 1.41 to 3.42). Conclusion Non-group A strains commonly cause streptococcal sore throats, and present with similar symptomatic clinical features to group A streptococci. The best features to predict streptococcal sore throat presenting in primary care deserve revisiting. PMID:23211183

  17. Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Bone Marrow: A Prespecified Analysis from the Phase III Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network Protocol 0201.

    PubMed

    Burns, Linda J; Logan, Brent R; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Miller, John P; Drexler, Rebecca; Spellman, Stephen; Switzer, Galen E; Wingard, John R; Anasetti, Claudio; Confer, Dennis L

    2016-06-01

    We report a comparison of time to recovery, side effects, and change in blood counts from baseline to after donation from unrelated donors who participated in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network phase III randomized, multicenter trial (0201) in which donor-recipient pairs were randomized to either peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) or bone marrow (BM) donation. Of the entire cohort, 262 donated PBSC and 264 donated BM; 372 (71%) donors were from domestic and 154 (29%) were from international centers (145 German and 9 Canadian). PBSC donors recovered in less time, with a median time to recovery of 1 week compared with 2.3 weeks for BM donors. The number of donors reporting full recovery was significantly greater for donors of PBSC than of BM at 1, 2, and 3 weeks and 3 months after donation. Multivariate analysis showed that PBSC donors were more likely to recover at any time after donation compared with BM donors (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.73 to 2.50; P < .001). Other characteristics that significantly increased the likelihood of complete recovery were being an international donor and donation in more recent years. Donors of BM were more likely to report grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, body symptoms, and fatigue at 1 week after donation. In logistic regression analysis of domestic donors only in which toxicities at peri-collection time points (day 5 filgrastim for PBSC donors and day 2 after collection of BM donors) could be analyzed, no variable was significantly associated with grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, including product donated (BM versus PBSC; odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, .74 to 1.74; P = .556). Blood counts were affected by product donated, with greater mean change from baseline to after donation for white blood cells, neutrophils, mononuclear cells, and platelets in PBSC donors whereas BM donors experienced a greater mean change in hemoglobin. This analysis provided an enhanced understanding of donor events as

  18. Elevated HbA1c Levels Are Associated with the Blunted Autonomic Response Assessed by Heart Rate Variability during Blood Volume Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kamakura, Miho; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2016-01-01

    A high glycemic status increases the risk for autonomic dysfunction and cardiovascular failure. The aim of this study was to investigate time-dependent changes in the autonomic response and cardiovascular dynamics and the association between the level of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and autonomic response during blood volume reduction. The study population consisted of 26 preoperative participants who were scheduled for autologous blood donation (200-400 mL of whole blood) for intraoperative or postoperative use. These participants without circulatory, respiratory, or brain disease and diabetes mellitus were grouped according to their HbA1c levels: < 6.5% (n = 18) and ≥ 6.5% (n = 8). We measured blood pressure (BP) and analyzed heart rate variability (HRV) to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation throughout blood donation. During blood volume reduction, which was about 10% of the circulating blood volume, the BP and heart rate varied within normal ranges in both groups. The high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, significantly decreased and increased with the progression of blood volume reduction, respectively, in the HbA1c < 6.5% group. In contrast, in the HbA1c ≥ 6.5% group, the HF component did not significantly change, and the increase in the LF/HF ratio was delayed. Time-dependent changes in HRV were related to blood volume reduction only in the HbA1c < 6.5% group. Thus, elevated HbA1c levels are associated with the decrease in the autonomic response induced by blood volume reduction. PMID:27615262

  19. Components of health: an analysis in rheumatoid arthritis using quality of life questionnaires and clinical and laboratory variables.

    PubMed Central

    Borstlap, M; van de Laar, M; Zant, J; van der Korst, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To gain insight into the overlap between additional information supplied by recently developed health status instruments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and traditional clinical and laboratory tests. METHODS--A cross sectional study of 282 outpatients with RA was made. From each patient, variables of clinical and laboratory measurements were obtained and the modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ) and a Dutch quality of life questionnaire, the IRGL, were completed. These variables were analysed for their interrelationship. RESULTS--Clinical and laboratory variables correlated significantly with the scales of the physical dimension and the disease impact scale of the IRGL. Their significant correlations with the IRGL psychological scales were weak. There were no significant correlations between any of the traditional variables and the IRGL social scales. Factor analysis yielded five factors: functionality, pain, depressive mood, social support, and laboratory. The laboratory factor is a measure of the disease process. The other four factors provide a health model. CONCLUSION--The results suggest that the IRGL questionnaire that was studied covers a complete health model that incorporates aspects of health that are not measured by clinical and laboratory tests. A simple questionnaire for the psychological and social dimension of health status, however, would probably be more cost effective and easier to use in clinical practice. PMID:8239759

  20. Design and development of microcontroller-based clinical chemistry analyser for measurement of various blood biochemistry parameters.

    PubMed

    Taneja, S R; Gupta, R C; Kumar, Jagdish; Thariyan, K K; Verma, Sanjeev

    2005-01-01

    Clinical chemistry analyser is a high-performance microcontroller-based photometric biochemical analyser to measure various blood biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, urea, protein, bilirubin, and so forth, and also to measure and observe enzyme growth occurred while performing the other biochemical tests such as ALT (alkaline amino transferase), amylase, AST (aspartate amino transferase), and so forth. These tests are of great significance in biochemistry and used for diagnostic purposes and classifying various disorders and diseases such as diabetes, liver malfunctioning, renal diseases, and so forth. An inexpensive clinical chemistry analyser developed by the authors is described in this paper. This is an open system in which any reagent kit available in the market can be used. The system is based on the principle of absorbance transmittance photometry. System design is based around 80C31 microcontroller with RAM, EPROM, and peripheral interface devices. The developed system incorporates light source, an optical module, interference filters of various wave lengths, peltier device for maintaining required temperature of the mixture in flow cell, peristaltic pump for sample aspiration, graphic LCD display for displaying blood parameters, patients test results and kinetic test graph, 40 columns mini thermal printer, and also 32-key keyboard for executing various functions. The lab tests conducted on the instrument include versatility of the analyzer, flexibility of the software, and treatment of sample. The prototype was tested and evaluated over 1000 blood samples successfully for seventeen blood parameters. Evaluation was carried out at Government Medical College and Hospital, the Department of Biochemistry. The test results were found to be comparable with other standard instruments. PMID:18924737

  1. Increased peripheral blood CD5+ B cells predict earlier conversion to MS in high-risk clinically isolated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Villar, Luisa M; Espiño, Mercedes; Roldán, Ernesto; Marín, Nieves; Costa-Frossard, Lucienne; Muriel, Alfonso; Alvarez-Cermeño, José C

    2011-06-01

    Clinically isolated syndrome patients (CIS) with oligoclonal IgG bands (OCGB) are at high risk for clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the outcome for individual patients is unpredictable and the search for reliable blood markers predicting early conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS) has clinical relevance. CD5+ B cells (CD5+Bc) are involved in some autoimmune diseases. This study investigated whether high blood CD5+Bc percentage can predict CIS conversion to MS. Fifty-five consecutive CIS showing OCGB were prospectively studied. Every patient underwent a brain MRI study and a flow cytometry analysis of CD5+Bc percentage. Conversion to MS was studied during follow-up. The CD5+Bc percentage was assessed in 40 controls and a cut-off value of 3.5% (mean+2 SD) was calculated. A blood CD5+Bc percentage above this value predicted earlier conversion to MS in the whole group (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.40; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.69-6.68; p=0.0005) and in CIS patients fulfilling three or more Barkhof-Tintoré criteria plus OCGB, who showed higher risk for MS (HR: 3.79; 95% CI: 1.86-15.32; p=0.0018). Multivariate analysis also showed a predictive value for high blood CD5+Bc count (HR: 4.3; 95% CI: 1.9-9.5; p<0.0001). It was concluded that high percentages of CD5+Bc independently associate with increased risk of early conversion to MS in CIS patients with OCGB and Barkhof-Tintoré criteria. PMID:21436320

  2. Variability amongst radiographers in the categorization of clinical acceptability for digital trauma radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decoster, Robin; Toomey, Rachel; Smits, Dirk; Mol, Harrie; Verhelle, Filip; Butler, Marie-Louise

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Radiographers evaluate anatomical structures to judge clinical acceptability of a radiograph. Whether a radiograph is deemed acceptable for diagnosis or not depends on the individual decision of the radiographer. Individual decisions cause variation in the accepted image quality. To minimise these variations definitions of acceptability, such as in RadLex, were developed. On which criteria radiographers attribute a RadLex categories to radiographs is unknown. Insight into these criteria helps to further optimise definitions and reduce variability in acceptance between radiographers. Therefore, this work aims the evaluation of the correlation between the RadLex classification and the evaluation of anatomical structures, using a Visual Grading Analysis (VGA) Methods: Four radiographers evaluated the visibility of five anatomical structures of 25 lateral cervical spine radiographs on a secondary class display with a VGA. They judged clinical acceptability of each radiograph using RadLex. Relations between VGAS and RadLex category were analysed with Kendall's Tau correlation and Nagelkerke pseudo-R². Results: The overall VGA score (VGAS) and the RadLex score correlate (rτ= 0.62, p<0.01, R2=0.72) strongly. The observers' evaluation of contrast between bone, air (trachea) and soft tissue has low value in predicting (rτ=0.55, p<0.01, R2=0.03) the RadLex score. The reproduction of spinous processes (rτ=0.67, p<0.01, R2=0.31) and the evaluation of the exposure (rτ=0.65, p<0.01, R2=0.56) have a strong correlation with high predictive value for the RadLex score. Conclusion: RadLex scores and VGAS correlate positively, strongly and significantly. The predictive value of bony structures may support the use of these in the judgement of clinical acceptability. Considerable inter-observer variations in the VGAS within a certain RadLex category, suggest that observers use of observer specific cut

  3. Thrombocytopenia in common variable immunodeficiency patients – clinical course, management, and effect of immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Siedlar, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Szaflarska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency of humoral immunity with heterogeneous clinical features. Diagnosis of CVID is based on hypogammaglobulinaemia, low production of specific antibodies, and disorders of cellular immunity. The standard therapy includes replacement of specific antibodies with human immunoglobulin, prophylaxis, and symptomatic therapy of infections. High prevalence of autoimmunity is characteristic for CVID, most commonly: thrombocytopaenia and neutropaenia, celiac disease, and systemic autoimmune diseases. The study included seven children diagnosed with CVID and treated with immunoglobulin substitution from 2 to 12 years. Thrombocytopenia was diagnosed prior to CVID in four children, developed during immunoglobulin substitution in three children. In one boy with CVID and thrombocytopaenia, haemolytic anaemia occurred, so a diagnosis of Evans syndrome was established. Therapy of thrombocytopaenia previous to CVID included steroids and/or immunoglobulins in high dose, and azathioprine. In children with CVID on regular immunoglobulin substitution, episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia were associated with infections and were treated with high doses of immunoglobulins and steroids. In two patients only chronic thrombocytopaenia was noted. Splenectomy was necessary in one patient because of severe course of thrombocytopaenia. The results of the study indicated a supportive role of regular immunoglobulin substitution in patients with CVID and chronic thrombocytopaenia. However, regular substitution of immunoglobulins in CVID patients did not prevent the occurrence of autoimmune thrombocytopaenia episodes or exacerbations of chronic form. In episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia or exacerbations of chronic thrombocytopaenia, infusions of immunoglobulins in high dose are effective, despite previous regular substitution in the replacing dose. PMID:26155188

  4. Staphylococcus agnetis sp. nov., a coagulase-variable species from bovine subclinical and mild clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Taponen, Suvi; Supré, Karlien; Piessens, Veerle; Van Coillie, Els; De Vliegher, Sarne; Koort, Joanna M K

    2012-01-01

    Thirteen Gram-positive-staining coagulase-variable staphylococci were isolated from subclinical and mild clinical mastitic bovine milk (n=12) and a teat apex (n=1). The results of sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and two housekeeping genes, rpoB and tuf, and DNA fingerprinting with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis showed that the isolates formed a separate branch within the genus Staphylococcus. The phylogenetically most closely related species were Staphylococcus hyicus and Staphylococcus chromogenes. DNA-DNA hybridization with S. hyicus DSM 20459(T) and S. chromogenes DSM 20674(T) confirmed that the isolates belonged to a separate species. The predominant fatty acids were i-C(15:0), ai-C(15:0), i-C(17:0) and C(20:0) and the peptidoglycan type was A3α L-Lys-Gly(5). Based on the results of genotypic and phenotypic analyses, it is proposed that the thirteen isolates represent a novel species, for which the name Staphylococcus agnetis sp. nov. is proposed. Strain 6-4(T) (=DSM 23656(T)=CCUG 59809(T)) is the type strain. PMID:21335502

  5. Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Blood Transport in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, P.; Benito, Y.; Perez Del Villar, C.; Gonzalez-Mansilla, A.; Barrio, A.; Yotti, R.; Kahn, A. M.; Shadden, S. C.; Fernandez-Aviles, F.; Bermejo, J.; Del Alamo, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    In the healthy heart, left ventricular (LV) filling generates flow patterns which have been proposed to optimize blood transport by coupling diastole and systole phases. We present a novel image-based method to assess how flow patterns influence LV blood transport in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Solving the advection equation with time-varying inflow boundary conditions allows to track the transport of blood entering the LV in the different filling waves, as well as the transport barriers which couple filling and ejection. The velocity fields were obtained using echocardiographic color Doppler velocimetry, which provides two-dimensional time-resolved flow maps in the apical long axis three-chamber view of the LV. We analyze flow transport in a group of patients with CRT devices as well as in healthy volunteers. In the patients under CRT, the device programming was varied to analyze flow transport under different values of the atrioventricular (AV) conduction delay and to model tachycardia. This analysis illustrates how CRT influences the transit of blood inside the LV, contributes to conserving kinetic energy and favors the generation of hemodynamic forces that accelerate blood in the direction of the LV outflow tract.

  6. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  7. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis. PMID:27475572

  8. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Whittle, Jeff; Lynch, Amy I.; Colantonio, Lisandro D.; Simpson, Lara M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Levitan, Emily B.; Whelton, Paul K; Cushman, William C.; Louis, Gail T.; Davis, Barry R.; Oparil, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Variability of blood pressure (BP) across outpatient visits is frequently dismissed as random fluctuation around a patient’s underlying BP. Objective: Examine the association between visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Post-hoc analysis of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Participants 25,814 ALLHAT participants. Measurements VVV of SBP was defined as the standard deviation (SD) across BP measurements obtained at 7 visits conducted from 6 to 28 months following ALLHAT enrollment. Participants free of cardiovascular disease events during the first 28 months of follow-up were followed from the month 28 study visit through the end of active ALLHAT follow-up. Outcomes included fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure. Results There were 1194 cases of fatal CHD or non-fatal MI, 1948 deaths, 606 cases of stroke and 921 cases of heart failure during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment including mean SBP, the hazard ratio comparing participants in the highest versus lowest quintile of SD of SBP (≥14.4 mmHg versus <6.5 mmHg) was 1.30 (1.06–1.59) for fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, 1.58 (1.32–1.90) for all-cause mortality, 1.46 (1.06–2.01) for stroke, and 1.25 (0.97–1.61) for heart failure. Higher VVV of DBP was also associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Limitations Long-term outcomes were not available. Conclusions Higher VVV of SBP is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Future studies should examine whether reducing VVV of BP lowers this risk. Primary funding source National Institutes of Health PMID:26215765

  9. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability during Yoga-Based Alternate Nostril Breathing Practice and Breath Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Telles, Shirley; Sharma, Sachin Kumar; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown a reduction in blood pressure (BP) immediately after the practice of alternate nostril yoga breathing (ANYB) in normal healthy male volunteers and in hypertensive patients of both sexes. The BP during ANYB has not been recorded. Material/Methods Participants were 26 male volunteers (group mean age ±SD, 23.8±3.5 years). We assessed (1) heart rate variability, (2) non-invasive arterial BP, and (3) respiration rate, during (a) ANYB and (b) breath awareness (BAW) sessions. Each session was 25 minutes. We performed assessments at 3 time points: Pre (5 minutes), during (15 minutes; for ANYB or BAW) and Post (5 minutes). A naïve-to-yoga control group (n=15 males, mean age ±SD 26.1±4.0 years) were assessed while seated quietly for 25 minutes. Results During ANYB there was a significant decrease (repeated measures ANOVA) in systolic BP and respiration rate; while RMSSD (the square root of the mean of the sum of squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals) and NN50 (the number of interval differences of successive normal to normal intervals greater than 50 ms) significantly increased. During BAW respiration rate decreased. In contrast, respiration rate increased during the control state. ANYB and BAW were significantly different (2-factor ANOVA) in RMSSD and respiration rate. BAW and control were different with respect to respiration rate. Conclusions The results suggest that vagal activity increased during and after ANYB, which could have contributed to the decrease in BP and changes in the HRV. PMID:25408140

  10. Correcting arterial blood gases for temperature: (when) is it clinically significant?

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jamie; Younker, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    Interpreting arterial blood gases (ABGs) is a common practice in intensive care units. The use of the temperature correction facility, however, is not standardized, and the effects of temperature correction on the ABG result may affect the overall management of the patient. The aim of this study was to discuss the significance of temperature correction. Current practice in the UK and Australia is discussed along with a review of physiological principles of oxygenation and acid-base balance. The alpha-stat and pH-stat methods of blood gas analysis are presented, with arguments for and against using the temperature correction facility for blood gas analysis. The study concludes with recommendations for practice. PMID:16983854

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow utilizing the gamma camera and xenon inhalation: reproducibility and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.A.; Knuckey, N.W.; Fleay, R.F.; Stokes, B.A.; Van der Schaaf, A.; Surveyor, I.

    1985-11-01

    A modified collimator and standard gamma camera have been used to measure regional cerebral blood flow following inhalation of radioactive xenon. The collimator and a simplified analysis technique enables excellent statistical accuracy to be achieved with acceptable precision in the measurement of grey matter blood flow. The validity of the analysis was supported by computer modelling and patient measurements. Sixty-one patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular disease or dementia were retested to determine the reproducibility of our method. The measured coefficient of variation was 6.5%. Of forty-six patients who had a proven subarachnoid hemorrhage, 15 subsequently developed cerebral ischaemia. These showed a CBF of 42 +/- 6 ml X minute-1 X 100 g brain-1 compared with 49 +/- 11 ml X minute-1 X 100 g brain-1 for the remainder. There is evidence that decreasing blood flow and low initial flow correlate with the subsequent onset of cerebral ischemia.

  12. KDOQI US Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Blood Pressure in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Taler, Sandra J.; Agarwal, Rajiv; Bakris, George L.; Flynn, Joseph T.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Rahman, Mahboob; Sanders, Paul W.; Textor, Stephen C.; Weir, Matthew R.; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the 2012 KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guideline for blood pressure management in patients with chronic kidney disease not on dialysis, the National Kidney Foundation organized a group of US experts in hypertension and transplant nephrology to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy in the context of current US clinical practice and concerns. The overriding message was the dearth of clinical trial evidence to provide strong evidence-based recommendations. For patients with CKD with normal to mildly increased albuminuria, goal blood pressure has been relaxed to ≤140/90 mm Hg for both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. In contrast, KDIGO continues to recommend goal blood pressure ≤130/80 mm Hg for patients with chronic kidney disease with moderately or severely increased albuminuria and for all renal transplant recipients regardless of the presence of proteinuria, without supporting data. The expert panel thought the KDIGO recommendations were generally reasonable but lacking in sufficient evidence support and that additional studies are greatly needed. PMID:23684145

  13. Frequencies of Blood Group Systems MNS, Diego, and Duffy and Clinical Phases of Carrion's Disease in Amazonas, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Solano, Luis; Escobar, Jorge; Fernandez, Miguel; Solano, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Carrion's disease (CD), is a human bartonellosis, that is, endemic in the Andes of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia. Bartonella bacilliformis, a native hemotrophic bacteria, is the causative agent of CD, and the interaction with the host could have produced changes in the gene frequencies of erythrocyte antigens. The goal here is to investigate the relationship between allele frequencies of blood group systems MNS, Diego, and Duffy and the clinical phases of CD, within a genetic context. In this associative and analytical study, 76 individuals from Bagua Grande, the province of Utcubamba, and the department of Amazonas in Peru, were enrolled. Forty of them resided in Tomocho-Collicate-Vista Hermosa area (high prevalence of cases in chronic phase, verrucous, or eruptive phase, without previous acute phase). Thirty-six individuals were from the area of Miraflores (high prevalence of cases in acute phase only) and were evaluated for blood group systems MNS, Diego, and Duffy. This study constitutes one of the first attempts at evaluating the genetic factors and clinical phases of CD. No significant statistical differences (P > 0.05) between allele frequencies of blood groups MNS, Diego, and Duffy and the prevalence of chronic and acute phases were detected in the two areas of Amazonas, Peru. PMID:24847360

  14. The clinical effects of red blood cell transfusions: an overview of the randomized controlled trials evidence base.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Kirstin L; Brunskill, Susan J; Dorée, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon; Murphy, Mike F; Hyde, Chris

    2011-04-01

    No up-to-date overview of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in red blood cell (RBC) transfusion exists. This systematic review examines the quantity and quality of the evidence for the clinical effects of RBC transfusion. One hundred forty-two eligible RCTs were identified through searches of The Cochrane Library (issue 4, 2009), MEDLINE (1950 to November 2009), EMBASE (1974 to November 2009), and other relevant sources. After data extraction and methodological quality assessment, trials were grouped by clinical specialty and type of RBC transfusion. Data analysis was predominantly descriptive. The 142 RCTs covered 11 specialties and 10 types of RBC transfusion. The number of included patients varied widely across the RCTs (median, 57; IQ range, 27-167). Most trials were single center comparing 2 parallel study arms. Overall, the reporting of methodological assessment was poor, although it improved markedly from 2001. Clinical areas with few trials are highlighted. Comparison with a study of RBC use in clinical practice highlighted a lack of correlation between the size of the evidence base for a given clinical specialty and the proportion of total RBC use by that clinical specialty. The gaps in the evidence base and the poor methodology of trials particularly in the past do not provide a strong evidence base for the use of RBC transfusions, but they indicate important targets for future research. PMID:21345644

  15. Sourcing of an Alternative Pericyte-Like Cell Type from Peripheral Blood in Clinically Relevant Numbers for Therapeutic Angiogenic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Blocki, Anna; Wang, Yingting; Koch, Maria; Goralczyk, Anna; Beyer, Sebastian; Agarwal, Nikita; Lee, Michelle; Moonshi, Shehzahdi; Dewavrin, Jean-Yves; Peh, Priscilla; Schwarz, Herbert; Bhakoo, Kishore; Raghunath, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Autologous cells hold great potential for personalized cell therapy, reducing immunological and risk of infections. However, low cell counts at harvest with subsequently long expansion times with associated cell function loss currently impede the advancement of autologous cell therapy approaches. Here, we aimed to source clinically relevant numbers of proangiogenic cells from an easy accessible cell source, namely peripheral blood. Using macromolecular crowding (MMC) as a biotechnological platform, we derived a novel cell type from peripheral blood that is generated within 5 days in large numbers (10–40 million cells per 100 ml of blood). This blood-derived angiogenic cell (BDAC) type is of monocytic origin, but exhibits pericyte markers PDGFR-β and NG2 and demonstrates strong angiogenic activity, hitherto ascribed only to MSC-like pericytes. Our findings suggest that BDACs represent an alternative pericyte-like cell population of hematopoietic origin that is involved in promoting early stages of microvasculature formation. As a proof of principle of BDAC efficacy in an ischemic disease model, BDAC injection rescued affected tissues in a murine hind limb ischemia model by accelerating and enhancing revascularization. Derived from a renewable tissue that is easy to collect, BDACs overcome current short-comings of autologous cell therapy, in particular for tissue repair strategies. PMID:25582709

  16. Open and Closed Endotracheal Suctioning and Arterial Blood Gas Values: A Single-Blind Crossover Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Azam; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Aim. This study was aimed at comparing the effects of the open and closed suctioning techniques on the arterial blood gas values in patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Methods. In a clinical trial, we recruited 42 patients after open-heart surgery in an educational hospital. Each patient randomly underwent both open and closed suctioning. ABGs, PaO2, SaO2, PaCO2, were analyzed before and one, five, and fifteen minutes after each suctioning episode. Results. At first the pressure of oxygen in arterial blood increased; however, this increase in the open technique was greater than that of the closed system (P < 0.001). The pressure of oxygen decreased five and fifteen minutes after both suctioning techniques (P < 0.05). The trends of carbon dioxide variations after the open and closed techniques were upward and downward, respectively. Moreover, the decrease in the level of oxygen saturation five and fifteen minutes after the open suctioning was greater than that of the closed suctioning technique (P < 0.05).  Conclusion. Arterial blood gas disturbances in the closed suctioning technique were less than those of the open technique. Therefore, to eliminate the unwanted effects of endotracheal suctioning on the arterial blood gases, the closed suctioning technique is recommended. PMID:26425366

  17. Total lymphoid irradiation in multiple sclerosis: blood lymphocytes and clinical course

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Zito, G.; Hafstein, M.; Lavenhar, M.; Hernandez, E.; Dowling, P.C.

    1987-11-01

    We have found a significant relationship between blood lymphocyte count and prognosis in 45 patients receiving either total lymphoid irradiation or sham irradiation for chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Patients with sustained lymphocyte counts less than 900 mm-3 for prolonged periods after treatment showed less rapid progression over the ensuing 3 years than did patients with multiple sclerosis who had lymphocyte counts above this level (p less than 0.01). Our results suggest that a simple laboratory test, the absolute blood lymphocyte count, may serve as a valuable barometer for monitoring the amount of immunosuppressive therapy needed to prevent progression in patients with multiple sclerosis, and possibly other autoimmune diseases.

  18. Effect of perioperative blood transfusion on clinical outcomes in hepatic surgery for cancer.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Rovera, Francesca; Rausei, Stefano; Cuffari, Salvatore; Cantone, Giovanni; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Dionigi, Renzo

    2009-08-28

    Allogeneic blood transfusion during liver resection for malignancies has been associated with an increased incidence of different types of complications: infectious complications, tumor recurrence, decreased survival. Even if there is clear evidence of transfusion-induced immunosuppression, it is difficult to demonstrate that transfusion is the only determinant factor that decisively affects the outcome. In any case there are several motivations to reduce the practice of blood transfusion. The advantages and drawbacks of different transfusion alternatives are reviewed here, emphasizing that surgeons and anesthetists who practice in centers with a high volume of liver resections, should be familiar with all the possible alternatives. PMID:19705491

  19. Guideline-defining asthma clinical trials of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Asthma Clinical Research Network and Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network.

    PubMed

    Denlinger, Loren C; Sorkness, Christine A; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Lemanske, Robert F

    2007-01-01

    Because of an increasing prevalence, morbidity, and mortality associated with asthma, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute created the Asthma Clinical Research Network and the Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network to improve public health. The objectives of these clinical research networks are to conduct multiple, well-designed clinical trials for rapid evaluation of new and existing therapeutic approaches to asthma and to disseminate laboratory and clinical findings to the health care community. These trials comprise a large proportion of the data driving the treatment guidelines established and reviewed by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. This article will review the basic design and major findings of selected Asthma Clinical Research Network and Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network trials involving both adults and children with asthma. Collectively, these studies have helped refine the therapeutic role of existing controller medications, establish standard models for side-effect evaluation and risk-benefit models, validate symptom-based assessments for asthma control, and identify baseline characteristics that might predict individual patient responses. Remaining challenges include shaping the role of novel therapeutics in future guidelines, incorporating pharmacogenomic data in treatment decisions, and establishing better implementation strategies for translation to community settings, all with the goal of reducing the asthma burden on society. PMID:17141853

  20. Influence of a constant and variable magnetic field on the coagulation of human blood in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degen, I. L.; Plaksenko, V. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of constant and varying magnetic fields on the coagulation of the blood was studied in experiments performed in vitro and vivo. In the in vitro tests it was found that a constant magnetic field with a strength of 100 or 200 oersteds influences the coagulation of the blood, retarding it in some cases and speeding up the coagulation time in others. In the in vivo studies, both retarding and accelerating effects were likewise observed with respect to the coagulation of the blood, but the nature of the change was a function of the background. A normalizing effect of the magnetic field on the coagulation of the blood was observed.

  1. Alterations in function and expression of ABC transporters at blood-brain barrier under diabetes and the clinical significances

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a systematic metabolic disease, which often develops a number of well-recognized vascular complications including brain complications which may partly result from the dysfunction of blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB is generally considered as a mechanism for protecting the brain from unwanted actions resulting from substances in the blood and maintaining brain homeostasis via monitoring the entry or efflux of compounds. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters including P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and breast cancer-related protein (BCRP), widely expressed in the luminal membrane of the microvessel endothelium and in the apical membrane of the choroids plexus epithelium, play important roles in the function of BBB. However, these transporters are easily altered by some diseases. The present article was focused on the alteration in expression and function of both P-GP and BCRP at BBB by diabetes and the clinical significances. PMID:25540622

  2. Evaluating measurement models in clinical research: covariance structure analysis of latent variable models of self-conception.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, R H

    1991-02-01

    Indirect measures of psychological constructs are vital to clinical research. On occasion, however, the meaning of indirect measures of psychological constructs is obfuscated by statistical procedures that do not account for the complex relations between items and latent variables and among latent variables. Covariance structure analysis (CSA) is a statistical procedure for testing hypotheses about the relations among items that indirectly measure a psychological construct and relations among psychological constructs. This article introduces clinical researchers to the strengths and limitations of CSA as a statistical procedure for conceiving and testing structural hypotheses that are not tested adequately with other statistical procedures. The article is organized around two empirical examples that illustrate the use of CSA for evaluating measurement models with correlated error terms, higher-order factors, and measured and latent variables. PMID:2002144

  3. Is Platelet-rich plasma superior to whole blood in the management of chronic tennis elbow: one year randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral humeral epicondylitis, or ‘tennis elbow’, is a common condition with a variety of treatment options. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and Autologous Whole Blood (AWB) represent new therapeutic options for chronic tendinopathies including tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the long term effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in patients with chronic tennis elbow. Methods Seventy six patients with chronic lateral humeral epicondylitis with duration of symptoms more than 3 months were included in this study and randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous leukocyte rich PRP (4.8 times of plasma) and group 2 with 2 mL of AWB. Tennis elbow strap, stretching and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS), Mayo score (modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) at 0, 4, 8 weeks and 6 and 12 months. Results All pain variables including VAS, PPT and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups at each follow up intervals compared to baseline. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain, functional scores and treatment success rates in all follow up examinations (P >0/05). Conclusion PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective methods to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis and their efficacy persisted during long term follow up. PRP was not superior to AWB in long term follow up. PMID:24635909

  4. Yoga for Heart Rate Variability: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Posadzki, Paul; Kuzdzal, Adrian; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ernst, Edzard

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to summarize and critically assess the effects of yoga on heart rate variability (HRV). Nine databases were searched from their inceptions to June 2014. We included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing yoga against any type of control intervention in healthy individuals or patients with any medical condition. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane criteria. Two reviewers performed the selection of studies, data extraction, and quality assessments independent of one another. Fourteen trials met the inclusion criteria. Only two of them were of acceptable methodological quality. Ten RCTs reported favourable effects of yoga on various domains of HRV, whereas nine of them failed to do so. One RCT did not report between-group comparisons. The meta-analysis (MA) of two trials did not show favourable effects of yoga compared to usual care on E:I ratio (n = 61, SMDs = 0.63; 95% CIs [-0.72 to 1.99], p = 0.36; heterogeneity: r(2) = 0.79, χ(2) = 5.48, df = 1, (p = 0.02); I(2) = 82%). The MA also failed to show statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the 30:15 ratio (n = 61, SMDs = 0.20; 95% CIs [-0.43 to 0.84], p = 0.53; heterogeneity: r(2) = 0.07, χ(2) = 1.45, df = 1, (p = 0.23); I(2) = 31%). The data from the remaining RCTs were too heterogeneous for pooling. These results provide no convincing evidence for the effectiveness of yoga in modulating HRV in patients or healthy subjects. Future investigations in this area should overcome the multiple methodological weaknesses of the previous research. PMID:26059998

  5. Variable immune cell frequencies in peripheral blood of LEW.1AR1-iddm rats over time compared to other congenic LEW strains

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, T; Jörns, A; Hedrich, H-J; Lenzen, S; Wedekind, D

    2014-01-01

    The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat is an animal model of human type 1 diabetes (T1D), which arose through a spontaneous mutation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-congenic background strain LEW.1AR1. The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat is characterized by two phenotypes: diabetes development with a diabetes incidence of 60% and a variable T cell frequency in peripheral blood. In this study the immune cell repertoire of LEW.1AR1-iddm rats was analysed over time from days 30 to 90 of life and compared to the background strain LEW.1AR1 and the LEW rat strain as well as the LEW.1WR1 rat strain. The LEW.1AR1-iddm rats are characterized by a high variability of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell frequencies in peripheral blood over time, and the frequency is unique for each animal. The variability within the frequencies resulted in changes of the CD4+ : CD8+ T cell ratio. The other three rat strains studied were characterized by a stable but nevertheless strain-specific T cell frequency resulting in a specific CD4+ : CD8+ T cell ratio. The frequency of natural killer (NK) cells and B cells in LEW.1AR1-iddm rats was increased, with a higher variability compared to the other strains. Only monocytes showed no differences in frequency and variability between all strains studied. These variabilities of immune cell frequencies in the LEW.1AR1-iddm rats might lead to imbalances between autoreactive and regulatory T cells in peripheral blood as a prerequisite for diabetes development. PMID:24628466

  6. Variable immune cell frequencies in peripheral blood of LEW.1AR1-iddm rats over time compared to other congenic LEW strains.

    PubMed

    Arndt, T; Jörns, A; Hedrich, H-J; Lenzen, S; Wedekind, D

    2014-07-01

    The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat is an animal model of human type 1 diabetes (T1D), which arose through a spontaneous mutation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-congenic background strain LEW.1AR1. The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat is characterized by two phenotypes: diabetes development with a diabetes incidence of 60% and a variable T cell frequency in peripheral blood. In this study the immune cell repertoire of LEW.1AR1-iddm rats was analysed over time from days 30 to 90 of life and compared to the background strain LEW.1AR1 and the LEW rat strain as well as the LEW.1WR1 rat strain. The LEW.1AR1-iddm rats are characterized by a high variability of CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell frequencies in peripheral blood over time, and the frequency is unique for each animal. The variability within the frequencies resulted in changes of the CD4(+) : CD8(+) T cell ratio. The other three rat strains studied were characterized by a stable but nevertheless strain-specific T cell frequency resulting in a specific CD4(+) : CD8(+) T cell ratio. The frequency of natural killer (NK) cells and B cells in LEW.1AR1-iddm rats was increased, with a higher variability compared to the other strains. Only monocytes showed no differences in frequency and variability between all strains studied. These variabilities of immune cell frequencies in the LEW.1AR1-iddm rats might lead to imbalances between autoreactive and regulatory T cells in peripheral blood as a prerequisite for diabetes development. PMID:24628466

  7. SMN Protein Can Be Reliably Measured in Whole Blood with an Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) Immunoassay: Implications for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Shannon; Sunshine, Sara S.; McCarthy, Kathleen; Risher, Nicole; Newcomb, Tara; Weetall, Marla; Prior, Thomas W.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Chen, Karen S.; Paushkin, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by defects in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene that encodes survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. The majority of therapeutic approaches currently in clinical development for SMA aim to increase SMN protein expression and there is a need for sensitive methods able to quantify increases in SMN protein levels in accessible tissues. We have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based immunoassay for measuring SMN protein in whole blood with a minimum volume requirement of 5μL. The SMN-ECL immunoassay enables accurate measurement of SMN in whole blood and other tissues. Using the assay, we measured SMN protein in whole blood from SMA patients and healthy controls and found that SMN protein levels were associated with SMN2 copy number and were greater in SMA patients with 4 copies, relative to those with 2 and 3 copies. SMN protein levels did not vary significantly in healthy individuals over a four-week period and were not affected by circadian rhythms. Almost half of the SMN protein was found in platelets. We show that SMN protein levels in C/C-allele mice, which model a mild form of SMA, were high in neonatal stage, decreased in the first few weeks after birth, and then remained stable throughout the adult stage. Importantly, SMN protein levels in the CNS correlated with SMN levels measured in whole blood of the C/C-allele mice. These findings have implications for the measurement of SMN protein induction in whole blood in response to SMN-upregulating therapy. PMID:26953792

  8. SMN Protein Can Be Reliably Measured in Whole Blood with an Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) Immunoassay: Implications for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Zaworski, Phillip; von Herrmann, Katharine M; Taylor, Shannon; Sunshine, Sara S; McCarthy, Kathleen; Risher, Nicole; Newcomb, Tara; Weetall, Marla; Prior, Thomas W; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Chen, Karen S; Paushkin, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by defects in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene that encodes survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. The majority of therapeutic approaches currently in clinical development for SMA aim to increase SMN protein expression and there is a need for sensitive methods able to quantify increases in SMN protein levels in accessible tissues. We have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based immunoassay for measuring SMN protein in whole blood with a minimum volume requirement of 5μL. The SMN-ECL immunoassay enables accurate measurement of SMN in whole blood and other tissues. Using the assay, we measured SMN protein in whole blood from SMA patients and healthy controls and found that SMN protein levels were associated with SMN2 copy number and were greater in SMA patients with 4 copies, relative to those with 2 and 3 copies. SMN protein levels did not vary significantly in healthy individuals over a four-week period and were not affected by circadian rhythms. Almost half of the SMN protein was found in platelets. We show that SMN protein levels in C/C-allele mice, which model a mild form of SMA, were high in neonatal stage, decreased in the first few weeks after birth, and then remained stable throughout the adult stage. Importantly, SMN protein levels in the CNS correlated with SMN levels measured in whole blood of the C/C-allele mice. These findings have implications for the measurement of SMN protein induction in whole blood in response to SMN-upregulating therapy. PMID:26953792

  9. Incorporation of expert variability into breast cancer treatment recommendation in designing clinical protocol guided fuzzy rule system models.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ying; John, Robert I; Ellis, Ian O

    2012-06-01

    It has been often demonstrated that clinicians exhibit both inter-expert and intra-expert variability when making difficult decisions. In contrast, the vast majority of computerized models that aim to provide automated support for such decisions do not explicitly recognize or replicate this variability. Furthermore, the perfect consistency of computerized models is often presented as a de facto benefit. In this paper, we describe a novel approach to incorporate variability within a fuzzy inference system using non-stationary fuzzy sets in order to replicate human variability. We apply our approach to a decision problem concerning the recommendation of post-operative breast cancer treatment; specifically, whether or not to administer chemotherapy based on assessment of five clinical variables: NPI (the Nottingham Prognostic Index), estrogen receptor status, vascular invasion, age and lymph node status. In doing so, we explore whether such explicit modeling of variability provides any performance advantage over a more conventional fuzzy approach, when tested on a set of 1310 unselected cases collected over a fourteen year period at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, UK. The experimental results show that the standard fuzzy inference system (that does not model variability) achieves overall agreement to clinical practice around 84.6% (95% CI: 84.1-84.9%), while the non-stationary fuzzy model can significantly increase performance to around 88.1% (95% CI: 88.0-88.2%), p<0.001. We conclude that non-stationary fuzzy models provide a valuable new approach that may be applied to clinical decision support systems in any application domain. PMID:22265814

  10. The effects of different environmental conditions on thermoregulation and clinical and hematological variables in long-distance road-transported calves.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, D; Gerardi, G; Peli, A; Nanni Costa, L; Amadori, M; Segato, S

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-distance road transport (19 h, from Poland to Italy) during 2 seasons (summer vs. winter) on clinical and hematological variables in calves. The environmental temperature range that could compromise the thermoregulation system (thermal stress) of the calves was tested. For the 7 Holstein calves in each transport, the BW and rectal temperature (RT) were measured, and blood samples were collected at the farm of origin, before loading at the transit center (T2), after unloading at the farm of destination (T3), and 1, 2, 3, and 4 d after arrival. The body temperature (BT) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored from T2 to T3. The data were statistically analyzed according to a mixed model that considered the fixed effects of transport (repeated measurements), season of journey, and their interaction. Within the observed temperature-humidity index (THI) range (30 to 80), effective thermoregulation allowed the calves to maintain their BT with small physiologic changes to prevent thermal stress, particularly in the summer. With no seasonal differences, the HR was greater at loading than unloading (120 vs. 115 beats per min; P = 0.012). As for the transport effect, the BW was less (P < 0.001) after unloading, and the RT was greater (P = 0.004). This effect was more marked in summer. The hematological variables indicated a moderate effect of transport on the hydration condition, reactive and muscular systems, and metabolism, although hematocrit (P = 0.004), erythrocytes, cortisol, NEFA, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and aspartate aminotransferase activity (P < 0.001), and total protein (P = 0.007) were greater after unloading. This was confirmed by a moderate decrease in total leukocytes (P = 0.031) and glucose concentration (P = 0.002). The changes in the clinical variables were similar for both seasons even though in the summer, hematocrit (P < 0.001), urea (P = 0

  11. Endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthases variably modulate the estrogen-mediated control of blood pressure and cardiovascular autonomic control

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We have previously shown that long-term estrogen (E2) replacement lowers blood pressure (BP) and improves the cardiovascular autonomic control in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. In this study, we investigated whether constitutive and/or inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) modulate these E2 effects.We evaluated changes in BP, myocardial contractility index (dP/dtmax), and power spectral indices of hemodynamic variability following selective inhibition of eNOS [N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine; L-NIO], nNOS (Nω-propyl-L-arginine; NPLA), or iNOS (1400W) in telemetered OVX rats treated for 16 weeks with (OVXE2) or without (control, OVXC) E2.OVXE2 rats exhibited: (i) reduced BP, and increased dP/dtmax, (ii) cardiac parasympathetic dominance as reflected by the reduced low-frequency (LF, 0.25–0.75 Hz)/high-frequency (HF, 0.75–3 Hz) ratio of interbeat intervals (IBILF/HF), and (iii) reduced LF oscillations of systolic BP, suggesting a reduced vasomotor sympathetic tone.eNOS inhibition (L-NIO, 20 mg/kg i.p.) elicited a shorter-lived pressor response in OVXE2, than in OVXC, rats along with reductions in dP/dtmax and increases in the spectral index of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (index α). NPLA (1 mg/kg i.p.) reduced BP and increased IBILF/HF ratio in OVXE2, but not OVXC rats. The iNOS inhibitor 1400W (5 mg/kg i.p.) caused no hemodynamic changes in OVXC or OVXE2 rats.Overall, constitutive NOS isoforms exert restraining tonic modulatory BP effects, which encompass eNOS-mediated reduction and nNOS-mediated elevation in BP in OVXE2 rats. Baroreflex facilitation, and dP/dtmax reductions might account for the shorter pressor action of L-NIO in E2-treated, compared with untreated, OVX rats. PMID:24471817

  12. Host Immune Transcriptional Profiles Reflect the Variability in Clinical Disease Manifestations in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banchereau, Romain; Jordan-Villegas, Alejandro; Ardura, Monica; Mejias, Asuncion; Baldwin, Nicole; Xu, Hui; Saye, Elizabeth; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Nguyen, Phuong; Blankenship, Derek; Creech, Clarence B.; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Ramilo, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are associated with diverse clinical manifestations leading to significant morbidity and mortality. To define the role of the host response in the clinical manifestations of the disease, we characterized whole blood transcriptional profiles of children hospitalized with community-acquired S. aureus infection and phenotyped the bacterial strains isolated. The overall transcriptional response to S. aureus infection was characterized by over-expression of innate immunity and hematopoiesis related genes and under-expression of genes related to adaptive immunity. We assessed individual profiles using modular fingerprints combined with the molecular distance to health (MDTH), a numerical score of transcriptional perturbation as compared to healthy controls. We observed significant heterogeneity in the host signatures and MDTH, as they were influenced by the type of clinical presentation, the extent of bacterial dissemination, and time of blood sampling in the course of the infection, but not by the bacterial isolate. System analysis approaches provide a new understanding of disease pathogenesis and the relation/interaction between host response and clinical disease manifestations. PMID:22496797

  13. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis and clinical characterization of Leptospira interrogans canine isolates.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Nobuo; Muto, Maki Mizutani; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Suzuki, Motoi; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Canine leptospirosis occurs worldwide; however, information on the relationship between Leptospira serotypes/genotypes and virulence in dogs remains limited. We investigated the molecular characteristics of Leptospira interrogans canine isolates belonging to three serogroups using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and the effects of each serotype/genotype on the clinical characteristics of leptospirosis in dogs. MLVA using 11 loci of the three major L. interrogans serogroups in Japan, Australis (32 strains from 21 dogs), Autumnalis (12; 7) and Hebdomadis (66; 39), revealed more divergent genetic heterogeneity within each serogroup than multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and they formed two, three and five clusters (CLs), respectively. Lethal infections were caused by all Leptospira serogroup isolates (70.3 % with Hebdomadis, 83.3 % with Australis and 100 % with Autumnalis) or Leptospira isolates belonging to all the CLs (57.1-100 %) without any significant differences. A significant difference in hyperaemia and haemorrhage of mucus membrane was observed between serogroups Australis and Autumnalis (P = 0.03). Leptospira isolates of Australis CL2 caused no hyperaemia and haemorrhage from mucus membrane, whereas those of Australis CL1, Autumnalis CL3 and Hebdomadis CL1 and CL3 did (P<0.05). Significant differences in creatinine (Cre) levels were observed between serogroups Australis and Hebdomadis (P = 0.02). In addition, significant differences in blood urea nitrogen levels were observed between serogroups Australis and Hebdomadis (P = 0.004) and Australis and Autumnalis (P = 0.02). Based on MLVA types, a significant difference in Cre levels was observed between Hebdomadis CL1 and CL4 (P = 0.0018). Our results indicated that MLVA had a higher discriminatory power and was more concordant with serotyping than MLST. Although all Leptospira serotypes and genotypes caused lethal infections in dogs, the L. interrogans

  14. Clinical Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Are Better Associated to Lipid Peroxidation Levels in Blood Mononuclear Cells Rather than in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Francisco J.; De Miguel, Manuel; Carrión, Angel M.; Navas, Plácido; Sánchez Alcázar, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Background We examined lipid peroxidation (LPO) in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and plasma, as a marker of oxidative damage, and its association to clinical symptoms in Fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Methods We conducted a case–control and correlational study comparing 65 patients and 45 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring LPO in BMCs and plasma. Results We found increased LPO levels in BMCs and plasma from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). A significant correlation between LPO in BMCs and clinical parameters was observed (r = 0.584, P<0.001 for VAS; r = 0.823, P<0.001 for FIQ total score; and r = 0.875, P<0.01 for depression in the BDI). We also found a positive correlation between LPO in plasma and clinical symptoms (r = 0.452, P<0.001 for VAS; r = 0.578, P<0.001 for FIQ total score; and r = 0.579, P<0.001 for depression in the BDI). Partial correlation analysis controlling for age and BMI, and sex, showed that both LPO in cells and plasma were independently associated to clinical symptoms. However, LPO in cells, but not LPO in plasma, was independently associated to clinical symptoms when controlling for depression (BDI scores). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia and that LPO in BMCs rather than LPO in plasma is better associated to clinical symptoms in FM. PMID:22046409

  15. The Parent Mealtime Action Scale revised (PMAS-R): Psychometric characteristics and associations with variables of clinical interest.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Helen; Harclerode, Whitney; Williams, Keith E

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to provide a revised and more psychometrically-examined version of the Parent Mealtime Action Scale (PMAS-R), then to examine how well the PMAS-R subscales explained variance for four variables relevant in clinical settings. Study participants included 238 parents of children referred to a hospital-based feeding program (72.3% male children; mean age = 72.2 months; 80 with autism spectrum disorder, 77 with other special needs, 81 with no special needs). Parents completed questionnaires to report child demographics and diet habits. Parents also used a five-point rating instead of the original three-point rating to report their usage of the 31 PMAS feeding practices. Using five-point ratings, the nine subscales of the PMAS-R demonstrated improved internal reliability and test-retest reliability compared to those published for the original PMAS. ANCOVA indicated that special needs status was the child demographic variable most associated with PMAS-R feeding practices. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that after controlling for child demographics, the nine PMAS-R subscales explained 26-49% of the variance for four variables of clinical interest (fruit and vegetable consumption, snack consumption, total food variety, and weight status). These variables of clinical interest were most often associated with "permissive" feeding practices including low Daily Fruit and Vegetable (FV) Availability, rarely using Insistence on Eating during meals, often using Many Food Choices, and often using Child-Selected Meals. The present study provides a more psychometrically-sound measure of child feeding practices, documents the association between "permissive feeding" and variables of clinical interest, and identifies specific parent practices included in "permissive feeding". PMID:27221356

  16. Immunomodulatory and clinical effects of the "tiaomian III decoction" in patients with blood blocking antibody deficiency and recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Gao, H Y; Tao, E X; Wang, Y; Yue, Q A; Ren, C E; Yan, L F

    2015-01-01

    We studied the immunomodulatory and clinical effects of the empirical formula "tiaomian III decoction" on maternal blood blocking antibody deficiency and recurrent spontaneous abortion. Sixty-one patients with blocking antibody deficiency were divided in the experimental group (N = 31), who took tiaomian III decoction, and the control group (N = 30), who received active immunotherapy with paternal lymphocytes; both treatments lasted 3 months. Blocking antibodies, anti-idiotypic antibodies, interleukin, T-lymphocyte subsets, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were tested. After treatment, the positive conversion rate reached 87.1 and 86.7% in the experimental and control groups, respectively. After treatment, CD4 levels decreased while CD8 levels increased in both groups. The CD4/CD8 ratio was higher than normal and increased significantly from pre-treatment (P < 0.05). IL-10 and M-CSF levels increased significantly in both groups (P < 0.05). The 1-year conception rates of the experimental and control groups were 58.1 and 46.7%, respectively (P < 0.05). The results show the tiaomian III decoction can increase the positive conversion rate of maternal blocking antibodies and promote the production of IL-10 and M-CSF. Thus, it strengthens the maternal body's protection of the fetus and maintenance of conception. The higher conception rate of the experimental group demonstrates the positive clinic efficacy of the tiaomian III decoction on maternal blood blocking antibody deficiency and recurrent spontaneous abortion. PMID:25966108

  17. Clinical and laboratory outcomes after umbilical cord blood transplantation in a patient with mucolipidosis II alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    Shibazaki, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Koichi; Saito, Shoji; Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Sakashita, Kazuo; Takagi, Mineo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Sakai, Norio; Koike, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Mucolipidosis (ML) II alpha/beta is an autosomal recessive disease caused by reduced enzyme activity of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. Clinical symptoms of ML II are severe psychomotor delay and dysostosis multiplex; death usually occurs by 5-8 years of age from cardiopulmonary complications. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been attempted for ML; however, few reports have documented the detailed outcomes of HSCT for ML. A 26-month-old girl received a human leukocyte antigen 3/6-allele-matched transplant from cord blood. The preparative regimen consisted of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, 6-Gy total body irradiation, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin. Although comparing before and after cord blood transplantation results, we observed that lysosomal enzyme activities in the plasma decreased by approximately 20-40%. Low serum levels of immunoglobulin A, G2, and G4 were also observed before HSCT; however, these values normalized after transplantation. Despite undergoing HSCT, she was treated twice for bacterial pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome at ages 37 and 38 months. Although HSCT effects on the clinical manifestations were limited, laboratory data including plasma lysosomal enzyme activities and serum levels of immunoglobulin showed improvement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26789537

  18. Blood and plasma glutathione measured in healthy subjects by HPLC: relation to sex, aging, biological variables, and life habits.

    PubMed

    Michelet, F; Gueguen, R; Leroy, P; Wellman, M; Nicolas, A; Siest, G

    1995-10-01

    We report an HPLC method for measuring the concentrations of reduced (GSH) and total (GSHt) free glutathione in human plasma and whole blood. The chromatographic step was coupled with a postcolumn derivatization reaction and fluorometric detection. The linear range was 0.81-13.02 mumol/L, and the detection limit was 0.13 mumol/L. In healthy adults (ages 18-73 years), mean concentrations were 941 +/- 155 mumol/L for GSHt and 849 +/- 63 mumol/L for GSH in blood (107 men, 94 women), and 3.39 +/- 1.04 mumol/L for GSH in plasma (66 men, 58 women). Blood GSHt but not GSH was significantly lower in children (32 boys, 32 girls: 872 +/- 157 mumol/L) than in adults. Blood GSHt and GSH appeared to be correlated positively with the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the regular practice of physical exercise, and negatively with alcohol abstinence. We observed positive correlations between blood GSHt and cholesterol and calcium concentrations, and between blood GSH and cholesterol concentration. PMID:7586526

  19. [THE CERTAIN CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF BLOOD IN PATIENTS WITH FAMILY MEDITERRANEAN FEVER OF ARMENIAN POPULATION].

    PubMed

    Pepoian, A Z; Arutunian, N; Grigorian, A; Tsaturian, V V; Manvelian, A M; Dilnian, E; Balaian, M A; Torok, T

    2015-06-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate erythrocyte sedimentation rate, glucose level, rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein in blood of patients with periodic peritonitis at the stage of remission. Also, effect of colchicine on activity of lactase was analyzed. It is demonstrated that frequency of increase of levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein during period of remission differed depending on gender while at the same time indicators of rheumatoid factor were within limits of normality in all patients. Despite research literature data establishing effect of colchicine on lactose assimilability, no significant inhibition of lactose activity was established in examined volunteers. PMID:26466452

  20. Quantitative cytochemistry of glycogen in blood cells. Methods and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Gahrton, G; Yataganas, X

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative glycogen determinations can be made in single blood and bone marrow cells, using microspectrophotometry or microfluorometry after staining with variants of the periodic acid--Schiff (PAS) reaction. These PAS variant reactions generally do not indicate the presence of non-glycogen PAS-positive substances, known to be prevalent in various hematopoietic cells, possibly due to masking of reactive groups. The specificity of the reaction in blood cells was ascertained by alpha-amylase digestion, which removed more than 95% of the PAS-positive material. Calibration of the PAS reaction was undertaken with a microdroplet model of pure leukocyte glycogen. The glycogen amounts in the droplets were determined by microinterferometry, the droplets were stained with a variant PAS reaction, and the total extinction of the reaction product in the stained droplets was determined by microspectrophotometry. The extinction coefficient (k) was obtained from the equation k equals Etot divided by M where (Etot) is the total extinction as determined by microspectrophotometry and (M) the dry glycogen amount as determined by microinterferometry. The microinterferometric dry mass determinations were calibrated by X-ray absorption in order to obtain the absolute amounts of glycogen. For practical purposes a reference system was made of normal neutrophil leukocytes. The glycogen content in the reference neutrophils was first determined with the micromodel. These neutrophils, now with a known glycogen amount, were stained with the PAS reagents and measured microspectrophotometrically in parallel with cells containing an unknown glycogen amount. Alternatively, the staining was made with a fluorescent PAS reaction, and the glycogen content determined by microfluorometry. Both methods appeared suitable for determining the glycogen content of blood cells from patients with various diseases, though the microfluorometric method was preferable for measurements of small amounts of

  1. Clinical laboratory experience of blood CRIM testing in infantile Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Deeksha S.; Goldstein, Jennifer L.; Rehder, Catherine; Kazi, Zoheb B.; Berrier, Kathryn L.; Dai, Jian; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-reactive immunological material (CRIM) status is an important prognostic factor in patients with infantile Pompe disease (IPD) being treated with enzyme replacement therapy. Western blot analysis of cultured skin fibroblast lysates has been the gold standard for determining CRIM status. Here, we evaluated CRIM status using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) protein. For 6 of 33 patients (18%) CRIM status determination using PBMC was either indeterminate or discordant with GAA genotype or fibroblast CRIM analysis results. While the use of PBMCs for CRIM determination has the advantage of a faster turnaround time, further evaluation is needed to ensure the accuracy of CRIM results. PMID:26693141

  2. Molecular characterization of Leptospira sp by multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) from clinical samples: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, Hélène; Buzelé, Rodolphe; Picardeau, Mathieu; Robert, Sylvie; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Mereghetti, Laurent; Lanotte, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection for which diagnosis is difficult. It has appeared as a global emerging infectious disease over recent years. Genotype determination often requires a Leptospira strain obtained by culture, which is a long and fastidious technique. A method based on multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) to determine the genotype of Leptospira interrogans, performed directly on blood or urine samples, is proposed. This method was applied to a fatal case of leptospirosis for which the geographical origin of infection was unknown. This technique will allow a genotype to be obtained for L. interrogans, even when cultures remain negative. PMID:26159846

  3. Validation and Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Method To Measure Miltefosine in Leishmaniasis Patients Using Dried Blood Spot Sample Collection

    PubMed Central

    Rosing, H.; Hillebrand, M. J. X.; Blesson, S.; Mengesha, B.; Diro, E.; Hailu, A.; Schellens, J. H. M.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate future pharmacokinetic studies of combination treatments against leishmaniasis in remote regions in which the disease is endemic, a simple cheap sampling method is required for miltefosine quantification. The aims of this study were to validate a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify miltefosine in dried blood spot (DBS) samples and to validate its use with Ethiopian patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Since hematocrit (Ht) levels are typically severely decreased in VL patients, returning to normal during treatment, the method was evaluated over a range of clinically relevant Ht values. Miltefosine was extracted from DBS samples using a simple method of pretreatment with methanol, resulting in >97% recovery. The method was validated over a calibration range of 10 to 2,000 ng/ml, and accuracy and precision were within ±11.2% and ≤7.0% (≤19.1% at the lower limit of quantification), respectively. The method was accurate and precise for blood spot volumes between 10 and 30 μl and for Ht levels of 20 to 35%, although a linear effect of Ht levels on miltefosine quantification was observed in the bioanalytical validation. DBS samples were stable for at least 162 days at 37°C. Clinical validation of the method using paired DBS and plasma samples from 16 VL patients showed a median observed DBS/plasma miltefosine concentration ratio of 0.99, with good correlation (Pearson's r = 0.946). Correcting for patient-specific Ht levels did not further improve the concordance between the sampling methods. This successfully validated method to quantify miltefosine in DBS samples was demonstrated to be a valid and practical alternative to venous blood sampling that can be applied in future miltefosine pharmacokinetic studies with leishmaniasis patients, without Ht correction. PMID:26787691

  4. Clinical variables and primary tumor characteristics predictive of the development of melanoma brain metastasis and post-brain metastasis survival

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Jan; Geraghty, Laurel N.; Rose, Amy E.; Christos, Paul J.; Mazumdar, Madhu; Polsky, David; Shapiro, Richard; Berman, Russell; Darvishian, Farbod; Hernando, Eva; Pavlick, Anna; Osman, Iman

    2010-01-01

    Background Melanoma patients who develop brain metastases (B-Met) have limited survival and are excluded from most clinical trials. In this study, we sought to identify primary tumor characteristics and clinical features predictive of B-Met development and post-B-Met survival. Methods We studied a prospectively accrued cohort of 900 melanoma patients to identify clinicopathologic features of primary melanoma (e.g. thickness, ulceration, mitotic index, lymphovascular invasion) that are predictive of B-Met development and post-B-Met survival. Associations between clinical variables present at the time of B-Met diagnosis (e.g. extracranial metastases, B-Met location, presence of neurological symptoms) and post-B-Met survival were also assessed. Univariate associations were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and the effect of independent predictors assessed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression. Results 89 (10%) of the 900 patients developed B-Met. Ulceration and site of primary on the head and neck were independent predictors of B-Met development on multivariate analysis (p=0.001 and p=0.003, respectively). Clinical variables predictive of post-B-Met survival on multivariate analysis included the presence of neurological symptoms (p=0.008) and extracranial metastases (p=0.04). Ulceration was the only primary tumor characteristic that remained a significant predictor of post-B-Met survival on multivariate analysis (p=0.04). Conclusions Primary tumor ulceration was the strongest predictor of B-Met development and remained an independent predictor of decreased post-B-Met survival in a multivariate analysis inclusive of primary tumor characteristics and clinical variables. Our results suggest that patients with ulcerated primaries should be prospectively studied to determine if heightened surveillance for B-Met can improve clinical outcome. PMID:21472718

  5. Longitudinal Study of Left Ventricular Mass Growth: Comparative Study of Clinic and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is an established cardiovascular risk factor, yet little is known about its trajectory in people with chronic kidney disease. The goal of this prospective research study was to describe the trajectory of LV mass index, its relationship with blood pressure (BP), and specifically to compare the relationship of BP measured in the clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring with LV mass index. Among 274 veterans with chronic kidney disease followed for over ≤ 4 years, the rate of growth of log LV mass index was inversely related to baseline LV mass index; it was rapid in the first 2 years, and plateaued subsequently. Systolic BP also significantly increased, but linearly, 1.7 mm Hg/y by clinic measurements and 1.8 mm Hg/y by 24-hour ambulatory BP. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of both clinic BP and 24-hour ambulatory BP with LV mass index were similar; both BP recording methods were associated with LV mass index and its growth over time. Controlled hypertension, masked uncontrolled hypertension, and uncontrolled hypertension categories had increasing LV mass index when diagnosed by 24-hour ambulatory and awake BP (P<0.05 for linear trend) but not sleep BP. After accounting for clinic BP both at baseline and longitudinally, LV mass index among individuals was additionally predicted by the difference in sleep systolic BP and clinic systolic BP (P=0.032). In conclusion, among people with chronic kidney disease, the growth of LV mass index is rapid. Research-grade clinic BP is useful to assess LV mass index and its growth over time. PMID:26831191

  6. Clinical Utility of Indium 111–Labeled White Blood Cell Scintigraphy for Evaluation of Suspected Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sarah S.; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2014-01-01

    Background  We sought to characterize the clinical utility of indium 111 (111In)–labeled white blood cell (WBC) scans by indication, to identify patient populations who might benefit most from this imaging modality. Methods  Medical records for all patients who underwent 111In-labeled WBC scans at our tertiary referral center from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed. Scan indication, results, and final diagnosis were assessed independently by 2 infectious disease physicians. Reviewers also categorized the clinical utility of each scan as helpful vs not helpful with diagnosis and/or management according to prespecified criteria. Cases for which clinical utility could not be determined were excluded from the utility assessment. Results  One hundred thirty-seven scans were included in this analysis; clinical utility could be determined in 132 (96%) cases. The annual number of scans decreased throughout the study period, from 26 in 2005 to 13 in 2011. Forty-one (30%) scans were positive, and 85 (62%) patients were ultimately determined to have an infection. Of the evaluable scans, 63 (48%) scans were deemed clinically useful. Clinical utility varied by scan indication: 111In-labeled WBC scans were more helpful for indications of osteomyelitis (35/50, 70% useful) or vascular access infection (10/15, 67% useful), and less helpful for evaluation of fever of unknown origin (12/35, 34% useful). Conclusions  111In-labeled WBC scans were useful for patient care less than half of the time at our center. Targeted ordering of these scans for indications in which they have greater utility, such as suspected osteomyelitis and vascular access infections, may optimize test utilization. PMID:25734155

  7. Potential of garlic (Allium sativum) in lowering high blood pressure: mechanisms of action and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ried, Karin; Fakler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Garlic supplements have shown promise in the treatment of uncontrolled hypertension, lowering blood pressure (BP) by about 10 mmHg systolic and 8 mmHg diastolic, similar to standard BP medication. Aged garlic extract, which contains S-allylcysteine as the bioactive sulfur compound, in particular is standardizable and highly tolerable, with little or no known harmful interaction when taken with other BP-reducing or blood-thinning medication. Here we describe biologically plausible mechanisms of garlic’s BP-lowering effect. Garlic-derived polysulfides stimulate the production of the vascular gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and enhance the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO), which induce smooth muscle cell relaxation, vasodilation, and BP reduction. Several dietary and genetic factors influence the efficiency of the H2S and NO signaling pathways and may contribute to the development of hypertension. Sulfur deficiency might play a part in the etiology of hypertension, and could be alleviated with supplementation of organosulfur compounds derived from garlic. PMID:25525386

  8. Oximeter for reliable clinical determination of blood oxygen saturation in a fetus

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.; Ward, Kenneth J.

    1996-01-01

    With the crude instrumentation now in use to continuously monitor the status of the fetus at delivery, the obstetrician and labor room staff not only over-recognize the possibility of fetal distress with the resultant rise in operative deliveries, but at times do not identify fetal distress which may result in preventable fetal neurological harm. The invention, which addresses these two basic problems, comprises a method and apparatus for non-invasive determination of blood oxygen saturation in the fetus. The apparatus includes a multiple frequency light source which is coupled to an optical fiber. The output of the fiber is used to illuminate blood containing tissue of the fetus. In the preferred embodiment, the reflected light is transmitted back to the apparatus where the light intensities are simultaneously detected at multiple frequencies. The resulting spectrum is then analyzed for determination of oxygen saturation. The analysis method uses multivariate calibration techniques that compensate for nonlinear spectral response, model interfering spectral responses and detect outlier data with high sensitivity.

  9. Noninvasive monitoring of systolic blood pressure on the arm utilizing photoplethysmography (PPG): clinical report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Claes; Jonsson, Bjorn; Vegfors, Magnus; Eneling, Martin; Lindberg, Lars-Goran

    2004-07-01

    A soft (silicone) probe, containing six light emitting diodes (880 nm) and three photo detectors, utilizes photoplethysmography (PPG) to monitor pulsations from the brachialis artery under an occluding cuff during deflation. When the arterial pulse returns, measured by PPG, the corresponding pressure in the cuff is determined. This pressure is assumed to equal the systolic pressure. An assessment trial was performed on 21 patients (9 women and 12 men, aged 27-69) at the Neuro-Intensive care unit. Since the patients were already provided with arterial needles, invasive blood pressure could be used as the reference. By choosing a threshold, for detecting pulses, as a fraction (4%) of the maximum amplitude, the systolic blood pressure was underestimated (-0.57 mmHg, SD 12.1). The range of systolic pressure for the patients was 95.5 - 199.0 mmHg, n=14. The method is promising, but improvements still have to be made in order to improve the technique.

  10. Potential of garlic (Allium sativum) in lowering high blood pressure: mechanisms of action and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Ried, Karin; Fakler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Garlic supplements have shown promise in the treatment of uncontrolled hypertension, lowering blood pressure (BP) by about 10 mmHg systolic and 8 mmHg diastolic, similar to standard BP medication. Aged garlic extract, which contains S-allylcysteine as the bioactive sulfur compound, in particular is standardizable and highly tolerable, with little or no known harmful interaction when taken with other BP-reducing or blood-thinning medication. Here we describe biologically plausible mechanisms of garlic's BP-lowering effect. Garlic-derived polysulfides stimulate the production of the vascular gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and enhance the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO), which induce smooth muscle cell relaxation, vasodilation, and BP reduction. Several dietary and genetic factors influence the efficiency of the H2S and NO signaling pathways and may contribute to the development of hypertension. Sulfur deficiency might play a part in the etiology of hypertension, and could be alleviated with supplementation of organosulfur compounds derived from garlic. PMID:25525386

  11. Metabolomic analysis of clinical plasma from cerebral infarction patients presenting with blood stasis.

    PubMed

    Cha, Min Ho; Kim, Min Jung; Jung, Jeeyoun; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Myung-Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Blood stasis (BS) is characterized as a disorder of blood circulation. In traditional Korean medicine (TKM), it is viewed as a cause factor of diseases such as multiple sclerosis and stroke. This study investigated differences in the plasma metabolites profiles of subjects displaying BS or non-BS patterns. Thirty-one patients with cerebral infarction diagnosed with BS and an equal number of sex- and age-matched non-BS patients were enrolled. Metabolic profiling was performed using UPLC-MS. The ratio of subjects with a rough pulse and purple coloration of the tongue was higher in patients presenting with BS pattern. Through metabolomics analysis, 82 metabolites that differed significantly between the BS and non-BS pattern were identified, and the two groups were significantly separated using an orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis model (P < 0.001). Of these 82 metabolites, acetyl carnitine, leucine, kynurenine, phosphocholine, hexanoyl carnitine, and decanoyl carnitine were present in significantly higher levels in patients with a BS pattern than those with a non-BS pattern. Our results also demonstrated that seven plasma metabolites, including acyl-carnitines and kynurenine, were associated with a BS pattern, suggesting that variant plasma metabolic profiles may serve as a biomarker for diagnosis of BS in patients with cerebral infarction. PMID:25834622

  12. Pattern of humoral immune response to Plasmodium falciparum blood stages in individuals presenting different clinical expressions of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Leoratti, Fabiana MS; Durlacher, Rui R; Lacerda, Marcus VG; Alecrim, Maria G; Ferreira, Antonio W; Sanchez, Maria CA; Moraes, Sandra L

    2008-01-01

    Background The development of protective immunity against malaria is slow and to be maintained, it requires exposure to multiple antigenic variants of malaria parasites and age-associated maturation of the immune system. Evidence that the protective immunity is associated with different classes and subclasses of antibodies reveals the importance of considering the quality of the response. In this study, we have evaluated the humoral immune response against Plasmodium falciparum blood stages of individuals naturally exposed to malaria who live in endemic areas of Brazil in order to assess the prevalence of different specific isotypes and their association with different malaria clinical expressions. Methods Different isotypes against P. falciparum blood stages, IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM, IgE and IgA, were determined by ELISA. The results were based on the analysis of different clinical expressions of malaria (complicated, uncomplicated and asymptomatic) and factors related to prior malaria exposure such as age and the number of previous clinical malaria attacks. The occurrence of the H131 polymorphism of the FcγIIA receptor was also investigated in part of the studied population. Results The highest levels of IgG, IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 antibodies were observed in individuals with asymptomatic and uncomplicated malaria, while highest levels of IgG4, IgE and IgM antibodies were predominant among individuals with complicated malaria. Individuals reporting more than five previous clinical malaria attacks presented a predominance of IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 antibodies, while IgM, IgA and IgE antibodies predominated among individuals reporting five or less previous clinical malaria attacks. Among individuals with uncomplicated and asymptomatic malaria, there was a predominance of high-avidity IgG, IgG1, IgG2 antibodies and low-avidity IgG3 antibodies. The H131 polymorphism was found in 44.4% of the individuals, and the highest IgG2 levels were observed among asymptomatic

  13. Variable clinical manifestations of a glycine to glutamic acid substitution of the COL3A1 gene at residue 736

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, F.M.; Narcisi, P.; Richards, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Glycine substitutions at the 3{prime} end of the COL3A1 gene generally produce a characteristic clinical phenotype including acrogeria and severe vascular fragility. Here we report a three generation British family in which the propositus presented with aneurysms of the groins. He, his mother, sister and elder daughter all had the external clinical phenotype of vascular EDS IV whilst another daughter and nephew were clinically normal. Cultured skin fibroblasts from the propositus and his clinically affected relatives poorly secreted normal and overmodified collagen III species. Normal components of secreted proteins predominated whilst overmodified molecules were prominent in intracellular material. Surprisingly the normal children also secreted less collagen type III than expected (though more than their clinically abnormal relatives). cDNA from bases 2671 to 3714 were amplified as four overlapping PCR fragments and analysed by DGGE. The region between 2671 and 3015 was heterozygous. Sequencing showed a mutation of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 736. This mutation created an extra Apa 1 restriction site which was suitable for family studies. These showed inheritance of the mutant gene by both vascular and non-vascular clinical phenotypes. This family therefore illustrates that replacement of glycine to glutamic acid at position 736 produces variable clinical and biochemical phenotypes ranging from easily recognizable vascular EDS IV with very poor collagen secretion to an EDS III-like picture and with less severe protein disturbance. The reasons for these differences are at present unexplained.

  14. Ambulatory 24-hour cardiac oxygen consumption and blood pressure-heart rate variability: effects of nebivolol and valsartan alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Khan, Safi U; Saleem, Osman; Osmond, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    We compared an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan; VAL), a beta-blocker (nebivolol; NEB) and the combination of NEB/VAL with respect to 24-hour myocardial oxygen consumption (determined by 24-hour ambulatory heart rate-central systolic pressure product [ACRPP]) and its components. Subjects with hypertension (systolic blood pressure >140 or diastolic blood pressure >90; n = 26) were studied in a double-blinded, double-dummy, forced-titration, crossover design with 3 random-order experimental periods: VAL 320 mg, NEB 40 mg, and NEB/VAL 320/40 mg daily. After 4 weeks of each drug, ambulatory pulse wave analysis (MobilOGraph) was performed every 20 minutes for 24 hours. All three treatments resulted in nearly identical brachial and central systolic blood pressures. NEB alone or in combination with VAL resulted in lower ACRPP (by 11%-14%; P < .001 each) and heart rate (by 18%-20%; P < .001 each) compared with VAL, but stroke work (ACRPP per beat) was lower with VAL. Relative and adjusted variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of heart rate were also lower with NEB and NEB/VAL than VAL. Results in African Americans, the majority subpopulation, were similar to those of the entire treatment group. We conclude that the rate-slowing effects of NEB cause ambulatory cardiac myocardial oxygen consumption to be lower with NEB monotherapy or NEB/VAL combination therapy than with VAL monotherapy. NEB/VAL is not superior to NEB alone in controlling heart rate, blood pressure, or ACRPP. Heart rate variability but not ACRPP variability is reduced by NEB or the combination NEB/VAL. There is no attenuation of beta-blocker-induced rate-slowing effects of in African Americans. PMID:26116459

  15. Clinical importance of increased sensitivity of BacT/Alert FAN aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, L C; Fune, J; Gaido, L B; Weinstein, M P; Reimer, L G; Flynn, T M; Wilson, M L; Mirrett, S; Reller, L B

    1996-01-01

    Two recent multicenter blood culture studies found that BacT/Alert FAN (FAN) bottles (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.) had increased yields in detecting bacteremia and fungemia compared with standard BacT/Alert (STD) bottles. Because the clinical importance of this increase in microbial recovery is unknown, we performed a retrospective analysis to determine the frequency with which FAN bottles were the sole means of detecting an episode of bacteremia. There were 1,047 positive blood cultures in which both study bottles were adequately filled and the organism isolated was judged to be the cause of sepsis: 240 (23%) were positive only in FAN bottles and 73 (7%) were positive only in STD bottles. Of a total of 664 episodes of bacteremia, 126 (19%) were identified only by FAN bottles and 43 (7%) were identified only by STD bottles (P < 0.0001). Episodes detected only by FAN bottles more often were recurrent events (23 of 126, or 18%) than episodes detected only by STD bottles (2 of 43, or 5%) (P < 0.05) and more commonly occurred in patients receiving theoretically effective antibiotic therapy (33 of 126 [26%] versus 4 of 43 [9%]) (P < 0.05). The medical records for patients with 127 of these episodes (92 FAN bottles only; 35 STD bottles only) were available for review. More than half of both FAN bottle-only (60 of 92, or 65%) and STD bottle-only (20 of 35, or 57%) episodes were judged to be clinically important. We conclude that FAN bottles improve the detection of bacteremia and that the majority of the additional episodes detected are clinically important. The benefits of the greater yield in specific patient populations must be balanced against the higher costs of FAN bottles. PMID:8862581

  16. Clinical Malaria Transmission Trends and Its Association with Climatic Variables in Tubu Village, Botswana: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chirebvu, Elijah; Chimbari, Moses John; Ngwenya, Barbara Ntombi; Sartorius, Benn

    2016-01-01

    Good knowledge on the interactions between climatic variables and malaria can be very useful for predicting outbreaks and preparedness interventions. We investigated clinical malaria transmission patterns and its temporal relationship with climatic variables in Tubu village, Botswana. A 5-year retrospective time series data analysis was conducted to determine the transmission patterns of clinical malaria cases at Tubu Health Post and its relationship with rainfall, flood discharge, flood extent, mean minimum, maximum and average temperatures. Data was obtained from clinical records and respective institutions for the period July 2005 to June 2010, presented graphically and analysed using the Univariate ANOVA and Pearson cross-correlation coefficient tests. Peak malaria season occurred between October and May with the highest cumulative incidence of clinical malaria cases being recorded in February. Most of the cases were individuals aged >5 years. Associations between the incidence of clinical malaria cases and several factors were strong at lag periods of 1 month; rainfall (r = 0.417), mean minimum temperature (r = 0.537), mean average temperature (r = 0.493); and at lag period of 6 months for flood extent (r = 0.467) and zero month for flood discharge (r = 0.497). The effect of mean maximum temperature was strongest at 2-month lag period (r = 0.328). Although malaria transmission patterns varied from year to year the trends were similar to those observed in sub-Saharan Africa. Age group >5 years experienced the greatest burden of clinical malaria probably due to the effects of the national malaria elimination programme. Rainfall, flood discharge and extent, mean minimum and mean average temperatures showed some correlation with the incidence of clinical malaria cases. PMID:26983035

  17. Clinical Malaria Transmission Trends and Its Association with Climatic Variables in Tubu Village, Botswana: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chimbari, Moses John; Ngwenya, Barbara Ntombi; Sartorius, Benn

    2016-01-01

    Good knowledge on the interactions between climatic variables and malaria can be very useful for predicting outbreaks and preparedness interventions. We investigated clinical malaria transmission patterns and its temporal relationship with climatic variables in Tubu village, Botswana. A 5-year retrospective time series data analysis was conducted to determine the transmission patterns of clinical malaria cases at Tubu Health Post and its relationship with rainfall, flood discharge, flood extent, mean minimum, maximum and average temperatures. Data was obtained from clinical records and respective institutions for the period July 2005 to June 2010, presented graphically and analysed using the Univariate ANOVA and Pearson cross-correlation coefficient tests. Peak malaria season occurred between October and May with the highest cumulative incidence of clinical malaria cases being recorded in February. Most of the cases were individuals aged >5 years. Associations between the incidence of clinical malaria cases and several factors were strong at lag periods of 1 month; rainfall (r = 0.417), mean minimum temperature (r = 0.537), mean average temperature (r = 0.493); and at lag period of 6 months for flood extent (r = 0.467) and zero month for flood discharge (r = 0.497). The effect of mean maximum temperature was strongest at 2-month lag period (r = 0.328). Although malaria transmission patterns varied from year to year the trends were similar to those observed in sub-Saharan Africa. Age group >5 years experienced the greatest burden of clinical malaria probably due to the effects of the national malaria elimination programme. Rainfall, flood discharge and extent, mean minimum and mean average temperatures showed some correlation with the incidence of clinical malaria cases. PMID:26983035

  18. Microcomputer-assisted monitoring system for measuring and processing cardiorespiratory variables: preliminary results of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hankeln, K B; Michelsen, H; Schipulle, M; Engel, H J; Beez, M; Szreter, T; Boehmert, F

    1985-05-01

    A microcomputer-assisted monitoring system was developed for the continuous measuring and processing of cardiorespiratory variables, including: systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, CVP, minute ventilation, inspired and expired O2 and CO2 concentrations, temperature, and heart rate. The primary data were converted to digital form, processed, displayed on a CRT monitor, and also stored for later evaluation. This system automatically calculated and displayed on-line and in real-time both primary measurements and derived cardiorespiratory variables, including: oxygen consumption, CO2 production, left and right ventricular stroke work, pulmonary venous admixture, and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances. Printouts of the variables and trend graphs could be obtained for any desired time period. During its development, we tested this monitoring system in 30 critically ill patients, finding that the real-time calculation of cardiorespiratory variables was a great advantage during monitoring and treatment. PMID:3987322

  19. Clinical aspects of blood pressure crisis due to withdrawal of centrally acting antihypertensive drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, L.

    1983-01-01

    1 Sudden cessation of antihypertensive therapy, in particular centrally acting drugs such as clonidine, may cause a withdrawal syndrome characterised by a rapid increase in blood pressure, headaches, tremor, restlessness and nausea. 2 The withdrawal syndrome is associated with a marked increase in sympathetic activity, as indicated by the increased levels of urinary and plasma catecholamines. 3 The clonidine withdrawal syndrome is reproducible. 4 The crisis can be managed acutely either by reinstituting the drug which has been withdrawn or by giving α- and β-adrenoceptor blocking drugs, either separately or in the form of labetalol. 5 The withdrawal syndrome can now be reproduced in animal models, but in spite of extensive studies, the exact underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  20. Plasma endothelin 1/2 levels in healthy blood donors and in hypertensive patients: clinical application.

    PubMed

    Baldys-Waligórska, A; Szybinski, Z

    1993-06-01

    Normal endothelin 1/2 levels and their correlation with age were evaluated and compared with endothelin 1/2 levels in hypertensive patients. Plasma endothelin 1/2 (ET) levels were measured in healthy blood donors, mostly males, of mean age 36 +/- 8 years (36 subjects), subdivided into three groups: 17-30, 31-40 and above 40 years of age (41-59 yrs). Hypertensive patients (15 subjects) were subdivided into two groups: essential and nephrogenic hypertension. The normal ET levels in the three age groups (means +/- S.D.) were: 0.58 +/- 0.19, 0.62 +/- 0.31, and 0.80 +/- 0.28 fmol/ml, respectively. The average ET level for the whole normal population was 0.66 +/- 0.28 fmol/ml. Only the differences between the mean ET levels in the first and last group were significant (P < 0.05). The difference between the mean ET levels in smokers 0.71 +/- 0.28 fmol/ml (53% of total population) and non-smokers 0.65 +/- 0.28 fmol/ml, women and men, irrespective of age, was not found to be significant. The average ET level in all patients with hypertension (0.91 +/- 0.37 fmol/ml) was significantly higher than the average ET level in blood donors of the same age group (P < 0.05). Although patients with essential hypertension had elevated ET levels compared with control, the difference between the mean ET level in these patients (0.77 +/- 0.24 fmol/ml) and in the corresponsding control group (0.62 +/- 0.31 fmol/ml) was not significant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8003715

  1. Novel Techniques for Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood: Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Rezvani, Katayoun; Olson, Amanda; Oran, Betul; Hosing, Chitra; Shah, Nina; Parmar, Simrit; Armitage, Sue; Shpall, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) provides an excellent alternative source of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) for patients lacking human leukocyte antigen-matched peripheral blood or bone marrow graft for transplantation. However, due to the limited cell dose in CB graft, it is associated with prolonged time to engraftment, risk of graft rejection, infections, and treatment-related mortality. To increase the cell dose, a variety of ex vivo expansion techniques have been developed. Results of traditional methods of CB expansion using cytokines alone were disappointing. Expanding CB cells with mesenchymal progenitor cells led to sizeable increase in graft content and improved engraftment. Other methods used HPC-differentiation blockers, such as nicotinamide analogs, copper chelators, inducing constitutive Notch signaling, or an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist (StemReginin1). Many of these methods lead to substantial expansions of total nucleated cells and CD34+ cells, and significantly improved time to neutrophil or platelet engraftment in patients transplanted with the expanded products compared to the recipients of unmanipulated CBT. These studies differ not only in the expansion method but also with regards to the cytokines used, patient population, conditioning regimens, and transplantation practices, to name a few. Some of these methods employed expansion of a portion of CB unit in the setting of single CBT, while others in the setting of double CBT. Here, we review various procedures used for CB expansion and highlight some of the key differences. Novel methods of improving engraftment that aim at improving bone marrow homing potential of CB cells are not reviewed. PMID:26697430

  2. Towards Clinical Applications of Blood-Borne miRNA Signatures: The Influence of the Anticoagulant EDTA on miRNA Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Rheinheimer, Stefanie; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) from blood are increasingly recognized as biomarker candidates for human diseases. Clinical routine settings frequently include blood sampling in tubes with EDTA as anticoagulant without considering the influence of phlebotomy on the overall miRNA expression pattern. We collected blood samples from six healthy individuals each in an EDTA blood collection tube. Subsequently, the blood was transferred into PAXgeneTM tubes at three different time points, i.e. directly (0 min), 10 min, and 2 h after phlebotomy. As control blood was also directly collected in PAXgeneTM blood RNA tubes that contain a reagent to directly lyse blood cells and stabilize their content. For all six blood donors at the four conditions (24 samples) we analyzed the abundance of 1,205 miRNAs by human Agilent miRNA V16 microarrays. Results While we found generally a homogenous pattern of the miRNA abundance in all 24 samples, the duration of the EDTA treatment appears to influence the miRNA abundance of specific miRNAs. The most significant changes are observed after longer EDTA exposition. Overall, the impact of the different blood sample conditions on the miRNA pattern was substantially lower than intra-individual variations. While samples belonging to one of the six individuals mostly cluster together, there was no comparable clustering for any of the four tested blood sampling conditions. The most affected miRNA was miR-769-3p that was not detected in any of the six PAXgene blood samples, but in all EDTA 2h samples. Accordingly, hsa-miR-769-3p was also the only miRNA that showed a significantly different abundance between the 4 blood sample conditions by an ANOVA analysis (Benjamini-Hochberg adjusted p-value of 0.003). Validation by qRT-PCR confirmed this finding. Conclusion The pattern of blood-borne miRNA abundance is rather homogenous between the four tested blood sample conditions of six blood donors. There was a clustering between the mi

  3. The impact of cranioplasty on cerebral blood flow and its correlation with clinical outcome in patients underwent decompressive craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jon Kooi; Kass, Rosman Azmin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Decompressive craniectomy is commonly use as the treatment for medically refractory intracranial hypertension. Unexpected improvement in patient's neurological status has been observed among patients that underwent cranioplasty. Restoration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) hemodynamics is one of the contributing factors. This study was conducted to determine the impact of cranioplasty on CBF and its correlation with clinical outcome. Aims: This study was done to evaluate the effect of cranioplasty on CBF with computed tomography perfusion (CTP). It also aimed to determine the correlation between postcranioplasty CBF and clinical outcome. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: All patients had CTP done to determine precranioplasty CBF. CTP was repeated at 6 weeks postcranioplasty and clinical assessment at 6 and 24 weeks postcranioplasty. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 12.0.1. Results: The median value of the ipsilateral CBF was 48.87 and 61.10 ml/min/100 g at precranioplasty and 6 weeks postcranioplasty (P < 0.001). Contralateral CBF also showed improvement from 60.55 to 71.84 ml/min/100 g (P < 0.001). Median value for mini mental state examination showed a significant difference with value of 22, 25, and 25.5 at precranioplasty, 6 and 24 weeks postcranioplasty (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001). Median value for frontal assessment battery was 12, 14.5, and 15 (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001). Conclusions: Cranioplasty can remarkably improve cortical perfusion for both ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere. Though we are unable to establish strong correlation, between CBF and clinical outcome, cranioplasty was observed to have a therapeutic role in terms of clinical outcome improvement. PMID:26889273

  4. The Potential Utility of Blood-Derived Biochemical Markers as Indicators of Early Clinical Trends Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    DeFazio, Michael; Rammo, Richard; Robles, Jaime R.; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Bullock, M. Ross

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a dynamic neuropathologic process in which a substantial proportion of patients die within the first 48-hours. The assessment of injury severity and prognosis are of primary concern in the initial management of severe TBI. Supplemental testing that aids in the stratification of patients at high risk for deterioration may significantly improve posttraumatic management in the acute setting. METHODS This retrospective study assessed the utility of both single-marker and multimarker models as predictive indicators of acute clinical status after severe TBI. Forty-four patients who sustained severe TBI (admission Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤8) were divided into two cohorts according to a dichotomized clinical outcome at 72 hours after admission: Poor status (death or GCS score ≤8) and improved status (GCS score improved to >8). Threshold values for clinical status prediction were calculated for serum S-100B, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and plasma D-dimer, upon admission and at 24 hours after TBI by the use of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Performance characteristics of these single-marker predictors were compared with those derived from a multimarker logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Biomarkers with the greatest predictive value for poor status at 72 hours included serum S-100B on admission, as well as plasma D-dimer and serum S-100B at 24 hours, for which, associations were strongly significant. Multimarker analysis indicated no substantial improvement in prediction accuracy over the best single predictors during this time frame. CONCLUSION In conjunction with other clinical, physical, and radiologic evidence, blood-derived biochemical markers may serve to enhance prediction of early clinical trends after severe TBI. PMID:23313262

  5. Oral coenzyme Q10 supplementation improves clinical symptoms and recovers pathologic alterations in blood mononuclear cells in a fibromyalgia patient.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; Cotán, David; del-Pozo-Martín, Yaiza; Carrión, Angel M; de Miguel, Manuel; Bullón, Pedro; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of FM. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant. Low CoQ10 levels have been detected in patients with FM, and a significant decrease of clinical symptoms has been reported after oral CoQ10 supplementation. In this report, we show the effect of CoQ10 treatment on clinical symptoms, blood mononuclear cells, and mitochondrial and oxidative stress markers from a woman with FM. After CoQ10 treatment, the patient reported a significant improvement of clinical symptoms. At the cellular level, CoQ10 treatment restored mitochondrial dysfunction and the mtDNA copy number, decreased oxidative stress, and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results suggest that CoQ10 could be an alternative therapeutic approach for FM. PMID:22898267

  6. [Increasing clinical applications of stem cells from umbilical cord blood and consequences for the handling of this biomaterial].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, V R; Schneider, K T M

    2009-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) of a newborn contains stem cells with a remarkably high differentiation and regeneration potential. They are therefore useful for application in regenerative medicine. In this review current clinical applications are summarised and the necessity for the storage of UCB stem cells is derived and discussed. A Medline search for publications regarding clinical application of UCB stem cells was carried out and other data bases were reviewed. The transplantation of UCB stem cells, a special class of adult stem cells, has not only been established successfully in a variety of haematoblastoses but could also improve the prognosis in diseases which are related to degeneration and/or injuries of body cells and organs. The current focus in worldwide research is tissue engineering of bioartificial heart valves and vessels as well as applications of UCB stem cells in acute myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus type 1 and neurodegenerative diseases. In urology the first results regarding the successful application of UCB stem cells in incontinence have been published. This definite progress in adult stem cell research as well as in clinical application requires a more rational handling of the resource UCB stem cells. Personal strategies as well as governmental concepts for storage of UCB stem cells for personal precautions, for donation to others or for research, respectively, have to be developed. PMID:19319793

  7. What is the relationship between renal function and visit-to-visit blood pressure variability in primary care? Retrospective cohort study from routinely collected healthcare data

    PubMed Central

    Lasserson, Daniel S; Scherpbier de Haan, Nynke; de Grauw, Wim; van der Wel, Mark; Wetzels, Jack F; O'Callaghan, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between renal function and visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) variability in a cohort of primary care patients. Design Retrospective cohort study from routinely collected healthcare data. Setting Primary care in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, from 2007 to 2012. Participants 19 175 patients who had a measure of renal function, and 7 separate visits with BP readings in the primary care record. Outcome measures Visit-to-visit variability in systolic BP, calculated from the first 7 office measurements, including SD, successive variation, absolute real variation and metrics of variability shown to be independent of mean. Multiple linear regression was used to analyse the influence of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) on BP variability measures with adjustment for age, sex, diabetes, mean BP, proteinuria, cardiovascular disease, time interval between measures and antihypertensive use. Results In the patient cohort, 57% were women, mean (SD) age was 65.5 (12.3) years, mean (SD) eGFR was 75.6 (18.0) mL/min/1.73m2 and SD systolic BP 148.3 (21.4) mm Hg. All BP variability measures were negatively correlated with eGFR and positively correlated with age. However, multiple linear regressions demonstrated consistent, small magnitude negative relationships between eGFR and all measures of BP variability adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusions Worsening renal function is associated with small increases in measures of visit-to-visit BP variability after adjustment for confounding factors. This is seen across the spectrum of renal function in the population, and provides a mechanism whereby chronic kidney disease may raise the risk of cardiovascular events. PMID:27288374

  8. Intra-Gene DNA Methylation Variability Is a Clinically Independent Prognostic Marker in Women’s Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Thomas E.; Jones, Allison; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Berns, Els M. J. J.; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B.; Davidson, Ben; Trope, Claes G.; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Widschwendter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel per-gene measure of intra-gene DNA methylation variability (IGV) based on the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 platform, which is prognostic independently of well-known predictors of clinical outcome. Using IGV, we derive a robust gene-panel prognostic signature for ovarian cancer (OC, n = 221), which validates in two independent data sets from Mayo Clinic (n = 198) and TCGA (n = 358), with significance of p = 0.004 in both sets. The OC prognostic signature gene-panel is comprised of four gene groups, which represent distinct biological processes. We show the IGV measurements of these gene groups are most likely a reflection of a mixture of intra-tumour heterogeneity and transcription factor (TF) binding/activity. IGV can be used to predict clinical outcome in patients individually, providing a surrogate read-out of hard-to-measure disease processes. PMID:26629914

  9. [Analysis Methods of Short-term Non-linear Heart Rate Variability and Their Application in Clinical Medicine].

    PubMed

    Chi, Xianglin; Zhou, Jianhua; Shi, Ping; Liu, Chengyu

    2016-02-01

    The linear analysis for heart rate variability (HRV), including time domain method, frequency domain method and time-frequency analysis, has reached a lot of consensus. The non-linear analysis has also been widely applied in biomedical and clinical researches. However, for non-linear HRV analysis, especially for short-term non-linear HRV analysis, controversy still exists, and a unified standard and conclusion has not been formed. This paper reviews and discusses three short-term non-linear HRV analysis methods (fractal dimension, entropy and complexity) and their principles, progresses and problems in clinical application in detail, in order to provide a reference for accurate application in clinical medicine. PMID:27382764

  10. [Chronic cytomegalovirus infection that present specific clinical course--a case of a boy with common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Wada, Y; Sato, T; Kitajima, H; Kubo, M

    1995-04-01

    We describe an 8-year-old boy with CVID and chronic CMV infection. Although at onset he was diagnosed as IgA deficiency, 4 years after his clinical manifestations because compatible to CVID. During his clinical course he had suffered from various disorders as follows; AIHA, interstitial pneumonia, hemophagocytic syndrome, chronic gastroenterocolitis and so forth. At the age of 8 the PCR of CMV-DNA of biopsy specimen from colon, lung and bone marrow were confirmed to be positive. Hematological examinations revealed abnormal cellular immunity such as decreased CD 4/8 ratio with increased HLA- DR+ CD 8+ T cell, decrease of absolute blood lymphocytes count and reduced response of lymphocytes to blastogenetic agents. These findings brought us to diagnose him as having CVID complicated with chronic CMV infection. This case gives us some impact to speculate what role CMV infection plays in CVID, Whose etiology is unknown. PMID:7553061

  11. PM2.5 EXPOSURE CHANGES HEART RATE VARIABILITY (HRV) AND BLOOD PARAMETERS IN STATE HIGHWAY PATROL TROOPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies show an association between ambient particulate matter PM and cardiovascular mortality. Panel and controlled exposure studies report PM-associated changes in HRV and blood factors involved in clotting and inflammation. We investigated the effects of in-veh...

  12. The Effects of Blood Alcohol Levels on Driving Variables in a High-Risk Population: Objective and Subjective Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Daniel J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Assessed high-risk individuals' subjective awareness of legal intoxication and ability to drive, and objectively quantified their blood alcohol levels and driving performance. While subjects were able to recognize legal intoxication, one-third of the subjects were still willing to drive after becoming intoxicated beyond the legal limit to drive.…

  13. An audit of blood pressure control in clinical practice in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Buranakitjaroen, Peera

    2006-11-01

    To gain "real life" data on the BP control of hypertensive patients in clinical practice in Thailand, a multi-centre cross-sectional study was carried out. Demographic data, cardiovascular risk factors, and antihypertensive regimens were collected. A total of 1,259 patients were enrolled between October 2003 and December 2003, 924 cases from 6 regions of different levels of health care and 335 cases from 4 medical training centres and a tertiary care hospital in Bangkok. Eighty one percent of the patients, age ranged from 45 to 75 years (61.2 +/- 11.6). Forty four percent of patients in audit had a BP < 140/90 mm Hg and only 12.3% of DM patients had attained a JNC 7 recommended BP target of 130/80 mm Hg. Hypercholesterolaemia (65.3%) was the most prevalent risk followed by DM (27. 7%). Antihypertensive drug used at the initial visit compared with the last visit were ARB (0.9% vs 6.1%), ACE Inhibitors (30.1% vs 40.0%), beta-blockers (27.3% vs 46. 7%), CCBs (23.2% vs 37.7%), and diuretics (46.0% vs 53.5%). In addition, the numbers of antihypertensive drugs used at the initial visit compared with the last clinic visit were one drug (62.0% vs 33.0%), two drugs (29.7% vs 45.8%), three drugs or more (3.7% vs 20.4%), with an average of 1.3 +/- 0.6 vs 1.9 +/- 0.8 drugs per patient. Two thirds of patients (66.2%) were on 2 or more antihypertensive drugs. Among the type 2 DM, 5% had records of microalbuminuria, and 50.6% and 9.8% were receiving ACE Inhibitors and ARBs, respectively at the last clinic visit. PMID:17718243

  14. On the spatial diffusion of fertility decline: the distance-to-clinic variable in a Chilean community.

    PubMed

    Fuller, G

    1974-10-01

    Survey data collected in San Gregorio, Chile during 1967 were selected for an investigation of the importance of residence distance-from-clinic in the pattern of contraceptive acceptance. Data were obtained through interviews conducted with women of fertile age who resided in every 4th house in the community. 1163 household reports could be employed. This number included a total of 1612 women in their fertile years. The 1612 women could be divided into users of some means of contraception and non-users. Once the basic binary classification procedure has been applied, each available socioeconomic variable for users and non-users may then be compared to determine if a significant difference exists among the distribution of the variables for each group. The variables of abortions, recent births, and aspiration level were the most potent discriminators between users and non-users of birth control. The more conventional socioeconomic variables showed little discriminatory power. Distance was found to be a fairly powerful discriminator between the group of users and non-users. Several variables other than distance are correlated with birth control practice, but once the influence of the spatial variation of these correlates has been extracted, distance emerges as the single most powerful discriminator between users and non-users of contraceptive techniques. There thus appears to be a need to emphasize the distribution of contraceptive supply in order to reduce the distance which women must travel to obtain birth control information or devices. PMID:12309958

  15. Clinical utility of valsartan in treatment of children and adolescents with high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Manu; Mohiuddin, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of hypertension in the pediatric population has been increasing secondary to lifestyle changes in children and adolescents. Recent studies have enhanced our understanding of the treatment of pediatric hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have traditionally been the most commonly used class of medication in children with hypertension. This is partly due to the important role of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system pathway in the mediation of pediatric hypertension. Angiotensin receptor blockers provide a reasonable alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The need for better tolerated antihypertensives had led to development of many new antihypertensives. Valsartan is a relatively novel angiotensin receptor blocker that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of pediatric hypertension. Two recent trials have demonstrated the efficacy of valsartan monotherapy in the pediatric population aged 1–16 years. Once-daily oral preparations of valsartan achieve adequate blood pressure control in the pediatric population. Lack of generic formulations is an important disadvantage. Plasma levels are predictable and clearance is primarily by the liver. Valsartan should be prescribed cautiously for sexually active adolescent females due to concern about angiotensin receptor blocker fetopathy. Otherwise, the drug has infrequent side effects. In summary, valsartan is a new and useful alternative to conventional antihypertensive therapy in pediatric population. PMID:24600279

  16. Numerical Simulation and Clinical Implications of Stenosis in Coronary Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liang; Luo, Tong; Huo, Yunlong; Tan, Swee Yaw; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Su, Boyang; Zhao, Xiaodan; Kassab, Ghassan S.; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Kang, Chang-Wei; Tan, Ru San

    2014-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is the gold standard to guide coronary interventions. However it can only be obtained via invasive angiography. The objective of this study is to propose a noninvasive method to determine FFRCT by combining computed tomography angiographic (CTA) images and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. Utilizing the method, this study explored the effects of diameter stenosis (DS), stenosis length, and location on FFRCT. The baseline left anterior descending (LAD) model was reconstructed from CTA of a healthy porcine heart. A series of models were created by adding an idealized stenosis (with DS from 45% to 75%, stenosis length from 4 mm to 16 mm, and at 4 locations separately). Through numerical simulations, it was found that FFRCT decreased (from 0.89 to 0.74), when DS increased (from 45% to 75%). Similarly, FFRCT decreased with the increase of stenosis length and the stenosis located at proximal position had lower FFRCT than that at distal position. These findings are consistent with clinical observations. Applying the same method on two patients' CTA images yielded FFRCT close to the FFR values obtained via invasive angiography. The proposed noninvasive computation of FFRCT is promising for clinical diagnosis of CAD. PMID:24987691

  17. Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia and Dog Phobia in Youth: Psychological Characteristics and Associated Features in a Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Oar, Ella L; Farrell, Lara J; Waters, Allison M; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2016-05-01

    Blood-Injection-Injury (BII) phobia is a particularly debilitating condition that has been largely ignored in the child literature. The present study examined the clinical phenomenology of BII phobia in 27 youths, relative to 25 youths with dog phobia-one of the most common and well-studied phobia subtypes in youth. Children were compared on measures of phobia severity, functional impairment, comorbidity, threat appraisals (danger expectancies and coping), focus of fear, and physiological responding, as well as vulnerability factors including disgust sensitivity and family history. Children and adolescents with BII phobia had greater diagnostic severity. In addition, they were more likely to have a comorbid diagnosis of a physical health condition, to report more exaggerated danger expectancies, and to report fears that focused more on physical symptoms (e.g., faintness and nausea) in comparison to youth with dog phobia. The present study advances knowledge relating to this poorly understood condition in youth. PMID:27157026

  18. Correlation of clinical and angiographic findings in brain ischemia with regional cerebral blood flow measured by the xenon inhalation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, I.; Little, J.R.; Furlan, A.J.; Weinstein, M.

    1982-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients with brain ischemia underwent cerebral angiography and measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after /sup 133/Xe inhalation. A fast compartment flow rate and an initial slope index were computed for each detector and for each hemisphere. The clinical presentation, angiographic findings, and rCBF results were then examined for significant correlations. Patients with hemispheric infarction most frequently showed bilateral diffusely decreased rCBF. In patients with transient ischemic attacks, no specific pattern emerged. Patients with unilateral internal carotid artery occlusion frequently hd bilateral diffusely decreased rCBF. Patients with severe internal carotid artery stenosis were more likely to show decreased rCBF than were patients with mild or moderate stenosis. The initial slope index seemed to be a more sensitive indicator of brain ischemia than the fast compartment flow rate. The possible pathophysiological significance and relationship to patient management of the various rCBF patterns are discussed.

  19. Evaluation of a Fully Automated Research Prototype for the Immediate Identification of Microorganisms from Positive Blood Cultures under Clinical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Jay M.; Walsh, John D.; Ronsick, Christopher; Wilson, Mark; Hazen, Kevin C.; Borzhemskaya, Larisa; Link, John; Clay, Bradford; Ullery, Michael; Sanchez-Illan, Mirta; Rothenberg, Steven; Robinson, Ron; van Belkum, Alex

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A clinical laboratory evaluation of an intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS)-based identification system paired to a BacT/Alert Virtuo microbial detection system (bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) was performed to assess the potential for fully automated identification of positive blood cultures. The prototype IFS system incorporates a novel method combining a simple microbial purification procedure with rapid in situ identification via spectroscopy. Results were available within 15 min of a bottle signaling positive and required no manual intervention. Among cultures positive for organisms contained within the database and producing acceptable spectra, 75 of 88 (85.2%) and 79 of 88 (89.8%) were correctly identified to the species and genus level, respectively. These results are similar to the performance of existing rapid methods. PMID:27094332

  20. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A.; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M.; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  1. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  2. Milk and blood biomarkers associated to the clinical efficacy of a probiotic for the treatment of infectious mastitis.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Martos, I; Jiménez, E; de Andrés, J; Rodríguez-Alcalá, L M; Tavárez, S; Manzano, S; Fernández, L; Alonso, E; Fontecha, J; Rodríguez, J M

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown the efficacy of oral administration of selected lactobacilli strains to treat mastitis. The objective of this study was to find microbiological, biochemical and/or immunological biomarkers of the probiotic effect. Women with (n=23) and without (n=8) symptoms of mastitis received three daily doses (10(9) cfu) of Lactobacillus salivarius PS2 for 21 days. Samples of milk, blood and urine were collected before and after the probiotic intervention, and screened for a wide spectrum of microbiological, biochemical and immunological parameters. In the mastitis group, L. salivarius PS2 intake led to a reduction in milk bacterial counts, milk and blood leukocyte counts and interleukin (IL)-8 level in milk, an increase in those of immunoglobulin (Ig)E, IgG3, epidermal growth factor and IL-7, a modification of the milk electrolyte profile, and a reduction of some oxidative stress biomarkers. Such biomarkers will be useful in future clinical studies involving a larger cohort. PMID:26925605

  3. Clinical Significance of the Resistive Index of Prostatic Blood Flow According to Prostate Size in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors evaluated the relationships between the clinical factors and resistive indexes (RIs) of prostate and urethral blood flows by using power Doppler transrectal ultrasonography (PDUS) in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: The data of 110 patients with BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) treated between January 2015 and July 2015 were prospectively collected. PDUS was used to identify the capsular and urethral arteries of the prostate in order to measure RIs. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximal flow rate (Qmax), total prostate volume (TPV), transition zone volume (TZV), transition zone index (=TZV/TPV), presence of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP), and the RIs of capsular and urethral arteries were evaluated for all of the patients by one urologist. Results: The 110 patients were categorized according to IPSS (mild symptoms, 0–7; moderate symptoms, 8–19; and severe symptoms, 20–35), Qmax (<10 and ≥10 mL/sec), TPV (<30 and ≥30 mL), and presence or absence of IPP. No significant relationship was found between the mean RI of any artery and IPSS or Qmax. The mean RIs of the urethral artery, and left and right capsular arteries were significantly dependent on prostate size and the presence of IPP. Conclusions: RI obtained by using PDUS correlated with the presence of IPP and prostate size. The RI of prostate blood flow can be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for BPH with LUTS. PMID:27032561

  4. Usefulness of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in daily clinical practice: Data from the Spanish ABPM registry.

    PubMed

    Segura, Julian; Banegas, Jose R; Ruilope, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    1. Hypertension is one of the most important challenges for public health systems because of its high prevalence and its association with the risk of cardiovascular and renal diseases. 2. Adequate control of hypertension is low in population and medical settings, with physicians frequently misclassifying patients' blood pressure status based on readings taken in the clinic rather than ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM). 3. Data from the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM registry support ABPM as a feasible option in the primary care setting, providing valuable information for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. By using ABPM rather than office BP monitoring, BP control can be doubled. This is an encouraging message to clinicians, although there is still a relatively large degree of undetected controlled and uncontrolled hypertension. 4. This short review describes the design, development and main results of the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM registry, a project based on a large-scale network of Spanish physicians trained in ABPM. PMID:23710883

  5. Quantitative Clinical Diagnostic Analysis of Acetone in Human Blood by HPLC: A Metabolomic Search for Acetone as Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Akgul Kalkan, Esin; Sahiner, Mehtap; Ulker Cakir, Dilek; Alpaslan, Duygu; Yilmaz, Selehattin

    2016-01-01

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) as a derivatizing reagent, an analytical method was developed for the quantitative determination of acetone in human blood. The determination was carried out at 365 nm using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array detector (DAD). For acetone as its 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, a good separation was achieved with a ThermoAcclaim C18 column (15 cm × 4.6 mm × 3 μm) at retention time (tR) 12.10 min and flowrate of 1 mL min−1 using a (methanol/acetonitrile) water elution gradient. The methodology is simple, rapid, sensitive, and of low cost, exhibits good reproducibility, and allows the analysis of acetone in biological fluids. A calibration curve was obtained for acetone using its standard solutions in acetonitrile. Quantitative analysis of acetone in human blood was successfully carried out using this calibration graph. The applied method was validated in parameters of linearity, limit of detection and quantification, accuracy, and precision. We also present acetone as a useful tool for the HPLC-based metabolomic investigation of endogenous metabolism and quantitative clinical diagnostic analysis. PMID:27298750

  6. Self-blood pressure monitoring in an urban, ethnically diverse population: A randomized clinical trial utilizing the electronic health record

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Stella S.; Tabaei, Bahman P.; Angell, Sonia Y.; Rapin, Anne; Buck, Michael D; Pagano, William G.; Maselli, Frank J.; Simmons, Alvaro; Chamany, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While control rates have improved over time, racial/ethnic disparities in hypertension control persist. Self-blood pressure monitoring (SBPM), by itself, has been shown to be an effective tool in predominantly white populations, but less studied in minority, urban communities. These types of minimally intensive approaches are important to test in all populations, especially those experiencing related health disparities, for broad implementation with limited resources. Methods and Results The New York City Health Department in partnership with community clinic networks implemented a randomized clinical trial (n=900, 450 per arm) to investigate the effectiveness of SBPM in medically underserved, and largely black and Hispanic participants. Intervention participants received a home blood pressure (BP) monitor and training on use, while control participants received usual care. After 9 months, systolic BP decreased (intervention: 14.7 mm Hg, control: 14.1 mm Hg; p=0.70). Similar results were observed when incorporating longitudinal data and calculating a mean slope over time. Control was achieved in 38.9% of intervention and 39.1% of control participants at the end of follow-up; the time-to-event experience of achieving BP control in the intervention vs. control were not different from each other (logrank p-value=0.91). Conclusions SBPM was not shown to improve control over usual care in this largely minority, urban population. The patient population in this study, which included a high proportion of Hispanics and uninsured persons is understudied. Results indicate these groups may have additional meaningful barriers to achieving BP control beyond access to the monitor itself. PMID:25737487

  7. Impact of systemic antifungal therapy on the detection of Candida species in blood cultures in clinical cases of candidemia.

    PubMed

    Bailly, S; Garnaud, C; Cornet, M; Pavese, P; Hamidfar-Roy, R; Foroni, L; Boisset, S; Timsit, J-F; Maubon, D

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis and follow-up of candidemia still rely on blood cultures (BCs). In vitro studies show that antifungals can significantly modify the result of blood culture not containing adsorbing agents. We aimed to evaluate, under clinical conditions, the impact on BC yeast detection of systemic antifungal therapy (SAT). Patients (n = 125) experiencing candidemia at Grenoble University Hospital (France) were included in a 4-year retrospective study. The Plus Aerobic/F (Aerobic) and Plus Anaerobic/F (Anaerobic) bottles, which both contain adsorbing resins and the non-resin selective Mycosis IC/F (Mycosis) bottles, were compared using multivariate hierarchical models adjusted for clinical characteristics. The positivity rate (PR) is decreased in patients with SAT (p < 0.01), abdominal surgery (p = 0.01), and hemodialysis (p = 0.02). In all bottles, SAT reduces PR by a factor of 0.16 (95 % CI: [0.08; 0.32]) and increases the time to positivity (TTP) by a factor of 1.76 ([1.30; 2.40]; p < 0.01). In the presence of SAT, TTP is higher in non-resin bottles (Mycosis) than in resin bottles (RR = 1.76, [1.30; 2.40]); however, the TTP in nonresin and resin bottles remains comparable. Although discordant results are observed with and without SAT (37 and 58 % respectively), we showed that the presence of SAT decreases significantly the agreement rate by a factor of 0.29 (CI: [0.12; 0.68]). The combination of Anaerobic and Mycosis bottles allowed a 100 % positivity rate for C. glabrata. SAT significantly affects BC results. Because they provide additional and complementary results, this study supports the concomitant use of resin and selective bottles, especially in patients receiving SAT. PMID:27039341

  8. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Balinda, Sheila N.; Ondoa, Pascale; Obuku, Ekwaro A.; Kliphuis, Aletta; Egau, Isaac; Bronze, Michelle; Kasambula, Lordwin; Schuurman, Rob; Spieker, Nicole; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Kityo, Cissy

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends regular viral load (VL) monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS). We evaluated a simple, low–cost, qualitative viral–failure assay (VFA) on dried blood spots (DBS) in three clinical settings in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross–sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV–1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS) and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref) as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml). Results 496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%–87.1%), 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%–96.4%), 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%–92%) and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second–line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV–1 treatment in RLS. PMID:26824465

  9. The effects of 2 levels of the inspired oxygen fraction on blood gas variables in propofol-anesthetized dogs with high intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Luis Gustavo Gosuen Gonçalves; Nunes, Newton; Lopes, Patrícia Cristina Ferro; de Almeida, Ricardo Miyasaka; Neto, Gláucia Bueno Pereira; de Souza, Ana Letícia Groszewicz; de Almeida Belmonte, Emílio

    2009-01-01

    The influence of 2 different levels of the inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) on blood gas variables was evaluated in dogs with high intracranial pressure (ICP) during propofol anesthesia (induction followed by a continuous rate infusion [CRI] of 0.6 mg/kg/min) and intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). Eight adult mongrel dogs were anesthetized on 2 occasions, 21 d apart, and received oxygen at an FiO2 of 1.0 (G100) or 0.6 (G60) in a randomized crossover fashion. A fiberoptic catheter was implanted on the surface of the right cerebral cortex for assessment of the ICP. An increase in the ICP was induced by temporary ligation of the jugular vein 50 min after induction of anesthesia and immediately after baseline measurement of the ICP. Blood gas measurements were taken 20 min later and then at 15-min intervals for 1 h. Numerical data were submitted to Morrison’s multivariate statistical methods. The ICP, the cerebral perfusion pressure and the mean arterial pressure did not differ significantly between FiO2 levels or measurement times after jugular ligation. The only blood gas values that differed significantly (P < 0.05) were the arterial oxygen partial pressure, which was greater with G100 than with G60 throughout the procedure, and the venous haemoglobin saturation, that was greater with G100 than with G60 at M0. There were no significant differences between FiO2 levels or measurement times in the following blood gas variables: arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, arterial hemoglobin saturation, base deficit, bicarbonate concentration, pH, venous oxygen partial pressure, venous carbon dioxide partial pressure and the arterial-to-end-tidal carbon dioxide difference. PMID:19436579

  10. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability in the Time Domain in Patients with Recent and Long-Standing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Estañol, Bruno; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio; Fossion, Ruben; Toledo-Roy, Juan C.; Mendoza-Temis, Joel; Morales, Irving O.; Landa, Emmanuel; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Moreno, Rene; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) affects the cardiovascular response of patients. To study this effect, interbeat intervals (IBI) and beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability of patients during supine, standing and controlled breathing tests were analyzed in the time domain. Simultaneous noninvasive measurements of IBI and SBP for 30 recently diagnosed and 15 long-standing DM patients were compared with the results for 30 rigorously screened healthy subjects (control). A statistically significant distinction between control and diabetic subjects was provided by the standard deviation and the higher moments of the distributions (skewness, and kurtosis) with respect to the median. To compare IBI and SBP for different populations, we define a parameter, α, that combines the variability of the heart rate and the blood pressure, as the ratio of the radius of the moments for IBI and the same radius for SBP. As diabetes evolves, α decreases, standard deviation of the IBI detrended signal diminishes (heart rate signal becomes more “rigid”), skewness with respect to the median approaches zero (signal fluctuations gain symmetry), and kurtosis increases (fluctuations concentrate around the median). Diabetes produces not only a rigid heart rate, but also increases symmetry and has leptokurtic distributions. SBP time series exhibit the most variable behavior for recently diagnosed DM with platykurtic distributions. Under controlled breathing, SBP has symmetric distributions for DM patients, while control subjects have non-zero skewness. This may be due to a progressive decrease of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity to the heart and blood vessels as diabetes evolves. PMID:26849653

  11. [Clinical and diagnostic value of heart rate variabilities in workers exposed to noise and vibration].

    PubMed

    Serebriakov, P V; Melent'ev, A V; Demina, I D

    2010-01-01

    Noise and vibration cause disorders of vegetative regulation of cardiovascular system. Daily ECG monitoring with heart rate variabilities analysis enables quanitative evaluation of disordered vegetative control over heart rate and diagnosis of cardioneuropathy caused by long occupational exposure to noise and vibration. PMID:20857555

  12. Report of a consultation on the optimization of clinical challenge trials for evaluation of candidate blood stage malaria vaccines, 18-19 March 2009, Bethesda, MD, USA.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, V S; Diggs, C; Ferro, S; Good, M F; Herrera, S; Hill, A V; Imoukhuede, E B; Kumar, S; Loucq, C; Marsh, K; Ockenhouse, C F; Richie, T L; Sauerwein, R W

    2009-09-25

    Development and optimization of first generation malaria vaccine candidates has been facilitated by the existence of a well-established Plasmodium falciparum clinical challenge model in which infectious sporozoites are administered to human subjects via mosquito bite. While ideal for testing pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines, some researchers believe that the sporozoite challenge model is less appropriate for testing blood stage vaccines. Here we report a consultation, co-sponsored by PATH MVI, USAID, EMVI and WHO, where scientists from all institutions globally that have conducted such clinical challenges in recent years and representatives from regulatory agencies and funding agencies met to discuss clinical malaria challenge models. Participants discussed strengthening and harmonizing the sporozoite challenge model and considered the pros and cons of further developing a blood stage challenge possibly better suited for evaluating the efficacy of blood stage vaccines. This report summarizes major findings and recommendations, including an update on the Plasmodium vivax clinical challenge model, the prospects for performing experimental challenge trials in malaria endemic countries and an update on clinical safety data. While the focus of the meeting was on the optimization of clinical challenge models for evaluation of blood stage candidate malaria vaccines, many of the considerations are relevant for the application of challenge trials to other purposes. PMID:19654061

  13. Cerebral blood flow changes with acute cocaine intoxication: clinical correlations with SPECT, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Mena, I; Giombetti, R J; Miller, B L; Garrett, K; Villanueva-Meyer, J; Mody, C; Goldberg, M A

    1994-01-01

    In summary, these data suggest that widespread primary or secondary cerebral vasoconstriction is common in patients with neurological complications from cocaine. In most patients, SPECT showed wide-spread hypoperfusion in regions that had no clear clinical significance (e.g., the periventricular area). In many, the SPECT was performed more than 24 hours after the onset of neurological symptomatology. These findings raise several questions. It has been assumed that these SPECT changes in patients with acute neurological symptoms are temporary, although it will be important to determine whether these areas of hypoperfusion persist after symptoms have abated. Recently, Holman and colleagues (1991) found multifocal and deep areas of hypoperfusion with SPECT in 16 of 18 patients with a history of chronic cocaine abuse. Although most of the subjects tested positive for cocaine, several had abstained from cocaine use for weeks prior to the study. All 18 subjects had neuropsychological deficits, 13 mild and 5 moderate. Similarly, Pascual-Leone and colleagues (1991) have shown that CT scan atrophy strongly correlates with the duration of cocaine abuse, suggesting that brain injury may occur with continued use of cocaine. It is the authors' concern that cocaine abuse might produce permanent changes in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, brain SPECT was found to be a useful procedure in the evaluation of acute cocaine intoxication. Brain SPECT revealed focal cortical lesions not seen on head CT or MRI, which corresponded to clinical deficits. In addition, [99mTc]HMPAO brain SPECT had a characteristic scalloped appearance, and this may be a marker for acute intoxication with cocaine. This study further supports the contention that cocaine causes neurological disease by its vasoconstrictive action. PMID:7603541

  14. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs. PMID:25274584

  15. Controlled Clinical Comparison of the BacT/ALERT FN and the Standard Anaerobic SN Blood Culture Medium

    PubMed Central

    Mirrett, S.; Petti, C. A.; Woods, C. W.; Magadia, R.; Weinstein, M. P.; Reller, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the optimal anaerobic companion bottle to pair with the BacT/ALERT (bioMérieux, Durham, N.C.) nonvented aerobic FA (FA) medium for recovery of pathogenic microorganisms from adult patients with bacteremia and fungemia, we compared the BacT/ALERT FN (FN) anaerobic bottle with the standard BacT/ALERT SN (SN) anaerobic bottle. Each bottle, FA, FN, and SN, was filled with 8 to 12 ml of blood. Of 11,498 blood culture sets received in the clinical microbiology laboratories at two university medical centers, 7,945 sets had all three bottles filled adequately and 8,569 had both anaerobic bottles filled adequately. Of 686 clinically important (based on previously published criteria) isolates detected in one or both adequately filled anaerobic bottles, more staphylococci (P < 0.001), including Staphylococcus aureus (P < 0.001); members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (P < 0.001); and all microorganisms combined (P < 0.001) were detected in FN bottles. In contrast, more Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (P < 0.01) and yeasts (P < 0.001) were detected in SN bottles. More Bacteroides fragilis group bacteremias were detected only in the FN (six) than in the SN (one) anaerobic bottle (P = not significant). Overall, the mean time to detection was shorter with FN (16.8 h) than with SN (18.2 h). This difference in time to detection was greatest for the B. fragilis group: FN, 28 h, versus SN, 60.0 h. Many of the facultative microorganisms recovered in either FN or SN were also found in the companion FA. When microorganisms found in the companion FA bottle were omitted from the analysis, significantly more staphylococci (P < 0.001), including S. aureus (P < 0.001), and Enterobacteriaceae (P < 0.005) still were detected in FN bottles, whereas there were no significant differences for P. aeruginosa and yeasts, which were found as expected in FA bottles. We conclude that the companion anaerobic FN bottle detects more microorganisms than does the anaerobic SN bottle when used

  16. Neuroleptic-resistant schizophrenic patients treated by clozapine: clinical evolution, plasma and red blood cell clozapine and desmethylclozapine levels.

    PubMed

    Aymard, N; Baldacci, C; Leyris, A; Smagghe, P O; Tribolet, S; Vacheron, M N; Viala, A; Caroli, F

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this open study was to determine a more rational therapeutic approach for psychotic patients treated with clozapine for several months, using measurement of plasma and red blood ce